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Sample records for enhances collagen fibril

  1. Collagen fibrils: nanoscale ropes.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become "accepted" wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition-that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application-from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits.

  2. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  3. Nanoscale scraping and dissection of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M P E; Horton, M A; Mesquida, P

    2008-09-24

    The main function of collagen is mechanical, hence there is a fundamental scientific interest in experimentally investigating the mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils on the nanometre scale. Here, we present a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based scraping technique that can dissect the outer layer of a biological specimen. Applied to individual collagen fibrils, the technique was successfully used to expose the fibril core and reveal the presence of a D-banding-like structure. AFM nanoindentation measurements of fibril shell and core indicated no significant differences in mechanical properties such as stiffness (reduced modulus), hardness, adhesion and adhesion work. This suggests that collagen fibrils are mechanically homogeneous structures. The scraping technique can be applied to other biological specimens, as demonstrated on the example of bacteria.

  4. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  5. Elastic Response of Crimped Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils have a three-dimensional structure at the micrometer scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this waveform allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendineae

  6. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  7. Collagen fibril arrangement and size distribution in monkey oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen fibre organisation and fibril size were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in distribution, shape and size. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498

  8. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  9. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-06-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson's trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM.

  10. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R.; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P.; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E.; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson’s trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM. PMID:27329311

  11. Thermal Memory in Self-Assembled Collagen Fibril Networks

    PubMed Central

    de Wild, Martijn; Pomp, Wim; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen fibrils form extracellular networks that regulate cell functions and provide mechanical strength to tissues. Collagen fibrillogenesis is an entropy-driven process promoted by warming and reversed by cooling. Here, we investigate the influence of noncovalent interactions mediated by the collagen triple helix on fibril stability. We measure the kinetics of cold-induced disassembly of fibrils formed from purified collagen I using turbimetry, probe the fibril morphology by atomic force microscopy, and measure the network connectivity by confocal microscopy and rheometry. We demonstrate that collagen fibrils disassemble by subunit release from their sides as well as their ends, with complex kinetics involving an initial fast release followed by a slow release. Surprisingly, the fibrils are gradually stabilized over time, leading to thermal memory. This dynamic stabilization may reflect structural plasticity of the collagen fibrils arising from their complex structure. In addition, we propose that the polymeric nature of collagen monomers may lead to slow kinetics of subunit desorption from the fibril surface. Dynamic stabilization of fibrils may be relevant in the initial stages of collagen assembly during embryogenesis, fibrosis, and wound healing. Moreover, our results are relevant for tissue repair and drug delivery applications, where it is crucial to control fibril stability. PMID:23823240

  12. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  13. Glassy state of native collagen fibril?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkian, S. G.; Allahverdyan, A. E.; Gevorgyan, D. S.; Hu, C.-K.

    2011-07-01

    Our micromechanical experiments show that viscoelastic features of type-I collagen fibril at physiological temperatures display essential dependence on the frequency and speed of heating. For temperatures of 20-30 °C the internal friction has a sharp maximum for a frequency less than 2 kHz. Upon heating the internal friction displays a peak at a temperature Tsoft(v) that essentially depends on the speed of heating v: Tsoft≈70°C for v=1°C/min, and Tsoft≈25°C for v=0.1°C/min. At the same temperature Tsoft(v) Young's modulus passes through a minimum. All these effects are specific for the native state of the fibril and disappear after heat-denaturation. Taken together with the known facts that the fibril is axially ordered as quasicrystal, but disordered laterally, we interpret our findings as indications of a glassy state, where Tsoft is the softening transition.

  14. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  15. Deformation micromechanisms of collagen fibrils under uniaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuye; Ballarini, Roberto; Buehler, Markus J; Eppell, Steven J

    2010-05-06

    Collagen, an essential building block of connective tissues, possesses useful mechanical properties due to its hierarchical structure. However, little is known about the mechanical properties of collagen fibril, an intermediate structure between the collagen molecule and connective tissue. Here, we report the results of systematic molecular dynamics simulations to probe the mechanical response of initially unflawed finite size collagen fibrils subjected to uniaxial tension. The observed deformation mechanisms, associated with rupture and sliding of tropocollagen molecules, are strongly influenced by fibril length, width and cross-linking density. Fibrils containing more than approximately 10 molecules along their length and across their width behave as representative volume elements and exhibit brittle fracture. Shorter fibrils experience a more graceful ductile-like failure. An analytical model is constructed and the results of the molecular modelling are used to find curve-fitted expressions for yield stress, yield strain and fracture strain as functions of fibril structural parameters. Our results for the first time elucidate the size dependence of mechanical failure properties of collagen fibrils. The associated molecular deformation mechanisms allow the full power of traditional material and structural engineering theory to be applied to our understanding of the normal and pathological mechanical behaviours of collagenous tissues under load.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Single Collagen Fibrils Revealed by Force Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John; Phillips, Charlotte; Grandbois, Michel

    2004-03-01

    In the field of biomechanics, collagen fibrils are believed to be robust mechanical structures characterized by a low extensibility. Until very recently, information on the mechanical properties of collagen fibrils could only be derived from ensemble measurements performed on complete tissues such as bone, skin and tendon. Here we measure force-elongation/relaxation profiles of single collagen fibrils using atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy. The elongation profiles indicate that in vitro assembled heterotrimeric type I collagen fibrils are characterized by a large extensibility. Numerous discontinuities and a plateau in the force profile indicate major reorganization occurs within the fibrils in the 1.5 -- 4.5 nN range. Our study demonstrates that newly assembled collagen fibrils are robust structures with a significant reserve of elasticity that could play a determinant role in cellular motion in the context of tissue growth and morphogenesis. In contrast, homotrimeric collagen fibrils corresponding to osteogenesis imperfecta pathology exhibit a marked difference in their elasticity profile.

  17. Molecular packing in bone collagen fibrils prior to mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Benjamin; Zhou, Hong-Wen; Burger, Christian; Chu, Benjamin; Glimcher, Melvin J.

    2012-02-01

    The three-dimensional packing of collagen molecules in bone collagen fibrils has been largely unknown because even in moderately mineralized bone tissues, the organic matrix structure is severely perturbed by the deposition of mineral crystals. During the past decades, the structure of tendon collagen (e.g. rat tail) --- a tissue that cannot mineralize in vivo, has been assumed to be representative for bone collagen fibrils. Small-angle X-ray diffraction analysis of the native, uncalcified intramuscular fish bone has revealed a new molecular packing scheme, significantly different from the quasi-hexagonal arrangement often found in tendons. The deduced structure in bone collagen fibrils indicates the presence of spatially discrete microfibrils, and an arrangement of intrafibrillar space to form ``channels'', which could accommodate crystals with dimensions typically found in bone apatite.

  18. Effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on collagen fibril formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cuicui; Zhang, Min; Tian, Huilin; Li, Guoying

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were mixed to obtain blends and the effect of HPMC on collagen self-assembly was studied. As deduced from atomic force microscopy (AFM), the amount of nuclei in collagen-HPMC solutions was changed with the addition of HPMC. Under physiological conditions, the kinetics curves of fibril formation showed that the turbidity of blends at 313 nm was higher than that of native collagen. More HPMC was involved in the hydrogel network for blends with higher HPMC/collagen. However, both the thermal stability and the storage moduli of hydrogels, which was evaluated by UV and rheological measurements respectively, reached the maximum just when HPMC/collagen=0.25. Furthermore, it was showed by AFM that denser fibrils with smaller diameter would be obtained as HPMC/collagen<0.25, while more addition of HPMC (HPMC/collagen>0.25) would bring about fibrils with larger diameter. However, HPMC did not significantly affect the characteristic D-periods of the fibrils for all blends.

  19. Stabilization and Anomalous Hydration of Collagen Fibril under Heating

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Sasun G.; Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Gevorgyan, David S.; Simonian, Aleksandr L.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Background Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones) and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. Methodology/Principal Finding When heating a native fibril sample, its Young’s modulus decreases in temperature range 20–58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58–75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58–75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. Conclusion/Significance We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen. PMID:24244320

  20. Collagen fibril formation in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Dombi, G W; Halsall, H B

    1985-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used to weaken both the electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions during collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro. The rate and extent of fibril formation as well as fibril morphology were affected by SDS concentration. Both the formation of large fibrils at 0.3 mM-SDS and the complete cessation of fibril formation at 0.5 mM-SDS were considered to be the result of SDS-induced conformational changes in the non-helical telopeptides. A possible mechanism of SDS interaction with the N-terminal and the distal region of the C-terminal telopeptides is offered. Images Fig. 5. PMID:4026797

  1. Does the genetic type of collagen determine fibril structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenberry, E.; Brodsky, B.; Cassidy, K.

    1980-10-01

    A number of genetic types of collagen, all triple-helical but with significant variations in their amino acid sequences, have been found and the distribution of these genetic types is tissue specific. For example, tendon is composed only of type I collagen, while cartilage contains largely type II collagen. Skin contains a large amount of type I, but has a significant fraction, approx. 15%, of type III. Each of these types can form fibrils, but it is not known whether they form distinctive fibril structures that are important in determining tissue organization. We are using x-ray diffraction to analyze a variety of tissues with different collagen genetic types to compare the fibril structures and thus investigate whether genetic type is an important determinant of this structure.

  2. Nanomechanical mapping of hydrated rat tail tendon collagen I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Quigley, Andrew S; Clegg, Charlotte; Kreplak, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Collagen fibrils play an important role in the human body, providing tensile strength to connective tissues. These fibrils are characterized by a banding pattern with a D-period of 67 nm. The proposed origin of the D-period is the internal staggering of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril, leading to gap and overlap regions and a corresponding periodic density fluctuation. Using an atomic force microscope high-resolution modulus maps of collagen fibril segments, up to 80 μm in length, were acquired at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s. The maps revealed a periodic modulation corresponding to the D-period as well as previously undocumented micrometer scale fluctuations. Further analysis revealed a 4/5, gap/overlap, ratio in the measured modulus providing further support for the quarter-staggered model of collagen fibril axial structure. The modulus values obtained at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s are significantly larger than those previously reported. Probing the effect of indentation speed over four decades reveals two distinct logarithmic regimes of the measured modulus and point to the existence of a characteristic molecular relaxation time around 0.1 ms. Furthermore, collagen fibrils exposed to temperatures between 50 and 62°C and cooled back to room temperature show a sharp decrease in modulus and a sharp increase in fibril diameter. This is also associated with a disappearance of the D-period and the appearance of twisted subfibrils with a pitch in the micrometer range. Based on all these data and a similar behavior observed for cross-linked polymer networks below the glass transition temperature, we propose that collagen I fibrils may be in a glassy state while hydrated.

  3. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  4. Molecular mechanics of mineralized collagen fibrils in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Arun K.; Gautieri, Alfonso; Chang, Shu-Wei; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-04-01

    Bone is a natural composite of collagen protein and the mineral hydroxyapatite. The structure of bone is known to be important to its load-bearing characteristics, but relatively little is known about this structure or the mechanism that govern deformation at the molecular scale. Here we perform full-atomistic calculations of the three-dimensional molecular structure of a mineralized collagen protein matrix to try to better understand its mechanical characteristics under tensile loading at various mineral densities. We find that as the mineral density increases, the tensile modulus of the network increases monotonically and well beyond that of pure collagen fibrils. Our results suggest that the mineral crystals within this network bears up to four times the stress of the collagen fibrils, whereas the collagen is predominantly responsible for the material’s deformation response. These findings reveal the mechanism by which bone is able to achieve superior energy dissipation and fracture resistance characteristics beyond its individual constituents.

  5. Mechanical model for a collagen fibril pair in extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue; Cox, Grant M; Haverkamp, Richard G; Hill, James M

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we model the mechanics of a collagen pair in the connective tissue extracellular matrix that exists in abundance throughout animals, including the human body. This connective tissue comprises repeated units of two main structures, namely collagens as well as axial, parallel and regular anionic glycosaminoglycan between collagens. The collagen fibril can be modeled by Hooke's law whereas anionic glycosaminoglycan behaves more like a rubber-band rod and as such can be better modeled by the worm-like chain model. While both computer simulations and continuum mechanics models have been investigated for the behavior of this connective tissue typically, authors either assume a simple form of the molecular potential energy or entirely ignore the microscopic structure of the connective tissue. Here, we apply basic physical methodologies and simple applied mathematical modeling techniques to describe the collagen pair quantitatively. We found that the growth of fibrils was intimately related to the maximum length of the anionic glycosaminoglycan and the relative displacement of two adjacent fibrils, which in return was closely related to the effectiveness of anionic glycosaminoglycan in transmitting forces between fibrils. These reveal the importance of the anionic glycosaminoglycan in maintaining the structural shape of the connective tissue extracellular matrix and eventually the shape modulus of human tissues. We also found that some macroscopic properties, like the maximum molecular energy and the breaking fraction of the collagen, were also related to the microscopic characteristics of the anionic glycosaminoglycan.

  6. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  7. Piezoelectricity in collagen type II fibrils measured by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, D.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Hsu, T.; Habelitz, S.; Fertala, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    The converse piezoelectric effect in collagen type II fibrils, the main collagen constituent in cartilage, was investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy. The fibrils exhibited shear piezoelectric behavior similar to that previously reported in collagen type I fibrils and followed the same cantilever-fibril angle dependence present for type I. A uniform polarization directed from the amine to carboxyl termini, as seen for collagen type I, was observed in all type II fibrils studied. The shear piezoelectric coefficient, d15, however, for type II was roughly 28-32% of the value measured for type I fibrils. Possible explanations for the reduced piezoelectric coefficient of type II collagen are provided.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Mineralized Collagen Fibrils As Influenced By Demineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Balooch, M.; Habelitz, S.; Kinney, J.H.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-05-11

    Dentin and bone derive their mechanical properties from a complex arrangement of collagen type-I fibrils reinforced with nanocrystalline apatite mineral in extra- and intrafibrillar compartments. While mechanical properties have been determined for the bulk of the mineralized tissue, information on the mechanics of the individual fibril is limited. Here, atomic force microscopy was used on individual collagen fibrils to study structural and mechanical changes during acid etching. The characteristic 67 nm periodicity of gap zones was not observed on the mineralized fibril, but became apparent and increasingly pronounced with continuous demineralization. AFM-nanoindentation showed a decrease in modulus from 1.5 GPa to 50 MPa during acid etching of individual collagen fibrils and revealed that the modulus profile followed the axial periodicity. The nanomechanical data, Raman spectroscopy and SAXS support the hypothesis that intrafibrillar mineral etches at a substantially slower rate than the extrafibrillar mineral. These findings are relevant for understanding the biomechanics and design principles of calcified tissues derived from collagen matrices.

  9. Constitutive modeling of crimped collagen fibrils in soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Grytz, Rafael; Meschke, Günther

    2009-10-01

    A microstructurally oriented constitutive formulation for the hyperelastic response of crimped collagen fibrils existing in soft connective tissues is proposed. The model is based on observations that collagen fibrils embedded in a soft matrix crimp into a smooth three-dimensional pattern when unloaded. Following ideas presented by Beskos and Jenkins [Beskos, D., Jenkins, J., 1975. A mechanical model for mammalian tendon. ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics 42, 755-758] and Freed and Doehring [Freed, A., Doehring, T., 2005. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering 127, 587-593] the collagen fibril crimp is approximated by a cylindrical helix to represent the constitutive behavior of the hierarchical organized substructure of biological tissues at the fibrillar level. The model is derived from the nonlinear axial force-stretch relationship of an extensible helical spring, including the full extension of the spring as a limit case. The geometrically nonlinear solution of the extensible helical spring is carried out by an iterative procedure. The model only requires one material parameter and two geometrical parameters to be determined from experiments. The ability of the proposed model to reproduce the biomechanical response of fibrous tissues is demonstrated for fascicles from rat tail tendons, for porcine cornea strips, and for bovine Achilles tendons.

  10. Exploring a Role in Tanning for the Gap Region of the Collagen Fibril: Catechin-Collagen Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron micrographs of stained collagen fibrils display a pattern of alternating light and dark bands perpendicular to the axis of the collagen fibril. Light bands correspond to regions of more dense lateral packing where adjacent collagen monomers overlap, and dark bands correspond to 'gap' regio...

  11. Collagen fibril surface displays a constellation of sites capable of promoting fibril assembly, stability, and hemostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, J.P.; Antipova, O.; Sagi, I.; Bitler, A.; Qiu, D.; Wang, R.; Xu, Y.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2011-12-14

    Fibrillar collagens form the structural basis of organs and tissues including the vasculature, bone, and tendon. They are also dynamic, organizational scaffolds that present binding and recognition sites for ligands, cells, and platelets. We interpret recently published X-ray diffraction findings and use atomic force microscopy data to illustrate the significance of new insights into the functional organization of the collagen fibril. These data indicate that collagen's most crucial functional domains localize primarily to the overlap region, comprising a constellation of sites we call the 'master control region.' Moreover, the collagen's most exposed aspect contains its most stable part - the C-terminal region that controls collagen assembly, cross-linking, and blood clotting. Hidden beneath the fibril surface exists a constellation of 'cryptic' sequences poised to promote hemostasis and cell - collagen interactions in tissue injury and regeneration. These findings begin to address several important, and previously unresolved, questions: How functional domains are organized in the fibril, which domains are accessible, and which require proteolysis or structural trauma to become exposed? Here we speculate as to how collagen fibrillar organization impacts molecular processes relating to tissue growth, development, and repair.

  12. Collagen fibril surface displays a constellation of sites capable of promoting fibril assembly, stability, and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Orgel, J P R O; Antipova, O; Sagi, I; Bitler, A; Qiu, D; Wang, R; Xu, Y; San Antonio, J D

    2011-02-01

    Fibrillar collagens form the structural basis of organs and tissues including the vasculature, bone, and tendon. They are also dynamic, organizational scaffolds that present binding and recognition sites for ligands, cells, and platelets. We interpret recently published X-ray diffraction findings and use atomic force microscopy data to illustrate the significance of new insights into the functional organization of the collagen fibril. These data indicate that collagen's most crucial functional domains localize primarily to the overlap region, comprising a constellation of sites we call the "master control region." Moreover, the collagen's most exposed aspect contains its most stable part-the C-terminal region that controls collagen assembly, cross-linking, and blood clotting. Hidden beneath the fibril surface exists a constellation of "cryptic" sequences poised to promote hemostasis and cell-collagen interactions in tissue injury and regeneration. These findings begin to address several important, and previously unresolved, questions: How functional domains are organized in the fibril, which domains are accessible, and which require proteolysis or structural trauma to become exposed? Here we speculate as to how collagen fibrillar organization impacts molecular processes relating to tissue growth, development, and repair.

  13. Collagen fibril diameter and alignment promote the quiescent keratocyte phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Peng, Lily; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George R.; Desai, Tejal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how matrix nanotopography affects corneal fibroblast phenotype and matrix synthesis. To this end, corneal fibroblasts isolated from bovine corneas were grown on collagen nanofiber scaffolds of different diameters and alignment – 30 nm aligned fibrils (30A), 300 nm or larger aligned fibrils (300A), and 30 nm nonaligned fibrils (30NA) in comparison to collagen coated flat glass substrates (FC). Cell morphology was visualized using confocal microscopy. Quantitative PCR was used to measure expression levels of six target genes: the corneal crystallin - transketolase (TKT), the myofibroblast marker - α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and four matrix proteins - collagen 1 (COL1), collagen 3 (COL3), fibronectin (FN) and biglycan. It was found that SMA expression was down-regulated and TKT expression was increased on all three collagen nanofiber substrates, compared to the FC control substrates. However, COL3 and biglycan expression was also significantly increased on 300A, compared to the FC substrates. Thus matrix nanotopography down-regulates the fibrotic phenotype, promotes formation of the quiescent keratocyte phenotype and influences matrix synthesis. These results have significant implications for the engineering of corneal replacements and for promoting regenerative healing of the cornea after disease and/or injury. PMID:22213336

  14. Mechanically overloading collagen fibrils uncoils collagen molecules, placing them in a stable, denatured state.

    PubMed

    Veres, Samuel P; Harrison, Julia M; Lee, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high occurrence rate of overextension injuries to tendons and ligaments, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of damage to these tissues' primary load-bearing elements: collagen fibrils and their constituent molecules. Based on our recent observations of a new subrupture, overload-induced mode of fibril disruption that we call discrete plasticity, we have sought in the current study to re-explore whether the tensile overload of collagen fibrils can alter the helical conformation of collagen molecules. In order to accomplish this, we have analyzed the conformation of collagen molecules within repeatedly overloaded tendons in relation to their undamaged matched-pair controls using both differential scanning calorimetry and variable temperature trypsin digestion susceptibility. We find that tensile overload reduces the specific enthalpy of denaturation of tendons, and increases their susceptibility to trypsin digestion, even when the digestion is carried out at temperatures as low as 4 °C. Our results indicate that the tensile overload of collagen fibrils can uncoil the helix of collagen molecules, placing them in a stable, denatured state.

  15. Cross-linking connectivity in bone collagen fibrils: the COOH-terminal locus of free aldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otsubo, K.; Katz, E. P.; Mechanic, G. L.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of the chemical state of the 16c residue of the alpha 1 chain of bone collagen were performed on samples from fetal (4-6-month embryo) and mature (2-3 year old) bovine animals. All of this residue could be accounted for in terms of three chemical states, in relative amounts which depended upon the age of the animal. Most of the residue was incorporated into either bifunctional or trifunctional cross-links. Some of it, however, was present as free aldehyde, and the content increased with maturation. This was established by isolating and characterizing the aldehyde-containing peptides generated by tryptic digestion of NaB3H4-reduced mature bone collagen. We have concluded that the connectivity of COOH-terminal cross-linking in bone collagen fibrils changes with maturation in the following way: at first, each 16c residue in each of the two alpha 1 chains of the collagen molecule is incorporated into a sheet-like pattern of intermolecular iminium cross-links, which stabilizes the young, nonmineralized fibril as a whole. In time, some of these labile cross-links maturate into pyridinoline while others dissociate back to their precursor form. The latter is likely due to changes in the molecular packing brought about by the mineralization of the collagen fibrils. The resultant reduction in cross-linking connectivity may provide a mechanism for enhancing certain mechanical characteristics of the skeleton of a mature animal.

  16. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Autoimmunity to Anchoring Fibril Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Kim, Gene H.; Prakash, Lori; Woodley, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare and acquired autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease of the skin and mucosa. EBA includes various distinct clinical manifestations resembling Bullous Pemphigus, Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid, or cicatricial pemphigoid. These patients have autoantibodies against type VII collagen, an integral component of anchoring fibrils, which are responsible for attaching the dermis to the epidermis. Destruction or perturbation of the normally functioning anchoring fibrils clinically results in skin fragility, blisters, erosions, scars, milia and nail loss, all features reminiscent of genetic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These anti-type VII collagen antibodies are “pathogenic” because when injected into a mouse, the mouse develops an EBA-like blistering disease. Currently treatment is often unsatisfactory, however some success has been achieved with colchichine, dapsone, photopheresis, plasmaphresis, infliximab, rituximab and IVIG. PMID:21955050

  17. Exploring a role in tanning for the gap region of the collagen fibril

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three-dimensional structures of fibrillar collagens have been the subject of numerous studies for more than 60 years. Electron micrographs of stained collagen fibrils display a pattern of alternating light and dark bands perpendicular to the axis of the collagen fibril. Light bands correspond to reg...

  18. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness.

  19. Structural variations in anchoring fibrils in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: correlation with type VII collagen expression.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; O'Grady, A; Leigh, I M; Eady, R A

    1993-04-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is characterized by various abnormalities of anchoring fibrils, which are mainly composed of type VII collagen, at the dermal-epidermal junction. To define these changes more clearly, we examined skin samples from 22 patients with different forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody (LH 7:2) that binds to the NC-1 globular domain of type VII collagen, followed by 1 nm colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibodies and subsequent silver enhancement. In dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa cases, there was only a slight but variable reduction in the immunolabeling density on anchoring fibrils and on the lamina densa, in parts similar to normal human skin. In localized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin, some fibrillar structures just below the lamina densa (and particularly subjacent to hemidesmosomes) had specific antibody labeling despite their lack of resemblance to definitive anchoring fibrils. Immunolabeling with LH 7:2 was also seen within basal keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic vesicles in some dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients, usually with milder phenotypic features. Even in the most severe cases of generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, occasional immunolabeling was found within the lamina densa and on scanty thin filamentous structures at sub-lamina densa sites usually occupied by anchoring fibrils. This study suggests that dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients express some type VII collagen NC-1 domain epitopes that may be variably reduced at the dermal-epidermal junction or retained within basal keratinocytes. The clinical heterogeneity in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is mirrored by a range of immunoelectron microscopy findings, indicating variability in completeness of anchoring fibril formation and a possible spectrum of underlying type VII collagen structural protein abnormalities.

  20. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  1. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-06

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry.

  2. Unraveling the role of Calcium ions in the mechanical properties of individual collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiangchao; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Collagen, the dominating material in the extracellular matrix, provides the strength, elasticity and mechanical stability to the organisms. The mechanical property of collagen is mainly dominated by its surrounding environments. However, the variation and origin of the mechanics of collagen fibril under different concentrations of calcium ions (χCa) remains unknown. By using the atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation, the mechanics and structure of individual type II collagen fibril were first investigated under different χCa in this study. The results demonstrate that both of the mechanical and structural properties of the collagen fibril show a prominent dependence on χCa. The mechanism of χCa-dependence of the collagen fibril was attributed to the chelation between collagen molecules and the calcium ions. Given the role of calcium in the pathology of osteoarthritis, the current study may cast new light on the understanding of osteoarthritis and other soft tissue hardening related diseases in the future. PMID:28378770

  3. The effect of collagen fibril orientation on the biphasic mechanics of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; An, Shuqiang; Damion, Robin A; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jones, Alison

    2017-01-01

    The highly inhomogeneous distribution of collagen fibrils may have important effects on the biphasic mechanics of articular cartilage. However, the effect of the inhomogeneity of collagen fibrils has mainly been investigated using simplified three-layered models, which may have underestimated the effect of collagen fibrils by neglecting their realistic orientation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the realistic orientation of collagen fibrils on the biphasic mechanics of articular cartilage. Five biphasic material models, each of which included a different level of complexity of fibril reinforcement, were solved using two different finite element software packages (Abaqus and FEBio). Model 1 considered the realistic orientation of fibrils, which was derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. The simplified three-layered orientation was used for Model 2. Models 3-5 were three control models. The realistic collagen orientations obtained in this study were consistent with the literature. Results from the two finite element implementations were in agreement for each of the conditions modelled. The comparison between the control models confirmed some functions of collagen fibrils. The comparison between Models 1 and 2 showed that the widely-used three-layered inhomogeneous model can produce similar fluid load support to the model including the realistic fibril orientation; however, an accurate prediction of the other mechanical parameters requires the inclusion of the realistic orientation of collagen fibrils.

  4. Advanced Glycation End-Products Reduce Collagen Molecular Sliding to Affect Collagen Fibril Damage Mechanisms but Not Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Fessel, Gion; Li, Yufei; Diederich, Vincent; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Schneider, Philipp; Sell, David R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Snedeker, Jess G.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) contribute to age-related connective tissue damage and functional deficit. The documented association between AGE formation on collagens and the correlated progressive stiffening of tissues has widely been presumed causative, despite the lack of mechanistic understanding. The present study investigates precisely how AGEs affect mechanical function of the collagen fibril – the supramolecular functional load-bearing unit within most tissues. We employed synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and carefully controlled mechanical testing after introducing AGEs in explants of rat-tail tendon using the metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Mass spectrometry and collagen fluorescence verified substantial formation of AGEs by the treatment. Associated mechanical changes of the tissue (increased stiffness and failure strength, decreased stress relaxation) were consistent with reports from the literature. SAXS analysis revealed clear changes in molecular deformation within MGO treated fibrils. Underlying the associated increase in tissue strength, we infer from the data that MGO modified collagen fibrils supported higher loads to failure by maintaining an intact quarter-staggered conformation to nearly twice the level of fibril strain in controls. This apparent increase in fibril failure resistance was characterized by reduced side-by-side sliding of collagen molecules within fibrils, reflecting lateral molecular interconnectivity by AGEs. Surprisingly, no change in maximum fibril modulus (2.5 GPa) accompanied the changes in fibril failure behavior, strongly contradicting the widespread assumption that tissue stiffening in ageing and diabetes is directly related to AGE increased fibril stiffness. We conclude that AGEs can alter physiologically relevant failure behavior of collagen fibrils, but that tissue level changes in stiffness likely occur at higher levels of tissue architecture. PMID:25364829

  5. Intrafibrillar mineralization of polyacrylic acid-bound collagen fibrils using a two-dimensional collagen model and Portland cement-based resins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiyu; Gu, Lisha; Huang, Zihua; Sun, Qiurong; Chen, Huimin; Ling, Junqi; Mai, Sui

    2017-02-01

    The biomimetic remineralization of apatite-depleted dentin is a potential method for enhancing the durability of resin-dentin bonding. To advance this strategy from its initial proof-of-concept design, we sought to investigate the characteristics of polyacrylic acid (PAA) adsorption to desorption from type I collagen and to test the mineralization ability of PAA-bound collagen. Portland cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were homogenized with a hydrophilic resin blend to produce experimental resins. The collagen fibrils reconstituted on nickel (Ni) grids were mineralized using different methods: (i) group I consisted of collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in simulated body fluid (SBF); (ii) group II consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in SBF; and (iii) group III consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with β-TCP-doped Portland cement-based resin in deionized water. Intrafibrillar mineralization was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. We found that a carbonyl-associated peak at pH 3.0 increased as adsorption time increased, whereas a hydrogen bond-associated peak increased as desorption time increased. The experimental resins maintained an alkaline pH and the continuous release of calcium ions. Apatite was detected within PAA-bound collagen in groups II and III. Our results suggest that PAA-bound type I collagen fibrils can be mineralized using Portland cement-based resins.

  6. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  7. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom‐up approach. By conserving the three‐dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite‐size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). PMID:26866939

  8. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  9. Structural changes in collagen fibrils across a mineralized interface revealed by cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Quan, Bryan D; Sone, Eli D

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the mineralized collagen fibril, which is the basic building block of mineralized connective tissues, is critical to its function. We use cryo-TEM to study collagen structure at a well-defined hard-soft tissue interface, across which collagen fibrils are continuous, in order to evaluate changes to collagen upon mineralization. To establish a basis for the analysis of collagen banding, we compared cryo-TEM images of rat-tail tendon collagen to a model based on the X-ray structure. While there is close correspondence of periodicity, differences in band intensity indicate fibril regions with high density but lacking order, providing new insight into collagen fibrillar structure. Across a mineralized interface, we show that mineralization results in an axial contraction of the fibril, concomitant with lateral expansion, and that this contraction occurs only in the more flexible gap region of the fibril. Nevertheless, the major features of the banding pattern are not significantly changed, indicating that the axial arrangement of molecules remains largely intact. These results suggest a mechanism by which collagen fibrils are able to accommodate large amounts of mineral without significant disruption of their molecular packing, leading to synergy of mechanical properties.

  10. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-16

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet's membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  11. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet’s membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  12. Nanomechanical assessment of human and murine collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy cantilever-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Fabri, Sebastien; Howarth, Peter H; Davies, Donna E; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-11-01

    The nanomechanical assessment of collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy (AFM) is of increasing interest within the biomedical research community. In contrast to conventional nanoindentation there exists no common standard for conducting experiments and analysis of data. Currently used analysis approaches vary between studies and validation of quantitative results is usually not performed, which makes comparison of data from different studies difficult. Also there are no recommendations with regards to the maximum indentation depth that should not be exceeded to avoid substrate effects. Here we present a methodology and analysis approach for AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation experiments that allows efficient use of captured data and relying on a reference sample for determination of tip shape. Further we show experimental evidence that maximum indentation depth on collagen fibrils should be lower than 10-15% of the height of the fibril to avoid substrate effects and we show comparisons between our and other approaches used in previous works. While our analysis approach yields similar values for indentation modulus compared to the Oliver-Pharr method we found that Hertzian analysis yielded significantly lower values. Applying our approach we successfully and efficiently indented collagen fibrils from human bronchi, which were about 30 nm in size, considerably smaller compared to collagen fibrils obtained from murine tail-tendon. In addition, derived mechanical parameters of collagen fibrils are in agreement with data previously published. To establish a quantitative validation we compared indentation results from conventional and AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation on polymeric samples with known mechanical properties. Importantly we can show that our approach yields similar results when compared to conventional nanoindentation on polymer samples. Introducing an approach that is reliable, efficient and taking into account the AFM tip shape, we anticipate

  13. New insight into the shortening of the collagen fibril D-period in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebska, Maria; Tarnawska, Dorota; Wrzalik, Roman; Chrobak, Artur; Grelowski, Michal; Wylegala, Edward; Zygadlo, Dorota; Ratuszna, Alicja

    2017-02-01

    Collagen fibrils type I display a typical banding pattern, so-called D-periodicity, of about 67 nm, when visualized by atomic force or electron microscopy imaging. Herein we report on a significant shortening of the D-period for human corneal collagen fibrils type I (21 ± 4 nm) upon air-drying, whereas no changes in the D-period were observed for human scleral collagen fibrils type I (64 ± 4 nm) measured under the same experimental conditions as the cornea. It was also found that for the corneal stroma fixed with glutaraldehyde and air-dried, the collagen fibrils show the commonly accepted D-period of 61 ± 8 nm. We used the atomic force microscopy method to image collagen fibrils type I present in the middle layers of human cornea and sclera. The water content in the cornea and sclera samples was varying in the range of .066-.085. Calculations of the D-period using the theoretical model of the fibril and the FFT approach allowed to reveal the possible molecular mechanism of the D-period shortening in the corneal collagen fibrils upon drying. It was found that both the decrease in the shift and the simultaneous reduction in the distance between tropocollagen molecules can be responsible for the experimentally observed effect. We also hypothesize that collagen type V, which co-assembles with collagen type I into heterotypic fibrils in cornea, could be involved in the observed shortening of the corneal D-period.

  14. Determination of the elastic modulus of native collagen fibrils via radial indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August J.; Matthews, William G.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2006-10-01

    The authors studied the elastic response of single, native collagen fibrils extracted from tissues of the inner dermis of the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, via local nanoscale indentation with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM imaging of fibrils under ambient conditions are presented, demonstrating a peak-to-peak periodicity, the d band, of dehydrated, unfixed fibrils to be ˜64.5nm. Radial indentation experiments were performed, and the measured value for the reduced modulus is 1-2GPa.

  15. Thermal denaturation behavior of collagen fibrils in wet and dry environment.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Yosuke; Nam, Kwangwoo; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio; Masuzawa, Toru

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new minimally invasive technique--integrated low-level energy adhesion technique (ILEAT)--which uses heat, pressure, and low-frequency vibrations for binding living tissues. Because the adhesion mechanism of the living tissues is not fully understood, we investigated the effect of thermal energy on the collagen structure in living tissues using ILEAT. To study the effect of thermal energy and heating time on the structure of the collagen fibril, samples were divided in two categories-wet and dry. Further, atomic force microscopy was used to analyze the collagen fibril structure before and after heating. Results showed that collagen fibrils in water denatured after 1 minute at temperatures higher than 80 °C, while partial denaturation was observed at temperatures of 80 °C and a heating time of 1 min. Furthermore, complete denaturation was achieved after 90 min, suggesting that the denaturation rate is temperature and time dependent. Moreover, the collagen fibrils in dry condition maintained their native structure even after being heated to 120 °C for 90 min in the absence of water, which specifically suppressed denaturation. However, partial denaturation of collagen fibrils could not be prevented, because this determines the adhesion between the collagen molecules, and stabilizes tissue bonding.

  16. Second harmonic generation quantitative measurements on collagen fibrils through correlation to electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, S.; Aimé, C.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Latour, G.; Coradin, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2015-03-01

    Type I collagen is a major structural protein in mammals that shows highly structured macromolecular organizations specific to each tissue. This biopolymer is synthesized as triple helices, which self-assemble into fibrils (Ø =10-300 nm) and further form various 3D organization. In recent years, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to probe in situ the fibrillar collagenous network within tissues. However, this optical technique cannot resolve most of the fibrils and is a coherent process, which has impeded quantitative measurements of the fibril diameter so far. In this study, we correlated SHG microscopy with Transmission Electron Microscopy to determine the sensitivity of SHG microscopy and to calibrate SHG signals as a function of the fibril diameter in reconstructed collagen gels. To that end, we synthetized isolated fibrils with various diameters and successfully imaged the very same fibrils with both techniques, down to 30 nm diameter. We observed that SHG signals scaled as the fourth power of the fibril diameter, as expected from analytical and numerical calculations. This calibration was then applied to diabetic rat cornea in which we successfully recovered the diameter of hyperglycemia-induced fibrils in the Descemet's membrane without having to resolve them. Finally we derived the first hyperpolarizability from a single collagen triple helix which validates the bottom-up approach used to calculate the non-linear response at the fibrillar scale and denotes a parallel alignment of triple helices within the fibrils. These results represent a major step towards quantitative SHG imaging of nm-sized collagen fibrils.

  17. Nanoscale characterization of the biomechanical properties of collagen fibrils in the sclera

    SciTech Connect

    Papi, M.; Paoletti, P.; Geraghty, B.; Akhtar, R.

    2014-03-10

    We apply the PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Property Mapping (PFQNM) atomic force microscopy mode for the investigation of regional variations in the nanomechanical properties of porcine sclera. We examine variations in the collagen fibril diameter, adhesion, elastic modulus and dissipation in the posterior, equatorial and anterior regions of the sclera. The mean fibril diameter, elastic modulus and dissipation increased from the posterior to the anterior region. Collagen fibril diameter correlated linearly with elastic modulus. Our data matches the known macroscopic mechanical behavior of the sclera. We propose that PFQNM has significant potential in ocular biomechanics and biophysics research.

  18. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils: influence of natural cross-links.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko; Magnusson, S Peter

    2013-06-04

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human collagen fibrils. There was an initial rise in modulus followed by a plateau with reduced modulus, which was finally followed by an even greater increase in stress and modulus before failure. The RTTs also displayed the initial increase and plateau phase, but the third region was virtually absent and the plateau continued until failure. The importance of cross-link lability was investigated by NaBH₄ reduction of the rat-tail fibrils, which did not alter their behavior. These findings shed light on the function of cross-links at the fibril level, but further studies will be required to establish the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Repeated subrupture overload causes progression of nanoscaled discrete plasticity damage in tendon collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Veres, Samuel P; Harrison, Julia M; Lee, J Michael

    2013-05-01

    A critical feature of tendons and ligaments is their ability to resist rupture when overloaded, resulting in strains or sprains instead of ruptures. To treat these injuries more effectively, it is necessary to understand how overload affects the primary load-bearing elements of these tissues: collagen fibrils. We have investigated how repeated subrupture overload alters the collagen of tendons at the nanoscale. Using scanning electron microscopy to examine fibril morphology and hydrothermal isometric tension testing to look at molecular stability, we demonstrated that tendon collagen undergoes a progressive cascade of discrete plasticity damage when repeatedly overloaded. With successive overload cycles, fibrils develop an increasing number of kinks along their length. These kinks-discrete zones of plastic deformation known to contain denatured collagen molecules-are accompanied by a progressive and eventual total loss of D-banding along the surface of fibrils, indicating a loss of native molecular packing and further molecular denaturation. Thermal analysis of molecular stability showed that the destabilization of collagen molecules within fibrils is strongly related to the amount of strain energy dissipated by the tendon after yielding during tensile overload. These novel findings raise new questions about load transmission within tendons and their fibrils and about the interplay between crosslinking, strain-energy dissipation ability, and molecular denaturation within these structures.

  20. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  1. Dissolution of type I collagen fibrils by gingival fibroblasts isolated from patients of various periodontitis categories.

    PubMed

    Havemose-Poulsen, A; Holmstrup, P; Stoltze, K; Birkedal-Hansen, H

    1998-07-01

    The classification of periodontitis in various disease categories, including juvenile periodontitis, rapidly progressive adult periodontitis and slowly progressive adult periodontitis is based mainly on differences in disease progression and age group susceptibility. Because dissolution of collagen fibers is an integral part of periodontal attachment loss, we investigated whether the clinical differences among these periodontitis/control groups are reflected in the collagen-degrading activity of gingival fibroblasts isolated from affected tissues. All fibroblast strains isolated from the 4 groups (n = 48) displayed cell-associated collagenolytic activity when seeded in contact with a reconstituted film of type I collagen fibrils. Cells from the control group (n = 14) dissolved the collagen fibril film twice as fast as those from each of the 3 disease groups (juvenile periodontitis (n = 13), rapidly progressive adult periodontitis (n = 7), and slowly progressive adult periodontitis (n = 14)). Both interleukin-1 beta and phorbolester accelerated the rate of dissolution 2-4-fold, but even after cytokine or phorbolester stimulation control cells were still considerably more effective in dissolving the collagen fibrils than cells from the disease groups. The observation made in this study, that dissolution of collagen fibrils by gingival fibroblasts from periodontally diseased individuals is significantly slower than by cells from healthy control subjects, challenges disease paradigms based on a direct relationship between collagenolytic potential and disease activity.

  2. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2010-02-11

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e{sub 1} bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  3. Some observations on the subfibrillar structure of collagen fibrils as noted during treatment with NKISK and cathepsin G with mechanical agitation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tailun; Weinhold, Paul S; Lee, Nicole Y; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-01-01

    We observed the structure of collagen fibrils in rat tail tendons after treatment with NKISK and cathepsin G. NKISK is a pentapeptide that has been previously shown to bind fibronectin, while cathepsin G is a serine protease that cleaves fibronectin but not type I collagen. In tendons treated with NKISK, fibrils were seen to extensively dissociate into smaller-diameter subfibrils. These subfibrils were homogeneous in diameter with an average diameter of 26.3 ± 5.8 nm. Similar, although less extensive, dissociation into subfibrils was found in tendons treated with cathepsin G. The average diameter of these subfibrils was 24.8 ± 4.9 nm. The ability of NKISK and cathepsin G to release subfibrils at physiological pH without harsh denaturants may enhance the study of the subfibrillar structure of collagen fibrils.

  4. Techniques to assess bone ultrastructure organization: orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Marios; Müller, Ralph; Schneider, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Bone's remarkable mechanical properties are a result of its hierarchical structure. The mineralized collagen fibrils, made up of collagen fibrils and crystal platelets, are bone's building blocks at an ultrastructural level. The organization of bone's ultrastructure with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils has been the matter of numerous studies based on a variety of imaging techniques in the past decades. These techniques either exploit physical principles, such as polarization, diffraction or scattering to examine bone ultrastructure orientation and arrangement, or directly image the fibrils at the sub-micrometre scale. They make use of diverse probes such as visible light, X-rays and electrons at different scales, from centimetres down to nanometres. They allow imaging of bone sections or surfaces in two dimensions or investigating bone tissue truly in three dimensions, in vivo or ex vivo, and sometimes in combination with in situ mechanical experiments. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss this broad range of imaging techniques and the different modalities of their use, in order to discuss their advantages and limitations for the assessment of bone ultrastructure organization with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils. PMID:27335222

  5. Techniques to assess bone ultrastructure organization: orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Marios; Müller, Ralph; Schneider, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    Bone's remarkable mechanical properties are a result of its hierarchical structure. The mineralized collagen fibrils, made up of collagen fibrils and crystal platelets, are bone's building blocks at an ultrastructural level. The organization of bone's ultrastructure with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils has been the matter of numerous studies based on a variety of imaging techniques in the past decades. These techniques either exploit physical principles, such as polarization, diffraction or scattering to examine bone ultrastructure orientation and arrangement, or directly image the fibrils at the sub-micrometre scale. They make use of diverse probes such as visible light, X-rays and electrons at different scales, from centimetres down to nanometres. They allow imaging of bone sections or surfaces in two dimensions or investigating bone tissue truly in three dimensions, in vivo or ex vivo, and sometimes in combination with in situ mechanical experiments. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss this broad range of imaging techniques and the different modalities of their use, in order to discuss their advantages and limitations for the assessment of bone ultrastructure organization with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils.

  6. Characterization of the correlation between collagen fibril thickness and forward and backward second harmonic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Chiu-Mei; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Optical-based microscopy plays an important role in various scientific fields such as physics, chemistry and biology. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has become one of the indispensable tools for biomedical imaging for the last decade because the signal generated from SHG is sensitive to the objective structure and this amazing non-invasive method can also directly observe the objective without using extra fluorescent labels, especially for collagen molecules. As the most abundant protein in animals, collagen is responsible for a number of important structural and functional roles in vertebrates. For certain diseases, it has been shown that collagen fiber diameter has a significant variation and thus as a vital symptom for diagnosis. Moreover, collagen diameter is also a key parameter for fibrogenesis studying. Therefore, the determination of collagen fiber diameter is important for studying biophysical processes and identifying bioengineering applications. In this study, we investigated various collagen fibril thicknesses and the corresponding forward (FSHG) and backward (BSHG) second harmonic signal intensity variation. Our result exhibits that SHG intensity can quantify describe the relative collagen fibril thickness alteration, which also indicates the coherent effect difference between FSHG and BSHG. This approach demonstrates the capability of SHG imaging in providing collagen mechanical information and that may be applied in the evaluation of advancing collagen issues in vivo.

  7. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency induces morphological changes of anterior cruciate ligament collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ochi, M; Murao, T; Sumen, Y; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, N

    1999-04-01

    We studied the ultrastructural changes of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with transmission electron micrograph cross-sections following isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the proximal third and anteromedial aspect of the ACL. Fourteen patients with PCL-deficient knees at a mean of 22.1 months from injury to surgery and 5 normal knees amputated secondary to malignant tumors or traumatic injuries were used as controls. A significant difference was found in the number of collagen fibrils per 1 microm2 between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. There was a significant difference found in the collagen fibril diameter between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. The collagen packing density (the percentage of sampled area occupied by collagen fibrils) was also significantly different between the PCL-deficient knee and the control group. The current study shows that an isolated PCL insufficiency can induce morphological changes in ACL collagen fibrils, suggesting that a PCL insufficiency can have adverse effects on other ligamentous structures in the knee joint.

  8. Characterization of a liver organoid tissue composed of hepatocytes and fibroblasts in dense collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Miho; Adachi, Eijiro; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2013-11-01

    The adult liver is wrapped in a connective tissue sheet called the liver capsule, which consists of collagen fibrils and fibroblasts. In this study, we set out to construct a liver organoid tissue that would be comparable to the endogenous liver, using a bioreactor. In vitro liver organoid tissue was generated by combining collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and primary murine hepatocytes or Hep G2 on a mesh of poly-lactic acid fabric using a bioreactor. Then, the suitability of this liver organoid tissue for transplantation was tested by implanting the constructs into partially hepatectomized BALB/cA-nu/nu mice. As determined by using scanning and transmission electron microscopes, the liver organoid tissues were composed of densely packed collagen fibrils with fibroblasts and aggregates of oval or spherical hepatocytes. Angiogenesis was induced after the transplantation, and blood vessels connected the liver organoid tissue with the surrounding tissue. Thus, a novel approach was applied to generate transplantable liver organoid tissue within a condensed collagen fibril matrix. These results suggested that a dense collagen network populated with fibroblasts can hold a layer of concentrated hepatocytes, providing a three-dimensional microenvrionment suitable for the reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, and resulting in the maintenance of their liver-specific functions. This liver organoid tissue may be useful for the study of intrahepatic functions of various cells, cytokines, and ECMs, and may fulfill the fundamental requirements of a donor tissue.

  9. Second harmonic generation imaging of the collagen in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiou, Yu-We; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2009-02-01

    Myocardial fibrosis, a common sequela of cardiac hypertrophy, has been shown to be associated with arrhythmias in experimental models. Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to atrial fibrillation. Second harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. In this presentation, we observe the SHG images of the collagen matrix in atrial myocardium and we analyzed of collagen fibers arrangement by using Fourier-transform analysis. Moreover, comparing the SHG images of the collagen fibers in atrial myocardium between normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and atrial fibrillation (AF), our result indicated that it is possible to realize the relation between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  10. Poisson's ratio of collagen fibrils measured by small angle X-ray scattering of strained bovine pericardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Hannah C.; Sizeland, Katie H.; Kayed, Hanan R.; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T.; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main structural component of skin, tendons, and skin products, such as leather. Understanding the mechanical performance of collagen fibrils is important for understanding the mechanical performance of the tissues that they make up, while the mechanical properties of bulk tissue are well characterized, less is known about the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils. In this study, bovine pericardium is subjected to strain while small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns are recorded using synchrotron radiation. The change in d-spacing, which is a measure of fibril extension, and the change in fibril diameter are determined from SAXS. The tissue is strained 0.25 (25%) with a corresponding strain in the collagen fibrils of 0.045 observed. The ratio of collagen fibril width contraction to length extension, or the Poisson's ratio, is 2.1 ± 0.7 for a tissue strain from 0 to 0.25. This Poisson's ratio indicates that the volume of individual collagen fibrils decreases with increasing strain, which is quite unlike most engineering materials. This high Poisson's ratio of individual fibrils may contribute to high Poisson's ratio observed for tissues, contributing to some of the remarkable properties of collagen-based materials.

  11. Poisson's ratio of collagen fibrils measured by small angle X-ray scattering of strained bovine pericardium

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Hannah C.; Sizeland, Katie H.; Kayed, Hanan R.; Haverkamp, Richard G.; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T.

    2015-01-28

    Type I collagen is the main structural component of skin, tendons, and skin products, such as leather. Understanding the mechanical performance of collagen fibrils is important for understanding the mechanical performance of the tissues that they make up, while the mechanical properties of bulk tissue are well characterized, less is known about the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils. In this study, bovine pericardium is subjected to strain while small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns are recorded using synchrotron radiation. The change in d-spacing, which is a measure of fibril extension, and the change in fibril diameter are determined from SAXS. The tissue is strained 0.25 (25%) with a corresponding strain in the collagen fibrils of 0.045 observed. The ratio of collagen fibril width contraction to length extension, or the Poisson's ratio, is 2.1 ± 0.7 for a tissue strain from 0 to 0.25. This Poisson's ratio indicates that the volume of individual collagen fibrils decreases with increasing strain, which is quite unlike most engineering materials. This high Poisson's ratio of individual fibrils may contribute to high Poisson's ratio observed for tissues, contributing to some of the remarkable properties of collagen-based materials.

  12. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibers in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiu, Yu-Wei; Lo, Men Tzung; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common irregular heart rhythm and the mortality rate for patients with AF is approximately twice the mortality rate for patients with normal sinus rhythm (NSR). Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to AF. Therefore, realizing the relationship between myocardial collagen fibrosis and AF is significant. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. We perform SHG microscopic imaging of the collagen fibers in the human atrial myocardium. Utilizing the SHG images, we can identify the differences in morphology and the arrangement of collagen fibers between NSR and AF tissues. We also quantify the arrangement of the collagen fibers using Fourier transform images and calculating the values of angle entropy. We indicate that SHG imaging, a nondestructive and reproducible method to analyze the arrangement of collagen fibers, can provide explicit information about the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  13. Fabrication of high-density collagen fibril matrix gels by renaturation of triple-helix collagen from gelatin.

    PubMed

    Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Yunoki, Shunji; Hatayama, Hirosuke; Teranishi, Yoshikazu

    2013-11-01

    Collagen-based 3-D hydrogels often lack sufficient mechanical strength for tissue engineering. We developed a method for fabrication of high-density collagen fibril matrix (CFM) gels from concentrated solutions of uncleaved gelatin (UCG). Denatured random-coil UCG exhibited more rapid and efficient renaturation into collagen triple-helix than cleaved gelatin (CG) over a broad range of setting temperatures. The UCG solution formed opaque gels with high-density reconstituted collagen fibrils at 28-32 °C and transparent gels similar to CG at <25 °C. The unique gelation properties of UCG enabled the encapsulation of cultured cells in CFM of high solid volume (>5%) and elasticity (1.28 ± 0.15 kPa at 5% and 4.82 ± 0.38 kPa at 8%) with minimal cell loss. The elastic modulus of these gels was higher than that of conventional CFM containing 0.5% collagen. High-strength CFM may provide more durable hydrogels for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  14. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs.

  15. A new model to simulate the elastic properties of mineralized collagen fibril.

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.; Stock, S.R.; Haeffner, D.R.; Almer, J.D.; Dunand , D.C.; Brinson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Bone, because of its hierarchical composite structure, exhibits an excellent combination of stiffness and toughness, which is due substantially to the structural order and deformation at the smaller length scales. Here, we focus on the mineralized collagen fibril, consisting of hydroxyapatite plates with nanometric dimensions aligned within a protein matrix, and emphasize the relationship between the structure and elastic properties of a mineralized collagen fibril. We create two- and three-dimensional representative volume elements to represent the structure of the fibril and evaluate the importance of the parameters defining its structure and properties of the constituent mineral and collagen phase. Elastic stiffnesses are calculated by the finite element method and compared with experimental data obtained by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The computational results match the experimental data well, and provide insight into the role of the phases and morphology on the elastic deformation characteristics. Also, the effects of water, imperfections in the mineral phase and mineral content outside the mineralized collagen fibril upon its elastic properties are discussed.

  16. A new model to simulate the elastic properties of mineralized collagen fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.; Stock, S.R.; Haeffner, D.R.; Almer, J.D.; Dunand, D.C.; Brinson, L.C.

    2012-05-02

    Bone, because of its hierarchical composite structure, exhibits an excellent combination of stiffness and toughness, which is due substantially to the structural order and deformation at the smaller length scales. Here, we focus on the mineralized collagen fibril, consisting of hydroxyapatite plates with nanometric dimensions aligned within a protein matrix, and emphasize the relationship between the structure and elastic properties of a mineralized collagen fibril. We create two- and three-dimensional representative volume elements to represent the structure of the fibril and evaluate the importance of the parameters defining its structure and properties of the constituent mineral and collagen phase. Elastic stiffnesses are calculated by the finite element method and compared with experimental data obtained by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The computational results match the experimental data well, and provide insight into the role of the phases and morphology on the elastic deformation characteristics. Also, the effects of water, imperfections in the mineral phase and mineral content outside the mineralized collagen fibril upon its elastic properties are discussed.

  17. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals strongly polarized movement of clostridial collagenase along collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Itami, Masahiro; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ando, Toshio; Konno, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial collagenases involved in donor infection are widely applied in many fields due to their high activity and specificity; however, little is known regarding the mechanisms by which bacterial collagenases degrade insoluble collagen in host tissues. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy, we simultaneously visualized the hierarchical structure of collagen fibrils and the movement of a representative bacterial collagenase, Clostridium histolyticum type I collagenase (ColG), to determine the relationship between collagen structure and collagenase movement. Notably, ColG moved ~14.5 nm toward the collagen N terminus in ~3.8 s in a manner dependent on a catalytic zinc ion. While ColG was engaged, collagen molecules were not only degraded but also occasionally rearranged to thicken neighboring collagen fibrils. Importantly, we found a similarity of relationship between the enzyme-substrate interface structure and enzyme migration in collagen-collagenase and DNA-nuclease systems, which share a helical substrate structure, suggesting a common strategy in enzyme evolution. PMID:27373458

  18. Acellular and cellular high-density, collagen-fibril constructs with suprafibrillar organization.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kevin M; Novak, Tyler; Watkins, Lauren; Neu, Corey P; Wallace, Joseph M; Bart, Zachary R; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Collagen is used extensively for tissue engineering due to its prevalence in connective tissues and its role in defining tissue biophysical and biological signalling properties. However, traditional collagen-based materials fashioned from atelocollagen and telocollagen have lacked collagen densities, multi-scale organization, mechanical integrity, and proteolytic resistance found within tissues in vivo. Here, highly interconnected low-density matrices of D-banded fibrils were created from collagen oligomers, which exhibit fibrillar as well as suprafibrillar assembly. Confined compression then was applied to controllably reduce the interstitial fluid while maintaining fibril integrity. More specifically, low-density (3.5 mg mL(-1)) oligomer matrices were densified to create collagen-fibril constructs with average concentrations of 12.25 mg mL(-1) and 24.5 mg mL(-1). Control and densified constructs exhibited nearly linear increases in ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and compressive modulus over the ranges of 65 to 213 kPa, 400 to 1.26 MPa, and 20 to 150 kPa, respectively. Densification also increased construct resistance to collagenase degradability. Finally, this process was amenable to creating high-density cellularized tissues; all constructs maintained high cell viability (at least 97%) immediately following compression as well as after 1 day and 7 days of culture. This method, which integrates the suprafibrillar assembly capacity of oligomers and controlled fluid reduction by confined compression, supports the rational and scalable design of a broad range of collagen-fibril materials and cell-encapsulated tissue constructs for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Fibrils of different collagen types containing immobilised proteoglycans (PGs) as coatings: characterisation and influence on osteoblast behaviour.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T; Hempel, U; Mietrach, C; Heinemann, S; Scharnweber, D; Worch, H

    2007-11-01

    Collagen, the main organic component of bone, is used as a coating on titanium implants and as a scaffold material in bone tissue engineering. Surface modifications of titanium which promote osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and synthesis of collagen by osteoblasts are desirable. One biomimetic approach is the coating of titanium with collagen in fibrillar form. Other organic components of bone may be bound to fibrils and exert additional effects. In this study, the collagen types I-III were compared regarding their ability to bind the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan, which are found in bone. More collagen was bound to collagen II fibrils than to those of types I and III. Therefore, titanium surfaces were coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the effect of the proteoglycans on human primary osteoblast behaviour. In addition, the growth factor TGF-beta1 was adsorbed onto surfaces coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the influence of decorin and biglycan on the effect of TGF-beta1 on osteoblasts. Fibril-bound biglycan and decorin influence primary osteoblast behaviour by themselves. The presence of substrate-bound biglycan or decorin influences the effect of TGF-beta1. These results may be important when designing collagen-based coatings or scaffolds for tissue engineering, including those loaded with growth factors.

  20. Stress shielding of patellar tendon: effect on small-diameter collagen fibrils in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Majima, Tokifumi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tsuchida, Takamasa; Tanaka, Kunio; Miyakawa, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akio; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of stress shielding on the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon using 40 mature female Japanese white rabbits. The patellar tendon was completely released from stress by drawing the patella toward the tibial tubercle with a stainless steel wire installed between them. Microstructurally, stress shielding for 3 and 6 weeks increased the number of cells approximately fivefold, to that of the control tendon. Collagen bundles were less well oriented in the stress-shielded tendon than in the control. Ultrastructurally, small collagen fibrils with a diameter of less than 90 nm increased in the stress-shielded tendon. The median collagen fibril diameter in 6-week stress-shielded tendon was significantly smaller ( P < 0.05) than in the control tendon (58.8% of control). The ratio of the total area of collagen fibrils to the whole visualized area in the stress-shielded patellar tendon was significantly smaller at 3 and 6 weeks than that in the control. This study demonstrated that complete stress shielding significantly affects the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon

  1. Influence of the mineral staggering on the elastic properties of the mineralized collagen fibril in lamellar bone.

    PubMed

    Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a three-dimensional finite element model of the staggered distribution of the mineral within the mineralized collagen fibril has been developed to characterize the lamellar bone elastic behavior at the sub-micro length scale. Minerals have been assumed to be embedded in a collagen matrix, and different degrees of mineralization have been considered allowing the growth of platelet-shaped minerals both in the axial and the transverse directions of the fibril, through the variation of the lateral space between platelets. We provide numerical values and trends for all the elastic constants of the mineralized collagen fibril as a function of the volume fraction of mineral. In our results, we verify the high influence of the mineral overlapping on the mechanical response of the fibril and we highlight that the lateral distance between crystals is relevant to the mechanical behavior of the fibril and not only the mineral overlapping in the axial direction.

  2. The Relation Between Collagen Fibril Kinematics and Mechanical Properties in the Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet

    SciTech Connect

    Liao,J.; Yang, L.; Grashow, J.; Sacks, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain ({epsilon}{sub D}) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, {epsilon}{sub D} increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using {epsilon}{sub D}, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5{+-}25.5 MPa, which was {approx}27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58{+-}1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and D remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min {epsilon}{sub D} was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen

  3. A computational remodeling approach to predict the physiological architecture of the collagen fibril network in corneo-scleral shells.

    PubMed

    Grytz, Rafael; Meschke, Günther

    2010-04-01

    Organized collagen fibrils form complex networks that introduce strong anisotropic and highly nonlinear attributes into the constitutive response of human eye tissues. Physiological adaptation of the collagen network and the mechanical condition within biological tissues are complex and mutually dependent phenomena. In this contribution, a computational model is presented to investigate the interaction between the collagen fibril architecture and mechanical loading conditions in the corneo-scleral shell. The biomechanical properties of eye tissues are derived from the single crimped fibril at the micro-scale via the collagen network of distributed fibrils at the meso-scale to the incompressible and anisotropic soft tissue at the macro-scale. Biomechanically induced remodeling of the collagen network is captured on the meso-scale by allowing for a continuous re-orientation of preferred fibril orientations and a continuous adaptation of the fibril dispersion. The presented approach is applied to a numerical human eye model considering the cornea and sclera. The predicted fibril morphology correlates well with experimental observations from X-ray scattering data.

  4. Collagen fibril diameter distribution does not reflect changes in the mechanical properties of in vitro stress-deprived tendons.

    PubMed

    Lavagnino, Michael; Arnoczky, S P Steven P; Frank, Katherine; Tian, Tao

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if an association exists between the tensile properties and the collagen fibril diameter distribution in in vitro stress-deprived rat tail tendons. Rat tail tendons were paired into two groups of 21 day stress-deprived and 0 time controls and compared using transmission electron microscopy (n = 6) to measure collagen fibril diameter distribution and density, and mechanical testing (n =6) to determine ultimate stress and tensile modulus. There was a statistically significant decrease in both ultimate tensile strength (control: 17.95+/-3.99 MPa, stress-deprived: 6.79+/-3.91 MPa) and tensile modulus (control: 312.8+/-89.5 MPa, stress-deprived: 176.0+/-52.7 MPa) in the in vitro stress-deprived tendons compared to controls. However, there was no significant difference between control and stress-deprived tendons in the number of fibrils per tendon counted, mean fibril diameter, mean fibril density, or fibril size distribution. The results of this study demonstrate that the decrease in mechanical properties observed in in vitro stress-deprived rat tail tendons is not correlated with the collagen fibril diameter distribution and, therefore, the collagen fibril diameter distribution does not, by itself, dictate the decrease in mechanical properties observed in in vitro stress-deprived rat tail tendons.

  5. Reduced anchoring fibril formation and collagen VII immunoreactivity in feline dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Dunston, S M; Marinkovich, M P

    1999-11-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa was diagnosed in a cat with juvenile-onset epithelial sloughing of the oral mucosa, footpads, and haired skin. Dermoepidermal separation occurred in the absence of inflammation or cytolysis of basal epidermal cells. Collagen IV-specific immunostaining corroborated the fact that clefting took place below the epidermal basement membrane. Ultrastructural examination revealed that the proband's anchoring fibrils exhibited a filamentous morphology and were decreased in number compared with those in a normal cat. Finally, the attenuated immunoreactivity for collagen VII in our patient led us to suspect that its encoding gene, COL7A1, could be mutated in this case of feline dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

  6. Rapid Patterning of 1-D Collagenous Topography as an ECM Protein Fibril Platform for Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Niannan; Li, Xia; Bertulli, Cristina; Li, Zhaoying; Patharagulpong, Atipat; Sadok, Amine; Huang, Yan Yan Shery

    2014-01-01

    Cellular behavior is strongly influenced by the architecture and pattern of its interfacing extracellular matrix (ECM). For an artificial culture system which could eventually benefit the translation of scientific findings into therapeutic development, the system should capture the key characteristics of a physiological microenvironment. At the same time, it should also enable standardized, high throughput data acquisition. Since an ECM is composed of different fibrous proteins, studying cellular interaction with individual fibrils will be of physiological relevance. In this study, we employ near-field electrospinning to create ordered patterns of collagenous fibrils of gelatin, based on an acetic acid and ethyl acetate aqueous co-solvent system. Tunable conformations of micro-fibrils were directly deposited onto soft polymeric substrates in a single step. We observe that global topographical features of straight lines, beads-on-strings, and curls are dictated by solution conductivity; whereas the finer details such as the fiber cross-sectional profile are tuned by solution viscosity. Using these fibril constructs as cellular assays, we study EA.hy926 endothelial cells' response to ROCK inhibition, because of ROCK's key role in the regulation of cell shape. The fibril array was shown to modulate the cellular morphology towards a pre-capillary cord-like phenotype, which was otherwise not observed on a flat 2-D substrate. Further facilitated by quantitative analysis of morphological parameters, the fibril platform also provides better dissection in the cells' response to a H1152 ROCK inhibitor. In conclusion, the near-field electrospun fibril constructs provide a more physiologically-relevant platform compared to a featureless 2-D surface, and simultaneously permit statistical single-cell image cytometry using conventional microscopy systems. The patterning approach described here is also expected to form the basics for depositing other protein fibrils, seen among

  7. Effect of ultrasonication on the fibril-formation and gel properties of collagen from grass carp skin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Deng, Mingxia; Wang, Zhongwen; Zhang, Juntao; Wang, Haiyin; Zhang, Hanjun

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the fibril-formation process of collagen in vitro to fabricate novel biomaterials is a new area in the field of collagen research. This study aimed to determine the effect of ultrasonication on collagen fibril formation and the properties of the resulting collagen gels. Native collagen, extracted from the skin of grass carp, self-assembled under ultrasonic conditions (at different ultrasonic power and duration). The self-assembly kinetics, fibrillar morphology, and physical and cell growth-promoting properties of the collagen gels were analyzed and compared. The results showed that the self-assembly rate of collagen was increased by ultrasonication at the nucleation stage. The resulting fibrils exhibited smaller diameters and D-periodicity lengths than that of the untreated collagen samples (p<0.05). The viscoelasticity and textural properties of collagen gels also changed after ultrasonication at the nucleation stage. Texture profile analysis and cell proliferation assays showed that ultrasonication produced softer collagen gel colloids, which were more suitable for cell proliferation than the untreated collagen gels.

  8. Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancón, José E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement.

  9. Gel-spinning of mimetic collagen and collagen/nano-carbon fibers: Understanding multi-scale influences on molecular ordering and fibril alignment.

    PubMed

    Green, Emily C; Zhang, Yiying; Li, Heng; Minus, Marilyn L

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic gel-spun collagen and collagen/nano-carbon fibers were found to exhibit structural mimicry comparable to native tendons. X-ray scattering and microscopy analyses are used to characterize the molecular and fibrillar alignment in the synthetic fibers, where D-banding is observed throughout the spun fibers - consistent with native collagen. For the composite collagen/nano-carbon fibers, the morphology and dispersion quality of the nano-carbons within was found to play a significant role in influencing collagen molecular ordering and fibril alignment. Fibrillar and molecular alignment was also better preserved during elongation of the composites as compared to the control collagen fibers. These results show the structural influence of a rigid inclusion on the collagen fibril structure. Both dry- and wet-state tensile testing were performed on the collagen fibers, and these results show behavior comparable to the native materials. Dry-state tests also reveal interfacial interaction between the nano-fillers and the collagen fibrils through theoretical analysis. Wet-state tensile testing indicates the structure-property behavior of the mimetic hierarchical structure within the synthetic fibers.

  10. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Bruckner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage. PMID:27780246

  11. Tectorins crosslink type II collagen fibrils and connect the tectorial membrane to the spiral limbus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo R; Salles, Felipe T; Grati, M'hamed; Manor, Uri; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-05-01

    All inner ear organs possess extracellular matrix appendices over the sensory epithelia that are crucial for their proper function. The tectorial membrane (TM) is a gelatinous acellular membrane located above the hearing sensory epithelium and is composed mostly of type II collagen, and α and β tectorins. TM molecules self-assemble in the endolymph fluid environment, interacting medially with the spiral limbus and distally with the outer hair cell stereocilia. Here, we used immunogold labeling in freeze-substituted mouse cochleae to assess the fine localization of both tectorins in distinct TM regions. We observed that the TM adheres to the spiral limbus through a dense thin matrix enriched in α- and β-tectorin, both likely bound to the membranes of interdental cells. Freeze-etching images revealed that type II collagen fibrils were crosslinked by short thin filaments (4±1.5nm, width), resembling another collagen type protein, or chains of globular elements (15±3.2nm, diameter). Gold-particles for both tectorins also localized adjacent to the type II collagen fibrils, suggesting that these globules might be composed essentially of α- and β-tectorins. Finally, the presence of gold-particles at the TM lower side suggests that the outer hair cell stereocilia membrane has a molecular partner to tectorins, probably stereocilin, allowing the physical connection between the TM and the organ of Corti.

  12. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength. PMID:25153614

  13. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength.

  14. Fibrillar, fibril-associated and basement membrane collagens of the arterial wall: architecture, elasticity and remodeling under stress.

    PubMed

    Osidak, M S; Osidak, E O; Akhmanova, M A; Domogatsky, S P; Domogatskaya, A S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a human artery to pass through 150 million liters of blood sustaining 2 billion pulsations of blood pressure with minor deterioration depends on unique construction of the arterial wall. Viscoelastic properties of this construction enable to re-seal the occuring damages apparently without direct immediate participance of the constituent cells. Collagen structures are considered to be the elements that determine the mechanoelastic properties of the wall in parallel with elastin responsible for elasticity and resilience. Collagen scaffold architecture is the function-dependent dynamic arrangement of a dozen different collagen types composing three distinct interacting forms inside the extracellular matrix of the wall. Tightly packed molecules of collagen types I, III, V provide high tensile strength along collagen fibrils but toughness of the collagen scaffold as a whole depends on molecular bonds between distinct fibrils. Apart of other macromolecules in the extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen-specific interlinks involve microfilaments of collagen type VI, meshwork-organized collagen type VIII, and FACIT collagen type XIV. Basement membrane collagen types IV, XV, XVIII and cell-associated collagen XIII enable transmission of mechanical signals between cells and whole artery matrix. Collagen scaffold undergoes continuous remodeling by decomposition promoted with MMPs and reconstitution from newly produced collagen molecules. Pulsatile stress-strain load modulates both collagen synthesis and MMP-dependent collagen degradation. In this way the ECM structure becomes adoptive to mechanical challenges. The mechanoelastic properties of the arterial wall are changed in atherosclerosis concomitantly with collagen turnover both type-specific and dependent on the structure. Improving the feedback could be another approach to restore sufficient blood circulation.

  15. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated matrix

  16. Effect of cyclic loading on the nanoscale deformation of hydroxyapatite and collagen fibrils in bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anjali; Stock, Stuart R; Almer, Jonathan D; Dunand, David C

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic compressive loading tests were carried out on bovine femoral bones at body temperature (37 °C), with varying mean stresses (-55 to -80 MPa) and loading frequencies (0.5-5 Hz). At various times, the cyclic loading was interrupted to carry out high-energy X-ray scattering measurements of the internal strains developing in the hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and the collagen fibrils. The residual strains upon unloading were always tensile in the HAP and compressive in the fibrils, and each increases in magnitude with loading cycles, which can be explained from damage at the HAP–collagen interface and accumulation of plastic deformation within the collagen phase. The samples tested at a higher mean stress and stress amplitude, and at lower loading frequencies exhibit greater plastic deformation and damage accumulation, which is attributed to greater contribution of creep. Synchrotron microcomputed tomography of some of the specimens showed that cracks are produced during cyclic loading and that they mostly occur concentric with Haversian canals.

  17. Molecular and intermolecular effects in collagen fibril mechanics: a multiscale analytical model compared with atomistic and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Marino, Michele

    2016-02-01

    Both atomistic and experimental studies reveal the dependence of collagen fibril mechanics on biochemical and biophysical features such as, for instance, cross-link density, water content and protein sequence. In order to move toward a multiscale structural description of biological tissues, a novel analytical model for collagen fibril mechanics is herein presented. The model is based on a multiscale approach that incorporates and couples: thermal fluctuations in collagen molecules; the uncoiling of collagen triple helix; the stretching of molecular backbone; the straightening of the telopeptide in which covalent cross-links form; slip-pulse mechanisms due to the rupture of intermolecular weak bonds; molecular interstrand delamination due to the rupture of intramolecular weak bonds; the rupture of covalent bonds within molecular strands. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with available atomistic results and experimental data, highlighting the importance of cross-link density in tuning collagen fibril mechanics. The typical three-region shape and hysteresis behavior of fibril constitutive response, as well as the transition from a yielding-like to a brittle-like behavior, are recovered with a special insight on the underlying nanoscale mechanisms. The model is based on parameters with a clear biophysical and biochemical meaning, resulting in a promising tool for analyzing the effect of pathological or pharmacological-induced histochemical alterations on the functional mechanical response of collagenous tissues.

  18. Pseudo-hyperelastic model of tendon hysteresis from adaptive recruitment of collagen type I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Dario, Paolo; Micera, Silvestro

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the functional relationship between the viscoelasticity and the morphology of soft collagenous tissues is fundamental for many applications in bioengineering science. This work presents a pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive theory aiming at describing the time-dependant hysteretic response of tendons subjected to uniaxial tensile loads. A macroscopic tendon is modeled as a composite homogeneous tissue with the anisotropic reinforcement of collagen type I fibrils. The tissue microstructure is considered as an adaptive network of fibrillar units connected in temporary junctions. The processes of breakage and reformation of active fibrils are thermally activated, and are occurring at random times. An internal softening variable and a dissipation energy function account for the adaptive arrangement of the fibrillar network in the pseudo-hyperelastic model. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests have been performed in vitro on porcine flexor digital tendons. The theoretical predictions fit accurately the experimental stress-strain data both for the loading and the unloading processes. The hysteresis behavior reflects the improvement in the efficiency and performance of the motion of the muscle-tendon unit at high strain rates. The results of the model demonstrate the microstructural importance of proteoglycans in determining the functional viscoelastic adaptability of the macroscopic tendon.

  19. The Impact of Collagen Fibril Polarity on Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Charles-André; Bancelin, Stéphane; Van der Kolk, Jarno; Popov, Konstantin; Rivard, Maxime; Légaré, Katherine; Martel, Gabrielle; Richard, Hélène; Brown, Cameron; Laverty, Sheila; Ramunno, Lora; Légaré, François

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the implementation of interferometric second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy with femtosecond pulses. As a proof of concept, we imaged the phase distribution of SHG signal from the complex collagen architecture of juvenile equine growth cartilage. The results are analyzed in respect to numerical simulations to extract the relative orientation of collagen fibrils within the tissue. Our results reveal large domains of constant phase together with regions of quasi-random phase, which are correlated to respectively high- and low-intensity regions in the standard SHG images. A comparison with polarization-resolved SHG highlights the crucial role of relative fibril polarity in determining the SHG signal intensity. Indeed, it appears that even a well-organized noncentrosymmetric structure emits low SHG signal intensity if it has no predominant local polarity. This work illustrates how the complex architecture of noncentrosymmetric scatterers at the nanoscale governs the coherent building of SHG signal within the focal volume and is a key advance toward a complete understanding of the structural origin of SHG signals from tissues. PMID:26682809

  20. Development of human corneal epithelium on organized fibrillated transparent collagen matrices synthesized at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Tidu, Aurélien; Ghoubay-Benallaoua, Djida; Lynch, Barbara; Haye, Bernard; Illoul, Corinne; Allain, Jean-Marc; Borderie, Vincent M; Mosser, Gervaise

    2015-08-01

    Several diseases can lead to opacification of cornea requiring transplantation of donor tissue to restore vision. In this context, transparent collagen I fibrillated matrices have been synthesized at 15, 30, 60 and 90 mg/mL. The matrices were evaluated for fibril organizations, transparency, mechanical properties and ability to support corneal epithelial cell culture. The best results were obtained with 90 mg/mL scaffolds. At this concentration, the fibril organization presented some similarities to that found in corneal stroma. Matrices had a mean Young's modulus of 570 kPa and acellular scaffolds had a transparency of 87% in the 380-780 nm wavelength range. Human corneal epithelial cells successfully colonized the surface of the scaffolds and generated an epithelium with characteristics of corneal epithelial cells (i.e. expression of cytokeratin 3 and presence of desmosomes) and maintenance of stemness during culture (i.e. expression of ΔNp63α and formation of holoclones in colony formation assay). Presence of cultured epithelium on the matrices was associated with increased transparency (89%).

  1. Molecular properties and fibril ultrastructure of types II and XI collagens in cartilage of mice expressing exclusively the α1(IIA) collagen isoform.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, Audrey; Traeger, Geoffrey; Hansen, Uwe; Weis, Mary Ann; Ravindran, Soumya; Wirthlin, Louisa; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2014-02-01

    Until now, no biological tools have been available to determine if a cross-linked collagen fibrillar network derived entirely from type IIA procollagen isoforms, can form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage. Recently, homozygous knock-in transgenic mice (Col2a1(+ex2), ki/ki) were generated that exclusively express the IIA procollagen isoform during post-natal development while type IIB procollagen, normally present in the ECM of wild type mice, is absent. The difference between these Col2a1 isoforms is the inclusion (IIA) or exclusion (IIB) of exon 2 that is alternatively spliced in a developmentally regulated manner. Specifically, chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA mRNA isoforms while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB mRNA isoforms. Recent characterization of the Col2a1(+ex2) mice has surprisingly shown that disruption of alternative splicing does not affect overt cartilage formation. In the present study, biochemical analyses showed that type IIA collagen extracted from ki/ki mouse rib cartilage can form homopolymers that are stabilized predominantly by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) cross-links at levels that differed from wild type rib cartilage. The findings indicate that mature type II collagen derived exclusively from type IIA procollagen molecules can form hetero-fibrils with type XI collagen and contribute to cartilage structure and function. Heteropolymers with type XI collagen also formed. Electron microscopy revealed mainly thin type IIA collagen fibrils in ki/ki mouse rib cartilage. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry of purified type XI collagen revealed a heterotrimeric molecular composition of α1(XI)α2(XI)α1(IIA) chains where the α1(IIA) chain is the IIA form of the α3(XI) chain. Since the N-propeptide of type XI collagen regulates type II collagen fibril diameter in cartilage, the retention of the exon 2-encoded IIA globular domain would structurally alter the N-propeptide of type XI collagen

  2. Surface located procollagen N-propeptides on dermatosparactic collagen fibrils are not cleaved by procollagen N-proteinase and do not inhibit binding of decorin to the fibril surface.

    PubMed

    Watson, R B; Holmes, D F; Graham, H K; Nusgens, B V; Kadler, K E

    1998-04-24

    Dermatosparaxis is a recessive disorder of animals (including man) which is caused by mutations in the gene for the enzyme procollagen N-proteinase and is characterised by extreme skin fragility. Partial loss of enzyme activity results in accumulation of pNcollagen (collagen with N-propeptides) and abnormal collagen fibrils in the fragile skin. How the N-propeptides persist in the tissue and how abnormal fibril morphology results in fragile skin is poorly understood. Using biochemical and quantitative mass mapping electron microscopy we showed that the collagen fibrils in the skin of a dermatosparactic calf contained 57% type I pNcollagen and 43% type I collagen and the fibrils were irregularly arranged in bundles and hieroglyphic in cross-section. Image analysis of the fibril cross-sections suggested that the deviation from circularity of dermatosparactic fibrils was caused by N-propeptides of pNcollagen being located at the fibril surface. Comparison of experimental and theoretical axial mass distributions of the fibrils showed that the N-propeptides were located to the overlap zone of the fibril D-period (where D=67 nm, the characteristic axial periodicity of collagen fibrils). Treatment of the dermatosparactic fibrils with N-proteinase did not remove the N-propeptides from the fibrils, although the N-propeptides were efficiently removed by trypsin and chymotrypsin. However, the N-propeptides were efficiently cleaved by the N-proteinase when the pNcollagen molecules were extracted from the fibrils. These results are consistent with close packing of N-propeptides at the fibril surface which prevented cleavage by the N-proteinase. Long-range axial mass determination along the fibril length showed gross non-uniformity with multiple mass bulges. Of note is the skin fragility in dermatosparaxis, and also the appearance of mass bulges along the fibril long axis symptomatic of the fragile skin of mice which lack decorin. Western blot analysis showed that the

  3. The interplay between surface micro-topography and -mechanics of type I collagen fibrils in air and aqueous media: An atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Bar, G.; Cantow, H.-J.

    2001-09-01

    Calf skin type I collagen fibrils were regenerated from acidic solution and imaged with contact mode atomic force microscopy in air, water, and buffer solution. When imaged in air at a contact force of 20-150 nN, collagen fibrils exhibited a distinct transverse banding pattern with a period of 65 nm, consisting of high ridges and shallow grooves. The force dependence of the images suggests that such banding pattern is attributed to the transverse contraction of the fibril upon dehydration during sample preparation, which reflects the tangential mass density across the fibril. Imaging in water and phosphate buffer solution at a contact force of 15-80 nN revealed hydrated collagen fibrils with smooth surfaces. The rigidity of the collagen fibrils decreased considerably upon hydration. Scanning the cantilever tip in an aqueous medium at a contact force of 90-280 nN enabled us to probe subunit arrangement in the bulk region of the collagen fibril. The results indicate that the molecular assembly in the hydrated fibril is akin to that in the intact form. The image resolution was improved by stabilizing the collagen molecules through crosslinking with glutaraldehyde, which served to resolve microfibril-like structure on the fibril surface.

  4. The self-assembly of a mini-fibril with axial periodicity from a designed collagen-mimetic triple helix.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parminder Jeet; Strawn, Rebecca; Bai, Hanying; Xu, Ke; Ordas, Gabriel; Matsui, Hiroshi; Xu, Yujia

    2015-04-03

    In this work we describe the self-assembly of a collagen-like periodic mini-fibril from a recombinant triple helix. The triple helix, designated Col108, is expressed in Escherichia coli using an artificial gene and consists of a 378-residue triple helix domain organized into three pseudo-repeating sequence units. The peptide forms a stable triple helix with a melting temperature of 41 °C. Upon increases of pH and temperature, Col108 self-assembles in solution into smooth mini-fibrils with the cross-striated banding pattern typical of fibrillar collagens. The banding pattern is characterized by an axially repeating feature of ∼35 nm as observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Both the negatively stained and the positively stained transmission electron microscopy patterns of the Col108 mini-fibrils are consistent with a staggered arrangement of triple helices having a staggering value of 123 residues, a value closely connected to the size of one repeat sequence unit. A mechanism is proposed for the mini-fibril formation of Col108 in which the axial periodicity is instigated by the built-in sequence periodicity and stabilized by the optimized interactions between the triple helices in a 1-unit staggered arrangement. Lacking hydroxyproline residues and telopeptides, two factors implicated in the fibrillogenesis of native collagen, the Col108 mini-fibrils demonstrate that sequence features of the triple helical domain alone are sufficient to "code" for axially repeating periodicity of fibrils. To our knowledge, Col108 is the first designed triple helix to self-assemble into periodic fibrils and offers a unique opportunity to unravel the specific molecular interactions of collagen fibrillogenesis.

  5. Fibril reinforced poroelastic model predicts specifically mechanical behavior of normal, proteoglycan depleted and collagen degraded articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Rami K; Laasanen, Mikko S; Töyräs, Juha; Lappalainen, Reijo; Helminen, Heikki J; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2003-09-01

    Degradation of collagen network and proteoglycan (PG) macromolecules are signs of articular cartilage degeneration. These changes impair cartilage mechanical function. Effects of collagen degradation and PG depletion on the time-dependent mechanical behavior of cartilage are different. In this study, numerical analyses, which take the compression-tension nonlinearity of the tissue into account, were carried out using a fibril reinforced poroelastic finite element model. The study aimed at improving our understanding of the stress-relaxation behavior of normal and degenerated cartilage in unconfined compression. PG and collagen degradations were simulated by decreasing the Young's modulus of the drained porous (nonfibrillar) matrix and the fibril network, respectively. Numerical analyses were compared to results from experimental tests with chondroitinase ABC (PG depletion) or collagenase (collagen degradation) digested samples. Fibril reinforced poroelastic model predicted the experimental behavior of cartilage after chondroitinase ABC digestion by a major decrease of the drained porous matrix modulus (-64+/-28%) and a minor decrease of the fibril network modulus (-11+/-9%). After collagenase digestion, in contrast, the numerical analyses predicted the experimental behavior of cartilage by a major decrease of the fibril network modulus (-69+/-5%) and a decrease of the drained porous matrix modulus (-44+/-18%). The reduction of the drained porous matrix modulus after collagenase digestion was consistent with the microscopically observed secondary PG loss from the tissue. The present results indicate that the fibril reinforced poroelastic model is able to predict specifically characteristic alterations in the stress-relaxation behavior of cartilage after enzymatic modifications of the tissue. We conclude that the compression-tension nonlinearity of the tissue is needed to capture realistically the mechanical behavior of normal and degenerated articular cartilage.

  6. The collagen fibril architecture in the lamina cribrosa and peripapillary sclera predicted by a computational remodeling approach.

    PubMed

    Grytz, Rafael; Meschke, Günther; Jonas, Jost B

    2011-06-01

    The biomechanics of the optic nerve head is assumed to play an important role in ganglion cell loss in glaucoma. Organized collagen fibrils form complex networks that introduce strong anisotropic and nonlinear attributes into the constitutive response of the peripapillary sclera (PPS) and lamina cribrosa (LC) dominating the biomechanics of the optic nerve head. The recently presented computational remodeling approach (Grytz and Meschke in Biomech Model Mechanobiol 9:225-235, 2010) was used to predict the micro-architecture in the LC and PPS, and to investigate its impact on intraocular pressure-related deformations. The mechanical properties of the LC and PPS were derived from a microstructure-oriented constitutive model that included the stretch-dependent stiffening and the statistically distributed orientations of the collagen fibrils. Biomechanically induced adaptation of the local micro-architecture was captured by allowing collagen fibrils to be reoriented in response to the intraocular pressure-related loading conditions. In agreement with experimental observations, the remodeling algorithm predicted the existence of an annulus of fibrils around the scleral canal in the PPS, and a predominant radial orientation of fibrils in the periphery of the LC. The peripapillary annulus significantly reduced the intraocular pressure-related expansion of the scleral canal and shielded the LC from high tensile stresses. The radial oriented fibrils in the LC periphery reinforced the LC against transversal shear stresses and reduced LC bending deformations. The numerical approach presents a novel and reasonable biomechanical explanation of the spatial orientation of fibrillar collagen in the optic nerve head.

  7. The binding capacity of α1β1-, α2β1- and α10β1-integrins depends on non-collagenous surface macromolecules rather than the collagens in cartilage fibrils.

    PubMed

    Woltersdorf, Christian; Bonk, Melanie; Leitinger, Birgit; Huhtala, Mikko; Käpylä, Jarmo; Heino, Jyrki; Gil Girol, Christian; Niland, Stephan; Eble, Johannes A; Bruckner, Peter; Dreier, Rita; Hansen, Uwe

    2017-02-10

    Interactions of cells with supramolecular aggregates of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mediated, in part, by cell surface receptors of the integrin family. These are important molecular components of cell surface-suprastructures regulating cellular activities in general. A subfamily of β1-integrins with von Willebrand-factor A-like domains (I-domains) in their α-chains can bind to collagen molecules and, therefore, are considered as important cellular mechano-receptors. Here we show that chondrocytes strongly bind to cartilage collagens in the form of individual triple helical molecules but very weakly to fibrils formed by the same molecules. We also find that chondrocyte integrins α1β1-, α2β1- and α10β1-integrins and their I-domains have the same characteristics. Nevertheless we find integrin binding to mechanically generated cartilage fibril fragments, which also comprise peripheral non-collagenous material. We conclude that cell adhesion results from binding of integrin-containing adhesion suprastructures to the non-collagenous fibril periphery but not to the collagenous fibril cores. The biological importance of the well-investigated recognition of collagen molecules by integrins is unknown. Possible scenarios may include fibrillogenesis, fibril degradation and/or phagocytosis, recruitment of cells to remodeling sites, or molecular signaling across cytoplasmic membranes. In these circumstances, collagen molecules may lack a fibrillar organization. However, other processes requiring robust biomechanical functions, such as fibril organization in tissues, cell division, adhesion, or migration, do not involve direct integrin-collagen interactions.

  8. Thrombogenic collagen-mimetic peptides: Self-assembly of triple helix-based fibrils driven by hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Mabel A; Kinney, William A; Chen, Cailin; Vinter, Jeremy G; Almond, Harold R; Balss, Karin M; Maryanoff, Cynthia A; Schmidt, Ute; Breslav, Michael; Mahan, Andrew; Lacy, Eilyn; Maryanoff, Bruce E

    2008-06-24

    Collagens are integral structural proteins in animal tissues and play key functional roles in cellular modulation. We sought to discover collagen model peptides (CMPs) that would form triple helices and self-assemble into supramolecular fibrils exhibiting collagen-like biological activity without preorganizing the peptide chains by covalent linkages. This challenging objective was accomplished by placing aromatic groups on the ends of a representative 30-mer CMP, (GPO)(10), as with l-phenylalanine and l-pentafluorophenylalanine in 32-mer 1a. Computational studies on homologous 29-mers 1a'-d' (one less GPO), as pairs of triple helices interacting head-to-tail, yielded stabilization energies in the order 1a' > 1b' > 1c' > 1d', supporting the hypothesis that hydrophobic aromatic groups can drive CMP self-assembly. Peptides 1a-d were studied comparatively relative to structural properties and ability to stimulate human platelets. Although each 32-mer formed stable triple helices (CD) spectroscopy, only 1a and 1b self-assembled into micrometer-scale fibrils. Light microscopy images for 1a depicted long collagen-like fibrils, whereas images for 1d did not. Atomic force microscopy topographical images indicated that 1a and 1b self-organize into microfibrillar species, whereas 1c and 1d do not. Peptides 1a and 1b induced the aggregation of human blood platelets with a potency similar to type I collagen, whereas 1c was much less effective, and 1d was inactive (EC(50) potency: 1a/1b > 1c > 1d). Thus, 1a and 1b spontaneously self-assemble into thrombogenic collagen-mimetic materials because of hydrophobic aromatic interactions provided by the special end-groups. These findings have important implications for the design of biofunctional CMPs.

  9. Collagen fibril orientation in ovine and bovine leather affects strength: a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) study.

    PubMed

    Basil-Jones, Melissa M; Edmonds, Richard L; Cooper, Sue M; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2011-09-28

    There is a large difference in strength between ovine and bovine leather. The structure and arrangement of fibrous collagen in leather and the relationship between collagen structure and leather strength has until now been poorly understood. Synchrotron based SAXS is used to characterize the fibrous collagen structure in a series of ovine and bovine leathers and to relate it to tear strength. SAXS gives quantitative information on the amount of fibrous collagen, the orientation (direction and spread) of the collagen microfibrils, and the d-spacing of the collagen. The amount of collagen varies through the thickness of the leather from the grain to the corium, with a greater concentration of crystalline collagen measured toward the corium side. The orientation index (OI) is correlated strongly with strength in ovine leather and between ovine and bovine leathers. Stronger leather has the fibrils arranged mostly parallel to the plane of the leather surface (high OI), while weaker leather has more out-of-plane fibrils (low OI). With the measurement taken parallel to the animal's backbone, weak (19.9 N/mm) ovine leather has an OI of 0.422 (0.033), stronger (39.5 N/mm) ovine leather has an OI of 0.452 (0.033), and bovine leather with a strength of (61.5 N/mm) has an OI of 0.493 (0.016). The d-spacing profile through leather thickness also varies according to leather strength, with little variation being detected in weak ovine leather (average=64.3 (0.5) nm), but with strong ovine leather and bovine leather (which is even stronger) exhibiting a dip in d-spacing (from 64.5 nm at the edges dropping to 62 nm in the center). This work provides a clear understanding of a nanostructural characteristic of ovine and bovine leather that leads to differences in strength.

  10. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale.

  11. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Saud A.; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I. A.; Khan, Adnan A.; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark. PMID:26167294

  12. Evidence against proteoglycan mediated collagen fibril load transmission and dynamic viscoelasticity in tendon.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G

    2009-10-01

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate side-chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans have been increasingly posited to act as molecular cross links between adjacent collagen fibrils and to directly contribute to tendon elasticity. GAGs have also been implicated in tendon viscoelasticity, supposedly affecting frictional loss during elongation or fluid flow through the extra cellular matrix. The current study sought to systematically test these theories of tendon structure-function by investigating the mechanical repercussions of enzymatic depletion of GAG complexes by chondroitinase ABC in a reproducible tendon structure-function model (rat tail tendon fascicles). The extent of GAG removal (at least 93%) was verified by relevant spectrophotometric assays and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic viscoelastic tensile tests on GAG depleted rat tail tendon fascicle were not mechanically different from controls in storage modulus (elastic behavior) over a wide range of strain-rates (0.05, 0.5, and 5% change in length per second) in either the linear or nonlinear regions of the material curve. Loss modulus (viscoelastic behavior) was only affected in the nonlinear region at the highest strain-rate, and even this effect was marginal (19% increased loss modulus, p=0.035). Thus glycosaminoglycan chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans do not appear to mediate dynamic elastic behavior nor do they appear to regulate the dynamic viscoelastic properties in rat tail tendon fascicles.

  13. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Saud A; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I A; Khan, Adnan A; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark.

  14. Characterization via atomic force microscopy of discrete plasticity in collagen fibrils from mechanically overloaded tendons: Nano-scale structural changes mimic rope failure.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Kreplak, Laurent; Lee, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    Tendons exposed to tensile overload show a structural alteration at the fibril scale termed discrete plasticity. Serial kinks appear along individual collagen fibrils that are susceptible to enzymatic digestion and are thermally unstable. Using atomic force microscopy we mapped the topography and mechanical properties in dehydrated and hydrated states of 25 control fibrils and 25 fibrils displaying periodic kinks, extracted from overloaded bovine tail tendons. Using the measured modulus of the hydrated fibrils as a probe of molecular density, we observed a non-linear negative correlation between molecular density and kink density of individual fibrils. This is accompanied by an increase in water uptake with kink density and a doubling of the coefficient of variation of the modulus between kinked, and control fibrils. The mechanical property maps of kinked collagen fibrils show radial heterogeneity that can be modeled as a high-density core surrounded by a low-density shell. The core of the fibril contains the kink structures characteristic of discrete plasticity; separated by inter-kink regions, which often retain the D-banding structure. We propose that the shell and kink structures mimic characteristic damage motifs observed in laid rope strands.

  15. Enhanced cell colonization of collagen scaffold by ultraviolet/ozone surface processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaozong; McKenna, Fiona-Mairead; Liang, He; Johnstone, Alan; Abel, Eric W

    2010-12-01

    Both physical and chemical crosslinking methods have been shown to be effective in improving the biological stability and mechanical properties of porous collagen scaffolds. However, the wetting of the collagen fibril surface by a culture medium is reduced and it is difficult for the medium to diffuse into the 3D structure of a porous collagen scaffold. This article reports a strategy for the surface processing of crosslinked collagen scaffolds by an integrated ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing technique. Ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing improved surface wettability for both the exterior and interior surfaces of the porous 3D collagen scaffold. This leads to a significant improvement in the scaffolds ability to take up water without compromising the bulk biological stability and mechanical properties. In vitro evaluation using mesenchymal stem cell demonstrated that surface processing enhanced cell colonization of the scaffolds, cells could migrate deep into the structure of the scaffolds, and significantly higher levels of cell proliferation were achieved. In contrast, the cells were unable to migrate deep into the scaffolds, and most of the cells that survived were observed only in the top seeding layer resulting in a low level of cell activity in the unprocessed scaffolds.

  16. Softenin, a Novel Protein That Softens the Connective Tissue of Sea Cucumbers through Inhibiting Interaction between Collagen Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Takehana, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Akira; Tamori, Masaki; Motokawa, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    The dermis in the holothurian body wall is a typical catch connective tissue or mutable collagenous tissue that shows rapid changes in stiffness. Some chemical factors that change the stiffness of the tissue were found in previous studies, but the molecular mechanisms of the changes are not yet fully understood. Detection of factors that change the stiffness by working directly on the extracellular matrix was vital to clarify the mechanisms of the change. We isolated from the body wall of the sea cucumber Stichopus chloronotus a novel protein, softenin, that softened the body-wall dermis. The apparent molecular mass was 20 kDa. The N-terminal sequence of 17 amino acids had low homology to that of known proteins. We performed sequential chemical and physical dissections of the dermis and tested the effects of softenin on each dissection stage by dynamic mechanical tests. Softenin softened Triton-treated dermis whose cells had been disrupted by detergent. The Triton-treated dermis was subjected to repetitive freeze-and-thawing to make Triton-Freeze-Thaw (TFT) dermis that was softer than the Triton-treated dermis, implying that some force-bearing structure had been disrupted by this treatment. TFT dermis was stiffened by tensilin, a stiffening protein of sea cucumbers. Softenin softened the tensilin-stiffened TFT dermis while it had no effect on the TFT dermis without tensilin treatment. We isolated collagen from the dermis. When tensilin was applied to the suspending solution of collagen fibrils, they made a large compact aggregate that was dissolved by the application of softenin or by repetitive freeze-and-thawing. These results strongly suggested that softenin decreased dermal stiffness through inhibiting cross-bridge formation between collagen fibrils; the formation was augmented by tensilin and the bridges were broken by the freeze-thaw treatment. Softenin is thus the first softener of catch connective tissue shown to work on the cross-bridges between

  17. Effects of fibrillation on the wood fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced by mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Hou, Qingxi; Chen, Wei; Wu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HBKP) fibers were pretreated by PFI mill to obtain the substrates, the effects of fibrillation on HBKP fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis was studied. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was enhanced obviously by mechanical refining. The mechanical refining alterated the fibers' characteristics such as fibrillation degree, specific surface area, swelling ability, crystallinity, fiber length and fines content. All these factors correlating to the enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated through mathematical analysis. Among these factors, the fibrillation degree has the profoundest impact on the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood fibers. Consequently, the mechanical refining aiming for a high fibrillation degree was feasible to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  18. Kniest dysplasia is characterized by an apparent abnormal processing of the C-propeptide of type II cartilage collagen resulting in imperfect fibril assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, A R; Pidoux, I; Reiner, A; Rosenberg, L; Hollister, D; Murray, L; Rimoin, D

    1988-01-01

    Epiphyseal and growth plate cartilages from four cases of Kniest dysplasia have been studied. In each case collagen fibril organization appeared abnormal by electron microscopy compared with age-matched normal cartilages: fibrils were much thinner, of irregular shape and did not exhibit the characteristic banding pattern. This was associated with the absence (compared with normal cartilage) of the C-propeptide of type II collagen (chondrocalcin) from the extracellular matrix of epiphyseal cartilages, although it was detected (as in normal cartilages) in the lower hypertrophic zone of the growth plate in association with calcifying cartilage. The C-propeptide was abnormally concentrated in intracellular vacuolar sites in Kniest cartilages and its total content was reduced in all cases but not in all cartilages. Moreover, it was not a part of the procollagen molecule. In contrast, type II collagen alpha-chain size was normal, indicating the formation of a triple helix. Also type II collagen content was normal and it was present in extracellular sites and only occasionally detected intracellularly. These observations suggest that the defect in Kniest dysplasia may result from the secretion of type II procollagen lacking the C-propeptide and abnormal fibril formation, and that the C-propeptide is normally required for fibril formation. Images PMID:3276736

  19. Surface characterization of insulin protofilaments and fibril polymorphs using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS).

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker; Lednev, Igor K

    2014-01-07

    Amyloid fibrils are β-sheet-rich protein aggregates that are strongly associated with a variety of neurodegenerative maladies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Even if the secondary structure of such fibrils is well characterized, a thorough understanding of their surface organization still remains elusive. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is one of a few techniques that allow the direct characterization of the amino acid composition and the protein secondary structure of the amyloid fibril surface. Herein, we investigated the surfaces of two insulin fibril polymorphs with flat (flat) and left-twisted (twisted) morphology. It was found that the two differ substantially in both amino acid composition and protein secondary structure. For example, the amounts of Tyr, Pro, and His differ, as does the number of carboxyl groups on the respective surfaces, whereas the amounts of Phe and of positively charged amino and imino groups remain similar. In addition, the surface of protofilaments, the precursors of the mature flat and twisted fibrils, was investigated using TERS. The results show substantial differences with respect to the mature fibrils. A correlation of amino acid frequencies and protein secondary structures on the surface of protofilaments and on flat and twisted fibrils allowed us to propose a hypothetical mechanism for the propagation to specific fibril polymorphs. This knowledge can shed a light on the toxicity of amyloids and define the key factors responsible for fibril polymorphism. Finally, this work demonstrates the potential of TERS for the surface characterization of amyloid fibril polymorphs.

  20. Vertebrae length and ultra-structure measurements of collagen fibrils and mineral content in the vertebrae of lordotic gilthead seabreams (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Berillis, Panagiotis; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Boursiaki, Vaia; Karapanagiotidis, Ioannis T; Mente, Eleni

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal deformities of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) are a major factor affecting the production cost, the external morphology and survival and growth of the fish. Adult individuals of S. aurata were collected from a commercial fish farm in Greece and were divided into two groups: one with the presence of lordosis, a skeletal deformity, and one without any skeletal deformity. Fishes were X-rayed, and cervical, abdominal and caudal vertebrae lengths were measured. Vertebrae were taken from the site of the vertebral column where lordosis occurred. One part was decalcified and prepared for collagen examination with transmission electron microscopy, and the rest were incinerated, and the Ca and P contents were measured. The stoichiometries of the samples were obtained by EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy). The same procedure was followed for fish without skeletal deformities (vertebrae were taken from the middle region of the vertebral column). The decalcified vertebrae parts were examined with TEM, collagen micrographs were taken and the fibrils' periods and diameters were measured. There were no significant differences for both Ca and P or the collagen fibrils' periods between the two fish groups. The mean lengths of the cervical, abdominal and caudal vertebrae where lordosis occurred were similar to the lengths of the respective regions of the individuals without the skeletal deformity. The TEM examination showed a significantly smaller mean vertebrae collagen fibril diameter from the fishes with lordosis compared with those from the controls, revealing the significance of collagen to bone structure.

  1. Structural constraints on the evolution of the collagen fibril: convergence on a 1014-residue COL domain

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, David Anthony; Farndale, Richard William

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the fundamental component of the extracellular matrix. Its α1 gene is the direct descendant of ancestral fibrillar collagen and contains 57 exons encoding the rod-like triple-helical COL domain. We trace the evolution of the COL domain from a primordial collagen 18 residues in length to its present 1014 residues, the limit of its possible length. In order to maintain and improve the essential structural features of collagen during evolution, exons can be added or extended only in permitted, non-random increments that preserve the position of spatially sensitive cross-linkage sites. Such sites cannot be maintained unless the twist of the triple helix is close to 30 amino acids per turn. Inspection of the gene structure of other long structural proteins, fibronectin and titin, suggests that their evolution might have been subject to similar constraints. PMID:25994354

  2. A fibril-based structural constitutive theory reveals the dominant role of network characteristics on the mechanical behavior of fibroblast-compacted collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhonggang; Ishiguro, Yuki; Fujita, Kyohei; Kosawada, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takao; Sato, Daisuke; Kitajima, Tatsuo; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present a general, fibril-based structural constitutive theory which accounts for three material aspects of crosslinked filamentous materials: the single fibrillar force response, the fibrillar network model, and the effects of alterations to the fibrillar network. In the case of the single fibrillar response, we develop a formula that covers the entropic and enthalpic deformation regions, and introduce the relaxation phase to explain the observed force decay after crosslink breakage. For the filamentous network model, we characterize the constituent element of the fibrillar network in terms its end-to-end distance vector and its contour length, then decompose the vector orientation into an isotropic random term and a specific alignment, paving the way for an expanded formalism from principal deformation to general 3D deformation; and, more important, we define a critical core quantity over which macroscale mechanical characteristics can be integrated: the ratio of the initial end-to-end distance to the contour length (and its probability function). For network alterations, we quantitatively treat changes in constituent elements and relate these changes to the alteration of network characteristics. Singular in its physical rigor and clarity, this constitutive theory can reproduce and predict a wide range of nonlinear mechanical behavior in materials composed of a crosslinked filamentous network, including: stress relaxation (with dual relaxation coefficients as typically observed in soft tissues); hysteresis with decreasing maximum stress under serial cyclic loading; strain-stiffening under uniaxial tension; the rupture point of the structure as a whole; various effects of biaxial tensile loading; strain-stiffening under simple shearing; the so-called "negative normal stress" phenomenon; and enthalpic elastic behaviors of the constituent element. Applied to compacted collagen gels, the theory demonstrates that collagen fibrils behave as enthalpic

  3. Investigation of ethanol infiltration into demineralized dentin collagen fibrils using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Jee, Sang Eun; Zhou, Jienfeng; Tan, Jianquo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R; Grégoire, Geneviève; Pashley, David H; Jang, Seung Soon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction of neat ethanol with bound and non-bound water in completely demineralized dentin that is fully hydrated, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The key to creating ideal resin-dentin bonds is the removal of residual free water layers and its replacement by ethanol solvent in which resin monomers are soluble, using the ethanol wet-bonding technique. The test null hypotheses were that ethanol cannot remove any collagen-bound water, and that ethanol cannot infiltrate into the spacing between collagen triple helix due to narrow interlayer spacing. Collagen fibrillar structures of overlap and gap regions were constructed by aligning the collagen triple helix of infinite length in hexagonal packing. Three layers of the water molecules were specified as the layers of 0.15-0.22nm, 0.22-0.43nm and 0.43-0.63nm from collagen atoms by investigating the water distribution surrounding collagen molecules. Our simulation results show that ethanol molecules infiltrated into the intermolecular spacing in the gap region, which increased due to the lateral shrinkage of the collagen structures in contact with ethanol solution, while there was no ethanol infiltration observed in the overlap region. Infiltrated ethanol molecules in the gap region removed residual water molecules via modifying mostly the third water layer (50% decrease), which would be considered as a loosely-bound water layer. The first and second hydration layers, which would be considered as tightly bound water layers, were not removed by the ethanol molecules, thus maintaining the helical structures of the collagen molecules.

  4. Some properties of the reactive hydroxylysyl residues in collagen: their possible role in nucleation during fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, E; Hamabata, A; Rojkind, M

    1984-10-01

    Native or heat-denatured collagens were incubated under controlled conditions of temperature and pH with variable molar ratios of KCNO or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. The results obtained suggest that a small number of free amino groups are available for reaction on the native protein, while all the free amino groups react on the denatured protein. The highly reactive free amino groups in the native protein are hydroxylysine residues and have an abnormally low pK of 8.5 which is conformation dependent; this pK becomes normalized upon denaturation of the protein. The reactive hydroxylysines appear to be located in basic regions that could be the nucleation sites needed for fiber formation in the heat-gelation assay; the modified protein does not form stable fibrils upon heating at 37 degrees C and the few fibers formed are not stabilized after reduction with NaBH4. Our results also suggest that the triple helix in collagen is heterogeneous with respect to the reactivity of free amino groups and that several discrete transition temperatures are observed with two main breaks at 30 degrees C and at 37 degrees C, respectively.

  5. Mineralization of collagen may occur on fibril surfaces: evidence from conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Song, M. J.; Arena, J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Marko, M.; Owen, C.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the normally calcifying leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, has been investigated at an ultrastructural level with conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy, computed tomography, and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods. Specimens treated by either aqueous or anhydrous techniques and resin-embedded were appropriately sectioned and regions of early tendon mineralization were photographed. On the basis of individual photomicrographs, stereoscopic pairs of images, and tomographic three-dimensional image reconstructions, platelet-shaped crystals may be demonstrated for the first time in association with the surface of collagen fibrils. Mineral is also observed in closely parallel arrays within collagen hole and overlap zones. The mineral deposition at these spatially distinct locations in the tendon provides insight into possible means by which calcification is mediated by collagen as a fundamental event in skeletal and dental formation among vertebrates.

  6. Conducting polymers with immobilised fibrillar collagen for enhanced neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Zhilian; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2011-10-01

    Conducting polymers with pendant functionality are advantageous in various bionic and organic bioelectronic applications, as they allow facile incorporation of bio-regulative cues to provide bio-mimicry and conductive environments for cell growth, differentiation and function. In this work, polypyrrole substrates doped with chondroitin sulfate (CS), an extracellular matrix molecule bearing carboxylic acid moieties, were electrochemically synthesized and conjugated with type I collagen. During the coupling process, the conjugated collagen formed a 3-dimensional fibrillar matrix in situ at the conducting polymer interface, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy under aqueous physiological conditions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurement confirmed no significant reduction in the electroactivity of the fibrillar collagen-modified conducting polymer substrates. Rat pheochromocytoma (nerve) cells showed increased differentiation and neurite outgrowth on the fibrillar collagen, which was further enhanced through electrical stimulation of the underlying conducting polymer substrate. Our study demonstrates that the direct coupling of ECM components such as collagen, followed by their further self-assembly into 3-dimensional matrices, has the potential to improve the neural-electrode interface of implant electrodes by encouraging nerve cell attachment and differentiation.

  7. Surface Characterization of Insulin Protofilaments and Fibril Polymorphs Using Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS)

    PubMed Central

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker; Lednev, Igor K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are β-sheet-rich protein aggregates that are strongly associated with a variety of neurodegenerative maladies, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Even if the secondary structure of such fibrils is well characterized, a thorough understanding of their surface organization still remains elusive. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is one of a few techniques that allow the direct characterization of the amino acid composition and the protein secondary structure of the amyloid fibril surface. Herein, we investigated the surfaces of two insulin fibril polymorphs with flat (flat) and left-twisted (twisted) morphology. It was found that the two differ substantially in both amino acid composition and protein secondary structure. For example, the amounts of Tyr, Pro, and His differ, as does the number of carboxyl groups on the respective surfaces, whereas the amounts of Phe and of positively charged amino and imino groups remain similar. In addition, the surface of protofilaments, the precursors of the mature flat and twisted fibrils, was investigated using TERS. The results show substantial differences with respect to the mature fibrils. A correlation of amino acid frequencies and protein secondary structures on the surface of protofilaments and on flat and twisted fibrils allowed us to propose a hypothetical mechanism for the propagation to specific fibril polymorphs. This knowledge can shed a light on the toxicity of amyloids and define the key factors responsible for fibril polymorphism. Finally, this work demonstrates the potential of TERS for the surface characterization of amyloid fibril polymorphs. PMID:24411258

  8. Timesaving microwave assisted synthesis of insulin amyloid fibrils with enhanced nanofiber aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Tiago; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Martins, Manuel A; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R

    2016-11-01

    Insulin amyloid fibrils with enhanced aspect ratio, were prepared using a timesaving microwave assisted (MW) methodology, reducing the incubation time from 13 to 2h. The fibrillation process was followed indirectly by Thioflavin T Fluorescence and UV-vis analysis, by measuring the amount of β-sheets formed and the insulin present in solution, respectively. TEM and AFM analysis revealed that the insulin fibrils obtained through the MW method, have very similar lengths but are much thinner than the ones obtained using the conventional method (CM). Additionally, it was verified that the nature of the peptides present in the final insulin fibrils was not affected by microwave irradiation. These morphological differences might reflect on noticeably enhanced mechanical and optical properties that can exploited on the development of advanced bionanomaterials.

  9. On the computation of stress in affine versus nonaffine fibril kinematics within planar collagen network models.

    PubMed

    Pence, Thomas J; Monroe, Ryan J; Wright, Neil T

    2008-08-01

    Some recent analyses modeled the response of collagenous tissues, such as epicardium, using a hypothetical network consisting of interconnected springlike fibers. The fibers in the network were organized such that internal nodes served as the connection point between three such collagen springs. The results for assumed affine and nonaffine deformations are contrasted after a homogeneous deformation at the boundary. Affine deformation provides a stiffer mechanical response than nonaffine deformation. In contrast to nonaffine deformation, affine deformation determines the displacement of internal nodes without imposing detailed force balance, thereby complicating the simplest intuitive notion of stress, one based on free body cuts, at the single node scale. The standard notion of stress may then be recovered via average field theory computations based on large micromesh realizations. An alternative and by all indications complementary viewpoint for the determination of stress in these collagen fiber networks is discussed here, one in which stress is defined using elastic energy storage, a notion which is intuitive at the single node scale. It replaces the average field theory computations by an averaging technique over randomly oriented isolated simple elements. The analytical operations do not require large micromesh realizations, but the tedious nature of the mathematical manipulation is clearly aided by symbolic algebra calculation. For the example case of linear elastic deformation, this results in material stiffnesses that relate the infinitesimal strain and stress. The result that the affine case is stiffer than the nonaffine case is recovered, as would be expected. The energy framework also lends itself to the natural inclusion of changes in mechanical response due to the chemical, electrical, or thermal environment.

  10. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Soumya; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K; Ganguly, Ranjan; Webster, Thomas J; Nayar, Suprabha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR) directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G) nanostructures using collagen (CL) was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed "biomimetic". Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the G flakes from transmission electron microscopy confirm ≤ five layers of G. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows an approximate 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than approximately 0.00005 of G. Thus, through the use of CL, this new material and process may improve the use of G in terms of biocompatibility for numerous medical applications that currently employ G, such as internally controlled drug-delivery assisted thermal ablation of carcinoma cells.

  11. Feasibility study of the natural derived chitosan dialdehyde for chemical modification of collagen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua; Gong, Juxia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the chemical crosslinking effects of the natural derived chitosan dialdehyde (OCS) on collagen. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) measurements suggest that introducing OCS might not destroy the natural triple helix conformation of collagen but enhance the thermal-stability of collagen. Meanwhile, a denser fibrous network of cross-linked collagen is observed by atomic force microscopy. Further, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and aggregation kinetics analysis confirm that the fibrillation process of collagen advances successfully and OCS could lengthen the completion time of collagen fibrillogenesis but raise the reconstitution rate of collagen fibrils or microfibrils. Besides, the cytocompatibility analysis implies that when the dosage of OCS is less than 15%, introducing OCS into collagen might be favorable for the cell's adhesion, growth and proliferation. Taken as a whole, the present study demonstrates that OCS might be an ideal crosslinker for the chemical fixation of collagen.

  12. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  13. Structural Characterization of Semen Coagulum-Derived SEM1(86–107) Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SEM1(86–107) is a 22-residue peptide corresponding to residues 86–107 in the semenogelin I protein. SEM1(86–107) is an abundant component of freshly liquefied semen and forms amyloid fibrils capable of enhancing HIV infection. To probe the factors affecting fibril formation and gain a better understanding of how differences in pH between semen and vaginal fluid affect fibril stability, this study determined the effect of pH on SEM1(86–107) fibril formation and dissociation. The SEM1(86–107) fibril structure (i.e., residues that comprise the fibrillar core) was also probed using hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) and hydroxyl radical-mediated protein modification. The average percent exposure to hydroxyl radical-mediated modification in the SEM1(86–107) fibrils was determined without requiring tandem mass spectrometry spectral acquisition or complete separation of modified peptides. It was found that the residue exposures calculated from HDXMS and hydroxyl radical-mediated modification were similar. These techniques demonstrated that three regions of SEM1(86–107) comprise the amyloid fibril core and that positively charged residues are exposed, suggesting that electrostatic interactions between SEM1(86–107) and HIV or the cell surface may be responsible for mediating HIV infection enhancement by the SEM1(86–107) fibrils. PMID:24811874

  14. Increase in dermal collagen fibril diameter and elastogenesis with UVB exposure: an optical and ultrastructural study in albino Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sueli Coelho; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Pascarelli, Bernardo Miguel; Souza, Sonia Oliveira; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Filgueira, Absalom Lima; Japiassu, Maria Augusta; Takiya, Christina Maeda

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous aging is a complex biological phenomenon, dependent not only on the innate or intrinsic process ("biological clock"), but also on extrinsic elements, primarily chronic sun exposure (photoaging). In order to verify dermal morphological changes in the elastic fiber system and collagen associated with aged skin, we performed a light and electron microscopic study on exposed-shaved albino mice, which were exposed to UVB radiation. The experimental group consisted of 48 exposed animals, randomly distributed in three groups and submitted to different radiation doses (A, 28800 J/m2; B, 57600 J/m2; and C, 86400 J/m2) and studied 0, 30, 60 and 90 days of exposure discontinuation. Nonexposed-shaved and nonexposed-nonshaved animals were included as controls. From the day of exposure discontinuation and subsequently, the elastic system and collagen network were progressively modified. The increase in collagen fibril diameter was prominent in the 60 and 90 day groups (p<0.05), as noticed on electron microscopy. Elastic fiber density also increased after irradiation (p<0.05). On electron microscopy, elastogenesis was seen in the deep dermis. The comparative study among the groups disclosed clear relationship between doses and "elastotic changes". It also showed that chronological aging of mice skin was apparently intensified after UVB exposure. Skin elastogenesis seems to be a major consequence of UVB exposure, apart from elastolysis, and occurs not only in humans but also in hairless mice submitted to continuous, long-term UVB exposure.

  15. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  16. Discoidin domain receptor 2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Iscru, Daniel F; Druhan, Lawrence J; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2006-09-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are widely expressed cell-surface receptors, which bind to and are activated by collagens, including collagen type 1. Activation of DDRs and the resulting downstream signaling is known to regulate the extracellular matrix. However, little is known about how DDRs interact with collagen and its direct impact on collagen regulation. Here, we have established that by binding to collagen, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2 inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis and alters the morphology of collagen type 1 fibers. Our in vitro assays utilized DDR2-Fc fusion proteins, which contain only the ECD of DDR2. Using surface plasmon resonance, we confirmed that further oligomerization of DDR2-Fc (by means of anti-Fc antibody) greatly enhances its binding to immobilized collagen type 1. Collagen turbidity measurements and biochemical assays indicated that DDR2 delays the formation of collagen fibrils. Atomic force microscopy of soluble collagen revealed that a predominately monomeric state of collagen was present with DDR2, while control solutions had an abundance of polymeric collagen. Transmission electron microscopy of collagen fibers, showed that the native periodic banded structure of collagen fibers was weakened and nearly absent in the presence of DDR2. Further, using a cell-based assay we demonstrate that overexpression of full length DDR2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1. Our results demonstrate a novel and important functional role of the DDR2 ECD that may contribute to collagen regulation via modulation of fibrillogenesis.

  17. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  18. Substitutions of aspartic acid for glycine-220 and of arginine for glycine-664 in the triple helix of the pro alpha 1(I) chain of type I procollagen produce lethal osteogenesis imperfecta and disrupt the ability of collagen fibrils to incorporate crystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Culbert, A A; Lowe, M P; Atkinson, M; Byers, P H; Wallis, G A; Kadler, K E

    1995-01-01

    We identified two infants with lethal (type II) osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) who were heterozygous for mutations in the COL1A1 gene that resulted in substitutions of aspartic acid for glycine at position 220 and arginine for glycine at position 664 in the product of one COL1A1 allele in each individual. In normal age- and site-matched bone, approximately 70% (by number) of the collagen fibrils were encrusted with plate-like crystallites of hydroxyapatite. In contrast, approximately 5% (by number) of the collagen fibrils in the probands' bone contained crystallites. In contrast with normal bone, the c-axes of hydroxyapatite crystallites were sometimes poorly aligned with the long axis of fibrils obtained from OI bone. Chemical analysis showed that the OI samples contained normal amounts of calcium. The probands' bone samples contained type I collagen, overmodified type I collagen and elevated levels of type III and V collagens. On the basis of biochemical and morphological data, the fibrils in the OI samples were co-polymers of normal and mutant collagen. The results are consistent with a model of fibril mineralization in which the presence of abnormal type I collagen prevents normal collagen in the same fibril from incorporating hydroxyapatite crystallites. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487936

  19. Type I collagen-based fibrous capsule enhances integration of tissue-engineered cartilage with native articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yueh-Hsun; Ard, Mary B; Halper, Jaroslava T; Barabino, Gilda A

    2014-04-01

    Successful integration of engineered constructs with host tissues is crucial for cartilage repair, yet achieving it remains challenging. A collagen I-based fibrous capsule characterized by increased cell density and decreased glycosaminoglycan deposition usually forms at the periphery of tissue-engineered cartilage. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of a solid fibrous capsule on construct integration with native articular cartilage. To this end, capsule-containing (CC) and capsule-free (CF) constructs were grown by culturing chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds with insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-β1, respectively, in a wavy-walled bioreactor that imparts hydrodynamic forces for 4 weeks. The ability of harvested constructs to integrate with native cartilage was determined using a cartilage explant model. Our results revealed that adhesive stress between native cartilage and the CC constructs was 57% higher than that in the CF group, potentially due to the absence of glycosaminoglycans and increased cell density in the capsule region and deposition of denser and thicker collagen fibrils at the integration site. The present work demonstrates that the fibrous capsule can effectively enhance early integration of engineered and native cartilage tissues and thus suggests the need to include the capsule as a variable in the development of cartilage tissue engineering strategies.

  20. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  1. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials.

  2. The Mechanism of Enhanced Insulin Amyloid Fibril Formation by NaCl Is Better Explained by a Conformational Change Model

    PubMed Central

    Muzaffar, Mahvish; Ahmad, Atta

    2011-01-01

    The high propensity of insulin to fibrillate causes severe biomedical and biotechnological complications. Insulin fibrillation studies attain significant importance considering the prevalence of diabetes and the requirement of functional insulin in each dose. Although studied since the early years of the 20th century, elucidation of the mechanism of insulin fibrillation has not been understood completely. We have previously, through several studies, shown that insulin hexamer dissociates into monomer that undergoes partial unfolding before converting into mature fibrils. In this study we have established that NaCl enhances insulin fibrillation mainly due to subtle structural changes and is not a mere salt effect. We have carried out studies both in the presence and absence of urea and Gdn.HCl and compared the relationship between conformation of insulin induced by urea and Gdn.HCl with respect to NaCl at both pH 7.4 (hexamer) and pH 2 (monomer). Fibril formation was followed with a Thioflavin T assay and structural changes were monitored by circular dichroism and size-exclusion chromatography. The results show salt-insulin interactions are difficult to classify as commonly accepted Debye-Hückel or Hofmeister series interactions but instead a strong correlation between the association states and conformational states of insulin and their propensity to fibrillate is evident. PMID:22132167

  3. Impacts of fullerene derivatives on regulating the structure and assembly of collagen molecules.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lina; Kang, Seung-gu; Pan, Jun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Mingyi; Xing, Gengmei; Wang, Fei; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Ruhong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2013-08-21

    During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 can enhance the rigidity of the native structure of collagen molecules and promote the formation of an oligomer or a microfibril. The interaction with Gd@C82(OH)22 may regulate further the assembly of collagen fibrils and change the biophysical properties of collagen. The control run with fullerene derivatives C60(OH)24 also indicates that C60(OH)24 can influence the structure and assembly of collagen molecules as well, but to a lesser degree. Both fullerene derivatives can form hydrogen bonds with multiple collagen molecules acting as a "fullerenol-mediated bridge" that enhance the interaction within or among collagen molecules. Compared to C60(OH)24, the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen is stronger, resulting in particular biomedical effects for regulating the biophysical properties of collagen fibrils.

  4. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  5. Collagen network strengthening following cyclic tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Paten, Jeffrey A; Sander, Edward A; Nguyen, Thao D; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-06

    The bulk mechanical properties of tissues are highly tuned to the physiological loads they experience and reflect the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of their constituent parts. A thorough understanding of the processes involved in tissue adaptation is required to develop multi-scale computational models of tissue remodelling. While extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is partly due to the changing cellular metabolic activity, there may also be mechanically directed changes in ECM nano/microscale organization which lead to mechanical tuning. The thermal and enzymatic stability of collagen, which is the principal load-bearing biopolymer in vertebrates, have been shown to be enhanced by force suggesting that collagen has an active role in ECM mechanical properties. Here, we ask how changes in the mechanical properties of a collagen-based material are reflected by alterations in the micro/nanoscale collagen network following cyclic loading. Surprisingly, we observed significantly higher tensile stiffness and ultimate tensile strength, roughly analogous to the effect of work hardening, in the absence of network realignment and alterations to the fibril area fraction. The data suggest that mechanical loading induces stabilizing changes internal to the fibrils themselves or in the fibril-fibril interactions. If such a cell-independent strengthening effect is operational in vivo, then it would be an important consideration in any multiscale computational approach to ECM growth and remodelling.

  6. Characterization of whole fibril-forming collagen proteins of types I, III, and V from fetal calf skin by infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dreisewerd, Klaus; Rohlfing, Andreas; Spottke, Beatrice; Urbanke, Claus; Henkel, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Fibril-forming collagen proteins of the types I, III, and V were extracted from fetal calf skin, purified by differential salt precipitation, and analyzed by infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI-TOF-MS). Glycerol was used as liquid IR-MALDI matrix. Noncovalently bound triple helices of the types I and V were detected from the NaCl precipitate. After heating at 43 degrees C for 10 min, resulting in the dissociation of the triple helix, the single alpha-chain subunits were detected. For type I, mass spectra acquired from molecular sieve chromatography fractions revealed the presence of further substructures of dimeric type and of supramolecular complexes up to the tetramer. Triple helices of type III, stabilized by covalent disulfide bonds, were detected from the total protein precipitate also after heat treatment. For type III, even hexamer and nonamer structures with molecular weights close to 600 and 900 kDa were recorded. For comparison, ultraviolet (UV-)MALDI-MS measurements with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix were carried out with some of the samples. Here, only the single alpha-chains were detected with significantly reduced sensitivity.

  7. Collagen nerve conduits promote enhanced axonal regeneration, schwann cell association, and neovascularization compared to silicone conduits.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephen W P; Syed, Shahbaz; Walsh, Walsh; Zochodne, Douglas W; Midha, Rajiv

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration within guidance conduits involves a critical association between regenerating axons, Schwann cells (SCs), and neovascularization. However, it is currently unknown if there is a greater association between these factors in nonpermeable versus semipermeable nerve guide conduits. We therefore examined this collaboration in both silicone- and collagen-based nerve conduits in both 5- and 10-mm-injury gaps in rat sciatic nerves. Results indicate that collagen conduits promoted enhanced axonal and SC regeneration and association when compared to silicone conduits in the shorter 5-mm-gap model. In addition, collagen tubes displayed enhanced neovascularization over silicone conduits, suggesting that these three factors are intimately related in successful peripheral nerve regeneration. At later time points (1- and 2-month analysis) in a 10-mm-gap model, collagen tubes displayed enhanced axonal regeneration, myelination, and vascularization when compared to silicone-based conduits. Results from these studies suggest that regenerating cables within collagen-based conduits are revascularized earlier and more completely, which in turn enhances peripheral nerve regeneration through these nerve guides as compared to silicone conduits.

  8. Alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition of mineralized collagen coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junjun; Lin, Jun; Li, Juan; Weng, Wenjian; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Huiming

    2015-12-01

    Mineralized collagen coatings were synthesized by electrochemical deposition with alternating negative and positive potentials. The obtained coatings demonstrated a multi-layer structure alternating consisting of weakly and highly mineralized collagen layers and the proportion of each layer could be controlled by adjusting the deposition time. The coatings deposited using alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition (AP-ECD) showed significantly enhanced osteoblasts proliferation, and rhBMP-2 loading capability compared to those of the coatings deposited using constant potential electrochemical deposition (CP-ECD). The enhanced cytocompatibility and rhBMP-2 loading capability of the coatings might be attributed to their high proportion of weakly mineralized collagen layer. Furthermore, the deposition mechanism for alternating potentials is proposed as that positive potential induces deposition of negatively charged collagen fibrils to form a weakly mineralized collagen layer. Our results suggest that the present deposition method could be a promising approach to engineer mineralized collagen coating with better biological performances.

  9. Enhanced thermal and mechanical properties of PVA composites formed with filamentous nanocellulose fibrils.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wu, Qiong; Zhao, Xin; Huang, Zhanhua; Cao, Jun; Li, Jian; Liu, Shouxin

    2014-11-26

    Long filamentous nanocellulose fibrils (NCFs) were prepared from chemical-thermomechanical pulps (CTMP) using ultrasonication. Their contribution to enhancements in thermal stability and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) films were investigated. The unique chemical pretreatment and mechanical effects of CTMP loosen and unfold fibers during the pulping process, which enables further chemical purification and subsequent ultrasound treatment for formation of NCFs. The NCFs exhibited higher crystallinity (72.9%) compared with that of CTMP (61.5%), and had diameters ranging from 50 to 120 nm. A NCF content of 6 wt% was found to yield the best thermal stability, light transmittance, and mechanical properties in the PVA/NCF composites. The composites also exhibited a visible light transmittance of 73.7%, and the tensile strength and Young's modulus were significantly improved, with values 2.8 and 2.4 times larger, respectively, than that of neat PVA.

  10. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  11. The exercise-induced biochemical milieu enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel W D; Lee-Barthel, Ann; McIntyre, Todd; Shamim, Baubak; Lee, Cassandra A; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-15

    Exercise stimulates a dramatic change in the concentration of circulating hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), but the biological functions of this response are unclear. Pharmacological GH administration stimulates collagen synthesis; however, whether the post-exercise systemic milieu has a similar action is unknown. We aimed to determine whether the collagen content and tensile strength of tissue-engineered ligaments is enhanced by serum obtained post-exercise. Primary cells from a human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were used to engineer ligament constructs in vitro. Blood obtained from 12 healthy young men 15 min after resistance exercise contained GH concentrations that were ∼7-fold greater than resting serum (P < 0.001), whereas IGF-1 was not elevated at this time point (P = 0.21 vs. rest). Ligament constructs were treated for 7 days with medium supplemented with serum obtained at rest (RestTx) or 15 min post-exercise (ExTx), before tensile testing and collagen content analysis. Compared with RestTx, ExTx enhanced collagen content (+19%; 181 ± 33 vs. 215 ± 40 μg per construct P = 0.001) and ligament mechanical properties - maximal tensile load (+17%, P = 0.03 vs. RestTx) and ultimate tensile strength (+10%, P = 0.15 vs. RestTx). In a separate set of engineered ligaments, recombinant IGF-1, but not GH, enhanced collagen content and mechanics. Bioassays in 2D culture revealed that acute treatment with post-exercise serum activated mTORC1 and ERK1/2. In conclusion, the post-exercise biochemical milieu, but not recombinant GH, enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments, in association with mTORC1 and ERK1/2 activation.

  12. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  13. RuvbL1 and RuvbL2 enhance aggresome formation and disaggregate amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zaarur, Nava; Xu, Xiaobin; Lestienne, Patrick; Meriin, Anatoli B; McComb, Mark; Costello, Catherine E; Newnam, Gary P; Ganti, Rakhee; Romanova, Nina V; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Silva, Sara TN; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Matias, Pedro M; Lobachev, Kirill S; Lednev, Igor K; Chernoff, Yury O; Sherman, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    The aggresome is an organelle that recruits aggregated proteins for storage and degradation. We performed an siRNA screen for proteins involved in aggresome formation and identified novel mammalian AAA+ protein disaggregases RuvbL1 and RuvbL2. Depletion of RuvbL1 or RuvbL2 suppressed aggresome formation and caused buildup of multiple cytoplasmic aggregates. Similarly, downregulation of RuvbL orthologs in yeast suppressed the formation of an aggresome-like body and enhanced the aggregate toxicity. In contrast, their overproduction enhanced the resistance to proteotoxic stress independently of chaperone Hsp104. Mammalian RuvbL associated with the aggresome, and the aggresome substrate synphilin-1 interacted directly with the RuvbL1 barrel-like structure near the opening of the central channel. Importantly, polypeptides with unfolded structures and amyloid fibrils stimulated the ATPase activity of RuvbL. Finally, disassembly of protein aggregates was promoted by RuvbL. These data indicate that RuvbL complexes serve as chaperones in protein disaggregation. PMID:26303906

  14. LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking is responsible for fibrosis-enhanced metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Bird, Demelza; Baker, Ann-Marie; Barker, Holly E; Ho, Melisa W-Y; Lang, Georgina; Erler, Janine T

    2013-03-15

    Tumor metastasis is a highly complex, dynamic, and inefficient process involving multiple steps, yet it accounts for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. Although it has long been known that fibrotic signals enhance tumor progression and metastasis, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Identifying events involved in creating environments that promote metastatic colonization and growth are critical for the development of effective cancer therapies. Here, we show a critical role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in establishing a milieu within fibrosing tissues that is favorable to growth of metastastic tumor cells. We show that LOX-dependent collagen crosslinking is involved in creating a growth-permissive fibrotic microenvironment capable of supporting metastatic growth by enhancing tumor cell persistence and survival. We show that therapeutic targeting of LOX abrogates not only the extent to which fibrosis manifests, but also prevents fibrosis-enhanced metastatic colonization. Finally, we show that the LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking directly increases tumor cell proliferation, enhancing metastatic colonization and growth manifesting in vivo as increased metastasis. This is the first time that crosslinking of collagen I has been shown to enhance metastatic growth. These findings provide an important link between ECM homeostasis, fibrosis, and cancer with important clinical implications for both the treatment of fibrotic disease and cancer.

  15. LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking is responsible for fibrosis-enhanced metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Thomas R.; Bird, Demelza; Baker, Ann-Marie; Barker, Holly E.; Ho, Melisa W-Y.; Lang, Georgina; Erler, Janine T.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly complex, dynamic and inefficient process involving multiple steps, yet accounts for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. Although it has long been known that fibrotic signals enhance tumor progression and metastasis, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Identifying events involved in creating environments that promote metastatic colonization and growth is critical for the development of effective cancer therapies. Here, we demonstrate a critical role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in establishing a milieu within fibrosing tissues that is favorable to growth of metastastic tumor cells. We show that LOX-dependent collagen crosslinking is involved in creating a growth-permissive fibrotic microenvironment capable of supporting metastatic growth by enhancing tumor cell persistence and survival. We show that therapeutic targeting of LOX abrogates not only the extent to which fibrosis manifests, but also prevents fibrosis-enhanced metastatic colonization. Finally, we show that the LOX-mediated collagen cross-linking directly increases tumor cell proliferation, enhancing metastatic colonization and growth manifesting in vivo as increased metastasis. This is the first time that crosslinking of collagen I has been shown to enhance metastatic growth. These findings provide an important link between extracellular matrix homeostasis, fibrosis and cancer with important clinical implications for both the treatment of fibrotic disease and cancer. PMID:23345161

  16. Controlling collagen fiber microstructure in three-dimensional hydrogels using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the primary fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix, and functional properties of collagen arise from variations in fiber structure. This study investigated the ability of ultrasound to control collagen microstructure during hydrogel fabrication. Under appropriate conditions, ultrasound exposure of type I collagen during polymerization altered fiber microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy and second-harmonic generation microscopy revealed decreased collagen fiber diameters in response to ultrasound compared to sham-exposed samples. Results of mechanistic investigations were consistent with a thermal mechanism for the effects of ultrasound on collagen fiber structure. To control collagen microstructure site-specifically, a high frequency, 8.3-MHz, ultrasound beam was directed within the center of a large collagen sample producing dense networks of short, thin collagen fibrils within the central core of the gel and longer, thicker fibers outside the beam area. Fibroblasts seeded onto these gels migrated rapidly into small, circularly arranged aggregates only within the beam area, and clustered fibroblasts remodeled the central, ultrasound-exposed collagen fibrils into dense sheets. These investigations demonstrate the capability of ultrasound to spatially pattern various collagen microstructures within an engineered tissue noninvasively, thus enhancing the level of complexity of extracellular matrix microenvironments and cellular functions achievable within three-dimensional engineered tissues. PMID:23927189

  17. Augmentation of diabetic wound healing and enhancement of collagen content using nanofibrous glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA scaffold membranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Shang-Hung; Chen, Wei-Jan; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Lin, Yu-Huang; Liu, Shih-Jung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng

    2015-02-01

    This work developed nanofibrous drug-loaded collagen/poly-D-L-lactide-glycolide (PLGA) scaffold membranes that provided the sustained release of glucophage for the wounds associated with diabetes. PLGA, glucophage, and collagen were firstly dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and were spun into nanofibrous membranes by electrospinning. High-performance liquid chromatography assay was used to characterize the in vivo and in vitro release rates of the pharmaceuticals from the membranes. High concentrations of glucophage were released for over three weeks from the nanofibrous membranes. The nanofibrous glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA membranes were more hydrophilic than collagen/PLGA membranes and exhibited a greater water-containing capacity. The glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA membranes markedly promoted the healing of diabetic wounds. Moreover, the collagen content of diabetic rats using drug-eluting membranes was higher than that of the control rats, because of the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9. The experimental results herein suggest that the nanofibrous glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA membranes had effect for increasing collagen content in treating diabetic wounds and very effective promoters of the healing of such wounds in the early stages.

  18. A modified collagen gel enhances healing outcome in a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Dasghatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action is scanty. This work provides first results from a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds, elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days postwounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges, suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in neutrophil-like human promyelocytic leukemia-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG-treated wound tissue displayed elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a preclinical setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other collagen-based products used in clinical setting.

  19. Aspartic Acid Racemization and Collagen Degradation Markers Reveal an Accumulation of Damage in Tendon Collagen That Is Enhanced with Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Streeter, Ian; Pinchbeck, Gina L.; Goodship, Allen E.; Clegg, Peter D.; Birch, Helen L.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the rate at which protein turnover occurs in living tendon and whether the rate differs between tendons with different physiological roles. In this study, we have quantified the racemization of aspartic acid to calculate the age of the collagenous and non-collagenous components of the high strain injury-prone superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) and low strain rarely injured common digital extensor tendon (CDET) in a group of horses with a wide age range. In addition, the turnover of collagen was assessed indirectly by measuring the levels of collagen degradation markers (collagenase-generated neoepitope and cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen). The fractional increase in d-Asp was similar (p = 0.7) in the SDFT (5.87 × 10−4/year) and CDET (5.82 × 10−4/year) tissue, and d/l-Asp ratios showed a good correlation with pentosidine levels. We calculated a mean (±S.E.) collagen half-life of 197.53 (±18.23) years for the SDFT, which increased significantly with horse age (p = 0.03) and was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that for the CDET (34.03 (±3.39) years). Using similar calculations, the half-life of non-collagenous protein was 2.18 (±0.41) years in the SDFT and was significantly (p = 0.04) lower than the value of 3.51 (±0.51) years for the CDET. Collagen degradation markers were higher in the CDET and suggested an accumulation of partially degraded collagen within the matrix with aging in the SDFT. We propose that increased susceptibility to injury in older individuals results from an inability to remove partially degraded collagen from the matrix leading to reduced mechanical competence. PMID:20308077

  20. Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fi-bri-LA- ... Works article. Understanding the Electrical Problem in Atrial Fibrillation In AF, the heart's electrical signals don't ...

  1. Jararhagin disruption of endothelial cell anchorage is enhanced in collagen enriched matrices.

    PubMed

    Baldo, C; Lopes, D S; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Jacysyn, J F; Niland, S; Eble, J A; Clissa, P B; Moura-da-Silva, A M

    2015-12-15

    Hemorrhage is one of the most striking effects of bites by viper snakes resulting in fast bleeding and ischemia in affected tissues. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are responsible for hemorrhagic activity, but the mechanisms involved in SVMP-induced hemorrhage are not entirely understood and the study of such mechanisms greatly depends on in vivo experiments. In vivo, hemorrhagic SVMPs accumulate on basement membrane (BM) of venules and capillary vessels allowing the hydrolysis of collagen IV with consequent weakness and rupture of capillary walls. These effects are not reproducible in vitro with conventional endothelial cell cultures. In this study we used two-dimension (2D) or three-dimension (3D) cultures of HUVECs on matrigel and observed the same characteristics as in ex vivo experiments: only the hemorrhagic toxin was able to localize on surfaces or internalize endothelial cells in 2D cultures or in the surface of tubules formed on 3D cultures. The contribution of matrigel, fibronectin and collagen matrices in jararhagin-induced endothelial cell damage was then analyzed. Collagen and matrigel substrates enhanced the endothelial cell damage induced by jararhagin allowing toxin binding to focal adhesions, disruption of stress fibers, detachment and apoptosis. The higher affinity of jararhagin to collagen than to fibronectin explains the localization of the toxin within BM. Moreover, once located in BM, interactions of jararhagin with α2β1 integrin would favor its localization on focal adhesions, as observed in our study. The accumulation of toxin in focal adhesions, observed only in cells grown in collagen matrices, would explain the enhancement of cell damage in these matrices and reflects the actual interaction among toxin, endothelial cells and BM components that occurs in vivo and results in the hemorrhagic lesions induced by viper venoms.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-coated sutures enhance collagen depositions in sutured tissues.

    PubMed

    Casado, Javier G; Blazquez, Rebeca; Jorge, Inmaculada; Alvarez, Veronica; Gomez-Mauricio, Guadalupe; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Vazquez, Jesus; Sanchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    Sutures are commonly used for surgical procedures and new sutures are being developed to improve wound healing. In the past decade, it has been extensively shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a wound healing potential. To benefit the overall wound healing process, we aimed to analyze the usage of pretreated sutures for improving the implantation of MSCs in the tissues. Our results firstly showed that suture pretreatments with gelatin, poly-L-lysine, and NaOH improved the adhesive strength of MSCs to sutures. These cells remained surrounding the sutured tissue and no significant phenotypic changes were found in those cells cultured onto pretreated sutures. In vivo experiments showed that the implantation of MSCs by suturing increases the collagen content in the sutured tissue. Moreover, proteomics analysis of secreted proteins showed that collagen alpha-1(I) chain was the most abundant collagen found. To our knowledge, this is the first report that aimed to improve the implantation of MSCs in tissue by suture pretreatments. Moreover, in vivo experiments suggest that MSC-coated sutures may enhance wound healing and tissue remodeling through the release of different collagen types being applicable for those patients that tend to have difficulty healing.

  3. Fabrication of homobifunctional crosslinker stabilized collagen for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Sai, Korrapati Purna

    2015-11-27

    Collagen biopolymer has found widespread application in the field of tissue engineering owing to its excellent tissue compatibility and negligible immunogenicity. Mechanical strength and enzymatic degradation of the collagen necessitates the physical and chemical strength enhancement. One such attempt deals with the understanding of crosslinking behaviour of EGS (ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester)) with collagen to improve the physico-chemical properties. The incorporation of a crosslinker during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. EGS crosslinked collagen films exhibited higher denaturation temperature (T d) and the residue left after thermogravimetric analysis was about 16 ± 5.2%. Mechanical properties determined by uniaxial tensile tests showed a threefold increase in tensile strength and Young's modulus at higher concentration (100 μM). Water uptake capacity reduced up to a moderate extent upon crosslinking which is essential for the transport of nutrients to the cells. Cell viability was found to be 100% upon treatment with 100 μM EGS whereas only 30% viability could be observed with glutaraldehyde. Rheological studies of crosslinked collagen showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity at 37 °C. Crosslinking with EGS resulted in the formation of a uniform fibrillar network. Trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) assay confirmed that EGS crosslinked collagen by forming a covalent interaction with ε-amino acids of collagen. The homobifunctional crosslinker used in this study enhanced the effectiveness of collagen as a biomaterial for biomedical application.

  4. A photochemical crosslinking technology for tissue engineering: enhancement of the physico-chemical properties of collagen-based scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Barbara P.

    2005-04-01

    Collagen gel is a natural biomaterial commonly used in tissue engineering because of its close resemblance to nature, negligible immunogenecity and excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen gel is mechanically weak, highly water binding and vulnerable to chemical and enzymatic attacks that limits its use in tissue engineering in particular tissues for weight-bearing purposes. The current project aimed to strengthen and stabilize collagen scaffolds using a photochemical crosslinking technique. Photochemical crosslinking is rapid, efficient, non-thermal and does not involve toxic chemicals, comparing with other crosslinking methods such as glutaraldehyde and gamma irradiation. Collagen scaffolds were fabricated using rat-tail tendon collagen. An argon laser was used to process the collagen gel after equilibrating with a photosensitizing reagent. Scanning electronic microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology of the membranes. Physico-chemical properties of the collagen scaffolds such as water-binding capacity, mechanical properties and thermostability were studied. Photochemical crosslinking significantly reduced the water-binding capacity, a parameter inversely proportional to the extent of crosslinking, of collagen scaffolds. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly increased the ultimate stress and tangent modulus at 90% of the rupture strain of the collagen scaffolds. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed a significantly higher shrinkage temperature and absence of the denaturation peak during the thermoscan comparing with the controls. This means greater thermostability in the photochemically crosslinked collagen scaffolds. This study demonstrates that the photochemical crosslinking technology is able to enhance the physicochemical propterties of collagen scaffolds by strengthening, stabilizing and controlling the swelling ratio of the collagen scaffolds so as to enable their use for tissue

  5. Impacts of fullerene derivatives on regulating the structure and assembly of collagen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lina; Kang, Seung-Gu; Pan, Jun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Mingyi; Xing, Gengmei; Wang, Fei; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Ruhong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2013-07-01

    During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 can enhance the rigidity of the native structure of collagen molecules and promote the formation of an oligomer or a microfibril. The interaction with Gd@C82(OH)22 may regulate further the assembly of collagen fibrils and change the biophysical properties of collagen. The control run with fullerene derivatives C60(OH)24 also indicates that C60(OH)24 can influence the structure and assembly of collagen molecules as well, but to a lesser degree. Both fullerene derivatives can form hydrogen bonds with multiple collagen molecules acting as a ``fullerenol-mediated bridge'' that enhance the interaction within or among collagen molecules. Compared to C60(OH)24, the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen is stronger, resulting in particular biomedical effects for regulating the biophysical properties of collagen fibrils.During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction

  6. Strain-enhanced stress relaxation impacts nonlinear elasticity in collagen gels

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sungmin; Hu, Kenneth H.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex assembly of structural proteins that provides physical support and biochemical signaling to cells in tissues. The mechanical properties of the ECM have been found to play a key role in regulating cell behaviors such as differentiation and malignancy. Gels formed from ECM protein biopolymers such as collagen or fibrin are commonly used for 3D cell culture models of tissue. One of the most striking features of these gels is that they exhibit nonlinear elasticity, undergoing strain stiffening. However, these gels are also viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation, with the resistance of the gel to a deformation relaxing over time. Recent studies have suggested that cells sense and respond to both nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity of ECM, yet little is known about the connection between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity. Here, we report that, as strain is increased, not only do biopolymer gels stiffen but they also exhibit faster stress relaxation, reducing the timescale over which elastic energy is dissipated. This effect is not universal to all biological gels and is mediated through weak cross-links. Mechanistically, computational modeling and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that strain-enhanced stress relaxation of collagen gels arises from force-dependent unbinding of weak bonds between collagen fibers. The broader effect of strain-enhanced stress relaxation is to rapidly diminish strain stiffening over time. These results reveal the interplay between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity in collagen gels, and highlight the complexity of the ECM mechanics that are likely sensed through cellular mechanotransduction. PMID:27140623

  7. Polarization effects in SHG of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Paul; Cox, Guy C.; Ramshaw, John A. M.; Lukins, Philip B.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2004-06-01

    The polarization dependence of the second harmonic emission of purified in-vitro reconstituted fibrils of collagen has been examined. The results confirmed the quasi-hexagonal crystalline structure within the fibrils. Interesting different polarization behaviours were seen between collagen types I and II, which can be utilized as an experimental technique for differentiation.

  8. Nanocomposite scaffold with enhanced stability by hydrogen bonds between collagen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Fan, Xialian; Tang, Keyong; Zheng, Xuejing; Liu, Jie; Wang, Baoshi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite scaffolds, as potential substrates for skin tissue engineering, were fabricated by freeze drying the mixture of type I collagen extracted from porcine skin and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. This procedure was performed without any cross-linker or toxic reagents to generate porosity in the scaffold. Both morphology and thermal stability of the nanocomposite scaffold were examined. The swelling behavior, mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation of the composite scaffolds were carefully investigated. Our results revealed that collagen, PVP and TiO2 are bonded together by four main hydrogen bonds, which is an essential action for the formation of nanocomposite scaffold. Using Coasts-Redfern model, we were able to calculate the thermal degradation apparent activation energy and demonstrated that the thermal stability of nanocomposites is dependent on amount of PVP incorporated. Furthermore, SEM images showed that the collagen fibers are wrapped and stabilized on scaffolds by PVP molecules, which improve the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The UTS of PVP-contained scaffold is four times higher than that of scaffold without PVP, whereas ultimate percentage of elongation (UPE) is decreased, and PVP can enhance the degradation resistance.

  9. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans: A Biomimetic Approach to Modulate Collagen Fibrillogenesis for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Paderi, John E.; Sistiabudi, Rizaldi; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2009-01-01

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), prevalent in collagenous tissues, regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and provide a host of biochemical cues critical to tissue function and homeostasis. Incorporating SLRPs may enhance tissue engineering designs that mimic the native extracellular matrix, although SLRPs purified from animal sources bear low yields and lack design control. Consequently, we have designed synthetic peptidoglycans, inspired by the native SLRP decorin, that contain a collagen-binding peptide attached to a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. These peptidoglycans modulate collagen fibrillogenesis and decrease fibril diameter in vitro, similarly to decorin, while maintaining the characteristic D-banded fibrils. Application for tissue engineering is demonstrated as these peptidoglycans are incorporated into collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells. Gels formed with peptidoglycans and decorin show a faster rate of gel compaction, and one peptidoglycan uniquely increases elastin production. The peptidoglycan design can be tailored with respect to the peptide sequence and GAG identity and is expected to have versatile application in tissue engineering. PMID:19323607

  10. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Akul Sudhakar, Yakkanti

    2012-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated. PMID:22512648

  11. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 Type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Sudhakar, Yakkanti Akul

    2012-10-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated.

  12. Hypoxia-mimicking bioactive glass/collagen glycosaminoglycan composite scaffolds to enhance angiogenesis and bone repair.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elaine; Partap, Sonia; Azevedo, Maria M; Jell, Gavin; Stevens, Molly M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-06-01

    One of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine is promoting sufficient vascularisation of tissue-engineered constructs. One approach to overcome this challenge is to target the cellular hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) pathway, which responds to low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and results in the activation of numerous pro-angiogenic genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Cobalt ions are known to mimic hypoxia by artificially stabilising the HIF-1α transcription factor. Here, resorbable bioactive glass particles (38 μm and 100 μm) with cobalt ions incorporated into the glass network were used to create bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds optimised for bone tissue engineering. Inclusion of the bioactive glass improved the compressive modulus of the resulting composite scaffolds while maintaining high degrees of porosity (>97%). Moreover, in vitro analysis demonstrated that the incorporation of cobalt bioactive glass with a mean particle size of 100 μm significantly enhanced the production and expression of VEGF in endothelial cells, and cobalt bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold conditioned media also promoted enhanced tubule formation. Furthermore, our results prove the ability of these scaffolds to support osteoblast cell proliferation and osteogenesis in all bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds irrespective of the particle size. In summary, we have developed a hypoxia-mimicking tissue-engineered scaffold with pro-angiogenic and pro-osteogenic capabilities that may encourage bone tissue regeneration and overcome the problem of inadequate vascularisation of grafts commonly seen in the field of tissue engineering.

  13. Vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse, Michiel J.

    1998-03-01

    One of the factors that favors the development of ventricular fibrillation is an increase in the dispersion of refractoriness. Experiments will be described in which an increase in dispersion in the recovery of excitability was determined during brief episodes of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity, known to increase the risk of fibrillation. Whereas in the normal heart ventricular fibrillation can be induced by a strong electrical shock, a premature stimulus of moderate intensity only induces fibrillation in the presence of regional ischemia, which greatly increases the dispersion of refractoriness. One factor that is of importance for the transition of reentrant ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation during acute regional ischemia is the subendocardial Purkinje system. After selective destruction of the Purkinje network by lugol, reentrant tachycardias still develop in the ischemic region, but they do not degenerate into fibrillation. Finally, attempts were made to determine the minimal mass of thin ventricular myocardium required to sustain fibrillation induced by burst pacing. This was done by freezing of subendocardial and midmural layers. The rim of surviving epicardial muscle had to be larger than 20 g. Extracellular electrograms during fibrillation in both the intact and the "frozen" left ventricle were indistinguishable, but activation patterns were markedly different. In the intact ventricle epicardial activation was compatible with multiple wavelet reentry, in the "frozen" heart a single, or at most two wandering reentrant waves were seen.

  14. Numerical study of adhesion enhancement by composite fibrils with soft tip layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balijepalli, Ram Gopal; Fischer, Sarah C. L.; Hensel, René; McMeeking, Robert M.; Arzt, Eduard

    2017-02-01

    Bio-inspired fibrillar surfaces with reversible adhesion to stiff substrates have been thoroughly investigated over the last decade. In this paper we propose a novel composite fibril consisting of a soft tip layer and stiffer stalk with differently shaped interfaces (flat vs. curved) between them. A tensile stress is applied remotely on the free end of the fibril whose other end adheres to a rigid substrate. The stress distributions and the resulting adhesion of such structures were numerically investigated under plane strain (2 D) and axisymmetric (3 D) conditions. The stress intensities were evaluated for different combinations of layer thickness and Young's moduli. The adhesion strength values were found to increase for thinner layers and larger modulus ratio; these trends are also reflected in selected experimental results. The results of this paper provide a new strategy for optimizing adhesion strength of fibrillar surfaces.

  15. VEGF released by deferoxamine preconditioned mesenchymal stem cells seeded on collagen-GAG substrates enhances neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Elizabeth A.; Schenck, Thilo L.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Balmayor, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia preconditioning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to promote wound healing through HIF-1α stabilization. Preconditioned MSCs can be applied to three-dimensional biomaterials to further enhance the regenerative properties. While environmentally induced hypoxia has proven difficult in clinical settings, this study compares the wound healing capabilities of adipose derived (Ad) MSCs seeded on a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermal substrate exposed to either environmental hypoxia or FDA approved deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) to stabilize HIF-1α for wound healing. The release of hypoxia related reparative factors by the cells on the collagen-GAG substrate was evaluated to detect if DFO produces results comparable to environmentally induced hypoxia to facilitate optimal clinical settings. VEGF release increased in samples exposed to DFO. While the SDF-1α release was lower in cells exposed to environmental hypoxia in comparison to cells cultured in DFO in vitro. The AdMSC seeded biomaterial was further evaluated in a murine model. The implants where harvested after 1 days for histological, inflammatory, and protein analysis. The application of DFO to the cells could mimic and enhance the wound healing capabilities of environmentally induced hypoxia through VEGF expression and promises a more viable option in clinical settings that is not merely restricted to the laboratory. PMID:27830734

  16. Acute food restriction increases collagen breakdown and phagocytosis by mature decidual cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Spadacci-Morena, D D; Katz, S G

    2001-06-01

    An ultrastructural study was undertaken on antimesometrial mature decidual tissue of fed and food-restricted mice, on day 9 of pregnancy. The mean ad libitum food intake was established on mice from the 8th till the 9th day of pregnancy. Fed mice were used as controls. Experimental animals were divided into two groups: one was allowed to feed 25% of normal diet and the other 50%. Extracellular collagen fibrils were scarce in fed animals and conspicuous in food restriction. Granular electron-dense deposits and filamentous aggregates of disintegrating collagen fibrils were observed in all food-deprived mice but were rarely noted in fed animals. Intracellular vacuolar structures exhibited other typical cross-banded collagen immersed in finely granular electron-translucent material (clear vacuole) or electron-dense material containing collagen fibrils with a faint periodicity (dark vacuole). The clear and dark vacuoles were scarce in fed animals and evident in food-restricted mice, mainly in those 25% food restricted. Although collagen breakdown may be part of the normal process of decidual tissue remodelling our results suggest that it is enhanced in food-restricted animals. Thus it seems that collagen breakdown is a normal mechanism that may be regulated by the food intake of the pregnant animal.

  17. QHREDGS Enhances Tube Formation, Metabolism and Survival of Endothelial Cells in Collagen-Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W.; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Reis, Lewis A.; Ismail, Nesreen; Rupnick, Maria; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels) in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:24013716

  18. Supra-molecular assembly of a lumican-derived peptide amphiphile enhances its collagen-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Merlin N M; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2016-02-01

    C16-YEALRVANEVTLN, a peptide amphiphile (PA) incorporating a biologically active amino acid sequence found in lumican, has been examined for its influence upon collagen synthesis by human corneal fibroblasts in vitro, and the roles of supra-molecular assembly and activin receptor-like kinase ALK receptor signaling in this effect were assessed. Cell viability was monitored using the Alamar blue assay, and collagen synthesis was assessed using Sirius red. The role of ALK signaling was studied by receptor inhibition. Cultured human corneal fibroblasts synthesized significantly greater amounts of collagen in the presence of the PA over both 7-day and 21-day periods. The aggregation of the PA to form nanotapes resulted in a notable enhancement in this activity, with an approximately two-fold increase in collagen production per cell. This increase was reduced by the addition of an ALK inhibitor. The data presented reveal a stimulatory effect upon collagen synthesis by the primary cells of the corneal stroma, and demonstrate a direct influence of supra-molecular assembly of the PA upon the cellular response observed. The effects of PA upon fibroblasts were dependent upon ALK receptor function. These findings elucidate the role of self-assembled nanostructures in the biological activity of peptide amphiphiles, and support the potential use of a self-assembling lumican derived PA as a novel biomaterial, intended to promote collagen deposition for wound repair and tissue engineering purposes.

  19. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  20. Secreted Endothelial Cell Factors Immobilized on Collagen Scaffolds Enhance the Recipient Endothelial Cell Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Callanan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strategies to design novel vascular scaffolds are a continuing aim in tissue engineering and often such designs encompass the use of recombinant factors to enhance the performance of the scaffold. The established use of cell secretion utilized in feeder systems and conditioned media offer a source of paracrine factors, which has potential to be used in tissue-engineered (TE) scaffolds. Here we utilize this principle from endothelial cells (ECs), to create a novel TE scaffold by harnessing secreted factors and immobilizing these to collagen scaffolds. This research revealed increased cellular attachment and positive angiogenic gene upregulation responses in recipient ECs grown on these conditioned scaffolds. Also, the conditioning method did not affect the mechanical structural integrity of the scaffolds. These results may advocate the potential use of this system to improve vascular scaffolds' in vivo performance. In addition, this process may be a future method utilized to improve other tissue engineering scaffold therapies. PMID:27057474

  1. Albumin modulates lateral assembly of fibrin polymers: evidence of enhanced fine fibril formation and of unique synergism with fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Galanakis, D.K.; Lane, B.P.; Simon, S.R.

    1987-04-21

    The authors identified a new property of human albumin. It enhances formation of fine fibril (or leptofibril) structure during fibrin gelation, and by nephelometric and electron microscopic measurements, this property is independent of and synergistic with that of fibrinogen. They examined fibrin aggregation using physiologic temperatures and pH and albumin:fibrin concentration ratios below those at which the known accelerating effect on fibrin aggregation occurs. An albumin concentration dependent decrease in gel turbidity maxima was consistently demonstrable in buffers containing or lacking (2-5 mM) CaCl/sub 2/. Electron microscopic measurements of cross-sectional fibril widths, performed on sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed gels, disclosed differences between albumin-containing and control gels which were significant. Spin-labeled albumin displayed no change in electron (para) magnetic spin resonance spectral measurements during its inhibition of fibrin, indicating no perturbation on albumin conformation in the vicinities of Cys-34 and of fatty acid binding sites. Certain fibrinogen:albumin ratios designed to induce maximal inhibition yet permit gelation in the presence of either alone prevented gelation of buffer-diluted fibrin monomers. Aliquots from these which were dried and negatively stained on formvar-coated grids disclosed strands of 5-17 nm width, most displaying a 60-250-nm approximate length. The amounts of /sup 131/I-labeled coagulable fibrin which remained soluble in fibrinogen solutions were increased by albumin. They conclude that albumin enhances formation of leptofibril-rich gel domains when other plasma factors favor formation of such structures. Available evidence indicating decreased permeability implies that such gel domains limit efflux rates from the intrathrombus environment and from intra- to extravascular space.

  2. Effect of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle on collagen stabilization for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, Kunnavakkam Vinjimur; Duraipandy, N; Begum, Shajitha; Lakra, Rachita; Ramamurthy, Usha; Korrapati, Purna Sai; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2015-04-01

    The current study aims at understanding the influence of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle (CCSNP) on stability of collagen. The results indicated that curcumin caged silver nanoparticles efficiently stabilize collagen, indicated by enhanced tensile strength, fibril formation and viscosity. The tensile strength of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle cross-linked collagen and elongation at break was also found to be higher than glutaraldehyde cross-linked collagen. The physicochemical characteristics of curcumin caged nanoparticle cross-linked collagen exhibited enhanced strength. The thermal properties were also good with both thermal degradation temperature and hydrothermal stability higher than native collagen. CD analysis showed no structural disparity in spite of superior physicochemical properties suggesting the significance of curcumin caged nanoparticle mediated cross-linking. The additional enhancement in the stabilization of collagen could be attributed to multiple sites for interaction with collagen molecule provided by curcumin caged silver nanoparticles. The results of cell proliferation and anti-microbial activity assays indicated that curcumin caged silver nanoparticles promoted cell proliferation and inhibited microbial growth making it an excellent biomaterial for wound dressing application. The study opens scope for nano-biotechnological strategies for the development of alternate non-toxic cross-linking agents facilitating multiple site interaction thereby improving therapeutic values to the collagen for biomedical application.

  3. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  4. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  5. Ryanodine receptor cluster fragmentation and redistribution in persistent atrial fibrillation enhance calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Macquaide, Niall; Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Sempels, Wouter; Lenaerts, Ilse; Holemans, Patricia; Hofkens, Johan; Jafri, M. Saleet; Willems, Rik; Sipido, Karin R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In atrial fibrillation (AF), abnormalities in Ca2+ release contribute to arrhythmia generation and contractile dysfunction. We explore whether ryanodine receptor (RyR) cluster ultrastructure is altered and is associated with functional abnormalities in AF. Methods and results Using high-resolution confocal microscopy (STED), we examined RyR cluster morphology in fixed atrial myocytes from sheep with persistent AF (N = 6) and control (Ctrl; N = 6) animals. RyR clusters on average contained 15 contiguous RyRs; this did not differ between AF and Ctrl. However, the distance between clusters was significantly reduced in AF (288 ± 12 vs. 376 ± 17 nm). When RyR clusters were grouped into Ca2+ release units (CRUs), i.e. clusters separated by <150 nm, CRUs in AF had more clusters (3.43 ± 0.10 vs. 2.95 ± 0.02 in Ctrl), which were more dispersed. Furthermore, in AF cells, more RyR clusters were found between Z lines. In parallel experiments, Ca2+ sparks were monitored in live permeabilized myocytes. In AF, myocytes had >50% higher spark frequency with increased spark time to peak (TTP) and duration, and a higher incidence of macrosparks. A computational model of the CRU was used to simulate the morphological alterations observed in AF cells. Increasing cluster fragmentation to the level observed in AF cells caused the observed changes, i.e. higher spark frequency, increased TTP and duration; RyR clusters dispersed between Z-lines increased the occurrence of macrosparks. Conclusion In persistent AF, ultrastructural reorganization of RyR clusters within CRUs is associated with overactive Ca2+ release, increasing the likelihood of propagating Ca2+ release. PMID:26490742

  6. The biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan enhances the oral tolerance to type II collagen

    PubMed Central

    Porporatto, C; Canali, M M; Bianco, I D; Correa, S G

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan is a mucoadhesive polysaccharide that promotes the transmucosal absorption of peptides and proteins. At mucosal sites chitosan exhibits immunomodulatory activities and stimulates the release of regulatory cytokines. Herein we evaluated the effect of the co-administration of chitosan in the tolerance to type II collagen (CII) using an experimental model of arthritis. Rats were fed diluent (acetic acid), 1 mg CII, 1 mg chitosan or 1 mg CII + 1 mg chitosan during 5 days before immunization with CII in Freund's complete adjuvant. Systemic effects were evaluated in draining lymph nodes after antigenic challenge or during the clinical evolution of arthritis. Specific antibodies, proliferation against CII and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-10 were assessed. Clinical signs were observed 13–15 days after primary immunization. The CII : chitosan group presented the lowest incidence and developed moderate arthritis, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a anti-CII, a limited proliferation in draining lymph nodes and a lower release of IFN-γ after restimulation with CII. Our results demonstrate that chitosan enhances the tolerance to an articular antigen with a decrease in the inflammatory responses and, as a consequence, an improvement in clinical signs. PMID:19076832

  7. Bone-to-bone Fixation Enhances Functional Healing of the Porcine Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using a Collagen-Platelet Composite

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Martha M.; Magarian, Elise; Zurakowski, David; Fleming, Braden C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if providing bony stabilization between the tibia and femur would improve the structural properties of an “enhanced” ACL repair using a collagen-platelet composite when compared to the traditional (Marshall) suture technique. Methods Twelve pigs underwent unilateral ACL transection and were treated with sutures connecting the bony femoral ACL attachment site to the distal ACL stump (LIGAMENT group), or to the tibia via a bone tunnel (TIBIA group). A collagen-platelet composite was placed around the sutures to enhance the biologic repair in both groups. Anteroposterior (AP) knee laxity and the graft structural properties were measured after 15 weeks of healing in both the ACL-repaired and contralateral ACL-intact joints. Results Enhanced ACL repair with bone-to-bone fixation significantly improved yield load and linear stiffness of the ACL repairs (p<0.05) after 15 weeks of healing. However, laxity values of the knees were similar in both groups of repaired knees (p>0.10). Conclusions Using an enhanced ACL suture repair technique that includes bone-to-bone fixation to protect the repair in the initial healing stages resulted in an ACL with improved structural properties after 15 weeks in the porcine model. Clinical Relevance The healing response of an ACL suture repair using a collagen-platelet composite can be enhanced by providing bony stabilization between the tibia and femur to protect the graft during the initial healing process in a translational model. PMID:20810092

  8. Genetic linkage to the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in 26 families with generalised recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and anchoring fibril abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Dunnill, M G; Richards, A J; Milana, G; Mollica, F; Atherton, D; Winship, I; Farrall, M; al-Imara, L; Eady, R A; Pope, F M

    1994-01-01

    To strengthen the evidence for genetic linkage to COL7A1, we have studied 26 generalised recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (EB) families of British, Italian, Irish, and South African origin. We chose two linkage markers, a COL7A1 PvuII intragenic polymorphism and a highly informative anonymous microsatellite marker, D3S1100, which maps close to the COL7A1 locus at 3p21.1-3. Diagnosis was established by family history, clinical examination, immunofluorescence, and ultrastructural studies. The PvuII marker was informative in 16 families with a maximum lod score (Zmax) of 3.51 at recombination fraction (theta) = 0. The D3S1100 microsatellite was informative in 24 out of 25 families with Zmax = 6.8 at theta = 0.05 (Z = 4.94 at theta = 0) and no obligatory recombination events. These data strongly suggest that COL7A1 mutations cause EB in these families and, combined with previous studies, indicate locus homogeneity. The importance of anchoring fibrils for dermal-epidermal adhesion is further underlined. D3S1100 may later prove useful in prenatal diagnosis of this disease, if used in combination with other markers. Images PMID:7837248

  9. Mandibular Cartilage Collagen Network Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mandibular condyle cartilage (MCC) has a unique structure among articular cartilages; however, little is known about its nanoscale collagen network architecture, hampering design of regeneration therapies and rigorous evaluation of regeneration experiment outcomes in preclinical research. Helium ion microscopy is a novel technology with a long depth of field that is uniquely suited to imaging open 3D collagen networks at multiple scales without obscuring conductive coatings. Objective The objective of this research was to image, at the micro- and nanoscales, the depth-dependent MCC collagen network architecture. Design MCC was collected from New Zealand white rabbits. Images of MCC zones were acquired using helium ion, transmission electron, and light microscopy. Network fibril and canal diameters were measured. Results For the first time, the MCC was visualized as a 3D collagen fibril structure at the nanoscale, the length scale of network assembly. Fibril diameters ranged from 7 to 110 nm and varied by zone. The articular surface was composed of a fine mesh that was woven through thin layers of larger fibrils. The fibrous zone was composed of approximately orthogonal lamellae of aligned fibrils. Fibrocyte processes surrounded collagen bundles forming extracellular compartments. The proliferative, mature, and hypertrophic zones were composed of a branched network that was progressively remodeled to accommodate chondrocyte hypertrophy. Osteoid fibrils were woven around osteoblast cytoplasmic processes to create numerous canals similar in size to canaliculi of mature bone. Conclusion This multiscale investigation advances our foundational understanding of the complex, layered 3D architecture of the MCC collagen network. PMID:27375843

  10. A biomaterial composed of collagen and solubilized elastin enhances angiogenesis and elastic fiber formation without calcification.

    PubMed

    Daamen, Willeke F; Nillesen, Suzan T M; Wismans, Ronnie G; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Hafmans, Theo; Veerkamp, Jacques H; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2008-03-01

    Elastin is the prime protein in elastic tissues that contributes to elasticity of, for example, lung, aorta, and skin. Upon injury, elastic fibers are not readily replaced, which hampers tissue regeneration. Incorporation of solubilized elastin (hydrolyzed insoluble elastin fibers or elastin peptides) in biomaterials may improve regeneration, because solubilized elastin is able to promote proliferation as well as elastin synthesis. Porous biomaterials composed of highly purified collagen without and without elastin fibers or solubilized elastin were prepared by freezing and lyophilization. Solubilized elastin formed spherical structures that were incorporated in the collagenous part of the scaffolds and that persisted after chemical crosslinking of the scaffolds. Crosslinked scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in young Sprague Dawley rats. Collagen-solubilized elastin and collagen scaffolds showed no calcification in this sensitive calcification model, in contrast to scaffolds containing elastin fibers. Collagen-solubilized elastin scaffolds also induced angiogenesis, as revealed by type IV collagen staining, and promoted elastic fiber synthesis, as shown with antibodies against rat elastin and fibrillin-1. It is concluded that scaffolds produced from collagen and solubilized elastin present a non-calcifying biomaterial with a capacity for soft-tissue regeneration, especially in relation to elastic fiber synthesis.

  11. Sericin enhances the bioperformance of collagen-based matrices preseeded with human-adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs).

    PubMed

    Dinescu, Sorina; Galateanu, Bianca; Albu, Madalina; Cimpean, Anisoara; Dinischiotu, Anca; Costache, Marieta

    2013-01-16

    Current clinical strategies for adipose tissue engineering (ATE), including autologous fat implants or the use of synthetic surrogates, not only are failing in the long term, but also can't face the latest requirements regarding the aesthetic restoration of the resulted imperfections. In this context, modern strategies in current ATE applications are based on the implantation of 3D cell-scaffold bioconstructs, designed for prospective achievement of in situ functional de novo tissue. Thus, in this paper, we reported for the first time the evaluation of a spongious 60% collagen and 40% sericin scaffold preseeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in terms of biocompatibility and adipogenic potential in vitro. We showed that the addition of the sticky protein sericin in the composition of a classical collagen sponge enhanced the adhesion and also the proliferation rate of the seeded cells, thus improving the biocompatibility of the novel scaffold. In addition, sericin stimulated PPARγ2 overexpression, triggering a subsequent upregulated expression profile of FAS, aP2 and perilipin adipogenic markers. These features, together with the already known sericin stimulatory potential on cellular collagen production, promote collagen-sericin biomatrix as a good candidate for soft tissue reconstruction and wound healing applications.

  12. Collagen immobilization of multi-layered BCP-ZrO2 bone substitutes to enhance bone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linh, Nguyen Thuy Ba; Jang, Dong-Woo; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2015-08-01

    A porous microstructure of multi-layered BCP-ZrO2 bone substitutes was fabricated using the sponge replica method in which the highly interconnected structure was immobilized with collagen via ethyl(dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide crosslinking. Their struts are combined with a three-layered BCP/BCP-ZrO2/ZrO2 microstructure. Collagen fibers were firmly attached to the strut surface of the BCP-ZrO2 scaffolds. With control of the three-layered microstructure and collagen immobilization, the compressive strength of the scaffolds increased significantly to 6.8 MPa compared to that of the monolithic BCP scaffolds (1.3 MPa). An in vitro study using MTT, confocal observation, and real-time polymer chain reaction analysis demonstrated that the proliferation and differentiation of the pre-osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells was improved due to the collagen incorporation. Remarkable enhancement of bone regeneration was observed without any immunological reaction in the femurs of rabbits during 1 and 5 months of implantation. Furthermore, the interfaces between new bone and the scaffold struts bonded directly without any gaps.

  13. Type I collagen-mediated synthesis of noble metallic nanoparticles networks and the applications in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sun, Lanlan; Zhang, Baohua; Xu, Fugang; Liu, Zhelin; Guo, Cunlan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhuang

    2009-08-15

    In this paper, we demonstrated an effective environmentally friendly synthesis route to prepare noble metallic (Au, Ag, Pt and Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) networks mediated by type I collagen in the absence of any seeds or surfactants. In the reactions, type I collagen served as stabilizing agent and assembly template for the synthesized metallic NPs. The hydrophobic interaction between collagen and mica interface as well as the hydrogen bonds between inter- and intra-collagen molecules play important roles in the formation of collagen-metallic NPs networks. The noble metallic NPs networks have many advantages in the applications of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and electrochemistry detection. Typically, the as-prepared Ag NPs networks reveal great Raman enhancement activity for 4-ATP, and can even be used to detect low concentration of DNA base, adenine, without any label step. Furthermore, the cyclic voltammograms showed Pt NPs networks have good electrocatalytic ability for the reduction of O(2).

  14. Ventricular Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine that produces a magnetic field that aligns atomic particles in some of your cells. Radio waves ... fibrillation is caused by a change in the structure of your heart, such as scarred tissue from ...

  15. Structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix and the influence to its integrity and stability.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuying; Patra, Prabir; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is a chain-like disaccharide that is linked to polypeptide core to connect two collagen fibrils/fibers and provide the intermolecular force in Collagen-GAG matrix (C-G matrix). Thus, the distribution of GAG in C-G matrix contributes to the integrity and mechanical properties of the matrix and related tissue. This paper analyzes the transverse isotropic distribution of GAG in C-G matrix. The angle of GAGs related to collagen fibrils is used as parameters to qualify the GAGs isotropic characteristic in both 3D and 2D rendering. Statistical results included that over one third of GAGs were perpendicular directed to collagen fibril with symmetrical distribution for both 3D matrix and 2D plane cross through collagen fibrils. The three factors tested in this paper: collagen radius, collagen distribution, and GAGs density, were not statistically significant for the strength of Collagen-GAG matrix in 3D rendering. However in 2D rendering, a significant factor found was the radius of collagen in matrix for the GAGs directed to orthogonal plane of Collagen-GAG matrix. Between two cross-section selected from Collagen-GAG matrix model, the plane cross through collagen fibrils was symmetrically distributed but the total percentage of perpendicular directed GAG was deducted by decreasing collagen radius. There were some symmetry features of GAGs angle distribution in selected 2D plane that passed through space between collagen fibrils, but most models showed multiple peaks in GAGs angle distribution. With less GAGs directed to perpendicular of collagen fibril, strength in collagen cross-section weakened. Collagen distribution was also a factor that influences GAGs angle distribution in 2D rendering. True hexagonal collagen packaging is reported in this paper to have less strength at collagen cross-section compared to quasi-hexagonal collagen arrangement. In this work focus is on GAGs matrix within the collagen and its relevance to anisotropy.

  16. [Atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia characterized by no-coordinated atrial contraction that results in an inefficient atrial systole. The clinical classification of atrial fibrillation includes: ocassional, paroxysmal, persistent, and permanent. Multiple mechanisms have been described and accounts for a single ECG manifestation. Treatment should be individualized and has to considered several aspects including age, associated heart disease, and symptoms. Treatment strategies are: rhythm control, rate control, and thromboprophylaxis.

  17. Eumelanin fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueenie, Ross; Sutter, Jens; Karolin, Jan; Birch, David J. S.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the auto-oxidation of 3, 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) in the synthesis of eumelanin to spontaneously produce fibrils upon drying. The self-assembled fibrils are of characteristic diameter ~1 to 2 μm, composed of filaments, and are unidirectional, apart from branches that are formed at typically an angle of 20 to 22 deg. The fibrils are characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay times, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The fibrils mimic natural melanin in consisting of core eumelanin with efficient nonradiative properties, but they also display pockets of electronically isolated species with higher radiative rates on the nanosecond timescale. Eumelanin fibrils formed occasionally in solution are tentatively attributed to a scaffold of bacteria or fungus. Fabricating and characterizing novel synthetic eumelanin structures such as fibrils are of interest in helping to reveal a functional structure for eumelanin, in understanding its photophysics, in learning more about L-DOPA as it is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and in producing novel materials which might embody some of the diverse properties of eumelanin.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... your body's cells and organs. Read More "Atrial Fibrillation" Articles Atrial Fibrillation / Who Is at Risk for ...

  19. Calcium alginate enhances wound healing by up-regulating the ratio of collagen types I/III in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gu, Qisheng; Zhao, Jun; Mei, Jiacai; Shao, Mingzhe; Pan, Ye; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haisheng; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Calcium alginate has been proved to favor the skin ulcer healing and collagen synthesis was a critical factor for the wound closure. The present study was to elucidate the mechanism of calcium alginate on the diabetes skin ulceration. Calcium alginate dressing was applied daily on the full-thickness exercising wound created on the back of diabetic rat model as Alg-group (n=6), and the vaseline dressing was used as control (n=6). Rats were respectively sacrificed and the wound tissues were removed and used for the evaluation of various biochemical analysis contained collagen (type I and III) by Western blotting and hydroxyproline level changes by ELISA assay at 3 d, 7 d and 14 d after wounding. The expression of skin collagen I in Alg-group was enhanced from day 3 (0.66±0.25 vs. 0.42±0.09, P<0.05) to day 14 (1.09±0.14 vs. 0.78±0.16, P<0.05). However, no significant difference of collagen III expression was found between two groups during wound healing (P>0.05). And the ratio of collagen I/III in Alg-group was greater than that of Vas-group at day 7 (1.07±0.31 vs. 0.77±0.11, P<0.05) and 14 (1.18±0.30 vs. 0.83±0.14, P<0.05). The hydroxyproline level in skin homogenate of Alg-group was higher than that of Vas-group from day 3 (30.29±0.92 ng/ml vs. 27.52±0.83 ng/ml, P<0.05) to day 14 (89.58±4.97 ng/ml vs. 79.30±4.42 ng/ml, P<0.05). Calcium alginate accelerates the process of wound healing through improving type I collagen synthesis and increasing ratio of collagen I/III in diabetic rats. PMID:26261545

  20. A copper sulfate and hydroxylysine treatment regimen for enhancing collagen cross-linking and biomechanical properties in engineered neocartilage.

    PubMed

    Makris, Eleftherios A; MacBarb, Regina F; Responte, Donald J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the biomechanical properties of engineered neotissues through promoting the development of collagen cross-links. It was hypothesized that supplementing medium with copper sulfate and the amino acid hydroxylysine would enhance the activity of lysyl oxidase enzyme to form collagen cross-links, increasing the strength and integrity of the neotissue. Neocartilage constructs were generated using a scaffoldless, self-assembling process and treated with copper sulfate and hydroxylysine, either alone or in combination, following a 2-factor, full-factorial study design. Following a 6-wk culture period, the biomechanical and biochemical properties of the constructs were measured. Results found copper sulfate to significantly increase pyridinoline (PYR) cross-links in all copper sulfate-containing groups over controls. When copper sulfate and hydroxylysine were combined, the result was synergistic, with a 10-fold increase in PYR content over controls. This increase in PYR cross-links manifested in a 3.3-fold significant increase in the tensile properties of the copper sulfate + hydroxylysine group. In addition, an 123% increase over control values was detected in the copper sulfate group in terms of the aggregate modulus. These data elucidate the role of copper sulfate and hydroxylysine toward improving the biomechanical properties of neotissues through collagen cross-linking enhancement.

  1. Subfibrillar architecture and functional properties of collagen: a comparative study in rat tendons.

    PubMed Central

    Raspanti, M; Ottani, V; Ruggeri, A

    1990-01-01

    Collagen fibrils from different rat tendons have been investigated by freeze-fracture and transmission electron microscopy. In all cases, marked differences in both fibril morphology and subfibrillar organisation have been consistently found between the tendon core (composed of large and heterogeneous fibrils comprising tightly-packed, straight, parallel molecules) and sheath (showing small, uniform collagen fibrils with a helical arrangement of the molecules). The bio-mechanical requirements to which these tissues are subjected suggest, as do previous observations on other tissues, that a causal correlation exists between substructure and collagen fibril function. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2272900

  2. Stabilization of collagen with EDC/NHS in the presence of L-lysine: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Usha, R; Sreeram, K J; Rajaram, A

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports the effect of L-lysine on the conformational, rheological, and thermal properties of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross linked collagen and investigates the influence of l-lysine on the self assembly processes of collagen. In the absence of L-lysine, the rheological characterization of collagen cross linked with EDC/NHS showed an increase in shearing stress with shearing speed indicating that the collagen chains become rigid and the molecules are reluctant to flow. On the other hand, the increase in shearing stress with shearing speed is comparatively much less in the presence of L-lysine indicating a greater flexibility of the collagen molecules. The self assembly processes of collagen treated with EDC/NHS in the absence and presence of L-lysine were characterized using powder XRD, FT-IR, polarizing optical microscopy and kinetic studies. XRD studies show an increase in peak intensity and sharpness in the presence of L-lysine indicating the enhancement of crystallinity of collagen nano-fibrils. FT-IR results suggest that the incorporation of L-lysine in the EDC/NHS cross linking favors the molecular stability of collagen. From the present study, it is possible to conclude that the pre-treatment of collagen with L-lysine enhances EDC/NHS cross linking and can be used for biomaterial applications.

  3. Enhancement of enzymatic accessibility by fibrillation of woody biomass using batch-type kneader with twin-screw elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Endo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Fibrillation of wood cell walls into submicron and/or nanoscale fibers was successfully carried out in the presence of water by using a batch-type kneader with combination-available twin-screw elements. The results obtained are expected to be used for the application of a twin-screw extruder. Two types of screw combinations were used for applying different shearing and distribution forces. Most of the fibers of the fibrillated products had diameters less than 1 microm, and some of them had diameters less than 100 nm. The maximum glucose yield by enzymatic saccharification was found to be 54.2% in the fibrillated products kneaded for 20 min after ball milling for 20 min using a screw combination for applying high shearing force. The fibrillation increased the surface area of cellulose. The glucose yield was improved by cooking the fibrillated products with water at 135 degrees C under 0.25 MPa, revealing that only mechanical kneading appears to have some limitation to expose cellulose for complete enzymatic saccharification.

  4. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  5. Glutaraldehyde assisted synthesis of collagen derivative modified Fe3+/TiO2 nanocomposite and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chongyi; Xue, Feng; Ding, Enyong; He, Xiaoling

    2015-11-01

    A unique organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was designed and synthesized by chemically anchoring the cationic collagen-based derivatives onto the surface of Fe3+/TiO2 nanospheres for the significant enhancement in photocatalytic activity under the visible light irradiation. The NMR analysis suggested the successful fabrication of cationic collagen-g-PDMC as grafted materials. In addition, the chemical structures, morphologies and properties of these samples were systematically characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum, ultra violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoluminescence (PL). And obtained results clearly demonstrated that Fe3+ ions diffusing into TiO2 lattice could be responsible for slightly reducing the average diameter of nanospheres to about 125 nm, promoting phase transition from anatase to rutile to some extent and extending the light harvesting range into visible region markedly. Meanwhile, the achievement that collagen-g-PDMC molecules had been covalently immobilized onto the surface of Fe3+/TiO2 nanoparticles was also well supported by the information acquired. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activities of all the as-prepared products were carefully evaluated by adopting photocatalytic decoloration of methyl orange (MO) solution under the solar direct irradiation, and the sample CFT-3 performed the best in the photocatalytic degradation process, which was mainly attributed to the energetic synergistic effect brought about by Fe3+ ions doping and collagen-g-PDMC molecules immobilized on the surface.

  6. Differential anion effects on thermal stability of collagen in the dispersed and aggregated states.

    PubMed

    Russell, A E

    1974-03-01

    The effects of KCNS and KI on thermal transition temperatures of calf skin collagen molecules in dilute acid solution and precipitated collagen fibrils from the same source were compared as a function of salt concentration and pH. The two salts produced qualitatively similar effects on each collagen form, but the response shown by single collagen molecules in dilute solution differed from that observed for molecular aggregates present in native-type fibrils.

  7. Transdermal nicotine patch enhances type I collagen synthesis in abstinent smokers.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Lars T; Jorgensen, Lars N; Zillmer, Rikke; Vange, Jakob; Hemmingsen, Ulla; Gottrup, Finn

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smokers deposit less collagen, expressed as hydroxyproline, in granulation tissue than nonsmokers. We studied the effect of abstinence from smoking and transdermal nicotine patches on deposition of hydroxyproline, proline, type I procollagen, and total proteins. Fifty-four healthy smokers were studied during 10 days of smoking and again from days 10 to 20 following smoking cessation. After the first 10 days of abstinence they were randomized to double-blind treatment with transdermal nicotine patches of 25 mg/day or placebo for a period of 10 days. During this period and during smoking, an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tube was implanted into the subcutis. Following removal of the implant, total amino acids and peptides were extracted. Hydroxyproline and proline were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography, type I procollagen was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunoassay, and total proteins were determined colorimetrically. In the 39 subjects who complied with the study protocol, abstinence from smoking did not affect the deposition of hydroxyproline, proline, type I procollagen, or total protein in the implants. During abstinence, the type I procollagen level increased by 18% in the transdermal nicotine patches group and decreased by 10% in the placebo group (p<0.05). We conclude that 20 days of abstinence from smoking does not affect collagen deposition in granulation tissue. However, in abstinent smokers, transdermal nicotine patches appears to increase type I collagen synthesis.

  8. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem.

  9. The Role of Collagen Quaternary Structure in the Platelet:Collagen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Lawrence F.; Bensusan, Howard B.

    1974-01-01

    We have investigated whether collagen queternary structure is required for the platelet: collagen interaction. Quaternary structure refers to the assembly of collagen monomers (tropocollagen) into polymers (native-type fibrils). Purified monomeric collagen was prepared from acetic acid extracts of fetal calfskin. Polymeric collagen was prepared by dispersion of bovine Achilles tendon collagen and by incubation of monomeric collagen at 37°C and pH 7.4. The state of polymerization was confirmed by electron microscopy. Release of platelet serotonin in the absence of platelet aggregation was used to determine the effectiveness of the platelet: collagen interaction. All forms of collagen produced serotonin release only after a lag period, but polymeric collagen gave a shorter lag period than did monomeric collagen. Monomeric collagen was also quanidinated selectively to convert collagen lysine groups to homoarginine, while leaving the arrangement of polar groups intact. Guanidination of monomeric collagen increased the rate of polymerization and reduced the lag time in serotonin release. Glucosamine (17 mM) retarded polymerization and inhibited the release of platelet serotonin by monomeric collagen but had little effect on release produced by thrombin or polymeric collagen. At the same concentration, glucosamine did not reduce the sensitivity of platelets to stimulation by collagen or block the platelet: collagen interaction. The only effect of glucosamine was on the collagen: collagen interaction. Galactosamine had a similar effect, but glucose, galactose, and N-acetylglycosamine had no effect. We conclude from this data that collagen monomers cannot effectively interact with platelets and that, therefore, collagen quaternary structure has a role in the recognition of collagen by platelets. PMID:4215825

  10. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    PubMed

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  11. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    weeks. Taken together, these findings illustrate the advantages of incorporating collagen as a means to enhance cell migration and proliferation in porous scaffolds which could be used to augment tissue repair strategies.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zimetbaum, Peter

    2017-03-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of atrial fibrillation, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Treatment for atrial fibrillation depends on how often you have symptoms, how ...

  14. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  15. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  16. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Auricular fibrillation - discharge; A-fib - discharge; AF - discharge; Afib - discharge ... been in the hospital because you have atrial fibrillation . This condition occurs when your heart beats faster ...

  17. A three-dimensional hierarchical collagen scaffold fabricated by a combined solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and electrospinning process to enhance mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeungHyun; Koh, Young Ho; Kim, GeunHyung

    2010-06-01

    Collagen has the advantage of being very similar to macromolecular substances that can be recognized and metabolized in the biological environment. Although the natural material has superior property for this purpose, its use to fabricate reproducible and pore-structure-controlled 3D structures, which are designed to allow the entry of sufficient cells and the easy diffusion of nutrients, has been limited due to its low processability. Here, we propose a hybrid technology that combines a cryogenic plotting system with an electrospinning process. Using this technique, an easily pore-size-controllable hierarchical 3D scaffold consisting of micro-sized highly porous collagen strands and micro/nano-sized collagen fibers was fabricated. The pore structure of the collagen scaffold was controlled by the collagen micro/nanofibers, which were layered in the scaffold. The hierarchical scaffolds were characterized with respect to initial cell attachment and proliferation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells within the scaffolds. The hierarchical scaffold exhibited incredibly enhanced initial cell attachment and cell compactness between pores of the plotted scaffold relative to the normally designed 3D collagen scaffold.

  18. Maternal overnutrition enhances mRNA expression of adipogenic markers and collagen deposition in skeletal muscle of beef cattle fetuses.

    PubMed

    Duarte, M S; Gionbelli, M P; Paulino, P V R; Serão, N V L; Nascimento, C S; Botelho, M E; Martins, T S; Filho, S C V; Dodson, M V; Guimarães, S E F; Du, M

    2014-09-01

    Twenty-four pregnant Nellore cows were randomly assigned into 2 feeding level groups (control [CTL]; fed 1.0 times the maintenance requirement; n = 12; and overnourished [ON]; fed at 1.5 times the maintenance requirement; n = 12) to evaluate effects of maternal overnutrition on fetal skeletal muscle development. Cows were slaughtered at 135, 190, and 240 d of gestation and samples of fetal LM were collected for analysis of mRNA expression analysis and for histological evaluation of collagen content and number of muscle cells. There was no interaction between gestational period and maternal nutrition for the variables evaluated (P > 0.05). The mRNA expression of Cadherin-associated protein, β 1 (β-catenin) tended to be greater in fetuses from ON cows (P = 0.08), while myogenic differentiation 1 (MyoD; P = 0.56), myogenin (MyoG; P = 0.70), and the number of muscle cells (P = 0.90) were not affected by maternal overnutrition. Gestational period did not affect the mRNA expression of β-catenin (P = 0.60) and MyoG (P = 0.21). The mRNA expression of MyoD tended to increase with days of gestation (P = 0.06). The mRNA expression of zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423; P < 0.0001), C/EBPα (P = 0.01), and PPARγ (P < 0.0001) were enhanced in ON fetuses. No effects of days of gestation were observed for mRNA expression of Zfp423 (P = 0.75) and C/EBPα (P = 0.48). The mRNA expression of PPARγ in fetuses at 190 d of gestation tended to be greater than those at 135 and 240 d of gestation (P = 0.06). The mRNA expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β; P < 0.0001), collagen type III, α I (COL3A1; P < 0.0001), and collagen content (P = 0.01) were increased in ON fetuses. Gestational period did not affect the mRNA expression of collagen type I, α I (COL1A1; P = 0.65). The mRNA expression of COL3A1 (P = 0.09) in fetuses at 190 d of gestation tended to be greater than fetuses at 135 and 240 d of gestation. The mRNA expression of TGF-β in fetuses at 190 d of gestation was

  19. Chitosan-collagen biomembrane embedded with calcium-aluminate enhances dentinogenic potential of pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Rosseto, Hebert Luís; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Salles; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomaterials capable of driving dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells able to secrete reparative dentin is the goal of current conservative dentistry. In the present investigation, a biomembrane (BM) composed of a chitosan/collagen matrix embedded with calcium-aluminate microparticles was tested. The BM was produced by mixing collagen gel with a chitosan solution (2:1), and then adding bioactive calcium-aluminate cement as the mineral phase. An inert material (polystyrene) was used as the negative control. Human dental pulp cells were seeded onto the surface of certain materials, and the cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell proliferation and cell morphology, assessed after 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in culture. The odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, total protein production, gene expression of DMP-1/DSPP and mineralized nodule deposition. The pulp cells were able to attach onto the BM surface and spread, displaying a faster proliferative rate at initial periods than that of the control cells. The BM also acted on the cells to induce more intense ALP activity, protein production at 14 days, and higher gene expression of DSPP and DMP-1 at 28 days, leading to the deposition of about five times more mineralized matrix than the cells in the control group. Therefore, the experimental biomembrane induced the differentiation of pulp cells into odontoblast-like cells featuring a highly secretory phenotype. This innovative bioactive material can drive other protocols for dental pulp exposure treatment by inducing the regeneration of dentin tissue mediated by resident cells.

  20. Enhancing FTIR imaging capabilities with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS): A study of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Eric Y.; Rieppo, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    This paper explores a new application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in FTIR spectroscopic imaging analysis of biological samples. A particular example demonstrated in this paper is the characterization of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage. A focal plane array detector-based FTIR imaging system has been proven to be an efficient tool to detect early collagen and proteoglycans degradation in developing osteoarthrosis through evaluating compositional changes of osteoarthritic cartilage along the depth. However, the closely overlapped bands of collagen and proteoglycans make normal spectral and spatial analysis difficult. With 2DCOS analysis of the imaging data, it is possible to enhance the spectral resolution and reveal distinctive compositional changes that are normally hidden with conventional approaches. The combined technique, FTIR imaging enhanced with 2DCOS, provides new possibilities to solve challenging problems in the analysis of complex biological systems.

  1. Second harmonic generation in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Karen M.; Stoller, Patrick; Celliers, Peter; Rubenchik, Alexander; Bratton, Clay; Yankelevich, Diego

    2003-11-01

    Collagen possesses a strong second order nonlinear susceptibility; when it is irradiated with intense laser light, some of the reflected and transmitted light will have twice the frequency of the incident beam, a phenomenon known as second harmonic generation (SHG). Polarization modulation of an ultra-short pulse laser beam can be used to simultaneously measure collagen fiber orientation, SHG intensity, and a parameter related to the second order non-linear susceptibility. This technique has made it possible to discriminate among patterns of fibrillar orientation in many tissues. In the present study the role that organizational complexity plays in the relationship between nonlinear optical properties and collagen structure is investigated. As a component of tissues and organs, collagen"s structure and function is inextricably intertwined with that of the many other matrix components; to what extent do these noncollagenous components affect its nonlinear properties? To answer this, we investigated SHG in two different collagenous tissues, liver and cartilage; in addition we looked at the effect of progressive pathological changes in these tissues on SHG. At the other end of the spectrum, we studied collagen organized at the minimal level of complexity necessary for SHG detection: fibrils generated from solutions containing only a single type of collagen. Data obtained from these studies suggest that collagen"s strong nonlinear susceptibility, a property no other biologically significant macromolecule shares to the same degree, may serve as more than the basis of a novel imaging device for soft tissue. Collagen"s nonlinear optical properties in conjunction with its vast capacity for self-initiated conformational change--through self-assembly, site recognition, post-translational modification, and the like -make it an attractive candidate molecule for any of several demanding engineering applications, such as nanopatterning.

  2. Atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further research into AF epidemiology, genetics, detection, and treatments continues to push forward rapidly as the worldwide population ages dramatically over the next 20 years. PMID:24474959

  3. OPTIMIZING COLLAGEN TRANSPORT THROUGH TRACK-ETCHED NANOPORES

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Ericka M.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer transport through nanopores is a potentially powerful tool for separation and organization of molecules in biotechnology applications. Our goal is to produce aligned collagen fibrils by mimicking cell-mediated collagen assembly: driving collagen monomers in solution through the aligned nanopores in track-etched membranes followed by fibrillogenesis at the pore exit. We examined type I atelo-collagen monomer transport in neutral, cold solution through polycarbonate track-etched membranes comprising 80-nm-diameter, 6-μm-long pores at 2% areal fraction. Source concentrations of 1.0, 2.8 and 7.0 mg/ml and pressure differentials of 0, 10 and 20 inH2O were used. Membrane surfaces were hydrophilized via covalent poly(ethylene-glycol) binding to limit solute-membrane interaction. Collagen transport through the nanopores was a non-intuitive process due to the complex behavior of this associating molecule in semi-dilute solution. Nonetheless, a modified open pore model provided reasonable predictions of transport parameters. Transport rates were concentration- and pressure-dependent, with diffusivities across the membrane in semi-dilute solution two-fold those in dilute solution, possibly via cooperative diffusion or polymer entrainment. The most significant enhancement of collagen transport was accomplished by membrane hydrophilization. The highest concentration transported (5.99±2.58 mg/ml) with the highest monomer flux (2.60±0.49 ×103 molecules s-1 pore-1) was observed using 2.8 mg collagen/ml, 10 inH2O and hydrophilic membranes. PMID:21394216

  4. Liposomes encapsulating Aloe vera leaf gel extract significantly enhance proliferation and collagen synthesis in human skin cell lines.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Kitamoto, Dai; Asikin, Yonathan; Takara, Kensaku; Wada, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Aloe vela leaf gel extract (AGE) are widely used as cosmetic and pharmaceutical ingredients because of its versatile skin care properties. In order to enhance the bioavailability of AGE, liposomes encapsulating AGE were prepared and examined for their interfacial and biochemical properties. The liposomes prepared from a soybean lecithin (SLP-WHITE, 1.0 wt%) by the Bangham method gave relatively a good trapping efficiency up to the AGE concentration of 0.5 wt%. The stable liposomes were then prepared from 1.0 wt% of SLP-WHITE and different concentrations of AGE by the mechanochemical method using a homogenizer and microfluidizer. The liposomes obtained from 0.25 wt% of AGE were confirmed to be small unilamellar vesicles with a diameter of less than 200 nm, and remained well dispersed for at least two weeks. The obtained liposomes encapsulating AGE were further examined for the effects on proliferation and type I collagen synthesis in normal human neonatal skin fibroblasts, NB1RGB cells. Liposomal AGE clearly showed higher proliferation rate than that of AGE alone. In addition, compared to the control, liposomal AGE significantly increased the collagen synthesis by 23%, while AGE alone showed a small effect. Liposomal AGE was also assayed for the effect on proliferation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes, NHEK(F) cells. Interestingly, liposomal AGE fractions containing 4 and 20 microg/mL of the extract considerably increased the proliferation rate by 77% and 101%, respectively. In contrast, AGE alone fractions containing 4 and 20 microg/mL of the extract increased the rate by 41% and 60%, respectively. Accordingly, the bioavailability and skin care properties of AGE will be significantly enhanced by liposome encapsulation, and the present liposomal AGE should have a great potential as an effective skin care formulation.

  5. Modulating the Rigidity and Mineralization of Collagen Gels Using Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    DeVolder, Ross J.; Kim, Il Won; Kim, Eun-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to prepare osteoconductive collagen gels for the regeneration of normal bone and the pathological examination of diseased bone; however, collagen gels are often plagued by limited controllability of their rigidity and mineral deposition. This study reports a simple but efficient strategy that tunes the mechanical properties of, and apatite formation in, collagen gels by incorporating hydrolyzable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles within the gels. The PLGA microparticles are associated with the collagen fibrils and increased both the gel's elasticity and rigidity while minimally influencing its permeability. As compared with pure collagen gels, the PLGA microparticle-filled collagen gels, termed PLGA-Col hydrogels, significantly enhanced the deposition of apatite-like minerals within the gels when incubated in simulated body fluid or encapsulated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) undergoing osteogenic differentiation. Finally, PLGA-Col hydrogels mineralized by differentiated MSCs led to an enhanced formation of bone-like tissues within the hydrogels. Overall, the PLGA-Col hydrogel system developed in this study will serve to improve the quality of osteoconductive matrices for both fundamental and clinical studies that are relevant to bone repair, regeneration, and pathogenesis. PMID:22480235

  6. The Acute Inflammatory Response to Absorbed Collagen Sponge Is Not Enhanced by BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hairong; Wismeijer, Daniel; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Wu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Absorbed collagen sponge (ACS)/bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) are widely used in clinical practise for bone regeneration. However, the application of this product was found to be associated with a significant pro-inflammatory response, particularly in the early phase after implantation. This study aimed to clarify if the pro-inflammatory activities, associated with BMP-2 added to ACS, were related to the physical state of the carrier itself, i.e., a wet or a highly dehydrated state of the ACS, to the local degree of vascularisation and/or to local biomechanical factors. ACS (0.8 cm diameter)/BMP-2 were implanted subcutaneously in the back of 12 eight-week-old Sprague Dawley rats. Two days after surgery, the implanted materials were retrieved and analysed histologically and histomorphometrically. The acute inflammatory response following implantation of ACS was dependent of neither the presence or absence of BMP-2 nor the degree of vascularization in the surrounding tissue nor the hydration state (wet versus dry) of the ACS material at the time of implantation. Differential micro biomechanical factors operating at the implantation site appeared to have an influence on the thickness of inflammation. We conclude that the degree of the early inflammatory response of the ACS/BMP-2 may be associated with the physical and chemical properties of the carrier material itself. PMID:28245606

  7. The effect of gamma irradiation on injectable human amnion collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.C.; Harrell, R.; Davis, R.H.; Dresden, M.H.; Spira, M. )

    1989-08-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the physicochemical properties of injectable human amnion collagen was investigated. Pepsin-extracted human amnion collagen was purified, reconstituted, and irradiated with varying doses of gamma irradiation (0.25 Mrads to 2.5 Mrads). Gamma irradiation had a significant impact on the physical characteristics of the collagen. The neutral solubility of collagen in PBS at 45{degrees}C was decreased from 100% for the nonirradiated control sample to 16% for the 2.5 Mrads irradiated sample. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also demonstrated the dose-dependent effect of gamma irradiation on collagen cross-links. Electron microscopic observation revealed that even at low irradiation dose (0.25 Mrads), collagen fibril diameter increased. The average diameter was 50 nm for nonirradiated control fibrils, while 4.4% of the irradiated collagen fibrils had a diameter greater than 100 nm. Irradiated collagen showed little evidence of damage. Well-preserved cross-striations were found in collagen fibrils at all doses of irradiation. Native amnion collagen irradiated with gamma rays demonstrated a slight increase in resistance to collagenase degradation compared with nonirradiated native collagen samples. Increased resistance to collagenase did not correlate with increasing irradiation dose. After 30 min of incubation at 37{degrees}C, both irradiated and nonirradiated collagen was completely digested by collagenase. However, gamma-irradiated collagen did become more sensitive to hydrolysis by trypsin. The higher the irradiation doses used, the greater sensitivity to trypsin was observed. At 0.25 Mrads irradiation only a slight increase was found. No marked differences in amino acid composition were noted among the high dose irradiated, low dose irradiated and control amnion collagen.

  8. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Type II Collagen Expression via a SOX9-dependent Enhancer in Intron 6.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hideyo; Oh, Chun-do; Chen, Di; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-13

    Type II collagen α1 is specific for cartilaginous tissues, and mutations in its gene are associated with skeletal diseases. Its expression has been shown to be dependent on SOX9, a master transcription factor required for chondrogenesis that binds to an enhancer region in intron 1. However, ChIP sequencing revealed that SOX9 does not strongly bind to intron 1, but rather it binds to intron 6 and a site 30 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Here, we aimed to determine the role of the novel SOX9-binding site in intron 6. We prepared reporter constructs that contain a Col2a1 promoter, intron 1 with or without intron 6, and the luciferase gene. Although the reporter constructs were not activated by SOX9 alone, the construct that contained both introns 1 and 6 was activated 5-10-fold by the SOX9/SOX5 or the SOX9/SOX6 combination in transient-transfection assays in 293T cells. This enhancement was also observed in rat chondrosarcoma cells that stably expressed the construct. CRISPR/Cas9-induced deletion of intron 6 in RCS cells revealed that a 10-bp region of intron 6 is necessary both for Col2a1 expression and SOX9 binding. Furthermore, SOX9, but not SOX5, binds to this region as demonstrated in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, although both SOX9 and SOX5 bind to a larger 325-bp fragment of intron 6 containing this small sequence. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of action of SOX5/6; namely, the SOX9/5/6 combination enhances Col2a1 transcription through a novel enhancer in intron 6 together with the enhancer in intron 1.

  9. Collagen-type specificity of glycoprotein VI as a determinant of platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie M; Takemura, Yukitoshi; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Adachi, Eijiro; Moroi, Masaaki

    2008-02-01

    Of the two physiologically important platelet collagen receptors, glycoprotein (GP) VI is the receptor responsible for platelet activation. However, its reactivities towards different types of vascular collagen have not been directly and quantitatively analysed with collagen preparations of defined composition, although the other major platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1) was shown to react with collagen types I-VI and VIII under either static or flow conditions. We analysed the collagen type specificity of GPVI binding to identify the physiological contribution of the various vascular collagens and how platelet reactivity towards the various collagens may be affected by fibril size. We used two methods to analyse the binding of recombinant GPVI (GPVI-Fc(2)) to different types of bovine collagen: binding to collagen microparticles in suspension and binding to immobilized collagen. GPVI-Fc(2) bound to type I-III collagens that can form large fibrils, but not to type V that only forms small fibrils. The apparent GPVI binding to types IV and V could be ascribed to type I collagen that was a contaminant in each of these preparations. Kinetic analyses of the binding data showed that type III collagen fibrils have both a higher Kd and Bmax than types I and II. Flow adhesion studies demonstrated that type III collagen supports the formation of larger platelet aggregates than type I. Our present results suggest that the physiological importance of type III collagen is to induce thrombus formation. Furthermore, these studies indicate that GPVI mainly binds to collagen types that can form large collagen fibrils.

  10. Anisotropy of chemical bonds in collagen molecules studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond S K; Metzler, Rebecca A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A; Beniash, Elia

    2012-03-16

    Collagen type I fibrils are the major building blocks of connective tissues. Collagen fibrils are anisotropic supramolecular structures, and their orientation can be revealed by polarized light microscopy and vibrational microspectroscopy. We hypothesized that the anisotropy of chemical bonds in the collagen molecules, and hence their orientation, might also be detected by X-ray photoemission electron spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, which use linearly polarized synchrotron light. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sections of rat-tail tendon, composed of parallel arrays of collagen fibrils. The results clearly indicate that XANES-PEEM is sensitive to collagen fibril orientation and, more specifically, to the orientations of carbonyl and amide bonds in collagen molecules. These data suggest that XANES-PEEM is a promising technique for characterizing the chemical composition and structural organization at the nanoscale of collagen-based connective tissues, including tendons, cartilage, and bone.

  11. Collagen organization in canine myxomatous mitral valve disease: an x-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Hadian, Mojtaba; Corcoran, Brendan M; Han, Richard I; Grossmann, J Günter; Bradshaw, Jeremy P

    2007-10-01

    Collagen fibrils, a major component of mitral valve leaflets, play an important role in defining shape and providing mechanical strength and flexibility. Histopathological studies show that collagen fibrils undergo dramatic changes in the course of myxomatous mitral valve disease in both dogs and humans. However, little is known about the detailed organization of collagen in this disease. This study was designed to analyze and compare collagen fibril organization in healthy and lesional areas of myxomatous mitral valves of dogs, using synchrotron small-angle x-ray diffraction. The orientation, density, and alignment of collagen fibrils were mapped across six different valves. The findings reveal a preferred collagen alignment in the main body of the leaflets between two commissures. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data showed significant differences between affected and lesion-free areas in terms of collagen content, fibril alignment, and total tissue volume. Regression analysis of the amount of collagen compared to the total tissue content at each point revealed a significant relationship between these two parameters in lesion-free but not in affected areas. This is the first time this technique has been used to map collagen fibrils in cardiac tissue; the findings have important applications to human cardiology.

  12. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  13. 96-Well plate assays for measuring collagenase activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen.

    PubMed

    Koshy, P J; Rowan, A D; Life, P F; Cawston, T E

    1999-11-15

    We describe two alternative assays for measuring collagenolytic activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen. Both assays have been developed for the 96-well plate format and measure the amount of radiolabeled collagen fragments released into the supernatant from an insoluble (3)H-acetylated collagen fibril preparation. The first method separates digested solubilized fragments from the intact fibril by sedimentation of the undigested collagen by centrifugation. The second method achieves this separation by filtration of the supernatant through the membrane of a 96-well filtration plate which retains the undigested collagen fibril. Both methods give linear dose- and time-dependent responses of collagenase activity > or = 70% of total collagen lysis. In addition, both assays can be simply modified to measure tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibitory activity, which is also linear between 20 and 75% of total collagen lysis with the amount of TIMP added.

  14. Enhancement of tendon–bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Chao, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Jan-Kan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA) bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon–bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon–bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon–bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon–bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. PMID:27601901

  15. Biomimetic mineralization of woven bone-like nanocomposites: role of collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuping; Thula, Taili T; Jee, Sangsoo; Perkins, Sasha L; Aparicio, Conrado; Douglas, Elliot P; Gower, Laurie B

    2012-01-09

    Ideal biomaterials for bone grafts must be biocompatible, osteoconductive, osteoinductive and have appropriate mechanical properties. For this, the development of synthetic bone substitutes mimicking natural bone is desirable, but this requires controllable mineralization of the collagen matrix. In this study, densified collagen films (up to 100 μm thick) were fabricated by a plastic compression technique and cross-linked using carbodiimide. Then, collagen-hydroxyapatite composites were prepared by using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. Compared to traditional methods that produce only extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite (HA) clusters on the surface of collagen scaffolds, by using the PILP mineralization process, homogeneous intra- and extrafibrillar minerals were achieved on densified collagen films, leading to a similar nanostructure as bone, and a woven microstructure analogous to woven bone. The role of collagen cross-links on mineralization was examined and it was found that the cross-linked collagen films stimulated the mineralization reaction, which in turn enhanced the mechanical properties (hardness and modulus). The highest value of hardness and elastic modulus was 0.7 ± 0.1 and 9.1 ± 1.4 GPa in the dry state, respectively, which is comparable to that of woven bone. In the wet state, the values were much lower (177 ± 31 and 8 ± 3 MPa) due to inherent microporosity in the films, but still comparable to those of woven bone in the same conditions. Mineralization of collagen films with controllable mineral content and good mechanical properties provide a biomimetic route toward the development of bone substitutes for the next generation of biomaterials. This work also provides insight into understanding the role of collagen fibrils on mineralization.

  16. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  17. Collagen-containing scaffolds enhance attachment and proliferation of non-cultured bone marrow multipotential stromal cells.

    PubMed

    El-Jawhari, Jehan J; Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Jones, Elena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2016-04-01

    Large bone defects are ideally treated with autografts, which have many limitations. Therefore, osteoconductive scaffolds loaded with autologous bone marrow (BM) aspirate are increasingly used as alternatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the growth of multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) from unprocessed BM on a collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold (Orthoss(®) Collagen) with a non-collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold, Orthoss(®) . Another collagen-containing synthetic scaffold, Vitoss(®) was included in the comparison. Colonization of scaffolds by BM MSCs (n = 23 donors) was evaluated using microscopy, colony forming unit-fibroblast assay and flow-cytometry. The number of BM MSCs initially attached to Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) was similar but greater than Orthoss(®) (p = 0.001 and p = 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, the number of MSCs released from Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) after 2-week culture was also higher compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.010 and p = 0.023, respectively). Interestingly, collagen-containing scaffolds accommodated larger numbers of lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cells. Additionally, the proliferation of culture-expanded MSCs on Orthoss(®) collagen and Vitoss(®) was greater compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.047 and p = 0.004, respectively). Collectively, collagen-containing scaffolds were superior in supporting the attachment and proliferation of MSCs when they were loaded with unprocessed BM aspirates. This highlights the benefit of collagen incorporation into bone scaffolds for use with autologous bone marrow aspirates as autograft substitutes.

  18. The Modulation of Endothelial Cell Morphology, Function, and Survival Using Anisotropic Nanofibrillar Collagen Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ngan F.; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C.; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S.; Paukshto, Michael V.; Sun, John; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G.; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues. PMID:23480958

  19. The modulation of endothelial cell morphology, function, and survival using anisotropic nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ngan F; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S; Paukshto, Michael V; Sun, John S; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G; Cooke, John P

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues.

  20. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  1. Effects of material and surface functional group on collagen self-assembly and subsequent cell adhesion behaviors.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Su, Yao; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Fang; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-04-01

    Collagen fibrous network not only provides structural support for cells but also serves as critical environment modulating various cell functions. Various factors would influence the collagen self-assembly but the effect of substrate surface on such process has been rarely studied. Here we examined the effects of materials (Ti and hydroxyapatite) and their surface characteristics (with and without the enrichment of hydroxyl group) on collagen self-reconstitution and fibrous network formation, and on subsequent cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). For both Ti and hydroxyapatite (HA) substrates, the enrichment of hydroxyl group (OH) on substrate surfaces promoted the collagen self-reconstitution and facilitated the formation of the fibrous network after 4h immersion in phosphate buffer solution (PBS), while all samples showed clear fibrous network formation after 2 day soaking in PBS. Compared with the Ti surfaces, the HA surfaces facilitated the self-reconstitution of collagen, leading to a more mature fibrous network with a twisted structure and enhanced lateral aggregation of fibrils. The fibrous network difference resulted in different behaviors of the subsequent MSC adhesion and spreading. The MSCs had the best adhesion and cytoskeleton organization on the OH enriched HA surface with collagen modification. Our results suggested that both the material selection and the hydroxyl group significantly influenced the collagen self-assembly and fibrous network formation and, as a result, the subsequent cell adhesion behaviors.

  2. Microstructural characterization of vocal folds toward a strain-energy model of collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Heris, Hossein K; Tripathy, Umakanta; Wiseman, Paul W; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-08-01

    Collagen fibrils are believed to control the immediate deformation of soft tissues under mechanical load. Most extracellular matrix proteins remain intact during frozen sectioning, which allows them to be scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Collagen fibrils are distinguishable because of their periodic roughness wavelength. In the present study, the shape and organization of collagen fibrils in dissected porcine vocal folds were quantified using nonlinear laser scanning microscopy data at the micrometer scale and AFM data at the nanometer scale. Rope-shaped collagen fibrils were observed. The geometric characteristics for the fibrils were fed into a hyperelastic model to predict the biomechanical response of the tissue. The model simulates the micrometer-scale unlocking behavior of collagen bundles when extended from their unloaded configuration. Force spectroscopy using AFM was used to estimate the stiffness of collagen fibrils (1±0.5MPa). The presence of rope-shaped fibrils is postulated to change the slope of the force-deflection response near the onset of nonlinearity. The proposed model could ultimately be used to evaluate changes in elasticity of soft tissues that result from the collagen remodeling.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Vocal Folds toward a Strain-Energy Model of Collagen Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Amir K.; Heris, Hossein K.; Tripathy, Umakanta; Wiseman, Paul W.; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Collagen fibrils are believed to control the immediate deformation of soft tissues under biomechanical load. Most extracellular matrix proteins remain intact during frozen sectioning, which allows them to be scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Collagen fibrils are distinguishable because of their helical shape. In the present study, the shape and organization of collagen fibrils in dissected porcine vocal folds were quantified using nonlinear laser scanning microscopy data at the micrometer scale and AFM data at the nanometer scale. Rope-shape collagen fibrils were observed. Geometric characteristics for the fibrils were fed to a hyperelastic model to predict the biomechanical response of the tissue. The model simulates the micrometer-scale unlocking behavior of collagen bundles when extended from their unloaded configuration. Force spectroscopy using AFM was used to estimate the stiffness of collagen fibrils (1 ± 0.5 MPa). The presence of rope-shape fibrils is postulated to change the slope of the force-deflection response near the onset of nonlinearity. The proposed model could ultimately be used to evaluate changes in elasticity of soft tissues that result from the collagen remodeling. PMID:23643604

  4. Effect of oxy radicals on several types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Poulin, G; Braquet, P; Randoux, A; Ferradini, C; Borel, J P

    1984-01-01

    Fibrils of collagen reconstituted in vitro by dialysis against sodium formate are exposed to free oxy radicals generated by three different systems: (i) xanthine oxidase + hypoxanthine, (ii) gamma-rays originating from a cobalt bomb; (iii) pulse radiolysis in a particle accelerator. A degradation of the collagen fibres is demonstrated by determination of the amount of hydroxyproline-containing peptides in the supernatant after incubation. Types I and III collagen are sensitive to the effect, whereas type V collagen is not. The effect persists when collagen is specially delipidated.

  5. In vitro, interaction of homotrimers with heterotrimers of type I collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sejin; Losert, Wolfgang; Leikin, Sergey

    2007-03-01

    The dominant mutations in type I collagen cause a group of diseases, often termed collagen, or connective tissue, diseases: for example, Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) characterized by bone fragility and skeletal deformity. The mechanism in which collagen mutations affect on the diseases is still unknown. To understand the fibril assembly and their interactions might provide a key to approaching the cause of the collagen diseases. This study demonstrates that the self-assembly, termed fibrillogenesis, of type I collagen homozygous mutations revealed substantial differences in the kinetics with the absence of lag time and in the morphology of 3D fibril network structure. The heterotrimers (normal) and homotrimers (mutant) in mixtures were segregated within the same fibrils during fibrillogenesis, in correspondence between confocal microscopy and thermodynamic measurements. The efficiency for self-assembly of the homotrimers into fibrils was markedly reduced, while that of the heterotrimers was not affected by the presence of homotrimers with no change in solubility.

  6. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages.

  7. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3/MicroRNA-21 Feedback Loop Contributes to Atrial Fibrillation by Promoting Atrial Fibrosis in a Rat Sterile Pericarditis Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhengrong; Chen, Xiao-jun; Qian, Cheng; Dong, Qian; Ding, Dan; Wu, Qiong-feng; Li, Jing; Wang, Hong-fei; Li, Wei-hua; Xie, Qiang; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-hua

    2016-01-01

    Background— Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in cardiac surgery. The aberrant activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) contributes to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) promotes atrial fibrosis. Recent studies support the existence of reciprocal regulation between STAT3 and miR-21. Here, we test the hypothesis that these 2 molecules might form a feedback loop that contributes to postoperative atrial fibrillation by promoting atrial fibrosis. Methods and Results— A sterile pericarditis model was created using atrial surfaces dusted with sterile talcum powder in rats. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor-β, and tumor necrosis factor-α, along with STAT3 and miR-21, were highly upregulated in sterile pericarditis rats. The inhibition of STAT3 by S3I-201 resulted in miR-21 downregulation, which ameliorated atrial fibrosis and decreased the expression of the fibrosis-related genes, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen-1, and collagen-3; reduced the inhomogeneity of atrial conduction; and attenuated atrial fibrillation vulnerability. Meanwhile, treatment with antagomir-21 decreased STAT3 phosphorylation, alleviated atrial remodeling, abrogated sterile pericarditis–induced inhomogeneous conduction, and prevented atrial fibrillation promotion. The culturing of cardiac fibroblasts with IL-6 resulted in progressively augmented STAT3 phosphorylation and miR-21 levels. S3I-201 blocked IL-6 induced the expression of miR-21 and fibrosis-related genes in addition to cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Transfected antagomir-21 decreased the IL-6–induced cardiac fibroblast activation and STAT3 phosphorylation. The overexpression of miR-21 in cardiac fibroblasts caused the upregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation, enhanced fibrosis-related genes, and increased cell numbers. Conclusions— Our results have uncovered a novel reciprocal loop between STAT3

  8. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you are pregnant If you notice red, dark brown or black urine or stools If you ... Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • Understand your Risk for AFib Children • Symptoms of ...

  9. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Cardiovascular Conditions What Is Atrial Fibrillation? Your heart has a natural pacemaker, called the “ ... if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the heart’s two small upper chambers (atria) ...

  10. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  11. The collagen I mimetic peptide DGEA enhances an osteogenic phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells when presented from cell-encapsulating hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manav; Madl, Christopher M; Lee, Shimwoo; Duda, Georg N; Mooney, David J

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to play critical roles in regulating cell phenotype. The identity of ECM ligands presented to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown to direct the cell fate commitment of these cells. To enhance osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, alginate hydrogels were prepared that present the DGEA ligand derived from collagen I. When presented from hydrogel surfaces in 2D, the DGEA ligand did not facilitate cell adhesion, while hydrogels presenting the RGD ligand derived from fibronectin did encourage cell adhesion and spreading. However, the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs encapsulated within alginate hydrogels presenting the DGEA ligand was enhanced when compared with unmodified alginate hydrogels and hydrogels presenting the RGD ligand. MSCs cultured in DGEA-presenting gels exhibited increased levels of osteocalcin production and mineral deposition. These data suggest that the presentation of the collagen I-derived DGEA ligand is a feasible approach for selectively inducing an osteogenic phenotype in encapsulated MSCs.

  12. Dual-enhancement cardiac computed tomography for assessing left atrial thrombus and pulmonary veins before radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Pak, Hui-Nam; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2013-07-15

    Noninvasive imaging that provides anatomic information while excluding intracardiac thrombus would be of significant clinical value for patients referred for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a dual-enhancement single-phase cardiac computed tomography (CT) protocol for thrombus and circulatory stasis detection in AF patients before catheter ablation. We studied 101 consecutive symptomatic AF patients (71 men and 30 women; mean age, 61.8 years) who were scheduled to have catheter ablation. All patients had undergone pre-AF ablation CT imaging and transesophageal echocardiography on the same day. CT was performed with prospective electrocardiographic gating, and scanning began 180 seconds after the test bolus. Mean left atrial appendage (LAA)/ascending aorta Hounsfield unit (HU) ratios were measured on CT images. Among the 101 patients, 9 thrombi and 18 spontaneous echo contrasts were detected by transesophageal echocardiography. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for the detection of thrombi in the LAA were 89%, 100%, 100%, and 99%, respectively. The mean LAA/ascending aorta HU ratios were significantly different between thrombus and circulatory stasis (0.17 vs 0.33, p = 0.002). Dual-enhancement single-scan cardiac CT is a sensitive modality for detecting and differentiating LAA thrombus and circulatory stasis.

  13. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  14. Microscale Mechanical Testing of Individual Collagen Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Jeffrey

    Collagen is a key constituent for a large number of biological materials including bone, tendon, cartilage, skin and fish scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen's microscale structural components (fibers and fibrils) is therefore of utmost importance for fields such as biomimetics and biomedical engineering. However, the mechanics of collagen fibers and fibrils remain largely unexplored. The main research challenges are the small sample sizes (diameters less than 1 im) and the need to maintain physiologically relevant conditions. In this work, a microscale mechanical testing device (MMTD) capable of measuring the stress-strain response of individual collagen fibers and fibrils was developed. The MMTD consists of: (i) a transducer from a commercial nanoindenter to measure load and displacement, (ii) an optical microscope to observe the deformation of the sample in-situ and (iii) micromanipulators to isolate, position and fix samples. Collagen fibers and fibrils were extracted from fish scales using a novel dissection procedure and tested using the MMTD. A variety of tensile tests were performed including monotonic loading and cyclic tests with increasing loading rate or maximum displacement. The monotonic test results found that the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure range from 0.5 to 1.3 GPa, 100 to 200 MPa and 20% to 60%, respectively. The cyclic tests revealed that the largest increase in damage accumulation occurs at strains between 10% and 20%, when hydrogen bonds at the molecular level are ruptured. Further straining the fibril causes little additional damage accumulation and signals the approach of failure. The addition of water is shown to increase damage tolerance and strain to failure.

  15. VLDL from Metabolic Syndrome Individuals Enhanced Lipid Accumulation in Atria with Association of Susceptibility to Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Ke, Liang-Yin; Wei, Chi; Hsiao, Yi-Lin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Wu, Bin-Nan

    2016-01-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of metabolic derangements. Dyslipidemia is an important factor in MetS and is related to atrial fibrillation (AF). We hypothesized that very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in MetS (MetS-VLDL) may induce atrial dilatation and vulnerability to AF. VLDL was therefore separated from normal (normal-VLDL) and MetS individuals. Wild type C57BL/6 male mice were divided into control, normal-VLDL (nVLDL), and MetS-VLDL (msVLDL) groups. VLDL (15 µg/g) and equivalent volumes of saline were injected via tail vein three times a week for six consecutive weeks. Cardiac chamber size and function were measured by echocardiography. MetS-VLDL significantly caused left atrial dilation (control, n = 10, 1.64 ± 0.23 mm; nVLDL, n = 7, 1.84 ± 0.13 mm; msVLDL, n = 10, 2.18 ± 0.24 mm; p < 0.0001) at week 6, associated with decreased ejection fraction (control, n = 10, 62.5% ± 7.7%, vs. msVLDL, n = 10, 52.9% ± 9.6%; p < 0.05). Isoproterenol-challenge experiment resulted in AF in young msVLDL mice. Unprovoked AF occurred only in elderly msVLDL mice. Immunohistochemistry showed excess lipid accumulation and apoptosis in msVLDL mice atria. These findings suggest a pivotal role of VLDL in AF pathogenesis for MetS individuals.

  16. DYNAMIC SHEAR-INFLUENCED COLLAGEN SELF-ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9 s-1). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (~2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 microns/sec) occurring at a shear rate of 9 s-1. The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s-1. However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term “hooks” which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or “mat” and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  17. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  18. Management of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Moukabary, Talal; Gonzalez, Mario D

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a very common clinical problem with a high prevalence that is expected to rise over time because of increasing risk factors (eg, age, obesity, hypertension). This high prevalence is also associated with high cost, because atrial fibrillation represents about 1% of overall health care spending. The management of atrial fibrillation involves multiple facets: (1) management of underlying disease if present and the management of atrial fibrillation risk factors, (2) prevention of thromboembolism, (3) control of the ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation, and (4) restoration and maintenance of normal sinus rhythm.

  19. Lysyl Oxidase Activity Is Required for Ordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis by Tendon Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Eliasson, Pernilla; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kadler, Karl E.; Magnusson, S. Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are a family of copper-dependent oxido-deaminases that can modify the side chain of lysyl residues in collagen and elastin, thereby leading to the spontaneous formation of non-reducible aldehyde-derived interpolypeptide chain cross-links. The consequences of LOX inhibition in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation. The improvement in structure and strength seen with time in control constructs was absent in constructs treated with BAPN. As expected, BAPN inhibited the formation of aldimine-derived cross-links in collagen, and the constructs were mechanically weak. However, an unexpected finding was that BAPN treatment led to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene expression. Collagen type V, decorin, fibromodulin, and tenascin-X proteins were unaffected by the cross-link inhibition, suggesting that LOX regulates fibrillogenesis independently of these molecules. Collectively, the data show the importance of LOX for the mechanical development of early collagenous tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation. PMID:25979340

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase interactions with collagen and elastin

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Most abundant in the extracellular matrix are collagens, joined by elastin that confers elastic recoil to the lung, aorta, and skin. These fibrils are highly resistant to proteolysis but can succumb to a minority of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Considerable inroads to understanding how such MMPs move to the susceptible sites in collagen and then unwind the triple helix of collagen monomers have been gained. The essential role in unwinding of the hemopexin-like domain of interstitial collagenases or the collagen binding domain of gelatinases is highlighted. Elastolysis is also facilitated by the collagen binding domain in the cases of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and remote exosites of the catalytic domain in the case of MMP-12. PMID:25599938

  1. Heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of type I collagen in longitudinal direction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Li, Tong; Gandhi, Neha S; Burrage, Kevin; Gu, YuanTong

    2017-01-07

    Collagen is an abundant structural biopolymer in mammal vertebrates, providing structural support as well as mechanical integrity for connective tissues such as bone, ligament, and tendon. The mechanical behaviours of these tissues are determined by the nanomechanics of their structures at different hierarchies and the role of collagen structures in the extracellular matrix. Some studies revealed that there is significant microstructural difference in the longitudinal direction of the collagen fibril, which challenges the conventional rod-like assumption prevalently adopted in the existing studies. Motivated by this discrepancy, in this study, we investigated the longitudinal heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of type I collagen molecule to probe the origin of the longitudinal heterogeneity of the collagen fibril at the molecular level. A full length type I collagen molecule structure was built based on the experimentally calibrated nanostructure. Then, a suitable strain rate was determined for stretching the three intact 'gap' regions and three intact 'overlap' regions of the collagen molecule. Further, the nanomechanical properties of the six collagen molecule segments were characterized by performing steered molecular dynamics simulations, using the obtained suitable strain rate in modelling. The results indicate that this computational model can be used to capture the mechanical behaviour of the collagen molecule under physiological stress conditions. Moreover, the 'gap' regions show a lower stiffness and undergo a slightly lager strain in the unwinding process, compared to the 'overlap' regions of the collagen molecule. This investigation provides insights into the origin of the longitudinal heterogeneity of collagen fibrils at the molecular level and suggests that it is of significant importance to consider the longitudinal heterogeneous mechanical properties of the collagen molecule in the development of coarse-grained models of collagen-related tissues.

  2. In Vitro Mineralization of an Osteoid-Like Dense Collagen Construct for Bone Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelli, Benedetto

    The aim of this doctoral research was to design and evaluate strategies to rapidly achieve an acellular mineralization of an osteoid-like dense collagen gel for potential applications in bone regeneration. It was hypothesized that the collagen fibrillar density (CFD) affects the microenvironment and the physical properties of the framework of collagen gels. To test this hypothesis, and as a first objective, the mineralization of collagen gel sheets, rolls and strips with increasing CFDs was investigated in vitro in simulated body fluid (SBF). Collagen gels with physiologically relevant CFDs (14.1 wt%) led to greater extent of mineralization (12 dry wt% at day 14 in SBF), when compared to highly hydrated gels. Chemical characterization confirmed this mineral phase to be CHA, which significantly increased the gel apparent modulus and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Surprisingly, CFD also affected the electrostatic properties of collagen gel, as investigated by quantifying the extent of anionic and cationic dyes bound to collagen gels with different CFDs. It was therefore proposed that the increase in gel CFD led to a more physiological microenvironment, resulting in a higher number of fibril-to-fibril contact points and an increase in charge concentration, which facilitated the mineral formation and validated the proposed osteoid model. As a second objective, the mineralization of dense collagen (DC) gels with physiologically relevant CFD (14.1 wt%) was enhanced and accelerated by mimicking the role of anionic non collagenous proteins (NCPs) in the native osteoid, which act as CHA nucleators. Two strategies were implemented: first, the influence of collagen fibrillization pH on the extent of DC gel mineralization was investigated. Since the collagen molecule is slightly positively charged at physiological pH (isoelectric point at pH 7.8), it was hypothesized that it would be more negatively charged if formed in an alkaline environment, i.e., above its isoelectric

  3. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent.

  4. Evaluation of dense collagen matrices as medicated wound dressing for the treatment of cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Helary, Christophe; Abed, Aicha; Mosser, Gervaise; Louedec, Liliane; Letourneur, Didier; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud-Guille, Marie Madeleine; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous chronic wounds are characterized by an impaired wound healing which may lead to infection and amputation. When current treatments are not effective enough, the application of wound dressings is required. To date, no ideal biomaterial is available. In this study, highly dense collagen matrices have been evaluated as novel medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds. For this purpose, the structure, mechanical properties, swelling ability and in vivo stability of matrices concentrated from 5 to 40 mg mL(-1) were tested. The matrix stiffness increased with the collagen concentration and was associated with the fibril density and thickness. Increased collagen concentration also enhanced the material resistance against accelerated digestion by collagenase. After subcutaneous implantation in rats, dense collagen matrices exhibited high stability without any degradation after 15 days. The absence of macrophages and neutrophils evidenced their biocompatibility. Subsequently, dense matrices at 40 mg mL(-1) were evaluated as drug delivery system for ampicillin release. More concentrated matrices exhibited the best swelling abilities and could absorb 20 times their dry weight in water, allowing for an efficient antibiotic loading from their dried form. They released efficient doses of antibiotics that inhibited the bacterial growth of Staphylococcus Aureus over 3 days. In parallel, they show no cytotoxicity towards human fibroblasts. These results show that dense collagen matrices are promising materials to develop medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  5. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  6. Enhancing anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation of titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol) and collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and collagen I were sequentially immobilized on the titanium surface to simultaneously improve the anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that PEG and collagen I were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results suggested the excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The anticoagulation experiments demonstrated that the immobilized PEG and collagen I on the titanium surface could not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved blood compatibility. Furthermore, immobilization of collagen to the end of PEG chain did not abate the anticoagulation. As compared to those on the pristine and PEG-modified titanium surfaces, endothelial cells exhibited improved proliferative profiles on the surface modified by the sequential immobilization of PEG and collagen in terms of CCK-8 assay, implying that the modified titanium may promote endothelialization without abating the blood compatibility. Our method may be used to modify the surface of blood-contacting biomaterials such as titanium to promote endothelialization and improve the anticoagulation, it may be helpful for development of the biomedical devices such as coronary stents, where endothelializaton and excellent anticoagulation are required.

  7. Estrogen-induced collagen reorientation correlates with sympathetic denervation of the rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Martínez, G F; Bianchimano, P; Brauer, M M

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen inhibits the growth and causes the degeneration (pruning) of sympathetic nerves supplying the rat myometrium. Previous cryoculture studies evidenced that substrate-bound signals contribute to diminish the ability of the estrogenized myometrium to support sympathetic nerve growth. Using electron microscopy, here we examined neurite-substrate interactions in myometrial cryocultures, observing that neurites grew associated to collagen fibrils present in the surface of the underlying cryosection. In addition, we assessed quantitatively the effects of estrogen on myometrial collagen organization in situ, using ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen and immature females undergoing puberty. Under low estrogen levels, most collagen fibrils were oriented in parallel to the muscle long axis (83% and 85%, respectively). Following estrogen treatment, 89% of fibrils was oriented perpendicularly to the muscle main axis; while after puberty, 57% of fibrils acquired this orientation. Immunohistochemistry combined with histology revealed that the vast majority of fine sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the myometrium courses within the areas where collagen realignment was observed. Finally, to assess whether depending on their orientation collagen fibrils can promote or inhibit neurite outgrowth, we employed cryocultures, now using as substrate tissue sections of rat-tail tendon. We observed that neurites grew extensively in the direction of the parallel-aligned collagen fibrils in the tendon main axis but were inhibited to grow perpendicularly to this axis. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that collagen reorientation may be one of the factors contributing to diminish the neuritogenic capacity of the estrogen-primed myometrial substrate.

  8. Decreasing NF-κB Expression Enhances Odontoblastic Differentiation and Collagen Expression in Dental Pulp Stem Cells Exposed to Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Hozhabri, Neda S. T.; Benson, M. Douglas; Vu, Michael D.; Patel, Rinkesh H.; Martinez, Rebecca M.; Nakhaie, Fatemeh N.; Kim, Harry K. W.; Varanasi, Venu G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory response in the dental pulp can alter the collagen matrix formation by dental pulp stem cells and lead to a delay or poor healing of the pulp. This inflammatory response is mediated by cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. In this study, it is hypothesized that suppressing the actions of these inflammatory cytokines by knocking down the activity of transcription factor Nuclear Factor–κB will lead to dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblasts and the production of collagen. Here, the role of Nuclear Factor–κB signaling and its reduction was examined during odontogenic behavior in the presence of these cytokines. The results showed a significant increase in Nuclear Factor–κB gene expression and p65 protein expression by interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Nuclear Factor–κB activation in the presence of these cytokines decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner by a Nuclear Factor–κB inhibitor (MG132) and p65 siRNA. Down-regulation of Nuclear Factor–κB activity also enhanced the gene expression of the odontoblastic markers (dentin sialophosphoprotein, Nestin, and alkaline phosphatase) and displayed an odontoblastic cell morphology indicating the promotion of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Finally, dental pulp stem cells exposed to reduced Nuclear Factor–κB activity resulted in a significant increase in collagen (I)-α1 expression in the presence of these cytokines. In conclusion, a decrease in Nuclear Factor-κB in dental pulp stem cells in the presence of inflammatory cytokines enhanced odontoblastic differentiation and collagen matrix formation. PMID:25629155

  9. Second Harmonic Light Scattering from Macromolecules: Collagen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Shmuel

    In this work we present the theory and practice of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as applied to rat-tail tendon collagen. Our work is the first quantitative application of SHG to biological systems. The angular dependence of SHG is found to display a sharp, intense, forward peak superimposed on a broad background. The sharp peak is shown to imply long-range polar order, while the broad background corresponds to that predicted for the random "up"/"down" array of collagen fibrils seen with the electron microscope. The dependence of fibril diameter distribution on age and state of hydration is measured. Our experiments also reveal information concerning the structure of the fibrils and their arrangement in the tendon. The degree of polar order, the coherence length of tendon for harmonic generation and the absolute magnitude of the nonlinear susceptibility of the collagen fibril are also determined. The biological significance of these findings and the many advantages of SHG for the structural study of biological macromolecules and tissues are discussed.

  10. Galactosylated collagen matrix enhanced in vitro maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ghodsizadeh, Arefeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Najarasl, Mostafa; Hiraoka, Yosuke; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Due to their important biomedical applications, functional human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hESC-HLCs) are an attractive topic in the field of stem cell differentiation. Here, we have initially differentiated hESCs into functional hepatic endoderm (HE) and continued the differentiation by replating them onto galactosylated collagen (GC) and collagen matrices. The differentiation of hESC-HE cells into HLCs on GC substrate showed significant up-regulation of hepatic-specific genes such as ALB, HNF4α, CYP3A4, G6P, and ASGR1. There was more albumin secretion and urea synthesis, as well as more cytochrome p450 activity, in differentiated HLCs on GC compared to the collagen-coated substrate. These results suggested that GC substrate has the potential to be used for in vitro maturation of hESC-HLCs.

  11. Fine structure of the dogfish egg case: a unique collagenous material.

    PubMed

    Knight, D P; Hunt, S

    1976-01-01

    The fine structure of the dogfish egg case is described with special reference to the highly ordered, unique, collagen-containing fibrils. The outer layer of the case wall contains densely packed, amorphous granules, rich in tyrosine while approximately 98% of the thickness of the case is built up from orthogonally stacked laminae of closely packed, collagen-containing fibrils. These fibrils show a paracrystalline three-dimensional construction. A model for the structure of the B band of the fibril is proposed, based on appearances in transverse sections of different thickness and on two projection seen in longitudinal sections. The transverse projection of the unit cell appears to be a square lattice with sides approximately 110 A possibly containing a pseudocell with sides (see article). The structure of these fibrils is discussed in relation to those of rat tail tendon collagen.

  12. Treatment of photoaged skin with topical tretinoin increases epidermal-dermal anchoring fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, D.T.; Briggaman, R.A. ); Zelickson, A.S. ); Hamilton, T.A.; Weiss, J.S.; Ellis, C.N.; Voorhees, J.J. )

    1990-06-13

    Topical 0.1% tretinoin or vehicle control was applied daily to the forearm skin of six caucasian adults for 4 months. Two-millimeter punch biopsy specimens were obtained from treatment sites at the beginning and end of the study period for electron microscopy. Anchoring fibrils within the epidermal-dermal junction of skin treatment sites were quantitated by blinded, standardized, computer-assisted morphometry. After 4 months of continual daily treatment, skin sites that received topical tretinoin showed double the anchoring fibril density compared with vehicle control sites. The possible mechanism by which topical tretinoin increases anchoring fibrils in skin include the drug's property of inhibiting collagenase, a dermal enzyme that degrades anchoring fibril collagen. The authors speculate that increased numbers of collagenous anchoring fibrils within the papillary dermis of human skin is one of the connective-tissue correlates of the clinical improvement observed in photoaged skin after treatment with topical tretinoin.

  13. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mansooreh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26186474

  14. Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagen matrices through relaxation time distribution spectrum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Li, Haiyue; Zhang, Yanhang

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide understanding of the macroscopic viscoelastic behavior of collagen matrices through studying the relaxation time distribution spectrum obtained from stress relaxation tests. Hydrated collagen gel and dehydrated collagen thin film was exploited as two different hydration levels of collagen matrices. Genipin solution was used to induce crosslinking in collagen matrices. Biaxial stress relaxation tests were performed to characterize the viscoelastic behavior of collagen matrices. The rate of stress relaxation of both hydrated and dehydrated collagen matrices shows a linear initial stress level dependency. Increased crosslinking reduces viscosity in collagen gel, but the effect is negligible for thin film. Relaxation time distribution spectrum was obtained from the stress relaxation data by inverse Laplace transform. For most of the collagen matrices, three peaks at the short (0.3s ~1 s), medium (3s ~90 s), and long relaxation time (> 200 s) were observed in the continuous spectrum, which likely corresponds to relaxation mechanisms involve fiber, inter-fibril, and fibril sliding. Splitting of the middle peak was observed at higher initial stress levels suggesting increased structural heterogeneity at the fibril level with mechanical loading. The intensity of the long-term peaks increases with higher initial stress levels indicating the engagement of collagen fibrils at higher levels of tissue strain.

  15. The importance of size-exclusion characteristics of type I collagen in bonding to dentin matrices

    PubMed Central

    M, Takahashi; M, Nakajima; J, Tagami; DLS, Scheffel; RM, Carvalho; A, Mazzoni; M, Carrilho; A, Tezvergil-Mutluay; L, Breschi; L, Tjäderhane; SS, Jang; FR, Tay; KA, Agee; DH, Pashley

    2013-01-01

    The mineral phase of dentin is located primarily within collagen fibrils. During development, bone or dentin collagen fibrils are formed first and then water within the fibril is replaced with apatite crystallites. Mineralized collagen contains very little water. During dentin bonding, acid-etching of mineralized dentin solubilizes the mineral crystallites and replaces them with water. During the infiltration phase of dentin bonding, adhesive comonomers are supposed to replace all of the collagen water with adhesive monomers that are then polymerized into copolymers. The authors of a recently published review suggested that dental monomers were too large to enter and displace water from collagen fibrils. If that were true, the endogenous proteases bound to dentin collagen could be responsible for unimpeded collagen degradation that is responsible for the poor durability of resin-dentin bonds. The current work studied the size-exclusion characteristics of dentin collagen, using a gel-filtration-like column chromatography technique, using dentin powder instead of Sephadex. The elution volumes of test molecules, including adhesive monomers, revealed that adhesive monomers smaller than about 1000 Da can freely diffuse into collagen water, while molecules of 10,000 Da begin to be excluded, and bovine serum albumin (66,000 Da) was fully excluded. These results validate the concept that dental monomers can permeate between collagen molecules during infiltration by etch-and-rinse adhesives. PMID:23928333

  16. Collagen Self-Assembly on Orthopedic Magnesium Biomaterials Surface and Subsequent Bone Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) biomaterials are a new generation of biodegradable materials and have promising potential for orthopedic applications. After implantation in bone tissues, these materials will directly interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) biomolecules and bone cells. Type I collagen, the major component of bone ECM, forms the architecture scaffold that provides physical support for bone cell attachment. However, it is still unknown how Mg substrate affects collagen assembly on top of it as well as subsequent cell attachment and growth. Here, we studied the effects of collagen monomer concentration, pH, assembly time, and surface roughness of two Mg materials (pure Mg and AZ31) on collagen fibril formation. Results showed that formation of fibrils would not initiate until the monomer concentration reached a certain level depending on the type of Mg material. The thickness of collagen fibril increased with the increase of assembly time. The structures of collagen fibrils formed on semi-rough surfaces of Mg materials have a high similarity to that of native bone collagen. Next, cell attachment and growth after collagen assembly were examined. Materials with rough surface showed higher collagen adsorption but compromised bone cell attachment. Interestingly, surface roughness and collagen structure did not affect cell growth on AZ31 for up to a week. Findings from this work provide some insightful information on Mg-tissue interaction at the interface and guidance for future surface modifications of Mg biomaterials. PMID:25303459

  17. Changes induced by ozone and ultraviolet light in type I collagen. Bovine Achilles tendon collagen versus rat tail tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, E

    1985-10-15

    High-molecular-mass aggregates were made soluble from insoluble collagens of bovine Achilles tendon and rat tail tendon by limited thermal hydrolysis. These polymeric collagen aggregates were cross-linked by 390-nm-fluorescent 3-hydroxy-pyridinium residues (excited at 325 nm) in the former tendon and by unknown non-fluorescent residues in the latter. With the solubilized insoluble-collagens from both tendons, as well as with acid-soluble collagen from rat tail tendon, other 350-385-nm fluorescence intensities (excited at 300 nm) were found to be higher in monomeric chains than in dimeric and polymeric chains. Low levels of ozone inhibited fibril formation of acid-soluble collagen particularly from young rat tail tendon, reacting with tyrosine residues and the 350-385-nm fluorophores. Aldehyde groups, involved in cross-linking, were not effectively modified by ozone. beta-Components (alpha-chain dimers) were not efficiently dissociated even by higher doses of ozone compared to gamma-components (alpha-chain trimers). Polymeric chain aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon collagen, whose 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links are cleaved by ozone, were more readily dissociated by ozone than those from rat tail tendon collagen. Ultraviolet (300-nm) light, which destroyed the 350-385-nm fluorophores, inhibited fibril formation less effectively than ultraviolet (275-nm) light, which is absorbed by tyrosine residues, and did not dissociate collagen polymers from rat tail tendon. On the other hand, ultraviolet (320-nm) light, absorbed by 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links which were rapidly photolyzed, partially dissociated polymeric collagen aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon after subsequent heating.

  18. Mechanical properties of human patellar tendon at the hierarchical levels of tendon and fibril.

    PubMed

    Svensson, René B; Hansen, Philip; Hassenkam, Tue; Haraldsson, Bjarki T; Aagaard, Per; Kovanen, Vuokko; Krogsgaard, Michael; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2012-02-01

    Tendons are strong hierarchical structures, but how tensile forces are transmitted between different levels remains incompletely understood. Collagen fibrils are thought to be primary determinants of whole tendon properties, and therefore we hypothesized that the whole human patellar tendon and its distinct collagen fibrils would display similar mechanical properties. Human patellar tendons (n = 5) were mechanically tested in vivo by ultrasonography. Biopsies were obtained from each tendon, and individual collagen fibrils were dissected and tested mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The Young's modulus was 2.0 ± 0.5 GPa, and the toe region reached 3.3 ± 1.9% strain in whole patellar tendons. Based on dry cross-sectional area, the Young's modulus of isolated collagen fibrils was 2.8 ± 0.3 GPa, and the toe region reached 0.86 ± 0.08% strain. The measured fibril modulus was insufficient to account for the modulus of the tendon in vivo when fibril content in the tendon was accounted for. Thus, our original hypothesis was not supported, although the in vitro fibril modulus corresponded well with reported in vitro tendon values. This correspondence together with the fibril modulus not being greater than that of tendon supports that fibrillar rather than interfibrillar properties govern the subfailure tendon response, making the fibrillar level a meaningful target of intervention. The lower modulus found in vitro suggests a possible adverse effect of removing the tissue from its natural environment. In addition to the primary work comparing the two hierarchical levels, we also verified the existence of viscoelastic behavior in isolated human collagen fibrils.

  19. The Role of Collagen Organization on the Properties of Bone.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Bone is a complex tissue constituted by a collagen matrix filled in with crystal of hydroxyapatite (HAP). Bone mechanical properties are influenced by the collagen matrix which is organized into hierarchical structures from the individual type I collagen heterotrimer flanked by linear telopeptides at each end to the collagen fibrils that are interconnected by enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links. Although most studies focused on the role of collagen cross-links in bone strength, other organizational features may also play a role. At the molecular level it has been shown that homotrimer of type I collagen found in bone tissue of some patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by decreased mechanical competence compared to the regular heterotrimer. The state of C-telopeptide isomerization-which can be estimated by the measurement in body fluids of the native and isomerized isoforms-has also been shown to be associated with bone strength, particularly the post-yield properties independent of bone size and bone mineral density. Other higher hierarchical features of collagen organization have shown to be associated with changes in bone mechanical behavior in ex vivo models and may also be relevant to explain bone fragility in diseases characterized by collagen abnormalities e.g., OI and Paget's disease. These include the orientation of collagen fibrils in a regular longitudinal direction, the D-spacing period between collagen fibrils and the collagen-HAP interfacial bonding. Preliminary data indicate that some of these organizational features can change during treatment with bisphosphonate, raloxifene, and PTH suggesting that they may contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. It remains however to be determined which of these parameters play a specific and independent role in bone matrix properties, what is the magnitude of mechanical strength explained by collagen organization, whether they are relevant to explain osteoporosis-induced bone

  20. Decrimping: The first stage of collagen thermal denaturation unraveled by in situ second-harmonic-generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Zhuo, Zong-Yan; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Tzeng, Yu-Yi; Chu, Shi-Wei; Yu, Shih-Fan; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace

    2011-04-01

    With polarized and time-lapsed second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging, three distinct thermodynamic stages are revealed during heating of collagenous tissue. In the first "decrimping" stage, SHG intensity remains unchanged while the characteristic crimp pattern of collagen fiber disappears. The intactness of underlying fibrils is confirmed by unaffected second-order susceptibility, suggesting decrimping is related to the breakage of cross-linking between collagen fibrils. In the latter stages, significant SHG decrease is observed, providing quantification to collagen thermal denaturation. This study manifests the benefits of adopting SHG for understanding the thermal response of collagen, and will be useful toward better thermal therapy design.

  1. Interfibrillar stiffening of echinoderm mutable collagenous tissue demonstrated at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jingyi; Blowes, Liisa M.; Egertová, Michaela; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Wang, Wen; Elphick, Maurice R.; Gupta, Himadri S.

    2016-01-01

    The mutable collagenous tissue (MCT) of echinoderms (e.g., sea cucumbers and starfish) is a remarkable example of a biological material that has the unique attribute, among collagenous tissues, of being able to rapidly change its stiffness and extensibility under neural control. However, the mechanisms of MCT have not been characterized at the nanoscale. Using synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction to probe time-dependent changes in fibrillar structure during in situ tensile testing of sea cucumber dermis, we investigate the ultrastructural mechanics of MCT by measuring fibril strain at different chemically induced mechanical states. By measuring a variable interfibrillar stiffness (EIF), the mechanism of mutability at the nanoscale can be demonstrated directly. A model of stiffness modulation via enhanced fibrillar recruitment is developed to explain the biophysical mechanisms of MCT. Understanding the mechanisms of MCT quantitatively may have applications in development of new types of mechanically tunable biomaterials. PMID:27708167

  2. Collagen in Human Tissues: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications from a Tissue Engineering Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Sireesha, Merum; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    The extracellular matrix is a complex biological structure encoded with various proteins, among which the collagen family is the most significant and abundant of all, contributing 30-35% of the whole-body protein. "Collagen" is a generic term for proteins that forms a triple-helical structure with three polypeptide chains, and around 29 types of collagen have been identified up to now. Although most of the members of the collagen family form such supramolecular structures, extensive diversity exists between each type of collagen. The diversity is not only based on the molecular assembly and supramolecular structures of collagen types but is also observed within its tissue distribution, function, and pathology. Collagens possess complex hierarchical structures and are present in various forms such as collagen fibrils (1.5-3.5 nm wide), collagen fibers (50-70 nm wide), and collagen bundles (150-250 nm wide), with distinct properties characteristic of each tissue providing elasticity to skin, softness of the cartilage, stiffness of the bone and tendon, transparency of the cornea, opaqueness of the sclera, etc. There exists an exclusive relation between the structural features of collagen in human tissues (such as the collagen composition, collagen fibril length and diameter, collagen distribution, and collagen fiber orientation) and its tissue-specific mechanical properties. In bone, a transverse collagen fiber orientation prevails in regions of higher compressive stress whereas longitudinally oriented collagen fibers correlate to higher tensile stress. The immense versatility of collagen compels a thorough understanding of the collagen types and this review discusses the major types of collagen found in different human tissues, highlighting their tissue-specific uniqueness based on their structure and mechanical function. The changes in collagen during a specific tissue damage or injury are discussed further, focusing on the many tissue engineering applications for

  3. Evidence that interfibrillar load transfer in tendon is supported by small diameter fibrils and not extrafibrillar tissue components.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Fetchko, Kristen L; Dodge, George R; Elliott, Dawn M

    2017-01-10

    Collagen fibrils in tendon are believed to be discontinuous and transfer tensile loads through shear forces generated during interfibrillar sliding. However, the structures that transmit these interfibrillar forces are unknown. Various extrafibrillar tissue components (e.g., glycosaminoglycans, collagens XII and XIV) have been suggested to transmit interfibrillar loads by bridging collagen fibrils. Alternatively, collagen fibrils may interact directly through physical fusions and interfibrillar branching. The objective of this study was to test whether extrafibrillar proteins are necessary to transmit load between collagen fibrils or if interfibrillar load transfer is accomplished directly by the fibrils themselves. Trypsin digestions were used to remove a broad spectrum of extrafibrillar proteins and measure their contribution to the multiscale mechanics of rat tail tendon fascicles. Additionally, images obtained from serial block-face scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the three-dimensional fibrillar organization in tendon fascicles and identify any potential interfibrillar interactions. While trypsin successfully removed several extrafibrillar tissue components, there was no change in the macroscale fascicle mechanics or fibril:tissue strain ratio. Furthermore, the imaging data suggested that a network of smaller diameter fibrils (<150 nm) wind around and fuse with their neighboring larger diameter fibrils. These findings demonstrate that interfibrillar load transfer is not supported by extrafibrillar tissue components and support the hypothesis that collagen fibrils are capable of transmitting loads themselves. Conclusively determining how fibrils bear load within tendon is critical for identifying the mechanisms that impair tissue function with degeneration and for restoring tissue properties via cell-mediated regeneration or engineered tissue replacements. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop

  4. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Treated? Treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) depends on ... much thyroid hormone). Who Needs Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation? People who have AF but don't have ...

  5. Collagen Gel Contraction by Fibroblasts: The Role of Myosin 2 and Gravity Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Wint, Barbara P.; Malouvier, Alexandre; Holton, Emily

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that collagen organization by connective tissue cells is sensitive to force. For instance, in flight experiments on rats the collagen fibrils which were produced under weightlessness and which were immediately next to the tendon fibroblasts were shown to be oriented randomly around the cells while the older fibrils right next to these and which were produced under 1 G, were highly organized.

  6. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  7. Collagen V expression is crucial in regional development of the supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Adams, Thomas H; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-12-01

    Manipulations in cell culture and mouse models have demonstrated that reduction of collagen V results in altered fibril structure and matrix assembly. A tissue-dependent role for collagen V in determining mechanical function was recently established, but its role in determining regional properties has not been addressed. The objective of this study was to define the role(s) of collagen V expression in establishing the site-specific properties of the supraspinatus tendon. The insertion and midsubstance of tendons from wild type, heterozygous and tendon/ligament-specific null mice were assessed for crimp morphology, fibril morphology, cell morphology, as well as total collagen and pyridinoline cross-link (PYD) content. Fibril morphology was altered at the midsubstance of both groups with larger, but fewer, fibrils and no change in cell morphology or collagen compared to the wild type controls. In contrast, a significant disruption of fibril assembly was observed at the insertion site of the null group with the presence of structurally aberrant fibrils. Alterations were also present in cell density and PYD content. Altogether, these results demonstrate that collagen V plays a crucial role in determining region-specific differences in mouse supraspinatus tendon structure. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2154-2161, 2016.

  8. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  9. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-08

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  10. Chitosan nanoparticles enhance the antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine in collagen membranes used for periapical guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barreras, Uriel Soto; Méndez, Fernando Torres; Martínez, Rita Elizabeth Martínez; Valencia, Carolina Samano; Rodríguez, Panfilo Raymundo Martinez; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo Loyola

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic failure is mainly associated with the persistence of microbial infection in the root canal system and/or the periradicular area. Microorganisms and their toxins located in the root canal system may trigger apical periodontitis and tissue destruction. Tissue regeneration in periapical surgery by using membrane barriers has shown an improved healing and bone closure. However, bacterial membrane contamination is a main reason of failure. In this in vitro study, different brands of chlorhexidine, a combination of chitosan nanoparticles containing chlorhexidine were tested against Enterococcus faecalis on agar plate's cultures and infected collagen membranes. Our results indicated that chitosan nanoparticles acted synergistically with chlorhexidine, inhibiting and eliminating significantly a greater amount of colony former units in both BHI-agar cultures and infected collagen membranes. These results suggested that chitosan nanoparticles could be used to improve regenerative procedures in periapical surgery.

  11. Enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration by the combination of a polycaprolactone tubular prosthesis and a scaffold of collagen with supramolecular organization

    PubMed Central

    Maturana, Luiz G; Pierucci, Amauri; Simões, Gustavo F; Vidigal, Mateus; Duek, Eliana A R; Vidal, Benedicto C; Oliveira, Alexandre L R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of implanting collagen with a supramolecular organization on peripheral nerve regeneration, using the sciatic nerve tubulization technique. For this purpose, adult female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five groups: (1) TP – sciatic nerve repaired with empty polyethylene tubular prothesis (n = 10), (2) TPCL – nerve repair with empty polycaprolactone (PCL) tubing (n = 8), (3) TPCLF – repair with PCL tubing filled with an implant of collagen with a supramolecular organization (n = 10), (4) AG – animals that received a peripheral nerve autograft (n = 8), and (5) Normal nerves (n = 8). The results were assessed by quantification of the regenerated fibers, nerve morphometry, and transmission electron microscopy, 60 days after surgery. Immunohistochemistry and polarization microscopy were also used to analyze the regenerated nerve structure and cellular elements. The results showed that the AG group presented a larger number of regenerated axons. However, the TPCL and TPCLF groups presented more compact regenerated fibers with a morphometric profile closer to normal, both at the tube midpoint and 2 mm distal to the prosthesis. These findings were reinforced by polarization microscopy, which indicated a better collagen/axons suprastructural organization in the TPCLF derived samples. In addition, the immunohistochemical results obtained using the antibody anti-p75NTR as a Schwann cell reactivity marker demonstrated that the Schwann cells were more reactive during the regenerative process in the TPCLF group as compared to the TPCL group and the normal sciatic nerve. Altogether, the results of this study indicated that the implant of collagen with a supramolecular organization positively influenced and stimulated the regeneration process through the nerve gap, resulting in the formation of a better morphologically arranged tissue. PMID:24381812

  12. Non-cross-linked collagen type I/III materials enhance cell proliferation: in vitro and in vivo evidence

    PubMed Central

    WILLERSHAUSEN, Ines; BARBECK, Mike; BOEHM, Nicole; SADER, Robert; WILLERSHAUSEN, Brita; KIRKPATRICK, Charles James; GHANAATI, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze Mucograft®(MG), a recently introduced collagen matrix, in vitro and in vivo, and compare it with BioGide®(BG), a well-established collagen membrane, as control. Material and Methods A detailed analysis of the materials surface and ultra-structure was performed. Cellular growth patterns and proliferation rates of human fibroblasts on MG and BG were analyzed in vitro. In addition, the early tissue reaction of CD-1 mouse to these materials was analyzed by means of histological and histomorphometrical analysis. Results MG showed a three-fold higher thickness both in dry and wet conditions, when compared to BG. The spongy surface of BG significantly differed from that of MG. Cells showed a characteristic proliferation pattern on the different materials in vitro. Fibroblasts tended to proliferate on the compact layers of both collagens, with the highest values on the compact side of BG. In vivo, at day three both materials demonstrated good tissue integration, with a mononuclear cell sheet of fibroblasts on all surfaces, however, without penetrating into the materials. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that MG and BG facilitate cell proliferation on both of their surfaces in vitro. In vivo, these two materials induce a comparable early tissue reaction, while serving as cell occlusive barriers. PMID:24626246

  13. Collagen peptides ameliorate intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction in immunostimulatory Caco-2 cell monolayers via enhancing tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianru; Chen, Oliver; Martins, Isabela M; Hou, Hu; Zhao, Xue; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Li, Bafang

    2017-03-22

    Dysfunction of the intestinal barrier plays a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and multiple organ failure. The effect of Alaska pollock skin-derived collagen and its 3 tryptic hydrolytic fractions, HCP (6 kDa retentate), MCP (3 kDa retentate) and LCP (3 kDa permeate) on TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction was investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers. TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction was significantly attenuated by the collagen and its peptide fractions, especially LCP, compared to TNF-α treated controls (P < 0.05). Compared to a negative control, 24 h pre-incubation with 2 mg mL(-1) LCP significantly alleviated the TNF-α induced breakdown of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and occludin and inhibited MLC phosphorylation and MLCK expression. The activation of NFκB and Elk-1 was suppressed by LCP. Thus, collagen peptides may attenuate TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction of Caco-2 cells by inhibiting the NFκB and ERK1/2-mediated MLCK pathway with associated decreases in ZO-1 and occludin protein expression.

  14. Acceleration of bone formation during fracture healing by injectable collagen powder and human basic fibroblast growth factor containing a collagen-binding domain from Clostridium histolyticum collagenase.

    PubMed

    Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Ueno, Masaki; Matsushita, Osamu; Inoue, Gen; Nishi, Nozomu; Ogura, Takayuki; Hattori, Shunji; Fujimaki, Hisako; Tanaka, Keisuke; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    Growth factor delivered with implantable biomaterials has been used to both accelerate and ensure healing of open fractures in human patients. However, a major limitation of implantable biomaterials is the requirement for open surgical placement. Here, we developed an injectable collagen material-based bone formation system consisting of injectable collagen powder with fibril morphology and collagen triple helix conformation, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fused to the collagen-binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. The affinity of the CBD towards collagen was confirmed by the results of collagen-binding assays. Moreover, the combination of the collagen binding-bFGF fusion protein (CB-bFGF) with injectable collagen powder induced bone formation at protein concentrations lower than those required for bFGF alone in mice fracture models. Taken together, these properties suggest that the CB-bFGF/collagen powder composite is a promising injectable material for bone repair in the clinical setting.

  15. Calcium phosphate phases integrated in silica/collagen nanocomposite xerogels enhance the bioactivity and ultimately manipulate the osteoblast/osteoclast ratio in a human co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, S; Heinemann, C; Wenisch, S; Alt, V; Worch, H; Hanke, T

    2013-01-01

    A human co-culture model of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, derived from bone marrow stromal cells and monocytes respectively, was used to characterize the influence of biomaterial modification on the bioactivity and ultimately the ratio of bone-forming to bone-resorbing cells cultivated directly on the surface. Nanocomposites of silica and collagen have been shown to function as skeletal structures in nature and were reproduced in vitro by using a sol-gel approach. The resulting xerogels exhibit a number of features that make it a valuable system for the development of innovative materials for bone substitution applications. In the present study, the incorporation of different calcium phosphate phases in silica/collagen-based gels was demonstrated to enhance the bioactivity of these samples. This ability of the biomaterial to precipitate calcium phosphate on the surface when incubated in simulated body fluids or cell culture medium is generally considered to an advantageous property for bone substitution materials. By co-cultivating human osteoblasts and osteoclasts up to 42 days on the xerogels, we demonstrate that the long-term ratio of these cell types depends on the level of bioactivity of the substrate samples. Biphasic silica/collagen xerogels exhibited comparably low bioactivity but encouraged proliferation of osteoblasts in comparison to osteoclast formation. A balanced ratio of both cell types was detected for moderately bioactive triphasic xerogels with 5% calcium phosphate. However, enhancing the bioactivity of the xerogel samples by increasing the calcium phosphate phase percentage to 20% resulted in a diminished number of osteoblasts in favor of osteoclast formation. Quantitative evaluation was carried out by biochemical methods (calcium, DNA, ALP, TRAP 5b) as well as RT-PCR (ALP, BSP II, OC, RANKL, TRAP, CALCR, VTNR, CTSK), and was supported by confocal laser scanning microscopy (cell nuclei, actin, CD68, TRAP) as well as scanning electron microscopy.

  16. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Avanish S; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Type XXV collagen, or collagen-like amyloidogenic component, is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)₁₀ , an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY, and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence was incorporated between (GPO)(n) domains. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed the GNNQQNY peptide formed a random coil structure, whereas the hybrid peptide contained a central disordered GNNQQNY region transitioning to triple-helical ends. Light scattering confirmed the GNNQQNY peptide had a high propensity to form amyloid fibrils, whereas amyloidogenesis was delayed in the hybrid peptide. NMR data suggested the triple-helix constraints on the GNNQQNY sequence within the hybrid peptide may disfavor the conformational change necessary for aggregation. Independent addition of a triple-helical peptide to the GNNQQNY peptide under aggregating conditions delayed nucleation and amyloid fibril growth. The inhibition of amyloid nucleation depended on the Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequence and required the triple-helix conformation. The inhibitory effect of the collagen triple-helix on an amyloidogenic sequence, when in the same molecule or when added separately, suggests Type XXV collagen, and possibly other collagens, may play a role in regulating amyloid fibril formation.

  17. Dynamics of Focal Fibrillation Waves during Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lanters, Eva A H; Allessie, Maurits A; DE Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and appearance of focal fibrillation waves on the right and left atrial epicardial surface were visualized during 10 seconds of persistent atrial fibrillation in a 71-year-old woman with valvular heart disease. The frequent, nonrepetitive, widespread, and capricious distribution of focal waves suggests that transmural conduction of fibrillation waves is most likely the mechanism underlying focal fibrillation waves.

  18. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  19. Loss of fibulin-4 disrupts collagen synthesis and maturation: implications for pathology resulting from EFEMP2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Tsunezumi, Jun; Ringuette, Léa-Jeanne; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Terajima, Masahiko; Yamashiro, Yoshito; Urquhart, Greg; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Davis, Elaine C.; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous recessive mutations in either EFEMP2 (encoding fibulin-4) or FBLN5 (encoding fibulin-5), critical genes for elastogenesis, lead to autosomal recessive cutis laxa types 1B and 1A, respectively. Previously, fibulin-4 was shown to bind lysyl oxidase (LOX), an elastin/collagen cross-linking enzyme, in vitro. Consistently, reported defects in humans with EFEMP2 mutations are more severe and broad in range than those due to FBLN5 mutations and encompass both elastin-rich and collagen-rich tissues. However, the underlying disease mechanism in EFEMP2 mutations has not been fully addressed. Here, we show that fibulin-4 is important for the integrity of aortic collagen in addition to elastin. Smooth muscle-specific Efemp2 loss in mouse (termed SMKO) resulted in altered fibrillar collagen localization with larger, poorly organized fibrils. LOX activity was decreased in Efemp2-null cells, and collagen cross-linking was diminished in SMKO aortas; however, elastin cross-linking was unaffected and the level of mature LOX was maintained to that of wild-type aortas. Proteomic screening identified multiple proteins involved in procollagen processing and maturation as potential fibulin-4-binding partners. We showed that fibulin-4 binds procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer 1 (Pcolce), which enhances proteolytic cleavage of the procollagen C-terminal propeptide during procollagen processing. Interestingly, however, procollagen cleavage was not affected by the presence or absence of fibulin-4 in vitro. Thus, our data indicate that fibulin-4 serves as a potential scaffolding protein during collagen maturation in the extracellular space. Analysis of collagen in other tissues affected by fibulin-4 loss should further increase our understanding of underlying pathologic mechanisms in patients with EFEMP2 mutations. PMID:26220971

  20. Amyloid Fibrillation of Insulin under Water-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Su; Lee, Jong Wha; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Hugh I.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrillation in water-organic mixtures has been widely studied to understand the effect of protein-solvent interactions on the fibrillation process. In this study, we monitored insulin fibrillation in formamide and its methyl derivatives (formamide, N-methyl formamide, N,N-dimethyl formamide) in the presence and absence of water. These model solvent systems mimic the cellular environment by providing denaturing conditions and a hydrophobic environment with limited water content. Thioflavin T (ThT) assay revealed that binary mixtures of water with formamide and its methyl derivatives enhanced fibrillation rates and β-sheet abundance, whereas organic solvents suppressed insulin fibrillation. We utilized solution small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the correlation between protein-solvent interactions and insulin fibrillation. SAXS experiments combined with simulated annealing of the protein indicated that the degree of denaturation of the hydrophobic core region at residues B11–B17 determines the fibrillation rate. In addition, DSC experiments suggested a crucial role of hydrophobic interactions in the fibrillation process. These results imply that an environment with limited water, which imitates a lipid membrane system, accelerates protein denaturation and the formation of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions during amyloid fibrillation. PMID:25418175

  1. Stellar fibril magnetic systems. I - Reduced energy state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1984-01-01

    The remarkable fibril structure of the magnetic fields at the surface of the sun (with fibrils compressed to 1,000-2,000 gauss) lies outside existing statistical theories of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The total energy of the fibril field is enhanced by a factor of more than 100 above the energy for the mean field in a continuum state. The magnetic energy density within a fibril is of the order of 100 times the local kinetic energy density, so that no simple application of equipartition principles is possible. It is pointed out that the total energy of the atmosphere (thermal + gravitational + magnetic) is reduced by the fibril state of the field by avoiding the magnetic inhibition of the convective overturning, suggesting that the formation of the observed intense fibril state may be in response to the associated energy reduction. Calculation of the minimum total energy of a polytropic atmosphere permeated by magnetic fibrils yields theoretical fibril fields of the order of 1-5 kilogauss when characteristics appropriate to the solar convective zone are introduced, in rough agreement with the actual fields of 1-2 kilogauss. The polytrope model, although crude, establishes that a large reduction in total energy is made possible by the fibril state.

  2. Mineralisation of reconstituted collagen using polyvinylphosphonic acid/polyacrylic acid templating matrix protein analogues in the presence of calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kyung; Gu, Li-sha; Bryan, Thomas E.; Kim, Jong Ryul; Chen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Yoon, James C.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    The complex morphologies of mineralised collagen fibrils are regulated through interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. In the present study, polyvinylphosphonic acid, a biomimetic analogue of matrix phosphoproteins, was synthesised and confirmed with FTIR and NMR. Biomimetic mineralisation of reconstituted collagen fibrils devoid of natural non-collagenous proteins was demonstrated with TEM using a Portland cement-containing resin composite and a phosphate-containing fluid in the presence of polyacrylic acid as sequestration, and polyvinylphosphonic acid as templating matrix protein analogues. In the presence of these dual biomimetic analogues in the mineralisation medium, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralisation via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the nonclassical crystallisation pathway could be identified. Conversely, only large mineral spheres with no preferred association with collagen fibrils were observed in the absence of biomimetic analogues in the medium. Mineral phases were evident within the collagen fibrils as early as 4 hours after the initially-formed amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors were transformed into apatite nanocrystals. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of highly mineralised collagen fibrils were nearly identical to those of natural bone, with apatite crystallites preferentially aligned along the collagen fibril axes. PMID:20621767

  3. Ectopic bone formation in rapidly fabricated acellular injectable dense collagen-Bioglass hybrid scaffolds via gel aspiration-ejection.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Muja, Naser; Kamranpour, Neysan O; Lepry, William C; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Clarke, Susan A; Nazhat, Showan N

    2016-04-01

    Gel aspiration-ejection (GAE) has recently been introduced as an effective technique for the rapid production of injectable dense collagen (IDC) gel scaffolds with tunable collagen fibrillar densities (CFDs) and microstructures. Herein, a GAE system was applied for the advanced production and delivery of IDC and IDC-Bioglass(®) (IDC-BG) hybrid gel scaffolds for potential bone tissue engineering applications. The efficacy of GAE in generating mineralizable IDC-BG gels (from an initial 75-25 collagen-BG ratio) produced through needle gauge numbers 8G (3.4 mm diameter and 6 wt% CFD) and 14G (1.6 mm diameter and 14 wt% CFD) was investigated. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of as-made gels revealed an increase in collagen fibril alignment with needle gauge number. In vitro mineralization of IDC-BG gels was confirmed where carbonated hydroxyapatite was detected as early as day 1 in simulated body fluid, which progressively increased up to day 14. In vivo mineralization of, and host response to, acellular IDC and IDC-BG gel scaffolds were further investigated following subcutaneous injection in adult rats. Mineralization, neovascularization and cell infiltration into the scaffolds was enhanced by the addition of BG and at day 21 post injection, there was evidence of remodelling of granulation tissue into woven bone-like tissue in IDC-BG. SHG imaging of explanted scaffolds indicated collagen fibril remodelling through cell infiltration and mineralization over time. In sum, the results suggest that IDC-BG hybrid gels have osteoinductive properties and potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach for procedures requiring the injectable delivery of a malleable and dynamic bone graft that mineralizes under physiological conditions.

  4. Collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Levison, D A; Morson, B C; Dawson, A M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and pathological aspects of six patients with collagenous colitis are presented. These patients have been observed for between four and 15 years and the evolution of the condition is documented in three (cases 1, 3 and 5). Management and possible pathogenetic mechanisms of this enigmatic condition are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3699567

  5. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis.

  6. Characterization of ultrastructure and collagen composition of the teratoma membrane: comparison to the amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Cho, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Young-Sun; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Jung, Min-Hyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-04-01

    The structural and morphological properties of the teratoma membrane were investigated to better understand the pathogenesis of ovarian teratomas. A mature cystic teratoma and amnion were obtained from patients who underwent laparoscopic cystectomy and uncomplicated delivery, respectively. The teratoma membrane was divided into three layers according to the results of the histological analysis. Each layer showed distinct morphological properties, including an outer layer that was uniformly arranged, a middle layer with an irregular pattern of fibers, and an inner layer that was structurally dense with a wavy pattern of fibers. The morphology of the layers of the amniotic membrane was the reverse that of the teratoma membrane. In the teratoma membrane, the outer layer was primarily composed of type III collagen and the inner layer had a large amount of type III and IV collagen. The amniotic membrane showed a small amount of type III collagen in the outer layer, whereas the inner layer had large amounts of type I, III, and IV collagen. In the teratoma membrane, the collagen fibrils were arranged regularly in the outer layer, but irregularly in the inner layer. In the amniotic membrane, the arrangement of collagen fibrils was the reverse that of the teratoma membrane. Additionally, the collagen fibrils in the teratoma membrane were thinner than those of the amniotic membrane and had slightly shorter d-spacing. Two membranes showed the differences in collagen fibril arrangement, which may caused by the different functional roles.

  7. Development and utilization of a bovine type I collagen microfibril model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered array to form a matrix of fibrils, fibers and fiber bundles, makes it uniquely suitable as a scaffold for biomaterial engineering. A major challenge for this application is to stabilize collagen structure by m...

  8. Age-associated increase of skin fibroblast-derived prostaglandin E2 contributes to reduced collagen levels in elderly human skin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Lei, Dan; Swindell, William R; Xia, Wei; Weng, Shinuo; Fu, Jianping; Worthen, Christal A; Okubo, Toru; Johnston, Andrew; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Production of type I collagen declines during aging, leading to skin thinning and impaired function. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a pleiotropic lipid mediator that is synthesized from arachidonic acid by the sequential actions of cyclooxygenases (COX) and PGE synthases (PTGES). PGE2 inhibits collagen production by fibroblasts in vitro. We report that PTGES1 and COX2 progressively increase with aging in sun-protected human skin. PTGES1 and COX2 mRNA was increased 3.4-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively, in the dermis of elderly (>80 years) versus young (21-30 years) individuals. Fibroblasts were the major cell source of both enzymes. PGE2 levels were increased 70% in elderly skin. Fibroblasts in aged skin display reduced spreading due to collagen fibril fragmentation. To investigate the relationship between spreading and PGE2 synthesis, fibroblasts were cultured on micropost arrays or hydrogels of varying mechanical compliance. Reduced spreading/mechanical force resulted in increased expression of both PTGES1 and COX2 and elevated levels of PGE2. Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by diclofenac enhanced collagen production in skin organ cultures. These data suggest that reduced spreading/mechanical force of fibroblasts in aged skin elevates PGE2 production, contributing to reduced collagen production. Inhibition of PGE2 production may be therapeutically beneficial for combating age-associated collagen deficit in human skin. PMID:25905589

  9. Surgery for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher P; Henn, Matthew C; Damiano, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its treatment options include drug therapy or catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its fourth iteration (Cox-Maze IV). This article reviews the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. This article also reviews the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous cut-and-sew method.

  10. Surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher P; Henn, Matthew C; Damiano, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its treatment options include drug therapy or catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its fourth iteration (Cox-Maze IV). This article reviews the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. This article also reviews the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous cut-and-sew method.

  11. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen distribution for polarization-resolved SHG microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-02-01

    A hierarchical model of the organization of fibrillar collagen is developed and its implications on polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are investigated. A "ground-up" approach is employed to develop the theory for understanding of the origin of SHG from fibrillar collagen. The effects of fibril ultrastructure and fibril macroscopic organization on the second-order polarization properties of fibrillar collagen are presented in conjunction with recent ab initio results performed on a collagen triple-helix model (-GLY-PRO-HYP-)n. Various tissues containing fibrillar collagen are quantified using a polarization-resolved SHG technique, termed polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) and interpreted in light of the aforementioned theory. The method involves varying the incident laser polarization, while monitoring the SHG intensity through an analyzer. From the SHG polarization data the orientation of the fibers, in biological tissue, can be deduced. Unique PIPO signatures are observed for different rat tissues and interpreted in terms of the collagen composition, fibril ultrastructure, and macroscopic organization. Similarities and discrepancies in the second-order polarization properties of different collagen types and ultrastructures will be presented. PIPO SHG microscopy shows promise in its ability to quantify the organization of collagen in various tissues. The ability to characterize the structure of collagen in various tissue microenvironments will aid in the study of numerous collagen related biological process, including tissue diseases, wound repair, and tumor development and progression.

  12. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  13. Enhancement by PL 14736 of granulation and collagen organization in healing wounds and the potential role of egr-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tkalcević, Vanesa Ivetić; Cuzić, Snjezana; Brajsa, Karmen; Mildner, Boris; Bokulić, Ana; Situm, Kristina; Perović, Daniela; Glojnarić, Ines; Parnham, Michael J

    2007-09-10

    Apart from becaplermin (recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor homodimer of B chains, PDGF-BB), for the treatment of lower extremity diabetic ulcers, few agents are available for pharmacological stimulation of wound healing. We have compared the mechanism of action of the potential wound healing agent, PL 14736 (G E P P P G K P A D D A G L V), with that of PDGF-BB on granulation tissue formation following sponge implantation in the normoglycemic rat and in healing full-thickness excisional wounds in db/db genetically diabetic mice. Expression of the immediate response gene, early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) was studied in Caco-2 cells in vitro. While PDGF-BB and PL 14736 had similar selectivity for stimulation of granulation tissue in both sponge granuloma and in healing wounds in db/db mice, PL 14736 was more active in stimulating early collagen organization. It also stimulated expression of egr-1 and its repressor nerve growth factor 1-A binding protein-2 (nab2) in non-differentiated Caco-2 cells more rapidly than PDGF-BB. EGR-1 induces cytokine and growth factor generation and early extracellular matrix (collagen) formation, offering an explanation for the beneficial effects of PL 14736 on wound healing.

  14. Sulfoxide stimulation of chondrogenesis in limb mesenchyme is accompanied by an increase in type II collagen enhancer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.E. Jr.; Higginbotham, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    We have utilized a modification of the limb bud mesenchyme micromass culture system to screen compounds that might stimulate chondrogenesis. Two compounds in the sulfoxide family (methylphenylsulfoxide and p-chlorophenyl methyl sulfoxide) were stimulatory at 10(-2) M and 10(-3) M, respectively; whereas other sulfoxides and organic solvents were not active at these concentrations. In addition, specific growth factors (basic FGF, IGF-I, IGF-II) were not chondroinductive at concentrations that are active in other cell systems. Both sulfoxide compounds stimulated cartilage nodule formation, ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation, and activity of the regulatory sequences of the collagen II gene. In contrast, transforming growth factor beta-1 (10 ng/ml) stimulated sulfate incorporation but produced only a diffuse deposition of cartilage matrix and reduced the ability of the cells to utilize the regulatory sequences of the collagen II gene. The sulfoxides appear to promote the differentiation of limb bud cells to chondrocytes and thus exhibit chondroinductive activity.

  15. Directing collagen fibers using counter-rotating cone extrusion.

    PubMed

    Hoogenkamp, Henk R; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Wolf, Louis; Suurs, Patricia; Dunnewind, Bertus; Barbut, Shai; Friedl, Peter; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daamen, Willeke F

    2015-01-01

    The bio-inspired engineering of tissue equivalents should take into account anisotropic morphology and the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix. This especially applies to collagen fibrils, which have various, but highly defined, orientations throughout tissues and organs. There are several methods available to control the alignment of soluble collagen monomers, but the options to direct native insoluble collagen fibers are limited. Here we apply a controlled counter-rotating cone extrusion technology to engineer tubular collagen constructs with defined anisotropy. Driven by diverging inner and outer cone rotation speeds, collagen fibrils from bovine skin were extruded and precipitated onto mandrels as tubes with oriented fibers and bundles, as examined by second harmonic generation microscopy and quantitative image analysis. A clear correlation was found whereby the direction and extent of collagen fiber alignment during extrusion were a function of the shear forces caused by a combination of the cone rotation and flow direction. A gradual change in the fiber direction, spanning +50 to -40°, was observed throughout the sections of the sample, with an average decrease ranging from 2.3 to 2.6° every 10μm. By varying the cone speeds, the collagen constructs showed differences in elasticity and toughness, spanning 900-2000kPa and 19-35mJ, respectively. Rotational extrusion presents an enabling technology to create and control the (an)isotropic architecture of collagen constructs for application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  16. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates.

  17. Internal strain drives spontaneous periodic buckling in collagen and regulates remodeling.

    PubMed

    Dittmore, Andrew; Silver, Jonathan; Sarkar, Susanta K; Marmer, Barry; Goldberg, Gregory I; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-07-26

    Fibrillar collagen, an essential structural component of the extracellular matrix, is remarkably resistant to proteolysis, requiring specialized matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to initiate its remodeling. In the context of native fibrils, remodeling is poorly understood; MMPs have limited access to cleavage sites and are inhibited by tension on the fibril. Here, single-molecule recordings of fluorescently labeled MMPs reveal cleavage-vulnerable binding regions arrayed periodically at ∼1-µm intervals along collagen fibrils. Binding regions remain periodic even as they migrate on the fibril, indicating a collective process of thermally activated and self-healing defect formation. An internal strain relief model involving reversible structural rearrangements quantitatively reproduces the observed spatial patterning and fluctuations of defects and provides a mechanism for tension-dependent stabilization of fibrillar collagen. This work identifies internal-strain-driven defects that may have general and widespread regulatory functions in self-assembled biological filaments.

  18. Internal strain drives spontaneous periodic buckling in collagen and regulates remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Dittmore, Andrew; Silver, Jonathan; Sarkar, Susanta K.; Marmer, Barry; Goldberg, Gregory I.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen, an essential structural component of the extracellular matrix, is remarkably resistant to proteolysis, requiring specialized matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to initiate its remodeling. In the context of native fibrils, remodeling is poorly understood; MMPs have limited access to cleavage sites and are inhibited by tension on the fibril. Here, single-molecule recordings of fluorescently labeled MMPs reveal cleavage-vulnerable binding regions arrayed periodically at ∼1-µm intervals along collagen fibrils. Binding regions remain periodic even as they migrate on the fibril, indicating a collective process of thermally activated and self-healing defect formation. An internal strain relief model involving reversible structural rearrangements quantitatively reproduces the observed spatial patterning and fluctuations of defects and provides a mechanism for tension-dependent stabilization of fibrillar collagen. This work identifies internal–strain-driven defects that may have general and widespread regulatory functions in self-assembled biological filaments. PMID:27402741

  19. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  20. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L

    2014-12-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm(2))/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s(-1)), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s(-1) revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s(-1) or 1000 s(-1), and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s(-1) (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s(-1)) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions.

  1. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β regulates the repression of type II collagen expression during the differentiation from proliferative to hypertrophic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Takahiro; Okazaki, Ken; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-31

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor that promotes hypertrophic differentiation by stimulating type X collagen and matrix metalloproteinase 13 during chondrocyte differentiation. However, the effect of C/EBPβ on proliferative chondrocytes is unclear. Here, we investigated whether C/EBPβ represses type II collagen (COL2A1) expression and is involved in the regulation of sex-determining region Y-type high mobility group box 9 (SOX9), a crucial factor for transactivation of Col2a1. Endogenous expression of C/EBPβ in the embryonic growth plate and differentiated ATDC5 cells were opposite to those of COL2A1 and SOX9. Overexpression of C/EBPβ by adenovirus vector in ATDC5 cells caused marked repression of Col2a1. The expression of Sox9 mRNA and nuclear protein was also repressed, resulting in decreased binding of SOX9 to the Col2a1 enhancer as shown by a ChIP assay. Knockdown of C/EBPβ by lentivirus expressing shRNA caused significant stimulation of these genes in ATDC5 cells. Reporter assays demonstrated that C/EBPβ repressed transcriptional activity of Col2a1. Deletion and mutation analysis showed that the C/EBPβ core responsive element was located between +2144 and +2152 bp within the Col2a1 enhancer. EMSA and ChIP assays also revealed that C/EBPβ directly bound to this region. Ex vivo organ cultures of mouse limbs transfected with C/EBPβ showed that the expression of COL2A1 and SOX9 was reduced upon ectopic C/EBPβ expression. Together, these results indicated that C/EBPβ represses the transcriptional activity of Col2a1 both directly and indirectly through modulation of Sox9 expression. This consequently promotes the phenotypic conversion from proliferative to hypertrophic chondrocytes during chondrocyte differentiation.

  2. A titanium surface with nano-ordered spikes and pores enhances human dermal fibroblastic extracellular matrix production and integration of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kato, Eiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-02-02

    The acquisition of substantial dermal sealing determines the prognosis of percutaneous titanium-based medical devices or prostheses. A nano-topographic titanium surface with ordered nano-spikes and pores has been shown to induce periodontal-like connective tissue attachment and activate gingival fibroblastic functions. This in vitro study aimed to determine whether an alkali-heat (AH) treatment-created nano-topographic titanium surface could enhance human dermal fibroblastic functions and binding strength to the deposited collagen on the titanium surface. The surface topographies of commercially pure titanium machined discs exposed to two different AH treatments were evaluated. Human dermal fibroblastic cultures grown on the discs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, and physicochemical binding strength of surface-deposited collagen. An isotropically-patterned, shaggy nano-topography with a sponge-like inner network and numerous well-organized, anisotropically-patterned fine nano-spikes and pores were observed on each nano-topographic surface type via scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to the typical spindle-shaped cells on the machined surfaces, the isotropically- and anisotropically-patterned nano-topographic titanium surfaces had small circular/angular cells containing contractile ring-like structures and elongated, multi-shaped cells with a developed cytoskeletal network and multiple filopodia and lamellipodia, respectively. These nano-topographic surfaces enhanced dermal-related ECM synthesis at both the protein and gene levels, without proinflammatory cytokine synthesis or reduced proliferative activity. Deposited collagen fibers were included in these surfaces and sufficiently bound to the nano-topographies to resist the physical, enzymatic and chemical detachment treatments, in contrast to machined surfaces. Well-organized, isotropically

  3. Northern pike (Esox lucius) collagen: Extraction, characterization and potential application.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, J; Sionkowska, A; Skopinska-Wisniewska, J; Piechowicz, K

    2015-11-01

    Acid soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin soluble collagen (PSC) from the scales of northern pike (Esox lucius) were extracted and characterized. It was the first time that this species was used as sources of collagen. FT-IR and amino acid analysis results revealed the presence of collagen. Glycine accounts for one-third of its amino acid residues and specific for collagen amino acid - hydroxyproline - is present in isolated protein. The content of imino acid: proline and hydroxyproline in ASC and PSC was similar (12.5% Pro and 6.5% Hyp). Both ASC and PSC were type I collagen. The denaturation temperature of ASC and PSC were 28.5 and 27°C, respectively. Thin collagen films were obtained by casting of collagen solution onto glass plates. The surface properties of ASC and PSC films were different - the surface of ASC collagen film was more polar and less rough than PSC and we can observe the formation of collagen fibrils after solvent evaporation. ASC films showed much higher tensile properties than PSC. The obtained results suggest that northern pike scales have potential as an alternative source of collagen for use in various fields.

  4. Fullerene-C60/liposome complex: Defensive effects against UVA-induced damages in skin structure, nucleus and collagen type I/IV fibrils, and the permeability into human skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Aoshima, Hisae; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-21

    We previously reported biological safety of fullerene-C60 (C60) incorporated in liposome consisting of hydrogenated lecithin and glycine soja sterol, as Liposome-Fullerene (0.5% aqueous phase; a particle size, 76nm; Lpsm-Flln), and its cytoprotective activity against UVA. In the present study, Lpsm-Flln was administered on the surface of three-dimensional human skin tissue model, rinsed out before each UVA-irradiation at 4 J/cm(2), and thereafter added again, followed by 19-cycle-repetition for 4 days (sum: 76 J/cm(2)). UVA-caused corneum scaling and disruption of epidermis layer were detected by scanning electron microscopy. Breakdown of collagen type I/IV, DNA strand cleavage and pycnosis/karyorrhexis were observed in vertical cross-sections of UVA-irradiated skin models visualized with fluorescent immunostain or Hoechst 33342 stain. These skin damages were scarcely repressed by liposome alone, but appreciably repressed by Lpsm-Flln of 250 ppm, containing 0.75 ppm of C60-equivalent to a 1/3300-weight amount vs. the whole liposome. Upon administration with Lpsm-Flln [16.7 microM (12 ppm): C60-equivalent] on human abdomen skin biopsies mounted in Franz diffusion cells, C60 permeated after 24h into the epidermis at 1.86 nmol/g tissue (1.34 ppm), corresponding to 0.3% of the applied amount and a 9.0-fold dilution rate, but C60 was not detected in the dermis by HPLC, suggesting no necessity for considering a toxicity of C60 due to systemic circulation via dermal veins. Thus Lpsm-Flln has a potential to be safely utilized as a cosmetic anti-oxidative ingredient for UVA-protection.

  5. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans Inhibit MMP Mediated Collagen Degradation and Reduce Dermal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Paul W.; Freeman, Lynetta; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13) mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA) vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing. PMID:21779387

  6. Effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on human Tau fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingying; Teng, Ningning; Li, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Tau fibrillation is reported to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, in which the natural environment is very crowded in the cells. Understanding the role of crowding environments in regulating Tau fibrillation is of great importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. In this experiment, the effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte reagents in the crowding environment on Tau fibrillation were studied by thioflavin T binding, SDS-PAGE and TEM assays. Ficoll 70 and Dextran 70 of different concentrations were used as macromolecular crowding reagents inside the cells and showed a strong enhancing effect on the fibrillation of normal and hyperphosphorylated Tau. The enhancing effect of Dextran is stronger than that of Ficoll 70 at the same concentration. In addition, the cellular osmolyte sucrose was found to protect Tau against fibrillation, and inhibit the enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on Tau fibrillation. A possible model for the fibrillation process of Tau and the effect of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on this process was proposed based on these experimental results. The information obtained from our study can enhance the understanding of how proteins aggregate and avoid aggregation in crowded physiological environments and might lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in vivo.

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels Reflects Transition From Series to Parallel Interactions With Increasing Collagen Content

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Victor K.; Lake, Spencer P.; Frey, Christina R.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin and collagen, biopolymers occurring naturally in the body, are commonly-used biomaterials as scaffolds for tissue engineering. How collagen and fibrin interact to confer macroscopic mechanical properties in collagen-fibrin composite systems remains poorly understood. In this study, we formulated collagen-fibrin co-gels at different collagen-to-fibrin ratios to observe changes in overall mechanical behavior and microstructure. A modeling framework of a two-network system was developed by modifying our micro-scale model, considering two forms of interaction between the networks: (a) two interpenetrating but non-interacting networks (“parallel”), and (b) a single network consisting of randomly alternating collagen and fibrin fibrils (“series”). Mechanical testing of our gels show that collagen-fibrin co-gels exhibit intermediate properties (UTS, strain at failure, tangent modulus) compared to those of pure collagen and fibrin. Comparison with model predictions show that the parallel and series model cases provide upper and lower bounds respectively for the experimental data, suggesting that a combination of such interactions exist between collagen and fibrin in co-gels. A transition from the series model to the parallel model occurs with increasing collagen content, with the series model best describing predominantly fibrin co-gels, and the parallel model best describing predominantly collagen co-gels. PMID:22482659

  8. Pueraria mirifica extract and puerarin enhance proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase and type I collagen in primary baboon osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tiyasatkulkovit, Wacharaporn; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Havill, Lorena M; Ford, Allen L; VandeBerg, John L

    2014-10-15

    Phytoestrogen-rich Pueraria mirifica (PM) tuberous extract is a promising candidate for the development of anti-osteoporosis drugs for postmenopausal women, but its action has never been validated in humans or in non-human primates, which are more closely related to humans than rodents. In vitro study of non-human primate osteoblasts is thus fundamental to prepare for in vivo studies of phytoestrogen effects on primate bone. This study aimed to establish a culture system of baboon primary osteoblasts and to investigate the effects of PM extract and its phytoestrogens on these cells. Primary osteoblasts from adult baboon fibulae exhibited osteoblast characteristics in regard to proliferation, differentiation, mineralization, and estrogen receptor expression. They responded to 17β-estradiol by increased proliferation rate and mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen, and osteocalcin. After being exposed for 48 h to 100 μg/ml PM extract, 1000 nM genistein, or 1000 nM puerarin, primary baboon osteoblasts markedly increased the rate of proliferation and mRNA levels of ALP and type I collagen without changes in Runx2, osterix, or osteocalcin expression. PM extract, genistein, and puerarin also decreased the RANKL/OPG ratio, suggesting that they could decrease osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. However, neither PM extract nor its phytoestrogens altered calcium deposition in osteoblast culture. In conclusion, we have established baboon primary osteoblast culture, which is a new tool for bone research and drug discovery. Furthermore, the present results provide substantial support for the potential of PM extract and its phytoestrogens to be developed as therapeutic agents against bone fragility.

  9. Estrogen Depletion Results in Nanoscale Morphology Changes in Dermal Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Liroff, Kaitlin G.; Turner, A. Simon; Les, Clifford M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2012-01-01

    Tissue cryo-sectioning combined with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging reveals that the nanoscale morphology of dermis collagen fibrils, quantified using the metric of D-periodic spacing, changes under the condition of estrogen depletion. Specifically, a new subpopulation of fibrils with D-spacings in the region between 56 and 59 nm is present two years following ovariectomy in ovine dermal samples. In addition, the overall width of the distribution, both values above and below the mean, has increased. The change in width due to an increase in lower values of D-spacings was previously reported for ovine bone; however, this report demonstrates that the effect is also present in non-mineralized collagen fibrils. A non-parametric Kolmogrov-Smirnov test of the cumulative density function indicates a statistical difference in the sham and OVX D-spacing distributions (p < 0.01). PMID:22437310

  10. Post-translational control of collagen fibrillogenesis in mineralizing cultures of chick osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenfeld, L. C.; Riva, A.; Hodgens, K.; Eyre, D. R.; Landis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cultured osteoblasts from chick embryo calvaria were used as a model system to investigate the post-translational extracellular mechanisms controlling the macroassembly of collagen fibrils. The results of these studies demonstrated that cultured osteoblasts secreted a collagenous extracellular matrix that assembled and mineralized in a defined temporal and spatial sequence. The assembly of collagen occurred in a polarized fashion, such that successive orthogonal arrays of fibrils formed between successive cell layers proceeding from the culture surface toward the media. Mineralization followed in the same manner, being observed first in the deepest and oldest fibril layers. Collagen fibrillogenesis, the kinetics of cross-link formation, and collagen stability in the extracellular matrix of the cultures were examined over a 30 day culture period. Between days 8 and 12 in culture, collagen fibril diameters increased from < 30 nm to an average of 30-45 nm. Thereafter, diameters ranged in size from 20 to 200 nm. Quantitation of the collagen cross-linking residues, hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) and lysyl pyridinoline (LP), showed that these mature cross-links increased from undetectable levels to concentrations found in normal chick bone. Analysis of the kinetics of their formation by pulse-chase labeling the cultures with [3H]lysine showed a doubling time of approximately 5 days. The relationships between cross-link formation, fibrillogenesis, and collagen stability were examined in cultures treated with beta-aminopropionitrile (beta-APN), a potent inhibitor of lysyl oxidase and cross-link formation. In beta-APN-treated cultures, total collagen synthesis was increased twofold, with no change in mRNA levels for type I collagen, whereas the amount of collagen accumulated in the cell layer was decreased by 50% and mineral deposition was reduced. The rate of collagen retention in the matrix was assessed by pulse-chase analysis of [3H]proline over a 16 day period in

  11. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements. PMID:23586938

  12. Thermal Destabilization of Collagen Matrix Hierarchical Structure by Freeze/Thaw.

    PubMed

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize and understand the effects of freezing on collagen structures and functionality. Specifically, thermodynamic destabilization of collagen at molecular- and fibril-levels by combination of low temperatures and freezing were experimentally characterized using modulated differential scanning calorimetry. In order to delineate the effects of sub-zero temperature and water-ice phase change, we hypothesized that the extent of destabilization can be determined based on post-thaw heat induced thermal denaturation of collagen. It is found that thermal denaturation temperature of collagen in hydrogel decreases by 1.4-1.6°C after freeze/thaw while no such decrease is observed in the case of molecular solution. The destabilization is predominantly due to ice formation. Exposure to low temperatures in the absence of ice has only minimal effect. Calorimetry measurements combined with morphological examination of collagen matrices by scanning electron microscopy suggest that freezing results in destabilization of collagen fibrils due to expansion of intrafibrillar space by ice formation. This fibril-level damage can be alleviated by use of cryoprotectant DMSO at concentrations as low as 0.5 M. A theoretical model explaining the change in collagen post-thaw thermal stability by freezing-induced fibril expansion is also proposed.

  13. Development of a high-throughput screening system for the compounds that inhibit collagen-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Okano-Kosugi, Hitomi; Matsushita, Osamu; Asada, Shinichi; Herr, Andrew B; Kitagawa, Kouki; Koide, Takaki

    2009-11-01

    Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) play important roles in various physiological events. Some CBPs are regarded as targets for drug development; for example, platelet glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) are promising targets for the development of novel antiplatelet and antifibrotic drugs, respectively. However, no systematic screening method to search compounds that inhibit collagen-CBP interactions have been developed, and only a few CBP inhibitors have been reported to date. In this study, a facile turbidimetric multiwell plate assay was developed to evaluate inhibitors of CBPs. The assay is based on the finding that CBPs retard spontaneous collagen fibril formation in vitro and that fibril formation is restored in the presence of compounds that interfere with the collagen-CBP interactions. Using the same platform, the assay was performed in various combinations of fibril-forming collagen types and CBPs. This homogeneous assay is simple, convenient, and suitable as an automated high-throughput screening system.

  14. Collagen-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates for Versatile Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Unser, Sarah; Holcomb, Samuel; Cary, ReJeana; Sagle, Laura

    2017-02-15

    Integration of noble metal nanoparticles with proteins offers promising potential to create a wide variety of biosensors that possess both improved selectivity and versatility. The multitude of functionalities that proteins offer coupled with the unique optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles can allow for the realization of simple, colorimetric sensors for a significantly larger range of targets. Herein, we integrate the structural protein collagen with 10 nm gold nanoparticles to develop a protein-nanoparticle conjugate which possess the functionality of the protein with the desired colorimetric properties of the nanoparticles. Applying the many interactions that collagen undergoes in the extracellular matrix, we are able to selectively detect both glucose and heparin with the same collagen-nanoparticle conjugate. Glucose is directly detected through the cross-linking of the collagen fibrils, which brings the attached nanoparticles into closer proximity, leading to a red-shift in the LSPR frequency. Conversely, heparin is detected through a competition assay in which heparin-gold nanoparticles are added to solution and compete with heparin in the solution for the binding sites on the collagen fibrils. The collagen-nanoparticle conjugates are shown to detect both glucose and heparin in the physiological range. Lastly, glucose is selectively detected in 50% mouse serum with the collagen-nanoparticle devices possessing a linear range of 3-25 mM, which is also within the physiologically relevant range.

  15. Collagen-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates for Versatile Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Unser, Sarah; Holcomb, Samuel; Cary, ReJeana; Sagle, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Integration of noble metal nanoparticles with proteins offers promising potential to create a wide variety of biosensors that possess both improved selectivity and versatility. The multitude of functionalities that proteins offer coupled with the unique optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles can allow for the realization of simple, colorimetric sensors for a significantly larger range of targets. Herein, we integrate the structural protein collagen with 10 nm gold nanoparticles to develop a protein-nanoparticle conjugate which possess the functionality of the protein with the desired colorimetric properties of the nanoparticles. Applying the many interactions that collagen undergoes in the extracellular matrix, we are able to selectively detect both glucose and heparin with the same collagen-nanoparticle conjugate. Glucose is directly detected through the cross-linking of the collagen fibrils, which brings the attached nanoparticles into closer proximity, leading to a red-shift in the LSPR frequency. Conversely, heparin is detected through a competition assay in which heparin-gold nanoparticles are added to solution and compete with heparin in the solution for the binding sites on the collagen fibrils. The collagen-nanoparticle conjugates are shown to detect both glucose and heparin in the physiological range. Lastly, glucose is selectively detected in 50% mouse serum with the collagen-nanoparticle devices possessing a linear range of 3–25 mM, which is also within the physiologically relevant range. PMID:28212282

  16. Next generation bone tissue engineering: non-viral miR-133a inhibition using collagen-nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds rapidly enhances osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencía Castaño, Irene; Curtin, Caroline M.; Duffy, Garry P.; O’Brien, Fergal J.

    2016-06-01

    Bone grafts are the second most transplanted materials worldwide at a global cost to healthcare systems valued over $30 billion every year. The influence of microRNAs in the regenerative capacity of stem cells offers vast therapeutic potential towards bone grafting; however their efficient delivery to the target site remains a major challenge. This study describes how the functionalisation of porous collagen-nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) scaffolds with miR-133a inhibiting complexes, delivered using non-viral nHA particles, enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell-mediated osteogenesis through the novel focus on a key activator of osteogenesis, Runx2. This study showed enhanced Runx2 and osteocalcin expression, as well as increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition, thus demonstrating a further enhanced therapeutic potential of a biomaterial previously optimised for bone repair applications. The promising features of this platform offer potential for a myriad of applications beyond bone repair and tissue engineering, thus presenting a new paradigm for microRNA-based therapeutics.

  17. Electromechanical properties of dried tendon and isoelectrically focused collagen hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Denning, D; Abu-Rub, M T; Zeugolis, D I; Habelitz, S; Pandit, A; Fertala, A; Rodriguez, B J

    2012-08-01

    Assembling artificial collagenous tissues with structural, functional, and mechanical properties which mimic natural tissues is of vital importance for many tissue engineering applications. While the electro-mechanical properties of collagen are thought to play a role in, for example, bone formation and remodeling, this functional property has not been adequately addressed in engineered tissues. Here the electro-mechanical properties of rat tail tendon are compared with those of dried isoelectrically focused collagen hydrogels using piezoresponse force microscopy under ambient conditions. In both the natural tissue and the engineered hydrogel D-periodic type I collagen fibrils are observed, which exhibit shear piezoelectricity. While both tissues also exhibit fibrils with parallel orientations, Fourier transform analysis has revealed that the degree of parallel alignment of the fibrils in the tendon is three times that of the dried hydrogel. The results obtained demonstrate that isoelectrically focused collagen has similar structural and electro-mechanical properties to that of tendon, which is relevant for tissue engineering applications.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation and Fibrosis: Beyond the Cardiomyocyte Centric View

    PubMed Central

    Miragoli, Michele; Glukhov, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with fibrosis is characterized by the appearance of interstitial myofibroblasts. These cells are responsible for the uncontrolled deposition of the extracellular matrix, which pathologically separate cardiomyocyte bundles. The enhanced fibrosis is thought to contribute to arrhythmias “indirectly” because a collagenous septum is a passive substrate for propagation, resulting in impulse conduction block and/or zigzag conduction. However, the emerging results demonstrate that myofibroblasts in vitro also promote arrhythmogenesis due to direct implications upon cardiomyocyte electrophysiology. This electrical interference may be considered beneficial as it resolves any conduction blocks; however, the passive properties of myofibroblasts might cause a delay in impulse propagation, thus promoting AF due to discontinuous slow conduction. Moreover, low-polarized myofibroblasts reduce, via cell-density dependence, the fast driving inward current for cardiac impulse conduction, therefore resulting in arrhythmogenic uniformly slow propagation. Critically, the subsequent reduction in cardiomyocytes resting membrane potential in vitro significantly increases the likelihood of ectopic activity. Myofibroblast densities and the degree of coupling at cellular border zones also impact upon this likelihood. By considering future in vivo studies, which identify myofibroblasts “per se” as a novel targets for cardiac arrhythmias, this review aims to describe the implications of noncardiomyocyte view in the context of AF. PMID:26229964

  19. Can Atrial Fibrillation Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atrial Fibrillation Be Prevented? Following a healthy lifestyle and taking ... for heart disease may help you prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). These steps include: Following a heart healthy ...

  20. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Christian T. Ruff Download PDF https://doi.org/ ... an irregular and fast heartbeat. What Causes Atrial Fibrillation? Several factors and medical conditions make it more ...

  1. Collagen type IX from human cartilage: a structural profile of intermolecular cross-linking sites.

    PubMed Central

    Diab, M; Wu, J J; Eyre, D R

    1996-01-01

    Type IX collagen, a quantitatively minor collagenous component of cartilage, is known to be associated with and covalently cross-linked to type II collagen fibrils in chick and bovine cartilage. Type IX collagen molecules have also been shown to form covalent cross-links with each other in bovine cartilage. In the present study we demonstrate by structural analysis and location of cross-linking sites that, in human cartilage, type IX collagen is covalently cross-linked to type II collagen and to other molecules of type IX collagen. We also present evidence that, if the proteoglycan form of type IX collagen is present in human cartilage, it can only be a minor component of the matrix, similar to findings with bovine cartilage. PMID:8660302

  2. Clinical uses of collagen shields.

    PubMed

    Poland, D E; Kaufman, H E

    1988-09-01

    Collagen shields immersed in tobramycin solution for one minute were applied to one eye each of 60 patients who had had cataract extraction, penetrating keratoplasty, or epikeratophakia or who had nonsurgical epithelial healing problems. The shields were well tolerated; one patient had the shield removed and one patient lost the shield in the early postoperative period. The surgical patients showed more rapid healing of epithelial defects after surgery with the use of the collagen shield. Patients with acute nonsurgical epithelial problems, such as contact lens abrasions and recurrent erosion, responded to the use of the collagen shield with improved healing. Patients with chronic epithelial defects responded poorly, presumably because underlying abnormalities in Bowman's layer prevented epithelial growth in the area of the defect. No infections were noted in any of the patients. The collagen shields appear to promote enhanced healing in patients with postsurgical and acute epithelial defects and to provide adequate antibiotic prophylaxis against infection in these vulnerable eyes.

  3. In vitro phagocytosis of exogenous collagen by fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, E L; Brunette, D M; Melcher, A H

    1979-01-01

    There have been numerous electron microscopic reports of apparent phagocytosis of collagen by fibroblasts and other cells in vivo. We have developed an in vitro system which, to the best of our knowledge, will permit for the first time the study of regulatory mechanisms governing phagocytosis and digestion of collagen fibres. Cells were cultured from explants of monkey periodontal ligament, subcultured, and grown to confluence in alpha-MEM plus 15% fetal calf serum plus antibiotics. The confluent cells were then cultured together with minced rat tail tendon collagen in alpha-MEM lacking proline, lysine, glycine and fetal calf serum for up to 7 days, after which they were processed for electron microscopy. Intracellular collagen profiles could be seen in cultured cells that were associated with exogenous collagen fibrils as early as 24 hours after addition of the collagen. Through electron microscopic examination of serial sections of the culture, we have demonstrated: (1) that fibroblasts can phagocytose collagen; (2) that the observed intracellular collagen is not the result of aggregation of endogenous synthesized collagen; (3) that it is not possible to base a decision as to whether a collagen fibril has been phagocytosed in whole or in part by the type of vesicle with which it is associated; (4) that cleavage of collagen into small pieces may not be a necessary prelude to its phagocytosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 (cont.) Fig. 4 Fig. 6 (cont.) Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:108237

  4. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis.

  5. Intrafibrillar Mineralization of Self-Assembled Elastin-Like Recombinamer Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuping; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; Aparicio, Conrado

    2017-02-22

    Biomineralization of bone, a controlled process where hydroxyapatite nanocrystals preferentially deposit in collagen fibrils, is achieved by the interplay of the collagen matrix and noncollagenous proteins. Mimicking intrafibrillar mineralization in synthetic systems is highly attractive for the development of advanced hybrid materials with elaborated morphologies and outstanding mechanical properties, as well as understanding the mechanisms of biomineralization. Inspired by nature, intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen fibrils has been successfully replicated in vitro via biomimetic systems, where acidic polymeric additives are used as analogue of noncollagenous proteins in mediating mineralization. The development of synthetic templates that mimic the structure and functions of collagenous matrix in mineralization has yet to be explored. In this study, we demonstrated that self-assembled fibrils of elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs) can induce intrafibrillar mineralization. The ELRs displayed a disordered structure at low temperature but self-assembled into nanofibrils above its inverse transition temperature. In the presence of the self-assembled ELR fibrils, polyaspartate-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphates preferentially infiltrated into the fibrils and then crystallized into hydroxyapatite nanocrystals with their [001] axes aligned parallel to the long axis of the ELR fibril. As the recombinant technology enables designing and producing well-defined ELRs, their molecular and structural properties can be fine-tuned. By examining the ultrastructure of the self-assembled ELRs fibrils as well as their mineralization, we concluded that the spatial confinement formed by a continuum β-spiral structure in an unperturbed fibrillar structure rather than electrostatic interactions or bioactive sequences in the recombinamer composition played the crucial role in inducing intrafibrillar mineralization.

  6. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of recent onset. Various definitions of acute atrial fibrillation have been used in the literature, but for the purposes of this review we have included studies where atrial fibrillation may have occurred up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, cardiovascular disease, alcohol, diabetes, and lung disease. Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. The condition resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in more than 50% of people; however, many people will require interventions to control heart rate or restore sinus rhythm. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent embolism, for conversion to sinus rhythm, and to control heart rate in people with recent-onset atrial fibrillation (within 7 days) who are haemodynamically stable? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: amiodarone, antithrombotic treatment before cardioversion, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, digoxin, diltiazem, direct current cardioversion, flecainide, metoprolol, nebivolol, propafenone, sotalol, timolol, and verapamil. PMID:25430048

  7. Collagen matrix-induced expression of integrin αVβ3 in circulating angiogenic cells can be targeted by matricellular protein CCN1 to enhance their function.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Brian; Vulesevic, Branka; Ostojic, Aleksandra; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J

    2015-04-01

    Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) play an important role in vascular homeostasis and hold therapeutic promise for treating a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, further improvements are needed because the effects of CAC therapy remain minimal or transient. The regenerative potential of these cells can be improved by culture on a collagen-based matrix through the up-regulation of key integrin proteins. We found that human CAC function was enhanced by using the matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61/CTGF/NOV family member 1) to target integrin αV and β3, which are up-regulated on matrix. Compared to matrix-cultured CACs, CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited a 2.2-fold increase in cell proliferation, 1.8-fold greater migration toward VEGF, and 1.7-fold more incorporation into capillary-like structures in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, intramuscular injection of CCN1-matrix-cultured CACs into ischemic hind limbs of CD-1 nude mice resulted in blood flow recovery to 80% of baseline, which was greater than matrix-cultured CACs (66%) and PBS (35%) treatment groups. Furthermore, transplanted CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited greater engraftment (11-fold) and stimulated the up-regulation of survival and angiogenic genes (>3-fold). These findings reveal the importance of cell-matrix interactions in regulating CAC function and also reveal a mechanism by which these may be exploited to enhance cell therapies for ischemic disease.

  8. Development of collagen-hydroxyapatite nanostructured composites via a calcium phosphate precursor mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Sang Soo

    Bone is an interpenetrating inorganic/organic composite that consists of mineralized collagen fibrils, which is hierarchically organized into various structures. The structure of mineralized collagen fibril, in which nano-crystals of hydroxyapatite are embedded within the collagen fibrils, provides remarkable mechanical and bio-resorptive properties. Therefore, there have been many attempts to produce collagen-hydroxyapatite composites having a bone-like structure. However, duplication of even the most fundamental level of bone structure has not been easily achieved by conventional nucleation and growth techniques, which are based on the most widely accepted hypothesis of bone mineralization. In nature, the collagen fibril is mineralized via intrafibrillar mineralization, which produces preferentially oriented hydroxyapatite nano-crystals occupying the interstices in collagen fibrils. Our group has demonstrated that intrafibrillar mineralization can be achieved by using a new method based on the Polymer-Induced Liquid-Precursor (PILP) mineralization process. In the PILP process, a poly-anionic additive can produce an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor which enables us to achieve intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen. It is thought that the precursor is pulled into the interstices of the collagen fibrils via capillary forces, and upon solidification and crystallization of the precursor produces an interpenetrating composite with the nanostructured architecture of bone. In this dissertation, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PILP process on the intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen fibril, various collagen scaffolds, such as turkey tendon, bovine tendon and synthetic collagen sponge, were mineralized by the PILP process. Various poly-aspartates with different molecular weight were also used for the optimization of the PILP process for the mineralization of the collagen scaffolds. With the systematic researches, we discovered that the molecular weight

  9. Development of a three-dimensional unit cell to model the micromechanical response of a collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2010-04-01

    The three-dimensional microstructure and mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils within the extracellular matrix (ECM) is now being recognized as a primary factor in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, an appreciation of the mechanical aspects by which a cell interacts with its ECM is required for the development of engineered tissues. Ultimately, using these interactions to design tissue equivalents requires mathematical models with three-dimensional architecture. In this study, a three-dimensional model of a collagen fibril matrix undergoing uniaxial tensile stress was developed by making use of cellular solids. A structure consisting of thin struts was chosen to represent the arrangement of collagen fibrils within an engineered ECM. To account for the large deformation of tissues, the collagen fibrils were modeled as hyperelastic neo-Hookean or Mooney-Rivlin materials. The use of cellular solids allowed the fibril properties to be related to the ECM properties in closed form, which, in turn, allowed the estimation of fibril properties using ECM experimental data. A set of previously obtained experimental data consisting of simultaneous measures of the fibril microstructure and mechanical tests was used to evaluate the model's capability to estimate collagen fibril mechanical property when given tissue-scale data and to predict the tissue-scale mechanical properties when given estimated fibril stiffness. The fibril tangent modulus was found to be 1.26 + or - 0.70 and 1.62 + or - 0.88 MPa when the fibril was modeled as neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material, respectively. There was no statistical significance of the estimated fibril tangent modulus among the different groups. Sensitivity analysis showed that the fibril mechanical properties and volume fraction were the two input parameters which required accurate values. While the volume fraction was easily obtained from the initial image of the gel, the fibril mechanical properties

  10. Cell Alignment Driven by Mechanically Induced Collagen Fiber Alignment in Collagen/Alginate Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Chaubaroux, Christophe; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne; Senger, Bernard; Vidal, Loïc; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Haikel, Youssef; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Lavalle, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    For many years it has been a major challenge to regenerate damaged tissues using synthetic or natural materials. To favor the healing processes after tendon, cornea, muscle, or brain injuries, aligned collagen-based architectures are of utmost interest. In this study, we define a novel aligned coating based on a collagen/alginate (COL/ALG) multilayer film. The coating exhibiting a nanofibrillar structure is cross-linked with genipin for stability in physiological conditions. By stretching COL/ALG-coated polydimethylsiloxane substrates, we developed a versatile method to align the collagen fibrils of the polymeric coating. Assays on cell morphology and alignment were performed to investigate the properties of these films. Microscopic assessments revealed that cells align with the stretched collagen fibrils of the coating. The degree of alignment is tuned by the stretching rate (i.e., the strain) of the COL/ALG-coated elastic substrate. Such coatings are of great interest for strategies that require aligned nanofibrillar biological material as a substrate for tissue engineering. PMID:25658028

  11. Development of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity in vitro and improved therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, Eva; Barchan, Karin; Herrlander, Daniel; Höjman, Patrik; Karlsson, Marie; Ljung, Lill; Andersson, Mats; Bäckman, Eva; Hager, Ann-Christin Malmborg; Walse, Björn; Joosten, Leo; van den Berg, Wim

    2008-04-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory interleukin-1-mediated activation of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R). Although wild-type IL-1Ra is used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, its effect is moderate and/or short-lived. The objective of this study was to generate IL-1Ra mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity for potential therapeutic use. Using a directed evolution approach in which libraries of IL-1Ra gene mutants were generated and screened in functional assays, mutants with desired properties were identified. Initially, diversity was introduced into the IL-1Ra using random mutagenesis. Mutations resulting in enhanced antagonistic activity were identified by screening in a reporter cell assay. To further enhance the antagonistic activity, selected mutations were recombined using the DNA recombination technology Fragment-INduced Diversity (FIND). Following three rounds of FIND recombination, several mutants with up to nine times enhanced antagonistic activity (mean IC50 +/- SEM value: 0.78 +/- 0.050 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.1 ng/ml for mutant and wild-type, respectively) were identified. Sequence analysis identified the mutations D47N, E52R and E90Y as being most important for this effect, however, the mutations P38Y, H54R, Q129L and M136N further enhanced the antagonistic function. Analysis of identified mutations in protein models based on the crystal structure of the IL-1Ra/IL-1R complex suggested that mutations found to enhance the antagonistic activity had a stabilizing effect on the IL-1Ra mutants or increased the affinity for the IL-1R. Finally, the therapeutic effect of one mutant was compared to that of wild-type IL-1Ra in collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Indeed, the enhanced antagonistic effect of the mutants observed in vitro was also seen in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that directed evolution of IL-1Ra is an effective means of generating highly potent therapeutic

  12. Ultrastructural changes of collagen and elastin in human gingiva during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; D'Aloya, U; De Pasquale, V; Caldini, E; Graziani, E; Borea, G; Ruggeri, A

    1989-12-01

    After 15 days of mesializing or distalizing orthodontic treatment, 10 permanent premolars of young patients were extracted with the interdental gingiva. The connective tissues of the compressed or stretched interdental papillae were compared to that of untreated samples by light and transmission electron microscope. Large collagen fibres bundles represented by fibrils with a banding pattern of 64 nm and a mean diameter of 75 nm were observed in compressed interdental gingiva. Several elastic fibres with a mean diameter of 950 nm were also present. In some central areas of compressed gingiva collagen fibrils longitudinally split into widely spaced microfibrils were often observed in proximity to the elastic fibres. In stretched and untreated interdental papillae the collagen fibrils presented a mean diameter of 66 nm and 57 nm respectively. In both groups, few elastic fibres ranging in diameter 600 nm were seen. The increased size of the gingival collagen fibrils undergoing pressure and tension is indicative of remodelling of the fibrous collagen system. The fair increase in number and size of elastic fibres in compressed gingiva suggests that the elastic fibre system takes over the place whenever a collapse of the collagenous framework occurs.

  13. Octocoral Sarcophyton auritum Verseveldt & Benayahu, 1978: Microanatomy and Presence of Collagen Fibers.

    PubMed

    Mandelberg, Yael; Benayahu, Dafna; Benayahu, Yehuda

    2016-02-01

    The study presents the microanatomy of the polyps of the reef-dwelling octocoral Sarcophyton auritum. We demonstrate the presence of its unique collagen fibers in the colony by means of Masson Trichrome histological staining. Based on peptide profiling, mass spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the fiber proteins were homologous with those of mammalian collagen. Histological and electron microscopy results showed that six of the eight mesenterial filaments of the polyps possess an internal, coiled, spring-like collagen fiber. High-resolution electron microscopy revealed for the first time in cnidarian collagen the interwoven, three-dimensional arrangement of the fibrils that comprise the fibers. Some fibrils feature free ends, while others are bifurcated, the latter being attributed to collagen undergoing fibrogenesis. Along with the mass spectroscopy finding, the coiled nature of the fibers and the fibril microanatomy show a resemblance to those of vertebrates, demonstrating the conserved nature of collagen fibers at both the biochemical and ultrastructural levels. The location, arrangement, and small diameter of the fibers and fibrils of S. auritum may provide a highly protective factor against occasional rupture and injury during the bending of the octocoral's extended polyps under strong current conditions; that is, providing the octocoral with a hydromechanical support. The findings from the microanatomical features of these unique fibers in S. auritum, as well as their suggested function, raise the potential for translation to biomedical applications.

  14. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue.

  15. STRUCTURAL MECHANISM FOR ALTERATION OF COLLAGEN GEL MECHANICS BY GLUTARALDEHYDE CROSSLINKING

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi L.; Paik, David C.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Soft collagenous tissues that are loaded in vivo undergo crosslinking during aging and wound healing. Bio-prosthetic tissues implanted in vivo are also commonly crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. While crosslinking changes the mechanical properties of the tissue, the nature of the mechanical changes and the underlying microstructural mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, a combined mechanical, biochemical and simulation approach was employed to identify the microstructural mechanism by which crosslinking alters mechanical properties. The model collagenous tissue used was an anisotropic cell-compacted collagen gel, and the model crosslinking agent was monomeric glutaraldehyde. The collagen gels were incrementally crosslinked by either increasing the glutaraldehyde concentration or by increasing the crosslinking time. In biaxial loading experiments, increased crosslinking produced: (1) decreased strain response to a small equibiaxial preload, with little change in response to subsequent loading, and (2) decreased coupling between the fiber and cross-fiber direction. The mechanical trend was found to be better described by the lysine consumption data than by the shrinkage temperature. The biaxial loading of incrementally-crosslinked collagen gels was simulated computationally with a previously published network model. Crosslinking was represented by increased fibril stiffness or by increased resistance to fibril rotation. Only the latter produced mechanical trends similar to that observed experimentally. Representing crosslinking as increased fibril stiffness did not reproduce the decreased coupling between the fiber and cross-fiber directions. The study concludes that the mechanical changes in crosslinked collagen gels are caused by the microstructural mechanism of increased resistance to fibril rotation. PMID:22775003

  16. Surgery for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Christopher P.; Henn, Matthew C.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and its treatment options include drug therapy or, catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure which was developed by James Cox in 1987 is a procedure where multiple surgical incisions are created along the atria to interrupt the electrical pathways thought to allow atrial fibrillation to persist. This procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its 4th iteration called the Cox-Maze IV. The Cox-Maze IV replaced the previous “cut-and-sew” method with a combination of cryoablation and bipolar RF ablation. The adaption of ablation technologies allowed the Cox-Maze IV procedure to be performed through a less invasive right minithoracotomy instead of a traditional sternotomy approach. The aim of this article is to review the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. A description of the operative techniques for both a sternotomy and right mini-thoracotomy approach will be discussed in addition to specific postoperative considerations. Finally, this article will review the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous “cut-and-sew” method. PMID:25443237

  17. Expression of catalytically active Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in dermal fibroblasts induces collagen fragmentation and functional alterations that resemble aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Hammerberg, Craig; Li, Yong; He, Tianyuan; Quan, Taihao; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and reduced production of type I collagen by dermal fibroblasts are prominent features of aged human skin. We have proposed that MMP-1-mediated collagen fibril fragmentation is a key driver of age-related decline of skin function. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed, characterized, and expressed constitutively active MMP-1 mutant (MMP-1 V94G) in adult human skin in organ culture and fibroblasts in three dimensional collagen lattice cultures. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in young skin in organ culture caused fragmentation and ultrastructural alterations of collagen fibrils similar to those observed in aged human skin in vivo. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in dermal fibroblasts cultured in three-dimensional collagen lattices caused substantial collagen fragmentation, which was markedly reduced by MMP-1 siRNA-mediated knockdown or MMP inhibitor MMI270. Importantly, fibroblasts cultured in MMP-1 V94G-fragmented collagen lattices displayed many alterations observed in fibroblasts in aged human skin, including reduced cytoplasmic area, disassembled actin cytoskeleton, impaired TGF-β pathway, and reduced collagen production. These results support the concept that MMP-1-mediated fragmentation of dermal collagen fibrils alters the morphology and function of dermal fibroblasts, and provide a foundation for understanding specific mechanisms that link collagen fibril fragmentation to age-related decline of fibroblast function. PMID:23601157

  18. Collagen Cross-linking Increases Its Biodegradation Resistance in Wet Dentin Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqi; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The biodegradation of exposed dentin collagen within the adhesive/dentin (a/d) interface is one of main reasons leading to composite restoration failures and seriously affects the durability of dental restorations. In the present study, the objective was to investigate whether the inclusion of the crosslinking reagent (glutaraldehyde, GA) in the adhesive would increase collagen biodegradation resistance within the a/d interface. Materials and methods The model adhesive consisted of ~60 % monomers (HEMA/BisGMA, 45/55 wt/wt) and ~ 40 % ethanol as a solvent. 5% GA was added to the above formulation. After the dentin surfaces were etched for 15 s with 35% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water and blotted dry, adhesives both with and without GA were applied and polymerized by visible light for 20 s. These a/d specimens were immersed in the biodegradation solution (prepared by adding 160 mg collagenase in 1 liter of TESCA buffer solution) for up to 30 days after proceeding with the sectioning/fracture to expose the a/d interfaces. The specimens were analyzed using SEM and micro-Raman. Results SEM results indicated that for the adhesive without GA, there were many voids and was a loss of collagen fibrils in the a/d interface after being challenged by the biodegradation solution. The Raman spectra collected from the interface showed that the amide I of collagen at 1667 cm−1 obviously decreased, indicating a removal of collagen fibrils during the degradation process. For the adhesive containing GA, the collagen fibrils within the interface did not degrade at all, which was also confirmed by the Raman results. Conclusion The results corroborate the previous findings that by using the current adhesive system and wet bonding, the collagen fibrils in the a/d interface are largely unprotected and easily undergo biodegradation. Directly including crosslinking agents in the adhesive could protect collagen fibrils from degradation in situ within the a/d interface. PMID

  19. Microstructural and mechanical differences between digested collagen-fibrin co-gels and pure collagen and fibrin gels.

    PubMed

    Lai, Victor K; Frey, Christina R; Kerandi, Allan M; Lake, Spencer P; Tranquillo, Robert T; Barocas, Victor H

    2012-11-01

    Collagen and fibrin are important extracellular matrix (ECM) components in the body, providing structural integrity to various tissues. These biopolymers are also common scaffolds used in tissue engineering. This study investigated how co-gelation of collagen and fibrin affected the properties of each individual protein network. Collagen-fibrin co-gels were cast and subsequently digested using either plasmin or collagenase; the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the resulting networks were then compared with the respective pure collagen or fibrin gels of the same protein concentration. The morphologies of the collagen networks were further analyzed via three-dimensional network reconstruction from confocal image z-stacks. Both collagen and fibrin exhibited a decrease in mean fiber diameter when formed in co-gels compared with the pure gels. This microstructural change was accompanied by an increased failure strain and decreased tangent modulus for both collagen and fibrin following selective digestion of the co-gels. In addition, analysis of the reconstructed collagen networks indicated the presence of very long fibers and the clustering of fibrils, resulting in very high connectivities for collagen networks formed in co-gels.

  20. Microstructural and Mechanical Differences Between Digested Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels and Pure Collagen and Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Victor K.; Frey, Christina R.; Kerandi, Allan M.; Lake, Spencer P.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen and fibrin are important extra-cellular matrix (ECM) components in the body, providing structural integrity to various tissues. These biopolymers are also common scaffolds used in tissue engineering. This study investigated how co-gelation of collagen and fibrin affected the properties of each individual protein network. Collagen-fibrin co-gels were cast and subsequently digested using either plasmin or collagenase; the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the resulting networks were then compared with respective pure collagen or fibrin gels of the same protein concentration. The morphologies of the collagen networks were further analyzed via 3-D network reconstruction from confocal image z-stacks. Both collagen and fibrin exhibited a decrease in mean fiber diameter when formed in the co-gels compared to the pure gels; this microstructural change was accompanied by increased failure strain and decreased tangent modulus for both collagen and fibrin following selected digestion of the co-gels. In addition, analysis of the reconstructed collagen networks indicated presence of very long fibers and clustering of fibrils, resulting in very high connectivities for collagen networks formed in co-gels. PMID:22828381

  1. Tenascin-x deficiency mimics ehlers-danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.R.; Taylor, G.; Dean, W.B.; Wagner, D.R.; Afzal, V.; Lotz, J.C.; Rubin, E.M.; Bristow, J.

    2002-03-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function1-3. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome4,5, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens6. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme7-14, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition15. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts.

  2. Cross-linking and the molecular packing of corneal collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Chandler, G. S.; Tanzawa, H.; Katz, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    We have quantitatively characterized, for the first time, the cross-linking in bovine cornea collagen as a function of age. The major iminium reducible cross-links were dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine (deH-HLNL) and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (deH-HHMD). The former rapidly diminished after birth; however, the latter persisted in mature animals at a level of 0.3 - 0.4 moles/mole of collagen. A nonreducible cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL), previously found only in skin, was also found to be a major mature cross-link in cornea. The presence of HHL indicates that cornea fibrils have a molecular packing similar to skin collagen. However, like deH-HHMD, the HHL content in corneal fibrils only reaches a maximum value with time about half that of skin. These data suggest that the corneal fibrils are comprised of discrete filaments that are internally stabilized by HHL and deH-HHMD cross-links. This pattern of intermolecular cross-linking would facilitate the special collagen swelling property required for corneal transparency.

  3. Mechanical Response Study of Collagen by means of Molecular Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2005-03-01

    We developed a coarse-grained model to study mechanical behavior of collagen fibrils as a function of their degree of cross-linking. A collagen molecule is represented by Lennard-Jones beads, which intra-molecularly are connected through harmonic springs on both bond length and angle. In this model each bead represents a helical turn in a collagen molecule. Triple-helical collagen molecules, which are 300 nm long, are packed within fibrils in a staggered fashion with an axial spacing of 67 nm in the absence of a load on the tendon. We treat the outer layer or shell different from the core by assuming the shell has the maximum amount of available cross-links. The core has a variable amount of cross-links by allowing cross-link formation and breakage depending on a reaction-type criterion. We study the stress-strain behavior of a single fibril through tensile deformation along the principal axis and a three-point bend perpendicular to the principal axis.

  4. Increasing the pore sizes of bone-mimetic electrospun scaffolds comprised of polycaprolactone, collagen I and hydroxyapatite to enhance cell infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Matthew C.; Clem, William C.; Grunda, Jessica M.; Clines, Gregory A.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Bone-mimetic electrospun scaffolds consisting of polycaprolactone (PCL), collagen I and nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite (HA) have previously been shown to support the adhesion, integrin-related signaling and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), suggesting these matrices serve as promising degradable substrates for osteoregeneration. However, the small pore sizes in electrospun scaffolds hinder cell infiltration in vitro and tissue-ingrowth into the scaffold in vivo, limiting their clinical potential. In this study, three separate techniques were evaluated for their capability to increase the pore size of the PCL/col I/nanoHA scaffolds: limited protease digestion, decreasing the fiber packing density during electro-spinning, and inclusion of sacrificial fibers of the water-soluble polymer PEO. The PEO sacrificial fiber approach was found to be the most effective in increasing scaffold pore size. Furthermore, the use of sacrificial fibers promoted increased MSC infiltration into the scaffolds, as well as greater infiltration of endogenous cells within bone upon placement of scaffolds within calvarial organ cultures. These collective findings support the use of sacrificial PEO fibers as a means to increase the porosity of complex, bone-mimicking electrospun scaffolds, thereby enhancing tissue regenerative processes that depend upon cell infiltration, such as vascularization and replacement of the scaffold with native bone tissue. PMID:22014462

  5. Modulation of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase cytoplasmic tail enhances tumor cell invasion and proliferation in three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Moss, Natalie M; Wu, Yi I; Liu, Yueying; Munshi, H G; Stack, M Sharon

    2009-07-24

    Increasing evidence suggests that the cytoplasmic tail of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is subject to phosphorylation and that this modification may influence its enzymatic activity at the cell surface. In this study, phosphorylated MT1-MMP is detected using a phospho-specific antibody recognizing a protein kinase C consensus sequence (phospho-TXR), and a MT1-MMP tail peptide is phosphorylated by exogenous protein kinase C. To characterize the potential role of cytoplasmic residue Thr(567) in these processes, mutants that mimic a state of either constitutive (T567E) or defective phosphorylation (T567A) were expressed and analyzed for their functional effects on MT1-MMP activity and cellular behavior. Phospho-mimetic mutants of Thr(567) exhibit enhanced matrix invasion as well as more extensive growth within a three-dimensional type I collagen matrix. Together, these findings suggest that MT1-MMP surface action is regulated by phosphorylation at cytoplasmic tail residue Thr(567) and that this modification plays a critical role in processes that are linked to tumor progression.

  6. High-resolution second-harmonic optical coherence tomography of collagen in rat-tail tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Tomov, Ivan V.; Wang, Yimin; Chen, Zhongping

    2005-03-01

    A high-resolution second-harmonic optical coherence tomography (SH-OCT) system is demonstrated using a spectrum broadened femtosecond Ti :sapphire laser. An axial resolution of 4.2μm at the second-harmonic wave center wavelength of 400 nm has been achieved. Because the SH-OCT system uses the second-harmonic generation signals that strongly depend on the orientation, polarization, and local symmetry properties of chiral molecules, this technique provides unique contrast enhancement to conventional optical coherence tomography. The system is applied to image biological tissues of the rat-tail tendon. Highly organized collagen fibrils in the rat-tail tendon can be visualized in recorded images.

  7. Segmentation and measurement of collagen fibers for shoulder and joint therapy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mascio, L.

    1994-11-15

    Various shoulder instabilities are debilitating, especially in individuals who perform overhead activities. Thermal modification of soft tissues in joints may allow precise alteration of these tissues` mechanical and/or structural properties to enhance joint function without inducing cell death or an inflammatory response. Several studies have evaluated laser energy for tissue welding. The collective findings are promising, and the next step is to identify the mechanisms responsible for laser-induced capsular tissue alternation, and the short- and long-term effects of non-ablative laser energy on joint capsular tissue. One step toward this goal is to compare the effect of three laser energy densities on the histologic properties of the tissue evaluating the architecture of the collagen (including density, fibril diameter distribution, and interfibrillar space) in sheep at various time intervals after surgery. The specific computer algorithms that are being used to make these measurements will be described.

  8. Biocompatible fibrous networks of cellulose nanofibres and collagen crosslinked using genipin: potential as artificial ligament/tendons.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aji P; Oksman, Kristiina; Pierron, Dorothée; Harmand, Marie-Françoise

    2013-03-01

    Bio-based fibrous nanocomposites of cellulose nanofibres and non-crosslinked/crosslinked collagen were prepared by in situ pH-induced fibrillation of collagen phase and sterilized using gamma rays at 25 KGy. Collagen phase is crosslinked using genipin, a bio-based crosslinker that introduces flexible crosslinks. Microscopy studies of the prepared materials showed nanostructured fibrous collagen and cellulose dispersed in collagen matrix. Mechanical performance of the sterilized nanocomposites was close to that of natural ligament and tendon, in simulated body conditions. Cytocompatibility studies indicated that these nanocomposites allowed human ligament cell and human endothelial cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation; which is eminently favourable to ligament tissue engineering.

  9. Grape seed proanthocyanidins increase collagen biodegradation resistance in the dentin/adhesive interface when included in an adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bradley; Yao, Xiaomei; Ganguly, Arindam; Xu, Changqi; Dusevich, Vladimir; Walker, Mary P; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary methods of dentin bonding could create hybrid layers (HLs) containing voids and exposed, demineralized collagen fibers. Proanthocyanidins (PA) have been shown to crosslink and strengthen demineralized dentin collagen, but their effects on collagen degradation within the HL have not been widely studied. The purpose of this study was to compare the morphological differences of HLs created by BisGMA/HEMA model adhesives with and without the addition of grape seed extract PA under conditions of enzymatic collagen degradation. Methods Model adhesives formulated with and without 5% PA were bonded to the acid etched dentin. Five-μm-thick sections cut from the bonded specimens were stained with Goldner’s trichrome. The specimens were then exposed to 0.1% collagenase solution for zero, one, or six days. Following collagenase treatment, the specimens were analyzed with SEM/TEM. Results Staining did not reveal a difference in the HLs created with the two adhesives. SEM showed the presence of intact collagen fibrils in all collagenase treatment conditions for specimens bonded with adhesive containing PA. These integral collagen fibrils were not observed in the specimens bonded with adhesive without PA after the same collagenase treatment. TEM confirmed that the specimens containing PA still showed normal collagen fibril organization and dimensions after treatment with collagenase solution. In contrast, disorganized collagen fibrils in the interfacial zone lacked the typical cross-banding of normal collagen after collagenase treatment for specimens without PA. Conclusions The presence of grape seed extract PA in dental adhesives may inhibit the biodegradation of unprotected collagen fibrils within the HL. PMID:20709136

  10. In vivo biological responses and bioresorption of tilapia scale collagen as a potential biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Hiroaki; Yunoki, Shunji; Kondo, Eiji; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    To date, collagen for biomedical uses has been obtained from mammalian sources. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo biological responses and bioresorption of collagen obtained from tilapia (Oreochromis niloticas) scales as compared to those of collagen from porcine dermis. Collagen sponges with micro-porous structures were fabricated from reconstituted collagen fibrils using freeze-drying and cross-linked by dehydrothermal treatment (DHT treatment) or additional treatment with a water-soluble carbodiimide (WSC treatment). The mechanical properties of the tilapia collagen sponges were similar to those of porcine collagen sponges with the same cross-linking methods, where WSC treatment remarkably improved the properties over DHT treatment alone. The pellet implantation tests into the paravertebral muscle of rabbits demonstrated that tilapia collagen caused rare inflammatory responses at 1- and 4-week implantations, statistically similar to those of porcine collagen and a high-density polyethylene as a negative control. The bioresorption rates of both the collagen implants were similar, except for the DHT-treated tilapia collagen sponges at 1-week implantation. These results suggest that tilapia collagen is a potential alternative to conventional mammalian collagens in biomedical uses.

  11. [Atrial fibrillation as consequence and cause of structural changes of atria].

    PubMed

    Aparina, O P; Chikhireva, L N; Stukalova, O V; Mironova, N A; Kashtanova, S Iu; Ternovoĭ, S K; Golitsyn, S P

    2014-01-01

    Changes of atrial structure and function are the contributors of atrial fibrillation clinical course, complications and treatment effectiveness. Effects of inflammation and mechanical stretch on atrial structural remodeling leading to atrial fibrillation are reviewed in the article. Contemporary invasive and non-invasive methods of evaluation (including late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with atrial structural remodeling in atrial fibrillation are also described.

  12. Thermal denaturation studies of collagen by microthermal analysis and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Laurent; Odlyha, Marianne

    2011-07-06

    The structural properties of collagen have been the subject of numerous studies over past decades, but with the arrival of new technologies, such as the atomic force microscope and related techniques, a new era of research has emerged. Using microthermal analysis, it is now possible to image samples as well as performing localized thermal measurements without damaging or destroying the sample itself. This technique was successfully applied to characterize the thermal response between native collagen fibrils and their denatured form, gelatin. Thermal transitions identified at (150 ± 10)°C and (220 ± 10)°C can be related to the process of gelatinization of the collagen fibrils, whereas at higher temperatures, both the gelatin and collagen samples underwent two-stage transitions with a common initial degradation temperature at (300 ± 10)°C and a secondary degradation temperature of (340 ± 10)°C for the collagen and of (420 ± 10)°C for the gelatin, respectively. The broadening and shift in the secondary degradation temperature was linked to the spread of thermal degradation within the gelatin and collagen fibrils matrix further away from the point of contact between probe and sample. Finally, similar measurements were performed inside a bone resorption lacuna, suggesting that microthermal analysis is a viable technique for investigating the thermomechanical response of collagen for in situ samples that would be, otherwise, too challenging or not possible using bulk techniques.

  13. Properties of collagen gels cross-linked by N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid deriviate.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Liu, Wentao; Tian, Zhenhua; Li, Conghu; Li, Guoying

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the properties of collagen gel, N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid derivative (NHS-AA) was introduced into the formation of collagen fibrils. NHS-AA with different [NHS-AA]/[NH2] ratios (0.1-1.5, calculated by [ester group] of NHS-AA and [NH2] of lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen) was added after, simultaneously with or before the formation of collagen fibrils (abbreviated CAF, CSF and CBF, respectively) to obtain different collagen gels. With the same dose of NHS-AA, the cross-linking degree for CAF was lower than those for CSF and CBF. The formation of collagen fibrils was restrained by NHS-AA for CSF and CBF while that for CAF was unaffected. When the dose of NHS-AA increased from 0.1 to 1.5, the water contents of CSF and CBF increased while that of CAF had no obvious change. With lower dose of NHS-AA (0.1), CAF possessed higher value of G' (87.3Pa) and the best thermal stability (47.6°C). As the ratio of [NHS-AA]/[NH2] increased to 1.5, CSF had the maximum value of G' (288.8Pa) and CAF had the best thermal stability (52.9°C). These results showed collagen gels with different properties could be prepared by adding NHS-AA with different adding sequence and dose.

  14. The role of collagen in bone apatite formation in the presence of hydroxyapatite nucleation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Fabio; Pieterse, Koen; George, Anne; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; Brylka, Laura J; Hilbers, Peter A J; de With, Gijsbertus; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2010-12-01

    Bone is a composite material in which collagen fibrils form a scaffold for a highly organized arrangement of uniaxially oriented apatite crystals. In the periodic 67 nm cross-striated pattern of the collagen fibril, the less dense 40-nm-long gap zone has been implicated as the place where apatite crystals nucleate from an amorphous phase, and subsequently grow. This process is believed to be directed by highly acidic non-collagenous proteins; however, the role of the collagen matrix during bone apatite mineralization remains unknown. Here, combining nanometre-scale resolution cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and cryogenic electron tomography with molecular modelling, we show that collagen functions in synergy with inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation to actively control mineralization. The positive net charge close to the C-terminal end of the collagen molecules promotes the infiltration of the fibrils with amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). Furthermore, the clusters of charged amino acids, both in gap and overlap regions, form nucleation sites controlling the conversion of ACP into a parallel array of oriented apatite crystals. We developed a model describing the mechanisms through which the structure, supramolecular assembly and charge distribution of collagen can control mineralization in the presence of inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation.

  15. Thermal Denaturation Studies of Collagen by Microthermal Analysis and Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bozec, Laurent; Odlyha, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    The structural properties of collagen have been the subject of numerous studies over past decades, but with the arrival of new technologies, such as the atomic force microscope and related techniques, a new era of research has emerged. Using microthermal analysis, it is now possible to image samples as well as performing localized thermal measurements without damaging or destroying the sample itself. This technique was successfully applied to characterize the thermal response between native collagen fibrils and their denatured form, gelatin. Thermal transitions identified at (150 ± 10)°C and (220 ± 10)°C can be related to the process of gelatinization of the collagen fibrils, whereas at higher temperatures, both the gelatin and collagen samples underwent two-stage transitions with a common initial degradation temperature at (300 ± 10)°C and a secondary degradation temperature of (340 ± 10)°C for the collagen and of (420 ± 10)°C for the gelatin, respectively. The broadening and shift in the secondary degradation temperature was linked to the spread of thermal degradation within the gelatin and collagen fibrils matrix further away from the point of contact between probe and sample. Finally, similar measurements were performed inside a bone resorption lacuna, suggesting that microthermal analysis is a viable technique for investigating the thermomechanical response of collagen for in situ samples that would be, otherwise, too challenging or not possible using bulk techniques. PMID:21723833

  16. Targeted deletion of collagen V in tendons and ligaments results in a classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome joint phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Freedman, Benjamin R; Wenstrup, Richard J; Soslowsky, Louis J; Birk, David E

    2015-05-01

    Collagen V mutations underlie classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and joint hypermobility is an important clinical manifestation. We define the function of collagen V in tendons and ligaments, as well as the role of alterations in collagen V expression in the pathobiology in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A conditional Col5a1(flox/flox) mouse model was bred with Scleraxis-Cre mice to create a targeted tendon and ligament Col5a1-null mouse model, Col5a1(Δten/Δten). Targeting was specific, resulting in collagen V-null tendons and ligaments. Col5a1(Δten/Δten) mice demonstrated decreased body size, grip weakness, abnormal gait, joint laxity, and early-onset osteoarthritis. These gross changes were associated with abnormal fiber organization, as well as altered collagen fibril structure with increased fibril diameters and decreased fibril number that was more severe in a major joint stabilizing ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), than in the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The ACL also had a higher collagen V content than did the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The collagen V-null ACL and flexor digitorum longus tendon both had significant alterations in mechanical properties, with ACL exhibiting more severe changes. The data demonstrate critical differential regulatory roles for collagen V in tendon and ligament structure and function and suggest that collagen V regulatory dysfunction is associated with an abnormal joint phenotype, similar to the hypermobility phenotype in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  17. Human recombinant type I collagen produced in plants.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2013-07-01

    As a central element of the extracellular matrix, collagen is intimately involved in tissue development, remodeling, and repair and confers high tensile strength to tissues. Numerous medical applications, particularly, wound healing, cell therapy, bone reconstruction, and cosmetic technologies, rely on its supportive and healing qualities. Its synthesis and assembly require a multitude of genes and post-translational modifications, where even minor deviations can be deleterious or even fatal. Historically, collagen was always extracted from animal and human cadaver sources, but bare risk of contamination and allergenicity and was subjected to harsh purification conditions resulting in irreversible modifications impeding its biofunctionality. In parallel, the highly complex and stringent post-translational processing of collagen, prerequisite of its viability and proper functioning, sets significant limitations on recombinant expression systems. A tobacco plant expression platform has been recruited to effectively express human collagen, along with three modifying enzymes, critical to collagen maturation. The plant extracted recombinant human collagen type I forms thermally stable helical structures, fibrillates, and demonstrates bioactivity resembling that of native collagen. Deployment of the highly versatile plant-based biofactory can be leveraged toward mass, rapid, and low-cost production of a wide variety of recombinant proteins. As in the case of collagen, proper planning can bypass plant-related limitations, to yield products structurally and functionally identical to their native counterparts.

  18. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Hodgens, K J; Arena, J; Song, M J; McEwen, B F

    1996-02-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  19. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Arena, J.; Song, M. J.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  20. Collagen morphology and texture analysis: from statistics to classification

    PubMed Central

    Mostaço-Guidolin, Leila B.; Ko, Alex C.-T.; Wang, Fei; Xiang, Bo; Hewko, Mark; Tian, Ganghong; Major, Arkady; Shiomi, Masashi; Sowa, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present an image analysis methodology capable of quantifying morphological changes in tissue collagen fibril organization caused by pathological conditions. Texture analysis based on first-order statistics (FOS) and second-order statistics such as gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) was explored to extract second-harmonic generation (SHG) image features that are associated with the structural and biochemical changes of tissue collagen networks. Based on these extracted quantitative parameters, multi-group classification of SHG images was performed. With combined FOS and GLCM texture values, we achieved reliable classification of SHG collagen images acquired from atherosclerosis arteries with >90% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The proposed methodology can be applied to a wide range of conditions involving collagen re-modeling, such as in skin disorders, different types of fibrosis and muscular-skeletal diseases affecting ligaments and cartilage. PMID:23846580

  1. Collagen morphology and texture analysis: from statistics to classification.

    PubMed

    Mostaço-Guidolin, Leila B; Ko, Alex C-T; Wang, Fei; Xiang, Bo; Hewko, Mark; Tian, Ganghong; Major, Arkady; Shiomi, Masashi; Sowa, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present an image analysis methodology capable of quantifying morphological changes in tissue collagen fibril organization caused by pathological conditions. Texture analysis based on first-order statistics (FOS) and second-order statistics such as gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) was explored to extract second-harmonic generation (SHG) image features that are associated with the structural and biochemical changes of tissue collagen networks. Based on these extracted quantitative parameters, multi-group classification of SHG images was performed. With combined FOS and GLCM texture values, we achieved reliable classification of SHG collagen images acquired from atherosclerosis arteries with >90% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The proposed methodology can be applied to a wide range of conditions involving collagen re-modeling, such as in skin disorders, different types of fibrosis and muscular-skeletal diseases affecting ligaments and cartilage.

  2. Structural and micromechanical characterization of type I collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Hough, Lawrence A; Daniel Ou-Yang, H

    2010-02-10

    In this paper we report a study where we use a novel optical tweezers technique to measure the local viscoelastic properties of type I collagen solutions spanning the sol-to-gel transition. We use phase contrast optical microscopy to reveal dense and sparse regions of the rigid fibril networks, and find that the spatial variations in the mechanical properties of the collagen gels closely follow the structural properties. Within the dense phase of the connected network in the gel samples, there are regions that exhibit drastically different viscoelastic properties. Within the sparse regions of the gel samples, no evidence of elasticity is found. In type I collagen gels, we find a high degree of structural inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity in the structural properties of collagen gels and the corresponding viscoelastic properties provide benchmark measurements for the behavior of desirable biological materials, or tissue equivalents.

  3. Collagen morphology and texture analysis: from statistics to classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaço-Guidolin, Leila B.; Ko, Alex C.-T.; Wang, Fei; Xiang, Bo; Hewko, Mark; Tian, Ganghong; Major, Arkady; Shiomi, Masashi; Sowa, Michael G.

    2013-07-01

    In this study we present an image analysis methodology capable of quantifying morphological changes in tissue collagen fibril organization caused by pathological conditions. Texture analysis based on first-order statistics (FOS) and second-order statistics such as gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) was explored to extract second-harmonic generation (SHG) image features that are associated with the structural and biochemical changes of tissue collagen networks. Based on these extracted quantitative parameters, multi-group classification of SHG images was performed. With combined FOS and GLCM texture values, we achieved reliable classification of SHG collagen images acquired from atherosclerosis arteries with >90% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The proposed methodology can be applied to a wide range of conditions involving collagen re-modeling, such as in skin disorders, different types of fibrosis and muscular-skeletal diseases affecting ligaments and cartilage.

  4. Reinforcement of polymeric structures with asbestos fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, C. A.; Schwartz, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    Investigation determines structural potential of asbestos fibrils. Methods are developed for dispersing macrofibers of the asbestos into colloidal-sized ultimate fibrils and incorporating these fibrils in matrices without causing reagglomeration.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial atrial fibrillation familial atrial fibrillation Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial atrial fibrillation is an inherited condition that disrupts the heart's ...

  6. Investigation of the influence of UV irradiation on collagen thin films by AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Yova, Dido; Alexandratou, Eleni

    2014-12-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous extracellular matrix protein and due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and cell-substrate. The aim of the paper was to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to investigate well-characterized collagen thin films after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The films were also used as in vitro culturing substrates in order to investigate the UV-induced alterations to fibroblasts. A special attention was given in the alteration on collagen D-periodicity. For short irradiation times, spectroscopy (fluorescence/absorption) studies demonstrated that photodegradation took place and AFM imaging showed alterations in surface roughness. Also, it was highlighted that UV-irradiation had different effects when it was applied on collagen solution than on films. Concerning fibroblast culturing, it was shown that fibroblast behavior was affected after UV irradiation of both collagen solution and films. Furthermore, after a long irradiation time, collagen fibrils were deformed revealing that collagen fibrils are consisting of multiple shells and D-periodicity occurred on both outer and inner shells. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen and the induced modifications of cell behavior on UV-irradiated collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell-matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist in the appropriate use of UV light for sterilizing and photo-cross-linking applications.

  7. The enhancement of cancer stem cell properties of MCF-7 cells in 3D collagen scaffolds for modeling of cancer and anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Yue; Zhao, Yannan; Han, Jin; Su, Guannan; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture could partially simulate in vivo conditions. In this work, we developed a 3D collagen scaffold to investigate cellular properties of MCF-7 cells. The porous scaffolds not only induced the diversification of cell morphologies but also extended cell proliferation. The expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors and the transcriptions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were significantly increased in cells cultured in 3D collagen scaffolds. In addition, 3D collagen scaffolds could generate a cell population with the properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs). The upregulation of EMT markers and the downregulation of the epithelial cell marker were observed in cells cultured in collagen scaffolds. The expression of stem cell markers, including OCT4A and SOX2, and breast cancer stem cell signatures, including SOX4, JAG1 and CD49F, was significantly unregulated in 3D collagen scaffolds. The proportion of cells with CSC-like CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) phenotype was notably increased. High-level expression of CSC-associated properties of MCF-7 cells cultured in 3D was further confirmed by high tumorigenicity in vivo. Moreover, xenografts with 3D cells formed larger tumors. The properties of MCF-7 cells in 3D may have partially simulated their in vivo behaviors. Thus, 3D collagen scaffolds might provide a useful platform for anti-cancer therapeutics and CSC research.

  8. Lung response to ultrafine Kevlar aramid synthetic fibrils following 2-year inhalation exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, K P; Kelly, D P; O'Neal, F O; Stadler, J C; Kennedy, G L

    1988-07-01

    Four groups of 100 male and 100 female rats were exposed to ultrafine Kevlar fibrils at concentrations of 0, 2.5, 25, and 100 fibrils/cc for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 years. One group was exposed to 400 fibrils/cc for 1 year and allowed to recover for 1 year. At 2.5 fibrils/cc, the lungs had normal alveolar architecture with a few dust-laden macrophages (dust cell response) in the alveolar airspaces. At 25 fibrils/cc, the lungs showed a dust cell response, slight Type II pneumocyte hyperplasia, alveolar bronchiolarization, and a negligible amount of collagenized fibrosis in the alveolar duct region. At 100 fibrils/cc, the same pulmonary responses were seen as at 25 fibrils/cc. In addition, cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (CKSCC) was found in 4 female rats, but not in male rats. Female rats had more prominent foamy alveolar macrophages, cholesterol granulomas, and alveolar bronchiolarization. These pulmonary lesions were related to the development of CKSCC. The lung tumors were derived from metaplastic squamous cells in areas of alveolar bronchiolarization. At 400 fibrils/cc following 1 year of recovery, the lung dust content, average fiber length, and the pulmonary lesions were markedly reduced, but slight centriacinar emphysema and minimal collagenized fibrosis were found in the alveolar duct region. One male and 6 female rats developed CKSCC. The lung tumors were a unique type of experimentally induced tumors in the rats and have not been seen as spontaneous tumors in man or animals. Therefore, the relevance of this type of lung tumor to the human situation is minimal.

  9. Retinal pigment epithelium cell alignment on nanostructured collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Stefan; Friedrichs, Jens; Valtink, Monika; Murovski, Simo; Franz, Clemens M; Müller, Daniel J; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    We investigated attachment and migration of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (primary, SV40-transfected and ARPE-19) on nanoscopically defined, two-dimensional matrices composed of parallel-aligned collagen type I fibrils. These matrices were used non-cross-linked (native) or after riboflavin/UV-A cross-linking to study cell attachment and migration by time-lapse video microscopy. Expression of collagen type I and IV, MMP-2 and of the collagen-binding integrin subunit α(2) were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. SV40-RPE cells quickly attached to the nanostructured collagen matrices and aligned along the collagen fibrils. However, they disrupted both native and cross-linked collagen matrices within 5 h. Primary RPE cells aligned more slowly without destroying either native or cross-linked substrates. Compared to primary RPE cells, ARPE-19 cells showed reduced alignment but partially disrupted the matrices within 20 h after seeding. Expression of the collagen type I-binding integrin subunit α(2) was highest in SV40-RPE cells, lower in primary RPE cells and almost undetectable in ARPE-19 cells. Thus, integrin α(2) expression levels directly correlated with the degree of cell alignment in all examined RPE cell types. Specific integrin subunit α(2)-mediated matrix binding was verified by preincubation with an α(2)-function-blocking antibody, which impaired cell adhesion and alignment to varying degrees in primary and SV40-RPE cells. Since native matrices supported extended and directed primary RPE cell growth, optimizing the matrix production procedure may in the future yield nanostructured collagen matrices serving as transferable cell sheet carriers.

  10. Rough fibrils provide a toughening mechanism in biological fibers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cameron P; Harnagea, Catalin; Gill, Harinderjit S; Price, Andrew J; Traversa, Enrico; Licoccia, Silvia; Rosei, Federico

    2012-03-27

    Spider silk is a fascinating natural composite material. Its combination of strength and toughness is unrivalled in nature, and as a result, it has gained considerable interest from the medical, physics, and materials communities. Most of this attention has focused on the one to tens of nanometer scale: predominantly the primary (peptide sequences) and secondary (β sheets, helices, and amorphous domains) structure, with some insights into tertiary structure (the arrangement of these secondary structures) to describe the origins of the mechanical and biological performance. Starting with spider silk, and relating our findings to collagen fibrils, we describe toughening mechanisms at the hundreds of nanometer scale, namely, the fibril morphology and its consequences for mechanical behavior and the dissipation of energy. Under normal conditions, this morphology creates a nonslip fibril kinematics, restricting shearing between fibrils, yet allowing controlled local slipping under high shear stress, dissipating energy without bulk fracturing. This mechanism provides a relatively simple target for biomimicry and, thus, can potentially be used to increase fracture resistance in synthetic materials.

  11. Estrogen enhances the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide).

    PubMed

    E, Ling-Ling; Xu, Wen-Huan; Feng, Lin; Liu, Yi; Cai, Dong-Qing; Wen, Ning; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of estrogen on the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on a collagen-based composite scaffold [nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide) (nHAC/PLA)]. For this purpose, 48 healthy 3‑month-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into 2 groups as follows: the bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) rats and sham‑operated rats. The PDLSCs were isolated at 3 months after surgery (by which time postmenopausal osteoporosis had developed). The effects of estrogen on the characteristics of these cells seeded in a culture plate and of the cells seeded on nHAC/PLA were then investigated. The PDLSC + nHAC/PLA constructs were implanted subcutaneously into the backs of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for 12 weeks in order to examine the role of estrogen in the bone formation ability of PDLSCs derived from osteoporotic rats. The results from methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay revealed that the proliferation of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly higher than that of the cells derived from the rats in the sham-operated group at the stage of logarithmic growth. The staining intensity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the mineralization of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly weaker than that of the cells from the rats in the sham-operated group. When the PDLSCs were seeded on nHAC/PLA, ALP activity, osteocalcin (OCN) secretion, mineral formation and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ in the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group were markedly decreased. Treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) significantly weakened the proliferative ability of the cells derived from the OVX group rats, and enhanced their osteogenic differentiation ability and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, ERα and ERβ. When the constructs were implanted

  12. Estrogen enhances the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide)

    PubMed Central

    E, LING-LING; XU, WEN-HUAN; FENG, LIN; LIU, YI; CAI, DONG-QING; WEN, NING; ZHENG, WEN-JIE

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of estrogen on the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on a collagen-based composite scaffold [nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide) (nHAC/PLA)]. For this purpose, 48 healthy 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into 2 groups as follows: the bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) rats and sham-operated rats. The PDLSCs were isolated at 3 months after surgery (by which time postmenopausal osteoporosis had developed). The effects of estrogen on the characteristics of these cells seeded in a culture plate and of the cells seeded on nHAC/PLA were then investigated. The PDLSC + nHAC/PLA constructs were implanted subcutaneously into the backs of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for 12 weeks in order to examine the role of estrogen in the bone formation ability of PDLSCs derived from osteoporotic rats. The results from methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay revealed that the proliferation of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly higher than that of the cells derived from the rats in the sham-operated group at the stage of logarithmic growth. The staining intensity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the mineralization of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly weaker than that of the cells from the rats in the sham-operated group. When the PDLSCs were seeded on nHAC/PLA, ALP activity, osteocalcin (OCN) secretion, mineral formation and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ in the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group were markedly decreased. Treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) significantly weakened the proliferative ability of the cells derived from the OVX group rats, and enhanced their osteogenic differentiation ability and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, ERα and ERβ. When the constructs were implanted into the backs of SCID

  13. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  14. Effect of immobilized collagen type IV on biological properties of endothelial cells for the enhanced endothelialization of synthetic vascular graft materials.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunhoe; Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Lim, Youn Mook; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-10-01

    Regeneration of healthy endothelium onto vascular graft materials is imperative for prevention of intimal hyperplasia and thrombogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of collagen type IV (COL-IV) immobilized onto electrospun nanofibers on modulation of endothelial cell (EC) function, as a potential signal to rapid endothelialization of vascular grafts. COL-IV is assembled in basement membrane underneath intimal layer and regulates morphogenesis of blood vessels. For immobilization of COL-IV, poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers (PL) were prepared as a model vascular graft substrate, onto which acrylic acid (AAc) was then grafted by using gamma-ray irradiation. AAc graft was dependent on irradiation doses and AAc concentrations, which allowed us to select the condition of 5% (v/v) AAc and 10 kGy for further conjugation of COL-IV. COL-IV immobilization was proportionally controlled as a function of its concentration. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis qualitatively supported immobilization of COL-IV, demonstrating increase in root mean square roughness of the PL from 665.37 ± 13.20 nm to 1440.74 ± 33.24. However, the Young's modulus of nanofibers was retained as approximately 1 MPa, regardless of surface modification. The number of ECs attached on the nanofibers with immobilized COL-IV was significantly increased by 5 times (1052 ± 138 cells/mm(2)) from pristine PL (234 ± 41 cells/mm(2)). In addition, the effect of immobilized COL-IV was profound for enhancing proliferation and up-regulation of markers implicated in rapid endothelialization. Collectively, our results suggest that COL-IV immobilized onto electrospun PLLA nanofibers may serve as a promising instructive cue used in vascular graft materials.

  15. A collagen and elastic network in the wing of the bat.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, K A; Odland, G F

    1978-01-01

    Bundles of collagen fibrils, elastic fibres and fibroblasts are organized into a network that lies in the plane of a large portion of the bat wing. By ultrastructural (TEM and SEM) and biochemical analyses it was found that individual bundles of the net are similar to elastic ligaments. Although elastic fibres predominate, they are integrated and aligned in parallel with small bundles of collagen. A reticulum of fibroblasts, joined by focal junctions, forms a cellular framework throughout each bundle. Because of the unique features of the fibre bundles of the bat's wing, in particular their accessibility, and the parallel alignment of the collagen fibrils and elastic fibres in each easily isolatable fibre bundle, they should prove a most valuable model for connective tissue studies, particularly for the study of collagen-elastin interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:649500

  16. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of collagens of marine sponge, Ircinia fusca (Porifera: Demospongiae: Irciniidae).

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee; Bojja, Sreedhar; Janapala, Venkateswara Rao

    2011-07-01

    Collagens were isolated and partially characterized from the marine demosponge, Ircinia fusca from Gulf of Mannar (GoM), India, with an aim to develop potentially applicable collagens from unused and under-used resources. The yield of insoluble, salt soluble and acid soluble forms of collagens was 31.71 ± 1.59, 20.69 ± 1.03, and 17.38 ± 0.87 mg/g dry weight, respectively. Trichrome staining, Scanning & Transmission Electron microscopic (SEM & TEM) studies confirmed the presence of collagen in the isolated, terminally globular irciniid filaments. The partially purified (gel filtration chromatography), non-fibrillar collagens appeared as basement type collagenous sheets under light microscopy whereas the purified fibrillar collagens appeared as fibrils with a repeated band periodicity of 67 nm under Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The non-fibrillar and fibrillar collagens were seen to have affinity for anti-collagen type IV and type I antibodies raised against human collagens, respectively. The macromolecules, i.e., total protein, carbohydrate and lipid contents within the tissues were also quantified. The present information on the three characteristic irciniid collagens (filamentous, fibrillar and non-fibrillar) could assist the future attempts to unravel the therapeutically important, safer collagens from marine sponges for their use in pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical industries.

  17. Collagen XII Contributes to Epicardial and Connective Tissues in the Zebrafish Heart during Ontogenesis and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Jan; Pfefferli, Catherine; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Bise, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish heart regeneration depends on cardiac cell proliferation, epicardium activation and transient reparative tissue deposition. The contribution and the regulation of specific collagen types during the regenerative process, however, remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified that the non-fibrillar type XII collagen, which serves as a matrix-bridging component, is expressed in the epicardium of the zebrafish heart, and is boosted after cryoinjury-induced ventricular damage. During heart regeneration, an intense deposition of Collagen XII covers the outer epicardial cap and the interstitial reparative tissue. Analysis of the activated epicardium and fibroblast markers revealed a heterogeneous cellular origin of Collagen XII. Interestingly, this matrix-bridging collagen co-localized with fibrillar type I collagen and several glycoproteins in the post-injury zone, suggesting its role in tissue cohesion. Using SB431542, a selective inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor, we showed that while the inhibitor treatment did not affect the expression of collagen 12 and collagen 1a2 in the epicardium, it completely suppressed the induction of both genes in the fibrotic tissue. This suggests that distinct mechanisms might regulate collagen expression in the outer heart layer and the inner injury zone. On the basis of this study, we postulate that the TGF-β signaling pathway induces and coordinates formation of a transient collagenous network that comprises fibril-forming Collagen I and fiber-associated Collagen XII, both of which contribute to the reparative matrix of the regenerating zebrafish heart. PMID:27783651

  18. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  19. Teleost fish scales amongst the toughest collagenous materials.

    PubMed

    Khayer Dastjerdi, A; Barthelat, F

    2015-12-01

    Fish scales from modern teleost fish are high-performance materials made of cross-plies of collagen type I fibrils reinforced with hydroxyapatite. Recent studies on this material have demonstrated the remarkable performance of this material in tension and against sharp puncture. Although it is known that teleost fish scales are extremely tough, actual measurements of fracture toughness have so far not been reported because it is simply not possible to propagate a crack in this material using standard fracture testing configurations. Here we present a new fracture test setup where the scale is clamped between two pairs of miniature steel plates. The plates transmit the load uniformly, prevent warping of the scale and ensure a controlled crack propagation. We report a toughness of 15 to 18kJm(-2) (depending on the direction of crack propagation), which confirms teleost fish scales as one of the toughest biological material known. We also tested the individual bony layers, which we found was about four times less tough than the collagen layer because of its higher mineralization. The mechanical response of the scales also depends on the cohesion between fibrils and plies. Delamination tests show that the interface between the collagen fibrils is three orders of magnitude weaker than the scale, which explains the massive delamination and defibrillation observed experimentally. Finally, simple fracture mechanics models showed that process zone toughening is the principal source of toughening for the scales, followed by bridging by delaminated fibrils. These findings can guide the design of cross-ply composites and engineering textiles for high-end applications. This study also hints on the fracture mechanics and performance of collagenous materials with similar microstructures: fish skin, lamellar bone or tendons.

  20. Collagen scaffolds loaded with collagen-binding NGF-beta accelerate ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Lin, Hang; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Wenxue; Zhao, Yannan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2010-03-01

    Studies have shown that exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) accelerates ulcer healing, but the inefficient growth factor delivery system limits its clinical application. In this report, we found that the native human NGF-beta fused with a collagen-binding domain (CBD) could form a collagen-based NGF targeting delivery system, and the CBD-fused NGF-beta could bind to collagen membranes efficiently. Using the rabbit dermal ischemic ulcer model, we have found that this targeting delivery system maintains a higher concentration and stronger bioactivity of NGF-beta on the collagen membranes by promoting peripheral nerve growth. Furthermore, it enhances the rate of ulcer healing through accelerating the re-epithelialization of dermal ulcer wounds and the formation of capillary lumens within the newly formed tissue area. Thus, collagen membranes loaded with collagen-targeting human NGF-beta accelerate ulcer healing efficiently.

  1. Collagen-mediated hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Manon-Jensen, T; Kjeld, N G; Karsdal, M A

    2016-03-01

    Collagens mediate essential hemostasis by maintaining the integrity and stability of the vascular wall. Imbalanced turnover of collagens by uncontrolled formation and/or degradation may result in pathologic conditions such as fibrosis. Thickening of the vessel wall because of accumulation of collagens may lead to arterial occlusion or thrombosis. Thinning of the wall because of collagen degradation or deficiency may lead to rupture of the vessel wall or aneurysm. Preventing excessive hemorrhage or thrombosis relies on collagen-mediated actions. Von Willebrand factor, integrins and glycoprotein VI, as well as clotting factors, can bind collagen to restore normal hemostasis after trauma. This review outlines the essential roles of collagens in mediating hemostasis, with a focus on collagens types I, III, IV, VI, XV, and XVIII.

  2. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  3. Ventricular fibrillation and defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P; Lodé, N

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in children is not often due to a disturbance in rhythm that is amenable to electrical defibrillation, contrary to the situation in adults. When a shockable rhythm is present, defibrillation using an external electric shock applied at an early stage after pre‐oxygenation and chest compressions is of proven efficacy. Success at conversion of ventricular fibrillation is dependent on the delay before delivering the shock and defibrillation efficiency, which is itself a function of thoracic impedance, energy dose and waveform. PMID:17895341

  4. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  5. Micro-mechanical model for the tension-stabilized enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thao; Ruberti, Jeffery

    We present a study of how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. Experiments of collagen fibrils and tissues show that mechanical tension can slow and halt enzymatic degradation. Tissue-level experiments also show that degradation rate is minimum at a stretch level coincident with the onset of strain-stiffening in the stress response. To understand these phenomena, we developed a micro-mechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation. Collagen fibers are described as sinusoidal elastica beams, and the tissue is described as a distribution of fibers. We assumed that the degradation reaction is inhibited by the axial strain energy of the crimped collagen fibers. The degradation rate law was calibrated to experiments on isolated single fibrils from bovine sclera. The fiber crimp and properties were fit to uniaxial tension tests of tissue strips. The fibril-level kinetic and tissue-level structural parameters were used to predict tissue-level degradation-induced creep rate under a constant applied force. We showed that we could accurately predict the degradation-induce creep rate of the pericardium and cornea once we accounted for differences in the fiber crimp structure and properties.

  6. In situ observation of collagen thermal denaturation by second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.-S.; Zhuo, Z.-Y.; Yu, J.-Y.; Chao, P.-H. G.; Chu, S.-W.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen denaturation is of fundamental importance for clinical treatment. Conventionally, the denaturation process is quantified by the shrinkage of collagen fibers, but the underlying molecular origin has not been fully understood. Since second harmonic generation (SHG) is related to the molecular packing of the triple helix in collagen fibers, this nonlinear signal provides an insight of molecular dynamics during thermal denaturation. With the aid of SHG microscopy, we found a new step in collagen thermal denaturation process, de-crimp. During the de-crimp step, the characteristic crimp pattern of collagen fascicles disappeared due to the breakage of interconnecting bonds between collagen fibrils, while SHG intensity remained unchanged, suggesting the intactness of the triple helical molecules. At higher temperature, shrinkage is observed with strongly reduced SHG intensity, indicating denaturation at the molecular level.

  7. Effect of silicone on the collagen fibrillogenesis and stability.

    PubMed

    Kadziński, Leszek; Prokopowicz, Magdalena; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Łukasiak, Jerzy; Banecki, Bogdan

    2015-04-01

    Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, is able to form fibrils, which have central role in tissue repair, fibrosis, and tumor invasion. As a component of skin, tendons, and cartilages, this protein contacts with any implanted materials. An inherent problem associated with implanted prostheses is their propensity to be coated with host proteins shortly after implantation. Also, silicone implants undergoing relatively long periods of contact with blood can lead to formation of thrombi and emboli. In this paper, we demonstrate the existence of interactions between siloxanes and collagen. Low-molecular-weight cyclic siloxane (hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane-D3) and polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) forming linear chains, ranging in viscosity from 20 to 12,000 cSt, were analyzed. We show that D3 as well as short-chain PDMS interact with collagen, resulting in a decrease in fibrillogenesis. However, loss of collagen native structure does not occur because of these interactions. Rather, collagen seems to be sequestered in its native form in an interlayer formed by collagen-siloxane complexes. On the other hand, silicone molecules with longer chains (i.e., PDMS with viscosity of 1000 and 12,000 cSt, the highest viscosity analyzed here) demonstrate little interaction with this protein and do not seem to affect collagen activity.

  8. Co-delivery and controlled release of stromal cell-derived factor-1α chemically conjugated on collagen scaffolds enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2-driven osteogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, HAIPENG; WANG, JINMING; DENG, FEILONG; LIU, YUN; ZHUANG, XIUMEI; XU, JIAYUN; LI, LONG

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable focus in investigations on the delivery systems and clinical applications of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) for novel bone formation. However, current delivery systems require high levels of BMP-2 to exert a biological function. There are several concerns in using of high levels of BMP-2, including safety and the high cost of treatment. Therefore, the development of strategies to decrease the levels of BMP-2 required in these delivery systems is required. In our previous studies, a controlled-release system was developed, which used Traut's reagent and the cross-linker, 4-(N-maleimi-domethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid 3-sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester sodium salt (Sulfo-SMCC), to chemically conjugate BMP-2 directly on collagen discs. In the current study, retention efficiency and release kinetics of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) cross-linked on collagen scaffolds were detected. In addition, the osteogenic activity of SDF-1α and suboptimal doses of BMP-2 cross-linked on collagen discs following subcutaneous implantation in rats were evaluated. Independent two-tailed t-tests and one-way analysis of variance were used for analysis. In the present study, the controlled release of SDF-1α chemically conjugated on collagen scaffolds was demonstrated. By optimizing the concentrations of Traut's reagent and the Sulfo-SMCC cross-linker, a significantly higher level of SDF-1α was covalently retained on the collagen scaffold, compared with that retained using a physical adsorption method. Mesenchymal stem cell homing indicated that the biological function of the SDF-1α cross-linked on the collagen scaffolds remained intact. In rats, co-treatment with SDF-1α and a suboptimal dose of BMP-2 cross-linked on collagen scaffolds using this chemically conjugated method induced higher levels of ectopic bone formation, compared with the physical adsorption method. No ectopic bone formation was observed following treatment with a

  9. The nanometre-scale physiology of bone: steric modelling and scanning transmission electron microscopy of collagen-mineral structure.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Benjamin; Daulton, Tyrone L; Genin, Guy M; Lipner, Justin; Pasteris, Jill D; Wopenka, Brigitte; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-08-07

    The nanometre-scale structure of collagen and bioapatite within bone establishes bone's physical properties, including strength and toughness. However, the nanostructural organization within bone is not well known and is debated. Widely accepted models hypothesize that apatite mineral ('bioapatite') is present predominantly inside collagen fibrils: in 'gap channels' between abutting collagen molecules, and in 'intermolecular spaces' between adjacent collagen molecules. However, recent studies report evidence of substantial extrafibrillar bioapatite, challenging this hypothesis. We studied the nanostructure of bioapatite and collagen in mouse bones by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. Additionally, we developed a steric model to estimate the packing density of bioapatite within gap channels. Our steric model and STEM results constrain the fraction of total bioapatite in bone that is distributed within fibrils at less than or equal to 0.42 inside gap channels and less than or equal to 0.28 inside intermolecular overlap regions. Therefore, a significant fraction of bone's bioapatite (greater than or equal to 0.3) must be external to the fibrils. Furthermore, we observe extrafibrillar bioapatite between non-mineralized collagen fibrils, suggesting that initial bioapatite nucleation and growth are not confined to the gap channels as hypothesized in some models. These results have important implications for the mechanics of partially mineralized and developing tissues.

  10. Defining the domains of type I collagen involved in heparin- binding and endothelial tube formation.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, S M; Guy, C A; Fields, G B; San Antonio, J D

    1998-06-23

    Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) interactions with type I collagen may be a ubiquitous cell adhesion mechanism. However, the HSPG binding sites on type I collagen are unknown. Previously we mapped heparin binding to the vicinity of the type I collagen N terminus by electron microscopy. The present study has identified type I collagen sequences used for heparin binding and endothelial cell-collagen interactions. Using affinity coelectrophoresis, we found heparin to bind as follows: to type I collagen with high affinity (Kd approximately 150 nM); triple-helical peptides (THPs) including the basic N-terminal sequence alpha1(I)87-92, KGHRGF, with intermediate affinities (Kd approximately 2 microM); and THPs including other collagenous sequences, or single-stranded sequences, negligibly (Kd > 10 microM). Thus, heparin-type I collagen binding likely relies on an N-terminal basic triple-helical domain represented once within each monomer, and at multiple sites within fibrils. We next defined the features of type I collagen necessary for angiogenesis in a system in which type I collagen and heparin rapidly induce endothelial tube formation in vitro. When peptides, denatured or monomeric type I collagen, or type V collagen was substituted for type I collagen, no tubes formed. However, when peptides and type I collagen were tested together, only the most heparin-avid THPs inhibited tube formation, likely by influencing cell interactions with collagen-heparin complexes. Thus, induction of endothelial tube morphogenesis by type I collagen may depend upon its triple-helical and fibrillar conformations and on the N-terminal heparin-binding site identified here.

  11. Impact of temperature and electrical potentials on the stability and structure of collagen adsorbed on the gold electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Frank; Ahlers, Michael; Brand, Izabella; Wittstock, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The morphology and structure of collagen type I adsorbed on gold electrodes were studied as a function of electrode potential and temperature by means of capacitance measurements, polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and scanning force microscopy at temperatures of 37 °C, 43 °C and 50 °C. The selected temperatures corresponded to the normal body temperature, temperature of denaturation of collagen molecules and denaturation of collagen fibrils, respectively. Independently of the solution temperature, collagen was adsorbed on gold electrodes in the potential range - 0.7 V < E < 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl, where the protein film was very stable. Fragments of collagen molecules made a direct contact to the gold surface and water was present in the film. Protein molecules were oriented preferentially with their long axis towards the gold surface. Collagen molecules in the adsorbed state preserved their native triple helical structure even at temperatures corresponding to collagen denaturation in aqueous solutions. Application of E < - 0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl leads to the swelling of the protein film by water and desorption from the electrode surface. IR spectra provided no evidence of the thermal denaturation of adsorbed collagen molecules. A temperature increase to 50 °C leads to a distortion of the collagen film. The processes of aggregation and fibrilization were preferred over thermal denaturation for collagen adsorbed on the electrode surface and exposed to changing potentials.

  12. Cardiac fibrillation risk of Taser weapons.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    The debate on potential health hazards associated with delivering electric discharges to incapacitated subjects, in particular on whether electric discharge weapons are lethal, less lethal or non-lethal, is still controversial. The cardiac fibrillation risks of Taser weapons X26 and X3 have been investigated by measuring the delivered high-tension pulses in dependence on load impedance. Excitation thresholds and sinus-to-Taser conversion factors have been determined by numerical modeling of endocardial, myocardial, and epicardial cells. Detailed quantitative assessment of cardiac electric exposure has been performed by numerical simulation at the normal-weighted anatomical model NORMAN. The impact of anatomical variation has been quantified at an overweight model (Visible Man), both with a spatial resolution of 2 × 2 × 2 mm voxels. Spacing and location of dart electrodes were systematically varied and the worst-case position determined. Based on volume-weighted cardiac exposure assessment, the fibrillation probability of the worst-case hit was determined to 30% (Taser X26) and 9% (Taser X3). The overall risk assessment of Taser application accounting for realistic spatial hit distributions was derived from training sessions of police officers under realistic scenarios and by accounting for the influence of body (over-)weight as well as gender. The analysis of the results showed that the overall fibrillation risk of Taser use is not negligible. It is higher at Taser X26 than at Taser X3 and amounts to about 1% for Europeans with an about 20% higher risk for Asians. Results demonstrate that enhancement as well as further reduction of fibrillation risk depends on responsible use or abuse of Taser weapons.

  13. Studies on the molecular significance in the interaction of bilirubin with collagen.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Usharani; Gladstone Christopher, Jayakumar; Chandrasekaran, Bangaru; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Balachandran, Unni Nair; Kohsaku, Kawakami

    2013-10-01

    The present investigation is aimed to understand the physiological significance of bilirubin interaction with collagen. In human skin, collagen absorbs both free bilirubin and serum bound bilirubin from the human system. Interaction between bilirubin and collagen depends on time, temperature and concentration of bilirubin. There is an increase in the aggregation rate of collagen in the presence of biliruibin. At physiological condition, 125 nM of bilirubin is the maximum concentration absorbed by per mg of collagen molecule. Bilirubin accelerates the lateral growth of collagen fibrils by shifting its rate of nucleation. Moreover, collagen-bilirubin complex exhibit a tendency to undergo adsorption onto the surface of the fibroblast cells, showing detrimental effects on fibroblasts proliferations. Based on the collagen binding assays, the binding of bilirubin to collagen is found to be electrostatic in nature, which confirms binding between the amino acid fragment of α1 (I) region of collagen and carboxyl group of bilirubin. The biotinylated bilirubin derivatives show better binding to α1 (I) chain rather than α2 (I) chains which clearly designates that bilirubin shows greater affinity to α1 chains of collagen. This novel approach directs to reduce the occurrence of bilirubin in hyperbilirubinemia patients.

  14. Ingestion of BioCell Collagen®, a novel hydrolyzed chicken sternal cartilage extract; enhanced blood microcirculation and reduced facial aging signs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen R; Park, Joosang

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging and its clinical manifestation is associated with altered molecular metabolism in the extracellular matrix of the dermis. In a pilot open-label study, we investigated the effect of a dietary supplement, BioCell Collagen® (BCC), which contains a naturally occurring matrix of hydrolyzed collagen type II and low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate, in 26 healthy females who displayed visible signs of natural and photoaging in the face. Daily supplementation with 1 g of BCC for 12 weeks led to a significant reduction of skin dryness/scaling (76%, P = 0.002) and global lines/wrinkles (13.2%, P = 0.028) as measured by visual/tactile score. Additionally, a significant increase in the content of hemoglobin (17.7%, P = 0.018) and collagen (6.3%, P = 0.002) in the skin dermis was observed after 6 weeks of supplementation. At the end of the study, the increase in hemoglobin remained significant (15%, P = 0.008), while the increase in collagen content was maintained, but the difference from baseline was not significant (3.5%, P = 0.134). This study provides preliminary data suggesting that dietary supplementation with BCC elicits several physiological events which can be harnessed to counteract natural photoaging processes to reduce visible aging signs in the human face. A controlled study is necessary to verify these observations. PMID:22956862

  15. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-06-16

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements.

  16. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  17. Artificial extracellular matrices of collagen and sulphated hyaluronan enhance the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in the presence of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Hintze, V; Miron, A; Möller, S; Schnabelrauch, M; Heinemann, S; Worch, H; Scharnweber, D

    2014-04-01

    In this study we investigated the potential of artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) coatings containing collagen II and two types of glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) with different degrees of sulphation to promote human bone formation in biomedical applications. To this end their impact on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was assessed. The cell proliferation was found to be significantly retarded in the first 14 days of culture on surfaces coated with collagen II and GAGs (coll-II/GAG) as compared to tissue culture polystyrol (TCPS) and those coated with collagen II. At later time points it only tended to be retarded on coll-II/sHya3.1. Heat-inactivation of the serum significantly reduced cell numbers on collagen II and coll-II/sHya3.1. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition, on the other hand, were higher for coatings containing sHya3.1 and were not significantly changed by heat-inactivation of the serum. Expression levels of the bone matrix proteins bone sialoprotein (BSP-II) and osteopontin (OP) were also increased on aECM coatings as compared to TCPS, which further validated the differentiation of hMSCs towards the osteogenic lineage. These observations reveal that aECM coatings, in particular those containing sHya3.1, are suitable to promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  18. LOXL4 knockdown enhances tumor growth and lung metastasis through collagen-dependent extracellular matrix changes in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sul Ki; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-01-02

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) family genes catalyze collagen cross-link formation. To determine the effects of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression on breast tumor formation and metastasis, we evaluated primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in mice injected with LOXL4-knockdown MDA-MB-231 triple-negative human breast cancer cells. In addition, we analyzed overall survival in breast cancer patients based on LOXL4 expression using a public online database. In the mouse xenograft model, LOXL4 knockdown increased primary tumor growth and lung colonization as well as collagen I and IV, lysine hydroxylase 1 and 2, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase subunit alpha 1 and 2 levels. Second harmonic generation imaging revealed that LOXL4 knockdown resulted in the thickening of collagen bundles within tumors. In addition, weak LOXL4 expression was associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients from the BreastMark dataset, and this association was strongest in triple-negative breast cancer patients. These results demonstrate that weak LOXL4 expression leads to remodeling of the extracellular matrix through induction of collagen synthesis, deposition, and structural changes. These alterations in turn promote tumor growth and metastasis and are associated with poor clinical outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer.

  19. Both hyaluronan and collagen type II keep proteoglycan 4 (lubricin) at the cartilage surface in a condition that provides low friction during boundary lubrication.

    PubMed

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Köwitsch, Alexander; Groth, Thomas; Schmidt, Tannin A; Sharma, Prashant K

    2014-12-09

    Wear resistant and ultralow friction in synovial joints is the outcome of a sophisticated synergy between the major macromolecules of the synovial fluid, e.g., hyaluronan (HA) and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), with collagen type II fibrils and other non-collagenous macromolecules of the cartilage superficial zone (SZ). This study aimed at better understanding the mechanism of PRG4 localization at the cartilage surface. We show direct interactions between surface bound HA and freely floating PRG4 using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Freely floating PRG4 was also shown to bind with surface bound collagen type II fibrils. Albumin, the most abundant protein of the synovial fluid, effectively blocked the adsorption of PRG4 with HA, through interaction with C and N terminals on PRG4, but not that of PRG4 with collagen type II fibrils. The above results indicate that collagen type II fibrils strongly contribute in keeping PRG4 in the SZ during cartilage articulation in situ. Furthermore, PRG4 molecules adsorbed very well on mimicked SZ of absorbed HA molecules with entangled collagen type II fibrils and albumin was not able to block this interaction. In this last condition PRG4 adsorption resulted in a coefficient of friction (COF) of the same order of magnitude as the COF of natural cartilage, measured with an atomic force microscope in lateral mode.

  20. Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. Ethanol Extract Enhancement of the Efficacy of the Collagen Scaffold in Wound Closure: A Study in a Full-Thickness-Wound Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Somchaichana, Jutamas; Bunaprasert, Tanom; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2012-01-01

    Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. is a Thai herb that is effective in wound healing. We sought to quantitatively determine whether or not the combined application of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. and a collagen scaffold will increase wound closure and angiogenesis. Balb/c mice (body weight: 22–25 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental. The dorsal skin incision measuring 1.5 × 1.5 cm was made and then deepened using scissors to produce a full-thickness incision down to the level of the panniculus carnosus. The size of the wound was approximately 10% of the total body surface area. The collagen sheet was implanted onto the wound. Animals were divided into 4 major groups as follows: wound with normal saline (W-NSS), wound treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. extract (W-AE (0.3 g/kg.bw)), wound implanted with collagen scaffold (W-Coll), and wound implanted with collagen scaffold and treated with 0.3 g/kg BW of Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl. (W-Coll-AE combination). On day 14, the W-Coll-AE group showed decreased wound areas and increased capillary vascularity (CV) when compared to the other 3 groups, W-NSS, W-AE0.3, and W-Coll. In the present study, the combination of AE0.3 with collagen showed the best effect on skin angiogenesis and promoted wound closure with less neutrophil infiltration. PMID:23093862

  1. Elastic moduli of collagen gels can be predicted from two-dimensional confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Leone, Lindsay M; Kaufman, Laura J

    2009-10-07

    We quantitatively compare data obtained from imaging two-dimensional slices of three-dimensional unlabeled and fluorescently labeled collagen gels with confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and/or confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM). Different network structures are obtained by assembling the gels over a range of concentrations at various temperatures. Comparison between CRM and CFM shows that the techniques are not equally sensitive to details of network structure, with CFM displaying higher fidelity in imaging fibers parallel to the optical axis. Comparison of CRM of plain and labeled collagen gels shows that labeling itself induces changes in gel structure, chiefly through inhibition of fibril bundling. Despite these differences, image analyses carried out on two-dimensional CFM and CRM slices of collagen gels reveal identical trends in structural parameters as a function of collagen concentration and gelation temperature. Fibril diameter approximated from either CRM or CFM is in good accord with that determined via electron microscopy. Two-dimensional CRM images are used to show that semiflexible polymer theory can relate network structural properties to elastic modulus successfully. For networks containing bundled fibrils, it is shown that average structural diameter, rather than fibril diameter, is the length scale that sets the magnitude of the gel elastic modulus.

  2. Carbohydrate-functionalized collagen matrices: design and characterization of a novel neoglycosylated biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Russo, Laura; Gautieri, Alfonso; Raspanti, Mario; Taraballi, Francesca; Nicotra, Francesco; Vesentini, Simone; Cipolla, Laura

    2014-05-07

    Collagen matrices have been neoglycosylated with lactose by reductive amination at lysine side chains. AFM analysis highlights that the chemical does not affect molecular assembly into fibrils. Moreover, ELLA biochemical assays show that the glycan moiety is efficiently exposed on the matrix surface for receptor recognition.

  3. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Roberto A.; Rosa, Ronaldo F.; Santos, Silvio CM

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses atrial fibrillation according to the guidelines of Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias and the Brazilian Cardiogeriatrics Guidelines. We stress the thromboembolic burden of atrial fibrillation and discuss how to prevent it as well as the best way to conduct cases of atrial fibrillatios in the elderly, reverting the arrhythmia to sinus rhythm, or the option of heart rate control. The new methods to treat atrial fibrillation, such as radiofrequency ablation, new oral direct thrombin inhibitors and Xa factor inhibitors, as well as new antiarrhythmic drugs, are depicted. PMID:22916053

  4. [Perioperative management of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Arguis, M J; Navarro, R; Regueiro, A; Arbelo, E; Sierra, P; Sabaté, S; Galán, J; Ruiz, A; Matute, P; Roux, C; Gomar, C; Rovira, I; Mont, L; Fita, G

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in the perioperative period. When it appears there is an increased risk of perioperative morbidity due to stroke, thromboembolism, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, anticoagulation haemorrhage, and hospital readmissions. The current article focuses on the recommendations for the management of perioperative atrial fibrillation based on the latest Clinical Practice Guidelines on atrial fibrillation by the European Society of Cardiology and the Spanish Society of Cardiology. This article pays special attention to the preoperative management, as well as to the acute perioperative episode. For this reason, the latest recommendations for the control of cardiac frequency, antiarrhythmic treatment and anticoagulation are included.

  5. In situ multi-level analysis of viscoelastic deformation mechanisms in tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, H S; Seto, J; Krauss, S; Boesecke, P; Screen, H R C

    2010-02-01

    Tendon is a hydrated multi-level fibre composite, in which time-dependent behaviour is well established. Studies indicate significant stress relaxation, considered important for optimising tissue stiffness. However, whilst this behaviour is well documented, the mechanisms associated with the response are largely unknown. This study investigates the sub-structural mechanisms occurring during stress relaxation at both the macro (fibre) and nano (fibril) levels of the tendon hierarchy. Stress relaxation followed a two-stage exponential behaviour, during which structural changes were visible at the fibre and fibril levels. Fibril relaxation and fibre sliding showed a double exponential response, while fibre sliding was clearly the largest contributor to relaxation. The amount of stress relaxation and sub-structural reorganisation increased with increasing load increments, but fibre sliding was consistently the largest contributor to stress relaxation. A simple model of tendon viscoelasticity at the fibril and fibre levels has been developed, capturing this behaviour by serially coupling a Voigt element (collagen fibril), with two Maxwell elements (non-collagenous matrix between fibrils and fibres). This multi-level analysis provides a first step towards understanding how sub-structural interactions contribute to viscoelastic behaviour. It indicates that nano- and micro-scale shearing are significant dissipative mechanisms, and the kinetics of relaxation follows a two-stage exponential decay, well fitted by serially coupled viscoelastic elements.

  6. Ultrastructure of the rat periodontal ligament as observed with quick-freeze, deep-etch and replica methods: arrangement of collagen and related structures.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, M; Tachikawa, T; Izumiyama, N; Takubo, K; Yoshiki, S; Higashi, S

    1996-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the periodontal ligament of rat molars was examined with the quick-freeze, deep-etch replica methods. It was mainly composed of elongated fibroblast-like cells and 40- to 50-nm-wide collagen fibrils that are arranged parallel to one another to form fibers approximately 1 micron in width. Collagen fibrils are composed of 10-nm-wide substructures that may run helically against the long axis of the fibril. Numerous rod-like structures ('rods') approximately 10 nm in width are present around the collagen fibrils. Individual or groups of rods span spaces between neighboring collagen fibrils to interconnect them. The surfaces of the fibroblast-like cells are also connected to the nearest collagen fibrils through the rods. In place, strands with a thickness similar to that of the rods were seen self-assembled into irregular meshwork structures. The treatment of the tissue with 10% sodium hydroxide for up to 5 days removed most of these rods and strands, thus exposing a three-dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils that is often not fully visualized in untreated tissues. With histochemical staining of thinly sectioned tissues using Alcian blue, these rods and strands were positively stained, and thus they were demonstrated to be composed of proteoglycans. The ultrastructural arrangement of the periodontal ligament, observed in this study as a delicate interaction of collagen and proteoglycan components, is likely to play a significant role in the transmission of occlusal forces applied to the tissue and in the dissipation of mechanical shock.

  7. Quantitative second-harmonic generation microscopy in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, Patrick; Celliers, Peter M.; Reiser, Karen M.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    2003-09-01

    The second-harmonic signal in collagen, even in highly organized samples such as rat tail tendon fascicles, varies significantly with position. Previous studies suggest that this variability may be due to the parallel and antiparallel orientation of neighboring collagen fibrils. We applied high-resolution second-harmonic generation microscopy to confirm this hypothesis. Studies in which the focal spot diameter was varied from ~1 to ~6 μm strongly suggest that regions in which collagen fibrils have the same orientation in rat tail tendon are likely to be less than ~1 μm in diameter. These measurements required accurate determination of the focal spot size achieved by use of different microscope objectives; we developed a technique that uses second-harmonic generation in a quartz reference to measure the focal spot diameter directly. We also used the quartz reference to determine a lower limit (dXXX > 0.4 pm/V) for the magnitude of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility in collagen.

  8. Biomimetic composite scaffolds containing bioceramics and collagen/gelatin for bone tissue engineering - A mini review.

    PubMed

    Kuttappan, Shruthy; Mathew, Dennis; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-12-01

    Bone is a natural composite material consisting of an organic phase (collagen) and a mineral phase (calcium phosphate, especially hydroxyapatite). The strength of bone is attributed to the apatite, while the collagen fibrils are responsible for the toughness and visco-elasticity. The challenge in bone tissue engineering is to develop such biomimetic composite scaffolds, having a balance between biological and biomechanical properties. This review summarizes the current state of the field by outlining composite scaffolds made of gelatin/collagen in combination with bioactive ceramics for bone tissue engineering application.

  9. Collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons exhibit altered dynamic mechanical behaviour at multiple hierarchical scales

    PubMed Central

    Connizzo, Brianne K.; Han, Lin; Birk, David E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Tendons function using a unique set of mechanical properties governed by the extracellular matrix and its ability to respond to varied multi-axial loads. Reduction of collagen V expression, such as in classic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, results in altered fibril morphology and altered macroscale mechanical function in both clinical and animal studies, yet the mechanism by which changes at the fibril level lead to macroscale functional changes has not yet been investigated. This study addresses this by defining the multiscale mechanical response of wild-type, collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons. Tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and analysed for macroscale properties, as well as microscale (fibre re-alignment) and nanoscale (fibril deformation and sliding) responses. In many macroscale parameters, results showed a dose-dependent response with severely decreased properties in the null group. In addition, both heterozygous and null groups responded to load faster than in wild-type tendons via earlier fibre re-alignment and fibril stretch. However, the heterozygous group exhibited increased fibril sliding, while the null group exhibited no fibril sliding. These studies demonstrate that dynamic responses play an important role in determining overall function and that collagen V is a critical regulator in the development of these relationships. PMID:26855746

  10. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen organization for interpreting the second-order susceptibility tensors in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Tuer, Adam E; Akens, Margarete K; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C; Whyne, Cari M; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-11-21

    The second-order nonlinear polarization properties of fibrillar collagen in various rat tissues (vertebrae, tibia, tail tendon, dermis, and cornea) are investigated with polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy. Three parameters are extracted: the second-order susceptibility ratio, R = [Formula: see text] ; a measure of the fibril distribution asymmetry, |A|; and the weighted-average fibril orientation, <δ>. A hierarchical organizational model of fibrillar collagen is developed to interpret the second-harmonic generation polarization properties. Highlights of the model include: collagen type (e.g., type-I, type-II), fibril internal structure (e.g., straight, constant-tilt), and fibril architecture (e.g., parallel fibers, intertwined, lamellae). Quantifiable differences in internal structure and architecture of the fibrils are observed. Occurrence histograms of R and |A| distinguished parallel from nonparallel fibril distributions. Parallel distributions possessed low parameter values and variability, whereas nonparallel distributions displayed an increase in values and variability. From the P-SHG parameters of vertebrae tissue, a three-dimensional reconstruction of lamellae of intervertebral disk is presented.

  11. Collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons exhibit altered dynamic mechanical behaviour at multiple hierarchical scales.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Han, Lin; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-02-06

    Tendons function using a unique set of mechanical properties governed by the extracellular matrix and its ability to respond to varied multi-axial loads. Reduction of collagen V expression, such as in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, results in altered fibril morphology and altered macroscale mechanical function in both clinical and animal studies, yet the mechanism by which changes at the fibril level lead to macroscale functional changes has not yet been investigated. This study addresses this by defining the multiscale mechanical response of wild-type, collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons. Tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and analysed for macroscale properties, as well as microscale (fibre re-alignment) and nanoscale (fibril deformation and sliding) responses. In many macroscale parameters, results showed a dose-dependent response with severely decreased properties in the null group. In addition, both heterozygous and null groups responded to load faster than in wild-type tendons via earlier fibre re-alignment and fibril stretch. However, the heterozygous group exhibited increased fibril sliding, while the null group exhibited no fibril sliding. These studies demonstrate that dynamic responses play an important role in determining overall function and that collagen V is a critical regulator in the development of these relationships.

  12. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2 and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm-2, which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications.Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2

  13. Hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds with improved architecture and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Kane, Robert J; Weiss-Bilka, Holly E; Meagher, Matthew J; Liu, Yongxing; Gargac, Joshua A; Niebur, Glen L; Wagner, Diane R; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced collagen scaffolds have shown promise for synthetic bone graft substitutes and tissue engineering scaffolds. Freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds are readily fabricated and have exhibited osteogenicity in vivo, but are limited by an inherent scaffold architecture that results in a relatively small pore size and weak mechanical properties. In order to overcome these limitations, HA-collagen scaffolds were prepared by compression molding HA reinforcements and paraffin microspheres within a suspension of concentrated collagen fibrils (∼ 180 mg/mL), cross-linking the collagen matrix, and leaching the paraffin porogen. HA-collagen scaffolds exhibited an architecture with high porosity (85-90%), interconnected pores ∼ 300-400 μm in size, and struts ∼ 3-100 μm in thickness containing 0-80 vol% HA whisker or powder reinforcements. HA reinforcement enabled a compressive modulus of up to ∼ 1 MPa, which was an order of magnitude greater than unreinforced collagen scaffolds. The compressive modulus was also at least one order of magnitude greater than comparable freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds and two orders of magnitude greater than absorbable collagen sponges used clinically. Moreover, scaffolds reinforced with up to 60 vol% HA exhibited fully recoverable elastic deformation upon loading to 50% compressive strain for at least 100,000 cycles. Thus, the scaffold mechanical properties were well-suited for surgical handling, fixation, and bearing osteogenic loads during bone regeneration. The scaffold architecture, permeability, and composition were shown to be conducive to the infiltration and differentiation of adipose-derive stromal cells in vitro. Acellular scaffolds were demonstrated to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis after subcutaneous ectopic implantation by recruiting endogenous cell populations, suggesting that the scaffolds were osteoinductive.

  14. Atrial fibrillation and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M L; Martinez, C M; Gallagher, E J

    1999-01-01

    A young male bodybuilder, consuming large doses of anabolic steroids (AS), presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with symptomatic rapid atrial fibrillation (AF). Echocardiogram revealed significant septal hypokinesis, and posterior and septal wall thickness at the upper limit of normal for highly trained athletes. The atrial fibrillation had not recurred at 10 weeks after discontinuation of AS use. Consumption of these agents in athletes has been associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and sudden death.

  15. Structural basis for collagen recognition by the immune receptor OSCAR

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Long; Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Blaszczyk, Michal; Miller, Jeanette L. C.; Conrady, Deborah G.; Barrow, Alexander D.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is a collagen-binding immune receptor with important roles in dendritic cell maturation and activation of inflammatory monocytes as well as in osteoclastogenesis. The crystal structure of the OSCAR ectodomain is presented, both free and in complex with a consensus triple-helical peptide (THP). The structures revealed a collagen-binding site in each immunoglobulin-like domain (D1 and D2). The THP binds near a predicted collagen-binding groove in D1, but a more extensive interaction with D2 is facilitated by the unusually wide D1-D2 interdomain angle in OSCAR. Direct binding assays, combined with site-directed mutagenesis, confirm that the primary collagen-binding site in OSCAR resides in D2, in marked contrast to the related collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1). Monomeric OSCAR D1D2 binds to the consensus THP with a KD of 28 µM measured in solution, but shows a higher affinity (KD 1.5 μM) when binding to a solid-phase THP, most likely due to an avidity effect. These data suggest a 2-stage model for the interaction of OSCAR with a collagen fibril, with transient, low-affinity interactions initiated by the membrane-distal D1, followed by firm adhesion to the primary binding site in D2. PMID:26552697

  16. Collagen model peptides: Sequence dependence of triple-helix stability.

    PubMed

    Persikov, A V; Ramshaw, J A; Brodsky, B

    2000-01-01

    The triple helix is a specialized protein motif, found in all collagens as well as in noncollagenous proteins involved in host defense. Peptides will adopt a triple-helical conformation if the sequence contains its characteristic features of Gly as every third residue and a high content of Pro and Hyp residues. Such model peptides have proved amenable to structural studies by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, suitable for thermodynamic and kinetic analysis, and a valuable tool in characterizing the binding activities of the collagen triple helix. A systematic approach to understanding the amino acid sequence dependence of the collagen triple helix has been initiated, based on a set of host-guest peptides of the form, (Gly-Pro-Hyp)(3)-Gly-X-Y-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(4). Comparison of their thermal stabilities has led to a propensity scale for the X and Y positions, and the additivity of contributions of individual residues is now under investigation. The local and global stability of the collagen triple helix is normally modulated by the residues in the X and Y positions, with every third position occupied by Gly in fibril-forming collagens. However, in collagen diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta, a single Gly may be substituted by another residue. Host-guest studies where the Gly is replaced by various amino acids suggest that the identity of the residue in the Gly position affects the degree of destabilization and the clinical severity of the disease.

  17. Mechano-regulation of Collagen Biosynthesis in Periodontal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kaku, Masaru; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Periodontal ligament (PDL) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of periodontium such as tooth eruption and dissipation of masticatory force. The mechanical properties of PDL are mainly derived from fibrillar type I collagen, the most abundant extracellular component. Study selection The biosynthesis of type I collagen is a long, complex process including a number of intra- and extracellular post-translational modifications. The final modification step is the formation of covalent intra- and intermolecular cross-links that provide collagen fibrils with stability and connectivity. Results It is now clear that collagen post-translational modifications are regulated by groups of specific enzymes and associated molecules in a tissue-specific manner; and these modifications appear to change in response to mechanical force. Conclusions This review focuses on the effect of mechanical loading on collagen biosynthesis and fibrillogenesis in PDL with emphasis on the post-translational modifications of collagens, which is an important molecular aspect to understand in the field of prosthetic dentistry. PMID:25311991

  18. Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy in Collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, P C

    2002-09-30

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the body; several pathological conditions lead to changes in collagen. Among imaging modalities that can be used in vivo, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has a key advantage: it provides {approx}1 {micro}m resolution information about collagen structure as a function of depth. A new technique--polarization-modulated SHG--is presented: it permits simultaneous measurement of collagen orientation, of a lower bound on the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility tensor, and of the ratio of the two independent elements in this tensor. It is applied to characterizing SHG in collagen and to determining effects of biologically relevant changes in collagen structure. The magnitude of the second harmonic signal in two dimensional images varies with position even in structurally homogeneous tissue; this phenomenon is due to interference between second harmonic light generated by neighboring fibrils, which are randomly oriented parallel or anti-parallel to each other. Studies in which focal spot size was varied indicated that regions where fibrils are co-oriented are less than {approx}1.5 {micro}m in diameter. A quartz reference was used to determine the spot size as well as a lower limit (d{sub xxx} > 0.3 pm/V) for the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The ratio of the two independent tensor elements ranged between d{sub XYY}/d{sub XXX} = 0.60 and 0.75. SHG magnitude alone was not useful for identifying structural anomalies in collagenous tissue. Instead, changes in the polarization dependence of SHG were used to analyze biologically relevant perturbations in collagen structure. Changes in polarization dependence were observed in dehydrated samples, but not in highly crosslinked samples, despite significant alterations in packing structure. Complete thermal denaturation and collagenase digestion produced samples with no detectable SHG signal. Collagen orientation was measured in thin

  19. Oligomers modulate interfibril branching and mass transport properties of collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Catherine F; Brandner, Eric; Teo, Ka Yaw; Han, Bumsoo; Nauman, Eric; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L

    2013-10-01

    Mass transport within collagen-based matrices is critical to tissue development, repair, and pathogenesis, as well as the design of next-generation tissue engineering strategies. This work shows how collagen precursors, specified by intermolecular cross-link composition, provide independent control of collagen matrix mechanical and transport properties. Collagen matrices were prepared from tissue-extracted monomers or oligomers. Viscoelastic behavior was measured in oscillatory shear and unconfined compression. Matrix permeability and diffusivity were measured using gravity-driven permeametry and integrated optical imaging, respectively. Both collagen types showed an increase in stiffness and permeability hindrance with increasing collagen concentration (fibril density); however, different physical property–concentration relationships were noted. Diffusivity was not affected by concentration for either collagen type over the range tested. In general, oligomer matrices exhibited a substantial increase in stiffness and only a modest decrease in transport properties when compared with monomer matrices prepared at the same concentration. The observed differences in viscoelastic and transport properties were largely attributed to increased levels of interfibril branching within oligomer matrices. The ability to relate physical properties to relevant microstructure parameters, including fibril density and interfibril branching, is expected to advance the understanding of cell–matrix signaling, as well as facilitate model-based prediction and design of matrix-based therapeutic strategies.

  20. Collagen Fragmentation Promotes Oxidative Stress and Elevates Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Fibroblasts in Aged Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Gary J.; Quan, Taihao; Purohit, Trupta; Shao, Yuan; Cho, Moon Kyun; He, Tianyuan; Varani, James; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Aged human skin is fragile because of fragmentation and loss of type I collagen fibrils, which confer strength and resiliency. We report here that dermal fibroblasts express increased levels of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1) in aged (>80 years old) compared with young (21 to 30 years old) human skin in vivo. Transcription factor AP-1 and α2β1 integrin, which are key regulators of MMP-1 expression, are also elevated in fibroblasts in aged human skin in vivo. MMP-1 treatment of young skin in organ culture causes fragmentation of collagen fibrils and reduces fibroblast stretch, consistent with reduced mechanical tension, as observed in aged human skin. Limited fragmentation of three-dimensional collagen lattices with exogenous MMP-1 also reduces fibroblast stretch and mechanical tension. Furthermore, fibroblasts cultured in fragmented collagen lattices express elevated levels of MMP-1, AP-1, and α2β1 integrin. Importantly, culture in fragmented collagen raises intracellular oxidant levels and treatment with antioxidant MitoQ10 significantly reduces MMP-1 expression. These data identify positive feedback regulation that couples age-dependent MMP-1-catalyzed collagen fragmentation and oxidative stress. We propose that this self perpetuating cycle promotes human skin aging. These data extend the current understanding of the oxidative theory of aging beyond a cellular-centric view to include extracellular matrix and the critical role that connective tissue microenvironment plays in the biology of aging. PMID:19116368

  1. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  2. Nano-imaging collagen by atomic force, near-field and nonlinear microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ken Choong; Tang, Jinkai; Li, Hao; Ng, Boon Ping; Kok, Shaw Wei; Wang, Qijie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    As the most abundant protein in the human body, collagen has a very important role in vast numbers of bio-medical applications. The unique second order nonlinear properties of fibrillar collagen make it a very important index in nonlinear optical imaging based disease diagnosis of the brain, skin, liver, colon, kidney, bone, heart and other organs in the human body. The second-order nonlinear susceptibility of collagen has been explored at the macroscopic level and was explained as a volume-averaged molecular hyperpolarizability. However, details about the origin of optical second harmonic signals from collagen fibrils at the molecular level are still not clear. Such information is necessary for accurate interpolation of bio-information from nonlinear optical imaging techniques. The later has shown great potential in collagen based disease diagnosis methodologies. In this paper, we report our work using an atomic force microscope (AFM), near field (SNOM) and nonlinear laser scanning microscope (NLSM) to study the structure of collagen fibrils and other pro-collagen structures.

  3. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  4. Self-association of collagen triple helic peptides into higher order structures.

    PubMed

    Kar, Karunakar; Amin, Priyal; Bryan, Michael A; Persikov, Anton V; Mohs, Angela; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2006-11-03

    Interest in self-association of peptides and proteins is motivated by an interest in the mechanism of physiologically higher order assembly of proteins such as collagen as well as the mechanism of pathological aggregation such as beta-amyloid formation. The triple helical form of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10), a peptide that has proved a useful model for molecular features of collagen, was found to self-associate, and its association properties are reported here. Turbidity experiments indicate that the triple helical peptide self-assembles at neutral pH via a nucleation-growth mechanism, with a critical concentration near 1 mM. The associated form is more stable than individual molecules by about 25 degrees C, and the association is reversible. The rate of self-association increases with temperature, supporting an entropically favored process. After self-association, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10) forms branched filamentous structures, in contrast with the highly ordered axially periodic structure of collagen fibrils. Yet a number of characteristics of triple helix assembly for the peptide resemble those of collagen fibril formation. These include promotion of fibril formation by neutral pH and increasing temperature; inhibition by sugars; and a requirement for hydroxyproline. It is suggested that these similar features for peptide and collagen self-association are based on common lateral underlying interactions between triple helical molecules mediated by hydrogen-bonded hydration networks involving hydroxyproline.

  5. Effect of Collagen Nanotopography on Keloid Fibroblast Proliferation and Matrix Synthesis: Implications for Dermal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George

    2014-01-01

    Keloids are locally exuberant dermal scars characterized by excessive fibroblast proliferation and matrix accumulation. Although treatment strategies include surgical removal and intralesional steroid injections, an effective regimen is yet to be established due to a high rate of recurrence. The regressing center and growing margin of the keloid have different collagen architecture and also differ in the rate of proliferation. To investigate whether proliferation is responsive to collagen topography, keloid, scar, and dermal fibroblasts were cultured on nanopatterned scaffolds varying in collagen fibril diameter and alignment-small and large diameter, aligned and random fibrils, and compared to cells grown on flat collagen-coated substrates, respectively. Cell morphology, proliferation, and expression of six genes related to proliferation (cyclin D1), phenotype (α-smooth muscle actin), and matrix synthesis (collagens I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -2) were measured to evaluate cell response. Fibril alignment was shown to reduce proliferation and matrix synthesis in all three types of fibroblasts. Further, keloid cells were found to be most responsive to nanotopography. PMID:24724556

  6. ALTERATIONS IN STATE OF MOLECULAR AGGREGATION OF COLLAGEN INDUCED IN CHICK EMBRYOS BY β-AMINOPROPIONITRILE (LATHYRUS FACTOR)

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Charles I.; Gross, Jerome

    1959-01-01

    The lathyrogenic agents, β-aminopropionitrile and semicarbizide, when applied to the chorio-allantoic membrane of the chick embryo produced a dramatic increase in fragility of the embryo. This alteration was not associated with a change in the concentration of collagen, except in aorta, but was accompanied by a sharp increase in the amount of collagen extractible in cold 1 M NaCl from skin, bone, and aorta. Increase in fragility and extractible collagen began within 3 hours after introduction of the agent and rose steadily for at least 72 hours. Essentially no collagen could be extracted from tissues of normal chick embryos. Both fragility and amount of extractible collagen were dosage- and time-dependent. It is concluded that the extractible collagen in lathyrism consists of a large proportion of dissolved fibers previously insoluble and formed prior to administration of the agent. The data also suggest that the "lathyritic" collagen in vivo is not in molecular dispersion but in an aggregate or fibrillar form. It is dispersed by cooling. The extracted collagen could be reconstituted to typical striated fibrils in vitro and the molecule appeared to be normal in the gross, with regard to asymmetry ratio and intramolecular helical structure. The evidence at hand suggests that at least one of the defects induced by lathyrogenic agents is an interference with the normal intermolecular cross-linking within the collagen fibril. PMID:14416144

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of collagen type XI alpha1 and alpha2 chains in human colon tissue.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Kara B; Reimers, Aaron P; Luman, Sarah; Kronz, Joseph D; Fyffe, William E; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2008-03-01

    In previous studies, collagen XI mRNA has been detected in colon cancer, but its location in human colon tissue has not been determined. The heterotrimeric collagen XI consists of three alpha chains. While it is known that collagen XI plays a regulatory role in collagen fibril formation, its function in the colon is unknown. The characterization of normal human colon tissue will allow a better understanding of the variance of collagen XI in abnormal tissues. Grossly normal and malignant human colon tissue was obtained from pathology archives. Immunohistochemical staining with a 58K Golgi marker and alpha1(XI) and alpha2(XI) antisera was used to specifically locate their presence in normal colon tissue. A comparative bright field microscopic analysis showed the presence of collagen XI in human colon. The juxtanuclear, dot-like collagen XI staining in the Golgi apparatus of goblet cells in normal tissue paralleled the staining of the 58K Golgi marker. Ultra light microscopy verified these results. Staining was also confirmed in malignant colon tissue. This study is the first to show that collagen XI is present in the Golgi apparatus of normal human colon goblet cells and localizes collagen XI in both normal and malignant tissue. Although the function of collagen XI in the colon is unknown, our immunohistochemical characterization provides the foundation for future immunohistopathology studies of the colon.

  8. Discoidin domain receptor 2 regulates the adhesion of fibroblasts to 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Min, Na Young; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2013-05-01

    The collagen matrix constitutes the primary extracellular matrix (ECM) portion of mammalian connective tissues in which the interaction of the cell and the surrounding collagen fibers has a significant impact on cell and tissue physiology, including morphogenesis, development and motility. Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) have been identified as the receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated upon collagen binding. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of DDRs on the mechanical interaction between fibroblasts and ECM. In this study, we demonstrated that one of the major phosphotyrosine proteins in human fibroblasts during 3D collagen matrix polymerization is DDR2. Treatment of fibroblasts in 3D collagen matrices with platelet-derived growth factor (PDFG) has been shown to increase DDR2 phosphorylation. Silencing of DDR2 with siRNA in fibroblasts significantly reduced the number of dendritic extensions regardless of whether cells were cultured in the collagen or fibronectin 3D matrices. Decreasing dendritic extensions in DDR2-silenced cells has also been shown to decrease the ability of fibroblast entanglement to collagen fibrils in 3D collagen matrices. Finally, we also showed that the silencing of DDR2 decreased the cell migration in 3D nested collagen matrices but had no effect on 3D floating matrix contraction. Collectively, these results suggest that DDR2 functioning is required for the membrane dynamics to control the mechanical attachment of fibroblasts to the 3D collagen matrices in an integrin-independent manner.

  9. Assessment of the biocompatibility and stability of a gold nanoparticle collagen bioscaffold.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sheila A; Spradling, Claire S; Grant, Daniel N; Fox, Derek B; Jimenez, Luis; Grant, David A; Rone, Rebecca J

    2014-02-01

    Collagen has been utilized as a scaffold for tissue engineering applications due to its many advantageous properties. However, collagen in its purified state is mechanically weak and prone to rapid degradation. To mitigate these effects, collagen can be crosslinked. Although enhanced mechanical properties and stability can be achieved by crosslinking, collagen can be rendered less biocompatible either due to changes in the overall microstructure or due to the cytotoxicity of the crosslinkers. We have investigated crosslinking collagen using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to enhance mechanical properties and resistance to degradation while also maintaining its natural microstructure and biocompatibility. Rat tail type I collagen was crosslinked with AuNPs using a zero-length crosslinker, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Several characterization studies were performed including electron microscopy, collagenase assays, ROS assays, and biocompatibility assays. The results demonstrated that AuNP-collagen scaffolds had increased resistance to degradation as compared to non-AuNP-collagen while still maintaining an open microstructure. Although the biocompatibility assays showed that the collagen and AuNP-collagen scaffolds are biocompatible, the AuNP-collagen demonstrated enhanced cellularity and glycoaminoglycans (GAG) production over the collagen scaffolds. Additionally, the Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assays indicated the ability of the AuNP-collagen to reduce oxidation. Overall, the AuNP-collagen scaffolds demonstrated enhanced biocompatibility and stability over non-AuNP scaffolds.

  10. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  11. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications.

  12. Early stiffening and softening of collagen: interplay of deformation mechanisms in biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Wong, Long Hui; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2012-03-12

    Collagen networks, the main structural/mechanical elements in biological tissues, increasingly serve as biomimetic scaffolds for cell behavioral studies, assays, and tissue engineering, and yet their full spectrum of nonlinear behavior remains unclear. Here, with self-assembled type-I collagen as model, we use metrics beyond those in standard single-harmonic analysis of rheological measurements to reveal strain-softening and strain-stiffening of collagen networks both in instantaneous responses and at steady state. The results show how different deformation mechanisms, such as deformation-induced increase in the elastically active fibrils, nonlinear extension of individual fibrils, and slips in the physical cross-links in the network, can lead to the observed complex nonlinearity. We demonstrate how comprehensive rheological analyses can uncover the rich mechanical properties of biopolymer networks, including the above-mentioned softening as well as an early strain-stiffening, which are important for understanding physiological response of biological materials to mechanical loading.

  13. Interaction study of collagen and sericin in blending solution.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Yuan, Jingjie; Yang, Xiao; Cheng, Xinjian; Li, Jiao

    2016-12-01

    The interactions of collagen and sericin were studied by fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, FTIR spectra and dynamic light scattering. The fluorescence quenching in emission spectra and red-shift (283-330nm) in synchronous fluorescence spectra suggested the Tyr of collagen and sericin overlapped with a distance of 3Å, generating excimer. The overlapped Tyr of collagen and sericin decreased the hydrophobicity of collagen, which resulted in the red-shifts (233-240nm) in ultraviolet spectra. Moreover, the red-shifts of amide bands of collagen in FTIR spectra indicated the hydrogen bonds of collagen were weaken and it could also be explained by the overlapped Tyr. The results of 2D-FTIR spectra demonstrated the backbone of collagen molecule was varied and the most susceptible structure of collagen was the triple helix with the presence of sericin. Based on dynamic light scattering, we conjectured large pure collagen aggregates were replaced by hybrid aggregates of collagen and sericin particles after the addition of sericin. With ascending sericin ratio, the diameters of the hybrid aggregates increased and attained maximum with 60% ratio of sericin, which were on account of the increasing excimer number. The results of DSC demonstrated the presence of sericin enhanced the thermal stability of collagen.

  14. Interactions between collagen IX and biglycan measured by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-H.; Yeh, M.-L.; Geyer, Mark; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Huang, M.-H.; Heggeness, Michael H.; Hoeoek, Magnus; Luo, Z.-P. . E-mail: luo@bcm.tmc.edu

    2006-01-06

    The stability of the lattice-like type II collagen architecture of articular cartilage is paramount to its optimal function. Such stability not only depends on the rigidity of collagen fibrils themselves, but more importantly, on their interconnections. One known interconnection is through type IX and biglycan molecules. However, the mechanical properties of this interaction and its role in the overall stability remain unrevealed. Using atomic force microscopy, this study directly measured the mechanical strength (or the rupture force) of a single bond between collagen IX and biglycan. The results demonstrated that the rupture force of this single bond was 15 pN, which was significantly smaller than those of other known molecule interactions to date. This result suggested that type IX collagen and biglycan interaction may be the weak link in the cartilage collagen architecture, vulnerable to abnormal joint force and associated with disorders such as osteoarthritis.

  15. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure: is atrial fibrillation a disease?

    PubMed

    Tilman, V

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation in heart failure often occur together. The relationship between atrial fibrillation and heart failure has remained a subject of research. The main manifestation of the violation of hydrodynamics in heart failure is the increased end-diastolic pressure, which is transmitted through the intercommunicated system (left ventricle-left atrium-pulmonary veins-alveolar capillaries) causing increased pulmonary wedge pressure with the danger for pulmonary edema. End-diastolic pressure is the sum of left ventricle diastolic pressure and left atrial systolic pressure. Stopping the mechanical systole of the left atrium can reduce the pressure in the system in heart failure. Atrial fibrillation stops the mechanical systole of the left atrium and decreases the intercommunicating pressur