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Sample records for enhances collagen fibril

  1. Collagen fibrils: nanoscale ropes.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become "accepted" wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition-that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application-from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits.

  2. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  3. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel. PMID:28787971

  4. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-02-16

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  5. Nanoscale scraping and dissection of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M P E; Horton, M A; Mesquida, P

    2008-09-24

    The main function of collagen is mechanical, hence there is a fundamental scientific interest in experimentally investigating the mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils on the nanometre scale. Here, we present a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based scraping technique that can dissect the outer layer of a biological specimen. Applied to individual collagen fibrils, the technique was successfully used to expose the fibril core and reveal the presence of a D-banding-like structure. AFM nanoindentation measurements of fibril shell and core indicated no significant differences in mechanical properties such as stiffness (reduced modulus), hardness, adhesion and adhesion work. This suggests that collagen fibrils are mechanically homogeneous structures. The scraping technique can be applied to other biological specimens, as demonstrated on the example of bacteria.

  6. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  7. [Fibril formation in solutions of solubilized collagen].

    PubMed

    Istranov, L P; Belova, L A; Shekhter, A B; Sychenikov, I A

    1975-01-01

    Influence of the preparations of bacterial proteinases, protorisine and prototerrisine, was studied on the stability of the mature collagen of beef skin. The chemical composition of the tissue has been shown to be changed by these enzymes inconsiderably. The tissue treated by orisine and terrisine is completely dissolved in 0.5 M acetic acid (solubilized collagen). When the solutions of such collagen are heated to 37 degrees within the pH range from 4 to 10 at the ionic strength of 0.25 fibrils are formed. Under electron microscope fibres are cross-striated that is typical of native collagen fibres with periodicity of about 640 A. After chilling to 4 degrees, a part of fibrils is dissolved again. Nephlometry was used to study the rate of fibril formation as a function of pH and temperature values. A conclusion has been drawn that the mature collagne dissolved after incubation with bacterial proteinases is close to the acid-soluble collagen fraction in the ability to produce fibres upon heating.

  8. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  9. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  10. Elastic Response of Crimped Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils have a three-dimensional structure at the micrometer scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this waveform allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendineae

  11. Collagen fibril arrangement and size distribution in monkey oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen fibre organisation and fibril size were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in distribution, shape and size. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498

  12. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  13. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-06-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson's trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM.

  14. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R.; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P.; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E.; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson’s trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM. PMID:27329311

  15. Thermal Memory in Self-Assembled Collagen Fibril Networks

    PubMed Central

    de Wild, Martijn; Pomp, Wim; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen fibrils form extracellular networks that regulate cell functions and provide mechanical strength to tissues. Collagen fibrillogenesis is an entropy-driven process promoted by warming and reversed by cooling. Here, we investigate the influence of noncovalent interactions mediated by the collagen triple helix on fibril stability. We measure the kinetics of cold-induced disassembly of fibrils formed from purified collagen I using turbimetry, probe the fibril morphology by atomic force microscopy, and measure the network connectivity by confocal microscopy and rheometry. We demonstrate that collagen fibrils disassemble by subunit release from their sides as well as their ends, with complex kinetics involving an initial fast release followed by a slow release. Surprisingly, the fibrils are gradually stabilized over time, leading to thermal memory. This dynamic stabilization may reflect structural plasticity of the collagen fibrils arising from their complex structure. In addition, we propose that the polymeric nature of collagen monomers may lead to slow kinetics of subunit desorption from the fibril surface. Dynamic stabilization of fibrils may be relevant in the initial stages of collagen assembly during embryogenesis, fibrosis, and wound healing. Moreover, our results are relevant for tissue repair and drug delivery applications, where it is crucial to control fibril stability. PMID:23823240

  16. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  17. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  18. Glassy state of native collagen fibril?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkian, S. G.; Allahverdyan, A. E.; Gevorgyan, D. S.; Hu, C.-K.

    2011-07-01

    Our micromechanical experiments show that viscoelastic features of type-I collagen fibril at physiological temperatures display essential dependence on the frequency and speed of heating. For temperatures of 20-30 °C the internal friction has a sharp maximum for a frequency less than 2 kHz. Upon heating the internal friction displays a peak at a temperature Tsoft(v) that essentially depends on the speed of heating v: Tsoft≈70°C for v=1°C/min, and Tsoft≈25°C for v=0.1°C/min. At the same temperature Tsoft(v) Young's modulus passes through a minimum. All these effects are specific for the native state of the fibril and disappear after heat-denaturation. Taken together with the known facts that the fibril is axially ordered as quasicrystal, but disordered laterally, we interpret our findings as indications of a glassy state, where Tsoft is the softening transition.

  19. Mechanical properties of a collagen fibril under simulated degradation.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, David C; Szleifer, Igal; Dhaher, Yasin

    2017-11-01

    Collagen fibrils are a very important component in most of the connective tissue in humans. An important process associated with several physiological and pathological states is the degradation of collagen. Collagen degradation is usually mediated by enzymatic and non-enzymatic processes. In this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of simulated degradation on the mechanical properties of the collagen fibril. We applied tensile stress to the collagen fiber at different stages of degradation. We compared the difference in the fibril mechanical priorities due the removal of enzymatic crosslink, surface degradation and volumetric degradation. As anticipated, our results indicated that, regardless of the degradation scenario, fibril mechanical properties is reduced. The type of degradation mechanism (crosslink, surface or volumetric) expressed differential effect on the change in the fibril stiffness. Our simulation results showed dramatic change in the fibril stiffness with a small amount of degradation. This suggests that the hierarchical structure of the fibril is a key component for the toughness and is very sensitive to changes in the organization of the fibril. The overall results are intended to provide a theoretical framework for the understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen fibrils under degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress-strain experiments on individual collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei L; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J

    2008-10-01

    Collagen, a molecule consisting of three braided protein helices, is the primary building block of many biological tissues including bone, tendon, cartilage, and skin. Staggered arrays of collagen molecules form fibrils, which arrange into higher-ordered structures such as fibers and fascicles. Because collagen plays a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of these tissues, significant theoretical research is directed toward developing models of the stiffness, strength, and toughness of collagen molecules and fibrils. Experimental data to guide the development of these models, however, are sparse and limited to small strain response. Using a microelectromechanical systems platform to test partially hydrated collagen fibrils under uniaxial tension, we obtained quantitative, reproducible mechanical measurements of the stress-strain curve of type I collagen fibrils, with diameters ranging from 150-470 nm. The fibrils showed a small strain (epsilon < 0.09) modulus of 0.86 +/- 0.45 GPa. Fibrils tested to strains as high as 100% demonstrated strain softening (sigma(yield) = 0.22 +/- 0.14 GPa; epsilon(yield) = 0.21 +/- 0.13) and strain hardening, time-dependent recoverable residual strain, dehydration-induced embrittlement, and susceptibility to cyclic fatigue. The results suggest that the stress-strain behavior of collagen fibrils is dictated by global characteristic dimensions as well as internal structure.

  1. Deformation micromechanisms of collagen fibrils under uniaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuye; Ballarini, Roberto; Buehler, Markus J; Eppell, Steven J

    2010-05-06

    Collagen, an essential building block of connective tissues, possesses useful mechanical properties due to its hierarchical structure. However, little is known about the mechanical properties of collagen fibril, an intermediate structure between the collagen molecule and connective tissue. Here, we report the results of systematic molecular dynamics simulations to probe the mechanical response of initially unflawed finite size collagen fibrils subjected to uniaxial tension. The observed deformation mechanisms, associated with rupture and sliding of tropocollagen molecules, are strongly influenced by fibril length, width and cross-linking density. Fibrils containing more than approximately 10 molecules along their length and across their width behave as representative volume elements and exhibit brittle fracture. Shorter fibrils experience a more graceful ductile-like failure. An analytical model is constructed and the results of the molecular modelling are used to find curve-fitted expressions for yield stress, yield strain and fracture strain as functions of fibril structural parameters. Our results for the first time elucidate the size dependence of mechanical failure properties of collagen fibrils. The associated molecular deformation mechanisms allow the full power of traditional material and structural engineering theory to be applied to our understanding of the normal and pathological mechanical behaviours of collagenous tissues under load.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Single Collagen Fibrils Revealed by Force Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John; Phillips, Charlotte; Grandbois, Michel

    2004-03-01

    In the field of biomechanics, collagen fibrils are believed to be robust mechanical structures characterized by a low extensibility. Until very recently, information on the mechanical properties of collagen fibrils could only be derived from ensemble measurements performed on complete tissues such as bone, skin and tendon. Here we measure force-elongation/relaxation profiles of single collagen fibrils using atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy. The elongation profiles indicate that in vitro assembled heterotrimeric type I collagen fibrils are characterized by a large extensibility. Numerous discontinuities and a plateau in the force profile indicate major reorganization occurs within the fibrils in the 1.5 -- 4.5 nN range. Our study demonstrates that newly assembled collagen fibrils are robust structures with a significant reserve of elasticity that could play a determinant role in cellular motion in the context of tissue growth and morphogenesis. In contrast, homotrimeric collagen fibrils corresponding to osteogenesis imperfecta pathology exhibit a marked difference in their elasticity profile.

  3. Molecular packing in bone collagen fibrils prior to mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Benjamin; Zhou, Hong-Wen; Burger, Christian; Chu, Benjamin; Glimcher, Melvin J.

    2012-02-01

    The three-dimensional packing of collagen molecules in bone collagen fibrils has been largely unknown because even in moderately mineralized bone tissues, the organic matrix structure is severely perturbed by the deposition of mineral crystals. During the past decades, the structure of tendon collagen (e.g. rat tail) --- a tissue that cannot mineralize in vivo, has been assumed to be representative for bone collagen fibrils. Small-angle X-ray diffraction analysis of the native, uncalcified intramuscular fish bone has revealed a new molecular packing scheme, significantly different from the quasi-hexagonal arrangement often found in tendons. The deduced structure in bone collagen fibrils indicates the presence of spatially discrete microfibrils, and an arrangement of intrafibrillar space to form ``channels'', which could accommodate crystals with dimensions typically found in bone apatite.

  4. Effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on collagen fibril formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cuicui; Zhang, Min; Tian, Huilin; Li, Guoying

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were mixed to obtain blends and the effect of HPMC on collagen self-assembly was studied. As deduced from atomic force microscopy (AFM), the amount of nuclei in collagen-HPMC solutions was changed with the addition of HPMC. Under physiological conditions, the kinetics curves of fibril formation showed that the turbidity of blends at 313 nm was higher than that of native collagen. More HPMC was involved in the hydrogel network for blends with higher HPMC/collagen. However, both the thermal stability and the storage moduli of hydrogels, which was evaluated by UV and rheological measurements respectively, reached the maximum just when HPMC/collagen=0.25. Furthermore, it was showed by AFM that denser fibrils with smaller diameter would be obtained as HPMC/collagen<0.25, while more addition of HPMC (HPMC/collagen>0.25) would bring about fibrils with larger diameter. However, HPMC did not significantly affect the characteristic D-periods of the fibrils for all blends.

  5. Stabilization and Anomalous Hydration of Collagen Fibril under Heating

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Sasun G.; Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Gevorgyan, David S.; Simonian, Aleksandr L.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Background Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones) and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. Methodology/Principal Finding When heating a native fibril sample, its Young’s modulus decreases in temperature range 20–58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58–75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58–75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. Conclusion/Significance We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen. PMID:24244320

  6. Collagen fibril formation in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Dombi, G W; Halsall, H B

    1985-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used to weaken both the electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions during collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro. The rate and extent of fibril formation as well as fibril morphology were affected by SDS concentration. Both the formation of large fibrils at 0.3 mM-SDS and the complete cessation of fibril formation at 0.5 mM-SDS were considered to be the result of SDS-induced conformational changes in the non-helical telopeptides. A possible mechanism of SDS interaction with the N-terminal and the distal region of the C-terminal telopeptides is offered. Images Fig. 5. PMID:4026797

  7. Evidence of structurally continuous collagen fibrils in tendons.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Rene B; Herchenhan, Andreas; Starborg, Tobias; Larsen, Michael; Kadler, Karl E; Qvortrup, Klaus; Magnusson, S Peter

    2017-03-01

    Tendons transmit muscle-generated force through an extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils. The force applied by the muscle at one end of a microscopic fibril has to be transmitted through the macroscopic length of the tendon by mechanisms that are poorly understood. A key element in this structure-function relationship is the collagen fibril length. During embryogenesis short fibrils are produced but they grow rapidly with maturation. There is some controversy regarding fibril length in adult tendon, with mechanical data generally supporting discontinuity while structural investigations favor continuity. This study initially set out to trace the full length of individual fibrils in adult human tendons, using serial block face-scanning electron microscopy. But even with this advanced technique the required length could not be covered. Instead a statistical approach was used on a large volume of fibrils in shorter image stacks. Only a single end was observed after tracking 67.5mm of combined fibril lengths, in support of fibril continuity. To shed more light on this observation, the full length of a short tendon (mouse stapedius, 125μm) was investigated and continuity of individual fibrils was confirmed. In light of these results, possible mechanisms that could reconcile the opposing findings on fibril continuity are discussed. Connective tissues hold all parts of the body together and are mostly constructed from thin threads of the protein collagen (called fibrils). Connective tissues provide mechanical strength and one of the most demanding tissues in this regard are tendons, which transmit the forces generated by muscles. The length of the collagen fibrils is essential to the mechanical strength and to the type of damage the tissue may experience (slippage of short fibrils or breakage of longer ones). This in turn is important for understanding the repair processes after such damage occurs. Currently the issue of fibril length is contentious, but this

  8. Does the genetic type of collagen determine fibril structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenberry, E.; Brodsky, B.; Cassidy, K.

    1980-10-01

    A number of genetic types of collagen, all triple-helical but with significant variations in their amino acid sequences, have been found and the distribution of these genetic types is tissue specific. For example, tendon is composed only of type I collagen, while cartilage contains largely type II collagen. Skin contains a large amount of type I, but has a significant fraction, approx. 15%, of type III. Each of these types can form fibrils, but it is not known whether they form distinctive fibril structures that are important in determining tissue organization. We are using x-ray diffraction to analyze a variety of tissues with different collagen genetic types to compare the fibril structures and thus investigate whether genetic type is an important determinant of this structure.

  9. Graded arrangement of collagen fibrils in the equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Imamura, Yasutada; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Ueda, Hiromi; Takehana, Kazushige

    2007-01-01

    By using ultramorphological and biochemical methods, we analyzed the regional differences between the three parts of the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), namely, the myotendinous junction (MTJ), middle metacarpal (mM), and osteotendinous junction (OTJ). Cross-sectional images showed unique distributions of collagen fibrils of varying diameters in each region. Small collagen fibrils (diameter <100 nm) were distributed predominantly in the MTJ region, and the OTJ region was relatively rich in large collagen fibrils (diameter >200 nm). In the mM region, the collagen fibrils were intermediately distributed between the MTJ and OTJ. The results indicate a graded arrangement of collagen fibrils in the tendon. Type V collagen was detected preferentially in the MTJ region. Since type V collagen is believed to be one of the collagens regulating collagen fibril formation, its possible functionality in the MTJ region in terms of fibril formation and fibril arrangement in the tendon has been discussed here.

  10. Nanomechanical mapping of hydrated rat tail tendon collagen I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Quigley, Andrew S; Clegg, Charlotte; Kreplak, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Collagen fibrils play an important role in the human body, providing tensile strength to connective tissues. These fibrils are characterized by a banding pattern with a D-period of 67 nm. The proposed origin of the D-period is the internal staggering of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril, leading to gap and overlap regions and a corresponding periodic density fluctuation. Using an atomic force microscope high-resolution modulus maps of collagen fibril segments, up to 80 μm in length, were acquired at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s. The maps revealed a periodic modulation corresponding to the D-period as well as previously undocumented micrometer scale fluctuations. Further analysis revealed a 4/5, gap/overlap, ratio in the measured modulus providing further support for the quarter-staggered model of collagen fibril axial structure. The modulus values obtained at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s are significantly larger than those previously reported. Probing the effect of indentation speed over four decades reveals two distinct logarithmic regimes of the measured modulus and point to the existence of a characteristic molecular relaxation time around 0.1 ms. Furthermore, collagen fibrils exposed to temperatures between 50 and 62°C and cooled back to room temperature show a sharp decrease in modulus and a sharp increase in fibril diameter. This is also associated with a disappearance of the D-period and the appearance of twisted subfibrils with a pitch in the micrometer range. Based on all these data and a similar behavior observed for cross-linked polymer networks below the glass transition temperature, we propose that collagen I fibrils may be in a glassy state while hydrated.

  11. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  12. Molecular mechanics of mineralized collagen fibrils in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Arun K.; Gautieri, Alfonso; Chang, Shu-Wei; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-04-01

    Bone is a natural composite of collagen protein and the mineral hydroxyapatite. The structure of bone is known to be important to its load-bearing characteristics, but relatively little is known about this structure or the mechanism that govern deformation at the molecular scale. Here we perform full-atomistic calculations of the three-dimensional molecular structure of a mineralized collagen protein matrix to try to better understand its mechanical characteristics under tensile loading at various mineral densities. We find that as the mineral density increases, the tensile modulus of the network increases monotonically and well beyond that of pure collagen fibrils. Our results suggest that the mineral crystals within this network bears up to four times the stress of the collagen fibrils, whereas the collagen is predominantly responsible for the material’s deformation response. These findings reveal the mechanism by which bone is able to achieve superior energy dissipation and fracture resistance characteristics beyond its individual constituents.

  13. Molecular mechanics of mineralized collagen fibrils in bone

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Arun K.; Gautieri, Alfonso; Chang, Shu-Wei; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a natural composite of collagen protein and the mineral hydroxyapatite. The structure of bone is known to be important to its load-bearing characteristics, but relatively little is known about this structure or the mechanism that govern deformation at the molecular scale. Here we perform full-atomistic calculations of the three-dimensional molecular structure of a mineralized collagen protein matrix to try to better understand its mechanical characteristics under tensile loading at various mineral densities. We find that as the mineral density increases, the tensile modulus of the network increases monotonically and well beyond that of pure collagen fibrils. Our results suggest that the mineral crystals within this network bears up to four times the stress of the collagen fibrils, whereas the collagen is predominantly responsible for the material’s deformation response. These findings reveal the mechanism by which bone is able to achieve superior energy dissipation and fracture resistance characteristics beyond its individual constituents. PMID:23591891

  14. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  15. Bending rigidity of type I collagen homotrimer fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sejin; Leikin, Sergey; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Normal type I collagen is an α1(I)2α2(I) heterotrimeric triple helix, but α1(I)3 homotrimers are also found in fetal tissues and various pathological conditions, e.g., causing bone fragility and reducing tendon tensile strength. It remains unclear whether homotrimers alter mechanical properties of individual fibrils or affect tissues by altering their organization at a higher level. To address this question, we investigated how homotrimers affect fibril bending rigidity. Homotrimer fibrils have been shown to be more loosely packed so that we expected them to be more susceptible to bending. However, homotrimer fibrils were more rigid despite being thinner and more hydrated. To quantify fibril rigidity, we analyzed their shape by Fourier decomposition, determined the correlation function for the direction along each fibril, and calculated the distribution of local fibril curvature. The estimated persistence length of homotrimer fibrils was 3 ˜ 10 times longer than for heterotrimer fibrils, indicating much higher bending rigidity of homotrimer fibrils.

  16. Mechanical model for a collagen fibril pair in extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue; Cox, Grant M; Haverkamp, Richard G; Hill, James M

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we model the mechanics of a collagen pair in the connective tissue extracellular matrix that exists in abundance throughout animals, including the human body. This connective tissue comprises repeated units of two main structures, namely collagens as well as axial, parallel and regular anionic glycosaminoglycan between collagens. The collagen fibril can be modeled by Hooke's law whereas anionic glycosaminoglycan behaves more like a rubber-band rod and as such can be better modeled by the worm-like chain model. While both computer simulations and continuum mechanics models have been investigated for the behavior of this connective tissue typically, authors either assume a simple form of the molecular potential energy or entirely ignore the microscopic structure of the connective tissue. Here, we apply basic physical methodologies and simple applied mathematical modeling techniques to describe the collagen pair quantitatively. We found that the growth of fibrils was intimately related to the maximum length of the anionic glycosaminoglycan and the relative displacement of two adjacent fibrils, which in return was closely related to the effectiveness of anionic glycosaminoglycan in transmitting forces between fibrils. These reveal the importance of the anionic glycosaminoglycan in maintaining the structural shape of the connective tissue extracellular matrix and eventually the shape modulus of human tissues. We also found that some macroscopic properties, like the maximum molecular energy and the breaking fraction of the collagen, were also related to the microscopic characteristics of the anionic glycosaminoglycan.

  17. Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hwa Shik; Shin, Tae Joo

    2009-11-01

    Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber and its distribution in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major, were investigated. By virtue of Zernike phase-contrast hard X-ray microscopy, it has been firstly observed that collagen fiber consists of helical substructures of collagen fibrils wrapped with incrustation. As it close to the scalar focus (that is, with aging), loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies started to be observed with loosing wrapping incrustation, indicative of the distortion of the basic helical assembly. Various distributions and packing arrangements of collagen fibers were observed dependent on subdivisions of fish scale. Freshly growing edge region of fish scale, embedded into fish skin, showed rarely patched and one directionally arranged collagen fibers, in which specifically triple helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were found. On the contrary, relatively aged region of the rostral field close to the scalar focus displayed randomly directed and densely packed collagen fibers, in which loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were mostly found. Our results have demonstrated that hard X-ray microscope can be a powerful tool to study in situ internal structure of biological specimens in an atmospheric pressure.

  18. Piezoelectricity in collagen type II fibrils measured by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, D.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Hsu, T.; Habelitz, S.; Fertala, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    The converse piezoelectric effect in collagen type II fibrils, the main collagen constituent in cartilage, was investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy. The fibrils exhibited shear piezoelectric behavior similar to that previously reported in collagen type I fibrils and followed the same cantilever-fibril angle dependence present for type I. A uniform polarization directed from the amine to carboxyl termini, as seen for collagen type I, was observed in all type II fibrils studied. The shear piezoelectric coefficient, d15, however, for type II was roughly 28-32% of the value measured for type I fibrils. Possible explanations for the reduced piezoelectric coefficient of type II collagen are provided.

  19. Mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibrils as influenced by demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Balooch, M.; Habelitz, S.; Kinney, J. H.; Marshall, S. J.; Marshall, G. W.

    2009-01-01

    Dentin and bone derive their mechanical properties from a complex arrangement of collagen type I fibrils reinforced with nanocrystaline apatite mineral in extra- and intrafibrillar compartments. While mechanical properties have been determined for the bulk of the mineralized tissue, information on the mechanics of the individual fibril is limited. Here, atomic force microscopy was used on individual collagen fibrils to study structural and mechanical changes during acid etching. The characteristic 67 nm periodicity of gap-zones was not observed on the mineralized fibril, but became apparent and increasingly pronounced with continuous demineralization. AFM-nanoindentation showed a decrease in modulus from 1.5 GPa to 50 MPa during acid etching of individual collagen fibrils and revealed that the modulus profile followed the axial periodicity. The nanomechanical data, Raman spectroscopy and SAXS support the hypothesis that intrafibrillar mineral etches at a substantially slower rate than the extrafibrillar mineral. These findings are relevant for understanding the biomechanics and design principles of calcified tissues derived from collagen matrices. PMID:18467127

  20. Mechanical Properties of Mineralized Collagen Fibrils As Influenced By Demineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Balooch, M.; Habelitz, S.; Kinney, J.H.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-05-11

    Dentin and bone derive their mechanical properties from a complex arrangement of collagen type-I fibrils reinforced with nanocrystalline apatite mineral in extra- and intrafibrillar compartments. While mechanical properties have been determined for the bulk of the mineralized tissue, information on the mechanics of the individual fibril is limited. Here, atomic force microscopy was used on individual collagen fibrils to study structural and mechanical changes during acid etching. The characteristic 67 nm periodicity of gap zones was not observed on the mineralized fibril, but became apparent and increasingly pronounced with continuous demineralization. AFM-nanoindentation showed a decrease in modulus from 1.5 GPa to 50 MPa during acid etching of individual collagen fibrils and revealed that the modulus profile followed the axial periodicity. The nanomechanical data, Raman spectroscopy and SAXS support the hypothesis that intrafibrillar mineral etches at a substantially slower rate than the extrafibrillar mineral. These findings are relevant for understanding the biomechanics and design principles of calcified tissues derived from collagen matrices.

  1. Papain-gel degrades intact nonmineralized type I collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Bertassoni, L E; Marshall, G W

    2009-01-01

    Papain-gel has been utilized as a chemo-mechanical material for caries removal due to its ability to preserve underlying sound dentin. However, little is known about the effect of the papain enzyme on intact type I collagen fibrils that compose the dentin matrix. Here we sought to define structural changes that occur in intact type I collagen fibrils after an enzymatic treatment with a papain-gel. Intact and nonmineralized type I collagen fibrils from rat tail were obtained and treated with a papain-gel (Papacarie) for 30 s, rinsed with water and imaged using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, polished healthy dentin specimens were also treated using the same protocol described above and had their elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) measured by means of AFM-based nanoindentation. AFM images showed that the papain-gel induced partial degradation of the fibrils surface, yet no rupture of fibrils was noticed. The distinction between gap and overlap zones of fibrils vanished in most regions after treatment, and overlap zones appeared to be generally more affected. Mechanical data suggested a gradual decrease in E and H after treatments. A significant two-fold drop from the values of normal dentin (E=20+/-1.9, H=0.8+/-0.08 GPa) was found after four applications (E=9.7+/-3.2, H=0.24+/-0.1 GPa) (P<0.001), which may be attributed to the degradation of proteoglycans of the matrix. In summary, this study provided novel evidence that intact nonmineralized type I collagen fibrils are partially degraded by a papain-gel. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Papain-gel Degrades Intact Nonmineralized Type I Collagen Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    BERTASSONI, L. E.; MARSHALL, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Papain-gel has been utilized as a chemomechanical material for caries removal due to its ability to preserve underlying sound dentin. However, little is known about the effect of the papain enzyme on intact type I collagen fibrils that compose the dentin matrix. Here we sought to define structural changes that occur in intact type I collagen fibrils after an enzymatic treatment with a papaingel. Intact and nonmineralized type I collagen fibrils from rat tail were obtained and treated with a papain-gel (Papacarie) for 30 s, rinsed with water and imaged using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, polished healthy dentin specimens were also treated using the same protocol described above and had their elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) measured by means of AFM-based nanoindentation. AFM images showed that the papain-gel induced partial degradation of the fibrils surface, yet no rupture of fibrils was noticed. The distinction between gap and overlap zones of fibrils vanished in most regions after treatment, and overlap zones appeared to be generally more affected. Mechanical data suggested a gradual decrease in E and H after treatments. A significant two-fold drop from the values of normal dentin (E= 20 +/− 1.9, H = 0.8 +/− 0.08 GPa) was found after four applications (E = 9.7 +/− 3.2, H = 0.24 +/− 0.1 GPa) ( P<0.001), which may be attributed to the degradation of proteoglycans of the matrix. In summary, this study provided novel evidence that intact nonmineralized type I collagen fibrils are partially degraded by a papain-gel. PMID:20205185

  3. Cartilage Fibrils of Mammals are Biochemically Heterogeneous: Differential Distribution of Decorin and Collagen IX

    PubMed Central

    Hagg, Rupert; Bruckner, Peter; Hedbom, Erik

    1998-01-01

    Cartilage fibrils contain collagen II as the major constituent, but the presence of additional components, minor collagens, and noncollagenous glycoproteins is thought to be crucial for modulating several fibril properties. We have examined the distribution of two fibril constituents—decorin and collagen IX—in samples of fibril fragments obtained after bovine cartilage homogenization. Decorin was preferentially associated with a population of thicker fibril fragments from adult articular cartilage, but was not present on the thinnest fibrils. The binding was specific for the gap regions of the fibrils, and depended on the decorin core protein. Collagen IX, by contrast, predominated in the population with the thinnest fibrils, and was scarce on wider fibrils. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated the coexistence of decorin and collagen IX in some fibrils of intermediate diameter, although most fibril fragments from adult cartilage were strongly positive for one component and lacked the other. Fibril fragments from fetal epiphyseal cartilage showed a different pattern, with decorin and collagen IX frequently colocalized on fragments of intermediate and large diameters. Hence, the presence of collagen IX was not exclusive for fibrils of small diameter. These results establish that articular cartilage fibrils are biochemically heterogeneous. Different populations of fibrils share collagen II, but have distinct compositions with respect to macromolecules defining their surface properties. PMID:9660881

  4. Exploring a Role in Tanning for the Gap Region of the Collagen Fibril: Catechin-Collagen Interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electron micrographs of stained collagen fibrils display a pattern of alternating light and dark bands perpendicular to the axis of the collagen fibril. Light bands correspond to regions of more dense lateral packing where adjacent collagen monomers overlap, and dark bands correspond to 'gap' regio...

  5. Constitutive modeling of crimped collagen fibrils in soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Grytz, Rafael; Meschke, Günther

    2009-10-01

    A microstructurally oriented constitutive formulation for the hyperelastic response of crimped collagen fibrils existing in soft connective tissues is proposed. The model is based on observations that collagen fibrils embedded in a soft matrix crimp into a smooth three-dimensional pattern when unloaded. Following ideas presented by Beskos and Jenkins [Beskos, D., Jenkins, J., 1975. A mechanical model for mammalian tendon. ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics 42, 755-758] and Freed and Doehring [Freed, A., Doehring, T., 2005. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering 127, 587-593] the collagen fibril crimp is approximated by a cylindrical helix to represent the constitutive behavior of the hierarchical organized substructure of biological tissues at the fibrillar level. The model is derived from the nonlinear axial force-stretch relationship of an extensible helical spring, including the full extension of the spring as a limit case. The geometrically nonlinear solution of the extensible helical spring is carried out by an iterative procedure. The model only requires one material parameter and two geometrical parameters to be determined from experiments. The ability of the proposed model to reproduce the biomechanical response of fibrous tissues is demonstrated for fascicles from rat tail tendons, for porcine cornea strips, and for bovine Achilles tendons.

  6. Ultrastructure features of camel cornea--collagen fibril and proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Almubrad, Turki; Akhtar, Saeed

    2012-01-01

      The uniform distribution of collagen fibrils and proteoglycans maintain the transparency of normal cornea. We describe the ultrastructural features of camel cornea including collagen fibrils and proteoglycans (PGs).   Camel corneas (of 6-, 8-, and 10-month-old animals) were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde containing cuprolinic blue in sodium acetate buffer and processed for electron microscopy. The 'AnalySIS LS Professional' program was used to analyze the collagen fibril diameter.   The camel cornea consists of four layers: the epithelium (227 μm), stroma (388 μm), Descemet's membrane (DM), and endothelium. The epithelium constituted 36% of the camel cornea, whereas corneal stroma constituted 62% of the corneal thickness (629 μm). The PGs in the posterior stroma were significantly larger in number and size compared with the anterior and middle stroma. The collagen fibril diameter was 25 nm and interfibrillar spacing 40 nm. Fibrillar structures are present throughout the DM.   The structure of the camel cornea is very different from human and other animals. The unique structure of the cornea might be an adaptation to help the camel to survive in a hot and dry climate. The camel cornea may also be a good model to study the effect of hot and dry climates on the cornea. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Collagen fibril diameter and alignment promote the quiescent keratocyte phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Peng, Lily; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George R.; Desai, Tejal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how matrix nanotopography affects corneal fibroblast phenotype and matrix synthesis. To this end, corneal fibroblasts isolated from bovine corneas were grown on collagen nanofiber scaffolds of different diameters and alignment – 30 nm aligned fibrils (30A), 300 nm or larger aligned fibrils (300A), and 30 nm nonaligned fibrils (30NA) in comparison to collagen coated flat glass substrates (FC). Cell morphology was visualized using confocal microscopy. Quantitative PCR was used to measure expression levels of six target genes: the corneal crystallin - transketolase (TKT), the myofibroblast marker - α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and four matrix proteins - collagen 1 (COL1), collagen 3 (COL3), fibronectin (FN) and biglycan. It was found that SMA expression was down-regulated and TKT expression was increased on all three collagen nanofiber substrates, compared to the FC control substrates. However, COL3 and biglycan expression was also significantly increased on 300A, compared to the FC substrates. Thus matrix nanotopography down-regulates the fibrotic phenotype, promotes formation of the quiescent keratocyte phenotype and influences matrix synthesis. These results have significant implications for the engineering of corneal replacements and for promoting regenerative healing of the cornea after disease and/or injury. PMID:22213336

  8. Collagen fibril surface displays a constellation of sites capable of promoting fibril assembly, stability, and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Orgel, J P R O; Antipova, O; Sagi, I; Bitler, A; Qiu, D; Wang, R; Xu, Y; San Antonio, J D

    2011-02-01

    Fibrillar collagens form the structural basis of organs and tissues including the vasculature, bone, and tendon. They are also dynamic, organizational scaffolds that present binding and recognition sites for ligands, cells, and platelets. We interpret recently published X-ray diffraction findings and use atomic force microscopy data to illustrate the significance of new insights into the functional organization of the collagen fibril. These data indicate that collagen's most crucial functional domains localize primarily to the overlap region, comprising a constellation of sites we call the "master control region." Moreover, the collagen's most exposed aspect contains its most stable part-the C-terminal region that controls collagen assembly, cross-linking, and blood clotting. Hidden beneath the fibril surface exists a constellation of "cryptic" sequences poised to promote hemostasis and cell-collagen interactions in tissue injury and regeneration. These findings begin to address several important, and previously unresolved, questions: How functional domains are organized in the fibril, which domains are accessible, and which require proteolysis or structural trauma to become exposed? Here we speculate as to how collagen fibrillar organization impacts molecular processes relating to tissue growth, development, and repair.

  9. Collagen fibril surface displays a constellation of sites capable of promoting fibril assembly, stability, and hemostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, J.P.; Antipova, O.; Sagi, I.; Bitler, A.; Qiu, D.; Wang, R.; Xu, Y.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2011-12-14

    Fibrillar collagens form the structural basis of organs and tissues including the vasculature, bone, and tendon. They are also dynamic, organizational scaffolds that present binding and recognition sites for ligands, cells, and platelets. We interpret recently published X-ray diffraction findings and use atomic force microscopy data to illustrate the significance of new insights into the functional organization of the collagen fibril. These data indicate that collagen's most crucial functional domains localize primarily to the overlap region, comprising a constellation of sites we call the 'master control region.' Moreover, the collagen's most exposed aspect contains its most stable part - the C-terminal region that controls collagen assembly, cross-linking, and blood clotting. Hidden beneath the fibril surface exists a constellation of 'cryptic' sequences poised to promote hemostasis and cell - collagen interactions in tissue injury and regeneration. These findings begin to address several important, and previously unresolved, questions: How functional domains are organized in the fibril, which domains are accessible, and which require proteolysis or structural trauma to become exposed? Here we speculate as to how collagen fibrillar organization impacts molecular processes relating to tissue growth, development, and repair.

  10. Mechanically overloading collagen fibrils uncoils collagen molecules, placing them in a stable, denatured state.

    PubMed

    Veres, Samuel P; Harrison, Julia M; Lee, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high occurrence rate of overextension injuries to tendons and ligaments, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of damage to these tissues' primary load-bearing elements: collagen fibrils and their constituent molecules. Based on our recent observations of a new subrupture, overload-induced mode of fibril disruption that we call discrete plasticity, we have sought in the current study to re-explore whether the tensile overload of collagen fibrils can alter the helical conformation of collagen molecules. In order to accomplish this, we have analyzed the conformation of collagen molecules within repeatedly overloaded tendons in relation to their undamaged matched-pair controls using both differential scanning calorimetry and variable temperature trypsin digestion susceptibility. We find that tensile overload reduces the specific enthalpy of denaturation of tendons, and increases their susceptibility to trypsin digestion, even when the digestion is carried out at temperatures as low as 4 °C. Our results indicate that the tensile overload of collagen fibrils can uncoil the helix of collagen molecules, placing them in a stable, denatured state.

  11. Cross-linking connectivity in bone collagen fibrils: the COOH-terminal locus of free aldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otsubo, K.; Katz, E. P.; Mechanic, G. L.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of the chemical state of the 16c residue of the alpha 1 chain of bone collagen were performed on samples from fetal (4-6-month embryo) and mature (2-3 year old) bovine animals. All of this residue could be accounted for in terms of three chemical states, in relative amounts which depended upon the age of the animal. Most of the residue was incorporated into either bifunctional or trifunctional cross-links. Some of it, however, was present as free aldehyde, and the content increased with maturation. This was established by isolating and characterizing the aldehyde-containing peptides generated by tryptic digestion of NaB3H4-reduced mature bone collagen. We have concluded that the connectivity of COOH-terminal cross-linking in bone collagen fibrils changes with maturation in the following way: at first, each 16c residue in each of the two alpha 1 chains of the collagen molecule is incorporated into a sheet-like pattern of intermolecular iminium cross-links, which stabilizes the young, nonmineralized fibril as a whole. In time, some of these labile cross-links maturate into pyridinoline while others dissociate back to their precursor form. The latter is likely due to changes in the molecular packing brought about by the mineralization of the collagen fibrils. The resultant reduction in cross-linking connectivity may provide a mechanism for enhancing certain mechanical characteristics of the skeleton of a mature animal.

  12. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Autoimmunity to Anchoring Fibril Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Kim, Gene H.; Prakash, Lori; Woodley, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare and acquired autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease of the skin and mucosa. EBA includes various distinct clinical manifestations resembling Bullous Pemphigus, Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid, or cicatricial pemphigoid. These patients have autoantibodies against type VII collagen, an integral component of anchoring fibrils, which are responsible for attaching the dermis to the epidermis. Destruction or perturbation of the normally functioning anchoring fibrils clinically results in skin fragility, blisters, erosions, scars, milia and nail loss, all features reminiscent of genetic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These anti-type VII collagen antibodies are “pathogenic” because when injected into a mouse, the mouse develops an EBA-like blistering disease. Currently treatment is often unsatisfactory, however some success has been achieved with colchichine, dapsone, photopheresis, plasmaphresis, infliximab, rituximab and IVIG. PMID:21955050

  13. Exploring a role in tanning for the gap region of the collagen fibril

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three-dimensional structures of fibrillar collagens have been the subject of numerous studies for more than 60 years. Electron micrographs of stained collagen fibrils display a pattern of alternating light and dark bands perpendicular to the axis of the collagen fibril. Light bands correspond to reg...

  14. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom-up approach. By conserving the three-dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite-size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness.

  15. Structural variations in anchoring fibrils in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: correlation with type VII collagen expression.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; O'Grady, A; Leigh, I M; Eady, R A

    1993-04-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is characterized by various abnormalities of anchoring fibrils, which are mainly composed of type VII collagen, at the dermal-epidermal junction. To define these changes more clearly, we examined skin samples from 22 patients with different forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody (LH 7:2) that binds to the NC-1 globular domain of type VII collagen, followed by 1 nm colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibodies and subsequent silver enhancement. In dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa cases, there was only a slight but variable reduction in the immunolabeling density on anchoring fibrils and on the lamina densa, in parts similar to normal human skin. In localized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin, some fibrillar structures just below the lamina densa (and particularly subjacent to hemidesmosomes) had specific antibody labeling despite their lack of resemblance to definitive anchoring fibrils. Immunolabeling with LH 7:2 was also seen within basal keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic vesicles in some dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients, usually with milder phenotypic features. Even in the most severe cases of generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, occasional immunolabeling was found within the lamina densa and on scanty thin filamentous structures at sub-lamina densa sites usually occupied by anchoring fibrils. This study suggests that dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients express some type VII collagen NC-1 domain epitopes that may be variably reduced at the dermal-epidermal junction or retained within basal keratinocytes. The clinical heterogeneity in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is mirrored by a range of immunoelectron microscopy findings, indicating variability in completeness of anchoring fibril formation and a possible spectrum of underlying type VII collagen structural protein abnormalities.

  16. Collagen assembly from acid solution to networks on solid surfaces and to fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, Jens-Hilmar; Mertig, Michael; Winzer, Bettina; Thiele, Uwe; Pompe, Wolfgang

    1996-04-01

    Two different kinds of collagen assembly have been studied: the reconstitution of type I collagen to fibrils and the formation of 2D networks on surfaces. The kinetics of fibril assembly are influenced by polyaspartate, as measured turbidimetrically. Addition of polyaspartate increases the fibril diameter. The reconstituted fibrils are imaged by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The preparation of thin collagen films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite leads to networks or tree like structures depending on the collagen concentration in the precursor. The results presented are of interest for the development of new bone-like implant materials and the covering of bone grafts with a biocompatible layer.

  17. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  18. Structure–mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, O. G.; Chang, S. W.; Vanleene, M.; Howarth, P. H.; Davies, D. E.; Shefelbine, S. J.; Buehler, M. J.; Thurner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  19. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-06

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry.

  20. Surface coupling of long-chain hyaluronan to the fibrils of reconstituted type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong G; Lee, Ming W; Tu, Yi H; Hung, Shih C; Wang, Yng J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to fabricate type II collagen fibrils with surface modified by long-chain hyaluronic acid. Monomeric type II collagen was isolated from bovine articular cartilage and reconstituted into collagen fibrils followed by a reaction with EDC (1-Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide)-activated long-chain hyaluronic acid. The existence of the hyaluronan molecules on the fibrillar surface was confirmed by the specific bindings of gold nanoparticles labeled with wheat germ agglutinin. The topographic pattern of type II collagen fibrils revealed by AFM scanning changed significantly after the surface coupling of hyaluronic acid. Beneath the hyaluronan, the characteristic D-bandings of the reconstituted collagen fibrils remained intact as shown by the results of TEM observation. The collagen fibrils became more resistant to collagenase digestion after surface coupling of hyaluronic acid as compared with that without hyaluronic acid immobilization. In addition, human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated and cultured within the matrix of HA-collagen fibrils have a higher proliferation rate than cells grown within the unmodified type II collagen fibrils. The newly synthesized material of HA-collagen II fibrils has a great potential for use in constructing scaffold for tissue repair.

  1. Unraveling the role of Calcium ions in the mechanical properties of individual collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiangchao; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Collagen, the dominating material in the extracellular matrix, provides the strength, elasticity and mechanical stability to the organisms. The mechanical property of collagen is mainly dominated by its surrounding environments. However, the variation and origin of the mechanics of collagen fibril under different concentrations of calcium ions (χCa) remains unknown. By using the atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation, the mechanics and structure of individual type II collagen fibril were first investigated under different χCa in this study. The results demonstrate that both of the mechanical and structural properties of the collagen fibril show a prominent dependence on χCa. The mechanism of χCa-dependence of the collagen fibril was attributed to the chelation between collagen molecules and the calcium ions. Given the role of calcium in the pathology of osteoarthritis, the current study may cast new light on the understanding of osteoarthritis and other soft tissue hardening related diseases in the future. PMID:28378770

  2. The effect of collagen fibril orientation on the biphasic mechanics of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; An, Shuqiang; Damion, Robin A; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jones, Alison

    2017-01-01

    The highly inhomogeneous distribution of collagen fibrils may have important effects on the biphasic mechanics of articular cartilage. However, the effect of the inhomogeneity of collagen fibrils has mainly been investigated using simplified three-layered models, which may have underestimated the effect of collagen fibrils by neglecting their realistic orientation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the realistic orientation of collagen fibrils on the biphasic mechanics of articular cartilage. Five biphasic material models, each of which included a different level of complexity of fibril reinforcement, were solved using two different finite element software packages (Abaqus and FEBio). Model 1 considered the realistic orientation of fibrils, which was derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. The simplified three-layered orientation was used for Model 2. Models 3-5 were three control models. The realistic collagen orientations obtained in this study were consistent with the literature. Results from the two finite element implementations were in agreement for each of the conditions modelled. The comparison between the control models confirmed some functions of collagen fibrils. The comparison between Models 1 and 2 showed that the widely-used three-layered inhomogeneous model can produce similar fluid load support to the model including the realistic fibril orientation; however, an accurate prediction of the other mechanical parameters requires the inclusion of the realistic orientation of collagen fibrils.

  3. Advanced Glycation End-Products Reduce Collagen Molecular Sliding to Affect Collagen Fibril Damage Mechanisms but Not Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Fessel, Gion; Li, Yufei; Diederich, Vincent; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Schneider, Philipp; Sell, David R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Snedeker, Jess G.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) contribute to age-related connective tissue damage and functional deficit. The documented association between AGE formation on collagens and the correlated progressive stiffening of tissues has widely been presumed causative, despite the lack of mechanistic understanding. The present study investigates precisely how AGEs affect mechanical function of the collagen fibril – the supramolecular functional load-bearing unit within most tissues. We employed synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and carefully controlled mechanical testing after introducing AGEs in explants of rat-tail tendon using the metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Mass spectrometry and collagen fluorescence verified substantial formation of AGEs by the treatment. Associated mechanical changes of the tissue (increased stiffness and failure strength, decreased stress relaxation) were consistent with reports from the literature. SAXS analysis revealed clear changes in molecular deformation within MGO treated fibrils. Underlying the associated increase in tissue strength, we infer from the data that MGO modified collagen fibrils supported higher loads to failure by maintaining an intact quarter-staggered conformation to nearly twice the level of fibril strain in controls. This apparent increase in fibril failure resistance was characterized by reduced side-by-side sliding of collagen molecules within fibrils, reflecting lateral molecular interconnectivity by AGEs. Surprisingly, no change in maximum fibril modulus (2.5 GPa) accompanied the changes in fibril failure behavior, strongly contradicting the widespread assumption that tissue stiffening in ageing and diabetes is directly related to AGE increased fibril stiffness. We conclude that AGEs can alter physiologically relevant failure behavior of collagen fibrils, but that tissue level changes in stiffness likely occur at higher levels of tissue architecture. PMID:25364829

  4. Intrafibrillar mineralization of polyacrylic acid-bound collagen fibrils using a two-dimensional collagen model and Portland cement-based resins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiyu; Gu, Lisha; Huang, Zihua; Sun, Qiurong; Chen, Huimin; Ling, Junqi; Mai, Sui

    2017-02-01

    The biomimetic remineralization of apatite-depleted dentin is a potential method for enhancing the durability of resin-dentin bonding. To advance this strategy from its initial proof-of-concept design, we sought to investigate the characteristics of polyacrylic acid (PAA) adsorption to desorption from type I collagen and to test the mineralization ability of PAA-bound collagen. Portland cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were homogenized with a hydrophilic resin blend to produce experimental resins. The collagen fibrils reconstituted on nickel (Ni) grids were mineralized using different methods: (i) group I consisted of collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in simulated body fluid (SBF); (ii) group II consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with Portland cement-based resin in SBF; and (iii) group III consisted of PAA-bound collagen treated with β-TCP-doped Portland cement-based resin in deionized water. Intrafibrillar mineralization was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. We found that a carbonyl-associated peak at pH 3.0 increased as adsorption time increased, whereas a hydrogen bond-associated peak increased as desorption time increased. The experimental resins maintained an alkaline pH and the continuous release of calcium ions. Apatite was detected within PAA-bound collagen in groups II and III. Our results suggest that PAA-bound type I collagen fibrils can be mineralized using Portland cement-based resins.

  5. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P R O

    2008-02-26

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or "collagenolysis." The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's "interaction domain," which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  6. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  7. Severe disruption and disorganization of dermal collagen fibrils in early striae gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Calderone, K; Do, T T; Smith, N R; Helfrich, Y R; Johnson, T R B; Kang, S; Voorhees, J J; Fisher, G J

    2017-08-17

    Striae gravidarum (SG), or stretch marks of pregnancy, begin as erythematous streaks, and mature into hypopigmented atrophic bands. To investigate molecular alterations that may promote atrophy of SG, we investigated dermal type I collagen fibrils, which provide human skin with support. We obtained skin samples of recently developed, erythematous abdominal SG from pregnant women. To examine the organization of collagen fibrils, second-harmonic generation imaging was performed using multiphoton microscopy. Immunostaining was used to determine protein expression and localization of type I procollagen, the precursor of type I collagen fibrils. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine gene expression levels. In control (hip) and stretched, normal-appearing perilesional abdominal skin, dermal collagen fibrils were organized as tightly packed, interwoven bundles. In SG, collagen bundles appeared markedly separated, especially in the mid-to-deep dermis. In the spaces separating bundles, loosely packed wavy collagen fibrils lacking organization as bundles were present. These disorganized fibrils persisted into the postpartum period and failed to form densely packed bundles. Numerous large fibroblasts displaying type I procollagen expression were in close proximity to the disorganized fibrils, suggesting that the fibrils are newly synthesized. Supporting this possibility, immunostaining and gene expression of type I procollagen were increased throughout the dermis of SG. Early SG display marked separation of collagen bundles and emergence of disorganized collagen fibrils that fail to form bundles. These alterations may reflect ineffective repair of collagen bundles disrupted by intense skin stretching. Persistent disruption of the collagenous extracellular matrix likely promotes formation and atrophy of SG. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of extracellular matrix collagen fibril architectures and pathological remodeling by polarization dependent second harmonic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rouède, Denis; Schaub, Emmanuel; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Ezan, Frédéric; Scimeca, Jean-Claude; Baffet, Georges; Tiaho, François

    2017-09-22

    Polarization dependence second harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy is gaining increase popularity for in situ quantification of fibrillar protein architectures. In this report, we combine P-SHG microscopy, new linear least square (LLS) fitting and modeling to determine and convert the complex second-order non-linear optical anisotropy parameter ρ of several collagen rich tissues into a simple geometric organization of collagen fibrils. Modeling integrates a priori knowledge of polyhelical organization of collagen molecule polymers forming fibrils and bundles of fibrils as well as Poisson photonic shot noise of the detection system. The results, which accurately predict the known sub-microscopic hierarchical organization of collagen fibrils in several tissues, suggest that they can be subdivided into three classes according to their microscopic and macroscopic hierarchical organization of collagen fibrils. They also show, for the first time to our knowledge, intrahepatic spatial discrimination between genuine fibrotic and non-fibrotic vessels. CCl4-treated livers are characterized by an increase in the percentage of fibrotic vessels and their remodeling involves peri-portal compaction and alignment of collagen fibrils that should contribute to portal hypertension. This integrated P-SHG image analysis method is a powerful tool that should open new avenue for the determination of pathophysiological and chemo-mechanical cues impacting collagen fibrils organization.

  9. Large Deformation Mechanisms, Plasticity, and Failure of an Individual Collagen Fibril With Different Mineral Content

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mineralized collagen fibrils are composed of tropocollagen molecules and mineral crystals derived from hydroxyapatite to form a composite material that combines optimal properties of both constituents and exhibits incredible strength and toughness. Their complex hierarchical structure allows collagen fibrils to sustain large deformation without breaking. In this study, we report a mesoscale model of a single mineralized collagen fibril using a bottom‐up approach. By conserving the three‐dimensional structure and the entanglement of the molecules, we were able to construct finite‐size fibril models that allowed us to explore the deformation mechanisms which govern their mechanical behavior under large deformation. We investigated the tensile behavior of a single collagen fibril with various intrafibrillar mineral content and found that a mineralized collagen fibril can present up to five different deformation mechanisms to dissipate energy. These mechanisms include molecular uncoiling, molecular stretching, mineral/collagen sliding, molecular slippage, and crystal dissociation. By multiplying its sources of energy dissipation and deformation mechanisms, a collagen fibril can reach impressive strength and toughness. Adding mineral into the collagen fibril can increase its strength up to 10 times and its toughness up to 35 times. Combining crosslinks with mineral makes the fibril stiffer but more brittle. We also found that a mineralized fibril reaches its maximum toughness to density and strength to density ratios for a mineral density of around 30%. This result, in good agreement with experimental observations, attests that bone tissue is optimized mechanically to remain lightweight but maintain strength and toughness. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). PMID:26866939

  10. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  11. Structural changes in collagen fibrils across a mineralized interface revealed by cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Quan, Bryan D; Sone, Eli D

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the mineralized collagen fibril, which is the basic building block of mineralized connective tissues, is critical to its function. We use cryo-TEM to study collagen structure at a well-defined hard-soft tissue interface, across which collagen fibrils are continuous, in order to evaluate changes to collagen upon mineralization. To establish a basis for the analysis of collagen banding, we compared cryo-TEM images of rat-tail tendon collagen to a model based on the X-ray structure. While there is close correspondence of periodicity, differences in band intensity indicate fibril regions with high density but lacking order, providing new insight into collagen fibrillar structure. Across a mineralized interface, we show that mineralization results in an axial contraction of the fibril, concomitant with lateral expansion, and that this contraction occurs only in the more flexible gap region of the fibril. Nevertheless, the major features of the banding pattern are not significantly changed, indicating that the axial arrangement of molecules remains largely intact. These results suggest a mechanism by which collagen fibrils are able to accommodate large amounts of mineral without significant disruption of their molecular packing, leading to synergy of mechanical properties.

  12. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-16

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet's membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  13. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet’s membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  14. New insight into the shortening of the collagen fibril D-period in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebska, Maria; Tarnawska, Dorota; Wrzalik, Roman; Chrobak, Artur; Grelowski, Michal; Wylegala, Edward; Zygadlo, Dorota; Ratuszna, Alicja

    2017-02-01

    Collagen fibrils type I display a typical banding pattern, so-called D-periodicity, of about 67 nm, when visualized by atomic force or electron microscopy imaging. Herein we report on a significant shortening of the D-period for human corneal collagen fibrils type I (21 ± 4 nm) upon air-drying, whereas no changes in the D-period were observed for human scleral collagen fibrils type I (64 ± 4 nm) measured under the same experimental conditions as the cornea. It was also found that for the corneal stroma fixed with glutaraldehyde and air-dried, the collagen fibrils show the commonly accepted D-period of 61 ± 8 nm. We used the atomic force microscopy method to image collagen fibrils type I present in the middle layers of human cornea and sclera. The water content in the cornea and sclera samples was varying in the range of .066-.085. Calculations of the D-period using the theoretical model of the fibril and the FFT approach allowed to reveal the possible molecular mechanism of the D-period shortening in the corneal collagen fibrils upon drying. It was found that both the decrease in the shift and the simultaneous reduction in the distance between tropocollagen molecules can be responsible for the experimentally observed effect. We also hypothesize that collagen type V, which co-assembles with collagen type I into heterotypic fibrils in cornea, could be involved in the observed shortening of the corneal D-period.

  15. Nanomechanical assessment of human and murine collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy cantilever-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Fabri, Sebastien; Howarth, Peter H; Davies, Donna E; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-11-01

    The nanomechanical assessment of collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy (AFM) is of increasing interest within the biomedical research community. In contrast to conventional nanoindentation there exists no common standard for conducting experiments and analysis of data. Currently used analysis approaches vary between studies and validation of quantitative results is usually not performed, which makes comparison of data from different studies difficult. Also there are no recommendations with regards to the maximum indentation depth that should not be exceeded to avoid substrate effects. Here we present a methodology and analysis approach for AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation experiments that allows efficient use of captured data and relying on a reference sample for determination of tip shape. Further we show experimental evidence that maximum indentation depth on collagen fibrils should be lower than 10-15% of the height of the fibril to avoid substrate effects and we show comparisons between our and other approaches used in previous works. While our analysis approach yields similar values for indentation modulus compared to the Oliver-Pharr method we found that Hertzian analysis yielded significantly lower values. Applying our approach we successfully and efficiently indented collagen fibrils from human bronchi, which were about 30 nm in size, considerably smaller compared to collagen fibrils obtained from murine tail-tendon. In addition, derived mechanical parameters of collagen fibrils are in agreement with data previously published. To establish a quantitative validation we compared indentation results from conventional and AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation on polymeric samples with known mechanical properties. Importantly we can show that our approach yields similar results when compared to conventional nanoindentation on polymer samples. Introducing an approach that is reliable, efficient and taking into account the AFM tip shape, we anticipate

  16. Determination of the elastic modulus of native collagen fibrils via radial indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August J.; Matthews, William G.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2006-10-01

    The authors studied the elastic response of single, native collagen fibrils extracted from tissues of the inner dermis of the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, via local nanoscale indentation with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM imaging of fibrils under ambient conditions are presented, demonstrating a peak-to-peak periodicity, the d band, of dehydrated, unfixed fibrils to be ˜64.5nm. Radial indentation experiments were performed, and the measured value for the reduced modulus is 1-2GPa.

  17. Thermal denaturation behavior of collagen fibrils in wet and dry environment.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Yosuke; Nam, Kwangwoo; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio; Masuzawa, Toru

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new minimally invasive technique--integrated low-level energy adhesion technique (ILEAT)--which uses heat, pressure, and low-frequency vibrations for binding living tissues. Because the adhesion mechanism of the living tissues is not fully understood, we investigated the effect of thermal energy on the collagen structure in living tissues using ILEAT. To study the effect of thermal energy and heating time on the structure of the collagen fibril, samples were divided in two categories-wet and dry. Further, atomic force microscopy was used to analyze the collagen fibril structure before and after heating. Results showed that collagen fibrils in water denatured after 1 minute at temperatures higher than 80 °C, while partial denaturation was observed at temperatures of 80 °C and a heating time of 1 min. Furthermore, complete denaturation was achieved after 90 min, suggesting that the denaturation rate is temperature and time dependent. Moreover, the collagen fibrils in dry condition maintained their native structure even after being heated to 120 °C for 90 min in the absence of water, which specifically suppressed denaturation. However, partial denaturation of collagen fibrils could not be prevented, because this determines the adhesion between the collagen molecules, and stabilizes tissue bonding.

  18. Second harmonic generation quantitative measurements on collagen fibrils through correlation to electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, S.; Aimé, C.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Latour, G.; Coradin, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2015-03-01

    Type I collagen is a major structural protein in mammals that shows highly structured macromolecular organizations specific to each tissue. This biopolymer is synthesized as triple helices, which self-assemble into fibrils (Ø =10-300 nm) and further form various 3D organization. In recent years, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to probe in situ the fibrillar collagenous network within tissues. However, this optical technique cannot resolve most of the fibrils and is a coherent process, which has impeded quantitative measurements of the fibril diameter so far. In this study, we correlated SHG microscopy with Transmission Electron Microscopy to determine the sensitivity of SHG microscopy and to calibrate SHG signals as a function of the fibril diameter in reconstructed collagen gels. To that end, we synthetized isolated fibrils with various diameters and successfully imaged the very same fibrils with both techniques, down to 30 nm diameter. We observed that SHG signals scaled as the fourth power of the fibril diameter, as expected from analytical and numerical calculations. This calibration was then applied to diabetic rat cornea in which we successfully recovered the diameter of hyperglycemia-induced fibrils in the Descemet's membrane without having to resolve them. Finally we derived the first hyperpolarizability from a single collagen triple helix which validates the bottom-up approach used to calculate the non-linear response at the fibrillar scale and denotes a parallel alignment of triple helices within the fibrils. These results represent a major step towards quantitative SHG imaging of nm-sized collagen fibrils.

  19. Nanoscale characterization of the biomechanical properties of collagen fibrils in the sclera

    SciTech Connect

    Papi, M.; Paoletti, P.; Geraghty, B.; Akhtar, R.

    2014-03-10

    We apply the PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Property Mapping (PFQNM) atomic force microscopy mode for the investigation of regional variations in the nanomechanical properties of porcine sclera. We examine variations in the collagen fibril diameter, adhesion, elastic modulus and dissipation in the posterior, equatorial and anterior regions of the sclera. The mean fibril diameter, elastic modulus and dissipation increased from the posterior to the anterior region. Collagen fibril diameter correlated linearly with elastic modulus. Our data matches the known macroscopic mechanical behavior of the sclera. We propose that PFQNM has significant potential in ocular biomechanics and biophysics research.

  20. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils: influence of natural cross-links.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko; Magnusson, S Peter

    2013-06-04

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human collagen fibrils. There was an initial rise in modulus followed by a plateau with reduced modulus, which was finally followed by an even greater increase in stress and modulus before failure. The RTTs also displayed the initial increase and plateau phase, but the third region was virtually absent and the plateau continued until failure. The importance of cross-link lability was investigated by NaBH₄ reduction of the rat-tail fibrils, which did not alter their behavior. These findings shed light on the function of cross-links at the fibril level, but further studies will be required to establish the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Structure of type I and type III heterotypic collagen fibrils: an X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Cameron, G J; Alberts, I L; Laing, J H; Wess, T J

    2002-01-01

    The molecular packing arrangement within collagen fibrils has a significant effect on the tensile properties of tissues. To date, most studies have focused on homotypic fibrils composed of type I collagen. This study investigates the packing of type I/III collagen molecules in heterotypic fibrils of colonic submucosa using a combination of X-ray diffraction data, molecular model building, and simulated X-ray diffraction fibre diagrams. A model comprising a 70-nm-diameter D- (approximately 65 nm) axial periodic structure containing type I and type III collagen chains was constructed from amino acid scattering factors organised in a liquid-like lateral packing arrangement simulated using a classical Lennard-Jones potential. The models that gave the most accurate correspondence with diffraction data revealed that the structure of the fibril involves liquid-like lateral packing combined with a constant helical inclination angle for molecules throughout the fibril. Combinations of type I:type III scattering factors in a ratio of 4:1 gave a reasonable correspondence with the meridional diffraction series. The attenuation of the meridional intensities may be explained by a blurring of the electron density profile of the D period caused by nonspecific or random interactions between collagen types I and III in the heterotypic fibril. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  2. Repeated subrupture overload causes progression of nanoscaled discrete plasticity damage in tendon collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Veres, Samuel P; Harrison, Julia M; Lee, J Michael

    2013-05-01

    A critical feature of tendons and ligaments is their ability to resist rupture when overloaded, resulting in strains or sprains instead of ruptures. To treat these injuries more effectively, it is necessary to understand how overload affects the primary load-bearing elements of these tissues: collagen fibrils. We have investigated how repeated subrupture overload alters the collagen of tendons at the nanoscale. Using scanning electron microscopy to examine fibril morphology and hydrothermal isometric tension testing to look at molecular stability, we demonstrated that tendon collagen undergoes a progressive cascade of discrete plasticity damage when repeatedly overloaded. With successive overload cycles, fibrils develop an increasing number of kinks along their length. These kinks-discrete zones of plastic deformation known to contain denatured collagen molecules-are accompanied by a progressive and eventual total loss of D-banding along the surface of fibrils, indicating a loss of native molecular packing and further molecular denaturation. Thermal analysis of molecular stability showed that the destabilization of collagen molecules within fibrils is strongly related to the amount of strain energy dissipated by the tendon after yielding during tensile overload. These novel findings raise new questions about load transmission within tendons and their fibrils and about the interplay between crosslinking, strain-energy dissipation ability, and molecular denaturation within these structures.

  3. Effects of hydration on the mechanical response of individual collagen fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Colin A.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.; Thomson, Neil H.

    2008-06-01

    Collagen fibrils prepared from bovine Achilles tendon have been mechanically tested through nanoindentation by an atomic force microscope using force volume analysis. In ambient conditions where the fibrils are expected to be dehydrated, the elastic modulus was determined to be 1.9±0.5GPa, while under aqueous fluid, it decreased by three orders of magnitude to 1.2±0.1MPa. In air, fibril fracture occurred along the axis and the crack lengths were quantized to the D-banding periodicity. The apparent hardness of the fibrils was estimated to be in the range of 0.35-0.6GPa.

  4. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlino, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; Antonio, James D. San

    2008-01-01

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The “cell interaction domain” is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The “matrix interaction domain” may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging. PMID:18487200

  5. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  6. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2010-02-11

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e{sub 1} bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  7. Decorin core protein (decoron) shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    PubMed

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E

    2009-09-15

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e(1) bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1) bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  8. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    PubMed Central

    Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e1 bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease. PMID:19753304

  9. Dissolution of type I collagen fibrils by gingival fibroblasts isolated from patients of various periodontitis categories.

    PubMed

    Havemose-Poulsen, A; Holmstrup, P; Stoltze, K; Birkedal-Hansen, H

    1998-07-01

    The classification of periodontitis in various disease categories, including juvenile periodontitis, rapidly progressive adult periodontitis and slowly progressive adult periodontitis is based mainly on differences in disease progression and age group susceptibility. Because dissolution of collagen fibers is an integral part of periodontal attachment loss, we investigated whether the clinical differences among these periodontitis/control groups are reflected in the collagen-degrading activity of gingival fibroblasts isolated from affected tissues. All fibroblast strains isolated from the 4 groups (n = 48) displayed cell-associated collagenolytic activity when seeded in contact with a reconstituted film of type I collagen fibrils. Cells from the control group (n = 14) dissolved the collagen fibril film twice as fast as those from each of the 3 disease groups (juvenile periodontitis (n = 13), rapidly progressive adult periodontitis (n = 7), and slowly progressive adult periodontitis (n = 14)). Both interleukin-1 beta and phorbolester accelerated the rate of dissolution 2-4-fold, but even after cytokine or phorbolester stimulation control cells were still considerably more effective in dissolving the collagen fibrils than cells from the disease groups. The observation made in this study, that dissolution of collagen fibrils by gingival fibroblasts from periodontally diseased individuals is significantly slower than by cells from healthy control subjects, challenges disease paradigms based on a direct relationship between collagenolytic potential and disease activity.

  10. Nanoscale characterization of isolated individual type I collagen fibrils: polarization and piezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy was applied to directly study individual type I collagen fibrils with diameters of ~100 nm isolated from bovine Achilles tendon. It was revealed that single collagen fibrils behave predominantly as shear piezoelectric materials with a piezoelectric coefficient on the order of 1 pm V-1, and have unipolar axial polarization throughout their entire length. It was estimated that, under reasonable shear load conditions, the fibrils were capable of generating an electric potential up to tens of millivolts. The result substantiates the nanoscale origin of piezoelectricity in bone and tendons, and implies also the potential importance of the shear load-transfer mechanism, which has been the principle basis of the nanoscale mechanics model of collagen, in mechanoelectric transduction in bone.

  11. Some observations on the subfibrillar structure of collagen fibrils as noted during treatment with NKISK and cathepsin G with mechanical agitation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tailun; Weinhold, Paul S; Lee, Nicole Y; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-01-01

    We observed the structure of collagen fibrils in rat tail tendons after treatment with NKISK and cathepsin G. NKISK is a pentapeptide that has been previously shown to bind fibronectin, while cathepsin G is a serine protease that cleaves fibronectin but not type I collagen. In tendons treated with NKISK, fibrils were seen to extensively dissociate into smaller-diameter subfibrils. These subfibrils were homogeneous in diameter with an average diameter of 26.3 ± 5.8 nm. Similar, although less extensive, dissociation into subfibrils was found in tendons treated with cathepsin G. The average diameter of these subfibrils was 24.8 ± 4.9 nm. The ability of NKISK and cathepsin G to release subfibrils at physiological pH without harsh denaturants may enhance the study of the subfibrillar structure of collagen fibrils.

  12. Collagen fibril disruption occurs early in primary guinea pig knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Huebner, J L; Williams, J M; Deberg, M; Henrotin, Y; Kraus, V B

    2010-03-01

    A major barrier inhibiting the discovery of structural modifying agents for osteoarthritis (OA) is an incomplete understanding of early disease events. Herein, we investigated the time course of collagen II cleavage and fibril disruption in the well-validated Hartley guinea pig model of spontaneous OA of the knee. Knee joints of 46 male Hartley guinea pigs were analyzed at 3 weeks, 2, 4, 7, 10, 12, and 18 months of age for histological severity of OA, cartilage collagen fibril disruption by semi-quantitative polarized light microscopy, and expression of type II collagen degradation biomarkers, 9A4 and Coll2-1, by immunohistochemistry. In addition, serum biomarkers specific for collagen II degradation, CTX-II, C2C, and Coll2-1 were quantified. Collagen fibril disruption and expression of the collagenase-generated cleavage neoepitope, 9A4, were observed as early as 2 months of age, despite the appearance of histological OA at 4 months of age. Only serum Coll2-1 increased coincident with the early disruption of the collagen fibril between 3 weeks and 7 months, in contrast to serum C2C, which did not change significantly or correlate with histological severity. Inversely, CTX-II declined dramatically from 3 weeks to 4 months and remaining low thereafter, coincident with growth plate turnover. Collagenase cleavage and disruption of the type II collagen network are early OA disease events in this model, preceding histological evidence of proteoglycan loss. The markedly different serum profiles of collagen II-related biomarkers during the early stages of disease development suggest compartmental segregation and temporal regulation of collagen degrading enzymes. Copyright 2009 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Collagen Fibril Disruption Occurs Early in Primary Guinea Pig Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Janet L; Williams, James M; Deberg, Michelle; Henrotin, Yves; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2009-01-01

    Objective A major barrier inhibiting the discovery of structural modifying agents for osteoarthritis (OA) is an incomplete understanding of early disease events. Herein, we investigated the time course of collagen II cleavage and fibril disruption in the well-validated Hartley guinea pig model of spontaneous osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods: Knee joints of 46 male Hartley guinea pigs were analyzed at 3 weeks, 2, 4, 7, 10, 12, and 18 months of age for histological severity of OA, cartilage collagen fibril disruption by semi-quantitative polarized light microscopy, and expression of type II collagen degradation biomarkers, 9A4 and Coll2-1, by immunohistochemistry. In addition, serum biomarkers specific for collagen II degradation, CTX-II, C2C, and Coll2-1 were quantified. Results Collagen fibril disruption and expression of the collagenase-generated cleavage neoepitope, 9A4, were observed as early as 2 months of age, despite the appearance of histological OA at 4 months of age. Only serum Coll2-1 increased coincident with the early disruption of the collagen fibril between 3 weeks and 7 months, in contrast to serum C2C, which did not change significantly or correlate with histological severity. Inversely, CTX-II declined dramatically from 3 weeks to 4 months and remaining low thereafter, coincident with growth plate turnover. Conclusions Collagenase cleavage and disruption of the type II collagen network are early OA disease events in this model, preceding histological evidence of proteoglycan loss. The markedly different serum profiles of collagen II-related biomarkers during the early stages of disease development suggest compartmental segregation and temporal regulation of collagen degrading enzymes. PMID:19825496

  14. Tensile Properties of Human Collagen Fibrils and Fascicles Are Insensitive to Environmental Salts

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, René B.; Hassenkam, Tue; Grant, Colin A.; Magnusson, S. Peter

    2010-01-01

    To carry out realistic in vitro mechanical testing on anatomical tissue, a choice has to be made regarding the buffering environment. Therefore, it is important to understand how the environment may influence the measurement to ensure the highest level of accuracy. The most physiologically relevant loading direction of tendon is along its longitudinal axis. Thus, in this study, we focus on the tensile mechanical properties of two hierarchical levels from human patellar tendon, namely: individual collagen fibrils and fascicles. Investigations on collagen fibrils and fascicles were made at pH 7.4 in solutions of phosphate-buffered saline at three different concentrations as well as two HEPES buffered solutions containing NaCl or NaCl + CaCl2. An atomic force microscope technique was used for tensile testing of individual collagen fibrils. Only a slight increase in relative energy dissipation was observed at the highest phosphate-buffered saline concentration for both the fibrils and fascicles, indicating a stabilizing effect of ionic screening, but changes were much less than reported for radial compression. Due to the small magnitude of the effects, the tensile mechanical properties of collagen fibrils and fascicles from the patellar tendon of mature humans are essentially insensitive to environmental salt concentration and composition at physiological pH. PMID:21156145

  15. Techniques to assess bone ultrastructure organization: orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Marios; Müller, Ralph; Schneider, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Bone's remarkable mechanical properties are a result of its hierarchical structure. The mineralized collagen fibrils, made up of collagen fibrils and crystal platelets, are bone's building blocks at an ultrastructural level. The organization of bone's ultrastructure with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils has been the matter of numerous studies based on a variety of imaging techniques in the past decades. These techniques either exploit physical principles, such as polarization, diffraction or scattering to examine bone ultrastructure orientation and arrangement, or directly image the fibrils at the sub-micrometre scale. They make use of diverse probes such as visible light, X-rays and electrons at different scales, from centimetres down to nanometres. They allow imaging of bone sections or surfaces in two dimensions or investigating bone tissue truly in three dimensions, in vivo or ex vivo, and sometimes in combination with in situ mechanical experiments. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss this broad range of imaging techniques and the different modalities of their use, in order to discuss their advantages and limitations for the assessment of bone ultrastructure organization with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils. PMID:27335222

  16. Techniques to assess bone ultrastructure organization: orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Marios; Müller, Ralph; Schneider, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    Bone's remarkable mechanical properties are a result of its hierarchical structure. The mineralized collagen fibrils, made up of collagen fibrils and crystal platelets, are bone's building blocks at an ultrastructural level. The organization of bone's ultrastructure with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils has been the matter of numerous studies based on a variety of imaging techniques in the past decades. These techniques either exploit physical principles, such as polarization, diffraction or scattering to examine bone ultrastructure orientation and arrangement, or directly image the fibrils at the sub-micrometre scale. They make use of diverse probes such as visible light, X-rays and electrons at different scales, from centimetres down to nanometres. They allow imaging of bone sections or surfaces in two dimensions or investigating bone tissue truly in three dimensions, in vivo or ex vivo, and sometimes in combination with in situ mechanical experiments. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss this broad range of imaging techniques and the different modalities of their use, in order to discuss their advantages and limitations for the assessment of bone ultrastructure organization with respect to the orientation and arrangement of mineralized collagen fibrils.

  17. Characterization of the correlation between collagen fibril thickness and forward and backward second harmonic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Chiu-Mei; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Optical-based microscopy plays an important role in various scientific fields such as physics, chemistry and biology. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has become one of the indispensable tools for biomedical imaging for the last decade because the signal generated from SHG is sensitive to the objective structure and this amazing non-invasive method can also directly observe the objective without using extra fluorescent labels, especially for collagen molecules. As the most abundant protein in animals, collagen is responsible for a number of important structural and functional roles in vertebrates. For certain diseases, it has been shown that collagen fiber diameter has a significant variation and thus as a vital symptom for diagnosis. Moreover, collagen diameter is also a key parameter for fibrogenesis studying. Therefore, the determination of collagen fiber diameter is important for studying biophysical processes and identifying bioengineering applications. In this study, we investigated various collagen fibril thicknesses and the corresponding forward (FSHG) and backward (BSHG) second harmonic signal intensity variation. Our result exhibits that SHG intensity can quantify describe the relative collagen fibril thickness alteration, which also indicates the coherent effect difference between FSHG and BSHG. This approach demonstrates the capability of SHG imaging in providing collagen mechanical information and that may be applied in the evaluation of advancing collagen issues in vivo.

  18. Characterization of a liver organoid tissue composed of hepatocytes and fibroblasts in dense collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Miho; Adachi, Eijiro; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi

    2013-11-01

    The adult liver is wrapped in a connective tissue sheet called the liver capsule, which consists of collagen fibrils and fibroblasts. In this study, we set out to construct a liver organoid tissue that would be comparable to the endogenous liver, using a bioreactor. In vitro liver organoid tissue was generated by combining collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and primary murine hepatocytes or Hep G2 on a mesh of poly-lactic acid fabric using a bioreactor. Then, the suitability of this liver organoid tissue for transplantation was tested by implanting the constructs into partially hepatectomized BALB/cA-nu/nu mice. As determined by using scanning and transmission electron microscopes, the liver organoid tissues were composed of densely packed collagen fibrils with fibroblasts and aggregates of oval or spherical hepatocytes. Angiogenesis was induced after the transplantation, and blood vessels connected the liver organoid tissue with the surrounding tissue. Thus, a novel approach was applied to generate transplantable liver organoid tissue within a condensed collagen fibril matrix. These results suggested that a dense collagen network populated with fibroblasts can hold a layer of concentrated hepatocytes, providing a three-dimensional microenvrionment suitable for the reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, and resulting in the maintenance of their liver-specific functions. This liver organoid tissue may be useful for the study of intrahepatic functions of various cells, cytokines, and ECMs, and may fulfill the fundamental requirements of a donor tissue.

  19. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency induces morphological changes of anterior cruciate ligament collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ochi, M; Murao, T; Sumen, Y; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, N

    1999-04-01

    We studied the ultrastructural changes of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with transmission electron micrograph cross-sections following isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the proximal third and anteromedial aspect of the ACL. Fourteen patients with PCL-deficient knees at a mean of 22.1 months from injury to surgery and 5 normal knees amputated secondary to malignant tumors or traumatic injuries were used as controls. A significant difference was found in the number of collagen fibrils per 1 microm2 between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. There was a significant difference found in the collagen fibril diameter between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. The collagen packing density (the percentage of sampled area occupied by collagen fibrils) was also significantly different between the PCL-deficient knee and the control group. The current study shows that an isolated PCL insufficiency can induce morphological changes in ACL collagen fibrils, suggesting that a PCL insufficiency can have adverse effects on other ligamentous structures in the knee joint.

  20. Targeted Disruption of Decorin Leads to Abnormal Collagen Fibril Morphology and Skin Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Keith G.; Baribault, Helene; Holmes, David F.; Graham, Helen; Kadler, Karl E.; Iozzo, Renato V.

    1997-01-01

    Decorin is a member of the expanding group of widely distributed small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are expected to play important functions in tissue assembly. We report that mice harboring a targeted disruption of the decorin gene are viable but have fragile skin with markedly reduced tensile strength. Ultrastructural analysis revealed abnormal collagen morphology in skin and tendon, with coarser and irregular fiber outlines. Quantitative scanning transmission EM of individual collagen fibrils showed abrupt increases and decreases in mass along their axes, thereby accounting for the irregular outlines and size variability observed in cross-sections. The data indicate uncontrolled lateral fusion of collagen fibrils in the decorindeficient mice and provide an explanation for the reduced tensile strength of the skin. These findings demonstrate a fundamental role for decorin in regulating collagen fiber formation in vivo. PMID:9024701

  1. Second harmonic generation imaging of the collagen in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiou, Yu-We; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2009-02-01

    Myocardial fibrosis, a common sequela of cardiac hypertrophy, has been shown to be associated with arrhythmias in experimental models. Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to atrial fibrillation. Second harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. In this presentation, we observe the SHG images of the collagen matrix in atrial myocardium and we analyzed of collagen fibers arrangement by using Fourier-transform analysis. Moreover, comparing the SHG images of the collagen fibers in atrial myocardium between normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and atrial fibrillation (AF), our result indicated that it is possible to realize the relation between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  2. Evidence that translocation of collagen fibril segments plays a role in early intrinsic tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Gunn, J Stephen; Ehrlich, H Paul

    2012-02-01

    Severed tendon repair advances with either a scar through extrinsic repair or regeneration through intrinsic repair. The authors examined whether intrinsic tendon repair reintroduces embryonic fibrillogenesis, whereby preformed collagen fibril segments are incorporated into growing collagen fibers at wound edges. Isolated tendons from 10-day-old chicken embryos were suspended in 1 mg/ml of the antibiotic gentamicin for 90 days, which released fibril segments that were fluorescently tagged with rhodamine. Tendons isolated from 14-day-old chicken embryos were wounded to half their diameter and then maintained as explants in stationary organ culture. Fluorescent-tagged fibril segments were introduced to wounded tendon explants in the presence of high concentrations of neomycin, an antibiotic; cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor; cytochalasin D, a disruptor of microfilaments; and colchicine, a disruptor of microtubules. At 24 hours, explants were viewed by means of fluorescent microscopy. Untreated, wounded tendon explants showed the translocation of fluorescent-tagged fibril segments from the explant surface to accumulation at wound edges. In the presence of high concentrations of neomycin, cytochalasin D, or colchicine, fluorescent-tagged fibril segments failed to accumulate at wound edges and were retained on the explant surface. Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide did not alter the accumulation of fluorescent-tagged fibril segments at wound edges. Inhibiting fluorescent-tagged fibril segment accumulation by antibiotics is consistent with their role in releasing fibril segments. Experimental findings show fibril segment translocation and accumulation at wound edges involves microfilaments and microtubules, but not protein synthesis. The experiments support the hypothesis that intrinsic tendon repair advances through the incorporation of fibril segments at wound edges.

  3. Poisson's ratio of collagen fibrils measured by small angle X-ray scattering of strained bovine pericardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Hannah C.; Sizeland, Katie H.; Kayed, Hanan R.; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T.; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main structural component of skin, tendons, and skin products, such as leather. Understanding the mechanical performance of collagen fibrils is important for understanding the mechanical performance of the tissues that they make up, while the mechanical properties of bulk tissue are well characterized, less is known about the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils. In this study, bovine pericardium is subjected to strain while small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns are recorded using synchrotron radiation. The change in d-spacing, which is a measure of fibril extension, and the change in fibril diameter are determined from SAXS. The tissue is strained 0.25 (25%) with a corresponding strain in the collagen fibrils of 0.045 observed. The ratio of collagen fibril width contraction to length extension, or the Poisson's ratio, is 2.1 ± 0.7 for a tissue strain from 0 to 0.25. This Poisson's ratio indicates that the volume of individual collagen fibrils decreases with increasing strain, which is quite unlike most engineering materials. This high Poisson's ratio of individual fibrils may contribute to high Poisson's ratio observed for tissues, contributing to some of the remarkable properties of collagen-based materials.

  4. Poisson's ratio of collagen fibrils measured by small angle X-ray scattering of strained bovine pericardium

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Hannah C.; Sizeland, Katie H.; Kayed, Hanan R.; Haverkamp, Richard G.; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T.

    2015-01-28

    Type I collagen is the main structural component of skin, tendons, and skin products, such as leather. Understanding the mechanical performance of collagen fibrils is important for understanding the mechanical performance of the tissues that they make up, while the mechanical properties of bulk tissue are well characterized, less is known about the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils. In this study, bovine pericardium is subjected to strain while small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns are recorded using synchrotron radiation. The change in d-spacing, which is a measure of fibril extension, and the change in fibril diameter are determined from SAXS. The tissue is strained 0.25 (25%) with a corresponding strain in the collagen fibrils of 0.045 observed. The ratio of collagen fibril width contraction to length extension, or the Poisson's ratio, is 2.1 ± 0.7 for a tissue strain from 0 to 0.25. This Poisson's ratio indicates that the volume of individual collagen fibrils decreases with increasing strain, which is quite unlike most engineering materials. This high Poisson's ratio of individual fibrils may contribute to high Poisson's ratio observed for tissues, contributing to some of the remarkable properties of collagen-based materials.

  5. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibers in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiu, Yu-Wei; Lo, Men Tzung; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common irregular heart rhythm and the mortality rate for patients with AF is approximately twice the mortality rate for patients with normal sinus rhythm (NSR). Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to AF. Therefore, realizing the relationship between myocardial collagen fibrosis and AF is significant. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. We perform SHG microscopic imaging of the collagen fibers in the human atrial myocardium. Utilizing the SHG images, we can identify the differences in morphology and the arrangement of collagen fibers between NSR and AF tissues. We also quantify the arrangement of the collagen fibers using Fourier transform images and calculating the values of angle entropy. We indicate that SHG imaging, a nondestructive and reproducible method to analyze the arrangement of collagen fibers, can provide explicit information about the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  6. Fabrication of high-density collagen fibril matrix gels by renaturation of triple-helix collagen from gelatin.

    PubMed

    Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Yunoki, Shunji; Hatayama, Hirosuke; Teranishi, Yoshikazu

    2013-11-01

    Collagen-based 3-D hydrogels often lack sufficient mechanical strength for tissue engineering. We developed a method for fabrication of high-density collagen fibril matrix (CFM) gels from concentrated solutions of uncleaved gelatin (UCG). Denatured random-coil UCG exhibited more rapid and efficient renaturation into collagen triple-helix than cleaved gelatin (CG) over a broad range of setting temperatures. The UCG solution formed opaque gels with high-density reconstituted collagen fibrils at 28-32 °C and transparent gels similar to CG at <25 °C. The unique gelation properties of UCG enabled the encapsulation of cultured cells in CFM of high solid volume (>5%) and elasticity (1.28 ± 0.15 kPa at 5% and 4.82 ± 0.38 kPa at 8%) with minimal cell loss. The elastic modulus of these gels was higher than that of conventional CFM containing 0.5% collagen. High-strength CFM may provide more durable hydrogels for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  7. Collagen fibrils in functionally distinct tendons have differing structural responses to tendon rupture and fatigue loading.

    PubMed

    Herod, Tyler W; Chambers, Neil C; Veres, Samuel P

    2016-09-15

    In this study we investigate relationships between the nanoscale structure of collagen fibrils and the macroscale functional response of collagenous tissues. To do so, we study two functionally distinct classes of tendons, positional tendons and energy storing tendons, using a bovine forelimb model. Molecular-level assessment using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), functional crosslink assessment using hydrothermal isometric tension (HIT) analysis, and ultrastructural assessment using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study undamaged, ruptured, and cyclically loaded samples from the two tendon types. HIT indicated differences in both crosslink type and crosslink density, with flexor tendons having more thermally stable crosslinks than the extensor tendons (higher TFmax of >90 vs. 75.1±2.7°C), and greater total crosslink density than the extensor tendons (higher t1/2 of 11.5±1.9 vs. 3.5±1.0h after NaBH4 treatment). Despite having a lower crosslink density than flexor tendons, extensor tendons were significantly stronger (37.6±8.1 vs. 23.1±7.7MPa) and tougher (14.3±3.6 vs. 6.8±3.4MJ/m(3)). SEM showed that collagen fibrils in the tougher, stronger extensor tendons were able to undergo remarkable levels of plastic deformation in the form of discrete plasticity, while those in the flexor tendons were not able to plastically deform. When cyclically loaded, collagen fibrils in extensor tendons accumulated fatigue damage rapidly in the form of kink bands, while those in flexor tendons did not accumulate significant fatigue damage. The results demonstrate that collagen fibrils in functionally distinct tendons respond differently to mechanical loading, and suggests that fibrillar collagens may be subject to a strength vs. fatigue resistance tradeoff. Collagen fibrils-nanoscale biological cables-are the fundamental load-bearing elements of all structural human tissues. While all collagen fibrils share common features, such as being composed of a

  8. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs.

  9. A new model to simulate the elastic properties of mineralized collagen fibril.

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.; Stock, S.R.; Haeffner, D.R.; Almer, J.D.; Dunand , D.C.; Brinson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Bone, because of its hierarchical composite structure, exhibits an excellent combination of stiffness and toughness, which is due substantially to the structural order and deformation at the smaller length scales. Here, we focus on the mineralized collagen fibril, consisting of hydroxyapatite plates with nanometric dimensions aligned within a protein matrix, and emphasize the relationship between the structure and elastic properties of a mineralized collagen fibril. We create two- and three-dimensional representative volume elements to represent the structure of the fibril and evaluate the importance of the parameters defining its structure and properties of the constituent mineral and collagen phase. Elastic stiffnesses are calculated by the finite element method and compared with experimental data obtained by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The computational results match the experimental data well, and provide insight into the role of the phases and morphology on the elastic deformation characteristics. Also, the effects of water, imperfections in the mineral phase and mineral content outside the mineralized collagen fibril upon its elastic properties are discussed.

  10. A new model to simulate the elastic properties of mineralized collagen fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.; Stock, S.R.; Haeffner, D.R.; Almer, J.D.; Dunand, D.C.; Brinson, L.C.

    2012-05-02

    Bone, because of its hierarchical composite structure, exhibits an excellent combination of stiffness and toughness, which is due substantially to the structural order and deformation at the smaller length scales. Here, we focus on the mineralized collagen fibril, consisting of hydroxyapatite plates with nanometric dimensions aligned within a protein matrix, and emphasize the relationship between the structure and elastic properties of a mineralized collagen fibril. We create two- and three-dimensional representative volume elements to represent the structure of the fibril and evaluate the importance of the parameters defining its structure and properties of the constituent mineral and collagen phase. Elastic stiffnesses are calculated by the finite element method and compared with experimental data obtained by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The computational results match the experimental data well, and provide insight into the role of the phases and morphology on the elastic deformation characteristics. Also, the effects of water, imperfections in the mineral phase and mineral content outside the mineralized collagen fibril upon its elastic properties are discussed.

  11. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals strongly polarized movement of clostridial collagenase along collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Itami, Masahiro; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ando, Toshio; Konno, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial collagenases involved in donor infection are widely applied in many fields due to their high activity and specificity; however, little is known regarding the mechanisms by which bacterial collagenases degrade insoluble collagen in host tissues. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy, we simultaneously visualized the hierarchical structure of collagen fibrils and the movement of a representative bacterial collagenase, Clostridium histolyticum type I collagenase (ColG), to determine the relationship between collagen structure and collagenase movement. Notably, ColG moved ~14.5 nm toward the collagen N terminus in ~3.8 s in a manner dependent on a catalytic zinc ion. While ColG was engaged, collagen molecules were not only degraded but also occasionally rearranged to thicken neighboring collagen fibrils. Importantly, we found a similarity of relationship between the enzyme-substrate interface structure and enzyme migration in collagen-collagenase and DNA-nuclease systems, which share a helical substrate structure, suggesting a common strategy in enzyme evolution. PMID:27373458

  12. Acellular and cellular high-density, collagen-fibril constructs with suprafibrillar organization.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kevin M; Novak, Tyler; Watkins, Lauren; Neu, Corey P; Wallace, Joseph M; Bart, Zachary R; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Collagen is used extensively for tissue engineering due to its prevalence in connective tissues and its role in defining tissue biophysical and biological signalling properties. However, traditional collagen-based materials fashioned from atelocollagen and telocollagen have lacked collagen densities, multi-scale organization, mechanical integrity, and proteolytic resistance found within tissues in vivo. Here, highly interconnected low-density matrices of D-banded fibrils were created from collagen oligomers, which exhibit fibrillar as well as suprafibrillar assembly. Confined compression then was applied to controllably reduce the interstitial fluid while maintaining fibril integrity. More specifically, low-density (3.5 mg mL(-1)) oligomer matrices were densified to create collagen-fibril constructs with average concentrations of 12.25 mg mL(-1) and 24.5 mg mL(-1). Control and densified constructs exhibited nearly linear increases in ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and compressive modulus over the ranges of 65 to 213 kPa, 400 to 1.26 MPa, and 20 to 150 kPa, respectively. Densification also increased construct resistance to collagenase degradability. Finally, this process was amenable to creating high-density cellularized tissues; all constructs maintained high cell viability (at least 97%) immediately following compression as well as after 1 day and 7 days of culture. This method, which integrates the suprafibrillar assembly capacity of oligomers and controlled fluid reduction by confined compression, supports the rational and scalable design of a broad range of collagen-fibril materials and cell-encapsulated tissue constructs for tissue engineering applications.

  13. Fibrils of different collagen types containing immobilised proteoglycans (PGs) as coatings: characterisation and influence on osteoblast behaviour.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T; Hempel, U; Mietrach, C; Heinemann, S; Scharnweber, D; Worch, H

    2007-11-01

    Collagen, the main organic component of bone, is used as a coating on titanium implants and as a scaffold material in bone tissue engineering. Surface modifications of titanium which promote osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and synthesis of collagen by osteoblasts are desirable. One biomimetic approach is the coating of titanium with collagen in fibrillar form. Other organic components of bone may be bound to fibrils and exert additional effects. In this study, the collagen types I-III were compared regarding their ability to bind the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan, which are found in bone. More collagen was bound to collagen II fibrils than to those of types I and III. Therefore, titanium surfaces were coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the effect of the proteoglycans on human primary osteoblast behaviour. In addition, the growth factor TGF-beta1 was adsorbed onto surfaces coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the influence of decorin and biglycan on the effect of TGF-beta1 on osteoblasts. Fibril-bound biglycan and decorin influence primary osteoblast behaviour by themselves. The presence of substrate-bound biglycan or decorin influences the effect of TGF-beta1. These results may be important when designing collagen-based coatings or scaffolds for tissue engineering, including those loaded with growth factors.

  14. Stress shielding of patellar tendon: effect on small-diameter collagen fibrils in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Majima, Tokifumi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tsuchida, Takamasa; Tanaka, Kunio; Miyakawa, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akio; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of stress shielding on the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon using 40 mature female Japanese white rabbits. The patellar tendon was completely released from stress by drawing the patella toward the tibial tubercle with a stainless steel wire installed between them. Microstructurally, stress shielding for 3 and 6 weeks increased the number of cells approximately fivefold, to that of the control tendon. Collagen bundles were less well oriented in the stress-shielded tendon than in the control. Ultrastructurally, small collagen fibrils with a diameter of less than 90 nm increased in the stress-shielded tendon. The median collagen fibril diameter in 6-week stress-shielded tendon was significantly smaller ( P < 0.05) than in the control tendon (58.8% of control). The ratio of the total area of collagen fibrils to the whole visualized area in the stress-shielded patellar tendon was significantly smaller at 3 and 6 weeks than that in the control. This study demonstrated that complete stress shielding significantly affects the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon

  15. Blocking collagen fibril formation in injured knees reduces flexion contracture in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Jolanta; Beredjiklian, Pedro K; Abboud, Joseph A; Wang, Mark L Y; Namdari, Surena; Barlow, Jonathan; Rivlin, Michael; Arnold, William V; Kostas, James; Hou, Cheryl; Fertala, Andrzej

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic joint contracture is a frequent orthopaedic complication that limits the movement of injured joints, thereby severely impairing affected patients. Non-surgical and surgical treatments for joint contracture often fail to improve the range of motion. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that limiting the formation of collagen-rich tissue in the capsules of injured joints would reduce the consequences of the fibrotic response and improve joint mobility. We targeted the formation of collagen fibrils, the main component of fibrotic deposits formed within the tissues of injured joints, by employing a relevant rabbit model to test the utility of a custom-engineered antibody. The antibody was delivered directly to the cavities of injured knees in order to block the formation of collagen fibrils produced in response to injury. In comparison to the non-treated control, mechanical tests of the antibody-treated knees demonstrated a significant reduction of flexion contracture. Detailed microscopic and biochemical studies verified that this reduction resulted from the antibody-mediated blocking of the assembly of collagen fibrils. These findings indicate that extracellular processes associated with excessive formation of fibrotic tissue represent a valid target for limiting post-traumatic joint stiffness. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1038-1046, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Relation Between Collagen Fibril Kinematics and Mechanical Properties in the Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet

    SciTech Connect

    Liao,J.; Yang, L.; Grashow, J.; Sacks, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain ({epsilon}{sub D}) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, {epsilon}{sub D} increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using {epsilon}{sub D}, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5{+-}25.5 MPa, which was {approx}27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58{+-}1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and D remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min {epsilon}{sub D} was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen

  17. Nanoscale Structure of Type I Collagen Fibrils: Quantitative Measurement of D-spacing

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Blake; Fang, Ming; Wallace, Joseph M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Les, Clifford M.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2012-01-01

    This paper details a quantitative method to measure the D-periodic spacing of Type I collagen fibrils using Atomic Force Microscopy coupled with analysis using a 2D Fast Fourier Transform approach. Instrument calibration, data sampling and data analysis are all discussed and comparisons of the data to the complementary methods of electron microscopy and X-ray scattering are made. Examples of the application of this new approach to the analysis of Type I collagen morphology in disease models of estrogen depletion and Osteogenesis Imperfecta are provided. We demonstrate that it is the D-spacing distribution, not the D-spacing mean, that showed statistically significant differences in estrogen depletion associated with early stage Osteoporosis and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. The ability to quantitatively characterize nanoscale morphological features of Type I collagen fibrils will provide important structural information regarding Type I collagen in many research areas, including tissue aging and disease, tissue engineering, and gene knock out studies. Furthermore, we also envision potential clinical applications including evaluation of tissue collagen integrity under the impact of diseases or drug treatments. PMID:23027700

  18. Reduced anchoring fibril formation and collagen VII immunoreactivity in feline dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Dunston, S M; Marinkovich, M P

    1999-11-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa was diagnosed in a cat with juvenile-onset epithelial sloughing of the oral mucosa, footpads, and haired skin. Dermoepidermal separation occurred in the absence of inflammation or cytolysis of basal epidermal cells. Collagen IV-specific immunostaining corroborated the fact that clefting took place below the epidermal basement membrane. Ultrastructural examination revealed that the proband's anchoring fibrils exhibited a filamentous morphology and were decreased in number compared with those in a normal cat. Finally, the attenuated immunoreactivity for collagen VII in our patient led us to suspect that its encoding gene, COL7A1, could be mutated in this case of feline dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

  19. A computational remodeling approach to predict the physiological architecture of the collagen fibril network in corneo-scleral shells.

    PubMed

    Grytz, Rafael; Meschke, Günther

    2010-04-01

    Organized collagen fibrils form complex networks that introduce strong anisotropic and highly nonlinear attributes into the constitutive response of human eye tissues. Physiological adaptation of the collagen network and the mechanical condition within biological tissues are complex and mutually dependent phenomena. In this contribution, a computational model is presented to investigate the interaction between the collagen fibril architecture and mechanical loading conditions in the corneo-scleral shell. The biomechanical properties of eye tissues are derived from the single crimped fibril at the micro-scale via the collagen network of distributed fibrils at the meso-scale to the incompressible and anisotropic soft tissue at the macro-scale. Biomechanically induced remodeling of the collagen network is captured on the meso-scale by allowing for a continuous re-orientation of preferred fibril orientations and a continuous adaptation of the fibril dispersion. The presented approach is applied to a numerical human eye model considering the cornea and sclera. The predicted fibril morphology correlates well with experimental observations from X-ray scattering data.

  20. Collagen fibril diameter distribution does not reflect changes in the mechanical properties of in vitro stress-deprived tendons.

    PubMed

    Lavagnino, Michael; Arnoczky, S P Steven P; Frank, Katherine; Tian, Tao

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if an association exists between the tensile properties and the collagen fibril diameter distribution in in vitro stress-deprived rat tail tendons. Rat tail tendons were paired into two groups of 21 day stress-deprived and 0 time controls and compared using transmission electron microscopy (n = 6) to measure collagen fibril diameter distribution and density, and mechanical testing (n =6) to determine ultimate stress and tensile modulus. There was a statistically significant decrease in both ultimate tensile strength (control: 17.95+/-3.99 MPa, stress-deprived: 6.79+/-3.91 MPa) and tensile modulus (control: 312.8+/-89.5 MPa, stress-deprived: 176.0+/-52.7 MPa) in the in vitro stress-deprived tendons compared to controls. However, there was no significant difference between control and stress-deprived tendons in the number of fibrils per tendon counted, mean fibril diameter, mean fibril density, or fibril size distribution. The results of this study demonstrate that the decrease in mechanical properties observed in in vitro stress-deprived rat tail tendons is not correlated with the collagen fibril diameter distribution and, therefore, the collagen fibril diameter distribution does not, by itself, dictate the decrease in mechanical properties observed in in vitro stress-deprived rat tail tendons.

  1. Rapid Patterning of 1-D Collagenous Topography as an ECM Protein Fibril Platform for Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Niannan; Li, Xia; Bertulli, Cristina; Li, Zhaoying; Patharagulpong, Atipat; Sadok, Amine; Huang, Yan Yan Shery

    2014-01-01

    Cellular behavior is strongly influenced by the architecture and pattern of its interfacing extracellular matrix (ECM). For an artificial culture system which could eventually benefit the translation of scientific findings into therapeutic development, the system should capture the key characteristics of a physiological microenvironment. At the same time, it should also enable standardized, high throughput data acquisition. Since an ECM is composed of different fibrous proteins, studying cellular interaction with individual fibrils will be of physiological relevance. In this study, we employ near-field electrospinning to create ordered patterns of collagenous fibrils of gelatin, based on an acetic acid and ethyl acetate aqueous co-solvent system. Tunable conformations of micro-fibrils were directly deposited onto soft polymeric substrates in a single step. We observe that global topographical features of straight lines, beads-on-strings, and curls are dictated by solution conductivity; whereas the finer details such as the fiber cross-sectional profile are tuned by solution viscosity. Using these fibril constructs as cellular assays, we study EA.hy926 endothelial cells' response to ROCK inhibition, because of ROCK's key role in the regulation of cell shape. The fibril array was shown to modulate the cellular morphology towards a pre-capillary cord-like phenotype, which was otherwise not observed on a flat 2-D substrate. Further facilitated by quantitative analysis of morphological parameters, the fibril platform also provides better dissection in the cells' response to a H1152 ROCK inhibitor. In conclusion, the near-field electrospun fibril constructs provide a more physiologically-relevant platform compared to a featureless 2-D surface, and simultaneously permit statistical single-cell image cytometry using conventional microscopy systems. The patterning approach described here is also expected to form the basics for depositing other protein fibrils, seen among

  2. Effect of ultrasonication on the fibril-formation and gel properties of collagen from grass carp skin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Deng, Mingxia; Wang, Zhongwen; Zhang, Juntao; Wang, Haiyin; Zhang, Hanjun

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the fibril-formation process of collagen in vitro to fabricate novel biomaterials is a new area in the field of collagen research. This study aimed to determine the effect of ultrasonication on collagen fibril formation and the properties of the resulting collagen gels. Native collagen, extracted from the skin of grass carp, self-assembled under ultrasonic conditions (at different ultrasonic power and duration). The self-assembly kinetics, fibrillar morphology, and physical and cell growth-promoting properties of the collagen gels were analyzed and compared. The results showed that the self-assembly rate of collagen was increased by ultrasonication at the nucleation stage. The resulting fibrils exhibited smaller diameters and D-periodicity lengths than that of the untreated collagen samples (p<0.05). The viscoelasticity and textural properties of collagen gels also changed after ultrasonication at the nucleation stage. Texture profile analysis and cell proliferation assays showed that ultrasonication produced softer collagen gel colloids, which were more suitable for cell proliferation than the untreated collagen gels.

  3. Interfibrillar shear stress is the loading mechanism of collagen fibrils in tendon.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-06-01

    Despite the critical role tendons play in transmitting loads throughout the musculoskeletal system, little is known about the microstructural mechanisms underlying their mechanical function. Of particular interest is whether collagen fibrils in tendon fascicles bear load independently or if load is transferred between fibrils through interfibrillar shear forces. We conducted multiscale experimental testing and developed a microstructural shear lag model to explicitly test whether interfibrillar shear load transfer is indeed the fibrillar loading mechanism in tendon. Experimental correlations between fascicle macroscale mechanics and microscale interfibrillar sliding suggest that fibrils are discontinuous and share load. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrate that a shear lag model can replicate the fascicle macroscale mechanics as well as predict the microscale fibrillar deformations. Since interfibrillar shear stress is the fundamental loading mechanism assumed in the model, this result provides strong evidence that load is transferred between fibrils in tendon and possibly other aligned collagenous tissues. Conclusively establishing this fibrillar loading mechanism and identifying the involved structural components should help develop repair strategies for tissue degeneration and guide the design of tissue engineered replacements. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interfibrillar shear stress is the loading mechanism of collagen fibrils in tendon

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the critical role tendons play in transmitting loads throughout the musculoskeletal system, little is known about the microstructural mechanisms underlying their mechanical function. Of particular interest is whether collagen fibrils in tendon fascicles bear load independently or if load is transferred between fibrils through interfibrillar shear forces. We conducted multiscale experimental testing and developed a microstructural shear lag model to explicitly test whether interfibrillar shear load transfer is indeed the fibrillar loading mechanism in tendon. Experimental correlations between fascicle macroscale mechanics and microscale interfibrillar sliding suggest that fibrils are discontinuous and share load. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrate that a shear lag model can replicate the fascicle macroscale mechanics as well as predict the microscale fibrillar deformations. Since interfibrillar shear stress is the fundamental loading mechanism assumed in the model, this result provides strong evidence that load is transferred between fibrils in tendon and possibly other aligned collagenous tissues. Conclusively establishing this fibrillar loading mechanism and identifying the involved structural components should help develop repair strategies for tissue degeneration and guide the design of tissue engineered replacements. PMID:24530560

  5. Gel-spinning of mimetic collagen and collagen/nano-carbon fibers: Understanding multi-scale influences on molecular ordering and fibril alignment.

    PubMed

    Green, Emily C; Zhang, Yiying; Li, Heng; Minus, Marilyn L

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic gel-spun collagen and collagen/nano-carbon fibers were found to exhibit structural mimicry comparable to native tendons. X-ray scattering and microscopy analyses are used to characterize the molecular and fibrillar alignment in the synthetic fibers, where D-banding is observed throughout the spun fibers - consistent with native collagen. For the composite collagen/nano-carbon fibers, the morphology and dispersion quality of the nano-carbons within was found to play a significant role in influencing collagen molecular ordering and fibril alignment. Fibrillar and molecular alignment was also better preserved during elongation of the composites as compared to the control collagen fibers. These results show the structural influence of a rigid inclusion on the collagen fibril structure. Both dry- and wet-state tensile testing were performed on the collagen fibers, and these results show behavior comparable to the native materials. Dry-state tests also reveal interfacial interaction between the nano-fillers and the collagen fibrils through theoretical analysis. Wet-state tensile testing indicates the structure-property behavior of the mimetic hierarchical structure within the synthetic fibers.

  6. Homogenized stiffness matrices for mineralized collagen fibrils and lamellar bone using unit cell finite element models.

    PubMed

    Vercher, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Tarancón, José E; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils have been usually analyzed like a two-phase composite material where crystals are considered as platelets that constitute the reinforcement phase. Different models have been used to describe the elastic behavior of the material. In this work, it is shown that when Halpin-Tsai equations are applied to estimate elastic constants from typical constituent properties, not all crystal dimensions yield a model that satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. We provide the ranges of platelet dimensions that lead to positive definite stiffness matrices. On the other hand, a finite element model of a mineralized collagen fibril unit cell under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed. By applying six canonical load cases, homogenized stiffness matrices are numerically calculated. Results show a monoclinic behavior of the mineralized collagen fibril. In addition, a 5-layer lamellar structure is also considered where crystals rotate in adjacent layers of a lamella. The stiffness matrix of each layer is calculated applying Lekhnitskii transformations, and a new finite element model under periodic boundary conditions is analyzed to calculate the homogenized 3D anisotropic stiffness matrix of a unit cell of lamellar bone. Results are compared with the rule-of-mixtures showing in general good agreement.

  7. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, Riccardo; Hansen, Uwe; Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F; Bruckner, Peter; Stolz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage.

  8. Supramolecular Organization of Collagen Fibrils in Healthy and Osteoarthritic Human Knee and Hip Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Raiteri, Roberto; Loparic, Marko; Düggelin, Marcel; Mathys, Daniel; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Bruckner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a composite of discrete, but interacting suprastructures, i.e. cartilage fibers with microfibrillar or network-like aggregates and penetrating extrafibrillar proteoglycan matrix. The biomechanical function of the proteoglycan matrix and the collagen fibers are to absorb compressive and tensional loads, respectively. Here, we are focusing on the suprastructural organization of collagen fibrils and the degradation process of their hierarchical organized fiber architecture studied at high resolution at the authentic location within cartilage. We present electron micrographs of the collagenous cores of such fibers obtained by an improved protocol for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Articular cartilages are permeated by small prototypic fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of 18 ± 5 nm that can align in their D-periodic pattern and merge into larger fibers by lateral association. Interestingly, these fibers have tissue-specific organizations in cartilage. They are twisted ropes in superficial regions of knee joints or assemble into parallel aligned cable-like structures in deeper regions of knee joint- or throughout hip joints articular cartilage. These novel observations contribute to an improved understanding of collagen fiber biogenesis, function, and homeostasis in hyaline cartilage. PMID:27780246

  9. Tectorins crosslink type II collagen fibrils and connect the tectorial membrane to the spiral limbus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo R; Salles, Felipe T; Grati, M'hamed; Manor, Uri; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-05-01

    All inner ear organs possess extracellular matrix appendices over the sensory epithelia that are crucial for their proper function. The tectorial membrane (TM) is a gelatinous acellular membrane located above the hearing sensory epithelium and is composed mostly of type II collagen, and α and β tectorins. TM molecules self-assemble in the endolymph fluid environment, interacting medially with the spiral limbus and distally with the outer hair cell stereocilia. Here, we used immunogold labeling in freeze-substituted mouse cochleae to assess the fine localization of both tectorins in distinct TM regions. We observed that the TM adheres to the spiral limbus through a dense thin matrix enriched in α- and β-tectorin, both likely bound to the membranes of interdental cells. Freeze-etching images revealed that type II collagen fibrils were crosslinked by short thin filaments (4±1.5nm, width), resembling another collagen type protein, or chains of globular elements (15±3.2nm, diameter). Gold-particles for both tectorins also localized adjacent to the type II collagen fibrils, suggesting that these globules might be composed essentially of α- and β-tectorins. Finally, the presence of gold-particles at the TM lower side suggests that the outer hair cell stereocilia membrane has a molecular partner to tectorins, probably stereocilin, allowing the physical connection between the TM and the organ of Corti. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Loss of fibulin-4 results in abnormal collagen fibril assembly in bone, caused by impaired lysyl oxidase processing and collagen cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takako; Stoop, Reinout; Sakai, Takao; Hess, Andreas; Deutzmann, Rainer; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Chu, Mon-Li; von der Mark, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix protein fibulin-4 has been shown to be indispensable for elastic fiber assembly, but there is also evidence from human mutations that it is involved in controlling skeletal development and bone stability. Fibulin-4 mutations were identified in patients suffering from vascular abnormality and/or cutis laxa, and some of these patients exhibited bone fragility, arachnodactyly and joint laxity. In order to elucidate the role of fibulin-4 in bone structure and skeletal development, we analyzed structural changes in skeletal tissues of Fbln4(-/-) mice. Immunostaining confirmed that fibulin-4 is highly expressed in cartilage, bone, ligaments and tendons. No morphological abnormalities were found in the skeleton of Fbln4(-/-) mice as compared to wild type littermates except forelimb contractures as well as unusually thick collagen fibrils. Furthermore, fibulin-4 deficiency caused enhanced susceptibility of bone collagen for acid extraction, consistent with significantly reduced lysylpyridinoline and hydroxylysylpyridinoline cross-links in bone. In accordance with that, the amount of lysyl oxidase in long bones and calvaria was strongly decreased and proteolytic activation of lysyl oxidase was reduced in fibulin-4 deficient osteoblasts, while addition of recombinant fibulin-4 rescued the activation. The finding suggested that fibulin-4 is important for the proteolytic activation of lysyl oxidase which has a pivotal role in cross-linking of collagen and elastin. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength.

  12. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength. PMID:25153614

  13. Fibrillar, fibril-associated and basement membrane collagens of the arterial wall: architecture, elasticity and remodeling under stress.

    PubMed

    Osidak, M S; Osidak, E O; Akhmanova, M A; Domogatsky, S P; Domogatskaya, A S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a human artery to pass through 150 million liters of blood sustaining 2 billion pulsations of blood pressure with minor deterioration depends on unique construction of the arterial wall. Viscoelastic properties of this construction enable to re-seal the occuring damages apparently without direct immediate participance of the constituent cells. Collagen structures are considered to be the elements that determine the mechanoelastic properties of the wall in parallel with elastin responsible for elasticity and resilience. Collagen scaffold architecture is the function-dependent dynamic arrangement of a dozen different collagen types composing three distinct interacting forms inside the extracellular matrix of the wall. Tightly packed molecules of collagen types I, III, V provide high tensile strength along collagen fibrils but toughness of the collagen scaffold as a whole depends on molecular bonds between distinct fibrils. Apart of other macromolecules in the extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen-specific interlinks involve microfilaments of collagen type VI, meshwork-organized collagen type VIII, and FACIT collagen type XIV. Basement membrane collagen types IV, XV, XVIII and cell-associated collagen XIII enable transmission of mechanical signals between cells and whole artery matrix. Collagen scaffold undergoes continuous remodeling by decomposition promoted with MMPs and reconstitution from newly produced collagen molecules. Pulsatile stress-strain load modulates both collagen synthesis and MMP-dependent collagen degradation. In this way the ECM structure becomes adoptive to mechanical challenges. The mechanoelastic properties of the arterial wall are changed in atherosclerosis concomitantly with collagen turnover both type-specific and dependent on the structure. Improving the feedback could be another approach to restore sufficient blood circulation.

  14. Effect of cyclic loading on the nanoscale deformation of hydroxyapatite and collagen fibrils in bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anjali; Stock, Stuart R; Almer, Jonathan D; Dunand, David C

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic compressive loading tests were carried out on bovine femoral bones at body temperature (37 °C), with varying mean stresses (-55 to -80 MPa) and loading frequencies (0.5-5 Hz). At various times, the cyclic loading was interrupted to carry out high-energy X-ray scattering measurements of the internal strains developing in the hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and the collagen fibrils. The residual strains upon unloading were always tensile in the HAP and compressive in the fibrils, and each increases in magnitude with loading cycles, which can be explained from damage at the HAP–collagen interface and accumulation of plastic deformation within the collagen phase. The samples tested at a higher mean stress and stress amplitude, and at lower loading frequencies exhibit greater plastic deformation and damage accumulation, which is attributed to greater contribution of creep. Synchrotron microcomputed tomography of some of the specimens showed that cracks are produced during cyclic loading and that they mostly occur concentric with Haversian canals.

  15. Modelling the mechanics of partially mineralized collagen fibrils, fibres and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanxin; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Chen, Changqing; Birman, Victor; Buehler, Markus J.; Genin, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive stiffening of collagen tissue by bioapatite mineral is important physiologically, but the details of this stiffening are uncertain. Unresolved questions about the details of the accommodation of bioapatite within and upon collagen's hierarchical structure have posed a central hurdle, but recent microscopy data resolve several major questions. These data suggest how collagen accommodates bioapatite at the lowest relevant hierarchical level (collagen fibrils), and suggest several possibilities for the progressive accommodation of bioapatite at higher hierarchical length scales (fibres and tissue). We developed approximations for the stiffening of collagen across spatial hierarchies based upon these data, and connected models across hierarchies levels to estimate mineralization-dependent tissue-level mechanics. In the five possible sequences of mineralization studied, percolation of the bioapatite phase proved to be an important determinant of the degree of stiffening by bioapatite. The models were applied to study one important instance of partially mineralized tissue, which occurs at the attachment of tendon to bone. All sequences of mineralization considered reproduced experimental observations of a region of tissue between tendon and bone that is more compliant than either tendon or bone, but the size and nature of this region depended strongly upon the sequence of mineralization. These models and observations have implications for engineered tissue scaffolds at the attachment of tendon to bone, bone development and graded biomimetic attachment of dissimilar hierarchical materials in general. PMID:24352669

  16. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated

  17. Molecular and intermolecular effects in collagen fibril mechanics: a multiscale analytical model compared with atomistic and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Marino, Michele

    2016-02-01

    Both atomistic and experimental studies reveal the dependence of collagen fibril mechanics on biochemical and biophysical features such as, for instance, cross-link density, water content and protein sequence. In order to move toward a multiscale structural description of biological tissues, a novel analytical model for collagen fibril mechanics is herein presented. The model is based on a multiscale approach that incorporates and couples: thermal fluctuations in collagen molecules; the uncoiling of collagen triple helix; the stretching of molecular backbone; the straightening of the telopeptide in which covalent cross-links form; slip-pulse mechanisms due to the rupture of intermolecular weak bonds; molecular interstrand delamination due to the rupture of intramolecular weak bonds; the rupture of covalent bonds within molecular strands. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with available atomistic results and experimental data, highlighting the importance of cross-link density in tuning collagen fibril mechanics. The typical three-region shape and hysteresis behavior of fibril constitutive response, as well as the transition from a yielding-like to a brittle-like behavior, are recovered with a special insight on the underlying nanoscale mechanisms. The model is based on parameters with a clear biophysical and biochemical meaning, resulting in a promising tool for analyzing the effect of pathological or pharmacological-induced histochemical alterations on the functional mechanical response of collagenous tissues.

  18. Characterization of the viscoelastic behavior of a simplified collagen micro-fibril based on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, Hossein; Darvish, Kurosh

    2016-10-01

    Collagen fibril is a major component of connective tissues such as bone, tendon, blood vessels, and skin. The mechanical properties of this highly hierarchical structure are greatly influenced by the presence of covalent cross-links between individual collagen molecules. This study investigates the viscoelastic behavior of a collagen lysine-lysine cross-link based on creep simulations with applied forces in the range or 10 to 2000pN using steered molecular dynamics (SMD). The viscoelastic model of the cross-link was combined with a system composed by two segments of adjacent collagen molecules hence representing a reduced viscoelastic model for a simplified micro-fibril. It was found that the collagen micro-fibril assembly had a steady-state Young׳s modulus ranging from 2.24 to 3.27GPa, which is in agreement with reported experimental measurements. The propagation of longitudinal force wave along the molecule was implemented by adding a delay element to the model. The force wave speed was found to be correlated with the speed of one-dimensional elastic waves in rods. The presented reduced model with three degrees of freedom can serve as a building block for developing models of the next level of hierarchy, i.e., a collagen fibril. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Abnormality of dermal collagen fibrils in Ehlers Danlos syndrome. Anticipation of the abnormality for the inherited hypermobile disorders.

    PubMed

    Kobayasi, Takasi

    2004-01-01

    The abnormality of dermal collagen fibrils is the ultrastructural criterion of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). This study evaluates the clinical significance of the abnormality. Besides 348 lax patients presenting the stigmata of EDS, skin specimens from 12 normal members in the pedigree of EDS, 98 randomly selected normal individuals, 7 Marfan syndrome and 4 osteogenesis inperfecta type I, were studied by electron microscopy. The abnormality was defined by thickness, array and shape of collagen fibrils. Of 348 lax patients, 115 patients showed Beighton's score higher than 6 and constantly the abnormality (EDS). Variable numbers of the patients with scores 1 to 5 displayed the abnormality (forme fruste). The abnormality did not correspond with variation of laxity. Marfan syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta were indistinguishable from EDS by the abnormality. Some of the normal persons in the EDS pedigree and some controls also showed the abnormality. The abnormality expressed the disposition for heritably defected collagen fibril formation.

  20. Molecular properties and fibril ultrastructure of types II and XI collagens in cartilage of mice expressing exclusively the α1(IIA) collagen isoform.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, Audrey; Traeger, Geoffrey; Hansen, Uwe; Weis, Mary Ann; Ravindran, Soumya; Wirthlin, Louisa; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2014-02-01

    Until now, no biological tools have been available to determine if a cross-linked collagen fibrillar network derived entirely from type IIA procollagen isoforms, can form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage. Recently, homozygous knock-in transgenic mice (Col2a1(+ex2), ki/ki) were generated that exclusively express the IIA procollagen isoform during post-natal development while type IIB procollagen, normally present in the ECM of wild type mice, is absent. The difference between these Col2a1 isoforms is the inclusion (IIA) or exclusion (IIB) of exon 2 that is alternatively spliced in a developmentally regulated manner. Specifically, chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA mRNA isoforms while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB mRNA isoforms. Recent characterization of the Col2a1(+ex2) mice has surprisingly shown that disruption of alternative splicing does not affect overt cartilage formation. In the present study, biochemical analyses showed that type IIA collagen extracted from ki/ki mouse rib cartilage can form homopolymers that are stabilized predominantly by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) cross-links at levels that differed from wild type rib cartilage. The findings indicate that mature type II collagen derived exclusively from type IIA procollagen molecules can form hetero-fibrils with type XI collagen and contribute to cartilage structure and function. Heteropolymers with type XI collagen also formed. Electron microscopy revealed mainly thin type IIA collagen fibrils in ki/ki mouse rib cartilage. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry of purified type XI collagen revealed a heterotrimeric molecular composition of α1(XI)α2(XI)α1(IIA) chains where the α1(IIA) chain is the IIA form of the α3(XI) chain. Since the N-propeptide of type XI collagen regulates type II collagen fibril diameter in cartilage, the retention of the exon 2-encoded IIA globular domain would structurally alter the N-propeptide of type XI collagen

  1. Molecular properties and fibril ultrastructure of types II and XI collagens in cartilage of mice expressing exclusively the α1(IIA) collagen isoform

    PubMed Central

    McAlinden, Audrey; Traeger, Geoffrey; Hansen, Uwe; Weis, Mary Ann; Ravindran, Soumya; Wirthlin, Louisa; Eyre, David R.; Fernandes, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Until now, no biological tools have been available to determine if a cross-linked collagen fibrillar network derived entirely from type IIA procollagen isoforms, can form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage. Recently, homozygous knock-in transgenic mice (Col2a1+ex2, ki/ki) were generated that exclusively express the IIA procollagen isoform during post-natal development while type IIB procollagen, normally present in the ECM of wild type mice, is absent. The difference between these Col2a1 isoforms is the inclusion (IIA) or exclusion (IIB) of exon 2 that is alternatively spliced in a developmentally regulated manner. Specifically, chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA mRNA isoforms while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB mRNA isoforms. Recent characterization of the Col2a1+ex2 mice has surprisingly shown that disruption of alternative splicing does not affect overt cartilage formation. In the present study, biochemical analyses showed that type IIA collagen extracted from ki/ki mouse rib cartilage can form homopolymers that are stabilized predominantly by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) cross-links at levels that differed from wild type rib cartilage. The findings indicate that mature type II collagen derived exclusively from type IIA procollagen molecules can form hetero-fibrils with type XI collagen and contribute to cartilage structure and function. Heteropolymers with type XI collagen also formed. Electron microscopy revealed mainly thin type IIA collagen fibrils in ki/ki mouse rib cartilage. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry of purified type XI collagen revealed a heterotrimeric molecular composition of α1(XI)α2(XI)α1(IIA) chains where the α1(IIA) chain is the IIA form of the α3(XI) chain. Since the N-propeptide of type XI collagen regulates type II collagen fibril diameter in cartilage, the retention of the exon 2-encoded IIA globular domain would structurally alter the N-propeptide of type XI collagen. This

  2. The Impact of Collagen Fibril Polarity on Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Charles-André; Bancelin, Stéphane; Van der Kolk, Jarno; Popov, Konstantin; Rivard, Maxime; Légaré, Katherine; Martel, Gabrielle; Richard, Hélène; Brown, Cameron; Laverty, Sheila; Ramunno, Lora; Légaré, François

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the implementation of interferometric second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy with femtosecond pulses. As a proof of concept, we imaged the phase distribution of SHG signal from the complex collagen architecture of juvenile equine growth cartilage. The results are analyzed in respect to numerical simulations to extract the relative orientation of collagen fibrils within the tissue. Our results reveal large domains of constant phase together with regions of quasi-random phase, which are correlated to respectively high- and low-intensity regions in the standard SHG images. A comparison with polarization-resolved SHG highlights the crucial role of relative fibril polarity in determining the SHG signal intensity. Indeed, it appears that even a well-organized noncentrosymmetric structure emits low SHG signal intensity if it has no predominant local polarity. This work illustrates how the complex architecture of noncentrosymmetric scatterers at the nanoscale governs the coherent building of SHG signal within the focal volume and is a key advance toward a complete understanding of the structural origin of SHG signals from tissues. PMID:26682809

  3. Pseudo-hyperelastic model of tendon hysteresis from adaptive recruitment of collagen type I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Dario, Paolo; Micera, Silvestro

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the functional relationship between the viscoelasticity and the morphology of soft collagenous tissues is fundamental for many applications in bioengineering science. This work presents a pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive theory aiming at describing the time-dependant hysteretic response of tendons subjected to uniaxial tensile loads. A macroscopic tendon is modeled as a composite homogeneous tissue with the anisotropic reinforcement of collagen type I fibrils. The tissue microstructure is considered as an adaptive network of fibrillar units connected in temporary junctions. The processes of breakage and reformation of active fibrils are thermally activated, and are occurring at random times. An internal softening variable and a dissipation energy function account for the adaptive arrangement of the fibrillar network in the pseudo-hyperelastic model. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests have been performed in vitro on porcine flexor digital tendons. The theoretical predictions fit accurately the experimental stress-strain data both for the loading and the unloading processes. The hysteresis behavior reflects the improvement in the efficiency and performance of the motion of the muscle-tendon unit at high strain rates. The results of the model demonstrate the microstructural importance of proteoglycans in determining the functional viscoelastic adaptability of the macroscopic tendon.

  4. Collagen Fibril Diameter Distributions in Rabbit Anterior Cruciate and Medial Collateral Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Robert A; Akeson, Wayne H; Spratt, Kevin; Amiel, David

    1999-01-01

    This study presents morphometric analyses of the collagen fibril diameters of rabbit anterior cruciate and medial collateral knee ligaments of New Zealand White rabbits (young, age two months and adult, age thirty-six to forty months). Measurements were made from transmission electron micrographs of transverse ligament sections of approximately 50,000x magnification. Statistically significant differences in the mean fibril diameters were found between the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments of the thirty-six to forty month old animals (.069 ± .005, .092 ± .016 mm, p < .1); however, no statistical significance was found for differences between these ligaments in two month old animals (.077 ± .006, .082 ± .009, p > .1). These data support the idea that known differences in fibril distributions of adult rabbit anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments develop with maturation, and may reflect both the cellular environment in which the fibrocytes of these ligaments are subject to, as well as the developmental genetic program of these cell populations. PMID:10847518

  5. Development of human corneal epithelium on organized fibrillated transparent collagen matrices synthesized at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Tidu, Aurélien; Ghoubay-Benallaoua, Djida; Lynch, Barbara; Haye, Bernard; Illoul, Corinne; Allain, Jean-Marc; Borderie, Vincent M; Mosser, Gervaise

    2015-08-01

    Several diseases can lead to opacification of cornea requiring transplantation of donor tissue to restore vision. In this context, transparent collagen I fibrillated matrices have been synthesized at 15, 30, 60 and 90 mg/mL. The matrices were evaluated for fibril organizations, transparency, mechanical properties and ability to support corneal epithelial cell culture. The best results were obtained with 90 mg/mL scaffolds. At this concentration, the fibril organization presented some similarities to that found in corneal stroma. Matrices had a mean Young's modulus of 570 kPa and acellular scaffolds had a transparency of 87% in the 380-780 nm wavelength range. Human corneal epithelial cells successfully colonized the surface of the scaffolds and generated an epithelium with characteristics of corneal epithelial cells (i.e. expression of cytokeratin 3 and presence of desmosomes) and maintenance of stemness during culture (i.e. expression of ΔNp63α and formation of holoclones in colony formation assay). Presence of cultured epithelium on the matrices was associated with increased transparency (89%).

  6. A possible role of collagen fibrils in the process of calcification observed in the capsule of the pineal gland in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Humbert, W; Cuisinier, F; Voegel, J C; Pévet, P

    1997-06-01

    The relationship between collagen fibrils and calcified concretions exclusively appearing in the pineal gland of adult/aging rats has been investigated. Deposits of lanthanum, which replace calcium ions are distributed along collagen fibrils with a repeating period of about 70 nm. Calcium has been detected histochemically between collagen bundles surrounding extracellular concretions by means of the pyroantimonate method and by X-ray microanalysis. It is associated with phosphorus. The data presented here suggest that collagen fibrils are involved in the genesis and growth of extracellular concretions located in the connective tissue surrounding the pineal gland of aging rats.

  7. Surface located procollagen N-propeptides on dermatosparactic collagen fibrils are not cleaved by procollagen N-proteinase and do not inhibit binding of decorin to the fibril surface.

    PubMed

    Watson, R B; Holmes, D F; Graham, H K; Nusgens, B V; Kadler, K E

    1998-04-24

    Dermatosparaxis is a recessive disorder of animals (including man) which is caused by mutations in the gene for the enzyme procollagen N-proteinase and is characterised by extreme skin fragility. Partial loss of enzyme activity results in accumulation of pNcollagen (collagen with N-propeptides) and abnormal collagen fibrils in the fragile skin. How the N-propeptides persist in the tissue and how abnormal fibril morphology results in fragile skin is poorly understood. Using biochemical and quantitative mass mapping electron microscopy we showed that the collagen fibrils in the skin of a dermatosparactic calf contained 57% type I pNcollagen and 43% type I collagen and the fibrils were irregularly arranged in bundles and hieroglyphic in cross-section. Image analysis of the fibril cross-sections suggested that the deviation from circularity of dermatosparactic fibrils was caused by N-propeptides of pNcollagen being located at the fibril surface. Comparison of experimental and theoretical axial mass distributions of the fibrils showed that the N-propeptides were located to the overlap zone of the fibril D-period (where D=67 nm, the characteristic axial periodicity of collagen fibrils). Treatment of the dermatosparactic fibrils with N-proteinase did not remove the N-propeptides from the fibrils, although the N-propeptides were efficiently removed by trypsin and chymotrypsin. However, the N-propeptides were efficiently cleaved by the N-proteinase when the pNcollagen molecules were extracted from the fibrils. These results are consistent with close packing of N-propeptides at the fibril surface which prevented cleavage by the N-proteinase. Long-range axial mass determination along the fibril length showed gross non-uniformity with multiple mass bulges. Of note is the skin fragility in dermatosparaxis, and also the appearance of mass bulges along the fibril long axis symptomatic of the fragile skin of mice which lack decorin. Western blot analysis showed that the

  8. The Self-assembly of a Mini-fibril with Axial Periodicity from a Designed Collagen-mimetic Triple Helix*

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parminder Jeet; Strawn, Rebecca; Bai, Hanying; Xu, Ke; Ordas, Gabriel; Matsui, Hiroshi; Xu, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    In this work we describe the self-assembly of a collagen-like periodic mini-fibril from a recombinant triple helix. The triple helix, designated Col108, is expressed in Escherichia coli using an artificial gene and consists of a 378-residue triple helix domain organized into three pseudo-repeating sequence units. The peptide forms a stable triple helix with a melting temperature of 41 °C. Upon increases of pH and temperature, Col108 self-assembles in solution into smooth mini-fibrils with the cross-striated banding pattern typical of fibrillar collagens. The banding pattern is characterized by an axially repeating feature of ∼35 nm as observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Both the negatively stained and the positively stained transmission electron microscopy patterns of the Col108 mini-fibrils are consistent with a staggered arrangement of triple helices having a staggering value of 123 residues, a value closely connected to the size of one repeat sequence unit. A mechanism is proposed for the mini-fibril formation of Col108 in which the axial periodicity is instigated by the built-in sequence periodicity and stabilized by the optimized interactions between the triple helices in a 1-unit staggered arrangement. Lacking hydroxyproline residues and telopeptides, two factors implicated in the fibrillogenesis of native collagen, the Col108 mini-fibrils demonstrate that sequence features of the triple helical domain alone are sufficient to “code” for axially repeating periodicity of fibrils. To our knowledge, Col108 is the first designed triple helix to self-assemble into periodic fibrils and offers a unique opportunity to unravel the specific molecular interactions of collagen fibrillogenesis. PMID:25673694

  9. The self-assembly of a mini-fibril with axial periodicity from a designed collagen-mimetic triple helix.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parminder Jeet; Strawn, Rebecca; Bai, Hanying; Xu, Ke; Ordas, Gabriel; Matsui, Hiroshi; Xu, Yujia

    2015-04-03

    In this work we describe the self-assembly of a collagen-like periodic mini-fibril from a recombinant triple helix. The triple helix, designated Col108, is expressed in Escherichia coli using an artificial gene and consists of a 378-residue triple helix domain organized into three pseudo-repeating sequence units. The peptide forms a stable triple helix with a melting temperature of 41 °C. Upon increases of pH and temperature, Col108 self-assembles in solution into smooth mini-fibrils with the cross-striated banding pattern typical of fibrillar collagens. The banding pattern is characterized by an axially repeating feature of ∼35 nm as observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Both the negatively stained and the positively stained transmission electron microscopy patterns of the Col108 mini-fibrils are consistent with a staggered arrangement of triple helices having a staggering value of 123 residues, a value closely connected to the size of one repeat sequence unit. A mechanism is proposed for the mini-fibril formation of Col108 in which the axial periodicity is instigated by the built-in sequence periodicity and stabilized by the optimized interactions between the triple helices in a 1-unit staggered arrangement. Lacking hydroxyproline residues and telopeptides, two factors implicated in the fibrillogenesis of native collagen, the Col108 mini-fibrils demonstrate that sequence features of the triple helical domain alone are sufficient to "code" for axially repeating periodicity of fibrils. To our knowledge, Col108 is the first designed triple helix to self-assemble into periodic fibrils and offers a unique opportunity to unravel the specific molecular interactions of collagen fibrillogenesis.

  10. Influence of the mineral staggering on the elastic properties of the mineralized collagen fibril in lamellar bone.

    PubMed

    Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Fuenmayor, F Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a three-dimensional finite element model of the staggered distribution of the mineral within the mineralized collagen fibril has been developed to characterize the lamellar bone elastic behavior at the sub-micro length scale. Minerals have been assumed to be embedded in a collagen matrix, and different degrees of mineralization have been considered allowing the growth of platelet-shaped minerals both in the axial and the transverse directions of the fibril, through the variation of the lateral space between platelets. We provide numerical values and trends for all the elastic constants of the mineralized collagen fibril as a function of the volume fraction of mineral. In our results, we verify the high influence of the mineral overlapping on the mechanical response of the fibril and we highlight that the lateral distance between crystals is relevant to the mechanical behavior of the fibril and not only the mineral overlapping in the axial direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The collagen fibril architecture in the lamina cribrosa and peripapillary sclera predicted by a computational remodeling approach.

    PubMed

    Grytz, Rafael; Meschke, Günther; Jonas, Jost B

    2011-06-01

    The biomechanics of the optic nerve head is assumed to play an important role in ganglion cell loss in glaucoma. Organized collagen fibrils form complex networks that introduce strong anisotropic and nonlinear attributes into the constitutive response of the peripapillary sclera (PPS) and lamina cribrosa (LC) dominating the biomechanics of the optic nerve head. The recently presented computational remodeling approach (Grytz and Meschke in Biomech Model Mechanobiol 9:225-235, 2010) was used to predict the micro-architecture in the LC and PPS, and to investigate its impact on intraocular pressure-related deformations. The mechanical properties of the LC and PPS were derived from a microstructure-oriented constitutive model that included the stretch-dependent stiffening and the statistically distributed orientations of the collagen fibrils. Biomechanically induced adaptation of the local micro-architecture was captured by allowing collagen fibrils to be reoriented in response to the intraocular pressure-related loading conditions. In agreement with experimental observations, the remodeling algorithm predicted the existence of an annulus of fibrils around the scleral canal in the PPS, and a predominant radial orientation of fibrils in the periphery of the LC. The peripapillary annulus significantly reduced the intraocular pressure-related expansion of the scleral canal and shielded the LC from high tensile stresses. The radial oriented fibrils in the LC periphery reinforced the LC against transversal shear stresses and reduced LC bending deformations. The numerical approach presents a novel and reasonable biomechanical explanation of the spatial orientation of fibrillar collagen in the optic nerve head.

  12. Fibril reinforced poroelastic model predicts specifically mechanical behavior of normal, proteoglycan depleted and collagen degraded articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Rami K; Laasanen, Mikko S; Töyräs, Juha; Lappalainen, Reijo; Helminen, Heikki J; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2003-09-01

    Degradation of collagen network and proteoglycan (PG) macromolecules are signs of articular cartilage degeneration. These changes impair cartilage mechanical function. Effects of collagen degradation and PG depletion on the time-dependent mechanical behavior of cartilage are different. In this study, numerical analyses, which take the compression-tension nonlinearity of the tissue into account, were carried out using a fibril reinforced poroelastic finite element model. The study aimed at improving our understanding of the stress-relaxation behavior of normal and degenerated cartilage in unconfined compression. PG and collagen degradations were simulated by decreasing the Young's modulus of the drained porous (nonfibrillar) matrix and the fibril network, respectively. Numerical analyses were compared to results from experimental tests with chondroitinase ABC (PG depletion) or collagenase (collagen degradation) digested samples. Fibril reinforced poroelastic model predicted the experimental behavior of cartilage after chondroitinase ABC digestion by a major decrease of the drained porous matrix modulus (-64+/-28%) and a minor decrease of the fibril network modulus (-11+/-9%). After collagenase digestion, in contrast, the numerical analyses predicted the experimental behavior of cartilage by a major decrease of the fibril network modulus (-69+/-5%) and a decrease of the drained porous matrix modulus (-44+/-18%). The reduction of the drained porous matrix modulus after collagenase digestion was consistent with the microscopically observed secondary PG loss from the tissue. The present results indicate that the fibril reinforced poroelastic model is able to predict specifically characteristic alterations in the stress-relaxation behavior of cartilage after enzymatic modifications of the tissue. We conclude that the compression-tension nonlinearity of the tissue is needed to capture realistically the mechanical behavior of normal and degenerated articular cartilage.

  13. Microstructures and rheological properties of tilapia fish-scale collagen hydrogels with aligned fibrils fabricated under magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Hirota, N; Okuda, M; Takeguchi, M; Kobayashi, H; Hanagata, N; Ikoma, T

    2011-02-01

    Tilapia fish-scale type I atelocollagen hydrogels with aligned fibril structures were fabricated under a strong magnetic field of 6 or 12 T using two different methods. In the first method, a solution of acid-soluble collagen was neutralized with phosphate buffer saline and maintained in the magnetic field at 28°C for 3h. Under these conditions fibrogenesis occurs, and a hydrogel is formed. The hydrogel was subsequently crosslinked with ethyl-dimethylcarbodiimide (EDC). In the second method, the hydrogels were formed as described above, but in the absence of an applied magnetic field. Only after being crosslinked with EDC were these gels exposed to the magnetic field (28°C for 3h). Both methods led to alignment of the collagen fibrils perpendicular to the magnetic direction, the extent of which depended on the duration of magnetic treatment. Even after EDC treatment, collagen fibrils can align, indicating that crosslinking has taken place within fibrils. Both sorts of aligned hydrogels exhibited similar rheological properties with higher storage and loss moduli than were observed with unoriented gels. The hydrogels treated at 6 T had the best rheological properties. The decrease in tangent angle phase delta indicated that the ratio of elasticity to viscosity was greater in the crosslinked than in the non-crosslinked hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy images showed that magnetic treatment had no effect on the nanostructure of collagen fibrils. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicated that collagen hydrogels with and without magnetic treatment had the same denaturation temperature, 48°C, while EDC crosslinking increased the denaturation temperature to 62°C. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Incorporation of a Decorin Biomimetic Enhances the Mechanical Properties of Electrochemically Aligned Collagen Threads

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Vipuil; Paderi, John E.; Akkus, Anna; Smith, Katie M.; Balachandran, Dave; Beaudoin, Stephen; Panitch, Alyssa; Akkus, Ozan

    2011-01-01

    Orientational anisotropy of collagen molecules is integral for the mechanical strength of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported a novel methodology to synthesize highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) threads with mechanical properties converging upon those of native tendon. Decorin, a small leucine rich proteoglycan (SLRP), binds to fibrillar collagen and has been suggested to enhance the mechanical properties of tendon. Based on the structure of natural decorin, we have previously designed and synthesized a peptidoglycan (DS-SILY) that mimics decorin both structurally and functionally. In this study, we investigated the effect of the incorporation of DS-SILY on the mechanical properties and structural organization of ELAC threads. The results indicated that the addition of DS-SILY at a molar ratio of 30:1 (Collagen:DS-SILY) significantly enhanced the ultimate stress and ultimate strain of the ELAC threads. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the addition of DS-SILY at a molar ratio of 30:1 resulted in a more thermally stable collagen structure. However, addition of DS-SILY at a higher concentration (10:1 Collagen:DS-SILY) yielded weaker threads with mechanical properties comparable to collagen control threads. Transmission emission microscopy revealed that the addition of DS-SILY at a higher concentration (10:1) resulted in pronounced aggregation of collagen fibrils. More importantly, these aggregates were not aligned along the long axis of the ELAC thereby compromising on the overall tensile properties of the material. We conclude that incorporation of an optimal amount of DS-SILY is a promising approach to synthesize mechanically competent collagen based biomaterials for tendon tissue engineering applications. PMID:21356334

  15. The binding capacity of α1β1-, α2β1- and α10β1-integrins depends on non-collagenous surface macromolecules rather than the collagens in cartilage fibrils.

    PubMed

    Woltersdorf, Christian; Bonk, Melanie; Leitinger, Birgit; Huhtala, Mikko; Käpylä, Jarmo; Heino, Jyrki; Gil Girol, Christian; Niland, Stephan; Eble, Johannes A; Bruckner, Peter; Dreier, Rita; Hansen, Uwe

    2017-02-10

    Interactions of cells with supramolecular aggregates of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mediated, in part, by cell surface receptors of the integrin family. These are important molecular components of cell surface-suprastructures regulating cellular activities in general. A subfamily of β1-integrins with von Willebrand-factor A-like domains (I-domains) in their α-chains can bind to collagen molecules and, therefore, are considered as important cellular mechano-receptors. Here we show that chondrocytes strongly bind to cartilage collagens in the form of individual triple helical molecules but very weakly to fibrils formed by the same molecules. We also find that chondrocyte integrins α1β1-, α2β1- and α10β1-integrins and their I-domains have the same characteristics. Nevertheless we find integrin binding to mechanically generated cartilage fibril fragments, which also comprise peripheral non-collagenous material. We conclude that cell adhesion results from binding of integrin-containing adhesion suprastructures to the non-collagenous fibril periphery but not to the collagenous fibril cores. The biological importance of the well-investigated recognition of collagen molecules by integrins is unknown. Possible scenarios may include fibrillogenesis, fibril degradation and/or phagocytosis, recruitment of cells to remodeling sites, or molecular signaling across cytoplasmic membranes. In these circumstances, collagen molecules may lack a fibrillar organization. However, other processes requiring robust biomechanical functions, such as fibril organization in tissues, cell division, adhesion, or migration, do not involve direct integrin-collagen interactions.

  16. Interleukin-4 Receptor α Signaling in Myeloid Cells Controls Collagen Fibril Assembly in Skin Repair.

    PubMed

    Knipper, Johanna A; Willenborg, Sebastian; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Bloch, Wilhelm; Maaß, Tobias; Wagener, Raimund; Krieg, Thomas; Sutherland, Tara; Munitz, Ariel; Rothenberg, Marc E; Niehoff, Anja; Richardson, Rebecca; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Allen, Judith E; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-10-20

    Activation of the immune response during injury is a critical early event that determines whether the outcome of tissue restoration is regeneration or replacement of the damaged tissue with a scar. The mechanisms by which immune signals control these fundamentally different regenerative pathways are largely unknown. We have demonstrated that, during skin repair in mice, interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα)-dependent macrophage activation controlled collagen fibril assembly and that this process was important for effective repair while having adverse pro-fibrotic effects. We identified Relm-α as one important player in the pathway from IL-4Rα signaling in macrophages to the induction of lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), an enzyme that directs persistent pro-fibrotic collagen cross-links, in fibroblasts. Notably, Relm-β induced LH2 in human fibroblasts, and expression of both factors was increased in lipodermatosclerosis, a condition of excessive human skin fibrosis. Collectively, our findings provide mechanistic insights into the link between type 2 immunity and initiation of pro-fibrotic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The phenotype of cancer cell invasion controlled by fibril diameter and pore size of 3D collagen networks.

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Rubner, Stefan; Martin, Steve; Kurth, Tony; Riedel, Stefanie; Mierke, Claudia T; Pompe, Tilo

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of cancer cells is strongly influenced by the properties of extracellular microenvironments, including topology, mechanics and composition. As topological and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix are hard to access and control for in-depth studies of underlying mechanisms in vivo, defined biomimetic in vitro models are needed. Herein we show, how pore size and fibril diameter of collagen I networks distinctively regulate cancer cell morphology and invasion. Three-dimensional collagen I matrices with a tight control of pore size, fibril diameter and stiffness were reconstituted by adjustment of concentration and pH value during matrix reconstitution. At first, a detailed analysis of topology and mechanics of matrices using confocal laser scanning microscopy, image analysis tools and force spectroscopy indicate pore size and not fibril diameter as the major determinant of matrix elasticity. Secondly, by using two different breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), we demonstrate collagen fibril diameter--and not pore size--to primarily regulate cell morphology, cluster formation and invasion. Invasiveness increased and clustering decreased with increasing fibril diameter for both, the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells with mesenchymal migratory phenotype and the MCF-7 cells with amoeboid migratory phenotype. As this behavior was independent of overall pore size, matrix elasticity is shown to be not the major determinant of the cell characteristics. Our work emphasizes the complex relationship between structural-mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix and invasive behavior of cancer cells. It suggests a correlation of migratory and invasive phenotype of cancer cells in dependence on topological and mechanical features of the length scale of single fibrils and not on coarse-grained network properties.

  18. Collagen Fibrils in Skin Orient in the Direction of Applied Uniaxial Load in Proportion to Stress while Exhibiting Differential Strains around Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Sterling; Scott, Wentzell; Macione, James; Kotha, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    We determined inhomogeneity of strains around discontinuities as well as changes in orientation of collagen fibrils under applied load in skin. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) images of collagen fibrils were obtained at different strain magnitudes. Changes in collagen orientation were analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) while strain inhomogeneity was determined at different distances from hair follicles using Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A parameter, defined as the Collagen Orientation Index (COI), is introduced that accounts for the increasingly ellipsoidal nature of the FFT amplitude images upon loading. We show that the COI demonstrates two distinct mechanical regimes, one at low strains (0%, 2.5%, 5% strain) in which randomly oriented collagen fibrils align in the direction of applied deformation. In the second regime, beginning at 5% strain, collagen fibrils elongate in response to applied deformation. Furthermore, the COI is also found to be linearly correlated with the applied stress indicating that collagen fibrils orient to take the applied load. DIC results indicated that major principal strains were found to increase with increased load at all locations. In contrast, minimum principal strain was dependent on distance from hair follicles. These findings are significant because global and local changes in collagen deformations are expected to be changed by disease, and could affect stem cell populations surrounding hair follicles, including mesenchymal stem cells within the outer root sheath. PMID:28788035

  19. Thrombogenic collagen-mimetic peptides: Self-assembly of triple helix-based fibrils driven by hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Mabel A; Kinney, William A; Chen, Cailin; Vinter, Jeremy G; Almond, Harold R; Balss, Karin M; Maryanoff, Cynthia A; Schmidt, Ute; Breslav, Michael; Mahan, Andrew; Lacy, Eilyn; Maryanoff, Bruce E

    2008-06-24

    Collagens are integral structural proteins in animal tissues and play key functional roles in cellular modulation. We sought to discover collagen model peptides (CMPs) that would form triple helices and self-assemble into supramolecular fibrils exhibiting collagen-like biological activity without preorganizing the peptide chains by covalent linkages. This challenging objective was accomplished by placing aromatic groups on the ends of a representative 30-mer CMP, (GPO)(10), as with l-phenylalanine and l-pentafluorophenylalanine in 32-mer 1a. Computational studies on homologous 29-mers 1a'-d' (one less GPO), as pairs of triple helices interacting head-to-tail, yielded stabilization energies in the order 1a' > 1b' > 1c' > 1d', supporting the hypothesis that hydrophobic aromatic groups can drive CMP self-assembly. Peptides 1a-d were studied comparatively relative to structural properties and ability to stimulate human platelets. Although each 32-mer formed stable triple helices (CD) spectroscopy, only 1a and 1b self-assembled into micrometer-scale fibrils. Light microscopy images for 1a depicted long collagen-like fibrils, whereas images for 1d did not. Atomic force microscopy topographical images indicated that 1a and 1b self-organize into microfibrillar species, whereas 1c and 1d do not. Peptides 1a and 1b induced the aggregation of human blood platelets with a potency similar to type I collagen, whereas 1c was much less effective, and 1d was inactive (EC(50) potency: 1a/1b > 1c > 1d). Thus, 1a and 1b spontaneously self-assemble into thrombogenic collagen-mimetic materials because of hydrophobic aromatic interactions provided by the special end-groups. These findings have important implications for the design of biofunctional CMPs.

  20. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen; Zhuang, Caiping; Li, Lihua; Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan; Zhou, Changren

    2016-11-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Collagen fibril orientation in ovine and bovine leather affects strength: a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) study.

    PubMed

    Basil-Jones, Melissa M; Edmonds, Richard L; Cooper, Sue M; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2011-09-28

    There is a large difference in strength between ovine and bovine leather. The structure and arrangement of fibrous collagen in leather and the relationship between collagen structure and leather strength has until now been poorly understood. Synchrotron based SAXS is used to characterize the fibrous collagen structure in a series of ovine and bovine leathers and to relate it to tear strength. SAXS gives quantitative information on the amount of fibrous collagen, the orientation (direction and spread) of the collagen microfibrils, and the d-spacing of the collagen. The amount of collagen varies through the thickness of the leather from the grain to the corium, with a greater concentration of crystalline collagen measured toward the corium side. The orientation index (OI) is correlated strongly with strength in ovine leather and between ovine and bovine leathers. Stronger leather has the fibrils arranged mostly parallel to the plane of the leather surface (high OI), while weaker leather has more out-of-plane fibrils (low OI). With the measurement taken parallel to the animal's backbone, weak (19.9 N/mm) ovine leather has an OI of 0.422 (0.033), stronger (39.5 N/mm) ovine leather has an OI of 0.452 (0.033), and bovine leather with a strength of (61.5 N/mm) has an OI of 0.493 (0.016). The d-spacing profile through leather thickness also varies according to leather strength, with little variation being detected in weak ovine leather (average=64.3 (0.5) nm), but with strong ovine leather and bovine leather (which is even stronger) exhibiting a dip in d-spacing (from 64.5 nm at the edges dropping to 62 nm in the center). This work provides a clear understanding of a nanostructural characteristic of ovine and bovine leather that leads to differences in strength.

  2. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale.

  3. Regional stiffening with aging in tibialis anterior tendons of mice occurs independent of changes in collagen fibril morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lauren K.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of tendon degeneration and rupture increases with advancing age. The mechanisms underlying this increased risk remain unknown but may arise because of age-related changes in tendon mechanical properties and structure. Our purpose was to determine the effect of aging on tendon mechanical properties and collagen fibril morphology. Regional mechanical properties and collagen fibril characteristics were determined along the length of tibialis anterior (TA) tendons from adult (8- to 12-mo-old) and old (28- to 30-mo-old) mice. Tangent modulus of all regions along the tendons increased in old age, but the increase was substantially greater in the proximal region adjacent to the muscle than in the rest of the tendon. Overall end-to-end modulus increased with old age at maximum tendon strain (799 ± 157 vs. 1,419 ± 91 MPa) and at physiologically relevant strain (377 ± 137 vs. 798 ± 104 MPa). Despite the dramatic changes in tendon mechanical properties from adulthood to old age, collagen fibril morphology and packing fraction remained relatively constant in all tendon regions examined. Since tendon properties are influenced by their external loading environment, we also examined the effect of aging on TA muscle contractile properties. Maximum isometric force did not differ between the age groups. We conclude that TA tendons stiffen in a region-dependent manner throughout the life span, but the changes in mechanical properties are not accompanied by corresponding changes in collagen fibril morphology or force-generating capacity of the TA muscle. PMID:21737825

  4. Lower strength of the human posterior patellar tendon seems unrelated to mature collagen cross-linking and fibril morphology.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Philip; Haraldsson, Bjarki Thor; Aagaard, Per; Kovanen, Vuokko; Avery, Nicholas C; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Krogsgaard, Michael; Kjaer, Michael; Peter Magnusson, S

    2010-01-01

    The human patellar tendon is frequently affected by tendinopathy, but the etiology of the condition is not established, although differential loading of the anterior and posterior tendon may be associated with the condition. We hypothesized that changes in fibril morphology and collagen cross-linking would parallel differences in material strength between the anterior and posterior tendon. Tendon fascicles were obtained from elective ACL surgery patients and tested micromechanically. Transmission electron microscopy was used to assess fibril morphology, and collagen cross-linking was determined by HPLC and calorimetry. Anterior fascicles were markedly stronger (peak stress: 54.3 +/- 21.2 vs. 39.7 +/- 21.3 MPa; P < 0.05) and stiffer (624 +/- 232 vs. 362 +/- 170 MPa; P < 0.01) than posterior fascicles. Notably, mature pyridinium type cross-links were less abundant in anterior fascicles (hydroxylysylpyridinoline: 0.859 +/- 0.197 vs. 1.416 +/- 0.250 mol/mol, P = 0.001; lysylpyridinoline: 0.023 +/- 0.006 vs. 0.035 +/- 0.006 mol/mol, P < 0.01), whereas pentosidine and pyrrole concentrations showed no regional differences. Fibril diameters tended to be larger in anterior fascicles (7.819 +/- 2.168 vs. 4.897 +/- 1.434 nm(2); P = 0.10). Material properties did not appear closely related to cross-linking or fibril morphology. These findings suggest region-specific differences in mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties of the human patellar tendon.

  5. Nano measurements with micro-devices: mechanical properties of hydrated collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Eppell, S.J; Smith, B.N; Kahn, H; Ballarini, R

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of a biological material to applied forces reflects deformation mechanisms occurring within a hierarchical architecture extending over several distinct length scales. Characterizing and in turn predicting the behaviour of such a material requires an understanding of the mechanical properties of the substructures within the hierarchy, the interaction between the substructures, and the relative influence of each substructure on the overall behaviour. While significant progress has been made in mechanical testing of micrometre to millimetre sized biological specimens, quantitative reproducible experimental techniques for making mechanical measurements on specimens with characteristic dimensions in the smaller range of 10–1000 nm are lacking. Filling this void in experimentation is a necessary step towards the development of realistic multiscale computational models useful to predict and mitigate the risk of bone fracture, design improved synthetic replacements for bones, tendons and ligaments, and engineer bioinspired efficient and environmentally friendly structures. Here, we describe a microelectromechanical systems device for directly measuring the tensile strength, stiffness and fatigue behaviour of nanoscale fibres. We used the device to obtain the first stress–strain curve of an isolated collagen fibril producing the modulus and some fatigue properties of this soft nanofibril. PMID:16849223

  6. Evidence against proteoglycan mediated collagen fibril load transmission and dynamic viscoelasticity in tendon.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G

    2009-10-01

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate side-chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans have been increasingly posited to act as molecular cross links between adjacent collagen fibrils and to directly contribute to tendon elasticity. GAGs have also been implicated in tendon viscoelasticity, supposedly affecting frictional loss during elongation or fluid flow through the extra cellular matrix. The current study sought to systematically test these theories of tendon structure-function by investigating the mechanical repercussions of enzymatic depletion of GAG complexes by chondroitinase ABC in a reproducible tendon structure-function model (rat tail tendon fascicles). The extent of GAG removal (at least 93%) was verified by relevant spectrophotometric assays and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic viscoelastic tensile tests on GAG depleted rat tail tendon fascicle were not mechanically different from controls in storage modulus (elastic behavior) over a wide range of strain-rates (0.05, 0.5, and 5% change in length per second) in either the linear or nonlinear regions of the material curve. Loss modulus (viscoelastic behavior) was only affected in the nonlinear region at the highest strain-rate, and even this effect was marginal (19% increased loss modulus, p=0.035). Thus glycosaminoglycan chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans do not appear to mediate dynamic elastic behavior nor do they appear to regulate the dynamic viscoelastic properties in rat tail tendon fascicles.

  7. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Saud A.; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I. A.; Khan, Adnan A.; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark. PMID:26167294

  8. Nano measurements with micro-devices: mechanical properties of hydrated collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Eppell, S J; Smith, B N; Kahn, H; Ballarini, R

    2006-02-22

    The mechanical response of a biological material to applied forces reflects deformation mechanisms occurring within a hierarchical architecture extending over several distinct length scales. Characterizing and in turn predicting the behaviour of such a material requires an understanding of the mechanical properties of the substructures within the hierarchy, the interaction between the substructures, and the relative influence of each substructure on the overall behaviour. While significant progress has been made in mechanical testing of micrometre to millimetre sized biological specimens, quantitative reproducible experimental techniques for making mechanical measurements on specimens with characteristic dimensions in the smaller range of 10-1000 nm are lacking. Filling this void in experimentation is a necessary step towards the development of realistic multiscale computational models useful to predict and mitigate the risk of bone fracture, design improved synthetic replacements for bones, tendons and ligaments, and engineer bioinspired efficient and environmentally friendly structures. Here, we describe a microelectromechanical systems device for directly measuring the tensile strength, stiffness and fatigue behaviour of nanoscale fibres. We used the device to obtain the first stress-strain curve of an isolated collagen fibril producing the modulus and some fatigue properties of this soft nanofibril.

  9. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Saud A; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I A; Khan, Adnan A; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark.

  10. Changes in collagen fibril network organization and proteoglycan distribution in equine articular cartilage during maturation and growth.

    PubMed

    Hyttinen, Mika M; Holopainen, Jaakko; van Weeren, P René; Firth, Elwyn C; Helminen, Heikki J; Brama, Pieter A J

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to record growth-related changes in collagen network organization and proteoglycan distribution in intermittently peak-loaded and continuously lower-level-loaded articular cartilage. Cartilage from the proximal phalangeal bone of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint at birth, at 5, 11 and 18 months, and at 6-10 years of age was collected from two sites. Site 1, at the joint margin, is unloaded at slow gaits but is subjected to high-intensity loading during athletic activity; site 2 is a continuously but less intensively loaded site in the centre of the joint. The degree of collagen parallelism was determined with quantitative polarized light microscopy and the parallelism index for collagen fibrils was computed from the cartilage surface to the osteochondral junction. Concurrent changes in the proteoglycan distribution were quantified with digital densitometry. We found that the parallelism index increased significantly with age (up to 90%). At birth, site 2 exhibited a more organized collagen network than site 1. In adult horses this situation was reversed. The superficial and intermediate zones exhibited the greatest reorganization of collagen. Site 1 had a higher proteoglycan content than site 2 at birth but here too the situation was reversed in adult horses. We conclude that large changes in joint loading during growth and maturation in the period from birth to adulthood profoundly affect the architecture of the collagen network in equine cartilage. In addition, the distribution and content of proteoglycans are modified significantly by altered joint use. Intermittent peak-loading with shear seems to induce higher collagen parallelism and a lower proteoglycan content in cartilage than more constant weight-bearing. Therefore, we hypothesize that the formation of mature articular cartilage with a highly parallel collagen network and relatively low proteoglycan content in the peak-loaded area of a joint is needed to withstand

  11. Enhanced cell colonization of collagen scaffold by ultraviolet/ozone surface processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaozong; McKenna, Fiona-Mairead; Liang, He; Johnstone, Alan; Abel, Eric W

    2010-12-01

    Both physical and chemical crosslinking methods have been shown to be effective in improving the biological stability and mechanical properties of porous collagen scaffolds. However, the wetting of the collagen fibril surface by a culture medium is reduced and it is difficult for the medium to diffuse into the 3D structure of a porous collagen scaffold. This article reports a strategy for the surface processing of crosslinked collagen scaffolds by an integrated ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing technique. Ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing improved surface wettability for both the exterior and interior surfaces of the porous 3D collagen scaffold. This leads to a significant improvement in the scaffolds ability to take up water without compromising the bulk biological stability and mechanical properties. In vitro evaluation using mesenchymal stem cell demonstrated that surface processing enhanced cell colonization of the scaffolds, cells could migrate deep into the structure of the scaffolds, and significantly higher levels of cell proliferation were achieved. In contrast, the cells were unable to migrate deep into the scaffolds, and most of the cells that survived were observed only in the top seeding layer resulting in a low level of cell activity in the unprocessed scaffolds.

  12. Characterization via atomic force microscopy of discrete plasticity in collagen fibrils from mechanically overloaded tendons: Nano-scale structural changes mimic rope failure.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Kreplak, Laurent; Lee, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    Tendons exposed to tensile overload show a structural alteration at the fibril scale termed discrete plasticity. Serial kinks appear along individual collagen fibrils that are susceptible to enzymatic digestion and are thermally unstable. Using atomic force microscopy we mapped the topography and mechanical properties in dehydrated and hydrated states of 25 control fibrils and 25 fibrils displaying periodic kinks, extracted from overloaded bovine tail tendons. Using the measured modulus of the hydrated fibrils as a probe of molecular density, we observed a non-linear negative correlation between molecular density and kink density of individual fibrils. This is accompanied by an increase in water uptake with kink density and a doubling of the coefficient of variation of the modulus between kinked, and control fibrils. The mechanical property maps of kinked collagen fibrils show radial heterogeneity that can be modeled as a high-density core surrounded by a low-density shell. The core of the fibril contains the kink structures characteristic of discrete plasticity; separated by inter-kink regions, which often retain the D-banding structure. We propose that the shell and kink structures mimic characteristic damage motifs observed in laid rope strands.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor I enhances collagen synthesis in engineered human tendon tissue.

    PubMed

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Bayer, Monika L; Eliasson, Pernilla; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Isolated human tendon cells form 3D tendon constructs that demonstrate collagen fibrillogenesis and feature structural similarities to tendon when cultured under tensile load. The exact role of circulating growth factors for collagen formation in tendon is sparsely examined. We investigated the influence of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on tendon construct formation in 3D cell culture. Tendon constructs were grown in 0.5 or 10% FBS with or without IGF-I (250 mg/ml) supplementation. Collagen content (fluorometric), mRNA levels (PCR) and fibril diameter (transmission electron microscopy) were determined at 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days. IGF-I revealed a stimulating effect on fibril diameter (up to day 21), mRNA for collagen (to day 28), tenomodulin (to day 28) and scleraxis (at days 10 and 14), and on overall collagen content. 10% FBS diminished the development of fibril diameter (day 14), collagen content (at days 21 and 28) and mRNA expression for collagen, tenomodulin and scleraxis. IGF-I supplementation promotes early onset of tensile load induced collagen formation and tendon structural arrangement, whereas the FBS concentration routinely used in cultures diminishes collagen expression, collagen content and fibril formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced second-harmonic-generation detection of collagen by means of optical wavefront shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Throckmorton, Graham A.; Hokr, Brett H.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) has proven to be an effective method to both image and detect structural variations in fibrillar collagen. The ability to detect these differences is especially useful in studying diseases like cancer and fibrosis.1 SHG techniques have historically been limited by their ability to penetrate and image through strongly scattering tissues. Recently, optical wavefront shaping has enabled light to be focused through highly scattering media such as biological tissue.2-4 This technology also enables us to examine the dependence of second harmonic generation on the spatial phase of the pump laser. Here, we demonstrate that wavefront shaping can be used to enhance the generation of second harmonic light from collagen fibrils even when scattering is low or non-existent.

  15. Collagen enhances compatibility and strength of glass ionomers.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-J; Wu, C-M; Chang, Y-C; Fanchiang, J-C; Shieh, D-B; Wong, T-Y

    2009-05-01

    Glass ionomers have been used for perforation repair and retrograde filling where biointegration with periodontal tissue is required. Collagen has been demonstrated to promote cellular adhesion and enhance mineral tissue compressive strength. It was hypothesized that an appropriate concentration of collagen integrated into glass ionomer may improve both bio-compatibility and the mechanical properties of the material. By SEM and AFM, we discovered 70-nm granules appearing on the surfaces of glass-ionomer/collagen hybrids. Acid-etching revealed irregularly shaped particles interlinked by membrane-like sheets on the surface of the material with the typical 70-nm granules. WST-1 assay showed that acid-etching significantly enhanced the viability of attached gingival fibroblasts. However, the glass-ionomer/collagen hybrids' combined surface-etching outperformed other groups. The glass-ionomer/collagen hybrids presented enhanced compressive strength when integrated with 0.01% collagen, while higher concentrations of collagen compromised their mechanical property. In summary, collagen improved both the mechanical and biocompatible properties of glass ionomers. Further in vivo study is warranted.

  16. In vitro tendon tissue development from human fibroblasts demonstrates collagen fibril diameter growth associated with a rise in mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Bayer, Monika L; Svensson, René B; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-rich tendons and ligaments are important for joint stability and force transmission, but the capacity to form new tendon is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated mechanical strength, fibril size, and structure during development of tendon-like tissue from adult human tenocytes (termed tendon constructs) in vitro over 5 weeks in 3D tissue culture. The constructs displayed large elongated tendon cells aligned along the tendon axis together with collagen fibrils that increased in diameter by 50% from day 14 to 35, which approaches that observed in adult human tendon in vivo. The increase in diameter was accompanied by a 5-fold increase in mechanical strength (0.9±0.1 MPa to 4.9±0.6 MPa) and Young's modulus (5.8±0.9 MPa to 32.3±4.2 MPa), while the maximal strain at failure (16%) remained constant throughout the 5-week culture period. The present study demonstrates that 3D tendon constructs can be formed by isolated human tendon fibroblasts, and when these constructs are subjected to static self-generated tension, the fibrils will grow in size and strength approaching that of adult human tendon in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Concerted and adaptive alignment of decorin dermatan sulfate filaments in the graded organization of collagen fibrils in the equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Imamura, Yasutada; Suzuki, Daisuke; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Ueda, Hiromi; Hiramatsu, Kohzy; Takehana, Kazushige

    2012-02-01

    The equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has a graded distribution of collagen fibril diameters, with predominantly small-diameter fibrils in the region of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), a gradual increase in large-diameter fibrils toward the osteotendinous junction (OTJ), and a mixture of small- and large-diameter fibrils in the middle metacarpal (MM) region. In this study, we investigated the ultrastructure of the SDFT, to correlate the spatial relationship of the collagen fibrils with the graded distribution. The surface-to-surface distances of pairs of fibrils were found to be almost constant over the entire tendon. However, the center-to-center distances varied according to fibril diameter. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in normal mature tendons, and has one dermatan sulfate (DS) or chondroitin sulfate (CS) filament as a side chain which is associated with the surfaces of the collagen fibrils via its core protein. We identified a coordinated arrangement of decorin DS filaments in the equine SDFT. The sizes of the decorin DS filaments detected by Cupromeronic blue staining showed a unique regional variation; they were shortest in the MM region and longer in the MTJ and OTJ regions, and a considerable number of filaments were arranged obliquely to adjacent collagen fibrils in the MTJ region. This regional variation of the filaments may be an adaptation to lubricate the interfibrillar space in response to local mechanical requirements. The results of this study suggest that the MTJ region, which receives the muscular contractile force first, acts as a buffer for mechanical forces in the equine SDFT. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society.

  18. Connective Tissue Polarity Unraveled by a Markov-Chain Mechanism of Collagen Fibril Segment Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hulliger, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    The well-established occurrence of pyroelectricity (Lang, 1966) in tissues of living organisms has found a first explanation by a Markov-chain mechanism taking place during collagen fibril self-assembly in extracytoplasmic channels. Recently reported biochemical findings on the longitudinal fusion reactivity of small fibril segments (which undergo C-, N- and C-, C- but not N-, N-terminal fusions; see Graham et al., 2000; Kadler et al., 1996) may provide a mechanism by which a difference in the fusion probabilities PCC, PNN drives the self-assembly into partial macroscopic polar order. In principle, a Markov-chain growth process can lower the noncentrosymmetric ∞2 symmetry describing dielectric properties of a growing limb (as managed by fibroblasts) into the polar ∞ group. It is proposed that macroscopically polar properties enter the biological world by a stochastic mechanism of unidirectional growth. Polarity formation in organisms shows similarity to effects reported for molecular crystals (Hulliger et al., 2002). PMID:12770863

  19. Decorin and biglycan are necessary for maintaining collagen fibril structure, fiber realignment, and mechanical properties of mature tendons.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelsey A; Sun, Mei; Barnum, Carrie E; Weiss, Stephanie N; Huegel, Julianne; Shetye, Snehal S; Lin, Linda; Saez, Daniel; Adams, Sheila M; Iozzo, Renato V; Soslowsky, Louis J; Birk, David E

    2017-09-04

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), decorin and biglycan, are key regulators of collagen fibril and matrix assembly. The goal of this work was to elucidate the roles of decorin and biglycan in tendon homeostasis. Our central hypothesis is that decorin and biglycan expression in the mature tendon would be critical for the maintenance of the structural and mechanical properties of healthy tendons. Defining the function(s) of these SLRPs in tendon homeostasis requires that effects in the mature tendon be isolated from their influence on development. Thus, we generated an inducible knockout mouse model that permits genetic ablation of decorin and biglycan expression in the mature tendon, while maintaining normal expression during development. Decorin and biglycan expression were knocked out in the mature patellar tendon with the subsequent turnover of endogenous SLRPs deposited prior to induction. The acute absence of SLRP expression was associated with changes in fibril structure with a general shift to larger diameter fibrils in the compound knockout tendons, together with fibril diameter heterogeneity. In addition, tendon mechanical properties were altered. Compared to wild-type controls, acute ablation of both genes resulted in failure of the tendon at lower loads, decreased stiffness, a trend towards decreased dynamic modulus, as well as a significant increase in percent relaxation and tissue viscosity. Collagen fiber realignment was also increased with a delayed and slower in response to load in the absence of expression. These structural and functional changes in response to an acute loss of decorin and biglycan expression in the mature tendon demonstrate a significant role for these SLRPs in adult tendon homeostasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Softenin, a Novel Protein That Softens the Connective Tissue of Sea Cucumbers through Inhibiting Interaction between Collagen Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Takehana, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Akira; Tamori, Masaki; Motokawa, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    The dermis in the holothurian body wall is a typical catch connective tissue or mutable collagenous tissue that shows rapid changes in stiffness. Some chemical factors that change the stiffness of the tissue were found in previous studies, but the molecular mechanisms of the changes are not yet fully understood. Detection of factors that change the stiffness by working directly on the extracellular matrix was vital to clarify the mechanisms of the change. We isolated from the body wall of the sea cucumber Stichopus chloronotus a novel protein, softenin, that softened the body-wall dermis. The apparent molecular mass was 20 kDa. The N-terminal sequence of 17 amino acids had low homology to that of known proteins. We performed sequential chemical and physical dissections of the dermis and tested the effects of softenin on each dissection stage by dynamic mechanical tests. Softenin softened Triton-treated dermis whose cells had been disrupted by detergent. The Triton-treated dermis was subjected to repetitive freeze-and-thawing to make Triton-Freeze-Thaw (TFT) dermis that was softer than the Triton-treated dermis, implying that some force-bearing structure had been disrupted by this treatment. TFT dermis was stiffened by tensilin, a stiffening protein of sea cucumbers. Softenin softened the tensilin-stiffened TFT dermis while it had no effect on the TFT dermis without tensilin treatment. We isolated collagen from the dermis. When tensilin was applied to the suspending solution of collagen fibrils, they made a large compact aggregate that was dissolved by the application of softenin or by repetitive freeze-and-thawing. These results strongly suggested that softenin decreased dermal stiffness through inhibiting cross-bridge formation between collagen fibrils; the formation was augmented by tensilin and the bridges were broken by the freeze-thaw treatment. Softenin is thus the first softener of catch connective tissue shown to work on the cross-bridges between

  1. Dynamics of Structural Parameters and Accumulation of Collagen Fibrils in Rat Lung after Inhalations of Surfactant-BL at Various Terms of Bleomycin-Induced Alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Volchkov, V A; Dubrovskaya, V F; Valkovich, A A; Klestova, O V; Serzhanina, V A; Zhuikov, A G; Seiliev, A A; Rosenberg, O A

    2016-08-01

    Rats were subjected to surfactant-BL inhalations at the early and late phases of bleomycininduced alveolitis. In both regimens, the drug reduced the severity of inflammation. In the acute phase of alveolitis, the therapeutic effect of inhalation was accompanied by activation of the synthesis of fine lose collagen fibrils. In the late phase of alveolitis, inhalation of surfactant-BL thickened the fibrils and diminished their population in alveolar walls.

  2. Temperature-Responsive Gelation of Type I Collagen Solutions Involving Fibril Formation and Genipin Crosslinking as a Potential Injectable Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Yunoki, Shunji

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the temperature-responsive gelation of collagen/genipin solutions using pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) and acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) as substrates. Gelation occurred in the PSC/genipin solutions at genipin concentrations 0–2 mM under moderate change in temperature from 25 to 37°C. The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points. In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system. The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation. The elastic modulus of the 0.5% PSC/genipin gel system could be adjusted in a range of 2.5 to 50 kPa by the PSC and genipin concentrations, suggesting that a PSC/genipin solution is a potential injectable gel system for drug and cell carriers, with mechanical properties matching those of living tissues. PMID:24222766

  3. Changes in collagen fibril network organization and proteoglycan distribution in equine articular cartilage during maturation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Hyttinen, Mika M; Holopainen, Jaakko; René van Weeren, P; Firth, Elwyn C; Helminen, Heikki J; Brama, Pieter A J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to record growth-related changes in collagen network organization and proteoglycan distribution in intermittently peak-loaded and continuously lower-level-loaded articular cartilage. Cartilage from the proximal phalangeal bone of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint at birth, at 5, 11 and 18 months, and at 6–10 years of age was collected from two sites. Site 1, at the joint margin, is unloaded at slow gaits but is subjected to high-intensity loading during athletic activity; site 2 is a continuously but less intensively loaded site in the centre of the joint. The degree of collagen parallelism was determined with quantitative polarized light microscopy and the parallelism index for collagen fibrils was computed from the cartilage surface to the osteochondral junction. Concurrent changes in the proteoglycan distribution were quantified with digital densitometry. We found that the parallelism index increased significantly with age (up to 90%). At birth, site 2 exhibited a more organized collagen network than site 1. In adult horses this situation was reversed. The superficial and intermediate zones exhibited the greatest reorganization of collagen. Site 1 had a higher proteoglycan content than site 2 at birth but here too the situation was reversed in adult horses. We conclude that large changes in joint loading during growth and maturation in the period from birth to adulthood profoundly affect the architecture of the collagen network in equine cartilage. In addition, the distribution and content of proteoglycans are modified significantly by altered joint use. Intermittent peak-loading with shear seems to induce higher collagen parallelism and a lower proteoglycan content in cartilage than more constant weight-bearing. Therefore, we hypothesize that the formation of mature articular cartilage with a highly parallel collagen network and relatively low proteoglycan content in the peak-loaded area of a joint is needed to withstand

  4. Effects of fibrillation on the wood fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced by mechanical refining.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Hou, Qingxi; Chen, Wei; Wu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The hardwood bleached kraft pulp (HBKP) fibers were pretreated by PFI mill to obtain the substrates, the effects of fibrillation on HBKP fibers' enzymatic hydrolysis was studied. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was enhanced obviously by mechanical refining. The mechanical refining alterated the fibers' characteristics such as fibrillation degree, specific surface area, swelling ability, crystallinity, fiber length and fines content. All these factors correlating to the enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated through mathematical analysis. Among these factors, the fibrillation degree has the profoundest impact on the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood fibers. Consequently, the mechanical refining aiming for a high fibrillation degree was feasible to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Kniest dysplasia is characterized by an apparent abnormal processing of the C-propeptide of type II cartilage collagen resulting in imperfect fibril assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, A R; Pidoux, I; Reiner, A; Rosenberg, L; Hollister, D; Murray, L; Rimoin, D

    1988-01-01

    Epiphyseal and growth plate cartilages from four cases of Kniest dysplasia have been studied. In each case collagen fibril organization appeared abnormal by electron microscopy compared with age-matched normal cartilages: fibrils were much thinner, of irregular shape and did not exhibit the characteristic banding pattern. This was associated with the absence (compared with normal cartilage) of the C-propeptide of type II collagen (chondrocalcin) from the extracellular matrix of epiphyseal cartilages, although it was detected (as in normal cartilages) in the lower hypertrophic zone of the growth plate in association with calcifying cartilage. The C-propeptide was abnormally concentrated in intracellular vacuolar sites in Kniest cartilages and its total content was reduced in all cases but not in all cartilages. Moreover, it was not a part of the procollagen molecule. In contrast, type II collagen alpha-chain size was normal, indicating the formation of a triple helix. Also type II collagen content was normal and it was present in extracellular sites and only occasionally detected intracellularly. These observations suggest that the defect in Kniest dysplasia may result from the secretion of type II procollagen lacking the C-propeptide and abnormal fibril formation, and that the C-propeptide is normally required for fibril formation. Images PMID:3276736

  6. Vertebrae length and ultra-structure measurements of collagen fibrils and mineral content in the vertebrae of lordotic gilthead seabreams (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Berillis, Panagiotis; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Boursiaki, Vaia; Karapanagiotidis, Ioannis T; Mente, Eleni

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal deformities of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) are a major factor affecting the production cost, the external morphology and survival and growth of the fish. Adult individuals of S. aurata were collected from a commercial fish farm in Greece and were divided into two groups: one with the presence of lordosis, a skeletal deformity, and one without any skeletal deformity. Fishes were X-rayed, and cervical, abdominal and caudal vertebrae lengths were measured. Vertebrae were taken from the site of the vertebral column where lordosis occurred. One part was decalcified and prepared for collagen examination with transmission electron microscopy, and the rest were incinerated, and the Ca and P contents were measured. The stoichiometries of the samples were obtained by EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy). The same procedure was followed for fish without skeletal deformities (vertebrae were taken from the middle region of the vertebral column). The decalcified vertebrae parts were examined with TEM, collagen micrographs were taken and the fibrils' periods and diameters were measured. There were no significant differences for both Ca and P or the collagen fibrils' periods between the two fish groups. The mean lengths of the cervical, abdominal and caudal vertebrae where lordosis occurred were similar to the lengths of the respective regions of the individuals without the skeletal deformity. The TEM examination showed a significantly smaller mean vertebrae collagen fibril diameter from the fishes with lordosis compared with those from the controls, revealing the significance of collagen to bone structure.

  7. Structural constraints on the evolution of the collagen fibril: convergence on a 1014-residue COL domain

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, David Anthony; Farndale, Richard William

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the fundamental component of the extracellular matrix. Its α1 gene is the direct descendant of ancestral fibrillar collagen and contains 57 exons encoding the rod-like triple-helical COL domain. We trace the evolution of the COL domain from a primordial collagen 18 residues in length to its present 1014 residues, the limit of its possible length. In order to maintain and improve the essential structural features of collagen during evolution, exons can be added or extended only in permitted, non-random increments that preserve the position of spatially sensitive cross-linkage sites. Such sites cannot be maintained unless the twist of the triple helix is close to 30 amino acids per turn. Inspection of the gene structure of other long structural proteins, fibronectin and titin, suggests that their evolution might have been subject to similar constraints. PMID:25994354

  8. Investigation of ethanol infiltration into demineralized dentin collagen fibrils using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Jee, Sang Eun; Zhou, Jienfeng; Tan, Jianquo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R; Grégoire, Geneviève; Pashley, David H; Jang, Seung Soon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction of neat ethanol with bound and non-bound water in completely demineralized dentin that is fully hydrated, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The key to creating ideal resin-dentin bonds is the removal of residual free water layers and its replacement by ethanol solvent in which resin monomers are soluble, using the ethanol wet-bonding technique. The test null hypotheses were that ethanol cannot remove any collagen-bound water, and that ethanol cannot infiltrate into the spacing between collagen triple helix due to narrow interlayer spacing. Collagen fibrillar structures of overlap and gap regions were constructed by aligning the collagen triple helix of infinite length in hexagonal packing. Three layers of the water molecules were specified as the layers of 0.15-0.22nm, 0.22-0.43nm and 0.43-0.63nm from collagen atoms by investigating the water distribution surrounding collagen molecules. Our simulation results show that ethanol molecules infiltrated into the intermolecular spacing in the gap region, which increased due to the lateral shrinkage of the collagen structures in contact with ethanol solution, while there was no ethanol infiltration observed in the overlap region. Infiltrated ethanol molecules in the gap region removed residual water molecules via modifying mostly the third water layer (50% decrease), which would be considered as a loosely-bound water layer. The first and second hydration layers, which would be considered as tightly bound water layers, were not removed by the ethanol molecules, thus maintaining the helical structures of the collagen molecules.

  9. A fibril-based structural constitutive theory reveals the dominant role of network characteristics on the mechanical behavior of fibroblast-compacted collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhonggang; Ishiguro, Yuki; Fujita, Kyohei; Kosawada, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takao; Sato, Daisuke; Kitajima, Tatsuo; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present a general, fibril-based structural constitutive theory which accounts for three material aspects of crosslinked filamentous materials: the single fibrillar force response, the fibrillar network model, and the effects of alterations to the fibrillar network. In the case of the single fibrillar response, we develop a formula that covers the entropic and enthalpic deformation regions, and introduce the relaxation phase to explain the observed force decay after crosslink breakage. For the filamentous network model, we characterize the constituent element of the fibrillar network in terms its end-to-end distance vector and its contour length, then decompose the vector orientation into an isotropic random term and a specific alignment, paving the way for an expanded formalism from principal deformation to general 3D deformation; and, more important, we define a critical core quantity over which macroscale mechanical characteristics can be integrated: the ratio of the initial end-to-end distance to the contour length (and its probability function). For network alterations, we quantitatively treat changes in constituent elements and relate these changes to the alteration of network characteristics. Singular in its physical rigor and clarity, this constitutive theory can reproduce and predict a wide range of nonlinear mechanical behavior in materials composed of a crosslinked filamentous network, including: stress relaxation (with dual relaxation coefficients as typically observed in soft tissues); hysteresis with decreasing maximum stress under serial cyclic loading; strain-stiffening under uniaxial tension; the rupture point of the structure as a whole; various effects of biaxial tensile loading; strain-stiffening under simple shearing; the so-called "negative normal stress" phenomenon; and enthalpic elastic behaviors of the constituent element. Applied to compacted collagen gels, the theory demonstrates that collagen fibrils behave as enthalpic

  10. Reduction of collagen VII anchoring fibrils in the airway basement membrane zone of infant rhesus monkeys exposed to house dust mite

    PubMed Central

    Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Miller, Lisa A.; Carlson, Melinda A.; Nishio, Susan J.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen VII anchoring fibrils in the basement membrane zone (BMZ) are part of a supracellular anchoring network that attaches the epithelium to the BMZ. Sloughing of airway epithelium in asthmatics (creola bodies) is a pathology associated with the supracellular anchoring network. In a rhesus monkey model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic asthma, we found increased deposition of collagen I in the BMZ. In this study, we determine whether HDM also affected deposition of collagen VII in the BMZ. In the developing airway of rhesus monkeys, the width of collagen VII anchoring fibrils in the BMZ was 0.02 ± 0.04 μm at 1 mo of age. At 6 mo the width had increased to 1.28 ± 0.34 μm and at 12 mo 2.15 ± 0.13 μm. In animals treated with HDM, we found a 42.2% reduction in the width of collagen VII layer in the BMZ at 6 mo (0.74 ± 0.15 μm; P < 0.05). During recovery, the rate of collagen VII deposition returned to normal. However, the amount of collagen VII lost was not recovered after 6 mo. We concluded that normal development of the collagen VII attachment between the epithelium and BMZ occurs in coordination with development of the BMZ. However, in HDM-treated animals, the collagen VII attachment with the epithelium was significantly reduced. Such a reduction in collagen VII may weaken the supracellular anchoring network and be associated with sloughing of the epithelium and formation of creola bodies in asthmatics. PMID:20139177

  11. Conducting polymers with immobilised fibrillar collagen for enhanced neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Zhilian; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2011-10-01

    Conducting polymers with pendant functionality are advantageous in various bionic and organic bioelectronic applications, as they allow facile incorporation of bio-regulative cues to provide bio-mimicry and conductive environments for cell growth, differentiation and function. In this work, polypyrrole substrates doped with chondroitin sulfate (CS), an extracellular matrix molecule bearing carboxylic acid moieties, were electrochemically synthesized and conjugated with type I collagen. During the coupling process, the conjugated collagen formed a 3-dimensional fibrillar matrix in situ at the conducting polymer interface, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy under aqueous physiological conditions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurement confirmed no significant reduction in the electroactivity of the fibrillar collagen-modified conducting polymer substrates. Rat pheochromocytoma (nerve) cells showed increased differentiation and neurite outgrowth on the fibrillar collagen, which was further enhanced through electrical stimulation of the underlying conducting polymer substrate. Our study demonstrates that the direct coupling of ECM components such as collagen, followed by their further self-assembly into 3-dimensional matrices, has the potential to improve the neural-electrode interface of implant electrodes by encouraging nerve cell attachment and differentiation.

  12. Some properties of the reactive hydroxylysyl residues in collagen: their possible role in nucleation during fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, E; Hamabata, A; Rojkind, M

    1984-10-01

    Native or heat-denatured collagens were incubated under controlled conditions of temperature and pH with variable molar ratios of KCNO or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. The results obtained suggest that a small number of free amino groups are available for reaction on the native protein, while all the free amino groups react on the denatured protein. The highly reactive free amino groups in the native protein are hydroxylysine residues and have an abnormally low pK of 8.5 which is conformation dependent; this pK becomes normalized upon denaturation of the protein. The reactive hydroxylysines appear to be located in basic regions that could be the nucleation sites needed for fiber formation in the heat-gelation assay; the modified protein does not form stable fibrils upon heating at 37 degrees C and the few fibers formed are not stabilized after reduction with NaBH4. Our results also suggest that the triple helix in collagen is heterogeneous with respect to the reactivity of free amino groups and that several discrete transition temperatures are observed with two main breaks at 30 degrees C and at 37 degrees C, respectively.

  13. Dental adhesives and strategies for displacement of water/solvents from collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Matuda, Larissa Sgarbosa de Araújo; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Leme, Ariene Arcas; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of temperature of evaporation in adhesive systems with different solvents on the apparent modulus of elasticity and mass change of macro-hybrid layers modified by proanthocyanidins (PACs). Adhesive resin beams (A) from Single Bond Plus (SB), Excite (EX) and One Step Plus (OS) were prepared after solvent evaporation at 23°C or 40°C (n=12). Macro-hybrid layers (M) (n=12) were prepared using demineralized dentin beams sectioned from extracted human third molars. The demineralized dentin specimens were infiltrated with each one of the three adhesive systems at 23°C or 40°C; with or without prior dentin treatment with PACs for 10min. The apparent modulus of elasticity (E) and mass change (Wmc, %) of adhesives beams and resin-infiltrated specimens were assessed in dry and wet conditions after immersion in water (24h, 1, 3 and 6 months). The E was statistically analyzed by Tukey-Kramer test and the Wmc, % by Kruskal Wallis, and Dunn (α=0.05). Solvent evaporation at 40°C resulted in higher E values for adhesive resin beams at all storage conditions, regardless of the adhesive system (p<0.05). Increased mass loss (3 months: -0.01%; 6 months: -0.05%) was observed in One Step resin beams (p≤0.05). In the macro-hybrid layer models the pretreatment with PACs along with solvent evaporation at 40°C increased E and decreased the Wmc, % (3 months: -2.5; 6 months: 2.75%) for adhesives evaluated over time (p<0.05). No significant differences in ratio (resin/dentin) were found for the macro-hybrid layers (p>0.05). Improved solvent evaporation at higher temperature, and increased collagen cross-linking induced by PACs, enhanced the mechanical properties resulting in highly stable macro-hybrid layers over 6 months storage. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mineralization of collagen may occur on fibril surfaces: evidence from conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Song, M. J.; Arena, J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Marko, M.; Owen, C.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the normally calcifying leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, has been investigated at an ultrastructural level with conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy, computed tomography, and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods. Specimens treated by either aqueous or anhydrous techniques and resin-embedded were appropriately sectioned and regions of early tendon mineralization were photographed. On the basis of individual photomicrographs, stereoscopic pairs of images, and tomographic three-dimensional image reconstructions, platelet-shaped crystals may be demonstrated for the first time in association with the surface of collagen fibrils. Mineral is also observed in closely parallel arrays within collagen hole and overlap zones. The mineral deposition at these spatially distinct locations in the tendon provides insight into possible means by which calcification is mediated by collagen as a fundamental event in skeletal and dental formation among vertebrates.

  15. Mineralization of collagen may occur on fibril surfaces: evidence from conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy and three-dimensional imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Song, M. J.; Arena, J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Marko, M.; Owen, C.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the normally calcifying leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, has been investigated at an ultrastructural level with conventional and high-voltage electron microscopy, computed tomography, and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods. Specimens treated by either aqueous or anhydrous techniques and resin-embedded were appropriately sectioned and regions of early tendon mineralization were photographed. On the basis of individual photomicrographs, stereoscopic pairs of images, and tomographic three-dimensional image reconstructions, platelet-shaped crystals may be demonstrated for the first time in association with the surface of collagen fibrils. Mineral is also observed in closely parallel arrays within collagen hole and overlap zones. The mineral deposition at these spatially distinct locations in the tendon provides insight into possible means by which calcification is mediated by collagen as a fundamental event in skeletal and dental formation among vertebrates.

  16. Collagen biogenesis and assembly into fibrils as shown by ultrastructural and 3H-proline radioautographic studies on the fibroblasts of the rat food pad

    SciTech Connect

    Marchi, F.; Leblond, C.P.

    1983-10-01

    To examine whether collagen is assembled into fibrils within or outside fibroblasts, the connective tissue of the rat foot pad was investigated by electron microscopy and by radioautography at times varying from 4 min to 3 days after an intravenous injection of 3H-proline. The fibroblasts of the rat food pad are long polarized cells with the nucleus at one end, the Golgi apparatus in the center, and a region with long processes at the other end. This region contains secretory granules and is considered to be the secretory pole of the cell. In the Golgi apparatus the stacks of saccules are separated from rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) by groups of ''intermediate vesicles'' including similarly structured tubules which may be over 300 nm long and are referred to as ''intermediate tubules.'' The Golgi saccules exhibit distended portions which differ at the various levels of the stack. Finally, the fibroblasts are associated with two types of collagen fibrils: extracellular ones arranged into large groups between the cells and intracellular ones located within long intracytoplasmic channels. Quantitative radioautography after 3H-proline injection reveals that the number of silver grains per unit area reaches a peak over the rER at 4-10 min, Golgi apparatus at 40 min, secretory granules at 60 min, and extracellular collagen fibrils at 3 h. At no time are intracellular collagen fibrils labeled. Qualitative observations further indicate that spherical Golgi distentions are mainly labeled at 40 min, and cylindrical distentions, at 60 min. In addition, from 20 min to 3 hr, some lysosomal elements are labeled.

  17. On the computation of stress in affine versus nonaffine fibril kinematics within planar collagen network models.

    PubMed

    Pence, Thomas J; Monroe, Ryan J; Wright, Neil T

    2008-08-01

    Some recent analyses modeled the response of collagenous tissues, such as epicardium, using a hypothetical network consisting of interconnected springlike fibers. The fibers in the network were organized such that internal nodes served as the connection point between three such collagen springs. The results for assumed affine and nonaffine deformations are contrasted after a homogeneous deformation at the boundary. Affine deformation provides a stiffer mechanical response than nonaffine deformation. In contrast to nonaffine deformation, affine deformation determines the displacement of internal nodes without imposing detailed force balance, thereby complicating the simplest intuitive notion of stress, one based on free body cuts, at the single node scale. The standard notion of stress may then be recovered via average field theory computations based on large micromesh realizations. An alternative and by all indications complementary viewpoint for the determination of stress in these collagen fiber networks is discussed here, one in which stress is defined using elastic energy storage, a notion which is intuitive at the single node scale. It replaces the average field theory computations by an averaging technique over randomly oriented isolated simple elements. The analytical operations do not require large micromesh realizations, but the tedious nature of the mathematical manipulation is clearly aided by symbolic algebra calculation. For the example case of linear elastic deformation, this results in material stiffnesses that relate the infinitesimal strain and stress. The result that the affine case is stiffer than the nonaffine case is recovered, as would be expected. The energy framework also lends itself to the natural inclusion of changes in mechanical response due to the chemical, electrical, or thermal environment.

  18. A comparison of glycosaminoglycan distributions, keratan sulphate sulphation patterns and collagen fibril architecture from central to peripheral regions of the bovine cornea.

    PubMed

    Ho, Leona T Y; Harris, Anthony M; Tanioka, Hidetoshi; Yagi, Naoto; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Caterson, Bruce; Quantock, Andrew J; Young, Robert D; Meek, Keith M

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated changes in collagen fibril architecture and the sulphation status of keratan sulphate (KS) glycosaminoglycan (GAG) epitopes from central to peripheral corneal regions. Freshly excised adult bovine corneal tissue was examined as a function of radial position from the centre of the cornea outwards. Corneal thickness, tissue hydration, hydroxyproline content, and the total amount of sulphated GAG were all measured. High and low-sulphated epitopes of keratan sulphate were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantified by ELISA. Chondroitin sulphate (CS) and dermatan sulphate (DS) distributions were observed by immunohistochemistry following specific enzyme digestions. Electron microscopy and X-ray fibre diffraction were used to ascertain collagen fibril architecture. The bovine cornea was 1021±5.42 μm thick at its outer periphery, defined as 9-12 mm from the corneal centre, compared to 844±8.10 μm at the centre. The outer periphery of the cornea was marginally, but not significantly, more hydrated than the centre (H=4.3 vs. H=3.7), and was more abundant in hydroxyproline (0.12 vs. 0.06 mg/mg dry weight of cornea). DMMB assays indicated no change in the total amount of sulphated GAG across the cornea. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of both high- and low-sulphated epitopes of KS, as well as DS, throughout the cornea, and CS only in the peripheral cornea before the limbus. Quantification by ELISA, disclosed that although both high- and low-sulphated KS remained constant throughout stromal depth at different radial positions, high-sulphated epitopes remained constant from the corneal centre to outer-periphery, whereas low-sulphated epitopes increased significantly. Both small angle X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis revealed that collagen fibril diameter remained relatively constant until the outer periphery was reached, after which fibrils became more widely spaced (from small angle x-ray diffraction analysis) and of larger diameter

  19. Surface characterization of insulin protofilaments and fibril polymorphs using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS).

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker; Lednev, Igor K

    2014-01-07

    Amyloid fibrils are β-sheet-rich protein aggregates that are strongly associated with a variety of neurodegenerative maladies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Even if the secondary structure of such fibrils is well characterized, a thorough understanding of their surface organization still remains elusive. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is one of a few techniques that allow the direct characterization of the amino acid composition and the protein secondary structure of the amyloid fibril surface. Herein, we investigated the surfaces of two insulin fibril polymorphs with flat (flat) and left-twisted (twisted) morphology. It was found that the two differ substantially in both amino acid composition and protein secondary structure. For example, the amounts of Tyr, Pro, and His differ, as does the number of carboxyl groups on the respective surfaces, whereas the amounts of Phe and of positively charged amino and imino groups remain similar. In addition, the surface of protofilaments, the precursors of the mature flat and twisted fibrils, was investigated using TERS. The results show substantial differences with respect to the mature fibrils. A correlation of amino acid frequencies and protein secondary structures on the surface of protofilaments and on flat and twisted fibrils allowed us to propose a hypothetical mechanism for the propagation to specific fibril polymorphs. This knowledge can shed a light on the toxicity of amyloids and define the key factors responsible for fibril polymorphism. Finally, this work demonstrates the potential of TERS for the surface characterization of amyloid fibril polymorphs. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface Characterization of Insulin Protofilaments and Fibril Polymorphs Using Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS)

    PubMed Central

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker; Lednev, Igor K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are β-sheet-rich protein aggregates that are strongly associated with a variety of neurodegenerative maladies, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Even if the secondary structure of such fibrils is well characterized, a thorough understanding of their surface organization still remains elusive. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is one of a few techniques that allow the direct characterization of the amino acid composition and the protein secondary structure of the amyloid fibril surface. Herein, we investigated the surfaces of two insulin fibril polymorphs with flat (flat) and left-twisted (twisted) morphology. It was found that the two differ substantially in both amino acid composition and protein secondary structure. For example, the amounts of Tyr, Pro, and His differ, as does the number of carboxyl groups on the respective surfaces, whereas the amounts of Phe and of positively charged amino and imino groups remain similar. In addition, the surface of protofilaments, the precursors of the mature flat and twisted fibrils, was investigated using TERS. The results show substantial differences with respect to the mature fibrils. A correlation of amino acid frequencies and protein secondary structures on the surface of protofilaments and on flat and twisted fibrils allowed us to propose a hypothetical mechanism for the propagation to specific fibril polymorphs. This knowledge can shed a light on the toxicity of amyloids and define the key factors responsible for fibril polymorphism. Finally, this work demonstrates the potential of TERS for the surface characterization of amyloid fibril polymorphs. PMID:24411258

  1. Timesaving microwave assisted synthesis of insulin amyloid fibrils with enhanced nanofiber aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Tiago; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Martins, Manuel A; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R

    2016-11-01

    Insulin amyloid fibrils with enhanced aspect ratio, were prepared using a timesaving microwave assisted (MW) methodology, reducing the incubation time from 13 to 2h. The fibrillation process was followed indirectly by Thioflavin T Fluorescence and UV-vis analysis, by measuring the amount of β-sheets formed and the insulin present in solution, respectively. TEM and AFM analysis revealed that the insulin fibrils obtained through the MW method, have very similar lengths but are much thinner than the ones obtained using the conventional method (CM). Additionally, it was verified that the nature of the peptides present in the final insulin fibrils was not affected by microwave irradiation. These morphological differences might reflect on noticeably enhanced mechanical and optical properties that can exploited on the development of advanced bionanomaterials.

  2. Fast determination of three-dimensional fibril orientation of type-I collagen via macroscopic chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Guan-Yu; Chen, Mei-Yu; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Guo, Chin-Lin; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is appealing for studying structural proteins and well-organized biophotonic nanostructures, due to its highly sensitized structural specificity. In recent years, it has been used to investigate the chiroptical effect, particularly SHG circular dichroism (SHG-CD) in biological tissues. Although SHG-CD attributed to macromolecular structures has been demonstrated, the corresponding quantitative analysis and interpretation on how SHG correlates with second-order susceptibility χ(2) under circularly polarized excitations remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate a method based on macroscopic chirality to elucidate the correlation between SHG-CD and the orientation angle of the molecular structure. By exploiting this approach, three-dimensional (3D) molecular orientation of type-I collagen is revealed with only two cross polarized SHG images (i.e., interactions of left and right circular polarizations) without acquiring an image stack of varying polarization.

  3. ADS-J1 inhibits semen-derived amyloid fibril formation and blocks fibril-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tianrong; Li, Wenjuan; Chen, Jinquan; Yu, Fei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ruizhe; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Li, Lin; Tan, Suiyi; Liu, Shuwen

    2015-09-01

    Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is composed of amyloid fibrils that can greatly enhance HIV-1 infectivity. By its cationic property, SEVI promotes viral sexual transmission by facilitating the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 to target cells. Therefore, semen-derived amyloid fibrils are potential targets for microbicide design. ADS-J1 is an anionic HIV-1 entry inhibitor. In this study, we explored an additional function of ADS-J1: inhibition of SEVI fibril formation and blockage of SEVI-mediated enhancement of viral infection. We found that ADS-J1 bound to an amyloidogenic peptide fragment (PAP248-286, comprising amino acids 248 to 286 of the enzyme prostatic acid phosphatase), thereby inhibiting peptide assembly into amyloid fibrils. In addition, ADS-J1 binds to mature amyloid fibrils and antagonizes fibril-mediated enhancement of viral infection. Unlike cellulose sulfate, a polyanion that failed in clinical trial to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission, ADS-J1 shows no ability to facilitate fibril formation. More importantly, the combination of ADS-J1 with several antiretroviral drugs exhibited synergistic effects against HIV-1 infection in semen, with little cytotoxicity to vaginal epithelial cells. Our results suggest that ADS-J1 or a derivative may be incorporated into a combination microbicide for prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV-1. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. ADS-J1 Inhibits Semen-Derived Amyloid Fibril Formation and Blocks Fibril-Mediated Enhancement of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xun, Tianrong; Li, Wenjuan; Chen, Jinquan; Yu, Fei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ruizhe; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is composed of amyloid fibrils that can greatly enhance HIV-1 infectivity. By its cationic property, SEVI promotes viral sexual transmission by facilitating the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 to target cells. Therefore, semen-derived amyloid fibrils are potential targets for microbicide design. ADS-J1 is an anionic HIV-1 entry inhibitor. In this study, we explored an additional function of ADS-J1: inhibition of SEVI fibril formation and blockage of SEVI-mediated enhancement of viral infection. We found that ADS-J1 bound to an amyloidogenic peptide fragment (PAP248–286, comprising amino acids 248 to 286 of the enzyme prostatic acid phosphatase), thereby inhibiting peptide assembly into amyloid fibrils. In addition, ADS-J1 binds to mature amyloid fibrils and antagonizes fibril-mediated enhancement of viral infection. Unlike cellulose sulfate, a polyanion that failed in clinical trial to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission, ADS-J1 shows no ability to facilitate fibril formation. More importantly, the combination of ADS-J1 with several antiretroviral drugs exhibited synergistic effects against HIV-1 infection in semen, with little cytotoxicity to vaginal epithelial cells. Our results suggest that ADS-J1 or a derivative may be incorporated into a combination microbicide for prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:26055369

  5. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Soumya; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K; Ganguly, Ranjan; Webster, Thomas J; Nayar, Suprabha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR) directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G) nanostructures using collagen (CL) was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed “biomimetic”. Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the G flakes from transmission electron microscopy confirm ≤ five layers of G. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows an approximate 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than approximately 0.00005 of G. Thus, through the use of CL, this new material and process may improve the use of G in terms of biocompatibility for numerous medical applications that currently employ G, such as internally controlled drug-delivery assisted thermal ablation of carcinoma cells. PMID:24648728

  6. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Soumya; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K; Ganguly, Ranjan; Webster, Thomas J; Nayar, Suprabha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR) directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G) nanostructures using collagen (CL) was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed "biomimetic". Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the G flakes from transmission electron microscopy confirm ≤ five layers of G. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows an approximate 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than approximately 0.00005 of G. Thus, through the use of CL, this new material and process may improve the use of G in terms of biocompatibility for numerous medical applications that currently employ G, such as internally controlled drug-delivery assisted thermal ablation of carcinoma cells.

  7. Fibronectin antibody labels corneal stromal collagen fibrils in situ along their length and circumference and demonstrates distinct staining along the cell and stromal interfaces of Descemet's membrane.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sheldon R

    2014-03-01

    An immunoperoxidase cytochemical study of fibronectin localization in the rat corneal stroma and Descemet's membrane was conducted following organ culture to determine whether stromal swelling allowed better primary antibody penetration into the normally tough fibrous corneal stroma. Following 24 h organ culture, corneas were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, washed and stained overnight at 4 °C in anti-fibronectin followed by washing and incubation in an appropriate secondary antibody and exposure to protein A-HRP. Cytochemical processing was carried out in a DAB-containing medium followed by dehydration and Epon embedding. Observations of the stromal lamellae revealed the presence of a novel punctate staining pattern along the length of the collagen fibrils that extended around the fibril's circumference. Measurements on the peroxidase reaction product spacing indicated a periodicity of approximately 20.69 ± 3.57 nm along the fibril's length. Light microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of fibronectin staining occurred within the endothelial cell layer but only along the DM/stromal interface. Electron microscopic observations however, revealed that fibronectin staining occurred in distinct linear patterns along the length of both the endothelial and stromal DM interfaces. Results indicate that organ culture mediated swelling helps facilitate the penetration of primary antibody into the corneal stroma. Observations suggest a novel association exists between fibronectin and stromal collagen fibrils that helps to mediate the arrangement and organization of the stromal extracellular matrix. Results also definitively indicate that fibronectin is deposited along both DM interfaces suggesting that it plays a role in the adhesion of both the endothelial cell layer and stroma to Descemet's membrane to help maintain the tissue architecture within this region of the cornea.

  8. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  9. Feasibility study of the natural derived chitosan dialdehyde for chemical modification of collagen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua; Gong, Juxia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the chemical crosslinking effects of the natural derived chitosan dialdehyde (OCS) on collagen. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) measurements suggest that introducing OCS might not destroy the natural triple helix conformation of collagen but enhance the thermal-stability of collagen. Meanwhile, a denser fibrous network of cross-linked collagen is observed by atomic force microscopy. Further, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and aggregation kinetics analysis confirm that the fibrillation process of collagen advances successfully and OCS could lengthen the completion time of collagen fibrillogenesis but raise the reconstitution rate of collagen fibrils or microfibrils. Besides, the cytocompatibility analysis implies that when the dosage of OCS is less than 15%, introducing OCS into collagen might be favorable for the cell's adhesion, growth and proliferation. Taken as a whole, the present study demonstrates that OCS might be an ideal crosslinker for the chemical fixation of collagen.

  10. Procollagen C-proteinase enhancer grasps the stalk of the C-propeptide trimer to boost collagen precursor maturation.

    PubMed

    Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Afrache, Hassnae; Mariano, Natacha; Kronenberg, Daniel; Thielens, Nicole; Moali, Catherine; Hulmes, David J S

    2013-04-16

    Tight regulation of collagen fibril deposition in the extracellular matrix is essential for normal tissue homeostasis and repair, defects in which are associated with several degenerative or fibrotic disorders. A key regulatory step in collagen fibril assembly is the C-terminal proteolytic processing of soluble procollagen precursors. This step, carried out mainly by bone morphogenetic protein-1/tolloid-like proteinases, is itself subject to regulation by procollagen C-proteinase enhancer proteins (PCPEs) which can dramatically increase bone morphogenetic protein-1/tolloid-like proteinase activity, in a substrate-specific manner. Although it is known that this enhancing activity requires binding of PCPE to the procollagen C-propeptide trimer, identification of the precise binding site has so far remained elusive. Here, use of small-angle X-ray scattering provides structural data on this protein complex indicating that PCPE binds to the stalk region of the procollagen C-propeptide trimer, where the three polypeptide chains associate together, at the junction with the base region. This is supported by site-directed mutagenesis, which identifies two highly conserved, surface-exposed lysine residues in this region of the trimer that are essential for binding, thus revealing structural parallels with the interactions of Complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, BMP-1 (CUB) domain-containing proteins in diverse biological systems such as complement activation, receptor signaling, and transport. Together with detailed kinetics and interaction analysis, these results provide insights into the mechanism of action of PCPEs and suggest clear strategies for the development of novel antifibrotic therapies.

  11. Lateral Growth Limitation of Corneal Fibrils and Their Lamellar Stacking Depend on Covalent Collagen Cross-linking by Transglutaminase-2 and Lysyl Oxidases, Respectively*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Uhlig, Philipp C.; Eikenberry, Eric F.; Robenek, Horst; Bruckner, Peter; Hansen, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Corneal stroma contains an extracellular matrix of orthogonal lamellae formed by parallel and equidistant fibrils with a homogeneous diameter of ∼35 nm. This is indispensable for corneal transparency and mechanical functions. However, the mechanisms controlling corneal fibrillogenesis are incompletely understood and the conditions required for lamellar stacking are essentially unknown. Under appropriate conditions, chick embryo corneal fibroblasts can produce an extracellular matrix in vitro resembling primary corneal stroma during embryonic development. Among other requirements, cross-links between fibrillar collagens, introduced by tissue transglutaminase-2, are necessary for the self-assembly of uniform, small diameter fibrils but not their lamellar stacking. By contrast, the subsequent lamellar organization into plywood-like stacks depends on lysyl aldehyde-derived cross-links introduced by lysyl oxidase activity, which, in turn, only weakly influences fibril diameters. These cross-links are introduced at early stages of fibrillogenesis. The enzymes are likely to be important for a correct matrix deposition also during repair of the cornea. PMID:24265319

  12. Amyloid fibrils enhance transport of metal nanoparticles in living cells and induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Handschin, Stephan; Chaitanya, Krishna; Adamcik, Jozef; Saito, Yasuyuki; Manz, Markus G; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-07-14

    Amyloid protein fibrils occur in vivo as pathological agents, in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, or as functional amyloids, when playing biologically vital roles. Here we show how amyloid fibrils generated from a food protein, β-lactoglobulin, can be used as nanoreactors for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles and demonstrate that the resulting hybrids can play a central role in the internalization of nanoparticles into living cells, with up to 3-fold-enhanced transport properties over pristine nanoparticles. We conjugate gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles onto amyloid fibrils by chemical reduction, and we study their effect on dendritic and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Transmission electron microscopy indicates localization of nanoparticles inside vesicles of the cells. Flow cytometry reveals that silver nanoparticle-amyloid hybrids are cytotoxic, while gold and palladium nanoparticle-amyloid hybrids produce no notable effect on cell viability and activation status.

  13. Keratinocyte apoptosis on type I collagen fibrils is prevented by Erk1/2 activation under high calcium condition.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Hitomi; Ebihara, Tetsuya; Irie, Shinkichi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Eijiro; Mochitate, Katumi; Hattori, Shunji

    2007-01-01

    Keratinocytes adhere and proliferate well on collagen-coated surfaces, but they undergo apoptosis without differentiation on collagen gels according to our past research. In the current studies, we investigated the necessary conditions for keratinocyte survival on fibrous collagen gels. We found that keratinocytes survived on collagen gels when the medium contains elevated levels (1.8 mM) of calcium. Under this high calcium condition, cells formed multicellular colonies and differentiated. Akt was not activated in cells cultured on collagen gels regardless of the calcium concentration, whereas it was activated in cells cultured on nonfibrous collagen. On the other hand, Erk1/2, key kinases of MAPK pathway, were phosphorylated in cells cultured under high calcium condition but not in cells cultured on collagen gels under low calcium condition. The necessity of Erk1/2 activation for keratinocyte survival on collagen gel was confirmed with experiment using U0126, an inhibitor for Erk1/2. These studies show that activation of Akt depends on collagen assembly, whereas activation of Erk1/2 is induced by increased extracellular calcium concentration. Thus, activation of the Erk1/2 by increasing calcium concentration in the incubation medium may compensate for the loss of Akt activation, allowing keratinocyte survival on collagen gels.

  14. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  15. Discoidin domain receptor 2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Iscru, Daniel F; Druhan, Lawrence J; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2006-09-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are widely expressed cell-surface receptors, which bind to and are activated by collagens, including collagen type 1. Activation of DDRs and the resulting downstream signaling is known to regulate the extracellular matrix. However, little is known about how DDRs interact with collagen and its direct impact on collagen regulation. Here, we have established that by binding to collagen, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2 inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis and alters the morphology of collagen type 1 fibers. Our in vitro assays utilized DDR2-Fc fusion proteins, which contain only the ECD of DDR2. Using surface plasmon resonance, we confirmed that further oligomerization of DDR2-Fc (by means of anti-Fc antibody) greatly enhances its binding to immobilized collagen type 1. Collagen turbidity measurements and biochemical assays indicated that DDR2 delays the formation of collagen fibrils. Atomic force microscopy of soluble collagen revealed that a predominately monomeric state of collagen was present with DDR2, while control solutions had an abundance of polymeric collagen. Transmission electron microscopy of collagen fibers, showed that the native periodic banded structure of collagen fibers was weakened and nearly absent in the presence of DDR2. Further, using a cell-based assay we demonstrate that overexpression of full length DDR2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1. Our results demonstrate a novel and important functional role of the DDR2 ECD that may contribute to collagen regulation via modulation of fibrillogenesis.

  16. Induced Collagen Cross-Links Enhance Cartilage Integration

    PubMed Central

    Athens, Aristos A.; Makris, Eleftherios A.; Hu, Jerry C.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage does not integrate due primarily to a scarcity of cross-links and viable cells at the interface. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lysyl-oxidase, a metalloenzyme that forms collagen cross-links, would be effective in improving integration between native-to-native, as well as tissue engineered-to-native cartilage surfaces. To examine these hypotheses, engineered cartilage constructs, synthesized via the self-assembling process, as well as native cartilage, were implanted into native cartilage rings and treated with lysyl-oxidase for varying amounts of time. For both groups, lysyl-oxidase application resulted in greater apparent stiffness across the cartilage interface 2–2.2 times greater than control. The construct-to-native lysyl-oxidase group also exhibited a statistically significant increase in the apparent strength, here defined as the highest observed peak stress during tensile testing. Histology indicated a narrowing gap at the cartilage interface in lysyl-oxidase treated groups, though this alone is not sufficient to indicate annealing. However, when the morphological and mechanical data are taken together, the longer the duration of lysyl-oxidase treatment, the more integrated the interface appeared. Though further data are needed to confirm the mechanism of action, the enhancement of integration may be due to lysyl-oxidase-induced pyridinoline cross-links. This study demonstrates that lysyl-oxidase is a potent agent for enhancing integration between both native-to-native and native-to-engineered cartilages. The fact that interfacial strength increased manifold suggests that cross-linking agents should play a significant role in solving the difficult problem of cartilage integration. Future studies must examine dose, dosing regimen, and cellular responses to lysyl-oxidase to optimize its application. PMID:23593295

  17. Chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on fish scale collagen.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Han-Hsiu; Uemura, Toshimasa; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2016-08-01

    Fish collagen has recently been reported to be a novel biomaterial for cell and tissue culture as an alternative to conventional mammalian collagens such as bovine and porcine collagens. Fish collagen could overcome the risk of zoonosis, such as from bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Among fish collagens, tilapia collagen, the denaturing temperature of which is near 37°C, is appropriate for cell and tissue culture. In this study, we investigated chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on tilapia scale collagen fibrils compared with porcine collagen and non-coated dishes. The collagen fibrils were observed using a scanning electronic microscope. Safranin O staining, glycosaminoglycans (GAG) expression, and real-time PCR were examined to evaluate chondrogenesis of hMSCs on each type of collagen fibril. The results showed that hMSCs cultured on tilapia scale collagen showed stronger Safranin O staining and higher GAG expression at day 6. Results of real-time PCR indicated that hMSCs cultured on tilapia collagen showed earlier SOX9 expression on day 4 and higher AGGRECAN and COLLAGEN II expression on day 6 compared with on porcine collagen and non-coated dishes. Furthermore, low mRNA levels of bone gamma-carboxyglutamate, a specific marker of osteogenesis, showed that tilapia collagen fibrils specifically enhanced chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs in chondrogenic medium, as well as porcine collagen. Accordingly, tilapia scale collagen may provide an appropriate collagen source for hMSC chondrogenesis in vitro. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increase in dermal collagen fibril diameter and elastogenesis with UVB exposure: an optical and ultrastructural study in albino Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sueli Coelho; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Pascarelli, Bernardo Miguel; Souza, Sonia Oliveira; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Filgueira, Absalom Lima; Japiassu, Maria Augusta; Takiya, Christina Maeda

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous aging is a complex biological phenomenon, dependent not only on the innate or intrinsic process ("biological clock"), but also on extrinsic elements, primarily chronic sun exposure (photoaging). In order to verify dermal morphological changes in the elastic fiber system and collagen associated with aged skin, we performed a light and electron microscopic study on exposed-shaved albino mice, which were exposed to UVB radiation. The experimental group consisted of 48 exposed animals, randomly distributed in three groups and submitted to different radiation doses (A, 28800 J/m2; B, 57600 J/m2; and C, 86400 J/m2) and studied 0, 30, 60 and 90 days of exposure discontinuation. Nonexposed-shaved and nonexposed-nonshaved animals were included as controls. From the day of exposure discontinuation and subsequently, the elastic system and collagen network were progressively modified. The increase in collagen fibril diameter was prominent in the 60 and 90 day groups (p<0.05), as noticed on electron microscopy. Elastic fiber density also increased after irradiation (p<0.05). On electron microscopy, elastogenesis was seen in the deep dermis. The comparative study among the groups disclosed clear relationship between doses and "elastotic changes". It also showed that chronological aging of mice skin was apparently intensified after UVB exposure. Skin elastogenesis seems to be a major consequence of UVB exposure, apart from elastolysis, and occurs not only in humans but also in hairless mice submitted to continuous, long-term UVB exposure.

  19. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  20. Type I collagen-based fibrous capsule enhances integration of tissue-engineered cartilage with native articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yueh-Hsun; Ard, Mary B; Halper, Jaroslava T; Barabino, Gilda A

    2014-04-01

    Successful integration of engineered constructs with host tissues is crucial for cartilage repair, yet achieving it remains challenging. A collagen I-based fibrous capsule characterized by increased cell density and decreased glycosaminoglycan deposition usually forms at the periphery of tissue-engineered cartilage. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of a solid fibrous capsule on construct integration with native articular cartilage. To this end, capsule-containing (CC) and capsule-free (CF) constructs were grown by culturing chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds with insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-β1, respectively, in a wavy-walled bioreactor that imparts hydrodynamic forces for 4 weeks. The ability of harvested constructs to integrate with native cartilage was determined using a cartilage explant model. Our results revealed that adhesive stress between native cartilage and the CC constructs was 57% higher than that in the CF group, potentially due to the absence of glycosaminoglycans and increased cell density in the capsule region and deposition of denser and thicker collagen fibrils at the integration site. The present work demonstrates that the fibrous capsule can effectively enhance early integration of engineered and native cartilage tissues and thus suggests the need to include the capsule as a variable in the development of cartilage tissue engineering strategies.

  1. Collagen crosslink status analysed in vitro using second-harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Vivien; Puschmann, Stefan; Gallinat, Stefan; Wenck, Horst; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Fischer, Frank

    2012-02-01

    One of the major structural proteins in human skin is collagen. Collagen and its crosslinks are essential for the mechanical stability of the skin. Looking at extrinsically aged human skin (photo damaged skin) we find a decrease of mature collagen crosslinks. Immature crosslinks an indicator of the collagen turnover are decreasing as well in extrinsically aged skin. Hence, we assume that a certain range of mature and immature crosslinks reflect a 'good quality' of collagen in terms of photoaging. In this study we established in vitro models of reduced crosslinking. We found that reduced collagen crosslinking resulted in a higher Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) intensity. Furthermore, we found a higher fibril diameter after crosslink reduction without an increase in collagen concentration. SHG is generated by a non-linear effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on collagen molecules. This effect might be influenced by the interspaces of the collagen molecules within the collagen fibril. From these findings the following hypothesis was introduced: reduced collagen crosslinking changes the interspace of single collagen molecules within the collagen fibril resulting in an enhanced SHG signal. Furthermore, in this study the fluorescence lifetime (FLIM) of collagen fluorescence was found to decrease in the in vitro models of reduced crosslinking. We speculate on possible mechanisms being responsible for the decrease in lifetime. Future in vivo measurements of the two parameters (SHG and FLIM) could lead to information about the collagen crosslink status, and therefore the status of photoaging of the skin.

  2. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  3. Structural Characterization of Semen Coagulum-Derived SEM1(86–107) Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SEM1(86–107) is a 22-residue peptide corresponding to residues 86–107 in the semenogelin I protein. SEM1(86–107) is an abundant component of freshly liquefied semen and forms amyloid fibrils capable of enhancing HIV infection. To probe the factors affecting fibril formation and gain a better understanding of how differences in pH between semen and vaginal fluid affect fibril stability, this study determined the effect of pH on SEM1(86–107) fibril formation and dissociation. The SEM1(86–107) fibril structure (i.e., residues that comprise the fibrillar core) was also probed using hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) and hydroxyl radical-mediated protein modification. The average percent exposure to hydroxyl radical-mediated modification in the SEM1(86–107) fibrils was determined without requiring tandem mass spectrometry spectral acquisition or complete separation of modified peptides. It was found that the residue exposures calculated from HDXMS and hydroxyl radical-mediated modification were similar. These techniques demonstrated that three regions of SEM1(86–107) comprise the amyloid fibril core and that positively charged residues are exposed, suggesting that electrostatic interactions between SEM1(86–107) and HIV or the cell surface may be responsible for mediating HIV infection enhancement by the SEM1(86–107) fibrils. PMID:24811874

  4. Identification of novel short peptides derived from the {alpha}4, {alpha}5, and {alpha}6 fibrils of type IV collagen with anti-angiogenic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiannis, Emmanouil D. . E-mail: ekaragi1@jhmi.edu; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2007-03-09

    Angiogenesis, or neovascularization, is tightly controlled by positive and negative regulators, many of which reside in the extracellular matrix. We have now identified eight novel 19- to 20-residue peptides derived from the {alpha}4, {alpha}5, and {alpha}6 fibrils of type IV collagen, which we have designated tetrastatins, pentastatins, and hexastatins, respectively. We have shown that these endogenous peptides suppress the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in vitro. By performing clustering analyses of the sequences using sequence similarity criteria and of the experimental results using a hierarchical algorithm, we report that the clusters identified by the experimental results coincide with the sequence-based clusters, indicating a tight relationship between peptide sequence and anti-angiogenic potency. These peptides may have potential as anti-angiogenic therapeutic agents.

  5. Substitutions of aspartic acid for glycine-220 and of arginine for glycine-664 in the triple helix of the pro alpha 1(I) chain of type I procollagen produce lethal osteogenesis imperfecta and disrupt the ability of collagen fibrils to incorporate crystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Culbert, A A; Lowe, M P; Atkinson, M; Byers, P H; Wallis, G A; Kadler, K E

    1995-01-01

    We identified two infants with lethal (type II) osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) who were heterozygous for mutations in the COL1A1 gene that resulted in substitutions of aspartic acid for glycine at position 220 and arginine for glycine at position 664 in the product of one COL1A1 allele in each individual. In normal age- and site-matched bone, approximately 70% (by number) of the collagen fibrils were encrusted with plate-like crystallites of hydroxyapatite. In contrast, approximately 5% (by number) of the collagen fibrils in the probands' bone contained crystallites. In contrast with normal bone, the c-axes of hydroxyapatite crystallites were sometimes poorly aligned with the long axis of fibrils obtained from OI bone. Chemical analysis showed that the OI samples contained normal amounts of calcium. The probands' bone samples contained type I collagen, overmodified type I collagen and elevated levels of type III and V collagens. On the basis of biochemical and morphological data, the fibrils in the OI samples were co-polymers of normal and mutant collagen. The results are consistent with a model of fibril mineralization in which the presence of abnormal type I collagen prevents normal collagen in the same fibril from incorporating hydroxyapatite crystallites. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487936

  6. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  7. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials.

  8. Impacts of fullerene derivatives on regulating the structure and assembly of collagen molecules.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lina; Kang, Seung-gu; Pan, Jun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Mingyi; Xing, Gengmei; Wang, Fei; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Ruhong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2013-08-21

    During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 can enhance the rigidity of the native structure of collagen molecules and promote the formation of an oligomer or a microfibril. The interaction with Gd@C82(OH)22 may regulate further the assembly of collagen fibrils and change the biophysical properties of collagen. The control run with fullerene derivatives C60(OH)24 also indicates that C60(OH)24 can influence the structure and assembly of collagen molecules as well, but to a lesser degree. Both fullerene derivatives can form hydrogen bonds with multiple collagen molecules acting as a "fullerenol-mediated bridge" that enhance the interaction within or among collagen molecules. Compared to C60(OH)24, the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen is stronger, resulting in particular biomedical effects for regulating the biophysical properties of collagen fibrils.

  9. Collagen VI enhances cartilage tissue generation by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Lai, Janice H; Goodman, Stuart B; Dragoo, Jason L; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-02-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.

  10. The Mechanism of Enhanced Insulin Amyloid Fibril Formation by NaCl Is Better Explained by a Conformational Change Model

    PubMed Central

    Muzaffar, Mahvish; Ahmad, Atta

    2011-01-01

    The high propensity of insulin to fibrillate causes severe biomedical and biotechnological complications. Insulin fibrillation studies attain significant importance considering the prevalence of diabetes and the requirement of functional insulin in each dose. Although studied since the early years of the 20th century, elucidation of the mechanism of insulin fibrillation has not been understood completely. We have previously, through several studies, shown that insulin hexamer dissociates into monomer that undergoes partial unfolding before converting into mature fibrils. In this study we have established that NaCl enhances insulin fibrillation mainly due to subtle structural changes and is not a mere salt effect. We have carried out studies both in the presence and absence of urea and Gdn.HCl and compared the relationship between conformation of insulin induced by urea and Gdn.HCl with respect to NaCl at both pH 7.4 (hexamer) and pH 2 (monomer). Fibril formation was followed with a Thioflavin T assay and structural changes were monitored by circular dichroism and size-exclusion chromatography. The results show salt-insulin interactions are difficult to classify as commonly accepted Debye-Hückel or Hofmeister series interactions but instead a strong correlation between the association states and conformational states of insulin and their propensity to fibrillate is evident. PMID:22132167

  11. Substance P Enhances Collagen Remodeling and MMP-3 Expression By Human Tenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Gloria; Backman, Ludvig J.; Hart, David A.; Danielson, Patrik; McCormack, Bob; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The loss of collagen organization is considered a hallmark histopathologic feature of tendinosis. At the cellular level, tenocytes have been shown to produce signal substances that were once thought to be restricted to neurons. One of the main neuropeptides implicated in tendinosis, substance P (SP), is known to influence collagen organization, particularly after injury. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of SP on collagen remodeling by primary human tendon cells cultured in vitro in three-dimensional collagen lattices. We found that SP stimulation led to an increased rate of collagen remodeling mediated via the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1 R), the preferred cell receptor for SP. Gene expression analysis showed that SP stimulation resulted in significant increases in MMP3 and ACTA2 mRNA levels in the collagen lattices. Furthermore, cyclic tensile loading of tendon cell cultures along with the administration of exogenous SP had an additive effect on MMP3 expression. Immunoblotting confirmed that SP increased MMP3 protein levels via the NK-1 R. This study indicates that SP, mediated via NK-1 R, increases collagen remodeling and leads to increased MMP3 mRNA and protein expression that is further enhanced by cyclic mechanical loading. PMID:22836729

  12. Collagen network strengthening following cyclic tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Paten, Jeffrey A; Sander, Edward A; Nguyen, Thao D; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-06

    The bulk mechanical properties of tissues are highly tuned to the physiological loads they experience and reflect the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of their constituent parts. A thorough understanding of the processes involved in tissue adaptation is required to develop multi-scale computational models of tissue remodelling. While extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is partly due to the changing cellular metabolic activity, there may also be mechanically directed changes in ECM nano/microscale organization which lead to mechanical tuning. The thermal and enzymatic stability of collagen, which is the principal load-bearing biopolymer in vertebrates, have been shown to be enhanced by force suggesting that collagen has an active role in ECM mechanical properties. Here, we ask how changes in the mechanical properties of a collagen-based material are reflected by alterations in the micro/nanoscale collagen network following cyclic loading. Surprisingly, we observed significantly higher tensile stiffness and ultimate tensile strength, roughly analogous to the effect of work hardening, in the absence of network realignment and alterations to the fibril area fraction. The data suggest that mechanical loading induces stabilizing changes internal to the fibrils themselves or in the fibril-fibril interactions. If such a cell-independent strengthening effect is operational in vivo, then it would be an important consideration in any multiscale computational approach to ECM growth and remodelling.

  13. Collagen nerve conduits promote enhanced axonal regeneration, schwann cell association, and neovascularization compared to silicone conduits.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephen W P; Syed, Shahbaz; Walsh, Walsh; Zochodne, Douglas W; Midha, Rajiv

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration within guidance conduits involves a critical association between regenerating axons, Schwann cells (SCs), and neovascularization. However, it is currently unknown if there is a greater association between these factors in nonpermeable versus semipermeable nerve guide conduits. We therefore examined this collaboration in both silicone- and collagen-based nerve conduits in both 5- and 10-mm-injury gaps in rat sciatic nerves. Results indicate that collagen conduits promoted enhanced axonal and SC regeneration and association when compared to silicone conduits in the shorter 5-mm-gap model. In addition, collagen tubes displayed enhanced neovascularization over silicone conduits, suggesting that these three factors are intimately related in successful peripheral nerve regeneration. At later time points (1- and 2-month analysis) in a 10-mm-gap model, collagen tubes displayed enhanced axonal regeneration, myelination, and vascularization when compared to silicone-based conduits. Results from these studies suggest that regenerating cables within collagen-based conduits are revascularized earlier and more completely, which in turn enhances peripheral nerve regeneration through these nerve guides as compared to silicone conduits.

  14. Enhanced regeneration of corneal tissue via a bioengineered collagen construct implanted by a nondisruptive surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Koulikovska, Marina; Rafat, Mehrdad; Petrovski, Goran; Veréb, Zoltán; Akhtar, Saeed; Fagerholm, Per; Lagali, Neil

    2015-03-01

    Severe shortage of donor corneas for transplantation, particularly in developing countries, has prompted the advancement of bioengineered tissue alternatives. Bioengineered corneas that can withstand transplantation while maintaining transparency and compatibility with host cells, and that are additionally amenable to standardized low-cost mass production are sought. In this study, a bioengineered porcine construct (BPC) was developed to function as a biodegradable scaffold to promote corneal stromal regeneration by host cells. Using high-purity medical-grade type I collagen, high 18% collagen content and optimized EDC-NHS cross-linker ratio, BPCs were fabricated into hydrogel corneal implants with over 90% transparency and four-fold increase in strength and stiffness compared with previous versions. Remarkably, optical transparency was achieved despite the absence of collagen fibril organization at the nanoscale. In vitro testing indicated that BPC supported confluent human epithelial and stromal-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations. With a novel femtosecond laser-assisted corneal surgical model in rabbits, cell-free BPCs were implanted in vivo in the corneal stroma of 10 rabbits over an 8-week period. In vivo, transparency of implanted corneas was maintained throughout the postoperative period, while healing occurred rapidly without inflammation and without the use of postoperative steroids. BPC implants had a 100% retention rate at 8 weeks, when host stromal cells began to migrate into implants. Direct histochemical evidence of stromal tissue regeneration was observed by means of migrated host cells producing new collagen from within the implants. This study indicates that a cost-effective BPC extracellular matrix equivalent can incorporate cells passively to initiate regenerative healing of the corneal stroma, and is compatible with human stem or organ-specific cells for future therapeutic applications as a stromal replacement for treating blinding

  15. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities*

    PubMed Central

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M.; Adams, Sheila M.; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P.; Birk, David E.; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. PMID:26178373

  16. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M; Adams, Sheila M; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-08-28

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Enhanced electrical conductivity of collagen films through long-range aligned iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bonfrate, Valentina; Manno, Daniela; Serra, Antonio; Salvatore, Luca; Sannino, Alessandro; Buccolieri, Alessandro; Serra, Tiziano; Giancane, Gabriele

    2017-09-01

    The development of biocompatible collagen substrates able to conduct electric current along specific pathways represent an appealing issue in tissue engineering, since it is well known that electrical stimuli significantly affects important cell behaviour, such as proliferation, differentiation, directional migration, and, therefore, tissue regeneration. In this work, a cheap and easy approach was proposed to produce collagen-based films exhibiting enhanced electrical conductivity, through the simple manipulation of a weak external magnetic trigger. Paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) capped by a biocompatible polyethylene-glycol coating were synthetized by a co-precipitation and solvothermic method and sprayed onto a collagen suspension. The system was then subjected to a static external magnetic field in order to conveniently tune NPs organization. Under the action of the external stimulus, NPs were induced to orient along the magnetic field lines, forming long-range aligned micropatterns within the collagen matrix. Drying of the substrate following water evaporation permanently blocked the magnetic architecture produced, thereby preserving NPs organization even after magnetic field removal. Electrical conductivity measurements clearly showed that the presence of such a magnetic framework endowed collagen with marked conductive properties in specific directions. The biocompatibility of the paramagnetic collagen films was also demonstrated by MTT cell cytotoxicity test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The exercise-induced biochemical milieu enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel W D; Lee-Barthel, Ann; McIntyre, Todd; Shamim, Baubak; Lee, Cassandra A; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-15

    Exercise stimulates a dramatic change in the concentration of circulating hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), but the biological functions of this response are unclear. Pharmacological GH administration stimulates collagen synthesis; however, whether the post-exercise systemic milieu has a similar action is unknown. We aimed to determine whether the collagen content and tensile strength of tissue-engineered ligaments is enhanced by serum obtained post-exercise. Primary cells from a human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were used to engineer ligament constructs in vitro. Blood obtained from 12 healthy young men 15 min after resistance exercise contained GH concentrations that were ∼7-fold greater than resting serum (P < 0.001), whereas IGF-1 was not elevated at this time point (P = 0.21 vs. rest). Ligament constructs were treated for 7 days with medium supplemented with serum obtained at rest (RestTx) or 15 min post-exercise (ExTx), before tensile testing and collagen content analysis. Compared with RestTx, ExTx enhanced collagen content (+19%; 181 ± 33 vs. 215 ± 40 μg per construct P = 0.001) and ligament mechanical properties - maximal tensile load (+17%, P = 0.03 vs. RestTx) and ultimate tensile strength (+10%, P = 0.15 vs. RestTx). In a separate set of engineered ligaments, recombinant IGF-1, but not GH, enhanced collagen content and mechanics. Bioassays in 2D culture revealed that acute treatment with post-exercise serum activated mTORC1 and ERK1/2. In conclusion, the post-exercise biochemical milieu, but not recombinant GH, enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments, in association with mTORC1 and ERK1/2 activation.

  19. Characterization of whole fibril-forming collagen proteins of types I, III, and V from fetal calf skin by infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dreisewerd, Klaus; Rohlfing, Andreas; Spottke, Beatrice; Urbanke, Claus; Henkel, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Fibril-forming collagen proteins of the types I, III, and V were extracted from fetal calf skin, purified by differential salt precipitation, and analyzed by infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI-TOF-MS). Glycerol was used as liquid IR-MALDI matrix. Noncovalently bound triple helices of the types I and V were detected from the NaCl precipitate. After heating at 43 degrees C for 10 min, resulting in the dissociation of the triple helix, the single alpha-chain subunits were detected. For type I, mass spectra acquired from molecular sieve chromatography fractions revealed the presence of further substructures of dimeric type and of supramolecular complexes up to the tetramer. Triple helices of type III, stabilized by covalent disulfide bonds, were detected from the total protein precipitate also after heat treatment. For type III, even hexamer and nonamer structures with molecular weights close to 600 and 900 kDa were recorded. For comparison, ultraviolet (UV-)MALDI-MS measurements with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix were carried out with some of the samples. Here, only the single alpha-chains were detected with significantly reduced sensitivity.

  20. Removing Cross-Linked Telopeptides Enhances the Production of Low-Molecular-Weight Collagen Peptides from Spent Hens.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hui; Chaplot, Shreyak; Chalamaiah, Meram; Roy, Bimol C; Bruce, Heather L; Wu, Jianping

    2017-08-30

    The low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides derived from collagen have shown a potential for various nutritional and pharmaceutical applications. However, production of LMW peptides from vertebrate collagen remains a challenge. Herein, we report a new method to produce LMW collagen peptides using pepsin pretreatment that removed cross-linked telopeptides in collagen molecules. After the pretreatment, the proportion of LMW collagen peptides (<1.4 kDa) that were obtained from pepsin-soluble collagen increased to 32.59% compared to heat-soluble collagen peptides (16.10%). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated that telopeptide cleavage retained the triple-helical conformation of collagen. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis suggested that Gly-X-Y (X is often proline, while Y is either hydroxyproline or hydroxylysine) repeats were not the main factors that hindered the enzymatic hydrolysis of collagen molecules. However, cross-link quantification demonstrated that trivalent cross-links that included pyridinolines and pyrroles were the primary obstacles to producing small peptides from collagen of spent hens. This study demonstrated for the first time that removing cross-linked telopeptides could enhance the production of LMW peptides from spent hen collagen, which is also of interest to manufacturers who produce LMW collagen peptides from other vertebrate animals, such as bovids and porcids.

  1. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIB. Morphology of type I collagen fibrils formed in vivo and in vitro is determined by the conformation of the retained N-propeptide.

    PubMed

    Holmes, D F; Watson, R B; Steinmann, B; Kadler, K E

    1993-07-25

    Previously we showed that fibrils generated from collagen and pNcollagen-ex6 from fibroblasts of an individual with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIIB were hieroglyphic in cross-section and all N-propeptides were located at the fibril surface. Hieroglyphs were resolved to near-cylindrical fibrils (that were similar in appearance to the fibrils seen in the tissues of individuals with EDS type VIIB) by treatment with N-proteinase which cleaved the pN alpha 1(I) chains but not the pN alpha 2(I)-ex6 chains (Watson, R. B., Wallis, G. A., Holmes, D. F., Viljoen, D., Byers, P. H., and Kadler, K. E. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 9093-9100). Here, quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) showed that N-propeptides in hieroglyphs were in a "bent-back" conformation and thus located exclusively in the overlap zone of the fibril D-period (D = 67 nm). In contrast, STEM of fibrils from the dermis of an individual with EDS type VIIB showed that partially cleaved N-propeptides (in which cleaved pN alpha 1(I) remained in noncovalent association with pN alpha 2(I)-ex6 chains) were distributed equally between the gap and overlap zones of the fibrils. Comparison of experimental data with theoretical mass distributions of the fibril based on amino acid sequence data gave a consistent value of 33 nm for the total axial extent for the N-propeptides in hieroglyphic and tissue fibrils irrespective of the location of N-propeptides to the gap or overlap zone. These data exclude the possibility that N-propeptides adopt a random configuration, but rather, that they locate to specific sites in the gap and overlap zones. The results demonstrated that cleavage of pN alpha 1(I) chains in vivo releases the N-propeptides from the constraints of the bent-back conformation. Co-distribution of partially cleaved N-propeptides between gap and overlap zones allows a higher surface packing density of N-propeptides and explains how circularity of large diameter fibrils can be achieved

  2. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  3. Enhancing oxidative stability in heated oils using core/shell structures of collagen and α-tocopherol complex.

    PubMed

    Gim, Seo Yeong; Hong, Seungmi; Kim, Jisu; Kwon, YongJun; Kim, Mi-Ja; Kim, GeunHyung; Lee, JaeHwan

    2017-11-15

    In this study, collagen mesh structure was prepared by carrying α-tocopherol in the form of core/shell complex. Antioxidant properties of α-tocopherol loaded carriers were tested in moisture added bulk oils at 140°C. From one gram of collagen core/shell complex, 138mg α-tocopherol was released in medium chain triacylglycerol (MCT). α-Tocopherol was substantially protected against heat treatment when α-tocopherol was complexed in collagen core/shell. Oxidative stability in bulk oil was significantly enhanced by added collagen mesh structure or collagen core/shell complex with α-tocopherol compared to that in control bulk oils (p<0.05), although no significant difference was observed between oils containing collagen mesh structure and collagen core/shell with α-tocopherol (p>0.05). Results of DPPH loss in methanol demonstrated that collagen core/shell with α-tocopherol had significantly (p<0.05) higher antioxidant properties than collagen mesh structure up to a certain period. Therefore, collagen core/shell complex is a promising way to enhance the stability of α-tocopherol and oxidative stability in oil-rich foods prepared at high temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking is responsible for fibrosis-enhanced metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Thomas R.; Bird, Demelza; Baker, Ann-Marie; Barker, Holly E.; Ho, Melisa W-Y.; Lang, Georgina; Erler, Janine T.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly complex, dynamic and inefficient process involving multiple steps, yet accounts for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. Although it has long been known that fibrotic signals enhance tumor progression and metastasis, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Identifying events involved in creating environments that promote metastatic colonization and growth is critical for the development of effective cancer therapies. Here, we demonstrate a critical role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in establishing a milieu within fibrosing tissues that is favorable to growth of metastastic tumor cells. We show that LOX-dependent collagen crosslinking is involved in creating a growth-permissive fibrotic microenvironment capable of supporting metastatic growth by enhancing tumor cell persistence and survival. We show that therapeutic targeting of LOX abrogates not only the extent to which fibrosis manifests, but also prevents fibrosis-enhanced metastatic colonization. Finally, we show that the LOX-mediated collagen cross-linking directly increases tumor cell proliferation, enhancing metastatic colonization and growth manifesting in vivo as increased metastasis. This is the first time that crosslinking of collagen I has been shown to enhance metastatic growth. These findings provide an important link between extracellular matrix homeostasis, fibrosis and cancer with important clinical implications for both the treatment of fibrotic disease and cancer. PMID:23345161

  5. LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking is responsible for fibrosis-enhanced metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Bird, Demelza; Baker, Ann-Marie; Barker, Holly E; Ho, Melisa W-Y; Lang, Georgina; Erler, Janine T

    2013-03-15

    Tumor metastasis is a highly complex, dynamic, and inefficient process involving multiple steps, yet it accounts for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. Although it has long been known that fibrotic signals enhance tumor progression and metastasis, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Identifying events involved in creating environments that promote metastatic colonization and growth are critical for the development of effective cancer therapies. Here, we show a critical role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in establishing a milieu within fibrosing tissues that is favorable to growth of metastastic tumor cells. We show that LOX-dependent collagen crosslinking is involved in creating a growth-permissive fibrotic microenvironment capable of supporting metastatic growth by enhancing tumor cell persistence and survival. We show that therapeutic targeting of LOX abrogates not only the extent to which fibrosis manifests, but also prevents fibrosis-enhanced metastatic colonization. Finally, we show that the LOX-mediated collagen crosslinking directly increases tumor cell proliferation, enhancing metastatic colonization and growth manifesting in vivo as increased metastasis. This is the first time that crosslinking of collagen I has been shown to enhance metastatic growth. These findings provide an important link between ECM homeostasis, fibrosis, and cancer with important clinical implications for both the treatment of fibrotic disease and cancer.

  6. Enhanced thermal and mechanical properties of PVA composites formed with filamentous nanocellulose fibrils.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wu, Qiong; Zhao, Xin; Huang, Zhanhua; Cao, Jun; Li, Jian; Liu, Shouxin

    2014-11-26

    Long filamentous nanocellulose fibrils (NCFs) were prepared from chemical-thermomechanical pulps (CTMP) using ultrasonication. Their contribution to enhancements in thermal stability and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) films were investigated. The unique chemical pretreatment and mechanical effects of CTMP loosen and unfold fibers during the pulping process, which enables further chemical purification and subsequent ultrasound treatment for formation of NCFs. The NCFs exhibited higher crystallinity (72.9%) compared with that of CTMP (61.5%), and had diameters ranging from 50 to 120 nm. A NCF content of 6 wt% was found to yield the best thermal stability, light transmittance, and mechanical properties in the PVA/NCF composites. The composites also exhibited a visible light transmittance of 73.7%, and the tensile strength and Young's modulus were significantly improved, with values 2.8 and 2.4 times larger, respectively, than that of neat PVA.

  7. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  8. Phospholipids enhance nucleation but not elongation of apolipoprotein C-II amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy M; Teoh, Chai L; Griffin, Michael D W; Bailey, Michael F; Schuck, Peter; Howlett, Geoffrey J

    2010-06-25

    Amyloid fibrils and their oligomeric intermediates accumulate in several age-related diseases where their presence is considered to play an active role in disease progression. A common characteristic of amyloid fibril formation is an initial lag phase indicative of a nucleation-elongation mechanism for fibril assembly. We have investigated fibril formation by human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II. ApoC-II readily forms amyloid fibrils in a lipid-dependent manner via an initial nucleation step followed by fibril elongation, breaking, and joining. We used fluorescence techniques and stopped-flow analysis to identify the individual kinetic steps involved in the activation of apoC-II fibril formation by the short-chain phospholipid dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). Submicellar DHPC activates fibril formation by promoting the rapid formation of a tetrameric species followed by a slow isomerisation that precedes monomer addition and fibril growth. Global fitting of the concentration dependence of apoC-II fibril formation showed that DHPC increased the overall tetramerisation constant from 7.5 x 10(-13) to 1.2 x 10(-6) microM(-3) without significantly affecting the rate of fibril elongation, breaking, or joining. Studies on the effect of DHPC on the free pool of apoC-II monomer and on fibril formation by cross-linked apoC-II dimers further demonstrate that DHPC affects nucleation but not elongation. These studies demonstrate the capacity of small lipid compounds to selectively target individual steps in the amyloid fibril forming pathway. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Augmentation of diabetic wound healing and enhancement of collagen content using nanofibrous glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA scaffold membranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Shang-Hung; Chen, Wei-Jan; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Lin, Yu-Huang; Liu, Shih-Jung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng

    2015-02-01

    This work developed nanofibrous drug-loaded collagen/poly-D-L-lactide-glycolide (PLGA) scaffold membranes that provided the sustained release of glucophage for the wounds associated with diabetes. PLGA, glucophage, and collagen were firstly dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and were spun into nanofibrous membranes by electrospinning. High-performance liquid chromatography assay was used to characterize the in vivo and in vitro release rates of the pharmaceuticals from the membranes. High concentrations of glucophage were released for over three weeks from the nanofibrous membranes. The nanofibrous glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA membranes were more hydrophilic than collagen/PLGA membranes and exhibited a greater water-containing capacity. The glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA membranes markedly promoted the healing of diabetic wounds. Moreover, the collagen content of diabetic rats using drug-eluting membranes was higher than that of the control rats, because of the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9. The experimental results herein suggest that the nanofibrous glucophage-loaded collagen/PLGA membranes had effect for increasing collagen content in treating diabetic wounds and very effective promoters of the healing of such wounds in the early stages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A modified collagen gel enhances healing outcome in a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Dasghatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action is scanty. This work provides first results from a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds, elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days postwounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges, suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in neutrophil-like human promyelocytic leukemia-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG-treated wound tissue displayed elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a preclinical setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other collagen-based products used in clinical setting.

  11. Aspartic Acid Racemization and Collagen Degradation Markers Reveal an Accumulation of Damage in Tendon Collagen That Is Enhanced with Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Streeter, Ian; Pinchbeck, Gina L.; Goodship, Allen E.; Clegg, Peter D.; Birch, Helen L.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the rate at which protein turnover occurs in living tendon and whether the rate differs between tendons with different physiological roles. In this study, we have quantified the racemization of aspartic acid to calculate the age of the collagenous and non-collagenous components of the high strain injury-prone superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) and low strain rarely injured common digital extensor tendon (CDET) in a group of horses with a wide age range. In addition, the turnover of collagen was assessed indirectly by measuring the levels of collagen degradation markers (collagenase-generated neoepitope and cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen). The fractional increase in d-Asp was similar (p = 0.7) in the SDFT (5.87 × 10−4/year) and CDET (5.82 × 10−4/year) tissue, and d/l-Asp ratios showed a good correlation with pentosidine levels. We calculated a mean (±S.E.) collagen half-life of 197.53 (±18.23) years for the SDFT, which increased significantly with horse age (p = 0.03) and was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that for the CDET (34.03 (±3.39) years). Using similar calculations, the half-life of non-collagenous protein was 2.18 (±0.41) years in the SDFT and was significantly (p = 0.04) lower than the value of 3.51 (±0.51) years for the CDET. Collagen degradation markers were higher in the CDET and suggested an accumulation of partially degraded collagen within the matrix with aging in the SDFT. We propose that increased susceptibility to injury in older individuals results from an inability to remove partially degraded collagen from the matrix leading to reduced mechanical competence. PMID:20308077

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell-coated sutures enhance collagen depositions in sutured tissues.

    PubMed

    Casado, Javier G; Blazquez, Rebeca; Jorge, Inmaculada; Alvarez, Veronica; Gomez-Mauricio, Guadalupe; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Vazquez, Jesus; Sanchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    Sutures are commonly used for surgical procedures and new sutures are being developed to improve wound healing. In the past decade, it has been extensively shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a wound healing potential. To benefit the overall wound healing process, we aimed to analyze the usage of pretreated sutures for improving the implantation of MSCs in the tissues. Our results firstly showed that suture pretreatments with gelatin, poly-L-lysine, and NaOH improved the adhesive strength of MSCs to sutures. These cells remained surrounding the sutured tissue and no significant phenotypic changes were found in those cells cultured onto pretreated sutures. In vivo experiments showed that the implantation of MSCs by suturing increases the collagen content in the sutured tissue. Moreover, proteomics analysis of secreted proteins showed that collagen alpha-1(I) chain was the most abundant collagen found. To our knowledge, this is the first report that aimed to improve the implantation of MSCs in tissue by suture pretreatments. Moreover, in vivo experiments suggest that MSC-coated sutures may enhance wound healing and tissue remodeling through the release of different collagen types being applicable for those patients that tend to have difficulty healing.

  13. Controlling collagen fiber microstructure in three-dimensional hydrogels using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the primary fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix, and functional properties of collagen arise from variations in fiber structure. This study investigated the ability of ultrasound to control collagen microstructure during hydrogel fabrication. Under appropriate conditions, ultrasound exposure of type I collagen during polymerization altered fiber microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy and second-harmonic generation microscopy revealed decreased collagen fiber diameters in response to ultrasound compared to sham-exposed samples. Results of mechanistic investigations were consistent with a thermal mechanism for the effects of ultrasound on collagen fiber structure. To control collagen microstructure site-specifically, a high frequency, 8.3-MHz, ultrasound beam was directed within the center of a large collagen sample producing dense networks of short, thin collagen fibrils within the central core of the gel and longer, thicker fibers outside the beam area. Fibroblasts seeded onto these gels migrated rapidly into small, circularly arranged aggregates only within the beam area, and clustered fibroblasts remodeled the central, ultrasound-exposed collagen fibrils into dense sheets. These investigations demonstrate the capability of ultrasound to spatially pattern various collagen microstructures within an engineered tissue noninvasively, thus enhancing the level of complexity of extracellular matrix microenvironments and cellular functions achievable within three-dimensional engineered tissues. PMID:23927189

  14. Impaired primary mouse myotube formation on crosslinked type I collagen films is enhanced by laminin and entactin.

    PubMed

    Grefte, S; Adjobo-Hermans, M J W; Versteeg, E M M; Koopman, W J H; Daamen, W F

    2016-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the stem cell niche is important for controlling the quiescent, proliferation and differentiation states of satellite cells, which are key for skeletal muscle regeneration after wounding. It has been shown that type I collagen, often used as 3D-scaffolds for regenerative medicine purposes, impairs myoblast differentiation. This is most likely due to the absence of specific extracellular matrix proteins providing attachment sites for myoblasts and/or myotubes. In this study we investigated the differentiation capacity of primary murine myoblasts on type I collagen films either untreated or modified with elastin, laminin, type IV collagen, laminin/entactin complex, combinations thereof, and Matrigel as a positive control. Additionally, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROCK signaling might also be involved. To measure ROS levels with live-cell microscopy, fibronectin-coated glass coverslips were additionally coated with type I collagen and Matrigel onto which myoblasts were differentiated. On type I collagen-coated coverslips, myotube formation was impaired while ROS levels were increased. However, anti-oxidant treatment did not enhance myotube formation. ROCK inhibition, which generally improve cellular attachment to uncoated surfaces or type I collagen, enhanced myoblast attachment to type I collagen-coated coverslips and -films, but slightly enhanced myotube formation. Only modification of type I collagen films by Matrigel and a combination of laminin/entactin significantly improved myotube formation. Our results indicate that type I collagen scaffolds can be modified by satellite cell niche factors of which specifically laminin and entactin enhanced myotube formation. This offers a promising approach for regenerative medicine purposes to heal skeletal muscle wounds. In this manuscript we show for the first time that impaired myotube formation on type I collagen scaffolds can be completely restored by modification with laminin and

  15. Direct visualization of HIV-enhancing endogenous amyloid fibrils in human semen

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shariq M.; Zirafi, Onofrio; Müller, Janis; Sandi-Monroy, Nathallie; Yadav, Jay K.; Meier, Christoph; Weil, Tanja; Roan, Nadia R.; Greene, Warner C.; Walther, Paul; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Hammarström, Per; Wetzel, Ronald; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Gagsteiger, Friedrich; Fändrich, Marcus; Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring fragments of the abundant semen proteins prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and semenogelins form amyloid fibrils in vitro. These fibrils boost HIV infection and may play a key role in the spread of the AIDS pandemic. However, the presence of amyloid fibrils in semen remained to be demonstrated. Here, we use state of the art confocal and electron microscopy techniques for direct imaging of amyloid fibrils in human ejaculates. We detect amyloid aggregates in all semen samples and find that they partially consist of PAP fragments, interact with HIV particles and increase viral infectivity. Our results establish semen as a body fluid that naturally contains amyloid fibrils that are exploited by HIV to promote its sexual transmission. PMID:24691351

  16. RuvbL1 and RuvbL2 enhance aggresome formation and disaggregate amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zaarur, Nava; Xu, Xiaobin; Lestienne, Patrick; Meriin, Anatoli B; McComb, Mark; Costello, Catherine E; Newnam, Gary P; Ganti, Rakhee; Romanova, Nina V; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Silva, Sara TN; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Matias, Pedro M; Lobachev, Kirill S; Lednev, Igor K; Chernoff, Yury O; Sherman, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    The aggresome is an organelle that recruits aggregated proteins for storage and degradation. We performed an siRNA screen for proteins involved in aggresome formation and identified novel mammalian AAA+ protein disaggregases RuvbL1 and RuvbL2. Depletion of RuvbL1 or RuvbL2 suppressed aggresome formation and caused buildup of multiple cytoplasmic aggregates. Similarly, downregulation of RuvbL orthologs in yeast suppressed the formation of an aggresome-like body and enhanced the aggregate toxicity. In contrast, their overproduction enhanced the resistance to proteotoxic stress independently of chaperone Hsp104. Mammalian RuvbL associated with the aggresome, and the aggresome substrate synphilin-1 interacted directly with the RuvbL1 barrel-like structure near the opening of the central channel. Importantly, polypeptides with unfolded structures and amyloid fibrils stimulated the ATPase activity of RuvbL. Finally, disassembly of protein aggregates was promoted by RuvbL. These data indicate that RuvbL complexes serve as chaperones in protein disaggregation. PMID:26303906

  17. Surface modification of PVDF using non-mammalian sources of collagen for enhancement of endothelial cell functionality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun Kit; Xiong, Gordon Minru; Luo, Baiwen; Choo, Chee Chong; Yuan, Shaojun; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo

    2016-03-01

    Although polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is non-toxic and stable in vivo, its hydrophobic surface has limited its bio-applications due to poor cell-material interaction and thrombus formation when used in blood contacting devices. In this study, surface modification of PVDF using naturally derived non-mammalian collagen was accomplished via direct surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerisation (SI-ATRP) to enhance its cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Results showed that Type I collagen was successfully extracted from fish scales and bullfrog skin. The covalent immobilisation of fish scale-derived collagen (FSCOL) and bullfrog skin-derived collagen (BFCOL) onto the PVDF surface improves the attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, both FSCOL and BFCOL had comparable anti-thrombogenic profiles to that of commercially available bovine collagen (BVCOL). Also, cell surface expression of the leukocyte adhesion molecule was lower on HUVECs cultured on non-mammalian collagen surfaces than on BVCOL, which is an indication of lower pro-inflammatory response. Overall, results from this study demonstrated that non-mammalian sources of collagen could be used to confer bioactivity to PVDF, with comparable cell-material interactions and hemocompatibility to BVCOL. Additionally, higher expression levels of Type IV collagen in HUVECs cultured on FSCOL and BFCOL were observed as compared to BVCOL, which is an indication that the non-mammalian sources of collagen led to a better pro-angiogenic properties, thus making them suitable for blood contacting applications.

  18. A photochemical crosslinking technology for tissue engineering: enhancement of the physico-chemical properties of collagen-based scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Barbara P.

    2005-04-01

    Collagen gel is a natural biomaterial commonly used in tissue engineering because of its close resemblance to nature, negligible immunogenecity and excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen gel is mechanically weak, highly water binding and vulnerable to chemical and enzymatic attacks that limits its use in tissue engineering in particular tissues for weight-bearing purposes. The current project aimed to strengthen and stabilize collagen scaffolds using a photochemical crosslinking technique. Photochemical crosslinking is rapid, efficient, non-thermal and does not involve toxic chemicals, comparing with other crosslinking methods such as glutaraldehyde and gamma irradiation. Collagen scaffolds were fabricated using rat-tail tendon collagen. An argon laser was used to process the collagen gel after equilibrating with a photosensitizing reagent. Scanning electronic microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology of the membranes. Physico-chemical properties of the collagen scaffolds such as water-binding capacity, mechanical properties and thermostability were studied. Photochemical crosslinking significantly reduced the water-binding capacity, a parameter inversely proportional to the extent of crosslinking, of collagen scaffolds. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly increased the ultimate stress and tangent modulus at 90% of the rupture strain of the collagen scaffolds. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed a significantly higher shrinkage temperature and absence of the denaturation peak during the thermoscan comparing with the controls. This means greater thermostability in the photochemically crosslinked collagen scaffolds. This study demonstrates that the photochemical crosslinking technology is able to enhance the physicochemical propterties of collagen scaffolds by strengthening, stabilizing and controlling the swelling ratio of the collagen scaffolds so as to enable their use for tissue

  19. Fabrication of homobifunctional crosslinker stabilized collagen for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Sai, Korrapati Purna

    2015-11-27

    Collagen biopolymer has found widespread application in the field of tissue engineering owing to its excellent tissue compatibility and negligible immunogenicity. Mechanical strength and enzymatic degradation of the collagen necessitates the physical and chemical strength enhancement. One such attempt deals with the understanding of crosslinking behaviour of EGS (ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester)) with collagen to improve the physico-chemical properties. The incorporation of a crosslinker during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. EGS crosslinked collagen films exhibited higher denaturation temperature (T d) and the residue left after thermogravimetric analysis was about 16 ± 5.2%. Mechanical properties determined by uniaxial tensile tests showed a threefold increase in tensile strength and Young's modulus at higher concentration (100 μM). Water uptake capacity reduced up to a moderate extent upon crosslinking which is essential for the transport of nutrients to the cells. Cell viability was found to be 100% upon treatment with 100 μM EGS whereas only 30% viability could be observed with glutaraldehyde. Rheological studies of crosslinked collagen showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity at 37 °C. Crosslinking with EGS resulted in the formation of a uniform fibrillar network. Trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) assay confirmed that EGS crosslinked collagen by forming a covalent interaction with ε-amino acids of collagen. The homobifunctional crosslinker used in this study enhanced the effectiveness of collagen as a biomaterial for biomedical application.

  20. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinquan; Ren, Ruxia; Tan, Suiyi; Zhang, Wanyue; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Yu, Fei; Xun, Tianrong; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2), can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT) and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells. Conclusions and Significance Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection. PMID:26656730

  1. Strain-enhanced stress relaxation impacts nonlinear elasticity in collagen gels

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sungmin; Hu, Kenneth H.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex assembly of structural proteins that provides physical support and biochemical signaling to cells in tissues. The mechanical properties of the ECM have been found to play a key role in regulating cell behaviors such as differentiation and malignancy. Gels formed from ECM protein biopolymers such as collagen or fibrin are commonly used for 3D cell culture models of tissue. One of the most striking features of these gels is that they exhibit nonlinear elasticity, undergoing strain stiffening. However, these gels are also viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation, with the resistance of the gel to a deformation relaxing over time. Recent studies have suggested that cells sense and respond to both nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity of ECM, yet little is known about the connection between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity. Here, we report that, as strain is increased, not only do biopolymer gels stiffen but they also exhibit faster stress relaxation, reducing the timescale over which elastic energy is dissipated. This effect is not universal to all biological gels and is mediated through weak cross-links. Mechanistically, computational modeling and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that strain-enhanced stress relaxation of collagen gels arises from force-dependent unbinding of weak bonds between collagen fibers. The broader effect of strain-enhanced stress relaxation is to rapidly diminish strain stiffening over time. These results reveal the interplay between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity in collagen gels, and highlight the complexity of the ECM mechanics that are likely sensed through cellular mechanotransduction. PMID:27140623

  2. Impacts of fullerene derivatives on regulating the structure and assembly of collagen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lina; Kang, Seung-Gu; Pan, Jun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Mingyi; Xing, Gengmei; Wang, Fei; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Ruhong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2013-07-01

    During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that Gd@C82(OH)22 can enhance the rigidity of the native structure of collagen molecules and promote the formation of an oligomer or a microfibril. The interaction with Gd@C82(OH)22 may regulate further the assembly of collagen fibrils and change the biophysical properties of collagen. The control run with fullerene derivatives C60(OH)24 also indicates that C60(OH)24 can influence the structure and assembly of collagen molecules as well, but to a lesser degree. Both fullerene derivatives can form hydrogen bonds with multiple collagen molecules acting as a ``fullerenol-mediated bridge'' that enhance the interaction within or among collagen molecules. Compared to C60(OH)24, the interaction of Gd@C82(OH)22 with collagen is stronger, resulting in particular biomedical effects for regulating the biophysical properties of collagen fibrils.During cancer development, the fibrous layers surrounding the tumor surface get thin and stiff which facilitates the tumor metastasis. After the treatment of metallofullerene derivatives Gd@C82(OH)22, the fibrous layers become thicker and softer, the metastasis of tumor is then largely suppressed. The effect of Gd@C82(OH)22 was found to be related to their direct interaction with collagen and the resulting impact on the structure of collagen fibrils, the major component of extracellular matrices. In this work we study the interaction

  3. Nanocomposite scaffold with enhanced stability by hydrogen bonds between collagen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone and titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Fan, Xialian; Tang, Keyong; Zheng, Xuejing; Liu, Jie; Wang, Baoshi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite scaffolds, as potential substrates for skin tissue engineering, were fabricated by freeze drying the mixture of type I collagen extracted from porcine skin and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. This procedure was performed without any cross-linker or toxic reagents to generate porosity in the scaffold. Both morphology and thermal stability of the nanocomposite scaffold were examined. The swelling behavior, mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation of the composite scaffolds were carefully investigated. Our results revealed that collagen, PVP and TiO2 are bonded together by four main hydrogen bonds, which is an essential action for the formation of nanocomposite scaffold. Using Coasts-Redfern model, we were able to calculate the thermal degradation apparent activation energy and demonstrated that the thermal stability of nanocomposites is dependent on amount of PVP incorporated. Furthermore, SEM images showed that the collagen fibers are wrapped and stabilized on scaffolds by PVP molecules, which improve the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The UTS of PVP-contained scaffold is four times higher than that of scaffold without PVP, whereas ultimate percentage of elongation (UPE) is decreased, and PVP can enhance the degradation resistance.

  4. Seminal Plasma Accelerates Semen-derived Enhancer of Viral Infection (SEVI) Fibril Formation by the Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP248–286) Peptide*

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Joanna S.; DiMaio, John T. M.; Doran, Todd M.; Brown, Caitlin; Nilsson, Bradley L.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils contained in semen, known as SEVI, or semen-derived enhancer of viral infection, have been shown to increase the infectivity of HIV dramatically. However, previous work with these fibrils has suggested that extensive time and nonphysiologic levels of agitation are necessary to induce amyloid formation from the precursor peptide (a proteolytic cleavage product of prostatic acid phosphatase, PAP248–286). Here, we show that fibril formation by PAP248–286 is accelerated dramatically in the presence of seminal plasma (SP) and that agitation is not required for fibrillization in this setting. Analysis of the effects of specific SP components on fibril formation by PAP248–286 revealed that this effect is primarily due to the anionic buffer components of SP (notably inorganic phosphate and sodium bicarbonate). Divalent cations present in SP had little effect on the kinetics of fibril formation, but physiologic levels of Zn2+ strongly protected SEVI fibrils from degradation by seminal proteases. Taken together, these data suggest that in the in vivo environment, PAP248–286 is likely to form fibrils efficiently, thus providing an explanation for the presence of SEVI in human semen. PMID:22354963

  5. Seminal plasma accelerates semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) fibril formation by the prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286) peptide.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Joanna S; DiMaio, John T M; Doran, Todd M; Brown, Caitlin; Nilsson, Bradley L; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2012-04-06

    Amyloid fibrils contained in semen, known as SEVI, or semen-derived enhancer of viral infection, have been shown to increase the infectivity of HIV dramatically. However, previous work with these fibrils has suggested that extensive time and nonphysiologic levels of agitation are necessary to induce amyloid formation from the precursor peptide (a proteolytic cleavage product of prostatic acid phosphatase, PAP(248-286)). Here, we show that fibril formation by PAP(248-286) is accelerated dramatically in the presence of seminal plasma (SP) and that agitation is not required for fibrillization in this setting. Analysis of the effects of specific SP components on fibril formation by PAP(248-286) revealed that this effect is primarily due to the anionic buffer components of SP (notably inorganic phosphate and sodium bicarbonate). Divalent cations present in SP had little effect on the kinetics of fibril formation, but physiologic levels of Zn(2+) strongly protected SEVI fibrils from degradation by seminal proteases. Taken together, these data suggest that in the in vivo environment, PAP(248-286) is likely to form fibrils efficiently, thus providing an explanation for the presence of SEVI in human semen.

  6. Polyanionic Candidate Microbicides Accelerate the Formation of Semen-Derived Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Suiyi; Lu, Lu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jixiang; Oksov, Yelena; Lu, Hong; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen

    2013-01-01

    Polyanionic candidate microbicides, including cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, PRO 2000, were proven ineffective in preventing HIV-1 transmission and even cellulose sulfate showed increased risk of HIV acquisition in the Phase III efficacy trials. Semen plays critical roles in HIV-1 sexual transmission. Specifically, amyloid fibrils formed by fragments of prostatic acidic phosphatase (PAP) in semen termed semen-derived enhancer of virus infection (SEVI) could drastically enhance HIV-1 infection. Here we investigated the interaction between polyanions and PAP248-286, a prototype peptide of SEVI, to understand the possible cause of polyanionic candidate microbicides to fail in clinical trials. We found anionic polymers could efficiently promote SEVI fibril formation, most likely mediated by the natural electrostatic interaction between polyanions and PAP248-286, as revealed by acid native PAGE and Western blot. The overall anti-HIV-1 activity of polyanions in the presence or absence of PAP248-286 or semen was evaluated. In the viral infection assay, the supernatants of polyanions/PAP248-286 or polyanions/semen mixtures containing the free, unbound polyanionic molecules showed a general reduction in antiviral efficacy, while the pellets containing amyloid fibrils formed by the polyanion-bound PAP248-286 showed aggravated enhancement of viral infection. Collectively, from the point of drug-host protein interaction, our study revealed that polyanions facilitate SEVI fibril formation to promote HIV-1 infection, thus highlighting a molecular mechanism underlying the failure of polyanions in clinical trials and the importance of drug-semen interaction in evaluating the anti-HIV-1 efficacy of candidate microbicides. PMID:23544097

  7. Phorbol esters enhance attachment of NIH/3T3 cells to laminin and type IV collagen substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shigemi; Ben, T.L.; De Luca, L.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The effect of phorbol esters on the adhesive properties of NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts was investigated using plastic substrates precoated with the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagen, and laminin. Treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced NIH/3T3 cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates but had little or no effect on attachment to fibronectin and type I collagen substrates. The effect of PMA in enhancing cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates was dose dependent between 10{sup {minus}9} and 10{sup {minus}7} M. PMA was effective as early as 30 min; the effect reached a maximum at 2 h and decreased gradually. Phorbol 12, 13-dibenzoate and phorbol 12, 13-diacetate were effective but to a lesser extent and phorbol 12-myristate and phorbol 13-acetate showed little or no effect. These results suggest that PMA may enhance NIH/3T3 cell adhesion through effects on laminin and type IV collagen receptors. Retinoic acid, which itself requires at least 6 h to show an effect on attachment, did not have any effect on cell attachment in 2 h and, if anything, slightly inhibited PMA-enhanced cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates.

  8. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 Type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Sudhakar, Yakkanti Akul

    2012-10-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated.

  9. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Akul Sudhakar, Yakkanti

    2012-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated. PMID:22512648

  10. Hypoxia-mimicking bioactive glass/collagen glycosaminoglycan composite scaffolds to enhance angiogenesis and bone repair.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Elaine; Partap, Sonia; Azevedo, Maria M; Jell, Gavin; Stevens, Molly M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-06-01

    One of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine is promoting sufficient vascularisation of tissue-engineered constructs. One approach to overcome this challenge is to target the cellular hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) pathway, which responds to low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and results in the activation of numerous pro-angiogenic genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Cobalt ions are known to mimic hypoxia by artificially stabilising the HIF-1α transcription factor. Here, resorbable bioactive glass particles (38 μm and 100 μm) with cobalt ions incorporated into the glass network were used to create bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds optimised for bone tissue engineering. Inclusion of the bioactive glass improved the compressive modulus of the resulting composite scaffolds while maintaining high degrees of porosity (>97%). Moreover, in vitro analysis demonstrated that the incorporation of cobalt bioactive glass with a mean particle size of 100 μm significantly enhanced the production and expression of VEGF in endothelial cells, and cobalt bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold conditioned media also promoted enhanced tubule formation. Furthermore, our results prove the ability of these scaffolds to support osteoblast cell proliferation and osteogenesis in all bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds irrespective of the particle size. In summary, we have developed a hypoxia-mimicking tissue-engineered scaffold with pro-angiogenic and pro-osteogenic capabilities that may encourage bone tissue regeneration and overcome the problem of inadequate vascularisation of grafts commonly seen in the field of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans: A Biomimetic Approach to Modulate Collagen Fibrillogenesis for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Paderi, John E.; Sistiabudi, Rizaldi; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2009-01-01

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), prevalent in collagenous tissues, regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and provide a host of biochemical cues critical to tissue function and homeostasis. Incorporating SLRPs may enhance tissue engineering designs that mimic the native extracellular matrix, although SLRPs purified from animal sources bear low yields and lack design control. Consequently, we have designed synthetic peptidoglycans, inspired by the native SLRP decorin, that contain a collagen-binding peptide attached to a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. These peptidoglycans modulate collagen fibrillogenesis and decrease fibril diameter in vitro, similarly to decorin, while maintaining the characteristic D-banded fibrils. Application for tissue engineering is demonstrated as these peptidoglycans are incorporated into collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells. Gels formed with peptidoglycans and decorin show a faster rate of gel compaction, and one peptidoglycan uniquely increases elastin production. The peptidoglycan design can be tailored with respect to the peptide sequence and GAG identity and is expected to have versatile application in tissue engineering. PMID:19323607

  12. Increased peri-ductal collagen micro-organization may contribute to raised mammographic density.

    PubMed

    McConnell, James C; O'Connell, Oliver V; Brennan, Keith; Weiping, Lisa; Howe, Miles; Joseph, Leena; Knight, David; O'Cualain, Ronan; Lim, Yit; Leek, Angela; Waddington, Rachael; Rogan, Jane; Astley, Susan M; Gandhi, Ashu; Kirwan, Cliona C; Sherratt, Michael J; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-08

    High mammographic density is a therapeutically modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Although mammographic density is correlated with the relative abundance of collagen-rich fibroglandular tissue, the causative mechanisms, associated structural remodelling and mechanical consequences remain poorly defined. In this study we have developed a new collaborative bedside-to-bench workflow to determine the relationship between mammographic density, collagen abundance and alignment, tissue stiffness and the expression of extracellular matrix organising proteins. Mammographic density was assessed in 22 post-menopausal women (aged 54-66 y). A radiologist and a pathologist identified and excised regions of elevated non-cancerous X-ray density prior to laboratory characterization. Collagen abundance was determined by both Masson's trichrome and Picrosirius red staining (which enhances collagen birefringence when viewed under polarised light). The structural specificity of these collagen visualisation methods was determined by comparing the relative birefringence and ultrastructure (visualised by atomic force microscopy) of unaligned collagen I fibrils in reconstituted gels with the highly aligned collagen fibrils in rat tail tendon. Localised collagen fibril organisation and stiffness was also evaluated in tissue sections by atomic force microscopy/spectroscopy and the abundance of key extracellular proteins was assessed using mass spectrometry. Mammographic density was positively correlated with the abundance of aligned periductal fibrils rather than with the abundance of amorphous collagen. Compared with matched tissue resected from the breasts of low mammographic density patients, the highly birefringent tissue in mammographically dense breasts was both significantly stiffer and characterised by large (>80 μm long) fibrillar collagen bundles. Subsequent proteomic analyses not only confirmed the absence of collagen fibrosis in high mammographic density tissue, but

  13. Collagen-GAG substrate enhances the quality of nerve regeneration through collagen tubes up to level of autograft.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, L J; Yannas, I V; Hsu, H P; Strichartz, G; Spector, M

    1998-12-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration was studied across a tubulated 10-mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve using histomorphometry and electrophysiological measurements of A-fiber, B-fiber, and C-fiber peaks of the evoked action potentials. Tubes fabricated from large-pore collagen (max. pore diameter, 22 nm), small-pore collagen (max. pore diameter, 4 nm), and silicone were implanted either saline-filled or filled with a highly porous, collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) matrix. The CG matrix was deliberately synthesized, based on a previous optimization study, to degrade with a half-life of about 6 weeks and to have a very high specific surface through a combination of high pore volume fraction (0.95) and relatively small average pore diameter (35 microm). Nerves regenerated through tubes fabricated from large-pore collagen and filled with the CG matrix had significantly more large-diameter axons, more total axons, and significantly higher A-fiber conduction velocities than any other tubulated group; and, although lower than normal, their histomorphometric and electrophysiological properties were statistically indistinguishable from those of the autograft control. Although the total number of myelinated axons in nerves regenerated by tubulation had reached a plateau by 30 weeks, the number of axons with diameter larger than 6 microm, which have been uniquely associated with the A-fiber peak of the action potential, continued to increase at substantial rates through the completion of the study (60 weeks). The kinetic data strongly suggest that a nerve trunk maturation process, not previously reported in studies of the tubulated 10-mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve, and consisting in increase of axonal tissue area with decrease in total tissue area, continues beyond 60 weeks after injury, resulting in a nerve trunk which increasingly approaches the structure of the normal control. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Dynamic inversion time for improved 3D late gadolinium enhancement imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Haldar, Shouvik; Wage, Ricardo; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Firmin, David N

    2015-02-01

    High resolution three-dimensional (3D) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging is performed with single R-wave gating to minimize lengthy acquisition durations. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), heart rate variability results in variable magnetization recovery between sequence repeats, and image quality is often poor. In this study, we implemented and tested a dynamic inversion time (dynamic-TI) scheme designed to reduce sequence sensitivity to heart rate variations. An inversion-prepared 3D segmented gradient echo sequence was modified so that the TI varied automatically from beat-to-beat (dynamic-TI) based on the time since the last sequence repeat. 3D LGE acquisitions were performed in 17 patients prior to radio frequency ablation of persistent AF both with and without dynamic-TI. Qualitative image quality scores, blood signal-to-ghosting ratios (SGRs). and blood-myocardium contrast-to-ghosting ratios (CGRs) were compared. Image quality scores were higher with dynamic-TI than without dynamic-TI (2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.8 ± 1.1, P = 0.008), as were blood-myocardium CGRs (13.8 ± 7.6 vs. 8.3 ± 6.1, P = 0.003) and blood SGRs (19.6 ± 8.5 vs. 13.1 ± 8.0, P = 0.003). The dynamic-TI algorithm improves image quality of 3D LGE imaging in this difficult patient population by reducing the sequence sensitivity to RR interval variations © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. VEGF released by deferoxamine preconditioned mesenchymal stem cells seeded on collagen-GAG substrates enhances neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Elizabeth A.; Schenck, Thilo L.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Balmayor, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia preconditioning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to promote wound healing through HIF-1α stabilization. Preconditioned MSCs can be applied to three-dimensional biomaterials to further enhance the regenerative properties. While environmentally induced hypoxia has proven difficult in clinical settings, this study compares the wound healing capabilities of adipose derived (Ad) MSCs seeded on a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermal substrate exposed to either environmental hypoxia or FDA approved deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) to stabilize HIF-1α for wound healing. The release of hypoxia related reparative factors by the cells on the collagen-GAG substrate was evaluated to detect if DFO produces results comparable to environmentally induced hypoxia to facilitate optimal clinical settings. VEGF release increased in samples exposed to DFO. While the SDF-1α release was lower in cells exposed to environmental hypoxia in comparison to cells cultured in DFO in vitro. The AdMSC seeded biomaterial was further evaluated in a murine model. The implants where harvested after 1 days for histological, inflammatory, and protein analysis. The application of DFO to the cells could mimic and enhance the wound healing capabilities of environmentally induced hypoxia through VEGF expression and promises a more viable option in clinical settings that is not merely restricted to the laboratory. PMID:27830734

  16. QHREDGS Enhances Tube Formation, Metabolism and Survival of Endothelial Cells in Collagen-Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W.; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Reis, Lewis A.; Ismail, Nesreen; Rupnick, Maria; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels) in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:24013716

  17. Fluorinated Methacrylamide Chitosan Hydrogels Enhance Collagen Synthesis in Wound Healing through Increased Oxygen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pritam S.; Fountas-Davis, Natalie; Huang, He; Evancho-Chapman, M. Michelle; Fulton, Judith A.; Shriver, Leah P.; Leipzig, Nic D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, methacrylamide chitosan modified with perfluorocarbon chains (MACF) is used as the base material to construct hydrogel dressings for treating dermal wounds. MACF hydrogels saturated with oxygen (+ O2) are examined for their ability to deliver and sustain oxygen, degrade in a biological environment, and promote wound healing in an animal model. The emerging technique of metabolomics is used to understand how MACF + O2 hydrogel dressings improve wound healing. Results indicate that MACF treatment facilitates oxygen transport rate that is two orders of magnitude greater than base MAC hydrogels. MACF hydrogel dressings are next tested in an in vivo splinted rat excisional wound healing model. Histological analysis reveals that MACF + O2 dressings improve re-epithelialization (p < 0.0001) and synthesis of collagen over controls (p < 0.01). Analysis of endogenous metabolites in the wounds using global metabolomics demonstrates that MACF + O2 dressings promotes a regenerative metabolic process directed toward hydroxyproline and collagen synthesis, with confirmation of metabolite levels within this pathway. The results of this study confirm that increased oxygen delivery through the application of MACF + O2 hydrogels enhances wound healing and metabolomics analyses provides a powerful tool to assess wound healing physiology. PMID:27000552

  18. An N-terminal antibody promotes the transformation of amyloid fibrils into oligomers and enhances the neurotoxicity of amyloid-beta: the dust-raising effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Bu, Xian-Le; Liang, Chun-Rong; Wang, Ye-Ran; Zhang, Tao; Jiao, Shu-Sheng; Zeng, Fan; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Deng, Juan; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2015-08-28

    Senile plaques consisting of amyloid-beta (Aβ) are the major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and have been the primary therapeutic target. Immunotherapies, which are designed to remove brain Aβ deposits, increased levels of soluble Aβ and accelerated brain atrophy in some clinical trials, suggesting that the solubilization of Aβ deposition might facilitate the formation of more toxic Aβ oligomers and enhance neurotoxicity. The capacity of antibodies against different epitopes of Aβ to disaggregate preformed Aβ fibrils was investigated. The co-incubation of antibodies and Aβ fibrils was then tested for neurotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. After the incubation of preformed Aβ fibrils with the N-terminal antibody 6E10, the fibrils were decreased, while the oligomers, mostly dimers and trimers, were significantly increased. However, no such effects were observed for antibodies targeting the middle domain (4G8) and C-terminus of Aβ (8G7). The co-incubates of preformed Aβ fibrils with 6E10 were more neurotoxic, both in vitro and in vivo, than the co-incubates with 4G8 and 8G7. Our results indicate that the antibody targeting the N-terminus of Aβ promoted the transformation of Aβ from fibrils into oligomers and increased neurotoxicity. Immunotherapies should take into consideration the enhanced neurotoxicity associated with the solubilization of Aβ deposits by antibodies against the Nterminus of Aβ.

  19. Supra-molecular assembly of a lumican-derived peptide amphiphile enhances its collagen-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Merlin N M; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2016-02-01

    C16-YEALRVANEVTLN, a peptide amphiphile (PA) incorporating a biologically active amino acid sequence found in lumican, has been examined for its influence upon collagen synthesis by human corneal fibroblasts in vitro, and the roles of supra-molecular assembly and activin receptor-like kinase ALK receptor signaling in this effect were assessed. Cell viability was monitored using the Alamar blue assay, and collagen synthesis was assessed using Sirius red. The role of ALK signaling was studied by receptor inhibition. Cultured human corneal fibroblasts synthesized significantly greater amounts of collagen in the presence of the PA over both 7-day and 21-day periods. The aggregation of the PA to form nanotapes resulted in a notable enhancement in this activity, with an approximately two-fold increase in collagen production per cell. This increase was reduced by the addition of an ALK inhibitor. The data presented reveal a stimulatory effect upon collagen synthesis by the primary cells of the corneal stroma, and demonstrate a direct influence of supra-molecular assembly of the PA upon the cellular response observed. The effects of PA upon fibroblasts were dependent upon ALK receptor function. These findings elucidate the role of self-assembled nanostructures in the biological activity of peptide amphiphiles, and support the potential use of a self-assembling lumican derived PA as a novel biomaterial, intended to promote collagen deposition for wound repair and tissue engineering purposes.

  20. Ascorbic acid enhances the expression of type 1 and type 4 collagen and SVCT2 in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yuki; Saito, Norikatsu; Kurita, Katsumi; Shimokado, Kentaro; Maruyama, Naoki; Ishigami, Akihito

    2013-01-11

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is essential for collagen biosynthesis as a cofactor for prolyl and lysyl hydroxylase and as a stimulus for collagen gene expression. Many studies have evaluated the relationship between AA and collagen expression in short- and long-term effects on cells after a single administration of AA into the culture medium. However, no such study has monitored in detail the stability of AA in medium or the alterations of intracellular AA levels during a protracted interval. Therefore, we examined here intracellular AA levels and stability throughout its exposure to human skin fibroblasts in vitro. Moreover, we determined the effects on type 1 and type 4 collagen and sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT) gene expression when medium containing 100 μM AA was replaced every 24h for 5 days to avoid depletion of AA. Throughout this long-term culture, intracellular AA levels remained constant; the expression of type 1 and type 4 collagens and SVCT2 mRNA was enhanced, and type 1 procollagen synthesis increased. Thus, these results indicate that human skin fibroblasts exposed to AA over time had rising levels of type 1/type 4 collagens and SVCT2 mRNA expression and type 1 procollagen synthesis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Secreted Endothelial Cell Factors Immobilized on Collagen Scaffolds Enhance the Recipient Endothelial Cell Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Callanan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strategies to design novel vascular scaffolds are a continuing aim in tissue engineering and often such designs encompass the use of recombinant factors to enhance the performance of the scaffold. The established use of cell secretion utilized in feeder systems and conditioned media offer a source of paracrine factors, which has potential to be used in tissue-engineered (TE) scaffolds. Here we utilize this principle from endothelial cells (ECs), to create a novel TE scaffold by harnessing secreted factors and immobilizing these to collagen scaffolds. This research revealed increased cellular attachment and positive angiogenic gene upregulation responses in recipient ECs grown on these conditioned scaffolds. Also, the conditioning method did not affect the mechanical structural integrity of the scaffolds. These results may advocate the potential use of this system to improve vascular scaffolds' in vivo performance. In addition, this process may be a future method utilized to improve other tissue engineering scaffold therapies. PMID:27057474

  2. Type I collagen-templated assembly of silver nanoparticles and their application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujing; Wei, Gang; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li; Sun, Lanlan; Guo, Cunlan; Yang, Tao; Li, Zhuang

    2008-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are one of the active substrates that are employed extensively in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and aggregations of Ag NPs play an important role in enhancing the Raman signals. In this paper, we fabricated two kinds of SERS-active substrates utilizing the electrostatic adsorption and superior assembly properties of type I collagen. These were collagen-Ag NP aggregation films and nanoporous Ag films. Two probe molecules, 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) and methylene blue (MB), were studied on these substrates. These substrates showed reproducible SERS intensities with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 8-10% and 11-14%, respectively, while the RSDs of the traditional thick Ag films were 12-28%. Also, the intensities for the 4-ATP spectrum on the collagen-templated nanoporous Ag film were approximately one order higher than those on the DNA-templated Ag film.

  3. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  4. Acute food restriction increases collagen breakdown and phagocytosis by mature decidual cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Spadacci-Morena, D D; Katz, S G

    2001-06-01

    An ultrastructural study was undertaken on antimesometrial mature decidual tissue of fed and food-restricted mice, on day 9 of pregnancy. The mean ad libitum food intake was established on mice from the 8th till the 9th day of pregnancy. Fed mice were used as controls. Experimental animals were divided into two groups: one was allowed to feed 25% of normal diet and the other 50%. Extracellular collagen fibrils were scarce in fed animals and conspicuous in food restriction. Granular electron-dense deposits and filamentous aggregates of disintegrating collagen fibrils were observed in all food-deprived mice but were rarely noted in fed animals. Intracellular vacuolar structures exhibited other typical cross-banded collagen immersed in finely granular electron-translucent material (clear vacuole) or electron-dense material containing collagen fibrils with a faint periodicity (dark vacuole). The clear and dark vacuoles were scarce in fed animals and evident in food-restricted mice, mainly in those 25% food restricted. Although collagen breakdown may be part of the normal process of decidual tissue remodelling our results suggest that it is enhanced in food-restricted animals. Thus it seems that collagen breakdown is a normal mechanism that may be regulated by the food intake of the pregnant animal.

  5. Numerical study of adhesion enhancement by composite fibrils with soft tip layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balijepalli, Ram Gopal; Fischer, Sarah C. L.; Hensel, René; McMeeking, Robert M.; Arzt, Eduard

    2017-02-01

    Bio-inspired fibrillar surfaces with reversible adhesion to stiff substrates have been thoroughly investigated over the last decade. In this paper we propose a novel composite fibril consisting of a soft tip layer and stiffer stalk with differently shaped interfaces (flat vs. curved) between them. A tensile stress is applied remotely on the free end of the fibril whose other end adheres to a rigid substrate. The stress distributions and the resulting adhesion of such structures were numerically investigated under plane strain (2 D) and axisymmetric (3 D) conditions. The stress intensities were evaluated for different combinations of layer thickness and Young's moduli. The adhesion strength values were found to increase for thinner layers and larger modulus ratio; these trends are also reflected in selected experimental results. The results of this paper provide a new strategy for optimizing adhesion strength of fibrillar surfaces.

  6. A Vibrational Circular Dichroism Microsampling Accessory: Mapping Enhanced Vibrational Circular Dichroism in Amyloid Fibril Films.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuefang; Li, Honggang; Nafie, Jordan W; Pazderka, Tomáš; Pazderková, Markéta; Dukor, Rina K; Nafie, Laurence A

    2017-06-01

    We report the first vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) measurement of spatial heterogeneity in a sample using infrared (IR) microsampling. Vibrational circular dichroism spectra are typically measured using a standard IR cell with an IR beam diameter of 10 mm or greater making it impossible to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of a solid film sample. We have constructed a VCD sampling assembly with either 3 mm or 1 mm spatial resolution. An XY-translation stage was used to measure spectra at different spatial locations producing IR and VCD maps of the sample. In addition, a rotating sample stage was employed using a dual photoelastic modulator (PEM) setup to suppress artifacts due to linear birefringence in solid-phase or film samples. Infrared and VCD mapping of an insulin fibril film has been carried out at both 3 and 1 mm spatial resolution, and lysozyme films were mapped at 1 mm resolution. The IR spectra of different spots vary in intensity due primarily to sample thickness. The changes in the VCD intensity across the map largely correlate to corresponding changes in the IR map. Closer inspection of the insulin map revealed changes in the relative intensities of the VCD spectra not present in the parent IR spectra, which indicated differences in the degree of supramolecular chirality of the fibrils in the various spatial regions. For lysozyme films, in addition to different degrees of supramolecular chirality, reversal of the net fibril chirality was observed. The large signal-to-noise ratio observed at 1 mm resolution implies the feasibility of further increasing the spatial resolution by one or two orders of magnitude for protein fibril film samples.

  7. Accuracy of Late Gadolinium Enhancement - Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Measurement of Left Atrial Substrate Remodeling in Patients With Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease and Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Da; Wu, Zhong; van der Geest, Rob J; Luo, Yong; Sun, Jiayu; Jiang, Jian; Chen, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a histopathological validation of cardiac late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of left atrial (LA) substrate remodeling (SRM) in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF).Adult patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and persistent AF undergoing open-heart surgery for mitral valve replacement were enrolled. Both two-dimensional (2D) sections and 3-dimensional (3D) full-volume LGE-MRI with different signal intensities were performed preoperatively to determine the extent of LA-SRM. Tissue samples were obtained intraoperatively from the LA roof and posterior lateral wall for pathological validation with Masson trichrome staining and immunostaining for collagen type I/III deposition. A linear regression model was used to determine the relationship between MRI-derived LA-SRM parameters and pathological results.Between February 2013 and March 2014, we successfully acquired LA tissue samples from 22 patients (13 men), with a mean age of 47 ± 8 years. All patients had rheumatic mitral valve stenosis, with a mean effective orifice area of 0.9 ± 0.2 cm(2) on echocardiography and a mean LA volume of 235 ± 85 mL on 3D-MRI. Multiple moderate linear associations were noted between the pathological results and LGE-MRI-derived LA-SRM parameters, with correlation indices (r(2)) of 0.194-0.385.LA-SRM measured by LGE-MRI showed moderate agreement with LA pathology in patients with rheumatic valve disease and persistent AF.

  8. Vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse, Michiel J.

    1998-03-01

    One of the factors that favors the development of ventricular fibrillation is an increase in the dispersion of refractoriness. Experiments will be described in which an increase in dispersion in the recovery of excitability was determined during brief episodes of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity, known to increase the risk of fibrillation. Whereas in the normal heart ventricular fibrillation can be induced by a strong electrical shock, a premature stimulus of moderate intensity only induces fibrillation in the presence of regional ischemia, which greatly increases the dispersion of refractoriness. One factor that is of importance for the transition of reentrant ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation during acute regional ischemia is the subendocardial Purkinje system. After selective destruction of the Purkinje network by lugol, reentrant tachycardias still develop in the ischemic region, but they do not degenerate into fibrillation. Finally, attempts were made to determine the minimal mass of thin ventricular myocardium required to sustain fibrillation induced by burst pacing. This was done by freezing of subendocardial and midmural layers. The rim of surviving epicardial muscle had to be larger than 20 g. Extracellular electrograms during fibrillation in both the intact and the "frozen" left ventricle were indistinguishable, but activation patterns were markedly different. In the intact ventricle epicardial activation was compatible with multiple wavelet reentry, in the "frozen" heart a single, or at most two wandering reentrant waves were seen.

  9. Biomineralized Recombinant Collagen-Based Scaffold Mimicking Native Bone Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gloria Belén; Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2017-08-04

    The need of synthetic bone grafts that recreate from macro- to nanoscale level the biochemical and biophysical cues of bone extracellular matrix has been a major driving force for the development of new generation of biomaterials. In this study, synthetic bone substitutes have been synthesized via biomimetic mineralization of a recombinant collagen type I-derived peptide (RCP), enriched in tri-amino acid sequence arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD). Three-dimensional (3D) isotropic porous scaffolds of three different compositions are developed by freeze-drying: non-mineralized (RCP, as a control), mineralized (Ap/RCP), and mineralized scaffolds in the presence of magnesium (MgAp/RCP) that closely imitate bone composition. The effect of mineral phase on scaffold pore size, porosity, and permeability, as well as on their in vitro kinetic degradation, is evaluated. The ultimate goal is to investigate how chemical (i.e., surface chemistry and ion release from scaffold) together with physical signals (i.e., surface nanotopography) conferred via biomimetic mineralization can persuade and guide mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) interaction and fate. The three scaffold compositions showed optimum pore size and porosity for osteoconduction, without significant differences between them. The degradation tests confirmed that MgAp/RCP scaffolds presented higher reactivity under physiological condition compared to Ap/RCP ones. The in vitro study revealed an enhanced cell growth and proliferation on MgAp/RCP scaffolds at day 7, 14, and 21. Furthermore, MgAp/RCP scaffolds potentially promoted cell migration through the inner areas reaching the bottom of the scaffold after 14 days. MSCs cultured on MgAp/RCP scaffolds displayed higher gene and protein expressions of osteogenic markers when comparing them with the results of those MSCs grown on RCP or Ap/RCP scaffolds. This work highlights that mineralization of recombinant collagen mimicking bone mineral composition and morphology is a

  10. Effect of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle on collagen stabilization for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, Kunnavakkam Vinjimur; Duraipandy, N; Begum, Shajitha; Lakra, Rachita; Ramamurthy, Usha; Korrapati, Purna Sai; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2015-04-01

    The current study aims at understanding the influence of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle (CCSNP) on stability of collagen. The results indicated that curcumin caged silver nanoparticles efficiently stabilize collagen, indicated by enhanced tensile strength, fibril formation and viscosity. The tensile strength of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle cross-linked collagen and elongation at break was also found to be higher than glutaraldehyde cross-linked collagen. The physicochemical characteristics of curcumin caged nanoparticle cross-linked collagen exhibited enhanced strength. The thermal properties were also good with both thermal degradation temperature and hydrothermal stability higher than native collagen. CD analysis showed no structural disparity in spite of superior physicochemical properties suggesting the significance of curcumin caged nanoparticle mediated cross-linking. The additional enhancement in the stabilization of collagen could be attributed to multiple sites for interaction with collagen molecule provided by curcumin caged silver nanoparticles. The results of cell proliferation and anti-microbial activity assays indicated that curcumin caged silver nanoparticles promoted cell proliferation and inhibited microbial growth making it an excellent biomaterial for wound dressing application. The study opens scope for nano-biotechnological strategies for the development of alternate non-toxic cross-linking agents facilitating multiple site interaction thereby improving therapeutic values to the collagen for biomedical application.

  11. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  12. Ovine tendon collagen: Extraction, characterisation and fabrication of thin films for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, M B; Lokanathan, Y; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I; Chowdhury, S R

    2016-11-01

    Collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in the human body, thus widely used in tissue engineering and subsequent clinical applications. This study aimed to extract collagen from ovine (Ovis aries) Achilles tendon (OTC), and to evaluate its physicochemical properties and its potential to fabricate thin film with collagen fibrils in a random or aligned orientation. Acid-solubilized protein was extracted from ovine Achilles tendon using 0.35M acetic acid, and 80% of extracted protein was measured as collagen. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of alpha 1 and alpha 2 chain of collagen type I (col I). Further analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirms the presence of triple helix structure of col I, similar to commercially available rat tail col I. Drying the OTC solution at 37°C resulted in formation of a thin film with randomly orientated collagen fibrils (random collagen film; RCF). Introduction of unidirectional mechanical intervention using a platform rocker prior to drying facilitated the fabrication of a film with aligned orientation of collagen fibril (aligned collagen film; ACF). It was shown that both RCF and ACF significantly enhanced human dermal fibroblast (HDF) attachment and proliferation than that on plastic surface. Moreover, cells were distributed randomly on RCF, but aligned with the direction of mechanical intervention on ACF. In conclusion, ovine tendon could be an alternative source of col I to fabricate scaffold for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan enhances the oral tolerance to type II collagen

    PubMed Central

    Porporatto, C; Canali, M M; Bianco, I D; Correa, S G

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan is a mucoadhesive polysaccharide that promotes the transmucosal absorption of peptides and proteins. At mucosal sites chitosan exhibits immunomodulatory activities and stimulates the release of regulatory cytokines. Herein we evaluated the effect of the co-administration of chitosan in the tolerance to type II collagen (CII) using an experimental model of arthritis. Rats were fed diluent (acetic acid), 1 mg CII, 1 mg chitosan or 1 mg CII + 1 mg chitosan during 5 days before immunization with CII in Freund's complete adjuvant. Systemic effects were evaluated in draining lymph nodes after antigenic challenge or during the clinical evolution of arthritis. Specific antibodies, proliferation against CII and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-10 were assessed. Clinical signs were observed 13–15 days after primary immunization. The CII : chitosan group presented the lowest incidence and developed moderate arthritis, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a anti-CII, a limited proliferation in draining lymph nodes and a lower release of IFN-γ after restimulation with CII. Our results demonstrate that chitosan enhances the tolerance to an articular antigen with a decrease in the inflammatory responses and, as a consequence, an improvement in clinical signs. PMID:19076832

  14. Bone-to-bone Fixation Enhances Functional Healing of the Porcine Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using a Collagen-Platelet Composite

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Martha M.; Magarian, Elise; Zurakowski, David; Fleming, Braden C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if providing bony stabilization between the tibia and femur would improve the structural properties of an “enhanced” ACL repair using a collagen-platelet composite when compared to the traditional (Marshall) suture technique. Methods Twelve pigs underwent unilateral ACL transection and were treated with sutures connecting the bony femoral ACL attachment site to the distal ACL stump (LIGAMENT group), or to the tibia via a bone tunnel (TIBIA group). A collagen-platelet composite was placed around the sutures to enhance the biologic repair in both groups. Anteroposterior (AP) knee laxity and the graft structural properties were measured after 15 weeks of healing in both the ACL-repaired and contralateral ACL-intact joints. Results Enhanced ACL repair with bone-to-bone fixation significantly improved yield load and linear stiffness of the ACL repairs (p<0.05) after 15 weeks of healing. However, laxity values of the knees were similar in both groups of repaired knees (p>0.10). Conclusions Using an enhanced ACL suture repair technique that includes bone-to-bone fixation to protect the repair in the initial healing stages resulted in an ACL with improved structural properties after 15 weeks in the porcine model. Clinical Relevance The healing response of an ACL suture repair using a collagen-platelet composite can be enhanced by providing bony stabilization between the tibia and femur to protect the graft during the initial healing process in a translational model. PMID:20810092

  15. Albumin modulates lateral assembly of fibrin polymers: evidence of enhanced fine fibril formation and of unique synergism with fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Galanakis, D.K.; Lane, B.P.; Simon, S.R.

    1987-04-21

    The authors identified a new property of human albumin. It enhances formation of fine fibril (or leptofibril) structure during fibrin gelation, and by nephelometric and electron microscopic measurements, this property is independent of and synergistic with that of fibrinogen. They examined fibrin aggregation using physiologic temperatures and pH and albumin:fibrin concentration ratios below those at which the known accelerating effect on fibrin aggregation occurs. An albumin concentration dependent decrease in gel turbidity maxima was consistently demonstrable in buffers containing or lacking (2-5 mM) CaCl/sub 2/. Electron microscopic measurements of cross-sectional fibril widths, performed on sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed gels, disclosed differences between albumin-containing and control gels which were significant. Spin-labeled albumin displayed no change in electron (para) magnetic spin resonance spectral measurements during its inhibition of fibrin, indicating no perturbation on albumin conformation in the vicinities of Cys-34 and of fatty acid binding sites. Certain fibrinogen:albumin ratios designed to induce maximal inhibition yet permit gelation in the presence of either alone prevented gelation of buffer-diluted fibrin monomers. Aliquots from these which were dried and negatively stained on formvar-coated grids disclosed strands of 5-17 nm width, most displaying a 60-250-nm approximate length. The amounts of /sup 131/I-labeled coagulable fibrin which remained soluble in fibrinogen solutions were increased by albumin. They conclude that albumin enhances formation of leptofibril-rich gel domains when other plasma factors favor formation of such structures. Available evidence indicating decreased permeability implies that such gel domains limit efflux rates from the intrathrombus environment and from intra- to extravascular space.

  16. A biomaterial composed of collagen and solubilized elastin enhances angiogenesis and elastic fiber formation without calcification.

    PubMed

    Daamen, Willeke F; Nillesen, Suzan T M; Wismans, Ronnie G; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Hafmans, Theo; Veerkamp, Jacques H; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2008-03-01

    Elastin is the prime protein in elastic tissues that contributes to elasticity of, for example, lung, aorta, and skin. Upon injury, elastic fibers are not readily replaced, which hampers tissue regeneration. Incorporation of solubilized elastin (hydrolyzed insoluble elastin fibers or elastin peptides) in biomaterials may improve regeneration, because solubilized elastin is able to promote proliferation as well as elastin synthesis. Porous biomaterials composed of highly purified collagen without and without elastin fibers or solubilized elastin were prepared by freezing and lyophilization. Solubilized elastin formed spherical structures that were incorporated in the collagenous part of the scaffolds and that persisted after chemical crosslinking of the scaffolds. Crosslinked scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in young Sprague Dawley rats. Collagen-solubilized elastin and collagen scaffolds showed no calcification in this sensitive calcification model, in contrast to scaffolds containing elastin fibers. Collagen-solubilized elastin scaffolds also induced angiogenesis, as revealed by type IV collagen staining, and promoted elastic fiber synthesis, as shown with antibodies against rat elastin and fibrillin-1. It is concluded that scaffolds produced from collagen and solubilized elastin present a non-calcifying biomaterial with a capacity for soft-tissue regeneration, especially in relation to elastic fiber synthesis.

  17. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  18. Calcium concentration dependent collagen mineralization.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Fan, Rui; Tian, Feng; Guo, Xiaolin; Li, Ping; Feng, Qingling; Fan, Yubo

    2017-04-01

    Mineralization of collagen fibrils is a regular combination process of organic and mineral components mainly involving calcium, phosphate and collagen. We report the influence of calcium to the self-assembly of collagen by changing the concentration of calcium ion in the process of mineralization. Low concentration of calcium results in the well collagen self-assembly while poor mineral crystallization. Relatively, high concentration of calcium can hinder collagen self-assembly, whereas it is benefited to mineral crystallization. We also reveal that collagen self-assembly happens in advance of the formation of better mineral crystals. These results interpret the mechanism of collagen mineralization further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of collagen/polydopamine complexed matrix as mechanically enhanced and highly biocompatible semi-natural tissue engineering scaffold.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Dan, Weihua; Xiong, Shanbai; Kang, Yang; Dhinakar, Arvind; Wu, Jun; Gu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    To improve the mechanical properties and biocompatibility of collagen I matrix, a novel and facile strategy was developed to modify porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM) via dopamine self-polymerization followed by collagen immobilization to enhance the biological, mechanical and physicochemical properties of PADM. Mechanism study indicated that the polymerization of dopamine onto PADM surface could be regulated by controlling the amount of hydrogen bonds forming between phenol hydroxyl (COH) and nitrogen atom (NCO) within collagen fibers of PADM. The investigations of surface interactions between PDA and PADM illustrated that PDA-PADM system yielded better mechanical properties, thermal stability, surface hydrophilicity and the structural integrity of PADM was maintained after dopamine coating. Furthermore, collagen (COL) was immobilized onto the fresh PDA-PADM to fabricate the collagen-PDA-PADM (COL-PDA-PADM) complexed scaffold. The MTT assay and CLSM observation showed that COL-PDA-PADM had better biocompatibility and higher cellular attachment than pure PADM and COL-PADM without dopamine coating, thus demonstrating the efficacy of PDA as the intermediate layer. Meanwhile, the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of COL-PDA-PADM were investigated by an in vivo study. The results revealed that COL-PDA-PADM could effectively promote bFGF and VEGF expression, possibly leading to enhancing the dura repairing process. Overall, this work contributed a new insight into the development of a semi-natural tissue engineering scaffold with high biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Obtaining scaffolds with high biocompatibility and good mechanical properties is still one of the most challenging issues in tissue engineering. To have excellent in vitro and in vivo performance, scaffolds are desired to have similar mechanical and biological properties as the natural extracellular matrix, such as collagen

  20. Collagen immobilization of multi-layered BCP-ZrO2 bone substitutes to enhance bone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linh, Nguyen Thuy Ba; Jang, Dong-Woo; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2015-08-01

    A porous microstructure of multi-layered BCP-ZrO2 bone substitutes was fabricated using the sponge replica method in which the highly interconnected structure was immobilized with collagen via ethyl(dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide crosslinking. Their struts are combined with a three-layered BCP/BCP-ZrO2/ZrO2 microstructure. Collagen fibers were firmly attached to the strut surface of the BCP-ZrO2 scaffolds. With control of the three-layered microstructure and collagen immobilization, the compressive strength of the scaffolds increased significantly to 6.8 MPa compared to that of the monolithic BCP scaffolds (1.3 MPa). An in vitro study using MTT, confocal observation, and real-time polymer chain reaction analysis demonstrated that the proliferation and differentiation of the pre-osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells was improved due to the collagen incorporation. Remarkable enhancement of bone regeneration was observed without any immunological reaction in the femurs of rabbits during 1 and 5 months of implantation. Furthermore, the interfaces between new bone and the scaffold struts bonded directly without any gaps.

  1. Sericin enhances the bioperformance of collagen-based matrices preseeded with human-adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs).

    PubMed

    Dinescu, Sorina; Galateanu, Bianca; Albu, Madalina; Cimpean, Anisoara; Dinischiotu, Anca; Costache, Marieta

    2013-01-16

    Current clinical strategies for adipose tissue engineering (ATE), including autologous fat implants or the use of synthetic surrogates, not only are failing in the long term, but also can't face the latest requirements regarding the aesthetic restoration of the resulted imperfections. In this context, modern strategies in current ATE applications are based on the implantation of 3D cell-scaffold bioconstructs, designed for prospective achievement of in situ functional de novo tissue. Thus, in this paper, we reported for the first time the evaluation of a spongious 60% collagen and 40% sericin scaffold preseeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in terms of biocompatibility and adipogenic potential in vitro. We showed that the addition of the sticky protein sericin in the composition of a classical collagen sponge enhanced the adhesion and also the proliferation rate of the seeded cells, thus improving the biocompatibility of the novel scaffold. In addition, sericin stimulated PPARγ2 overexpression, triggering a subsequent upregulated expression profile of FAS, aP2 and perilipin adipogenic markers. These features, together with the already known sericin stimulatory potential on cellular collagen production, promote collagen-sericin biomatrix as a good candidate for soft tissue reconstruction and wound healing applications.

  2. Mandibular Cartilage Collagen Network Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mandibular condyle cartilage (MCC) has a unique structure among articular cartilages; however, little is known about its nanoscale collagen network architecture, hampering design of regeneration therapies and rigorous evaluation of regeneration experiment outcomes in preclinical research. Helium ion microscopy is a novel technology with a long depth of field that is uniquely suited to imaging open 3D collagen networks at multiple scales without obscuring conductive coatings. Objective The objective of this research was to image, at the micro- and nanoscales, the depth-dependent MCC collagen network architecture. Design MCC was collected from New Zealand white rabbits. Images of MCC zones were acquired using helium ion, transmission electron, and light microscopy. Network fibril and canal diameters were measured. Results For the first time, the MCC was visualized as a 3D collagen fibril structure at the nanoscale, the length scale of network assembly. Fibril diameters ranged from 7 to 110 nm and varied by zone. The articular surface was composed of a fine mesh that was woven through thin layers of larger fibrils. The fibrous zone was composed of approximately orthogonal lamellae of aligned fibrils. Fibrocyte processes surrounded collagen bundles forming extracellular compartments. The proliferative, mature, and hypertrophic zones were composed of a branched network that was progressively remodeled to accommodate chondrocyte hypertrophy. Osteoid fibrils were woven around osteoblast cytoplasmic processes to create numerous canals similar in size to canaliculi of mature bone. Conclusion This multiscale investigation advances our foundational understanding of the complex, layered 3D architecture of the MCC collagen network. PMID:27375843

  3. Type I collagen-mediated synthesis of noble metallic nanoparticles networks and the applications in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sun, Lanlan; Zhang, Baohua; Xu, Fugang; Liu, Zhelin; Guo, Cunlan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhuang

    2009-08-15

    In this paper, we demonstrated an effective environmentally friendly synthesis route to prepare noble metallic (Au, Ag, Pt and Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) networks mediated by type I collagen in the absence of any seeds or surfactants. In the reactions, type I collagen served as stabilizing agent and assembly template for the synthesized metallic NPs. The hydrophobic interaction between collagen and mica interface as well as the hydrogen bonds between inter- and intra-collagen molecules play important roles in the formation of collagen-metallic NPs networks. The noble metallic NPs networks have many advantages in the applications of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and electrochemistry detection. Typically, the as-prepared Ag NPs networks reveal great Raman enhancement activity for 4-ATP, and can even be used to detect low concentration of DNA base, adenine, without any label step. Furthermore, the cyclic voltammograms showed Pt NPs networks have good electrocatalytic ability for the reduction of O(2).

  4. Calcium alginate enhances wound healing by up-regulating the ratio of collagen types I/III in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gu, Qisheng; Zhao, Jun; Mei, Jiacai; Shao, Mingzhe; Pan, Ye; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haisheng; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Calcium alginate has been proved to favor the skin ulcer healing and collagen synthesis was a critical factor for the wound closure. The present study was to elucidate the mechanism of calcium alginate on the diabetes skin ulceration. Calcium alginate dressing was applied daily on the full-thickness exercising wound created on the back of diabetic rat model as Alg-group (n=6), and the vaseline dressing was used as control (n=6). Rats were respectively sacrificed and the wound tissues were removed and used for the evaluation of various biochemical analysis contained collagen (type I and III) by Western blotting and hydroxyproline level changes by ELISA assay at 3 d, 7 d and 14 d after wounding. The expression of skin collagen I in Alg-group was enhanced from day 3 (0.66±0.25 vs. 0.42±0.09, P<0.05) to day 14 (1.09±0.14 vs. 0.78±0.16, P<0.05). However, no significant difference of collagen III expression was found between two groups during wound healing (P>0.05). And the ratio of collagen I/III in Alg-group was greater than that of Vas-group at day 7 (1.07±0.31 vs. 0.77±0.11, P<0.05) and 14 (1.18±0.30 vs. 0.83±0.14, P<0.05). The hydroxyproline level in skin homogenate of Alg-group was higher than that of Vas-group from day 3 (30.29±0.92 ng/ml vs. 27.52±0.83 ng/ml, P<0.05) to day 14 (89.58±4.97 ng/ml vs. 79.30±4.42 ng/ml, P<0.05). Calcium alginate accelerates the process of wound healing through improving type I collagen synthesis and increasing ratio of collagen I/III in diabetic rats. PMID:26261545

  5. Administration of adipose-derived stem cells enhances vascularity, induces collagen deposition, and dermal adipogenesis in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Bliley, Jacqueline M; Argenta, Anne; Satish, Latha; McLaughlin, Meghan M; Dees, Aaron; Tompkins-Rhoades, Casey; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment options for severe burn wounds are often insufficient in reconstructing skin and soft tissue defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), a readily available source of multipotent stem cells, represent a promising therapy for the treatment of full-thickness burn wounds. Full-thickness burn wounds were created on the paraspinal region of athymic mice. A one-time, sub-eschar injection of 6.8×10(6) ASCs in PBS or PBS alone was administered at 24-h postoperatively. Time to healing was quantified using Image J analysis. At days 4, 7, 14, and 21, mice were sacrificed and tissues were excised for molecular and histological analysis. ASCs were able to survive in burn wounds as determined by the presence of PKH labeling and human PPARγ expression within the wounds. CD-31 staining demonstrated increased vascularity in ASC-treated wounds at POD 4 (p<0.05). Molecular studies showed enhanced adipogenesis, as well as type III and type I collagen deposition in the ASC treated group (p<0.05). An increase in the mRNA expression ratio of type III to type I collagen was also observed following ASC treatment (p<0.05). By enhancing vascularity, collagen deposition, and adipogenesis, ASCs show promise as an adjunctive therapy for the current treatment of full thickness burn wounds. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A copper sulfate and hydroxylysine treatment regimen for enhancing collagen cross-linking and biomechanical properties in engineered neocartilage.

    PubMed

    Makris, Eleftherios A; MacBarb, Regina F; Responte, Donald J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the biomechanical properties of engineered neotissues through promoting the development of collagen cross-links. It was hypothesized that supplementing medium with copper sulfate and the amino acid hydroxylysine would enhance the activity of lysyl oxidase enzyme to form collagen cross-links, increasing the strength and integrity of the neotissue. Neocartilage constructs were generated using a scaffoldless, self-assembling process and treated with copper sulfate and hydroxylysine, either alone or in combination, following a 2-factor, full-factorial study design. Following a 6-wk culture period, the biomechanical and biochemical properties of the constructs were measured. Results found copper sulfate to significantly increase pyridinoline (PYR) cross-links in all copper sulfate-containing groups over controls. When copper sulfate and hydroxylysine were combined, the result was synergistic, with a 10-fold increase in PYR content over controls. This increase in PYR cross-links manifested in a 3.3-fold significant increase in the tensile properties of the copper sulfate + hydroxylysine group. In addition, an 123% increase over control values was detected in the copper sulfate group in terms of the aggregate modulus. These data elucidate the role of copper sulfate and hydroxylysine toward improving the biomechanical properties of neotissues through collagen cross-linking enhancement.

  7. Genetic linkage to the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in 26 families with generalised recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and anchoring fibril abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Dunnill, M G; Richards, A J; Milana, G; Mollica, F; Atherton, D; Winship, I; Farrall, M; al-Imara, L; Eady, R A; Pope, F M

    1994-01-01

    To strengthen the evidence for genetic linkage to COL7A1, we have studied 26 generalised recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (EB) families of British, Italian, Irish, and South African origin. We chose two linkage markers, a COL7A1 PvuII intragenic polymorphism and a highly informative anonymous microsatellite marker, D3S1100, which maps close to the COL7A1 locus at 3p21.1-3. Diagnosis was established by family history, clinical examination, immunofluorescence, and ultrastructural studies. The PvuII marker was informative in 16 families with a maximum lod score (Zmax) of 3.51 at recombination fraction (theta) = 0. The D3S1100 microsatellite was informative in 24 out of 25 families with Zmax = 6.8 at theta = 0.05 (Z = 4.94 at theta = 0) and no obligatory recombination events. These data strongly suggest that COL7A1 mutations cause EB in these families and, combined with previous studies, indicate locus homogeneity. The importance of anchoring fibrils for dermal-epidermal adhesion is further underlined. D3S1100 may later prove useful in prenatal diagnosis of this disease, if used in combination with other markers. Images PMID:7837248

  8. Highly purified collagen coating enhances tissue adherence and integration properties of monofilament polypropylene meshes.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Rodrigo Teixeira; Melo, Marli; Palma, Paulo César Rodrigues; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Riccetto, Cassio Luiz Zanettini

    2013-10-01

    Complications related to tissue integration of polypropylene implants used in the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse are relatively prevalent. Collagen, a biocompatible, less immunogenic material with modulating properties on the inflammatory process, may improve polypropylene integration. The objective was to study biomechanical and histological effects of monofilament polypropylene mesh coated with purified collagen gel. Forty rats were implanted with two fragments of polypropylene mesh in their abdominal walls (one on each side of the linea alba). One of the fragments had a collagen gel coating (group I) while the other one did not (group II). The animals were euthanized at 7, 14, 90, and 180 days after implantation and their abdominal walls were excised for analysis. The biomechanical study showed that mesh adherence to neighboring tissue increased significantly in group II (p < 0.05). Acute (p < 0.001) and chronic (p = 0.004) inflammatory responses as well as granulation tissue formation (p = 0.001) were less intense in group II at 7 and 14 days. Granulomatous inflammation and foreign body reaction was less significant at 7 days in group II (p = 0.029 and p < 0.001). The birefringence analysis showed higher mean brightness density in the late phase of implantation in group II meshes (p = 0.000). Polypropylene mesh coated with purified collagen gel increases adherence to tissue, promotes a less intense and lasting inflammatory response and triggers a greater organization and packing arrangement of collagen fibers in the late phase of implantation.

  9. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) promotes collagen fibre deposition associated with increased myofibroblast population in the early healing phase of diabetic wound.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ming-Chun; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen; Li, Xiaohui; Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of PEMF on collagen fibre deposition, collagen fibril alignment and collagen fibre orientation. The potential relationships between collagen fibre deposition and myofibroblast population in diabetic wound healing were also examined. Forty young male streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to PEMF group or control group. 2 cm × 2 cm square wounds were made at their back. The PEMF group received daily exposure of PEMF to the wounds, while control group was handled in the same manner except that the PEMF device was not activated. Wound tissues harvested on post-wounding day 7, 10 and 14 were fixed, processed and sectioned. The abundance, fibril alignment and fibre orientation of type I collagen were quantified with picro-sirius polarization method and image analysis software (Nikon NIS Element AR). Myofibroblast population data were adopted from our previous study. Correlation between myofibroblast population and collagen fibre deposition was examined. There was significantly greater abundance of type I collagen fibre in the PEMF group than in the control on day 7 (P = .013), but not on day 10 or 14. No significant between-group differences were found in collagen fibril alignment and collagen fibre orientation at any measured time points. Positive correlation was found between collagen fibre deposition and myofibroblast population only on day 7 (r = .729, P = .007). In conclusion, PEMF can significantly increase collagen fibre in the early phase of diabetic wound healing, which is associated with the enhancement of myofibroblast population.

  10. Structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix and the influence to its integrity and stability.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuying; Patra, Prabir; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is a chain-like disaccharide that is linked to polypeptide core to connect two collagen fibrils/fibers and provide the intermolecular force in Collagen-GAG matrix (C-G matrix). Thus, the distribution of GAG in C-G matrix contributes to the integrity and mechanical properties of the matrix and related tissue. This paper analyzes the transverse isotropic distribution of GAG in C-G matrix. The angle of GAGs related to collagen fibrils is used as parameters to qualify the GAGs isotropic characteristic in both 3D and 2D rendering. Statistical results included that over one third of GAGs were perpendicular directed to collagen fibril with symmetrical distribution for both 3D matrix and 2D plane cross through collagen fibrils. The three factors tested in this paper: collagen radius, collagen distribution, and GAGs density, were not statistically significant for the strength of Collagen-GAG matrix in 3D rendering. However in 2D rendering, a significant factor found was the radius of collagen in matrix for the GAGs directed to orthogonal plane of Collagen-GAG matrix. Between two cross-section selected from Collagen-GAG matrix model, the plane cross through collagen fibrils was symmetrically distributed but the total percentage of perpendicular directed GAG was deducted by decreasing collagen radius. There were some symmetry features of GAGs angle distribution in selected 2D plane that passed through space between collagen fibrils, but most models showed multiple peaks in GAGs angle distribution. With less GAGs directed to perpendicular of collagen fibril, strength in collagen cross-section weakened. Collagen distribution was also a factor that influences GAGs angle distribution in 2D rendering. True hexagonal collagen packaging is reported in this paper to have less strength at collagen cross-section compared to quasi-hexagonal collagen arrangement. In this work focus is on GAGs matrix within the collagen and its relevance to anisotropy.

  11. Newly identified interfibrillar collagen crosslinking suppresses cell proliferation and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Benedetto; Le Nihouannen, Damien; Hacking, S Adam; Tran, Simon; Li, Jingjing; Murshed, Monzur; Doillon, Charles J; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Zhang, Yu Ling; Nazhat, Showan N; Barralet, Jake E

    2015-06-01

    Copper is becoming recognised as a key cation in a variety of biological processes. Copper chelation has been studied as a potential anti-angiogenic strategy for arresting tumour growth. Conversely the delivery of copper ions and complexes in vivo can elicit a pro-angiogenic effect. Previously we unexpectedly found that copper-stimulated intraperitoneal angiogenesis was accompanied by collagen deposition. Here, in hard tissue, not only was healing accelerated by copper, but again enhanced deposition of collagen was detected at 2 weeks. Experiments with reconstituted collagen showed that addition of copper ions post-fibrillogenesis rendered plastically-compressed gels resistant to collagenases, enhanced their mechanical properties and increased the denaturation temperature of the protein. Unexpectedly, this apparently interfibrillar crosslinking was not affected by addition of glucose or ascorbic acid, which are required for crosslinking by advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Fibroblasts cultured on copper-crosslinked gels did not proliferate, whereas those cultured with an equivalent quantity of copper on either tissue culture plastic or collagen showed no effect compared with controls. Although non-proliferative, fibroblasts grown on copper-cross-linked collagen could migrate, remained metabolically active for at least 14 days and displayed a 6-fold increase in Mmps 1 and 3 mRNA expression compared with copper-free controls. The ability of copper ions to crosslink collagen fibrils during densification and independently of AGEs or Fenton type reactions is previously unreported. The effect on MMP susceptibility of collagen and the dramatic change in cell behaviour on this crosslinked ECM may contribute to shedding some light on unexplained phenomena as the apparent benefit of copper complexation in fibrotic disorders or the enhanced collagen deposition in response to localised copper delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ryanodine receptor cluster fragmentation and redistribution in persistent atrial fibrillation enhance calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Macquaide, Niall; Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Sempels, Wouter; Lenaerts, Ilse; Holemans, Patricia; Hofkens, Johan; Jafri, M. Saleet; Willems, Rik; Sipido, Karin R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In atrial fibrillation (AF), abnormalities in Ca2+ release contribute to arrhythmia generation and contractile dysfunction. We explore whether ryanodine receptor (RyR) cluster ultrastructure is altered and is associated with functional abnormalities in AF. Methods and results Using high-resolution confocal microscopy (STED), we examined RyR cluster morphology in fixed atrial myocytes from sheep with persistent AF (N = 6) and control (Ctrl; N = 6) animals. RyR clusters on average contained 15 contiguous RyRs; this did not differ between AF and Ctrl. However, the distance between clusters was significantly reduced in AF (288 ± 12 vs. 376 ± 17 nm). When RyR clusters were grouped into Ca2+ release units (CRUs), i.e. clusters separated by <150 nm, CRUs in AF had more clusters (3.43 ± 0.10 vs. 2.95 ± 0.02 in Ctrl), which were more dispersed. Furthermore, in AF cells, more RyR clusters were found between Z lines. In parallel experiments, Ca2+ sparks were monitored in live permeabilized myocytes. In AF, myocytes had >50% higher spark frequency with increased spark time to peak (TTP) and duration, and a higher incidence of macrosparks. A computational model of the CRU was used to simulate the morphological alterations observed in AF cells. Increasing cluster fragmentation to the level observed in AF cells caused the observed changes, i.e. higher spark frequency, increased TTP and duration; RyR clusters dispersed between Z-lines increased the occurrence of macrosparks. Conclusion In persistent AF, ultrastructural reorganization of RyR clusters within CRUs is associated with overactive Ca2+ release, increasing the likelihood of propagating Ca2+ release. PMID:26490742

  13. “Polymerization and Matrix Physical Properties as Important Design Considerations for Soluble Collagen Formulations”

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, S.T.; Bell, B.J.; Bailey, J.; Stites, E.; Kuske, J.; Waisner, B.; Voytik-Harbin, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite extensive use of type I collagen for research and medical applications, its fibril-forming or polymerization potential has yet to be fully defined and exploited. Here we describe a type I collagen formulation that is acid solubilized from porcine skin (PSC), quality controlled based upon polymerization potential, and well suited as a platform polymer for preparing three-dimensional (3D) culture systems and injectable/implantable in-vivo cellular microenvironments in which both relevant biochemical and biophysical parameters can be precision-controlled. PSC is compared with 3 commercial collagens in terms of composition and purity as well as polymerization potential, which is described by kinetic parameters and fibril microstructure and mechanical properties of formed matrices. When subjected to identical polymerization conditions, PSC showed significantly decreased polymerization times compared to the other collagens and yielded matrices with the greatest mechanical integrity and broadest range of mechanical properties as characterized in oscillatory shear, uniaxial extension, and unconfined compression. Compositional and intrinsic viscosity analyses suggest that the enhanced polymerization potential of PSC may be attributed to its unique oligomer composition. Collectively, this work demonstrates the importance of standardizing next generation collagen formulations based upon polymerization potential and provides preliminary insight into the contribution of oligomers to collagen polymerization properties. PMID:20235198

  14. Traumatic Acid Reduces Oxidative Stress and Enhances Collagen Biosynthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Pankiewicz, Walentyn; Czerpak, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic acid (TA) is a plant hormone (cytokinin) that in terms of chemical structure belongs to the group of fatty acids derivatives. It was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris. TA activity and its influence on human cells and organism has not previously been the subject of research. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TA on collagen content and basic oxidative stress parameters, such as antioxidative enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, thiol group content, and lipid peroxidation in physiological conditions. The results show a stimulatory effect of TA on tested parameters. TA caused a decrease in membrane phospholipid peroxidation and exhibited protective properties against ROS production. It also increases protein and collagen biosynthesis and its secretion into the culture medium. The present findings reveal that TA exhibits multiple and complex activity in fibroblast cells in vitro. TA, with its activity similar to unsaturated fatty acids, shows antioxidant and stimulatory effects on collagen biosynthesis. It is a potentially powerful agent with applications in the treatment of many skin diseases connected with oxidative stress and collagen biosynthesis disorders.

  15. Enhanced proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells in collagen sponge reinforced with different poly(ethylene terephthalate) fibers.

    PubMed

    Takamoto, Tomoaki; Hiraoka, Yosuke; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of collagen sponges mechanically reinforced by the incorporation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers in stem cell culture. A collagen solution with homogeneously dispersed PET fibers was freeze-dried, followed by dehydrothermal cross-linking to obtain the collagen sponge incorporating PET fibers. By scanning electron microscopy observation, the collagen sponges exhibited isotropic and interconnected pore structures with an average size of 200 microm, irrespective of PET fiber incorporation. As expected, PET fibers incorporation significantly enhanced the compression strength of collagen sponge. When used for rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the collagen sponge incorporating PET fibers was superior to the original collagen sponge without PET fibers incorporation in terms of the initial attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of cells, irrespective of the amount and diameter of fibers incorporated. The shrinkage of sponges during cell culture was significantly suppressed by the fiber incorporation. It is possible that the shrinkage suppression maintains the three-dimensional inner pore structure of collagen sponges without impairing the cell compatibility, resulting in the superior MSC attachment and the subsequent osteogenic differentiation in the sponge incorporating PET fiber.

  16. Subfibrillar architecture and functional properties of collagen: a comparative study in rat tendons.

    PubMed Central

    Raspanti, M; Ottani, V; Ruggeri, A

    1990-01-01

    Collagen fibrils from different rat tendons have been investigated by freeze-fracture and transmission electron microscopy. In all cases, marked differences in both fibril morphology and subfibrillar organisation have been consistently found between the tendon core (composed of large and heterogeneous fibrils comprising tightly-packed, straight, parallel molecules) and sheath (showing small, uniform collagen fibrils with a helical arrangement of the molecules). The bio-mechanical requirements to which these tissues are subjected suggest, as do previous observations on other tissues, that a causal correlation exists between substructure and collagen fibril function. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2272900

  17. Glutaraldehyde assisted synthesis of collagen derivative modified Fe3+/TiO2 nanocomposite and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chongyi; Xue, Feng; Ding, Enyong; He, Xiaoling

    2015-11-01

    A unique organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was designed and synthesized by chemically anchoring the cationic collagen-based derivatives onto the surface of Fe3+/TiO2 nanospheres for the significant enhancement in photocatalytic activity under the visible light irradiation. The NMR analysis suggested the successful fabrication of cationic collagen-g-PDMC as grafted materials. In addition, the chemical structures, morphologies and properties of these samples were systematically characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum, ultra violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoluminescence (PL). And obtained results clearly demonstrated that Fe3+ ions diffusing into TiO2 lattice could be responsible for slightly reducing the average diameter of nanospheres to about 125 nm, promoting phase transition from anatase to rutile to some extent and extending the light harvesting range into visible region markedly. Meanwhile, the achievement that collagen-g-PDMC molecules had been covalently immobilized onto the surface of Fe3+/TiO2 nanoparticles was also well supported by the information acquired. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activities of all the as-prepared products were carefully evaluated by adopting photocatalytic decoloration of methyl orange (MO) solution under the solar direct irradiation, and the sample CFT-3 performed the best in the photocatalytic degradation process, which was mainly attributed to the energetic synergistic effect brought about by Fe3+ ions doping and collagen-g-PDMC molecules immobilized on the surface.

  18. Collagen I Self-Assembly: Revealing the Developing Structures that Generate Turbidity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jieling; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Type I collagen gels are routinely used in biophysical studies and bioengineering applications. The structural and mechanical properties of these fibrillar matrices depend on the conditions under which collagen fibrillogenesis proceeds, and developing a fuller understanding of this process will enhance control over gel properties. Turbidity measurements have long been the method of choice for monitoring developing gels, whereas imaging methods are regularly used to visualize fully developed gels. In this study, turbidity and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) were simultaneously employed to track collagen fibrillogenesis and reconcile the information reported by the two techniques, with confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) used to supplement information about early events in fibrillogenesis. Time-lapse images of 0.5 mg/ml, 1.0 mg/ml, and 2.0 mg/ml acid-solubilized collagen I gels forming at 27°C, 32°C, and 37°C were collected. It was found that in situ turbidity measured in a scanning transmittance configuration was interchangeable with traditional turbidity measurements using a spectrophotometer. CRM and CFM were employed to reveal the structures responsible for the turbidity that develops during collagen self-assembly. Information from CRM and transmittance images was collapsed into straightforward single variables; total intensity in CRM images tracked turbidity development closely for all collagen gels investigated, and the two techniques were similarly sensitive to fibril number and dimension. Complementary CRM, CFM, and in situ turbidity measurements revealed that fibril and network formation occurred before substantial turbidity was present, and the majority of increasing turbidity during collagen self-assembly was due to increasing fibril thickness. PMID:24739181

  19. Isolated right ventricular infarct presenting as ventricular fibrillation arrest and confirmed by delayed-enhancement cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, João L; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Hudson, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias resulting from isolated right ventricular myocardial infarction (RVMI) without left ventricular myocardial ischaemia or infarction occur rarely. We present a case of a 61 year-old male with acute onset of chest pain and ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest requiring prompt defibrillation. Subsequent 15-lead EKG, showed ST-segment elevation in the anterior and right precordial leads without ST-segment elevation in the inferior leads. Angiography documented occlusion of a large RV marginal branch. Delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (DE-CMR) with gadolinium performed two days post-infarct showed isolated RVMI. Patient remained symptom free and haemodynamically stable throughout his hospital stay. The clinical presentation of isolated RV infarct can be misleading and diagnosis difficult. EKG findings can resemble acute anterior wall myocardial infarction, while its course can be accompanied by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This case uniquely combines this rare clinical sequence with DE-CMR images using gadolinium to confirm isolated RVMI. A brief review of RVMI presentation and associated EKG patterns is also discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Association of Left Atrial Local Conduction Velocity With Late Gadolinium Enhancement on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kotaro; Habibi, Mohammadali; Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Zahid, Sohail; Khurram, Irfan M; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Spragg, David; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Trayanova, Natalia; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Rickard, John; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

    2016-03-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated regional left atrial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) heterogeneity on magnetic resonance imaging. Heterogeneity in regional conduction velocities is a critical substrate for functional reentry. We sought to examine the association between left atrial conduction velocity and LGE in patients with atrial fibrillation. LGE imaging and left atrial activation mapping were performed during sinus rhythm in 22 patients before pulmonary vein isolation. The locations of 1468 electroanatomic map points were registered to the corresponding anatomic sites on 469 axial LGE image planes. The local conduction velocity at each point was calculated using previously established methods. The myocardial wall thickness and image intensity ratio defined as left atrial myocardial LGE signal intensity divided by the mean left atrial blood pool intensity was calculated for each mapping site. The local conduction velocity and image intensity ratio in the left atrium (mean ± SD) were 0.98 ± 0.46 and 0.95 ± 0.26 m/s, respectively. In multivariable regression analysis, clustered by patient, and adjusting for left atrial wall thickness, conduction velocity was associated with the local image intensity ratio (0.20 m/s decrease in conduction velocity per increase in unit image intensity ratio, P<0.001). In this clinical in vivo study, we demonstrate that left atrial myocardium with increased gadolinium uptake has lower local conduction velocity. Identification of such regions may facilitate the targeting of the substrate for reentrant arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  2. Stabilization of collagen with EDC/NHS in the presence of L-lysine: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Usha, R; Sreeram, K J; Rajaram, A

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports the effect of L-lysine on the conformational, rheological, and thermal properties of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross linked collagen and investigates the influence of l-lysine on the self assembly processes of collagen. In the absence of L-lysine, the rheological characterization of collagen cross linked with EDC/NHS showed an increase in shearing stress with shearing speed indicating that the collagen chains become rigid and the molecules are reluctant to flow. On the other hand, the increase in shearing stress with shearing speed is comparatively much less in the presence of L-lysine indicating a greater flexibility of the collagen molecules. The self assembly processes of collagen treated with EDC/NHS in the absence and presence of L-lysine were characterized using powder XRD, FT-IR, polarizing optical microscopy and kinetic studies. XRD studies show an increase in peak intensity and sharpness in the presence of L-lysine indicating the enhancement of crystallinity of collagen nano-fibrils. FT-IR results suggest that the incorporation of L-lysine in the EDC/NHS cross linking favors the molecular stability of collagen. From the present study, it is possible to conclude that the pre-treatment of collagen with L-lysine enhances EDC/NHS cross linking and can be used for biomaterial applications.

  3. Direct Evidence of Imino Acid-Aromatic Interactions in Native Collagen Protein by DNP-Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Aussenac, Fabien; Sinha, Neeraj

    2014-11-20

    Aromatic amino acids (AAAs) have rare presence (∼1.4% abundance of Phe) inside of collagen protein, which is the most abundant animal protein playing a functional role in skin, bone, and connective tissues. The role of AAAs is very crucial and has been debated. We present here experimental results depicting interaction of AAAs with imino acids in a native collagen protein sample. The interaction is probed by solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy experiments such as (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) performed on a native collagen sample. The natural abundance (13)C spectrum was obtained by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) sensitivity enhancement coupled with ssNMR, providing ∼30-fold signal enhancement. Our results also open up new avenues of probing collagen structure/dynamics closest to the native state by ssNMR experiments coupled with DNP.

  4. Thermal and infrared-diode laser effects on indocyanine-green-treated corneal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, George T.; Patmore, Ann; Shallal, Assaad; McHugh, Dominic; Marshall, John

    1993-07-01

    It has been suggested that laser welds of collagenous tissues form by interdigitation and chemical bonding of thermally 'unraveled' collagen fibrils. We investigated this proposal by attempting to weld highly collagenous, avascular corneal tissue with an infrared (IR) diode laser as follows. First, the temperature at which corneal collagen shrinks and collagen fibrils 'split' into subfibrillary components was determined. Second, since use of a near-IR laser wavelength necessitated addition of an absorbing dye (indocyanine green (ICG) to the cornea, we measured absorption spectra of ICG-treated tissue to ensure that peak ICG absorbance did not change markedly when ICG was present in the cornea. Third, using gel electrophoresis of thermally altered corneal collagen, we searched for covalently crosslinked compounds predicted by the proposed welding mechanism. Finally, we attempted to weld partial thickness corneal incisions infused with ICG. Principal experimental findings were as follows: (1) Human corneal (type I) collagen splits into subfibrillary components at approximately 63 degree(s)C, the same temperature that produces collagen shrinkage. (2) Peak ICG absorption does not change significantly in corneal stroma or with laser heating. (3) No evidence was found for the formation of novel compounds or the loss of proteins as a result of tissue heating. All tissue treated with ICG, however, exhibited a novel 244 kD protein band indicating chemical activity between collagen and corneal stromal components. (4) Laser welding corneal incisions was unsuccessful possibly due to shrinkage of the sides of the incision, lack of incision compression during heating, or a less than optimal combination of ICG concentration and radiant exposure. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the biochemical and morphological complexity of ICG-enhanced IR laser-tissue welding and the need for further investigation of laser welding mechanisms.

  5. Enhanced collagen type I synthesis by human tenocytes subjected to periodic in vitro mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Elise; Lu, Alex; McCormack, Robert G; Scott, Alex

    2014-11-21

    Mechanical stimulation (e.g. slow heavy loading) has proven beneficial in the rehabilitation of chronic tendinopathy, however the optimal parameters of stimulation have not been experimentally determined. In this study of mechanically stimulated human tenocytes, the influence of rest insertion and cycle number on (1) the protein and mRNA levels of type I and III collagen; (2) the mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGFB1) and scleraxis (SCXA); and (3) tenocyte morphology, were assessed. Human hamstring tenocytes were mechanically stimulated using a Flexcell® system. The stimulation regimens were 1) continuous and 2) rest-inserted cyclic equiaxial strain at a frequency of 0.1 Hz for 100 or 1000 cycles. Data were normalized to unstimulated (non-stretched) control groups for every experimental condition. qPCR was performed to determine relative mRNA levels and quantitative immunocytochemistry image analysis was used to assess protein levels and cell morphology. Collagen type I mRNA level and pro-collagen protein levels were higher in tenocytes that were subjected to rest-inserted mechanical stimulation, compared to continuous stretching (p<0.05). Rest insertion and increased cycle number also had significant positive effects on the levels of mRNA for TGFB1 and SCXA (p<0.05). There was no direct relation between cell morphology and gene expression, however mechanical stimulation, overall, induced a metabolically active tenocyte phenotype as evidenced by cells that on average demonstrated a decreased major-minor axis ratio (p<0.05) with greater branching (p<0.01). The incorporation of rest periods in a mechanical stretching regimen results in greater collagen type I synthesis. This knowledge may be beneficial in refining rehabilitation protocols for tendon injury.

  6. Transdermal nicotine patch enhances type I collagen synthesis in abstinent smokers.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Lars T; Jorgensen, Lars N; Zillmer, Rikke; Vange, Jakob; Hemmingsen, Ulla; Gottrup, Finn

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smokers deposit less collagen, expressed as hydroxyproline, in granulation tissue than nonsmokers. We studied the effect of abstinence from smoking and transdermal nicotine patches on deposition of hydroxyproline, proline, type I procollagen, and total proteins. Fifty-four healthy smokers were studied during 10 days of smoking and again from days 10 to 20 following smoking cessation. After the first 10 days of abstinence they were randomized to double-blind treatment with transdermal nicotine patches of 25 mg/day or placebo for a period of 10 days. During this period and during smoking, an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tube was implanted into the subcutis. Following removal of the implant, total amino acids and peptides were extracted. Hydroxyproline and proline were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography, type I procollagen was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunoassay, and total proteins were determined colorimetrically. In the 39 subjects who complied with the study protocol, abstinence from smoking did not affect the deposition of hydroxyproline, proline, type I procollagen, or total protein in the implants. During abstinence, the type I procollagen level increased by 18% in the transdermal nicotine patches group and decreased by 10% in the placebo group (p<0.05). We conclude that 20 days of abstinence from smoking does not affect collagen deposition in granulation tissue. However, in abstinent smokers, transdermal nicotine patches appears to increase type I collagen synthesis.

  7. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ventricular Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine that produces a magnetic field that aligns atomic particles in some of your cells. Radio waves ... fibrillation is caused by a change in the structure of your heart, such as scarred tissue from ...

  9. Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... information about the heart's electrical system and detailed animations, go to the Diseases and Conditions Index How ... can't restore a normal heart rhythm. The animation below shows atrial fibrillation. Click the "start" button ...

  10. [Atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia characterized by no-coordinated atrial contraction that results in an inefficient atrial systole. The clinical classification of atrial fibrillation includes: ocassional, paroxysmal, persistent, and permanent. Multiple mechanisms have been described and accounts for a single ECG manifestation. Treatment should be individualized and has to considered several aspects including age, associated heart disease, and symptoms. Treatment strategies are: rhythm control, rate control, and thromboprophylaxis.

  11. Enhanced antiangiogenic therapy with antibody-collagen XVIII NC1 domain fusion proteins engineered to exploit matrix remodeling events.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Arévalo Lobo, Víctor J; Cuesta, Angel M; Sanz, Laura; Compte, Marta; García, Pascal; Prieto, Jesús; Blanco, Francisco J; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2006-07-15

    Antiangiogenic therapy is nowadays one of the most active fields in cancer research. The first strategies, aimed at inhibiting tumor vascularization, included upregulation of endogenous inhibitors and blocking of the signals delivered by angiogenic factors. But interaction between endothelial cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix also plays a critical role in the modulation of the angiogenic process. This study introduces a new concept to enhance the efficacy of antibody-based antiangiogenic cancer therapy strategies, taking advantage of a key molecular event occurring in the tumor context: the proteolysis of collagen XVIII, which releases the endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor endostatin. By fusing the collagen XVIII NC1 domain to an antiangiogenic single-chain antibody, a multispecific agent was generated, which was efficiently processed by tumor-associated proteinases to produce monomeric endostatin and fully functional trimeric antibody fragments. It was demonstrated that the combined production in the tumor area of complementary antiangiogenic agents from a single molecular entity secreted by gene-modified cells resulted in enhanced antitumor effects. These results indicate that tailoring recombinant antibodies with extracellular matrix-derived scaffolds is an effective approach to convert tumor progression associated processes into molecular clues for improving antibody-based therapies. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Eumelanin fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueenie, Ross; Sutter, Jens; Karolin, Jan; Birch, David J. S.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the auto-oxidation of 3, 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) in the synthesis of eumelanin to spontaneously produce fibrils upon drying. The self-assembled fibrils are of characteristic diameter ~1 to 2 μm, composed of filaments, and are unidirectional, apart from branches that are formed at typically an angle of 20 to 22 deg. The fibrils are characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay times, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The fibrils mimic natural melanin in consisting of core eumelanin with efficient nonradiative properties, but they also display pockets of electronically isolated species with higher radiative rates on the nanosecond timescale. Eumelanin fibrils formed occasionally in solution are tentatively attributed to a scaffold of bacteria or fungus. Fabricating and characterizing novel synthetic eumelanin structures such as fibrils are of interest in helping to reveal a functional structure for eumelanin, in understanding its photophysics, in learning more about L-DOPA as it is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and in producing novel materials which might embody some of the diverse properties of eumelanin.

  13. Differential anion effects on thermal stability of collagen in the dispersed and aggregated states.

    PubMed

    Russell, A E

    1974-03-01

    The effects of KCNS and KI on thermal transition temperatures of calf skin collagen molecules in dilute acid solution and precipitated collagen fibrils from the same source were compared as a function of salt concentration and pH. The two salts produced qualitatively similar effects on each collagen form, but the response shown by single collagen molecules in dilute solution differed from that observed for molecular aggregates present in native-type fibrils.

  14. Intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds enhance the osteogenic capacity of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-na; Sun, Jia-qi; Li, Qi-hong; Jiao, Kai; Shen, Li-juan; Wu, Dan; Tay, Franklin; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigated the effects of intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds (ISCS) on the osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) in vitro and in vivo. The hDPSCs were co-cultured with ISCS or nonsilicified collagen scaffolds (NCS) in control medium (CM) or osteogenic differentiation medium (ODM). Cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analyzed with flow cytometry to measure the viability of hDPSCs. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting were used to evaluate the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes and proteins of hDPSCs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and alizarin red S assay were used to evaluate the ALP activity of hDPSCs and their calcium deposition potential. In addition, hDPSCs and scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 8 weeks. Harvested tissues were immunohistochemically stained for osteocalcin (OCN) expression from hDPSCs, and stained with alizarin red S for examination of their calcium deposition in vivo. The ISCS had no adverse effect on hDPSCs, promoted their proliferation, and significantly up-regulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes and proteins. The hDPSCs co-cultured with ISCS in ODM exhibited the highest ALP activity and calcium deposition in vitro. The ISCS promoted the OCN expression and calcium deposition of hDPSCs after ectopic transplantation in vivo. Intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds significantly promoted the proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hDPSCs, when compared with NCS. This study demonstrates combining the use of hDPSCs and ISCS to promote bone-like tissue formation is a promising approach for clinical bone repair and regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum YKL-40 as a Marker of Left Atrial Fibrosis Assessed by Delayed Enhancement MRI in Lone Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, Uğur; Aytemir, Kudret; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Özer, Necla; Oto, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of the left atrial (LA) fibrosis by using delayed-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is a pioneering noninvasive method. Serum YKL-40 is a novel marker for inflammation and known to play a role in ongoing tissue fibrosis. However, its role in LA fibrosis is unclear. We aimed to investigate the association of serum YKL-40 with the presence and extent of LA fibrosis. A total of 50 patients with lone paroxysmal AF (62% male; age: 47.2 ± 7.0 years) underwent cardiac DE-MRI according to study protocol. Cardiac DE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla scanner was used to quantify LA fibrosis. Serum YKL-40 levels and clinical and echocardiographic data were recorded in all participants. DE-MRI revealed any degree of LA fibrosis in 31 (62%) patients. Median serum YKL-40 was significantly higher (P = 0.008) and left venticular ejection fraction was lower (P = 0.047) in patients with LA fibrosis as compared to patients without LA fibrosis. Extent of LA fibrosis was significantly correlated with age, duration of AF history, serum C-reactive protein, and serum YKL-40 levels. Only log (YKL-40) level was found as independent predictor for the presence of LA fibrosis (odds ratio: 1.626, P = 0.022). Multivariate linear regression analysis pointed out that duration of AF history (β = 0.330, P = 0.003) and serum log (YKL-40) levels (β = 0.546, P < 0.001) were significantly and independently associated with the extent of LA fibrosis. Higher levels of serum YKL-40 are associated with the presence and more extensive LA fibrosis in patients with lone AF. As a marker of inflammation, serum YKL-40 may also be used as an indicator for the degree of LA fibrosis. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Prognostic Implications of Left Ventricular Scar Determined by Late Gadolinium Enhanced Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Suksaranjit, Promporn; McGann, Christopher J; Akoum, Nazem; Biskupiak, Joseph; Stoddard, Gregory J; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Navaravong, Leenhapong; Rassa, Allen; Bieging, Erik; Chang, Lowell; Haider, Imran; Marrouche, Nassir F; Wilson, Brent D

    2016-10-01

    Left ventricular (LV) scar identified by late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is associated with adverse outcomes in coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathies. We sought to determine the prognostic significance of LV-LGE in atrial fibrillation (AF). We studied 778 consecutive patients referred for radiofrequency ablation of AF who underwent CMR. Patients with coronary artery disease, previous myocardial infarction, or hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy were excluded. The end points of interest were major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack. Of the 754 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 60% were men with an average age of 64 years. Most (87%) had a normal LV ejection fraction of ≥55%. LV-LGE was found in 46 patients (6%). There were 32 MACCE over the mean follow-up period of 55 months. The MACCE rate was higher for patients with LV-LGE (13.0% vs 3.7%; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc score (hazard ratio [HR] 1.36, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.76), the presence of LV-LGE (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.31 to 7.88), and the LV-LGE extent (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.78) were independent predictors of MACCE. In addition, the presence of LV-LGE was an independent predictor for ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (HR 3.61, 95% CI 1.18 to 11.01) after adjusting for CHA2DS2-VASc score. In conclusion, the presence and extent of LV scar identified by LGE-CMR were independent predictors of MACCE in patients with AF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recurrence of atrial fibrillation correlates with the extent of post-procedural late gadolinium enhancement: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dana C; Wylie, John V; Hauser, Thomas H; Nezafat, Reza; Han, Yuchi; Woo, Jeong Joo; Taclas, Jason; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Josephson, Mark E; Manning, Warren J

    2009-03-01

    We sought to evaluate radiofrequency (RF) ablation lesions in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and to correlate the ablation patterns with treatment success. RF ablation procedures for treatment of AF result in localized scar that is detected by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR. We hypothesized that the extent of scar in the left atrium and pulmonary veins (PV) would correlate with moderate-term procedural success. Thirty-five patients with AF, undergoing their first RF ablation procedure, were studied. The RF ablation procedure was performed to achieve bidirectional conduction block around each PV ostium. AF recurrence was documented using a 7-day event monitor at multiple intervals during the first year. High spatial resolution 3-dimensional LGE CMR was performed 46 +/- 28 days after RF ablation. The extent of scarring around the ostia of each PV was quantitatively (volume of scar) and qualitatively (1: minimal, 3: extensive and circumferential) assessed. Thirteen (37%) patients had recurrent AF during the 6.7 +/- 3.6-month observation period. Paroxysmal AF was a strong predictor of nonrecurrent AF (15% with recurrence vs. 68% without, p = 0.002). Qualitatively, patients without recurrence had more completely circumferentially scarred veins (55% vs. 35% of veins, p = NS). Patients without recurrence more frequently had scar in the inferior portion of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV) (82% vs. 31%, p = 0.025, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of scar in the RIPV was quantitatively greater in patients without AF recurrence (p < or = 0.05) and was a univariate predictor of recurrence using Cox regression (p = 0.049, Bonferroni corrected). Among patients undergoing PV isolation, AF recurrence during the first year is associated with a lesser degree of PV and left atrial scarring on 3-dimensional LGE CMR. This finding was significant for RIPV scar and may have implications for the procedural technique used in PV

  18. Sodium nitroprusside enhanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves short term survival in a porcine model of ischemic refractory ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yannopoulos, Demetris; Bartos, Jason A; George, Stephen A; Sideris, George; Voicu, Sebastian; Oestreich, Brett; Matsuura, Timothy; Shekar, Kadambari; Rees, Jennifer; Aufderheide, Tom P

    2017-01-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced CPR (SNPeCPR) demonstrates increased vital organ blood flow and survival in multiple porcine models. We developed a new, coronary occlusion/ischemia model of prolonged resuscitation, mimicking the majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests presenting with shockable rhythms. SNPeCPR will increase short term (4-h) survival compared to standard 2015 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines in an ischemic refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF), prolonged CPR model. Sixteen anesthetized pigs had the ostial left anterior descending artery occluded leading to ischemic VF arrest. VF was untreated for 5min. Basic life support was performed for 10min. At minute 10 (EMS arrival), animals received either SNPeCPR (n=8) or standard ACLS (n=8). Defibrillation (200J) occurred every 3min. CPR continued for a total of 45min, then the balloon was deflated simulating revascularization. CPR continued until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or a total of 60min, if unsuccessful. SNPeCPR animals received 2mg of SNP at minute 10 followed by 1mg every 5min until ROSC. Standard ACLS animals received 0.5mg epinephrine every 5min until ROSC. Primary endpoints were ROSC and 4-h survival. All SNPeCPR animals (8/8) achieved sustained ROSC versus 2/8 standard ACLS animals within one hour of resuscitation (p=0.04). The 4-h survival was significantly improved with SNPeCPR compared to standard ACLS, 7/8 versus 1/8 respectively, p=0.0019. SNPeCPR significantly improved ROSC and 4-h survival compared with standard ACLS CPR in a porcine model of prolonged ischemic, refractory VF cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of chronic gap junction conduction-enhancing antiarrhythmic peptide GAP-134 administration on experimental atrial fibrillation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Gabriel; Leong-Poi, Howard; Mangat, Iqwal; Moe, Gordon W; Hu, Xudong; So, Petsy Pui-Sze; Tarulli, Emidio; Ramadeen, Andrew; Rossman, Eric I; Hennan, James K; Dorian, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal intercellular communication caused by connexin dysfunction may contribute to atrial fibrillation (AF). The present study assessed the effect of the gap junction conduction-enhancing antiarrhythmic peptide GAP-134 on AF inducibility and maintenance in a dog model of atrial cardiomyopathy. Twenty-four dogs subject to simultaneous atrioventricular pacing (220 bpm for 14 days) were randomly assigned to placebo treatment (PACED-CTRL; 12 dogs) or oral GAP-134 (2.9 mg/kg BID; PACED-GAP-134; 12 dogs) starting on day 0. UNPACED-CTRL (4 dogs) and UNPACED-GAP-134 (4 dogs) served as additional control groups. Change in left atrial (LA) systolic area from baseline to 14 days was calculated using transoesophageal echocardiography. At 14 days, animals underwent an open-chest electrophysiological study. PACED-CTRL dogs (versus UNPACED-CTRL) had a shorter estimated LA wavelength (8.0+/-1.4 versus 24.4+/-2.5 cm, P<0.05) and a greater AF vulnerability (mean AF duration, 1588+/-329 versus 25+/-34 seconds, P<0.05). Oral GAP-134 had no effect on AF vulnerability in UNPACED dogs. Compared with PACED-CTRL dogs, PACED-GAP-134 dogs had a longer estimated LA wavelength (10.2+/-2.8 versus 8.0+/-1.4 cm, respectively, P<0.05). Oral GAP-134 did not significantly reduce AF inducibility or maintenance in the entire group of 24 PACED dogs; in a subgroup of dogs (n=11) with less than 100% increase in LA systolic area, oral GAP-134 reduced AF induction from 100% to 40% and mean AF duration from 1737+/-120 to 615+/-280 seconds (P<0.05). Oral GAP-134 reduces pacing-induced decrease in LA wavelength and appears to attenuate AF vulnerability in dogs with less atrial mechanical remodeling. Gap junction modulation may affect AF in some circumstances.

  20. Enhancement of enzymatic accessibility by fibrillation of woody biomass using batch-type kneader with twin-screw elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Endo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Fibrillation of wood cell walls into submicron and/or nanoscale fibers was successfully carried out in the presence of water by using a batch-type kneader with combination-available twin-screw elements. The results obtained are expected to be used for the application of a twin-screw extruder. Two types of screw combinations were used for applying different shearing and distribution forces. Most of the fibers of the fibrillated products had diameters less than 1 microm, and some of them had diameters less than 100 nm. The maximum glucose yield by enzymatic saccharification was found to be 54.2% in the fibrillated products kneaded for 20 min after ball milling for 20 min using a screw combination for applying high shearing force. The fibrillation increased the surface area of cellulose. The glucose yield was improved by cooking the fibrillated products with water at 135 degrees C under 0.25 MPa, revealing that only mechanical kneading appears to have some limitation to expose cellulose for complete enzymatic saccharification.

  1. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    weeks. Taken together, these findings illustrate the advantages of incorporating collagen as a means to enhance cell migration and proliferation in porous scaffolds which could be used to augment tissue repair strategies.

  2. Fabrication, characterization, and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectrum of assembled type-I collagen-silver nanoparticle multilayered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujing; Wang, Li; Sun, Lanlan; Guo, Cunlan; Yang, Tao; Liu, Zhelin; Xu, Fugang; Li, Zhuang

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we report a facile method for the fabrication of type-I collagen-silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) multilayered films by utilizing type-I collagen as a medium. These samples were characterized by UV-vis spectra photometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform IR spectrum. Experimental results show that collagen molecules serve as effective templates to assemble Ag NPs into multilayer films. These samples exhibit high surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement abilities. For example, EF(νcc) (EF means enhancement factor) at 1592cm-1 in the SERS spectrum of 4-aminothiophenol on seven-layered substrates was calculated to be 1.81×105, which is larger than that reported in several literatures. The EFs increased as the layer number of multilayer films increases.

  3. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    PubMed

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  4. Use of a Collagen Membrane to Enhance the Survival of Primary Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Claudio, Fiorella; Muglia, Cecilia I; Smaldini, Paola L; Orsini Delgado, María Lucía; Trejo, Fernando M; Grigera, J Raúl; Docena, Guillermo H

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal epithelial cell culture is important for biological, functional, and immunological studies. Since enterocytes have a short in vivo life span due to anoikis, we aimed to establish a novel and reproducible method to prolong the survival of mouse and human cells. Cells were isolated following a standard procedure, and cultured on ordered-cow's collagen membranes. A prolonged cell life span was achieved; cells covered the complete surface of bio-membranes and showed a classical enterocyte morphology with high expression of enzymes supporting the possibility of cryopreservation. Apoptosis was dramatically reduced and cultured enterocytes expressed cytokeratin and LGR5 (low frequency). Cells exposed to LPS or flagellin showed the induction of TLR4 and TLR5 expression and a functional phenotype upon exposure to the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum or the pathogenic Clostridium difficile. The secretion of the homeostatic (IL-25 and TSLP), inhibitory (IL-10 and TGF-β), or pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β and TNF) were induced. In conclusion, this novel protocol using cow's collagen-ordered membrane provides a simple and reproducible method to maintain intestinal epithelial cells functional for cell-microorganism interaction studies and stem cell expansion. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2489-2496, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Role of Collagen Quaternary Structure in the Platelet:Collagen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Lawrence F.; Bensusan, Howard B.

    1974-01-01

    We have investigated whether collagen queternary structure is required for the platelet: collagen interaction. Quaternary structure refers to the assembly of collagen monomers (tropocollagen) into polymers (native-type fibrils). Purified monomeric collagen was prepared from acetic acid extracts of fetal calfskin. Polymeric collagen was prepared by dispersion of bovine Achilles tendon collagen and by incubation of monomeric collagen at 37°C and pH 7.4. The state of polymerization was confirmed by electron microscopy. Release of platelet serotonin in the absence of platelet aggregation was used to determine the effectiveness of the platelet: collagen interaction. All forms of collagen produced serotonin release only after a lag period, but polymeric collagen gave a shorter lag period than did monomeric collagen. Monomeric collagen was also quanidinated selectively to convert collagen lysine groups to homoarginine, while leaving the arrangement of polar groups intact. Guanidination of monomeric collagen increased the rate of polymerization and reduced the lag time in serotonin release. Glucosamine (17 mM) retarded polymerization and inhibited the release of platelet serotonin by monomeric collagen but had little effect on release produced by thrombin or polymeric collagen. At the same concentration, glucosamine did not reduce the sensitivity of platelets to stimulation by collagen or block the platelet: collagen interaction. The only effect of glucosamine was on the collagen: collagen interaction. Galactosamine had a similar effect, but glucose, galactose, and N-acetylglycosamine had no effect. We conclude from this data that collagen monomers cannot effectively interact with platelets and that, therefore, collagen quaternary structure has a role in the recognition of collagen by platelets. PMID:4215825

  6. A composite coating by electrolysis-induced collagen self-assembly and calcium phosphate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuwei; Duan, Ke; Wang, Rizhi

    2005-05-01

    A composite coating that is composed of collagen protein and calcium phosphate minerals is considered to be bioactive and may enhance bone growth and fixation of metallic orthopedic implants. In this study, we have successfully developed a uniform collagen fibril/octacalcium phosphate composite coating on silicon substrate by electrolytic deposition (ELD). The coating deposition was done through applying a constant potential to the cathode in a three-electrode electrochemistry cell that contain a mild acidic (pH 4.8-5.3) aqueous solution of collagen molecules, calcium and phosphate ions. The coating process involved self-assembly of collagen fibrils and the deposition of calcium phosphate minerals as a result of cathode reaction and local pH increase. The two steps could be synchronized to form a bone-like composite at nanometer scale through proper adjustment of the solution and deposition parameters. Coating morphology, crystal structure and compositions were analyzed by optical and fluorescence microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, inductively coupled argon plasma optical emission spectrophotometry, and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Under typical deposition conditions, the cathode (Si) surface formed a thin (100 nm) layer of calcium phosphate coating, on top of which a thick (approximately 100 microm) composite layer formed. The porous composite layer consists of a collagen fibril network on which clusters of octacalcium phosphate crystals nucleate and grow. By combining photolithography and ELD, we were also able to pattern the composite coating into regular arrays of squares. Preliminary results by nanoindentation tests showed that properly prepared composite coating may have higher elastic modulus and scratch resistance than monolithic porous calcium phosphate coating. The results not only provide a novel bioactive coating for biomedical implants, but also establish a new experimental

  7. Enhanced bile canaliculi formation enabling direct recovery of biliary metabolites of hepatocytes in 3D collagen gel microcavities.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Shoji; Osada, Tomoharu; Fujii, Teruo; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2012-04-24

    Analysis of biliary metabolites is essential to predict pharmacokinetics and hepatotoxicity during drug development. In this paper, we present a hepatocyte culture configuration that enables the direct recovery of bile acid that accumulates in bile canaliculi by embedding the hepatocytes in a 3D micropatterned collagen gel substrate. We investigated the formation of bile canaliculi in hepatocytes embedded in circular microcavities of various sizes and made from collagen gel. Image analyses using fluorescently labeled bile acid revealed that the area of bile canaliculi in embedded hepatocytes in a microcavity of 60 or 80 μm in diameter was enlarged when compared with other sized microcavities and those of hepatocytes cultured using conventional hepatocyte sandwich cultures. We successfully recovered bile acid from the enlarged bile canaliculi of hepatocytes cultured in microcavities using a glass capillary and quantified the amount recovered. Using our approach, the direct recovery of biliary metabolites, using hepatocyte cultures with enhanced biliary excretion and geometrically enlarged bile canaliculi, may enable accurate screening of pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions against drug transporters.

  8. Enhancement of periosteal bone formation by basic fibroblast-derived growth factor containing polycystic kidney disease and collagen-binding domains from Clostridium histolyticum collagenase.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kentaro; Matsushita, Osamu; Nishi, Nozomu; Inoue, Gen; Horikawa, Kyosuke; Takaso, Masashi

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a potent mitogen for mesenchymal cells that accelerates bone union and repair when applied locally at defect sites. However, because bFGF diffuses rapidly from bone defect sites, repeated dosing is required for sustained therapeutic effect. We previously fused the collagen-binding domain (CBD) and polycystic kidney disease (PKD) domain of Clostridium histolyticum class II collagenase (ColH) to bFGF and demonstrated that the fusion protein markedly enhances bone formation when loaded onto collagen materials used for grafting. However, systemic injection of a fusion protein consisting of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and a CBD was shown to accelerate bone formation in an osteoporosis model more rapidly than treatment with a PTH-PKD-CBD fusion protein. Here, we compared the biological properties of two collagen-binding forms of bFGF, bFGF-CBD and bFGF-PKD-CBD. Both fusion proteins promoted the in vitro proliferation of periosteal mesenchymal cells, indicating that they had biological activity similar to that of native bFGF. In vivo periosteal bone formation assays in rat femurs showed that both bFGF-CBD and bFGF-PKD-CBD induced periosteal bone formation at higher rates than collagen sheet alone and bFGF. However, bFGF-PKD-CBD markedly enhanced bone formation and had higher collagen-binding ability than bFGF-CBD in in vitro protein release assays. Taken together, these results suggest that the PKD domain increases the retention of bFGF at graft sites by enhancing collagen-binding affinity. Therefore, bFGF-PKD-CBD-collagen composite appears to be a promising material for bone repair in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  10. Spiroplasma fibrils.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D L; Brink, P R; Zieve, G W

    1984-09-01

    A fundamental question in biology concerns the morphology of spiroplasmas: How does a wall-less microorganism maintain its characteristic morphology as a helical filament? An answer to this question began to form when it was discovered that spiroplasmas treated with any of a number of detergents (sodium deoxycholate, Triton X-100, Nonidet P-40) release their cytoplasmic contents. If this procedure is performed on a formvar-coated electron microscope grid and the resultant preparation negatively stained and observed by transmission electron microscopy, numerous striated microfibrils can be seen where spiroplasmas once were. The fibrils are of varying lengths, 4 nm in width, and show a striation repeat at 9 nm along their length. It is not possible to discern from the pattern of the released fibrils just how they are organized within the intact spiroplasma; nor is it yet possible to identify a fibrillar substructure in thin sections or in freeze-fractured organisms. Townsend and his colleagues at the John Innes Institute in Norwich, UK, purified fibrils by density gradient centrifugation. SDS-PAGE showed the fibrils to consist of a 55,000-dalton protein recognizable in the four serogroups tested by protein blotting with an antiserum made against the PAGE-separated protein. The presence of fibrils is a feature common to all spiroplasma, regardless of whether they are helical or nonhelical, as in the Ixodes tick-derived spiroplasma or Townsend's ASP-1 strain of Spiroplasma citri. We have employed gentle demembranation treatments that preserve filamentous substructure in an effort to elucidate the organization of the fibrils within the spiroplasma cell.

  11. Chitosan-collagen biomembrane embedded with calcium-aluminate enhances dentinogenic potential of pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Rosseto, Hebert Luís; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Salles; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomaterials capable of driving dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells able to secrete reparative dentin is the goal of current conservative dentistry. In the present investigation, a biomembrane (BM) composed of a chitosan/collagen matrix embedded with calcium-aluminate microparticles was tested. The BM was produced by mixing collagen gel with a chitosan solution (2:1), and then adding bioactive calcium-aluminate cement as the mineral phase. An inert material (polystyrene) was used as the negative control. Human dental pulp cells were seeded onto the surface of certain materials, and the cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell proliferation and cell morphology, assessed after 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in culture. The odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, total protein production, gene expression of DMP-1/DSPP and mineralized nodule deposition. The pulp cells were able to attach onto the BM surface and spread, displaying a faster proliferative rate at initial periods than that of the control cells. The BM also acted on the cells to induce more intense ALP activity, protein production at 14 days, and higher gene expression of DSPP and DMP-1 at 28 days, leading to the deposition of about five times more mineralized matrix than the cells in the control group. Therefore, the experimental biomembrane induced the differentiation of pulp cells into odontoblast-like cells featuring a highly secretory phenotype. This innovative bioactive material can drive other protocols for dental pulp exposure treatment by inducing the regeneration of dentin tissue mediated by resident cells.

  12. Maternal overnutrition enhances mRNA expression of adipogenic markers and collagen deposition in skeletal muscle of beef cattle fetuses.

    PubMed

    Duarte, M S; Gionbelli, M P; Paulino, P V R; Serão, N V L; Nascimento, C S; Botelho, M E; Martins, T S; Filho, S C V; Dodson, M V; Guimarães, S E F; Du, M

    2014-09-01

    Twenty-four pregnant Nellore cows were randomly assigned into 2 feeding level groups (control [CTL]; fed 1.0 times the maintenance requirement; n = 12; and overnourished [ON]; fed at 1.5 times the maintenance requirement; n = 12) to evaluate effects of maternal overnutrition on fetal skeletal muscle development. Cows were slaughtered at 135, 190, and 240 d of gestation and samples of fetal LM were collected for analysis of mRNA expression analysis and for histological evaluation of collagen content and number of muscle cells. There was no interaction between gestational period and maternal nutrition for the variables evaluated (P > 0.05). The mRNA expression of Cadherin-associated protein, β 1 (β-catenin) tended to be greater in fetuses from ON cows (P = 0.08), while myogenic differentiation 1 (MyoD; P = 0.56), myogenin (MyoG; P = 0.70), and the number of muscle cells (P = 0.90) were not affected by maternal overnutrition. Gestational period did not affect the mRNA expression of β-catenin (P = 0.60) and MyoG (P = 0.21). The mRNA expression of MyoD tended to increase with days of gestation (P = 0.06). The mRNA expression of zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423; P < 0.0001), C/EBPα (P = 0.01), and PPARγ (P < 0.0001) were enhanced in ON fetuses. No effects of days of gestation were observed for mRNA expression of Zfp423 (P = 0.75) and C/EBPα (P = 0.48). The mRNA expression of PPARγ in fetuses at 190 d of gestation tended to be greater than those at 135 and 240 d of gestation (P = 0.06). The mRNA expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β; P < 0.0001), collagen type III, α I (COL3A1; P < 0.0001), and collagen content (P = 0.01) were increased in ON fetuses. Gestational period did not affect the mRNA expression of collagen type I, α I (COL1A1; P = 0.65). The mRNA expression of COL3A1 (P = 0.09) in fetuses at 190 d of gestation tended to be greater than fetuses at 135 and 240 d of gestation. The mRNA expression of TGF-β in fetuses at 190 d of gestation was

  13. A three-dimensional hierarchical collagen scaffold fabricated by a combined solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and electrospinning process to enhance mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, SeungHyun; Koh, Young Ho; Kim, GeunHyung

    2010-06-01

    Collagen has the advantage of being very similar to macromolecular substances that can be recognized and metabolized in the biological environment. Although the natural material has superior property for this purpose, its use to fabricate reproducible and pore-structure-controlled 3D structures, which are designed to allow the entry of sufficient cells and the easy diffusion of nutrients, has been limited due to its low processability. Here, we propose a hybrid technology that combines a cryogenic plotting system with an electrospinning process. Using this technique, an easily pore-size-controllable hierarchical 3D scaffold consisting of micro-sized highly porous collagen strands and micro/nano-sized collagen fibers was fabricated. The pore structure of the collagen scaffold was controlled by the collagen micro/nanofibers, which were layered in the scaffold. The hierarchical scaffolds were characterized with respect to initial cell attachment and proliferation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells within the scaffolds. The hierarchical scaffold exhibited incredibly enhanced initial cell attachment and cell compactness between pores of the plotted scaffold relative to the normally designed 3D collagen scaffold.

  14. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Benditt, Earl P.

    1961-01-01

    The regular sequence encountered in healing guinea pig skin wounds has been examined by methods of light and electron microscopy. Observations on cell populations, their fine structure, and fibril formation in the connective tissue have been made. Linear incisions in the skin of normal female guinea pigs weighing 300 to 350 grams were allowed to heal. The wounds were then excised, fixed with buffered 2 per cent osmium tetroxide, and postfixed in neutral buffered formalin, at 16 and 24 hours and at 3, 5, 9, and 14 days after wounding. They were then embedded in epoxy resin. In the inflammatory phase the exudate observed in the early wounds consists largely of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes, macrophages, fibrin, and free extracellular organelles from the disrupted inflammatory cells. These organelles later appear in vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Fibroblasts first appear at 24 hours, and show extensive development and dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which sometimes contains moderately dense flocculent material. In addition, these fibroblasts have enlarged mitochondria and condensations of filamentous material within the cytoplasm near the cell surface. Occasional myelin figures and moderately dense, 0.5 to 1.0 micron bodies are found within the cytoplasm of the early fibroblasts. Collagen fibrils are first seen at 3 days extracellularly near the cell surfaces. They appear at the later times in two populations of sizes. With increasing wound age the fibroblasts retain their morphology and the wounds decrease in cellularity concomitantly with the formation of increasing amounts of collagen. Several proposed mechanisms of collagen fibril formation are discussed in relation to the observed phenomena. The problem of correlating fibril diameter with the appearance of the periodic structure of collagen in relation to the minimal size fibril which would be anticipated to display this appearance is discussed. PMID:14494202

  15. Enhancing FTIR imaging capabilities with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS): A study of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Eric Y.; Rieppo, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    This paper explores a new application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in FTIR spectroscopic imaging analysis of biological samples. A particular example demonstrated in this paper is the characterization of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage. A focal plane array detector-based FTIR imaging system has been proven to be an efficient tool to detect early collagen and proteoglycans degradation in developing osteoarthrosis through evaluating compositional changes of osteoarthritic cartilage along the depth. However, the closely overlapped bands of collagen and proteoglycans make normal spectral and spatial analysis difficult. With 2DCOS analysis of the imaging data, it is possible to enhance the spectral resolution and reveal distinctive compositional changes that are normally hidden with conventional approaches. The combined technique, FTIR imaging enhanced with 2DCOS, provides new possibilities to solve challenging problems in the analysis of complex biological systems.

  16. Liposomes encapsulating Aloe vera leaf gel extract significantly enhance proliferation and collagen synthesis in human skin cell lines.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Kitamoto, Dai; Asikin, Yonathan; Takara, Kensaku; Wada, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Aloe vela leaf gel extract (AGE) are widely used as cosmetic and pharmaceutical ingredients because of its versatile skin care properties. In order to enhance the bioavailability of AGE, liposomes encapsulating AGE were prepared and examined for their interfacial and biochemical properties. The liposomes prepared from a soybean lecithin (SLP-WHITE, 1.0 wt%) by the Bangham method gave relatively a good trapping efficiency up to the AGE concentration of 0.5 wt%. The stable liposomes were then prepared from 1.0 wt% of SLP-WHITE and different concentrations of AGE by the mechanochemical method using a homogenizer and microfluidizer. The liposomes obtained from 0.25 wt% of AGE were confirmed to be small unilamellar vesicles with a diameter of less than 200 nm, and remained well dispersed for at least two weeks. The obtained liposomes encapsulating AGE were further examined for the effects on proliferation and type I collagen synthesis in normal human neonatal skin fibroblasts, NB1RGB cells. Liposomal AGE clearly showed higher proliferation rate than that of AGE alone. In addition, compared to the control, liposomal AGE significantly increased the collagen synthesis by 23%, while AGE alone showed a small effect. Liposomal AGE was also assayed for the effect on proliferation in normal human epidermal keratinocytes, NHEK(F) cells. Interestingly, liposomal AGE fractions containing 4 and 20 microg/mL of the extract considerably increased the proliferation rate by 77% and 101%, respectively. In contrast, AGE alone fractions containing 4 and 20 microg/mL of the extract increased the rate by 41% and 60%, respectively. Accordingly, the bioavailability and skin care properties of AGE will be significantly enhanced by liposome encapsulation, and the present liposomal AGE should have a great potential as an effective skin care formulation.

  17. Enhanced migration of murine fibroblast-like 3T3-L1 preadipocytes on type I collagen-coated dish is reversed by silibinin treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoling; Xu, Qian; Liu, Weiwei; Yao, Guodong; Zhao, Yeli; Xu, Fanxing; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Yamato, Masayuki; Ikejima, Takashi

    2017-09-20

    Migration of fibroblast-like preadipocytes is important for the development of adipose tissue, whereas excessive migration is often responsible for impaired adipose tissue related with obesity and fibrotic diseases. Type I collagen (collagen I) is the most abundant component of extracellular matrix and has been shown to regulate fibroblast migration in vitro, but its role in adipose tissue is not known. Silibinin is a bioactive natural flavonoid with antioxidant and antimetastasis activities. In this study, we found that type I collagen coating promoted the proliferation and migration of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in a dose-dependent manner, implying that collagen I could be an extracellular signal. Regarding the mechanisms of collagen I-stimulated 3T3-L1 migration, we found that NF-κB p65 is activated, including the increased nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 as well as the upregulation of NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and acetylation, accompanied by the increased expressions of proinflammatory factors and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Reduction of collagen I-enhanced migration of cells by treatment with silibinin was associated with suppression of NF-κB p65 activity and ROS generation, and negatively correlated with the increasing sirt1 expression. Taken together, the enhanced migration of 3T3-L1 cells induced on collagen I-coated dish is mediated by the activation of NF-κB p65 function and ROS generation that can be alleviated with silibinin by upregulation of sirt1, leading to the repression of NF-κB p65 function and ROS generation.

  18. The incidence, pattern, and prognostic value of left ventricular myocardial scar by late gadolinium enhancement in patients with atrial fibrillation .

    PubMed

    Neilan, Tomas G; Shah, Ravi V; Abbasi, Siddique A; Farhad, Hoshang; Groarke, John D; Dodson, John A; Coelho-Filho, Otavio; McMullan, Ciaran J; Heydari, Bobak; Michaud, Gregory F; John, Roy M; van der Geest, Rob; Steigner, Michael L; Blankstein, Ron; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2013-12-10

    This study sought to identify the frequency, pattern, and prognostic significance of left ventricular (LV) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). There are limited data on the presence, pattern, and prognostic significance of LV myocardial fibrosis in patients with AF. LGE during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a marker for myocardial fibrosis. A group of 664 consecutive patients without known prior myocardial infarction who were referred for radiofrequency ablation of AF were studied. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was requested to assess pulmonary venous anatomy. Overall, 73% were men, with a mean age of 56 years and a mean LV ejection fraction of 56 ± 10%. LV LGE was found in 88 patients (13%). The endpoint was all-cause mortality, and in this cohort, 68 deaths were observed over a median follow-up period of 42 months. On univariate analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 1.08; chi-square likelihood ratio [LRχ(2)]: 15.2; p = 0.0001), diabetes (HR: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.41 to 4.09; LRχ(2): 10.3; p = 0.001), a history of heart failure (HR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.91; LRχ(2): 5.37; p = 0.02), left atrial dimension (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.08; LRχ(2): 6.47; p = 0.01), presence of LGE (HR: 5.08; 95% CI: 3.08 to 8.36; LRχ(2): 28.8; p < 0.0001), and LGE extent (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.21; LRχ(2): 35.6; p < 0.0001) provided the strongest associations with mortality. The mortality rate was 8.1% per patient-year in patients with LGE compared with 2.3% patients without LGE. In the best overall multivariate model for mortality, age and the extent of LGE were independent predictors of mortality. Indeed, each 1% increase in the extent of LGE was associated with a 15% increased risk for death. In patients with AF, LV LGE is a frequent finding and is a powerful predictor of mortality. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  19. Second harmonic generation in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Karen M.; Stoller, Patrick; Celliers, Peter; Rubenchik, Alexander; Bratton, Clay; Yankelevich, Diego

    2003-11-01

    Collagen possesses a strong second order nonlinear susceptibility; when it is irradiated with intense laser light, some of the reflected and transmitted light will have twice the frequency of the incident beam, a phenomenon known as second harmonic generation (SHG). Polarization modulation of an ultra-short pulse laser beam can be used to simultaneously measure collagen fiber orientation, SHG intensity, and a parameter related to the second order non-linear susceptibility. This technique has made it possible to discriminate among patterns of fibrillar orientation in many tissues. In the present study the role that organizational complexity plays in the relationship between nonlinear optical properties and collagen structure is investigated. As a component of tissues and organs, collagen"s structure and function is inextricably intertwined with that of the many other matrix components; to what extent do these noncollagenous components affect its nonlinear properties? To answer this, we investigated SHG in two different collagenous tissues, liver and cartilage; in addition we looked at the effect of progressive pathological changes in these tissues on SHG. At the other end of the spectrum, we studied collagen organized at the minimal level of complexity necessary for SHG detection: fibrils generated from solutions containing only a single type of collagen. Data obtained from these studies suggest that collagen"s strong nonlinear susceptibility, a property no other biologically significant macromolecule shares to the same degree, may serve as more than the basis of a novel imaging device for soft tissue. Collagen"s nonlinear optical properties in conjunction with its vast capacity for self-initiated conformational change--through self-assembly, site recognition, post-translational modification, and the like -make it an attractive candidate molecule for any of several demanding engineering applications, such as nanopatterning.

  20. The Acute Inflammatory Response to Absorbed Collagen Sponge Is Not Enhanced by BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hairong; Wismeijer, Daniel; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Wu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Absorbed collagen sponge (ACS)/bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) are widely used in clinical practise for bone regeneration. However, the application of this product was found to be associated with a significant pro-inflammatory response, particularly in the early phase after implantation. This study aimed to clarify if the pro-inflammatory activities, associated with BMP-2 added to ACS, were related to the physical state of the carrier itself, i.e., a wet or a highly dehydrated state of the ACS, to the local degree of vascularisation and/or to local biomechanical factors. ACS (0.8 cm diameter)/BMP-2 were implanted subcutaneously in the back of 12 eight-week-old Sprague Dawley rats. Two days after surgery, the implanted materials were retrieved and analysed histologically and histomorphometrically. The acute inflammatory response following implantation of ACS was dependent of neither the presence or absence of BMP-2 nor the degree of vascularization in the surrounding tissue nor the hydration state (wet versus dry) of the ACS material at the time of implantation. Differential micro biomechanical factors operating at the implantation site appeared to have an influence on the thickness of inflammation. We conclude that the degree of the early inflammatory response of the ACS/BMP-2 may be associated with the physical and chemical properties of the carrier material itself. PMID:28245606

  1. OPTIMIZING COLLAGEN TRANSPORT THROUGH TRACK-ETCHED NANOPORES

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Ericka M.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer transport through nanopores is a potentially powerful tool for separation and organization of molecules in biotechnology applications. Our goal is to produce aligned collagen fibrils by mimicking cell-mediated collagen assembly: driving collagen monomers in solution through the aligned nanopores in track-etched membranes followed by fibrillogenesis at the pore exit. We examined type I atelo-collagen monomer transport in neutral, cold solution through polycarbonate track-etched membranes comprising 80-nm-diameter, 6-μm-long pores at 2% areal fraction. Source concentrations of 1.0, 2.8 and 7.0 mg/ml and pressure differentials of 0, 10 and 20 inH2O were used. Membrane surfaces were hydrophilized via covalent poly(ethylene-glycol) binding to limit solute-membrane interaction. Collagen transport through the nanopores was a non-intuitive process due to the complex behavior of this associating molecule in semi-dilute solution. Nonetheless, a modified open pore model provided reasonable predictions of transport parameters. Transport rates were concentration- and pressure-dependent, with diffusivities across the membrane in semi-dilute solution two-fold those in dilute solution, possibly via cooperative diffusion or polymer entrainment. The most significant enhancement of collagen transport was accomplished by membrane hydrophilization. The highest concentration transported (5.99±2.58 mg/ml) with the highest monomer flux (2.60±0.49 ×103 molecules s-1 pore-1) was observed using 2.8 mg collagen/ml, 10 inH2O and hydrophilic membranes. PMID:21394216

  2. Modulating the Rigidity and Mineralization of Collagen Gels Using Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    DeVolder, Ross J.; Kim, Il Won; Kim, Eun-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to prepare osteoconductive collagen gels for the regeneration of normal bone and the pathological examination of diseased bone; however, collagen gels are often plagued by limited controllability of their rigidity and mineral deposition. This study reports a simple but efficient strategy that tunes the mechanical properties of, and apatite formation in, collagen gels by incorporating hydrolyzable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles within the gels. The PLGA microparticles are associated with the collagen fibrils and increased both the gel's elasticity and rigidity while minimally influencing its permeability. As compared with pure collagen gels, the PLGA microparticle-filled collagen gels, termed PLGA-Col hydrogels, significantly enhanced the deposition of apatite-like minerals within the gels when incubated in simulated body fluid or encapsulated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) undergoing osteogenic differentiation. Finally, PLGA-Col hydrogels mineralized by differentiated MSCs led to an enhanced formation of bone-like tissues within the hydrogels. Overall, the PLGA-Col hydrogel system developed in this study will serve to improve the quality of osteoconductive matrices for both fundamental and clinical studies that are relevant to bone repair, regeneration, and pathogenesis. PMID:22480235

  3. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Type II Collagen Expression via a SOX9-dependent Enhancer in Intron 6.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hideyo; Oh, Chun-do; Chen, Di; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-13

    Type II collagen α1 is specific for cartilaginous tissues, and mutations in its gene are associated with skeletal diseases. Its expression has been shown to be dependent on SOX9, a master transcription factor required for chondrogenesis that binds to an enhancer region in intron 1. However, ChIP sequencing revealed that SOX9 does not strongly bind to intron 1, but rather it binds to intron 6 and a site 30 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Here, we aimed to determine the role of the novel SOX9-binding site in intron 6. We prepared reporter constructs that contain a Col2a1 promoter, intron 1 with or without intron 6, and the luciferase gene. Although the reporter constructs were not activated by SOX9 alone, the construct that contained both introns 1 and 6 was activated 5-10-fold by the SOX9/SOX5 or the SOX9/SOX6 combination in transient-transfection assays in 293T cells. This enhancement was also observed in rat chondrosarcoma cells that stably expressed the construct. CRISPR/Cas9-induced deletion of intron 6 in RCS cells revealed that a 10-bp region of intron 6 is necessary both for Col2a1 expression and SOX9 binding. Furthermore, SOX9, but not SOX5, binds to this region as demonstrated in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, although both SOX9 and SOX5 bind to a larger 325-bp fragment of intron 6 containing this small sequence. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of action of SOX5/6; namely, the SOX9/5/6 combination enhances Col2a1 transcription through a novel enhancer in intron 6 together with the enhancer in intron 1.

  4. Type I collagen gel in seeding medium improves murine mesencymal stem cell loading onto the scaffold, increases their subsequent proliferation, and enhances culture mineralization.

    PubMed

    Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Nickmahzar, Aghbibi; Mohamadi, Yossef; Mivehchi, Houri

    2009-08-01

    Collagen I as a major organic component of bone matrix may be important for establishment and maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in osteogenic 3D culture. To explore this subject, murine marrow-derived MSCs were seeded onto hybrid scaffolds of alginate/gelatin/beta-tricalcium phosphate in a medium either with or without collagen I gel. The cultures were then provided with osteogenic medium and incubated for three weeks during which loading efficiency, cell proliferation and the culture mineralization were quantified and statistically compared. According to the findings, in culture with collagen, although about 60% of the cells left the scaffolds, the remaining cells, however, proliferated extensively with a population doubling number (PDN) equivalent to 2.46 +/- 0.31 and organized as cell aggregations that were heavily mineralized (calcium concentration = 1.017 +/- 0.141 mM per scaffold), whereas in the culture without collagen, about 75% of the cells left the scaffolds, less cell proliferation occurred (PDN = 1.48 +/- 0.29) and no cell aggregation was observed. The calcium concentration in this culture was 0.185 +/- 0.029 mM per scaffold. All these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Taken together, these data suggested that using the collagen I in seeding medium could help mMSCs loading into the scaffold, enhance their subsequent proliferation, and increase calcium deposition in 3D culture system.

  5. The effect of gamma irradiation on injectable human amnion collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.C.; Harrell, R.; Davis, R.H.; Dresden, M.H.; Spira, M. )

    1989-08-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the physicochemical properties of injectable human amnion collagen was investigated. Pepsin-extracted human amnion collagen was purified, reconstituted, and irradiated with varying doses of gamma irradiation (0.25 Mrads to 2.5 Mrads). Gamma irradiation had a significant impact on the physical characteristics of the collagen. The neutral solubility of collagen in PBS at 45{degrees}C was decreased from 100% for the nonirradiated control sample to 16% for the 2.5 Mrads irradiated sample. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also demonstrated the dose-dependent effect of gamma irradiation on collagen cross-links. Electron microscopic observation revealed that even at low irradiation dose (0.25 Mrads), collagen fibril diameter increased. The average diameter was 50 nm for nonirradiated control fibrils, while 4.4% of the irradiated collagen fibrils had a diameter greater than 100 nm. Irradiated collagen showed little evidence of damage. Well-preserved cross-striations were found in collagen fibrils at all doses of irradiation. Native amnion collagen irradiated with gamma rays demonstrated a slight increase in resistance to collagenase degradation compared with nonirradiated native collagen samples. Increased resistance to collagenase did not correlate with increasing irradiation dose. After 30 min of incubation at 37{degrees}C, both irradiated and nonirradiated collagen was completely digested by collagenase. However, gamma-irradiated collagen did become more sensitive to hydrolysis by trypsin. The higher the irradiation doses used, the greater sensitivity to trypsin was observed. At 0.25 Mrads irradiation only a slight increase was found. No marked differences in amino acid composition were noted among the high dose irradiated, low dose irradiated and control amnion collagen.

  6. Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zimetbaum, Peter

    2017-03-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of atrial fibrillation, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  7. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  8. Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Treatment for atrial fibrillation depends on how often you have symptoms, how ...

  9. Collagen-type specificity of glycoprotein VI as a determinant of platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie M; Takemura, Yukitoshi; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Adachi, Eijiro; Moroi, Masaaki

    2008-02-01

    Of the two physiologically important platelet collagen receptors, glycoprotein (GP) VI is the receptor responsible for platelet activation. However, its reactivities towards different types of vascular collagen have not been directly and quantitatively analysed with collagen preparations of defined composition, although the other major platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1) was shown to react with collagen types I-VI and VIII under either static or flow conditions. We analysed the collagen type specificity of GPVI binding to identify the physiological contribution of the various vascular collagens and how platelet reactivity towards the various collagens may be affected by fibril size. We used two methods to analyse the binding of recombinant GPVI (GPVI-Fc(2)) to different types of bovine collagen: binding to collagen microparticles in suspension and binding to immobilized collagen. GPVI-Fc(2) bound to type I-III collagens that can form large fibrils, but not to type V that only forms small fibrils. The apparent GPVI binding to types IV and V could be ascribed to type I collagen that was a contaminant in each of these preparations. Kinetic analyses of the binding data showed that type III collagen fibrils have both a higher Kd and Bmax than types I and II. Flow adhesion studies demonstrated that type III collagen supports the formation of larger platelet aggregates than type I. Our present results suggest that the physiological importance of type III collagen is to induce thrombus formation. Furthermore, these studies indicate that GPVI mainly binds to collagen types that can form large collagen fibrils.

  10. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Auricular fibrillation - discharge; A-fib - discharge; AF - discharge; Afib - discharge ... been in the hospital because you have atrial fibrillation . This condition occurs when your heart beats faster ...

  11. Enhancement of tendon–bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Chao, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Jan-Kan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA) bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon–bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon–bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon–bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon–bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. PMID:27601901

  12. Collagen-containing scaffolds enhance attachment and proliferation of non-cultured bone marrow multipotential stromal cells.

    PubMed

    El-Jawhari, Jehan J; Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Jones, Elena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2016-04-01

    Large bone defects are ideally treated with autografts, which have many limitations. Therefore, osteoconductive scaffolds loaded with autologous bone marrow (BM) aspirate are increasingly used as alternatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the growth of multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) from unprocessed BM on a collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold (Orthoss(®) Collagen) with a non-collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold, Orthoss(®) . Another collagen-containing synthetic scaffold, Vitoss(®) was included in the comparison. Colonization of scaffolds by BM MSCs (n = 23 donors) was evaluated using microscopy, colony forming unit-fibroblast assay and flow-cytometry. The number of BM MSCs initially attached to Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) was similar but greater than Orthoss(®) (p = 0.001 and p = 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, the number of MSCs released from Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) after 2-week culture was also higher compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.010 and p = 0.023, respectively). Interestingly, collagen-containing scaffolds accommodated larger numbers of lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cells. Additionally, the proliferation of culture-expanded MSCs on Orthoss(®) collagen and Vitoss(®) was greater compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.047 and p = 0.004, respectively). Collectively, collagen-containing scaffolds were superior in supporting the attachment and proliferation of MSCs when they were loaded with unprocessed BM aspirates. This highlights the benefit of collagen incorporation into bone scaffolds for use with autologous bone marrow aspirates as autograft substitutes.

  13. In vitro crystal growth of octacalcium phosphate on type 1 collagen fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Mayumi; Moriwaki, Yutaka; Kuboki, Yoshinori

    1994-04-01

    Octacalcium phosphate crystals grew on tendon collagen, which was sliced into a disk, in an experimental system where Ca2(+) and PO3(-)(sub 4) ions diffused into the collagen disk from mutually opposite sides. Crystal growth on collagen fibrils reflected the intrinsic property of the collagenous matrix. The results indicate that the collagenous matrix modulates the ionic diffusion and therefore regulates the crystal growth.

  14. In Vitro Study of a Novel Nanogold-Collagen Composite to Enhance the Mesenchymal Stem Cell Behavior for Vascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Huey-Shan; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Chang, Chen-Jung; Tang, Cheng-Ming; Kao, Wei-Chien; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Hsieh, Hsien-Hsu; Chu, Mei-Yun; Sun, Wei-Shen; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2014-01-01

    Novel nanocomposites based on type I collagen (Col) containing a small amount (17.4, 43.5, and 174 ppm) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, approximately 5 nm) were prepared in this study. The pure Col and Col-AuNP composites (Col-Au) were characterized by the UV-Vis spectroscopy (UV-Vis), surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The interaction between Col and AuNPs was confirmed by infrared (IR) spectra. The effect of AuNPs on the biocompatibility of Col, evaluated by the proliferation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as well as the activation of monocytes and platelets, was investigated. Results showed that Col-Au had better biocompatibility than Col. Upon stimulation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), MSCs expressed the highest levels of αvβ3 integrin/CXCR4, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) proteins when grown on the Col-Au (43.5 ppm) nanocomposite. Taken together, Col-Au nanocomposites may promote the proliferation and migration of MSCs and stimulate the endothelial cell differentiation. These results suggest that Col-Au may be used to construct tissue engineering scaffolds for vascular regeneration. PMID:25093502

  15. Collagen organization in canine myxomatous mitral valve disease: an x-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Hadian, Mojtaba; Corcoran, Brendan M; Han, Richard I; Grossmann, J Günter; Bradshaw, Jeremy P

    2007-10-01

    Collagen fibrils, a major component of mitral valve leaflets, play an important role in defining shape and providing mechanical strength and flexibility. Histopathological studies show that collagen fibrils undergo dramatic changes in the course of myxomatous mitral valve disease in both dogs and humans. However, little is known about the detailed organization of collagen in this disease. This study was designed to analyze and compare collagen fibril organization in healthy and lesional areas of myxomatous mitral valves of dogs, using synchrotron small-angle x-ray diffraction. The orientation, density, and alignment of collagen fibrils were mapped across six different valves. The findings reveal a preferred collagen alignment in the main body of the leaflets between two commissures. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data showed significant differences between affected and lesion-free areas in terms of collagen content, fibril alignment, and total tissue volume. Regression analysis of the amount of collagen compared to the total tissue content at each point revealed a significant relationship between these two parameters in lesion-free but not in affected areas. This is the first time this technique has been used to map collagen fibrils in cardiac tissue; the findings have important applications to human cardiology.

  16. Anisotropy of chemical bonds in collagen molecules studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond S K; Metzler, Rebecca A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A; Beniash, Elia

    2012-03-16

    Collagen type I fibrils are the major building blocks of connective tissues. Collagen fibrils are anisotropic supramolecular structures, and their orientation can be revealed by polarized light microscopy and vibrational microspectroscopy. We hypothesized that the anisotropy of chemical bonds in the collagen molecules, and hence their orientation, might also be detected by X-ray photoemission electron spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, which use linearly polarized synchrotron light. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sections of rat-tail tendon, composed of parallel arrays of collagen fibrils. The results clearly indicate that XANES-PEEM is sensitive to collagen fibril orientation and, more specifically, to the orientations of carbonyl and amide bonds in collagen molecules. These data suggest that XANES-PEEM is a promising technique for characterizing the chemical composition and structural organization at the nanoscale of collagen-based connective tissues, including tendons, cartilage, and bone.

  17. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  18. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages.

  19. Biomimetic mineralization of woven bone-like nanocomposites: role of collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuping; Thula, Taili T; Jee, Sangsoo; Perkins, Sasha L; Aparicio, Conrado; Douglas, Elliot P; Gower, Laurie B

    2012-01-09

    Ideal biomaterials for bone grafts must be biocompatible, osteoconductive, osteoinductive and have appropriate mechanical properties. For this, the development of synthetic bone substitutes mimicking natural bone is desirable, but this requires controllable mineralization of the collagen matrix. In this study, densified collagen films (up to 100 μm thick) were fabricated by a plastic compression technique and cross-linked using carbodiimide. Then, collagen-hydroxyapatite composites were prepared by using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. Compared to traditional methods that produce only extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite (HA) clusters on the surface of collagen scaffolds, by using the PILP mineralization process, homogeneous intra- and extrafibrillar minerals were achieved on densified collagen films, leading to a similar nanostructure as bone, and a woven microstructure analogous to woven bone. The role of collagen cross-links on mineralization was examined and it was found that the cross-linked collagen films stimulated the mineralization reaction, which in turn enhanced the mechanical properties (hardness and modulus). The highest value of hardness and elastic modulus was 0.7 ± 0.1 and 9.1 ± 1.4 GPa in the dry state, respectively, which is comparable to that of woven bone. In the wet state, the values were much lower (177 ± 31 and 8 ± 3 MPa) due to inherent microporosity in the films, but still comparable to those of woven bone in the same conditions. Mineralization of collagen films with controllable mineral content and good mechanical properties provide a biomimetic route toward the development of bone substitutes for the next generation of biomaterials. This work also provides insight into understanding the role of collagen fibrils on mineralization.

  20. Characterization of collagenous matrix assembly in a chondrocyte model system

    PubMed Central

    Yingst, Sorcha; Bloxham, Kaci; Warner, Lisa R.; Brown, Raquel J.; Cole, Jennifer; Kenoyer, Linda; Knowlton, William B.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2010-01-01

    Collagen is a major component of the newly synthesized pericellular microenvironment of chondrocytes. Collagen types II, IX, and XI are synthesized and assembled into higher ordered complexes by a mechanism in which type XI collagen plays a role in nucleation of new fibrils, and in limiting fibril diameter. This study utilizes a cell line derived from the Swarm rat chondrosarcoma that allows the accumulation and assembly of pericellular matrix. Immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy were used to assess early intermediates of fibril formation. Results indicate that this cell line synthesizes and secretes chondrocyte-specific pericellular matrix molecules including types II, IX, and XI collagen and is suitable for the study of newly synthesized collagen matrix under the experimental conditions used. AFM data indicate that small fibrils or assemblies of microfibrils are detectable and may represent precursors of the ~20 nm thin fibrils reported in cartilage. Treatment with hyaluronidase indicates that the dimensions of the small fibrils may be dependent upon the presence of hyaluronan within the matrix. This study provides information on the composition and organization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix that plays a role in establishing the material properties and performance of biological materials such as cartilage. PMID:18496861

  1. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  2. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  3. Atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further research into AF epidemiology, genetics, detection, and treatments continues to push forward rapidly as the worldwide population ages dramatically over the next 20 years. PMID:24474959

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations on networks of heparin and collagen.

    PubMed

    Kulke, Martin; Geist, Norman; Friedrichs, Wenke; Langel, Walter

    2017-06-01

    Synthetic scaffolds containing collagen (Type I) are of increasing interest for bone tissue engineering, especially for highly porous biomaterials in combination with glycosaminoglycans. In experiments the integration of heparin during the fibrillogenesis resulted in different types of collagen fibrils, but models for this aggregation on a molecular scale were only tentative. We conducted molecular dynamic simulations investigating the binding of heparin to collagen and the influence of the telopeptides during collagen aggregation. This aims at explaining experimental findings on a molecular level. Novel structures for N- and C-telopeptides were developed with the TIGER2 replica exchange algorithm and dihedral principle component analysis. We present an extended statistical analysis of the mainly electrostatic interaction between heparin and collagen and identify several binding sites. Finally, we propose a molecular mechanism for the influence of glycosaminoglycans on the morphology of collagen fibrils. Proteins 2017; 85:1119-1130. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  6. 96-Well plate assays for measuring collagenase activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen.

    PubMed

    Koshy, P J; Rowan, A D; Life, P F; Cawston, T E

    1999-11-15

    We describe two alternative assays for measuring collagenolytic activity using (3)H-acetylated collagen. Both assays have been developed for the 96-well plate format and measure the amount of radiolabeled collagen fragments released into the supernatant from an insoluble (3)H-acetylated collagen fibril preparation. The first method separates digested solubilized fragments from the intact fibril by sedimentation of the undigested collagen by centrifugation. The second method achieves this separation by filtration of the supernatant through the membrane of a 96-well filtration plate which retains the undigested collagen fibril. Both methods give linear dose- and time-dependent responses of collagenase activity > or = 70% of total collagen lysis. In addition, both assays can be simply modified to measure tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibitory activity, which is also linear between 20 and 75% of total collagen lysis with the amount of TIMP added.

  7. High-voltage pulsed current stimulation enhances wound healing in diabetic rats by restoring the expression of collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Cho, Hwi-Young; Lee, Suk Min

    2014-09-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and a major morbidity that leads to pain and severely diminished quality of life. Diabetic wounds are commonly associated with defective immune cell responses or abnormality of extracellular matrix. Various types of electrical stimulation interventions have been used to promote tissue healing. However, it is unclear whether high-voltage pulsed current stimulation (HVPCS) enhances diabetic wound healing. In this study, the effects of HVPCS on wound healing were investigated in diabetic rats. Three groups of rats (10 per group) were used: non-diabetic control, diabetic control, and diabetic rats that were administered HVPCS for 40 minutes daily for 1 week. Rats from control groups were administered sham interventions. Dorsal incision wounds were generated in all animals, and wound-healing rate was determined during one-week intervention. After interventions, we measured the relative expression levels of collagen type I (collagen-I), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) mRNAs in the wounded skin. Wound closure was delayed in diabetic control rats compared to the non-diabetic control rats, and the diabetic control rats showed the reduced expression levels of collagen-I, α-SMA and TGF-β1 mRNAs. Importantly, compared to diabetic control rats, rats with HVPCS showed accelerated wound closure and healing (p < 0.01) and restored expression levels of collagen-I (p = 0.02), α-SMA (p = 0.04), and TGF-β1 (p = 0.01) mRNAs. In conclusion, HVPCS may be beneficial for enhancing the healing of diabetic wounds by restoring the expression levels of TGF-β1, collagen-I, and α-SMA.

  8. Fibrosis in left atrial tissue of patients with atrial fibrillation with and without underlying mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Boldt, A; Wetzel, U; Lauschke, J; Weigl, J; Gummert, J; Hindricks, G; Kottkamp, H; Dhein, S

    2004-04-01

    To examine the hypothesis that major extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are expressed differently in the left atrial tissue of patients in sinus rhythm (SR), lone atrial fibrillation (AF), and AF with underlying mitral valve disease (MVD). Case-control study. 118 patients with lone AF, MVD+AF, and SR. Collagen I, collagen III, and fibronectin protein expression measured by quantitative western blotting techniques and immunohistochemical methods. Protein concentrations increased in patients with AF (all forms) compared with those in SR (all forms): collagen I (1.15 (0.11) v 0.45 (0.28), respectively; p = 0.002), collagen III (0.74 (0.05) v 0.46 (0.11); p = 0.002, and fibronectin (0.88 (0.06) v 0.62 (0.13); p = 0.08). Especially, collagen I was similarly enhanced in both lone AF (1.49 (0.15) and MVD+AF (1.53 (0.16) compared with SR (0.56 (0.28); both p = 0.01). Collagen III was not significantly increased in lone AF but was significantly increased in AF combined with MVD (0.84 (0.07) both compared with SR (0.46 (0.11); p = 0.01). The concentration of fibronectin was not significantly increased in lone AF and MVD+AF (both compared with SR). Furthermore, there was a similar degree of enhanced collagen expression in paroxysmal AF and chronic AF. AF is associated with fibrosis. Forms of AF differ from each other in collagen III expression. However, there was no systematic difference in ECM expression between paroxysmal AF and chronic AF. Enhanced concentrations of ECM proteins may have a role in structural remodelling and the pathogenesis of AF as a result of separation of the cells by fibrotic depositions.

  9. Effects of material and surface functional group on collagen self-assembly and subsequent cell adhesion behaviors.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Su, Yao; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Fang; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-04-01

    Collagen fibrous network not only provides structural support for cells but also serves as critical environment modulating various cell functions. Various factors would influence the collagen self-assembly but the effect of substrate surface on such process has been rarely studied. Here we examined the effects of materials (Ti and hydroxyapatite) and their surface characteristics (with and without the enrichment of hydroxyl group) on collagen self-reconstitution and fibrous network formation, and on subsequent cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). For both Ti and hydroxyapatite (HA) substrates, the enrichment of hydroxyl group (OH) on substrate surfaces promoted the collagen self-reconstitution and facilitated the formation of the fibrous network after 4h immersion in phosphate buffer solution (PBS), while all samples showed clear fibrous network formation after 2 day soaking in PBS. Compared with the Ti surfaces, the HA surfaces facilitated the self-reconstitution of collagen, leading to a more mature fibrous network with a twisted structure and enhanced lateral aggregation of fibrils. The fibrous network difference resulted in different behaviors of the subsequent MSC adhesion and spreading. The MSCs had the best adhesion and cytoskeleton organization on the OH enriched HA surface with collagen modification. Our results suggested that both the material selection and the hydroxyl group significantly influenced the collagen self-assembly and fibrous network formation and, as a result, the subsequent cell adhesion behaviors.

  10. The Modulation of Endothelial Cell Morphology, Function, and Survival Using Anisotropic Nanofibrillar Collagen Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ngan F.; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C.; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S.; Paukshto, Michael V.; Sun, John; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G.; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues. PMID:23480958

  11. The modulation of endothelial cell morphology, function, and survival using anisotropic nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ngan F; Okogbaa, Janet; Lee, Jerry C; Jha, Arshi; Zaitseva, Tatiana S; Paukshto, Michael V; Sun, John S; Punjya, Niraj; Fuller, Gerald G; Cooke, John P

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are aligned longitudinally under laminar flow, whereas they are polygonal and poorly aligned in regions of disturbed flow. The unaligned ECs in disturbed flow fields manifest altered function and reduced survival that promote lesion formation. We demonstrate that the alignment of the ECs may directly influence their biology, independent of fluid flow. We developed aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds that mimic the structure of collagen bundles in blood vessels, and examined the effects of these materials on EC alignment, function, and in vivo survival. ECs cultured on 30-nm diameter aligned fibrils re-organized their F-actin along the nanofibril direction, and were 50% less adhesive for monocytes than the ECs grown on randomly oriented fibrils. After EC transplantation into both subcutaneous tissue and the ischemic hindlimb, EC viability was enhanced when ECs were cultured and implanted on aligned nanofibrillar scaffolds, in contrast to non-patterned scaffolds. ECs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and cultured on aligned scaffolds also persisted for over 28 days, as assessed by bioluminescence imaging, when implanted in ischemic tissue. By contrast, ECs implanted on scaffolds without nanopatterning generated no detectable bioluminescent signal by day 4 in either normal or ischemic tissues. We demonstrate that 30-nm aligned nanofibrillar collagen scaffolds guide cellular organization, modulate endothelial inflammatory response, and enhance cell survival after implantation in normal and ischemic tissues.

  12. Bacterial collagen-binding domain targets undertwisted regions of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Koide, Takaki; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium histolyticum collagenase causes extensive degradation of collagen in connective tissue that results in gas gangrene. The C-terminal collagen-binding domain (CBD) of these enzymes is the minimal segment required to bind to a collagen fibril. CBD binds unidirectionally to the undertwisted C-terminus of triple helical collagen. Here, we examine whether CBD could also target undertwisted regions even in the middle of the triple helix. Collageneous peptides with an additional undertwisted region were synthesized by introducing a Gly → Ala substitution [(POG)xPOA(POG)y]3, where x + y = 9 and x > 3). 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance (HSQC NMR) titration studies with 15N-labeled CBD demonstrated that the minicollagen binds to a 10 Å wide 25 Å long cleft. Six collagenous peptides each labeled with a nitroxide radical were then titrated with 15N-labeled CBD. CBD binds to either the Gly → Ala substitution site or to the C-terminus of each minicollagen. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed that CBD prefers to bind the Gly → Ala site to the C-terminus. The HSQC NMR spectra of 15N-labeled minicollagen and minicollagen with undertwisted regions were unaffected by the titration of unlabeled CBD. The results imply that CBD binds to the undertwisted region of the minicollagen but does not actively unwind the triple helix. PMID:22898990

  13. Effect of oxy radicals on several types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Poulin, G; Braquet, P; Randoux, A; Ferradini, C; Borel, J P

    1984-01-01

    Fibrils of collagen reconstituted in vitro by dialysis against sodium formate are exposed to free oxy radicals generated by three different systems: (i) xanthine oxidase + hypoxanthine, (ii) gamma-rays originating from a cobalt bomb; (iii) pulse radiolysis in a particle accelerator. A degradation of the collagen fibres is demonstrated by determination of the amount of hydroxyproline-containing peptides in the supernatant after incubation. Types I and III collagen are sensitive to the effect, whereas type V collagen is not. The effect persists when collagen is specially delipidated.

  14. The synergic role of collagen and citrate in stabilizing amorphous calcium phosphate precursors with platy morphology.

    PubMed

    Delgado-López, José Manuel; Bertolotti, Federica; Lyngsø, Jeppe; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Cervellino, Antonio; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta

    2017-02-01

    Bioinspired in vitro collagen mineralization experiments have been performed in the presence of citrate and the combined role of the two bone organic matrix components in controlling mineral formation was investigated for the first time. Mineralized and non-mineralized collagen fibrils have been in depth characterized by combining small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. A synergic effect of collagen and citrate in driving the formation of long-term stable amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) nanoparticles with platy morphology was found. AFM images on mineralized collagen fibrils revealed that some of the ACP nanoparticles were deposited on the intramolecular nanoscopic holes of collagen fibrils. Citrate is an important component of the bone organic matrix but its specific role in bone mineralization is presently unclear. In this work, bioinspired in vitro collagen mineralization experiments in the presence of citrate have been carried out and the combined role of collagen and citrate in controlling mineral formation has been addressed for the first time. Through X-ray scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy characterizations on mineralized and non-mineralized collagen fibrils, we have found that citrate in synergy with collagen stabilizes an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase with platy morphology over one week and controls its deposition on collagen fibrils. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microstructural Characterization of Vocal Folds toward a Strain-Energy Model of Collagen Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Amir K.; Heris, Hossein K.; Tripathy, Umakanta; Wiseman, Paul W.; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Collagen fibrils are believed to control the immediate deformation of soft tissues under biomechanical load. Most extracellular matrix proteins remain intact during frozen sectioning, which allows them to be scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Collagen fibrils are distinguishable because of their helical shape. In the present study, the shape and organization of collagen fibrils in dissected porcine vocal folds were quantified using nonlinear laser scanning microscopy data at the micrometer scale and AFM data at the nanometer scale. Rope-shape collagen fibrils were observed. Geometric characteristics for the fibrils were fed to a hyperelastic model to predict the biomechanical response of the tissue. The model simulates the micrometer-scale unlocking behavior of collagen bundles when extended from their unloaded configuration. Force spectroscopy using AFM was used to estimate the stiffness of collagen fibrils (1 ± 0.5 MPa). The presence of rope-shape fibrils is postulated to change the slope of the force-deflection response near the onset of nonlinearity. The proposed model could ultimately be used to evaluate changes in elasticity of soft tissues that result from the collagen remodeling. PMID:23643604

  16. Microstructural characterization of vocal folds toward a strain-energy model of collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Heris, Hossein K; Tripathy, Umakanta; Wiseman, Paul W; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-08-01

    Collagen fibrils are believed to control the immediate deformation of soft tissues under mechanical load. Most extracellular matrix proteins remain intact during frozen sectioning, which allows them to be scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Collagen fibrils are distinguishable because of their periodic roughness wavelength. In the present study, the shape and organization of collagen fibrils in dissected porcine vocal folds were quantified using nonlinear laser scanning microscopy data at the micrometer scale and AFM data at the nanometer scale. Rope-shaped collagen fibrils were observed. The geometric characteristics for the fibrils were fed into a hyperelastic model to predict the biomechanical response of the tissue. The model simulates the micrometer-scale unlocking behavior of collagen bundles when extended from their unloaded configuration. Force spectroscopy using AFM was used to estimate the stiffness of collagen fibrils (1±0.5MPa). The presence of rope-shaped fibrils is postulated to change the slope of the force-deflection response near the onset of nonlinearity. The proposed model could ultimately be used to evaluate changes in elasticity of soft tissues that result from the collagen remodeling.

  17. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  18. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  19. Riboflavin-ultraviolet-A-induced collagen cross-linking treatments in improving dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yung-Show; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Chuang, Shu-Fen; Wu, Ching-Ming; Wei, Pal-Jen; Han, Chang-Fu; Lin, Jui-Che; Chang, Hsiao-Tzu

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the collagen cross-linkers, riboflavin-ultraviolet-A (RF/UVA) and glutaraldehyde, with regard to their efficacy in cross-linking the dentinal collagen and improving dentin bonding. Glutaraldehyde and different RF/UVA protocols (0.1%RF/1-minUV, 0.1%RF/2-minUV, and 1%RF/1-minUV) were first evaluated by gel electrophoresis to determine their abilities of collagen cross-linking. The mechanical properties of acid-etched dentin receiving these cross-linking treatments were examined in either dry or wet condition by a nanoindentation test. Fifteen teeth with exposed occlusal dentin received the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test. The teeth were primed either with RF/UVA or glutaraldehyde, followed by adhesive treatment and composite restorations, and then cut into resin-dentin microbeams. Half of the microbeams received the μTBS test after 24h, and the other half received test after 5000 thermocycles. Nanoleakage at the bond interface was examined under TEM. The alignments of collagen fibrils in the hybrid layers were also defined by an image analysis. Gel electrophoresis showed that glutaraldehyde induced strong collagen gelation, while RF/UVA generated milder collagen cross-linking. Glutaraldehyde, 0.1%RF/2-min-UVA, and 1%RF/1-minUV showed higher stiffness compared to untreated and 0.1%RF/1-minUV in wet condition. All the crosslinking treatments improved early μTBS, but 0.1%RF/2-minUVA treatment maintained high μTBS after theromocycles. Under TEM, glutaraldehyde-treated dentin showed dense and enclosed collagen network on the adhesive interface. 0.1%RF/2-minUVA showed the least nanoleakage, and this could be associated with the suspended collagen fibrils in the hybrid layer. 0.1%RF/2-minUVA treatment enhanced resin-dentin bond possibly through enhancing the stiffness and maintaining the expanding collagen matrix in the hybrid layer. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro, interaction of homotrimers with heterotrimers of type I collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sejin; Losert, Wolfgang; Leikin, Sergey

    2007-03-01

    The dominant mutations in type I collagen cause a group of diseases, often termed collagen, or connective tissue, diseases: for example, Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) characterized by bone fragility and skeletal deformity. The mechanism in which collagen mutations affect on the diseases is still unknown. To understand the fibril assembly and their interactions might provide a key to approaching the cause of the collagen diseases. This study demonstrates that the self-assembly, termed fibrillogenesis, of type I collagen homozygous mutations revealed substantial differences in the kinetics with the absence of lag time and in the morphology of 3D fibril network structure. The heterotrimers (normal) and homotrimers (mutant) in mixtures were segregated within the same fibrils during fibrillogenesis, in correspondence between confocal microscopy and thermodynamic measurements. The efficiency for self-assembly of the homotrimers into fibrils was markedly reduced, while that of the heterotrimers was not affected by the presence of homotrimers with no change in solubility.

  1. The essential role of fetuin in the serum-induced calcification of collagen.

    PubMed

    Toroian, Damon; Price, Paul A

    2008-02-01

    The mineral in bone is located primarily within the collagen fibril, and during mineralization the fibril is formed first and then water within the fibril is replaced with mineral. Our goal is to understand the mechanism of fibril mineralization, and as a first step we recently determined the size exclusion characteristics of the fibril. This study indicates that apatite crystals up to 12 unit cells in size can access the water within the fibril while molecules larger than a 40-kDa protein are excluded. We proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization based on these observations, one that relies exclusively on agents excluded from the fibril. One agent generates crystals outside the fibril, some of which diffuse into the fibril and grow, and the other selectively inhibits crystal growth outside of the fibril. We have tested this mechanism by examining the impact of removing the major serum inhibitor of apatite growth, fetuin, on the serum-induced calcification of collagen. The results of this test show that fetuin determines the location of serum-driven mineralization: in fetuin's presence, mineral forms only within collagen fibrils; in fetuin's absence, mineral forms only in solution outside the fibrils. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of serum-induced mineral is comparable to the spectrum of bone crystals. These observations show that serum calcification activity consists of an as yet unidentified agent that generates crystal nuclei, some of which diffuse into the fibril, and fetuin, which favors fibril mineralization by selectively inhibiting the growth of crystals outside the fibril.

  2. Microscale Mechanical Testing of Individual Collagen Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Jeffrey

    Collagen is a key constituent for a large number of biological materials including bone, tendon, cartilage, skin and fish scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen's microscale structural components (fibers and fibrils) is therefore of utmost importance for fields such as biomimetics and biomedical engineering. However, the mechanics of collagen fibers and fibrils remain largely unexplored. The main research challenges are the small sample sizes (diameters less than 1 im) and the need to maintain physiologically relevant conditions. In this work, a microscale mechanical testing device (MMTD) capable of measuring the stress-strain response of individual collagen fibers and fibrils was developed. The MMTD consists of: (i) a transducer from a commercial nanoindenter to measure load and displacement, (ii) an optical microscope to observe the deformation of the sample in-situ and (iii) micromanipulators to isolate, position and fix samples. Collagen fibers and fibrils were extracted from fish scales using a novel dissection procedure and tested using the MMTD. A variety of tensile tests were performed including monotonic loading and cyclic tests with increasing loading rate or maximum displacement. The monotonic test results found that the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure range from 0.5 to 1.3 GPa, 100 to 200 MPa and 20% to 60%, respectively. The cyclic tests revealed that the largest increase in damage accumulation occurs at strains between 10% and 20%, when hydrogen bonds at the molecular level are ruptured. Further straining the fibril causes little additional damage accumulation and signals the approach of failure. The addition of water is shown to increase damage tolerance and strain to failure.

  3. [Atrial fibrillation and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Apor, Péter

    2013-03-31

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia. Its "lone" form (when underlying pathology is not discovered) can be detected in a small percentage of endurance sports participants, and in growing numbers among veterans, probably as a result of some cardiac or other irregularities. Enhanced vagal tone and sudden sympathetic impulse, repetitive oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, enlarged atria, electric instabilization can explain the higher occurrence. Treatment of atrial fibrillation enables the affected persons to participate in regular medium-intensity exercise, 3-5 hours a week, which offers a protective role against cardiovascular, metabolic and mental illnesses.

  4. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent.

  5. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase interactions with collagen and elastin

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Most abundant in the extracellular matrix are collagens, joined by elastin that confers elastic recoil to the lung, aorta, and skin. These fibrils are highly resistant to proteolysis but can succumb to a minority of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Considerable inroads to understanding how such MMPs move to the susceptible sites in collagen and then unwind the triple helix of collagen monomers have been gained. The essential role in unwinding of the hemopexin-like domain of interstitial collagenases or the collagen binding domain of gelatinases is highlighted. Elastolysis is also facilitated by the collagen binding domain in the cases of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and remote exosites of the catalytic domain in the case of MMP-12. PMID:25599938

  7. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  8. Enhancing anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation of titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol) and collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and collagen I were sequentially immobilized on the titanium surface to simultaneously improve the anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that PEG and collagen I were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results suggested the excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The anticoagulation experiments demonstrated that the immobilized PEG and collagen I on the titanium surface could not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved blood compatibility. Furthermore, immobilization of collagen to the end of PEG chain did not abate the anticoagulation. As compared to those on the pristine and PEG-modified titanium surfaces, endothelial cells exhibited improved proliferative profiles on the surface modified by the sequential immobilization of PEG and collagen in terms of CCK-8 assay, implying that the modified titanium may promote endothelialization without abating the blood compatibility. Our method may be used to modify the surface of blood-contacting biomaterials such as titanium to promote endothelialization and improve the anticoagulation, it may be helpful for development of the biomedical devices such as coronary stents, where endothelializaton and excellent anticoagulation are required.

  9. DYNAMIC SHEAR-INFLUENCED COLLAGEN SELF-ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9 s-1). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (~2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 microns/sec) occurring at a shear rate of 9 s-1. The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s-1. However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term “hooks” which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or “mat” and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  10. Decreasing NF-κB Expression Enhances Odontoblastic Differentiation and Collagen Expression in Dental Pulp Stem Cells Exposed to Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Hozhabri, Neda S. T.; Benson, M. Douglas; Vu, Michael D.; Patel, Rinkesh H.; Martinez, Rebecca M.; Nakhaie, Fatemeh N.; Kim, Harry K. W.; Varanasi, Venu G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory response in the dental pulp can alter the collagen matrix formation by dental pulp stem cells and lead to a delay or poor healing of the pulp. This inflammatory response is mediated by cytokines, including interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. In this study, it is hypothesized that suppressing the actions of these inflammatory cytokines by knocking down the activity of transcription factor Nuclear Factor–κB will lead to dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblasts and the production of collagen. Here, the role of Nuclear Factor–κB signaling and its reduction was examined during odontogenic behavior in the presence of these cytokines. The results showed a significant increase in Nuclear Factor–κB gene expression and p65 protein expression by interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Nuclear Factor–κB activation in the presence of these cytokines decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner by a Nuclear Factor–κB inhibitor (MG132) and p65 siRNA. Down-regulation of Nuclear Factor–κB activity also enhanced the gene expression of the odontoblastic markers (dentin sialophosphoprotein, Nestin, and alkaline phosphatase) and displayed an odontoblastic cell morphology indicating the promotion of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Finally, dental pulp stem cells exposed to reduced Nuclear Factor–κB activity resulted in a significant increase in collagen (I)-α1 expression in the presence of these cytokines. In conclusion, a decrease in Nuclear Factor-κB in dental pulp stem cells in the presence of inflammatory cytokines enhanced odontoblastic differentiation and collagen matrix formation. PMID:25629155

  11. Galactosylated collagen matrix enhanced in vitro maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ghodsizadeh, Arefeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Najarasl, Mostafa; Hiraoka, Yosuke; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Due to their important biomedical applications, functional human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hESC-HLCs) are an attractive topic in the field of stem cell differentiation. Here, we have initially differentiated hESCs into functional hepatic endoderm (HE) and continued the differentiation by replating them onto galactosylated collagen (GC) and collagen matrices. The differentiation of hESC-HE cells into HLCs on GC substrate showed significant up-regulation of hepatic-specific genes such as ALB, HNF4α, CYP3A4, G6P, and ASGR1. There was more albumin secretion and urea synthesis, as well as more cytochrome p450 activity, in differentiated HLCs on GC compared to the collagen-coated substrate. These results suggested that GC substrate has the potential to be used for in vitro maturation of hESC-HLCs.

  12. Lysyl Oxidase Activity Is Required for Ordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis by Tendon Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Eliasson, Pernilla; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kadler, Karl E.; Magnusson, S. Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are a family of copper-dependent oxido-deaminases that can modify the side chain of lysyl residues in collagen and elastin, thereby leading to the spontaneous formation of non-reducible aldehyde-derived interpolypeptide chain cross-links. The consequences of LOX inhibition in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation. The improvement in structure and strength seen with time in control constructs was absent in constructs treated with BAPN. As expected, BAPN inhibited the formation of aldimine-derived cross-links in collagen, and the constructs were mechanically weak. However, an unexpected finding was that BAPN treatment led to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene expression. Collagen type V, decorin, fibromodulin, and tenascin-X proteins were unaffected by the cross-link inhibition, suggesting that LOX regulates fibrillogenesis independently of these molecules. Collectively, the data show the importance of LOX for the mechanical development of early collagenous tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation. PMID:25979340

  13. Heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of type I collagen in longitudinal direction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Li, Tong; Gandhi, Neha S; Burrage, Kevin; Gu, YuanTong

    2017-01-07

    Collagen is an abundant structural biopolymer in mammal vertebrates, providing structural support as well as mechanical integrity for connective tissues such as bone, ligament, and tendon. The mechanical behaviours of these tissues are determined by the nanomechanics of their structures at different hierarchies and the role of collagen structures in the extracellular matrix. Some studies revealed that there is significant microstructural difference in the longitudinal direction of the collagen fibril, which challenges the conventional rod-like assumption prevalently adopted in the existing studies. Motivated by this discrepancy, in this study, we investigated the longitudinal heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of type I collagen molecule to probe the origin of the longitudinal heterogeneity of the collagen fibril at the molecular level. A full length type I collagen molecule structure was built based on the experimentally calibrated nanostructure. Then, a suitable strain rate was determined for stretching the three intact 'gap' regions and three intact 'overlap' regions of the collagen molecule. Further, the nanomechanical properties of the six collagen molecule segments were characterized by performing steered molecular dynamics simulations, using the obtained suitable strain rate in modelling. The results indicate that this computational model can be used to capture the mechanical behaviour of the collagen molecule under physiological stress conditions. Moreover, the 'gap' regions show a lower stiffness and undergo a slightly lager strain in the unwinding process, compared to the 'overlap' regions of the collagen molecule. This investigation provides insights into the origin of the longitudinal heterogeneity of collagen fibrils at the molecular level and suggests that it is of significant importance to consider the longitudinal heterogeneous mechanical properties of the collagen molecule in the development of coarse-grained models of collagen-related tissues.

  14. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3/MicroRNA-21 Feedback Loop Contributes to Atrial Fibrillation by Promoting Atrial Fibrosis in a Rat Sterile Pericarditis Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhengrong; Chen, Xiao-jun; Qian, Cheng; Dong, Qian; Ding, Dan; Wu, Qiong-feng; Li, Jing; Wang, Hong-fei; Li, Wei-hua; Xie, Qiang; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-hua

    2016-01-01

    Background— Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in cardiac surgery. The aberrant activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) contributes to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) promotes atrial fibrosis. Recent studies support the existence of reciprocal regulation between STAT3 and miR-21. Here, we test the hypothesis that these 2 molecules might form a feedback loop that contributes to postoperative atrial fibrillation by promoting atrial fibrosis. Methods and Results— A sterile pericarditis model was created using atrial surfaces dusted with sterile talcum powder in rats. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor-β, and tumor necrosis factor-α, along with STAT3 and miR-21, were highly upregulated in sterile pericarditis rats. The inhibition of STAT3 by S3I-201 resulted in miR-21 downregulation, which ameliorated atrial fibrosis and decreased the expression of the fibrosis-related genes, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen-1, and collagen-3; reduced the inhomogeneity of atrial conduction; and attenuated atrial fibrillation vulnerability. Meanwhile, treatment with antagomir-21 decreased STAT3 phosphorylation, alleviated atrial remodeling, abrogated sterile pericarditis–induced inhomogeneous conduction, and prevented atrial fibrillation promotion. The culturing of cardiac fibroblasts with IL-6 resulted in progressively augmented STAT3 phosphorylation and miR-21 levels. S3I-201 blocked IL-6 induced the expression of miR-21 and fibrosis-related genes in addition to cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Transfected antagomir-21 decreased the IL-6–induced cardiac fibroblast activation and STAT3 phosphorylation. The overexpression of miR-21 in cardiac fibroblasts caused the upregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation, enhanced fibrosis-related genes, and increased cell numbers. Conclusions— Our results have uncovered a novel reciprocal loop between STAT3

  15. In Vitro Mineralization of an Osteoid-Like Dense Collagen Construct for Bone Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelli, Benedetto

    The aim of this doctoral research was to design and evaluate strategies to rapidly achieve an acellular mineralization of an osteoid-like dense collagen gel for potential applications in bone regeneration. It was hypothesized that the collagen fibrillar density (CFD) affects the microenvironment and the physical properties of the framework of collagen gels. To test this hypothesis, and as a first objective, the mineralization of collagen gel sheets, rolls and strips with increasing CFDs was investigated in vitro in simulated body fluid (SBF). Collagen gels with physiologically relevant CFDs (14.1 wt%) led to greater extent of mineralization (12 dry wt% at day 14 in SBF), when compared to highly hydrated gels. Chemical characterization confirmed this mineral phase to be CHA, which significantly increased the gel apparent modulus and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Surprisingly, CFD also affected the electrostatic properties of collagen gel, as investigated by quantifying the extent of anionic and cationic dyes bound to collagen gels with different CFDs. It was therefore proposed that the increase in gel CFD led to a more physiological microenvironment, resulting in a higher number of fibril-to-fibril contact points and an increase in charge concentration, which facilitated the mineral formation and validated the proposed osteoid model. As a second objective, the mineralization of dense collagen (DC) gels with physiologically relevant CFD (14.1 wt%) was enhanced and accelerated by mimicking the role of anionic non collagenous proteins (NCPs) in the native osteoid, which act as CHA nucleators. Two strategies were implemented: first, the influence of collagen fibrillization pH on the extent of DC gel mineralization was investigated. Since the collagen molecule is slightly positively charged at physiological pH (isoelectric point at pH 7.8), it was hypothesized that it would be more negatively charged if formed in an alkaline environment, i.e., above its isoelectric

  16. Evaluation of dense collagen matrices as medicated wound dressing for the treatment of cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Helary, Christophe; Abed, Aicha; Mosser, Gervaise; Louedec, Liliane; Letourneur, Didier; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud-Guille, Marie Madeleine; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous chronic wounds are characterized by an impaired wound healing which may lead to infection and amputation. When current treatments are not effective enough, the application of wound dressings is required. To date, no ideal biomaterial is available. In this study, highly dense collagen matrices have been evaluated as novel medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds. For this purpose, the structure, mechanical properties, swelling ability and in vivo stability of matrices concentrated from 5 to 40 mg mL(-1) were tested. The matrix stiffness increased with the collagen concentration and was associated with the fibril density and thickness. Increased collagen concentration also enhanced the material resistance against accelerated digestion by collagenase. After subcutaneous implantation in rats, dense collagen matrices exhibited high stability without any degradation after 15 days. The absence of macrophages and neutrophils evidenced their biocompatibility. Subsequently, dense matrices at 40 mg mL(-1) were evaluated as drug delivery system for ampicillin release. More concentrated matrices exhibited the best swelling abilities and could absorb 20 times their dry weight in water, allowing for an efficient antibiotic loading from their dried form. They released efficient doses of antibiotics that inhibited the bacterial growth of Staphylococcus Aureus over 3 days. In parallel, they show no cytotoxicity towards human fibroblasts. These results show that dense collagen matrices are promising materials to develop medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  17. Glutaraldehyde-induced remineralization improves the mechanical properties and biostability of dentin collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoqun; Mao, Caiyun; Sun, Jian; Chen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang; Gu, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce a biomimetic remineralization process by using glutaraldehyde (GA) to reconstruct the mechanical properties and biostability of demineralized collagen. Demineralized dentin disks (35% phosphoric acid, 10s) were pretreated with a 5% GA solution for 3min and then cultivated in a calcium phosphate remineralization solution. The remineralization kinetics and superstructure of the remineralization layer were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation tests. The biostability was examined by enzymatic degradation experiments. A significant difference was found in dentin remineralization process between dentin with and without GA pretreating. GA showed a specific affinity to dentin collagen resulting in the formation of a cross-linking superstructure. GA pretreating could remarkably shorten remineralization time from 7days to 2days. The GA-induced remineralized collagen fibrils were well encapsulated by newly formed hydroxyapatite mineral nanocrystals. With the nano-hydroxyapatite coating, both the mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) and the biostability against enzymatic degradation of the collagen were significantly enhanced, matching those of natural dentin. The results indicated that GA cross-linking of dentin collagen could promote dentin biomimetic remineralization, resulting in an improved mechanical properties and biostability. It may provide a promising tissue-engineering technology for dentin repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differentiation of pre-ablation and post-ablation late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI scans of longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Xiahai; Khan, Habib; Haldar, Shouvik; Nyktari, Eva; Li, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Slabaugh, Greg; Wong, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David

    2017-03-01

    Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Cardiac MRI (LGE CMRI) is an emerging non-invasive technique to image and quantify preablation native and post-ablation atrial scarring. Previous studies have reported that enhanced image intensities of the atrial scarring in the LGE CMRI inversely correlate with the left atrial endocardial voltage invasively obtained by electro-anatomical mapping. However, the reported reproducibility of using LGE CMRI to identify and quantify atrial scarring is variable. This may be due to two reasons: first, delineation of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) anatomy generally relies on manual operation that is highly subjective, and this could substantially affect the subsequent atrial scarring segmentation; second, simple intensity based image features may not be good enough to detect subtle changes in atrial scarring. In this study, we hypothesized that texture analysis can provide reliable image features for the LGE CMRI images subject to accurate and objective delineation of the heart anatomy based on a fully-automated whole heart segmentation (WHS) method. We tested the extracted texture features to differentiate between pre-ablation and post-ablation LGE CMRI studies in longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation patients. These patients often have extensive native scarring and differentiation from post-ablation scarring can be difficult. Quantification results showed that our method is capable of solving this classification task, and we can envisage further deployment of this texture analysis based method for other clinical problems using LGE CMRI.

  19. Dual-enhancement cardiac computed tomography for assessing left atrial thrombus and pulmonary veins before radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Pak, Hui-Nam; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2013-07-15

    Noninvasive imaging that provides anatomic information while excluding intracardiac thrombus would be of significant clinical value for patients referred for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a dual-enhancement single-phase cardiac computed tomography (CT) protocol for thrombus and circulatory stasis detection in AF patients before catheter ablation. We studied 101 consecutive symptomatic AF patients (71 men and 30 women; mean age, 61.8 years) who were scheduled to have catheter ablation. All patients had undergone pre-AF ablation CT imaging and transesophageal echocardiography on the same day. CT was performed with prospective electrocardiographic gating, and scanning began 180 seconds after the test bolus. Mean left atrial appendage (LAA)/ascending aorta Hounsfield unit (HU) ratios were measured on CT images. Among the 101 patients, 9 thrombi and 18 spontaneous echo contrasts were detected by transesophageal echocardiography. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for the detection of thrombi in the LAA were 89%, 100%, 100%, and 99%, respectively. The mean LAA/ascending aorta HU ratios were significantly different between thrombus and circulatory stasis (0.17 vs 0.33, p = 0.002). Dual-enhancement single-scan cardiac CT is a sensitive modality for detecting and differentiating LAA thrombus and circulatory stasis.

  20. Generation of 3D Collagen Gels with Controlled Diverse Architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Rat tail collagen solutions have been used as polymerizable in vitro three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) gels for single and collective cell migration assays as well as spheroid formation. Factors such as ECM concentration, pH, ionic concentration, and temperature can alter collagen polymerization and ECM architecture. This unit describes how to generate 3D collagen gels that have distinct architectures ranging from a highly reticular meshwork of short thin fibrils with small pores to a loose matrix consisting of stiff, parallel-bundled long fibrils by changing collagen polymerization temperature. This permits analysis of 3D cell migration in different ECM architectures found in vivo while maintaining a similar ECM concentration. Also included are collagen labeling techniques helpful for ECM visualization during live fluorescence imaging. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Comparative vibrational spectroscopy of intracellular tau and extracellular collagen I reveals parallels of gelation and fibrillar structure.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Laura J

    2004-02-27

    The N-terminal tau 2-19 peptide undergoes gelation, syneresis, and aggregation over a period of years. These changes may be approximated on a shorter time scale by agitation and partial dehydration. The anomalously enhanced (229 nm) ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) imide II band reveals a common structural feature for gels of nondehydrated tau 2-19 and collagen I and insoluble paired helical filaments (PHFs) and collagen I of weak hydrogen bonding at proline carbonyls. Anomalous UVRR enhancement of amide bands at 229 nm results from gel structure, as demonstrated by increased amide absorption at the red edge for tau 2-19 gel and implies the involvement of water in gel structure. In aged, dehydrated tau 2-19 gel, proline carbonyls lose their bonds to water and tyrosine becomes deprotonated, as demonstrated by UVRR spectroscopy. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) amide I band shows that antiparallel beta-sheet structure increases with syneresis in the tau 2-19 hydrogel. The comparison of FTIR results for PHFs with collagen I gel and polyproline demonstrates that the secondary structure of PHFs is polyproline II. One implication of this assignment is that the fibrillation of hydrophilic tau is thermodynamically driven by the entropy gained as hydrogen-bonded water is freed, as for collagen I. The FTIR results also show that peptide domains culled from a longer protein do not necessarily fold into identical secondary structures. A pathological, sequential mechanism of gelation, syneresis, and fibrillation for tau in AD is suggested and is supported by the observation of amorphous neurofibrillary tangle development and fibrillation in vivo.

  2. [Atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, L J

    2001-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. AF has now been exhaustively studied: more is known about its mechanism and research is moving towards new forms of treatment. For chronic AF, basically the control of ventricular rate and the brain protection are the main issues. It is well known that with the identification of high risk group for embolism, oral anticoagulation should be administered. Ventricular rate control can be achieved by using betablockers or calcium channel blockers, unless these are contraindicated for the elderly. Oral anticoagulation prevents the stroke. The main mechanism of AF is the re-entry of multiple wavelets, but now it is more frequently found on patients with focal AF. Therapies are employed to bring the patient to a sinusal rhythm as soon as possible with antiarryhthmics or electric cardioversion externally or internally. The internal procedure includes 1 to 15 J and the success rate is of 91% vs 67% in relation to the external one. The introduction of the catheter ablation has opened new frontiers for the treatment of AF, first as the ablate-and-pace technique and now trying to mimic the maze procedure or with the ablation of the focal tachycardia. The stimulation for prevention of AF under research, as well as the implantable dysfibrillation for selected patients. On going studies will show the possible benefit of this type of benefits.

  3. VLDL from Metabolic Syndrome Individuals Enhanced Lipid Accumulation in Atria with Association of Susceptibility to Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Ke, Liang-Yin; Wei, Chi; Hsiao, Yi-Lin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lai, Wen-Ter; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Wu, Bin-Nan

    2016-01-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of metabolic derangements. Dyslipidemia is an important factor in MetS and is related to atrial fibrillation (AF). We hypothesized that very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in MetS (MetS-VLDL) may induce atrial dilatation and vulnerability to AF. VLDL was therefore separated from normal (normal-VLDL) and MetS individuals. Wild type C57BL/6 male mice were divided into control, normal-VLDL (nVLDL), and MetS-VLDL (msVLDL) groups. VLDL (15 µg/g) and equivalent volumes of saline were injected via tail vein three times a week for six consecutive weeks. Cardiac chamber size and function were measured by echocardiography. MetS-VLDL significantly caused left atrial dilation (control, n = 10, 1.64 ± 0.23 mm; nVLDL, n = 7, 1.84 ± 0.13 mm; msVLDL, n = 10, 2.18 ± 0.24 mm; p < 0.0001) at week 6, associated with decreased ejection fraction (control, n = 10, 62.5% ± 7.7%, vs. msVLDL, n = 10, 52.9% ± 9.6%; p < 0.05). Isoproterenol-challenge experiment resulted in AF in young msVLDL mice. Unprovoked AF occurred only in elderly msVLDL mice. Immunohistochemistry showed excess lipid accumulation and apoptosis in msVLDL mice atria. These findings suggest a pivotal role of VLDL in AF pathogenesis for MetS individuals.

  4. K+ channel blockade in the prevention of ventricular fibrillation in dogs with acute ischemia and enhanced sympathetic activity.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, E; Hull, S S; Adamson, P B; Foreman, R D; Schwartz, P J

    1995-12-01

    The value of K+ channel blockade in preventing lethal arrhythmias, and specifically those triggered by acute myocardial ischemia and sympathetic hyperactivity, remains unproven. To address this issue, we tested the antifibrillatory effect of d-sotalol, and Ikr blocker, d,l-sotalol, its racemic compound which blocks Ikr, and beta-adrenoreceptors, and propranolol. Ten dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction (MI) had ventricular fibrillation (VF) during a 2-min occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery performed toward the end of a submaximal exercise stress test. In successive trials in the same animals, d-sotalol (three injections of 8 mg/kg, one every 12 h), d,l-sotalol (8 mg/kg), and propranolol (1 mg/kg) were tested. All three interventions significantly reduced heart rate (HR) response to exercise, but only d,l-sotalol and propranolol also blunted the reflex HR increase during acute myocardial ischemia. With d-sotalol, HR at 30 s of coronary occlusion was similar (253 +/- 28 beats/min) to that observed in the control tests (259 +/- 35 beats/min). d-Sotalol prevented recurrence of VF in only 1 of 10 dogs tested. One dog was lost to the continuation of the study after occurrence of VF with d-sotalol. Six of 9 dogs (67%) tested with d,l-sotalol and 5 (56%) of the same 9 dogs tested with propranolol were protected from VF. d-Sotalol does not reduce risk of VF during acute myocardial ischemia associated with sympathetic hyperactivity, and lethal events can be prevented by antiadrenergic interventions.

  5. Second Harmonic Light Scattering from Macromolecules: Collagen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Shmuel

    In this work we present the theory and practice of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as applied to rat-tail tendon collagen. Our work is the first quantitative application of SHG to biological systems. The angular dependence of SHG is found to display a sharp, intense, forward peak superimposed on a broad background. The sharp peak is shown to imply long-range polar order, while the broad background corresponds to that predicted for the random "up"/"down" array of collagen fibrils seen with the electron microscope. The dependence of fibril diameter distribution on age and state of hydration is measured. Our experiments also reveal information concerning the structure of the fibrils and their arrangement in the tendon. The degree of polar order, the coherence length of tendon for harmonic generation and the absolute magnitude of the nonlinear susceptibility of the collagen fibril are also determined. The biological significance of these findings and the many advantages of SHG for the structural study of biological macromolecules and tissues are discussed.

  6. Estrogen-induced collagen reorientation correlates with sympathetic denervation of the rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Martínez, G F; Bianchimano, P; Brauer, M M

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen inhibits the growth and causes the degeneration (pruning) of sympathetic nerves supplying the rat myometrium. Previous cryoculture studies evidenced that substrate-bound signals contribute to diminish the ability of the estrogenized myometrium to support sympathetic nerve growth. Using electron microscopy, here we examined neurite-substrate interactions in myometrial cryocultures, observing that neurites grew associated to collagen fibrils present in the surface of the underlying cryosection. In addition, we assessed quantitatively the effects of estrogen on myometrial collagen organization in situ, using ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen and immature females undergoing puberty. Under low estrogen levels, most collagen fibrils were oriented in parallel to the muscle long axis (83% and 85%, respectively). Following estrogen treatment, 89% of fibrils was oriented perpendicularly to the muscle main axis; while after puberty, 57% of fibrils acquired this orientation. Immunohistochemistry combined with histology revealed that the vast majority of fine sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the myometrium courses within the areas where collagen realignment was observed. Finally, to assess whether depending on their orientation collagen fibrils can promote or inhibit neurite outgrowth, we employed cryocultures, now using as substrate tissue sections of rat-tail tendon. We observed that neurites grew extensively in the direction of the parallel-aligned collagen fibrils in the t