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Sample records for enhancing genetic gains

  1. Advances in Maize Genomics and Their Value for Enhancing Genetic Gains from Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunbi; Skinner, Debra J.; Wu, Huixia; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Araus, Jose Luis; Yan, Jianbing; Gao, Shibin; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Crouch, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    Maize is an important crop for food, feed, forage, and fuel across tropical and temperate areas of the world. Diversity studies at genetic, molecular, and functional levels have revealed that, tropical maize germplasm, landraces, and wild relatives harbor a significantly wider range of genetic variation. Among all types of markers, SNP markers are increasingly the marker-of-choice for all genomics applications in maize breeding. Genetic mapping has been developed through conventional linkage mapping and more recently through linkage disequilibrium-based association analyses. Maize genome sequencing, initially focused on gene-rich regions, now aims for the availability of complete genome sequence. Conventional insertion mutation-based cloning has been complemented recently by EST- and map-based cloning. Transgenics and nutritional genomics are rapidly advancing fields targeting important agronomic traits including pest resistance and grain quality. Substantial advances have been made in methodologies for genomics-assisted breeding, enhancing progress in yield as well as abiotic and biotic stress resistances. Various genomic databases and informatics tools have been developed, among which MaizeGDB is the most developed and widely used by the maize research community. In the future, more emphasis should be given to the development of tools and strategic germplasm resources for more effective molecular breeding of tropical maize products. PMID:19688107

  2. Genetic enhancements and expectations.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, K

    2009-07-01

    Some argue that genetic enhancements and environmental enhancements are not importantly different: environmental enhancements such as private schools and chess lessons are simply the old-school way to have a designer baby. I argue that there is an important distinction between the two practices--a distinction that makes state restrictions on genetic enhancements more justifiable than state restrictions on environmental enhancements. The difference is that parents have no settled expectations about genetic enhancements.

  3. Microstrip antenna gain enhancement with metamaterial radome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attachi, S.; Saleh, C.; Bouzouad, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a high gain patch antenna using multilayer FSS radome is proposed for millimeter-wave applications. The antenna operating frequency is 43.5 GHz. The antenna/radome system consists of one, two, three, or four layers of metasurfaces placed in the near-field region of a microstrip patch antenna. The antenna/radome system gain is improved by 9 dBi compared to the patch antenna alone, and the radiation pattern half-power beamwidth is reduces to 20° in both E- and H-planes.

  4. Fundamental limitations to gain enhancement in periodic media and waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grgić, Jure; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mørk, Jesper; Mortensen, N Asger

    2012-05-04

    A common strategy to compensate for losses in optical nanostructures is to add gain material in the system. By exploiting slow-light effects it is expected that the gain may be enhanced beyond its bulk value. Here we show that this route cannot be followed uncritically: inclusion of gain inevitably modifies the underlying dispersion law, and thereby may degrade the slow-light properties underlying the device operation and the anticipated gain enhancement itself. This degradation is generic; we demonstrate it for three different systems of current interest (coupled-resonator optical waveguides, Bragg stacks, and photonic crystal waveguides). Nevertheless, a small amount of added gain may be beneficial.

  5. Obesity and diabetes genetic variants associated with gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Stuebe, Alison M.; Lyon, Helen; Herring, Amy; Ghosh, Joyee; Wise, Alison; North, Kari E.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether genetic variants associated with diabetes and obesity predict gestational weight gain. Study Design 960 participants in the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition cohorts were genotyped for 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with diabetes and obesity. Results Among white and black women (n=960), KCNQ1 risk allele carriage was directly associated with weight gain (p < 0.01). In Bayesian hierarchical models among white women (N=628), we found posterior odds ratios > 3 for inclusion of TCF2 and THADA SNPs in our models. Among black women (n=332), we found associations between risk allele carriage and weight gain for the THADA and INSIG2 SNPs. In Bayesian variable selection models, we found an interaction between the TSPAN8 risk allele and pre-gravid obesity, with lower weight gain among obese risk allele carriers. Conclusion We found evidence that diabetes and obesity risk alleles interact with maternal pre-gravid BMI to predict gestational weight gain. PMID:20816152

  6. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  7. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  8. Does justice require genetic enhancements?

    PubMed

    Holtug, N

    1999-04-01

    It is argued that justice in some cases provides a pro tanto reason genetically to enhance victims of the genetic lottery. Various arguments--both to the effect that justice provides no such reason and to the effect that while there may be such reasons, they are overridden by certain moral constraints--are considered and rejected. Finally, it is argued that justice provides stronger reasons to perform more traditional medical tasks (treatments), and that therefore genetic enhancements should not play an important role in a public health care system.

  9. The myth of genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rosoff, Philip M

    2012-06-01

    The ongoing revolution in molecular genetics has led many to speculate that one day we will be able to change the expression or phenotype of numerous complex traits to improve ourselves in many different ways. The prospect of genetic enhancements has generated heated controversy, with proponents advocating research and implementation, with caution advised for concerns about justice, and critics tending to see the prospect of genetic enhancements as an assault on human freedom and human nature. Both camps base their arguments on the unquestioned assumption that the science will realize either their dreams or nightmares. In this paper, I show that their beliefs are based upon two fundamental mistakes. First, they are based upon an unwarranted reliance in a genetic determinism that takes for granted that the traits that we might most want to enhance, like intelligence, aggression, shyness, and even athletic ability, can be causally directed by specific genes. In so doing, character descriptions are reified to be concrete and discrete entities, in this case, genes. Second, they have accepted on faith that there is, or will be, a science to translate their hopes or worries into reality when, in fact, that is unlikely to occur because of the irreducible complexity of phenotypic expression.

  10. Gain enhancement with near-zero-index metamaterial superstrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzouad, M.; Chaker, S. M.; Bensafielddine, D.; Laamari, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to use a near-zero-index ( n) metamaterial as a single- or a double-layer superstrate suspended above a microstrip patch antenna, operating at 43 GHz, for the gain enhancement. The single metamaterial layer superstrate consists of a periodic arrangement of Jerusalem cross unit cells and behaves as an homogeneous medium characterized by a refractive index close to zero. This metamaterial property allows gathering radiated waves from the antenna and collimates them toward the superstrate normal direction. The proposed design improves the antenna gain by 5.1 dB with the single-layer superstrate and 7 dB with the double-layer superstrate.

  11. Efficient use of hybrid Genetic Algorithms in the gain optimization of distributed Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Neto, B; Teixeira, A L J; Wada, N; André, P S

    2007-12-24

    In this paper, we propose an efficient and accurate method that combines the Genetic Algorithm (GA) with the Nelder-Mead method in order to obtain the gain optimization of distributed Raman amplifiers. By using these two methods together, the advantages of both are combined: the convergence of the GA and the high accuracy of the Nelder-Mead. To enhance the convergence of the GA, several features were examined and correlated with fitting errors. It is also shown that when the right moment to switch between methods is chosen, the computation time can be reduced by a factor of two.

  12. Who gains? Genetic and neurophysiological correlates of BMI gain upon college entry in women.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Lance O

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation examined P3 event-related electroencephalographic potentials and a short and selected list of addiction-related candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 84 female students, aged 18-20 yrs. The students were assigned to groups defined by the presence versus absence of a positive body mass index (BMI) change from the pre-college physical exam to the current day. Analyses revealed significantly greater P3 latencies and reduced P3 amplitudes during a response inhibition task among students who exhibited a BMI gain. BMI gain was also significantly associated with a ANKK1 SNP previously implicated in substance dependence risk. In logistic regression analyses, P3 latencies at the frontal electrode and this ANKK1 genotype correctly classified 71.1% of the students into the BMI groups. The present findings suggest that heritable indicators of impaired response inhibition can differentiate students who may be on a path toward an overweight or obese body mass.

  13. "Genetic Engineering" Gains Momentum (Science/Society Case Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W.; Moore, Elizabeth A., Eds.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the benefits and hazards of genetic engineering, or "recombinant-DNA" research. Recent federal safety rules issued by NIH which ease the strict prohibitions on recombinant-DNA research are explained. (CS)

  14. Who Gains? Genetic and Neurophysiological Correlates of BMI Gain Upon College Entry in Women

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Lance O.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examined P3 event-related electroencephalographic potentials and a short and selected list of addiction-related candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 84 female students, aged 18–20 yrs. The students were assigned to groups defined by the presence versus absence of a positive body mass index (BMI) change from the pre-college physical exam to the current day. Analyses revealed significantly greater P3 latencies and reduced P3 amplitudes during a response inhibition task among students who exhibited a BMI gain. BMI gain was also significantly associated with a ANKK1 SNP previously implicated in substance dependence risk. In logistic regression analyses, P3 latencies at the frontal electrode and this ANKK1 genotype correctly classified 71.1% of the students into the BMI groups. The present findings suggest that heritable indicators of impaired response inhibition can differentiate students who may be on a path toward an overweight or obese body mass. PMID:25049133

  15. Enhanced redundancy gain in schizophrenics: a correlate of callosal dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Florio, Vincenzo; Marzi, Carlo A; Girelli, Andrea; Savazzi, Silvia

    2008-09-01

    An abnormal pattern of hemispheric asymmetry, possibly as a result of disturbed interhemispheric communication, is widely, albeit by no means unanimously, held as a major cause of schizophrenia. To behaviourally test interhemispheric communication in schizophrenia we used a task that has been shown to be a reliable indicator of callosal functioning, namely, the redundant signals effect (RSE). It consists of the speeding of simple reaction time when responding to double as opposed to single visual stimuli. When the stimuli in a pair are presented to different hemispheres patients who underwent total commissurotomy or suffer from callosal agenesis show a paradoxically enhanced RSE with respect to healthy controls. Therefore, if schizophrenia patients have a callosal abnormality they ought to show a similar effect. In three experiments we tested a total of 55 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 51 healthy controls. In Experiment 1 we presented unilateral single stimuli and bilateral simultaneous double stimuli. The RSE was reliably larger in schizophrenics than in controls. In Experiment 2 the temporal interval between the two stimuli in a pair was varied. We found that while in controls the RSE disappeared with interstimulus intervals longer than 17ms, in schizophrenia patients there was a RSE only for simultaneous double stimuli. Finally, in Experiment 3 we found that there was no enhanced redundancy gain in schizophrenics when the double stimuli were presented to one and the same hemisphere, and therefore, with no need for callosal transmission. All in all, the present results provide evidence of a callosal dysfunction in schizophrenia that impairs interhemispheric integration.

  16. Genetic enhancement: plan now to act later.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2005-03-01

    All three main articles in the issues of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal endorse the view that genetic enhancement should be permitted, including human germ-line genetic enhancement. However, unregulated, wealth-based access to genetic enhancement in general, and germ-line enhancement in particular, would create intolerable risks for society. Although there are a number of practical problems raised by proposals to regulate or restrict access to genetic enhancement, which will make it difficult if not impossible to muster support for any effective restrictions until we begin to experience the societal problems that genetic enhancement will create, it is important to consider now what restrictions would be appropriate, how they would be imposed, and what changes would be needed in existing laws and institutions to facilitate them. Without this type of groundwork, there is no way society will be in a position to act in time.

  17. High-gain nonlinear observer for simple genetic regulation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, L. A.; Ibarra-Junquera, V.; Escalante-Minakata, P.; Rosu, H. C.

    2007-07-01

    High-gain nonlinear observers occur in the nonlinear automatic control theory and are in standard usage in chemical engineering processes. We apply such a type of analysis in the context of a very simple one-gene regulation circuit. In general, an observer combines an analytical differential-equation-based model with partial measurement of the system in order to estimate the non-measured state variables. We use one of the simplest observers, that of Gauthier et al., which is a copy of the original system plus a correction term which is easy to calculate. For the illustration of this procedure, we employ a biological model, recently adapted from Goodwin's old book by De Jong, in which one plays with the dynamics of the concentrations of the messenger RNA coding for a given protein, the protein itself, and a single metabolite. Using the observer instead of the metabolite, it is possible to rebuild the non-measured concentrations of the mRNA and the protein.

  18. Genetic gains from selection for fiber traits in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    PubMed

    de Faria, G M P; Sanchez, C F B; de Carvalho, L P; da Silva Oliveira, M; Cruz, C D

    2016-11-21

    Brazil is among the five largest producers of cotton in the world, cultivating the species Gossypium hirsutum L. r. latifolium Hutch. The cultivars should have good fiber quality as well as yield. Genetic improvement of fiber traits requires the study of the genetic structure of the populations under improvement, leading to the identification of promising parent plants. To this end, it is important to acquire some information, such as estimates of genetic variance components and heritability coefficients, which will support the appropriate choice of the breeding strategy to be employed as well as enable the estimation of gains from selection. This study aimed to evaluate some agronomic characteristics, such as fiber quality and yield, estimating genetic parameters for the purpose of predicting earnings. Twelve cultivars of cotton, including four male progenitors (CNPA 01-42, BRS Verde, Glandless, and Okra leaf) and eight female progenitors (Delta opal, CNPA 7H, Aroeira, Antares, Sucupira, Facual, Precoce 3, and CNPA 8H), were used in performing crosses according to design I, proposed by Comstock and Robinson (1948). The experimental design was a randomized block with four replications. We observed genetic variability among all traits as well as higher efficiency of selection for the gains related to traits. Our results showed that the combined selection presented the highest genetic gains for all traits. For fiber length, the female/male selection and the combined selection resulted in the highest genetic gain.

  19. Enhancing optical gains in Si nanocrystals via hydrogenation and cerium ion doping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong-Chen; Li, Yan-Li; Song, Sheng-Chi; Guo, Wen-Ping; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jia-Rong

    2014-07-28

    We report optical gain enhancements in Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) via hydrogenation and Ce{sup 3+} ion doping. Variable stripe length technique was used to obtain gains. At 0.3 W/cm{sup 2} pumping power density of pulsed laser, net gains were observed together with gain enhancements after hydrogenation and/or Ce{sup 3+} ion doping; gains after loss corrections were between 89.52 and 341.95 cm{sup −1}; and the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime was found to decrease with the increasing gain enhancement. At 0.04 W/cm{sup 2} power density, however, no net gain was found and the PL lifetime increased with the increasing PL enhancement. The results were discussed according to stimulated and spontaneous excitation and de-excitation mechanisms of Si-NCs.

  20. Feature-based attention enhances performance by increasing response gain

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Katrin; Heeger, David J.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Covert spatial attention can increase contrast sensitivity either by changes in contrast gain or by changes in response gain, depending on the size of the attention field and the size of the stimulus (Herrmann, Montaser-Kouhsari, Carrasco, & Heeger, 2010), as predicted by the normalization model of attention (Reynolds & Heeger, 2009). For feature-based attention, unlike spatial attention, the model predicts only changes in response gain, regardless of whether the featural extent of the attention field is small or large. To test this prediction, we measured the contrast dependence of feature-based attention. Observers performed an orientation-discrimination task on a spatial array of grating patches. The spatial locations of the gratings were varied randomly so that observers could not attend to specific locations. Feature-based attention was manipulated with a 75% valid and 25% invalid pre-cue, and the featural extent of the attention field was manipulated by introducing uncertainty about the upcoming grating orientation. Performance accuracy was better for valid than for invalid pre-cues, consistent with a change in response gain, when the featural extent of the attention field was small (low uncertainty) or when it was large (high uncertainty) relative to the featural extent of the stimulus. These results for feature-based attention clearly differ from results of analogous experiments with spatial attention, yet both support key predictions of the normalization model of attention. PMID:22580017

  1. Feature-based attention enhances performance by increasing response gain.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Katrin; Heeger, David J; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-12-01

    Covert spatial attention can increase contrast sensitivity either by changes in contrast gain or by changes in response gain, depending on the size of the attention field and the size of the stimulus (Herrmann et al., 2010), as predicted by the normalization model of attention (Reynolds & Heeger, 2009). For feature-based attention, unlike spatial attention, the model predicts only changes in response gain, regardless of whether the featural extent of the attention field is small or large. To test this prediction, we measured the contrast dependence of feature-based attention. Observers performed an orientation-discrimination task on a spatial array of grating patches. The spatial locations of the gratings were varied randomly so that observers could not attend to specific locations. Feature-based attention was manipulated with a 75% valid and 25% invalid pre-cue, and the featural extent of the attention field was manipulated by introducing uncertainty about the upcoming grating orientation. Performance accuracy was better for valid than for invalid pre-cues, consistent with a change in response gain, when the featural extent of the attention field was small (low uncertainty) or when it was large (high uncertainty) relative to the featural extent of the stimulus. These results for feature-based attention clearly differ from results of analogous experiments with spatial attention, yet both support key predictions of the normalization model of attention.

  2. Persistency of Prediction Accuracy and Genetic Gain in Synthetic Populations Under Recurrent Genomic Selection.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dominik; Schopp, Pascal; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2017-03-10

    Recurrent selection (RS) has been used in plant breeding to successively improve synthetic and other multiparental populations. Synthetics are generated from a limited number of parents [Formula: see text] but little is known about how [Formula: see text] affects genomic selection (GS) in RS, especially the persistency of prediction accuracy ([Formula: see text]) and genetic gain. Synthetics were simulated by intermating [Formula: see text]= 2-32 parent lines from an ancestral population with short- or long-range linkage disequilibrium ([Formula: see text]) and subjected to multiple cycles of GS. We determined [Formula: see text] and genetic gain across 30 cycles for different training set (TS) sizes, marker densities, and generations of recombination before model training. Contributions to [Formula: see text] and genetic gain from pedigree relationships, as well as from cosegregation and [Formula: see text] between QTL and markers, were analyzed via four scenarios differing in (i) the relatedness between TS and selection candidates and (ii) whether selection was based on markers or pedigree records. Persistency of [Formula: see text] was high for small [Formula: see text] where predominantly cosegregation contributed to [Formula: see text], but also for large [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] replaced cosegregation as the dominant information source. Together with increasing genetic variance, this compensation resulted in relatively constant long- and short-term genetic gain for increasing [Formula: see text] > 4, given long-range LDA in the ancestral population. Although our scenarios suggest that information from pedigree relationships contributed to [Formula: see text] for only very few generations in GS, we expect a longer contribution than in pedigree BLUP, because capturing Mendelian sampling by markers reduces selective pressure on pedigree relationships. Larger TS size ([Formula: see text]) and higher marker density improved persistency of

  3. Persistency of Prediction Accuracy and Genetic Gain in Synthetic Populations Under Recurrent Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dominik; Schopp, Pascal; Melchinger, Albrecht E.

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent selection (RS) has been used in plant breeding to successively improve synthetic and other multiparental populations. Synthetics are generated from a limited number of parents (Np), but little is known about how Np affects genomic selection (GS) in RS, especially the persistency of prediction accuracy (rg,g^) and genetic gain. Synthetics were simulated by intermating Np= 2–32 parent lines from an ancestral population with short- or long-range linkage disequilibrium (LDA) and subjected to multiple cycles of GS. We determined rg,g^ and genetic gain across 30 cycles for different training set (TS) sizes, marker densities, and generations of recombination before model training. Contributions to rg,g^ and genetic gain from pedigree relationships, as well as from cosegregation and LDA between QTL and markers, were analyzed via four scenarios differing in (i) the relatedness between TS and selection candidates and (ii) whether selection was based on markers or pedigree records. Persistency of rg,g^ was high for small Np, where predominantly cosegregation contributed to rg,g^, but also for large Np, where LDA replaced cosegregation as the dominant information source. Together with increasing genetic variance, this compensation resulted in relatively constant long- and short-term genetic gain for increasing Np > 4, given long-range LDA in the ancestral population. Although our scenarios suggest that information from pedigree relationships contributed to rg,g^ for only very few generations in GS, we expect a longer contribution than in pedigree BLUP, because capturing Mendelian sampling by markers reduces selective pressure on pedigree relationships. Larger TS size (NTS) and higher marker density improved persistency of rg,g^ and hence genetic gain, but additional recombinations could not increase genetic gain. PMID:28064189

  4. Genetic enhancement, human nature, and rights.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Terrance

    2010-08-01

    Authors such as Francis Fukuyama, the President's Council on Bioethics, and George Annas have argued that biotechnological interventions that aim to promote genetic enhancement pose a threat to human nature. This paper clarifies what conclusions these critics seek to establish, and then shows that there is no plausible account of human nature that will meet the conditions necessary to support this position. Appeals to human nature cannot establish a prohibition against the pursuit of genetic enhancement.

  5. X ray laser with enhanced x ray gain through photodepopulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elton, Raymond C.

    1990-07-01

    This patent discloses a nuclear charge Z lasing on a 3-2 Balmer-a transition, a second hydrogenic ion having a nuclear charge Z/2 emitting Lyman-a and Lyman-B photons, wherein n=2 electrons of he first hydrogenic ion are excited to the n=4 and n=6 level by resonance absorption of Lyman-a and Lyman-B photons from the second hydrogenic ion. The invention results in an increase in population inversion and gain to saturation, an improvement in overall efficiency and an increase in plasma size.

  6. Gain enhancement for wideband end-fire antenna design with artificial material.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Sun, Yuanhua; Wu, Xi; Wen, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Gain enhancement wideband end-fire antenna is proposed in this paper. The proposed antenna can achieve gain enhancement by loading novel artificial materials structures (Split-ring Resonators) in the end-fire direction while broad bandwidth is realized by using elliptic dipole elements and a microstrip to coplanar balun. The measurements show that the proposed antenna have around 5-8 dB gain in the working band (5-11 GHz), which is around 2 dB more than the unloaded one. This antenna can be used in target recognition systems for its advantages of end-fire radiation broad bandwidth and high gain.

  7. Genetic enhancement technologies and the new society.

    PubMed

    Smith, G P

    2000-01-01

    So long as procreation continues to remain a central driving force in a marital relationship, and the family the very core of progressive society, efforts will be undertaken to expand the period of fecundity and combat infertility. Genetic planning and eugenic programming are more rational and humane alternatives to population regulation than death by famine and war. Genetic enhancement technologies and the scientific research undertaken to advance them should be viewed as not only aiding (or, sometimes resolving) the tragedy of infertility in family planning, but as a tool for enhancing the health of a Nation's citizens by engineering man's genetic weaknesses out of the line of inheritance. Put simply, healthier and genetically sound individuals have a much better opportunity for pursuing and achieving the "good life" and making a significant contribution to society's greater well being.

  8. Distinct developmental genetic mechanisms underlie convergently evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Nicholas A.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Donde, Nikunj N.; Cleves, Phillip A.; Agoglia, Rachel M.; Miller, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are a classic model system of organogenesis, as repeated and reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions pattern placode formation and outgrowth. Less is known about the developmental and genetic bases of tooth formation and replacement in polyphyodonts, which are vertebrates with continual tooth replacement. Here, we leverage natural variation in the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus to investigate the genetic basis of tooth development and replacement. We find that two derived freshwater stickleback populations have both convergently evolved more ventral pharyngeal teeth through heritable genetic changes. In both populations, evolved tooth gain manifests late in development. Using pulse-chase vital dye labeling to mark newly forming teeth in adult fish, we find that both high-toothed freshwater populations have accelerated tooth replacement rates relative to low-toothed ancestral marine fish. Despite the similar evolved phenotype of more teeth and an accelerated adult replacement rate, the timing of tooth number divergence and the spatial patterns of newly formed adult teeth are different in the two populations, suggesting distinct developmental mechanisms. Using genome-wide linkage mapping in marine-freshwater F2 genetic crosses, we find that the genetic basis of evolved tooth gain in the two freshwater populations is largely distinct. Together, our results support a model whereby increased tooth number and an accelerated tooth replacement rate have evolved convergently in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations using largely distinct developmental and genetic mechanisms. PMID:26062935

  9. Genetic diversity and selection gain in the physic nut (Jatropha curcas).

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, B P; Silva, S A; Souza, D R; Santos, P A; Oliveira, R S; Lyra, D H

    2013-07-08

    The use of efficient breeding methods depends on knowledge of genetic control of traits to be improved. We estimated genetic parameters, selection gain, and genetic diversity in physic nut half-sib families, in order to provide information for breeding programs of this important biofuel species. The progeny test included 20 half-sib families in 4 blocks and 10 plants per plot. The mean progeny heritability values were: 50% for number of bunches, 47% for number of fruits, 35% for number of seeds, 6% for stem diameter, 26% for number of primary branches, 14% for number of secondary branches, 66% for plant height, and 25% for survival of the plants, demonstrating good potential for early selection in plant height, number of branches, and number of fruits per plant. In the analysis of genetic diversity, genotypes were divided into 4 groups. Genotypes 18, 19, 20, and 8 clustered together and presented the highest means for the vegetative and production. Lower means were observed in the 17, 12, 13, and 9 genotypes from the same group. We detected genetic variability in this population, with high heritability estimates and accuracy, demonstrating the possibility of obtaining genetic gains for vegetative characters and production at 24 months after planting.

  10. Distinct developmental genetic mechanisms underlie convergently evolved tooth gain in sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Nicholas A; Glazer, Andrew M; Donde, Nikunj N; Cleves, Phillip A; Agoglia, Rachel M; Miller, Craig T

    2015-07-15

    Teeth are a classic model system of organogenesis, as repeated and reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions pattern placode formation and outgrowth. Less is known about the developmental and genetic bases of tooth formation and replacement in polyphyodonts, which are vertebrates with continual tooth replacement. Here, we leverage natural variation in the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus to investigate the genetic basis of tooth development and replacement. We find that two derived freshwater stickleback populations have both convergently evolved more ventral pharyngeal teeth through heritable genetic changes. In both populations, evolved tooth gain manifests late in development. Using pulse-chase vital dye labeling to mark newly forming teeth in adult fish, we find that both high-toothed freshwater populations have accelerated tooth replacement rates relative to low-toothed ancestral marine fish. Despite the similar evolved phenotype of more teeth and an accelerated adult replacement rate, the timing of tooth number divergence and the spatial patterns of newly formed adult teeth are different in the two populations, suggesting distinct developmental mechanisms. Using genome-wide linkage mapping in marine-freshwater F2 genetic crosses, we find that the genetic basis of evolved tooth gain in the two freshwater populations is largely distinct. Together, our results support a model whereby increased tooth number and an accelerated tooth replacement rate have evolved convergently in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations using largely distinct developmental and genetic mechanisms.

  11. Genetic modifications for personal enhancement: a defence.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-04-01

    Bioconservative commentators argue that parents should not take steps to modify the genetics of their children even in the name of enhancement because of the damage they predict for values, identities and relationships. Some commentators have even said that adults should not modify themselves through genetic interventions. One commentator worries that genetic modifications chosen by adults for themselves will undermine moral agency, lead to less valuable experiences and fracture people's sense of self. These worries are not justified, however, since the effects of modification will not undo moral agency as such. Adults can still have valuable experiences, even if some prior choices no longer seem meaningful. Changes at the genetic level will not always, either, alienate people from their own sense of self. On the contrary, genetic modifications can help amplify choice, enrich lives and consolidate identities. Ultimately, there is no moral requirement that people value their contingent genetic endowment to the exclusion of changes important to them in their future genetic identities. Through weighing risks and benefits, adults also have the power to consent to, and assume the risks of, genetic modifications for themselves in a way not possible in prenatal genetic interventions.

  12. Realized gain and prediction of yield with genetically improved Pinus radiata in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, S.D.; Hayes, J.D. ); Garcia, O. . Centro de Investigacions Forestais de Lourizan)

    1999-05-01

    Pinus radiata D. Don seedlots of varying genetic quality were compared in block-plot genetic-gain trials at 10 locations representing most of the site types in New Zealand. Permanent sample plots were measured annually for growth from age 6--8 yr from planting to ages 15--17 (midrotation). Seedlots from first-generation open-pollinated seed orchards and a mix of crosses that all involved the top-performing parent were, respectively, on average 4.5 % and 5.3% taller and had 6% and 11% larger mean diameter, 12% and 30% more basal area, and 15% and 34% more stem volume than seedlots originating from mild mass selection in harvested stands (climbing select). The observed growth increases were quantified as changes in the rate of growth from that predicted by pre-existing growth models in order to account for tree size and stocking differences. Seedlots from first-generation seed orchards and crosses of the top clone, respectively, grew 5.1% and 4.5% faster in height, and functions for basal area and stocking changed 13% and 26.4% faster, respectively, than the baseline growth models, which were based on climbing select. This implies that increased basal area growth must be taken into account in order to obtain accurate prediction of gain in stem volume. The incorporation of these observed increases in growth rates into stand growth models as genetic-gain multipliers in order to extrapolate predictions of growth of genetically improved seedlots beyond the sites, silvicultures, and seedlots represented in the genetic gain trials is discussed.

  13. Weighted Genetic Risk Scores and Prediction of Weight Gain in Solid Organ Transplant Populations

    PubMed Central

    Saigi-Morgui, Núria; Quteineh, Lina; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Crettol, Severine; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Beckmann, Sonja; Mueller, Nicolas J; Binet, Isabelle; van Delden, Christian; Steiger, Jürg; Mohacsi, Paul; Stirnimann, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Pascual, Manuel; Eap, Chin B

    2016-01-01

    Background Polygenic obesity in Solid Organ Transplant (SOT) populations is considered a risk factor for the development of metabolic abnormalities and graft survival. Few studies to date have studied the genetics of weight gain in SOT recipients. We aimed to determine whether weighted genetic risk scores (w-GRS) integrating genetic polymorphisms from GWAS studies (SNP group#1 and SNP group#2) and from Candidate Gene studies (SNP group#3) influence BMI in SOT populations and if they predict ≥10% weight gain (WG) one year after transplantation. To do so, two samples (nA = 995, nB = 156) were obtained from naturalistic studies and three w-GRS were constructed and tested for association with BMI over time. Prediction of 10% WG at one year after transplantation was assessed with models containing genetic and clinical factors. Results w-GRS were associated with BMI in sample A and B combined (BMI increased by 0.14 and 0.11 units per additional risk allele in SNP group#1 and #2, respectively, p-values<0.008). w-GRS of SNP group#3 showed an effect of 0.01 kg/m2 per additional risk allele when combining sample A and B (p-value 0.04). Models with genetic factors performed better than models without in predicting 10% WG at one year after transplantation. Conclusions This is the first study in SOT evaluating extensively the association of w-GRS with BMI and the influence of clinical and genetic factors on 10% of WG one year after transplantation, showing the importance of integrating genetic factors in the final model. Genetics of obesity among SOT recipients remains an important issue and can contribute to treatment personalization and prediction of WG after transplantation. PMID:27788139

  14. Low-index-metamaterial for gain enhancement of planar terahertz antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qing-Le; Si, Li-Ming Lv, Xin; Huang, Yongjun; Zhu, Weiren

    2014-03-15

    We theoretically present a high gain planar antenna at terahertz (THz) frequencies by combing a conventional log-periodic antenna (LPA) with a low-index-metamaterial (LIM, |n| < 1). The LIM is realized by properly designing a fishnet metamaterial using full-wave finite-element simulation. Owing to the impedance matching, the LIM can be placed seamlessly on the substrate of the LPA without noticeable reflection. The effectiveness of using LIM for antenna gain enhancement is confirmed by comparing the antenna performance with and without LIM, where significantly improved half-power beam-width (3-dB beam-width) and more than 4 dB gain enhancement are seen within a certain frequency range. The presented LIM-enhanced planar THz antenna is compact, flat, low profile, and high gain, which has extensive applications in THz systems, including communications, radar, and spectroscopy.

  15. Bioethics, sport and the genetically enhanced athlete.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2002-01-01

    This paper begins by acknowledging the interest taken by various international organisations in genetic enhancement and sport, including the US President's Council on Bioethics (July, 2002) and the World Anti-Doping Agency (March, 2002). It is noticed how sporting organisations have been particularly concerned to emphasize the 'threat' of genetics to sport, whereas other institutions have recognised the broader bioethical issues arising from this prospect, which do not readily reject the use of genetic technology in sport. Sports are identified as necessarily 'human' and 'moral' practices, the exploration of which can reveal greater insight into the intuitive fears about genetic modification. It is argued that anti-doping testing measures and sanctions unacceptably persecute the athlete. While there are substantial reasons to be concerned about the use of genetic modification in sport, the desire for policy ought not diminish the need for ethical research; nor ought such research embody the similar guise of traditional 'anti' doping strategies. Rather, the approach to genetics in sport must be informed more by broader social policies in bioethics and recognition of the greater goods arising from genetic technology.

  16. 'Battling my biology': psychological effects of genetic testing for risk of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S F; Wardle, J

    2014-04-01

    The availability of genetic tests for multifactorial conditions such as obesity raises concerns that higher-risk results could lead to fatalistic reactions or lower-risk results to complacency. No study has investigated the effects of genetic test feedback for the risk of obesity in non-clinical samples. The present study explored psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test feedback for a weight related gene (FTO) in a volunteer sample (n = 18) using semi-structured interviews. Respondents perceived the gene test result as scientifically objective; removing some of the emotion attached to the issue of weight control. Those who were struggling with weight control reported relief of self-blame. There was no evidence for either complacency or fatalism; all respondents emphasized the importance of lifestyle choices in long-term weight management, although they recognized the role of both genes and environment. Regardless of the test result, respondents evaluated the testing positively and found it motivating and informative. Genetic test feedback for risk of weight gain may offer psychological benefits beyond its objectively limited clinical utility. As the role of genetic counselors is likely to expand, awareness of reasons for genetic testing for common, complex conditions and reactions to the test result is important.

  17. Gain enhanced Fano resonance in a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Tang, Jing; Sun, Yue; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2016-01-01

    Systems with coupled cavities and waveguides have been demonstrated as optical switches and optical sensors. To optimize the functionalities of these optical devices, Fano resonance with asymmetric and steep spectral line shape has been used. We theoretically propose a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure to achieve Fano resonance by placing partially reflecting elements in waveguide. To enhance Fano resonance, optical gain material is introduced into the cavity. As the gain increases, the transmission line shape becomes steepened and the transmissivity can be six times enhanced, giving a large contrast by a small frequency shift. It is prospected that the gain enhanced Fano resonance is very useful for optical switches and optical sensors. PMID:27640809

  18. Gain enhanced Fano resonance in a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Tang, Jing; Sun, Yue; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2016-09-01

    Systems with coupled cavities and waveguides have been demonstrated as optical switches and optical sensors. To optimize the functionalities of these optical devices, Fano resonance with asymmetric and steep spectral line shape has been used. We theoretically propose a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure to achieve Fano resonance by placing partially reflecting elements in waveguide. To enhance Fano resonance, optical gain material is introduced into the cavity. As the gain increases, the transmission line shape becomes steepened and the transmissivity can be six times enhanced, giving a large contrast by a small frequency shift. It is prospected that the gain enhanced Fano resonance is very useful for optical switches and optical sensors.

  19. Potential benefits of genomic selection on genetic gain of small ruminant breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Shumbusho, F; Raoul, J; Astruc, J M; Palhiere, I; Elsen, J M

    2013-08-01

    In conventional small ruminant breeding programs, only pedigree and phenotype records are used to make selection decisions but prospects of including genomic information are now under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the potential benefits of genomic selection on the genetic gain in French sheep and goat breeding designs of today. Traditional and genomic scenarios were modeled with deterministic methods for 3 breeding programs. The models included decisional variables related to male selection candidates, progeny testing capacity, and economic weights that were optimized to maximize annual genetic gain (AGG) of i) a meat sheep breeding program that improved a meat trait of heritability (h(2)) = 0.30 and a maternal trait of h(2) = 0.09 and ii) dairy sheep and goat breeding programs that improved a milk trait of h(2) = 0.30. Values of ±0.20 of genetic correlation between meat and maternal traits were considered to study their effects on AGG. The Bulmer effect was accounted for and the results presented here are the averages of AGG after 10 generations of selection. Results showed that current traditional breeding programs provide an AGG of 0.095 genetic standard deviation (σa) for meat and 0.061 σa for maternal trait in meat breed and 0.147 σa and 0.120 σa in sheep and goat dairy breeds, respectively. By optimizing decisional variables, the AGG with traditional selection methods increased to 0.139 σa for meat and 0.096 σa for maternal traits in meat breeding programs and to 0.174 σa and 0.183 σa in dairy sheep and goat breeding programs, respectively. With a medium-sized reference population (nref) of 2,000 individuals, the best genomic scenarios gave an AGG that was 17.9% greater than with traditional selection methods with optimized values of decisional variables for combined meat and maternal traits in meat sheep, 51.7% in dairy sheep, and 26.2% in dairy goats. The superiority of genomic schemes increased with the size of the

  20. Antenna Gain Enhancement and Beamshaping using a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbitt, Christopher

    Dielectric and metamaterial lenses have been designed for gain enhancement and beam shaping. The motivation for this work came from a commercially available slotted waveguide antenna with a dielectric lens that shapes the beam and enhances the gain only in the azimuth plane. When two of these antennas, each with a dielectric lens, are stacked as an array to form the sum and difference patterns the elevation plane gain is low and the beam width too wide to be acceptable for radar applications. The objective of the present work is to design a diffractive optical element (DOE) lens for gain enhancement gain and beam shaping. As compared to other available lenses it is much thinner, lighter and easily machined. The DOE lens is made from rexolite which has a dielectric constant of 2.53. The DOE lens is composed of a series of zones which focus the light at a certain focal length. The phase is the same everywhere on each zone at the focal point. The phase difference between neighboring zones is 2pi, resulting in a constructive interference at the focus. These zones are able to focus the radiation from an antenna in order to enhance the gain and shape the beam. The design parameters include the lens diameter, number of zones, the center zone thickness for a particular frequency and refractive index of the dielectric material. A comprehensive study has been performed in CST Microwave Studio to illustrate the properties of the DOE lens. The focusing property for image formation is verified by a plane wave excitation. Lenses have been designed and tested at different frequencies and with varying design parameters. Gain enhancement and beam shaping are illustrated by modeling the DOE lens in CST and placing it in front of different antennas. This work presents lenses for 10GHz and 40GHz horn antennas, a 3GHz slotted waveguide antenna array, and a 10GHz microstrip patch arrays. Beam shaping and focusing is clearly illustrated for each type of antenna. It is seen that the size

  1. A Confucian reflection on genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruiping

    2010-04-01

    This essay explores a proper Confucian vision on genetic enhancement. It argues that while Confucians can accept a formal starting point that Michael Sandel proposes in his ethics of giftedness, namely, that children should be taken as gifts, Confucians cannot adopt his generalist strategy. The essay provides a Confucian full ethics of giftedness by addressing a series of relevant questions, such as what kind of gifts children are, where the gifts are from, in which way they are given, and for what purpose they are given. It indicates that Confucians should sort out different types of enhancement and bring them to the test of the Confucian values in terms of both Confucian virtue principles and specific ritual rules. It concludes that Confucians can accept some types of enhancement but must reject others.

  2. Defining desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding objective using analytic hierarchy process.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lim, P; Komen, H; Kause, A; van Arendonk, J A M; Barfoot, A J; Martin, K E; Parsons, J E

    2012-06-01

    Distributing animals from a single breeding program to a global market may not satisfy all producers, as they may differ in market objectives and farming environments. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to estimate preferences, which can be aggregated to consensus preference values using weighted goal programming (WGP). The aim of this study was to use an AHP-WGP based approach to derive desired genetic gains for rainbow trout breeding and to study whether breeding trait preferences vary depending on commercial products and farming environments. Two questionnaires were sent out. Questionnaire-A (Q-A) was distributed to 178 farmers from 5 continents and used to collect information on commercial products and farming environments. In this questionnaire, farmers were asked to rank the 6 most important traits for genetic improvement from a list of 13 traits. Questionnaire B (Q-B) was sent to all farmers who responded to Q-A (53 in total). For Q-B, preferences of the 6 traits were obtained using pairwise comparison. Preference intensity was given to quantify (in % of a trait mean; G%) the degree to which 1 trait is preferred over the other. Individual preferences, social preferences, and consensus preferences (Con-P) were estimated using AHP and WGP. Desired gains were constructed by multiplying Con-P by G%. The analysis revealed that the 6 most important traits were thermal growth coefficient (TGC), survival (Surv), feed conversion ratio (FCR), condition factor (CF), fillet percentage (FIL%), and late maturation (LMat). Ranking of traits based on average Con-P values were Surv (0.271), FCR (0.246), TGC (0.246), LMat (0.090), FIL% (0.081), and CF (0.067). Corresponding desired genetic gains (in % of trait mean) were 1.63, 1.87, 1.67, 1.29, 0.06, and 0.33%, respectively. The results from Con-P values show that trait preferences may vary for different types of commercial production or farming environments. This study demonstrated that combination of AHP and WGP can

  3. Comparison of genetic gains per year for carcass traits among breeding programs in the Japanese Brown and the Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Miyake, T; Gaillard, C; Oguni, T; Matsumoto, M; Ito, M; Kurahara, T; Sasae, Y; Fujinaka, K; Ohtagaki, S; Dougo, T

    2006-02-01

    The breeding program for beef cattle in Japan has changed dramatically over 4 decades. Visual judging was done initially, but progeny testing in test stations began in 1968. In the 1980s, the genetic evaluation program using field records, so-called on-farm progeny testing, was first adopted in Oita, Hyogo, and Kumamoto prefectures. In this study, genetic trends for carcass traits in these 3 Wagyu populations were estimated, and genetic gains per year were compared among the 3 different beef cattle breeding programs. The field carcass records used were collected between 1988 and 2003. The traits analyzed were carcass weight, LM area, rib thickness, s.c. fat thickness, and beef marbling standard number. The average breeding values of reproducing dams born the same year were used to estimate the genetic trends for the carcass traits. For comparison of the 3 breeding programs, birth years of the dams were divided into 3 periods reflecting each program. Positive genetic trends for beef marbling standard number were clearly shown in all populations. The genetic gains per year for all carcass traits were significantly enhanced by adopting the on-farm progeny testing program. These results indicate that the on-farm progeny testing program with BLUP is a very powerful approach for genetic improvement of carcass traits in Japanese Wagyu beef cattle.

  4. Fast Ignition Thermonuclear Fusion: Enhancement of the Pellet Gain by the Colossal-Magnetic-Field Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The fast ignition fusion pellet gain can be enhanced by a laser generated B-field shell. The B-field shell, (similar to Earth's B-field, but with the alternating B-poles), follows the pellet compression in a frozen-in B-field regime. A properly designed laser-pellet coupling can lead to the generation of a B-field shell, (up to 100 MG), which inhibits electron thermal transport and confines the alpha-particles. In principle, a pellet gain of few-100s can be achieved in this manner. Supported in part by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University, 1010 Pearl, La Jolla, CA 92038-1007.

  5. Genetic enhancement in sport: just another form of doping?

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2012-12-01

    Patented genetic technologies such as the ACTN3 genetic test are adding a new dimension to the types of performance enhancement available to elite athletes. Organized sports organizations and governments are seeking to prevent athletes' use of biomedical enhancements. This paper discusses how these interdiction efforts will affect the use and availability of genetic technologies that can enhance athletic performance. The paper provides a working definition of enhancement, and in light of that definition and the concerns of the sports community, reviews genetic enhancement as a result of varied technologies, including, genetic testing to identify innate athletic ability, performance-enhancing drugs developed with genetic science and technology, pharmacogenetics, enhancement through reproductive technologies, somatic gene transfer, and germ line gene transfer.

  6. Modeling of genetic gain for single traits from marker-assisted seedling selection in clonally propagated crops

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Sushan; Hardner, Craig; Carter, Patrick A; Evans, Kate; Main, Dorrie; Peace, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Seedling selection identifies superior seedlings as candidate cultivars based on predicted genetic potential for traits of interest. Traditionally, genetic potential is determined by phenotypic evaluation. With the availability of DNA tests for some agronomically important traits, breeders have the opportunity to include DNA information in their seedling selection operations—known as marker-assisted seedling selection. A major challenge in deploying marker-assisted seedling selection in clonally propagated crops is a lack of knowledge in genetic gain achievable from alternative strategies. Existing models based on additive effects considering seed-propagated crops are not directly relevant for seedling selection of clonally propagated crops, as clonal propagation captures all genetic effects, not just additive. This study modeled genetic gain from traditional and various marker-based seedling selection strategies on a single trait basis through analytical derivation and stochastic simulation, based on a generalized seedling selection scheme of clonally propagated crops. Various trait-test scenarios with a range of broad-sense heritability and proportion of genotypic variance explained by DNA markers were simulated for two populations with different segregation patterns. Both derived and simulated results indicated that marker-based strategies tended to achieve higher genetic gain than phenotypic seedling selection for a trait where the proportion of genotypic variance explained by marker information was greater than the broad-sense heritability. Results from this study provides guidance in optimizing genetic gain from seedling selection for single traits where DNA tests providing marker information are available. PMID:27148453

  7. Depression Risk Predicts Blunted Neural Responses to Gains and Enhanced Responses to Losses in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Luking, Katherine R.; Pagliaccio, David; Luby, Joan L.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Maternal major depressive disorder (MDD) increases risk for MDD and predicts reduced reward responding in adolescent offspring. However, it is unclear whether alterations in neural response to reward can be detected in school-aged children at high risk prior to the typical increase in reward response observed in adolescence. Method To assess relationships between neural response to gain/loss feedback, MDD risk, and child depressive symptoms, forty-seven psychiatrically healthy 7–10-year-old children (16 at high-risk given maternal MDD) completed questionnaires and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) card-guessing game where candy was gained and lost. Results High-risk children showed both blunted response to gain and greater deactivation/reduced activation to loss within the ventral striatum and anterior insula. Within the striatum, risk-group differences in response to loss feedback were significantly larger than for gain, with greater deactivation to loss predicting risk-group status above and beyond blunted gain activation. Anhedonia was related to reduced deactivation to loss (i.e. reduced sensitivity to loss), while negative mood was related to enhanced deactivation to loss (i.e. enhanced sensitivity to loss) in the ventral striatum. Conclusion High-risk children showed blunted ventral striatal activation to gain feedback, but ventral striatal deactivation to loss was a stronger predictor of MDD risk. Further, relationships between response to loss and elevated depressive symptoms within the ventral striatum and cingulate differed depending on the type of depressive symptom. Together these results highlight the potentially important role of response to loss of reward in childhood risk for depression. PMID:27015724

  8. Genetic Redundancies Enhance Information Transfer in Noisy Regulatory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular decision making is based on regulatory circuits that associate signal thresholds to specific physiological actions. This transmission of information is subjected to molecular noise what can decrease its fidelity. Here, we show instead how such intrinsic noise enhances information transfer in the presence of multiple circuit copies. The result is due to the contribution of noise to the generation of autonomous responses by each copy, which are altogether associated with a common decision. Moreover, factors that correlate the responses of the redundant units (extrinsic noise or regulatory cross-talk) contribute to reduce fidelity, while those that further uncouple them (heterogeneity within the copies) can lead to stronger information gain. Overall, our study emphasizes how the interplay of signal thresholding, redundancy, and noise influences the accuracy of cellular decision making. Understanding this interplay provides a basis to explain collective cell signaling mechanisms, and to engineer robust decisions with noisy genetic circuits. PMID:27741249

  9. Chronic clozapine treatment in female rats does not induce weight gain or metabolic abnormalities but enhances adiposity: implications for animal models of antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G D; Harrold, J A; Halford, J C G; Goudie, A J

    2008-02-15

    The ability of clozapine to induce weight gain in female rats was investigated in three studies with progressively lowered doses of clozapine. In an initial preliminary high dose study, clozapine at 6 and 12 mg/kg (i.p., b.i.d.) was found to induce weight loss. In a subsequent intermediate dose study, we obtained no evidence for clozapine-induced weight gain despite using identical procedures and doses of clozapine (1-4 mg/kg, i.p., b.i.d.) with which we have observed olanzapine-induced weight gain, hyperphagia, enhanced adiposity and metabolic changes [Cooper G, Pickavance L, Wilding J, Halford J, Goudie A (2005). A parametric analysis of olanzapine-induced weight gain in female rats. Psychopharmacology; 181: 80-89.]. Instead, clozapine induced weight loss without alteration in food intake and muscle mass or changes in levels of glucose, insulin, leptin and prolactin. However, these intermediate doses of clozapine enhanced visceral adiposity and elevated levels of adiponectin. In a final study, low doses of clozapine (0.25-0.5 mg/kg, i.p, b.i.d.) induced weight loss. These data demonstrate that clozapine-induced weight gain can be much more difficult to observe in female rats than olanzapine-induced weight gain. Moreover, these findings contrast with clinical findings with clozapine, which induces substantial weight gain in humans. Clozapine-induced enhanced adiposity appears to be easier to observe in rats than weight gain. These findings, along with other preclinical studies, suggest that enhanced adiposity can be observed in the absence of antipsychotic-induced weight gain and hyperphagia, possibly reflecting a direct drug effect on adipocyte function independent of drug-induced hyperphagia [e.g. Minet-Ringuet J, Even P, Valet P, Carpene C, Visentin V, Prevot D, Daviaud D, Quignard-Boulange A, Tome D, de Beaurepaire R (2007). Alterations of lipid metabolism and gene expression in rat adipocytes during chronic olanzapine treatment. Molecular Psychiatry; 12: 562

  10. Bandwidth enhancement of MgZnO-based MSM photodetectors by inductive gain peaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Guo, Xinlu; Guo, Lixin; He, Jingfang; Yang, Yintang; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    For high-speed optical communication applications, the bandwidth of photodetector would be a key limitation. In this work, the bandwidth property of MgZnO-based Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photodetector considering RC and transit limitations is investigated on the basis of the series and enhanced gain peaked photodetector circuits proposed by us with different finger widths. To ensure the accuracy of parameters, the high-filed transportation characteristics of MgZnO are investigated by a three-valley ensemble Monte Carlo simulation combined with first principle calculations. The results show that the gain peaking technique, especially the enhanced gain peaking, can improve the bandwidth of MgZnO MSM photodetector to a maximum value of 61.28 GHz, corresponding to a bandwidth enhancement of 49% without undesired effects. Three-dimensional electromagnetic computation is further performed to design and simulate the on-chip-inductor. The value of the simulated inductor is approximately 0.0529 nH, which is in good agreement with the designed value of 0.0569 nH. This work benefits the development of high speed MgZnO MSM photodetector.

  11. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars; Laurin, Charles; Morgen, Camilla S.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Smith, George Davey; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Nohr, Ellen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup. Objective To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity. Design A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined. Results In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01). For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01) per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings. Conclusion We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs. PMID:26930408

  12. Psychological responses to genetic testing for weight gain: a vignette study.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Susanne F; Walker, Catherine; Wardle, Jane

    2012-03-01

    Genetic testing for obesity risk is increasingly available to the public but few studies have examined motivational or affective reactions. Here we report findings from a "vignette" study investigating reactions to "higher-risk" and "average-risk" results for the obesity-related FTO gene in two groups: a panel sample of individuals with weight concerns, for whom testing may have treatment implications (n = 306, mean age = 45 years, mean BMI = 35) and a student sample (n = 395, mean age = 25 years, mean BMI = 23), for whom testing would have implications for obesity prevention. Participants were given FTO gene information that described higher-risk alleles as linked with modest weight gain and slightly higher risk of obesity. They responded to both higher- and average-risk vignettes, with order randomized. Interest in genetic testing was high overall, and higher in panel respondents than students (93% vs. 78% would "probably" or "definitely" have the test; P < 0.001). In students, a higher-risk result generated higher motivation to change (d = 0.15; P < 0.001), but also slightly higher negative affect (d = 0.03, P < 0.001) and fatalism (d = 0.05, P < 0.001) than an average-risk result. Panel respondents also had higher motivation to change (d = 0.17, P < 0.001) as well as relief about having an explanation for their body weight (d = 0.02, P = 0.013) in the higher-risk condition, but no increase in fatalism or depression. These results suggest that at the level of anticipated responses to FTO gene feedback, higher-risk results had positive motivational effects with minimal changes in negative affect or fatalism. Genetic testing has the potential to be a useful clinical or preventive tool when combined with appropriate information.

  13. Printed wide-slot antenna design with bandwidth and gain enhancement on low-cost substrate.

    PubMed

    Samsuzzaman, M; Islam, M T; Mandeep, J S; Misran, N

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS.

  14. Printed Wide-Slot Antenna Design with Bandwidth and Gain Enhancement on Low-Cost Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Samsuzzaman, M.; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a printed wide-slot antenna design and prototyping on available low-cost polymer resin composite material fed by a microstrip line with a rotated square slot for bandwidth enhancement and defected ground structure for gain enhancement. An I-shaped microstrip line is used to excite the square slot. The rotated square slot is embedded in the middle of the ground plane, and its diagonal points are implanted in the middle of the strip line and ground plane. To increase the gain, four L-shaped slots are etched in the ground plane. The measured results show that the proposed structure retains a wide impedance bandwidth of 88.07%, which is 20% better than the reference antenna. The average gain is also increased, which is about 4.17 dBi with a stable radiation pattern in the entire operating band. Moreover, radiation efficiency, input impedance, current distribution, axial ratio, and parametric studies of S11 for different design parameters are also investigated using the finite element method-based simulation software HFSS. PMID:24696661

  15. Meander-line-based inhomogeneous anisotropic artificial material for gain enhancement of UWB Vivaldi antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Singh, Hari Shankar; Meshram, Manoj Kumar

    2016-02-01

    An inhomogeneous anisotropic (IA) artificial material (AM) is proposed having epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) characteristics and effective refractive index >1, simultaneously, in the same direction. Further, the proposed IA-AM is utilized for the gain enhancement of Vivaldi antenna for ultra-wideband (UWB) applications. The IA-AM consists of two types of compact meandered line-based anisotropic artificial material with ENZ characteristics in two adjacent narrow bands of 5.5-8.5 and 8-11.5 GHz. However, the non-resonant behavior of the artificial material in other direction appears with high refractive index property in broadband region. The combination of both the unit cells with broadband ENZ and high refractive index property is used to improve the gain of the Vivaldi antenna in broadband. The proposed IA-AM-loaded Vivaldi antenna exhibits a gain enhancement of up to 2 dBi compared to the original antenna in the operating frequency band of 3.1-12 GHz with | S 11| < -10 dB. The proposed antenna shows nearly stable unidirectional radiation patterns with high directivity and nearly flat group delay.

  16. Brillouin-Erbium fiber laser with enhanced feedback coupling using common Erbium gain section.

    PubMed

    Samsuri, N M; Zamzuri, A K; Al-Mansoori, M H; Ahmad, A; Mahdi, M A

    2008-10-13

    We demonstrate an enhanced architecture of Brillouin-Erbium fiber laser utilizing the reverse-S-shaped fiber section as the coupling mechanism. The enhancement is made by locating a common section of Erbium-doped fiber next to the single-mode fiber to amplify the Brillouin pumps and the oscillating Stokes lines. The requirement of having two Erbium gain sections to enhance the multiple Brillouin Stokes lines generation is neglected by the proposed fiber laser structure. The mode competitions arise from the self-lasing cavity modes of the fiber laser are efficiently suppressed by the stronger pre-amplified Brillouin pump power before entering the single mode fiber section. The maximum output power of 20 mW is obtained from the proposed fiber laser with 10 laser lines that equally separated by 0.089 nm spacing.

  17. Central angiotensin (1-7) enhances baroreflex gain in conscious rabbits with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sumit; Gao, Lie; Belatti, Daniel A; Curry, Pamela L; Zucker, Irving H

    2011-10-01

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), arterial baroreflex function is impaired, in part, by activation of the central renin-angiotensin system. A metabolite of angiotensin (Ang) II, Ang-(1-7), has been shown to exhibit cardiovascular effects that are in opposition to that of Ang II. However, the action of Ang-(1-7) on sympathetic outflow and baroreflex function is not well understood, especially in CHF. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intracerebroventricular infusion of Ang-(1-7) on baroreflex control of heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rabbits with CHF. We hypothesized that central Ang-(1-7) would improve baroreflex function in CHF. Ang-(1-7) (2 nmol/1 μL per hour) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (1 μL per hour) was infused by an osmotic minipump for 4 days in sham and pacing-induced CHF rabbits (n=3 to 6 per group). Ang-(1-7) treatment had no effects in sham rabbits but reduced heart rate and increased baroreflex gain (7.4±1.5 versus 2.5±0.4 bpm/mm Hg; P<0.05) in CHF rabbits. The Ang-(1-7) antagonist A779 (8 nmol/1 μL per hour) blocked the improvement in baroreflex gain in CHF. Baroreflex gain increased in CHF+Ang-(1-7) animals when only the vagus was allowed to modulate baroreflex control by acute treatment with the β-1 antagonist metoprolol, indicating increased vagal tone. Baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity was significantly lower, and baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity was enhanced in CHF rabbits receiving Ang-(1-7). These data suggest that augmentation of central Ang-(1-7) inhibits sympathetic outflow and increases vagal outflow in CHF, thus contributing to enhanced baroreflex gain in this disease state.

  18. Enhancing speed of pinning synchronizability: low-degree nodes with high feedback gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Liao, Hao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-12-01

    Controlling complex networks is of paramount importance in science and engineering. Despite recent efforts to improve controllability and synchronous strength, little attention has been paid to the speed of pinning synchronizability (rate of convergence in pinning control) and the corresponding pinning node selection. To address this issue, we propose a hypothesis to restrict the control cost, then build a linear matrix inequality related to the speed of pinning controllability. By solving the inequality, we obtain both the speed of pinning controllability and optimal control strength (feedback gains in pinning control) for all nodes. Interestingly, some low-degree nodes are able to achieve large feedback gains, which suggests that they have high influence on controlling system. In addition, when choosing nodes with high feedback gains as pinning nodes, the controlling speed of real systems is remarkably enhanced compared to that of traditional large-degree and large-betweenness selections. Thus, the proposed approach provides a novel way to investigate the speed of pinning controllability and can evoke other effective heuristic pinning node selections for large-scale systems.

  19. Enhancing speed of pinning synchronizability: low-degree nodes with high feedback gains

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Liao, Hao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Cai, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex networks is of paramount importance in science and engineering. Despite recent efforts to improve controllability and synchronous strength, little attention has been paid to the speed of pinning synchronizability (rate of convergence in pinning control) and the corresponding pinning node selection. To address this issue, we propose a hypothesis to restrict the control cost, then build a linear matrix inequality related to the speed of pinning controllability. By solving the inequality, we obtain both the speed of pinning controllability and optimal control strength (feedback gains in pinning control) for all nodes. Interestingly, some low-degree nodes are able to achieve large feedback gains, which suggests that they have high influence on controlling system. In addition, when choosing nodes with high feedback gains as pinning nodes, the controlling speed of real systems is remarkably enhanced compared to that of traditional large-degree and large-betweenness selections. Thus, the proposed approach provides a novel way to investigate the speed of pinning controllability and can evoke other effective heuristic pinning node selections for large-scale systems. PMID:26626045

  20. Enhancing family communication about genetics: ethical and professional dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jan; Gaff, Clara

    2013-02-01

    When a new genetic condition is diagnosed within a family, genetic counselors often describe a sense of responsibility towards other at risk family members to be appropriately informed about their status. Successful communication of genetic information in families is contingent on many factors. While a small number of probands directly state their intention not to inform their relatives, many who do intend to communicate this information appear to be unsuccessful for a wide range of reasons and may benefit from follow up support from a genetic counselor. Drawing on the reciprocal-engagement model (REM) of genetic counseling practice we explore how enhancing family communication about genetics raises a number of ethical and professional challenges for counselors-and describe how we resolved these. A subsequent manuscript will describe the counseling framework we have developed to enhance family communication about genetics.

  1. A Cognitive Tutor for Genetics Problem Solving: Learning Gains and Student Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Albert; Kauffman, Linda; Maclaren, Ben; Wagner, Angela; Jones, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Genetics is a unifying theme of biology that poses a major challenge for students across a wide range of post-secondary institutions, because it entails complex problem solving. This article reports a new intelligent learning environment called the Genetics Cognitive Tutor, which supports genetics problem solving. The tutor presents complex,…

  2. The contribution of migrant breeds to the genetic gain of beef traits of German Vorderwald and Hinterwald cattle.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, S; Wellmann, R; Hamann, H; Bennewitz, J

    2014-12-01

    During the past decades, migrant contributions have accumulated in many local breeds. Cross-breeding was carried out to mitigate the risk of inbreeding depression and to improve the performance of local breeds. However, breeding activities for local breeds were not as intensive and target oriented as for popular high-yielding breeds. Therefore, even if performance improved, the gap between the performance of local and popular breeds increased for many traits. Furthermore, the genetic originality of local breeds declined due to the increasing contributions of migrant breeds. This study examined the importance of migrant breed influences for the realization of breeding progress of beef traits of German Vorderwald and Hinterwald cattle. The results show that there is a high amount of migrant contributions and their effects on performance are substantial for most traits. The effect of the French cattle breed Montbéliard (p-value 0.014) on daily gain of Vorderwald bulls at test station was positive. The effects of Vorderwald ancestors (p-value for daily gain 0.007 and p-value for net gain 0.004) were positive for both traits under consideration in the population of Hinterwald cattle. Additionally, the effect of remaining breeds (p-value 0.030) on net gain of Hinterwald cattle in the field was also positive. The estimated effect of Fleckvieh ancestors on net gain of Hinterwald cattle was even larger but not significant. Breeding values adjusted for the effects of the migrant breeds showed little genetic trend.

  3. Littermate presence enhances motor development, weight gain and competitive ability in newborn and juvenile domestic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, Leticia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Hudson, Robyn; Bautista, Amando

    2011-01-01

    Interest has been growing in the influence siblings may have on individual development. While mammalian research has tended to emphasize competition among siblings for essential but often limited resources such as the mother's milk, there is also evidence of mutual benefits to be had from sibling presence, most notably for altricial young in enhanced thermoregulatory efficiency. In the present study we asked whether littermates of an altricial mammal, the domestic rabbit, might gain other developmental benefits from sibling presence. From postnatal days 1 to 25 we raised rabbit pups either together with their littermates or alone except for the brief, once daily nursing characteristic of this species, while controlling for litter size and ambient nest box temperature. At weaning on Day 25 the young were then transferred to individual cages. Before weaning, we found that pups raised separately from their littermates obtained less milk, and showed lower weight gain and slower development of the ability to maintain body equilibrium than their litter-raised sibs. This was the case even though the two groups did not differ in birth weight or in the ratio of converting milk into body mass in their temperature-controlled nest boxes. Postweaning, the isolation-raised animals were also less successful in competing for food and water when tested after deprivation than their litter-raised sibs. The present study adds to the growing evidence of the influence, in this case positive, that sibs (or half sibs) may have in shaping one another's development.

  4. Genetic Screening of Cells with Enhanced Antibody Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-22

    Final Progress Report DARPA Grant No. W911NF-05-C-0059 Genetic Screening of Cells with Enhanced Antibody Production By Roxanne Duan, Ph.D...Functional Genetics , Inc. January 22, 2007 Summary Here we report the progress made for grant No. W911NF-05-C-0059 between the entire funding...period, 06/01/05 and 8/31/06. We have completed the study proposed: to use Functional Genetics ’ proprietary technology, Random Homozygous Knock Out

  5. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  6. Undergraduates Achieve Learning Gains in Plant Genetics through Peer Teaching of Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrispeels, H. E.; Klosterman, M. L.; Martin, J. B.; Lundy, S. R.; Watkins, J. M.; Gibson, C. L.; Muday, G. K.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that undergraduates who peer teach genetics will have greater understanding of genetic and molecular biology concepts as a result of their teaching experiences. Undergraduates enrolled in a non-majors biology course participated in a service-learning program in which they led middle school (MS) or high school (HS)…

  7. Genetic Engineering Strategies for Enhanced Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Krishnamoorthy; Chandra, Niharika; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Veeranki, Venkata Dasu

    2015-07-01

    The focus on biodiesel research has shown a tremendous growth over the last few years. Several microbial and plant sources are being explored for the sustainable biodiesel production to replace the petroleum diesel. Conventional methods of biodiesel production have several limitations related to yield and quality, which led to development of new engineering strategies to improve the biodiesel production in plants, and microorganisms. Substantial progress in utilizing algae, yeast, and Escherichia coli for the renewable production of biodiesel feedstock via genetic engineering of fatty acid metabolic pathways has been reported in the past few years. However, in most of the cases, the successful commercialization of such engineering strategies for sustainable biodiesel production is yet to be seen. This paper systematically presents the drawbacks in the conventional methods for biodiesel production and an exhaustive review on the present status of research in genetic engineering strategies for production of biodiesel in plants, and microorganisms. Further, we summarize the technical challenges need to be tackled to make genetic engineering technology economically sustainable. Finally, the need and prospects of genetic engineering technology for the sustainable biodiesel production and the recommendations for the future research are discussed.

  8. GENETIC ENGINEERING OF ENHANCED MICROBIAL NITRIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to introduce genetic information in the form of antibiotic or mercuric ion resistance genes into Nitrobacter hamburgensis strain X14. The resistance genes were either stable components of broad host range plasmids or transposable genes on methods for p...

  9. Controlling inbreeding and maximizing genetic gain using semi-definite programming with pedigree-based and genomic relationships.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, S; Pimentel, E C G; Tietze, M; Körte, J; Reents, R; Reinhardt, F; Simianer, H; König, S

    2011-12-01

    Because of the relatively high levels of genetic relationships among potential bull sires and bull dams, innovative selection tools should consider both genetic gain and genetic relationships in a long-term perspective. Optimum genetic contribution theory using official estimated breeding values for a moderately heritable trait (production index, Index-PROD), and a lowly heritable functional trait (index for somatic cell score, Index-SCS) was applied to find optimal allocations of bull dams and bull sires. In contrast to previous practical applications using optimizations based on Lagrange multipliers, we focused on semi-definite programming (SDP). The SDP methodology was combined with either pedigree (a(ij)) or genomic relationships (f(ij)) among selection candidates. Selection candidates were 484 genotyped bulls, and 499 preselected genotyped bull dams completing a central test on station. In different scenarios separately for PROD and SCS, constraints on the average pedigree relationships among future progeny were varied from a(ij)=0.08 to a(ij)=0.20 in increments of 0.01. Corresponding constraints for single nucleotide polymorphism-based kinship coefficients were derived from regression analysis. Applying the coefficient of 0.52 with an intercept of 0.14 estimated for the regression pedigree relationship on genomic relationship, the corresponding range to alter genomic relationships varied from f(ij) = 0.18 to f(ij) = 0.24. Despite differences for some bulls in genomic and pedigree relationships, the same trends were observed for constraints on pedigree and corresponding genomic relationships regarding results in genetic gain and achieved coefficients of relationships. Generally, allowing higher values for relationships resulted in an increase of genetic gain for Index-PROD and Index-SCS and in a reduction in the number of selected sires. Interestingly, more sires were selected for all scenarios when restricting genomic relationships compared with restricting

  10. The silencing of Kierkegaard in Habermas' critique of genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Karin

    2009-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an important part of Habermas' critique of genetic enhancement, which has been largely ignored in the discussion; namely his use of Kierkegaard's reflections on the existential conditions for becoming one-self from Either/or and the Sickness unto Death. It will be argued that, although Habermas presents some valuable and highly significant perspectives on the effect of genetic enhancement on the individual's self-understanding and ability to experience him- or herself as a free and equal individual, he does not succeed in working out a consistent argument. The claim is that he fails to explain how the existential analysis is related to his reflections on the sociological and psychological impacts of genetic enhancement in the realm of communicative action. It is this lack of theoretical clarity, which seems to render Habermas vulnerable to some of the critique which has been raised against his theory from a number of different scientific disciplines and areas of research. Hence, the first part of the paper provides some examples of the nature and variety of this critique, the second part presents Habermas' own critique of genetic enhancement in the context of a dispute between so-called 'liberal' and 'conservative' arguments, and finally, the third part discusses the limits and possibilities of his position in a future debate about genetic enhancement.

  11. Selection for feed efficiency traits and correlated genetic responses in feed intake and weight gain of Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Grion, A L; Mercadante, M E Z; Cyrillo, J N S G; Bonilha, S F M; Magnani, E; Branco, R H

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters for indicator traits of feed efficiency and to recommend traits that would result in better responses to selection for increased weaning weight (weaning weight adjusted to 210 d of age [W210]), ADG, and metabolic BW (BW(0.75)) and lower DMI. Records of W210 from 8,004 Nellore animals born between 1978 and 2011 and postweaning performance test records from 678 males and females born between 2004 and 2011 were used. The following feed efficiency traits were evaluated: G:F, partial efficiency of growth (PEG), relative growth rate (RGR), Kleiber's ratio (KR), residual feed intake (RFI), residual weight gain (RWG), and residual intake and gain (RIG). Covariance and variance components were estimated by the restricted maximum likelihood method using multitrait analysis under an animal model. Estimates of genetic gain and correlated responses were obtained considering single-stage and 2-stage selection. Heritability estimates were 0.22 ± 0.03 (W210), 0.60 ± 0.08 (DMI), 0.42 ± 0.08 (ADG), 0.56 ± 0.06 (BW(0.75)), 0.19 ± 0.07 (G:F), 0.25 ± 0.09 (PEG), 0.19 ± 0.07 (RGR), 0.22 ± 0.07 (KR), 0.33 ± 0.10 (RFI), 0.13 ± 0.07 (RWG), and 0.19 ± 0.08 (RIG). The genetic correlations of DMI with W210 (0.64 ± 0.10), ADG (0.87 ± 0.06), and BW(0.75) (0.84 ± 0.05) were high. The only efficiency traits showing favorable responses to selection for lower DMI were G:F, PEG, RFI, and RIG. However, the use of G:F, PEG, or RFI as a selection criterion results in unfavorable correlated responses in some growth traits. The linear combination of RFI and RWG through RIG is the best selection criterion to obtain favorable responses in postweaning growth and feed intake of Nellore cattle in single-stage selection. Genetic gains in feed efficiency are expected even after preselection for W210 and subsequent feed efficiency testing of the preselected animals.

  12. The experience of dentists who gained enhanced skills in endodontics within a novel pilot training programme.

    PubMed

    Eliyas, S; Briggs, P; Gallagher, J E

    2017-02-24

    Objective To explore the experiences of primary care dentists following training to enhance endodontic skills and their views on the implications for the NHS.Design Qualitative study using anonymised free text questionnaires.Setting Primary care general dental services within the National Health Service (NHS) in London, United Kingdom.Subjects and methods Eight primary care dentists who completed this training were asked about factors affecting participant experience of the course, perceived impact on themselves, their organisation, their patients and barriers/facilitators to providing endodontic treatment in NHS primary care. Data were transferred verbatim to a spreadsheet and thematically analysed.Intervention 24-month part-time educational and service initiative to provide endodontics within the NHS, using a combination of training in simulation lab and treatment of patients in primary care.Results Positive impacts were identified at individual (gains in knowledge, skills, confidence, personal development), patient (more teeth saved, quality of care improved) and system levels (access, value for money). Suggested developments for future courses included more case discussions, teaching of practical skills earlier in the course and refinement of the triaging processes. Barriers to using the acquired skills in providing endodontic treatment in primary care within the NHS were perceived to be resources (remuneration, time, skills) and accountability. Facilitators included appropriately remunerated contracts, necessary equipment and time.Conclusion This novel pilot training programme in endodontics combining general practice experience with education/training, hands-on experience and a portfolio was perceived by participants as beneficial for extending skills and service innovation in primary dental care. The findings provide insight into primary dental care practitioners' experience with education/training and have implications for future educational initiatives in

  13. Genetic enhancement of Brassica napus seed quality.

    PubMed

    Hannoufa, Abdelali; Pillai, Bhinu V S; Chellamma, Sreekala

    2014-02-01

    The ultimate value of the Brassica napus (canola) seed is derived from the oil fraction, which has long been recognized for its premium dietary attributes, including its low level of saturated fatty acids, high content of monounsaturated fatty acids, and favorable omega-3 fatty acid profile. However, the protein (meal) portion of the seed has also received favorable attention for its essential amino acids, including abundance of sulfur-containing amino acids, such that B. napus protein is being contemplated for large scale use in livestock and fish feed formulations. Efforts to optimize the composition of B. napus oil and protein fractions are well documented; therefore, this article will review research concerned with optimizing secondary metabolites that affect the quality of seed oil and meal, from undesirable anti-nutritional factors to highl value beneficial products. The biological, agronomic, and economic values attributed to secondary metabolites have brought much needed attention to those in Brassica oilseeds and other crops. This review focuses on increasing levels of beneficial endogenous secondary metabolites (such as carotenoids, choline and tochopherols) and decreasing undesirable antinutritional factors (glucosinolates, sinapine and phytate). Molecular genetic approaches are given emphasis relative to classical breeding.

  14. n-3 Essential fatty acids decrease weight gain in genetically obese mice.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, S C; McAdoo, K R; Horrobin, D F

    1986-07-01

    1. Lean (ln/ln) and obese (ob/ob) mice were given diets containing a fat source of 100 g evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) oil (fatty acids 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6; EPO) or 100 g cod liver oil (20:5n-3, 22:6n-3; CLO)/kg diet. 2. Weight gain was lower in the ob/ob mice fed on CLO, an effect unrelated to food intake. 3. In the ob/ob mice fed on CLO, thromboxane synthesis by clotting platelets was reduced compared with that in ob/ob mice fed on EPO. 4. The ob/ob CLO-fed mice had lower arachidonic acid but higher levels of n-3 fatty acids in liver, brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue. 5. The n-3 fatty acids in CLO therefore replaced the n-6 fatty acids in tissue lipids and reduced synthesis of '2 series' prostaglandins in addition to causing lower weight gain in the CLO-fed ob/ob mice.

  15. Gain enhancement plasma-loaded FEL in the presence of beat waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shamamian, A.H.; Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the dielectric permittivity of underdense plasma interacting with laser beat waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of beat waves in plasma results in an effective growth of the plasma frequency. The FEL Gain is investigated in the case when the frequency of soft photons weakly depending on the electron beam energy and the synchronism condition is maintained. It is shown that the plasma beat waves lead to the essential increase in FEL gain.

  16. Genetic enhancement of peanut oil quality and disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this project were to develop recombinant inbred lines (RILs, derived from SunOleic 97R x NC94022 ) for genetic and genomic studies and enhancement of peanut oil quality and disease resistance. The major fatty acids (oleic acid, linoleic acid, and palmitic acid) were 83.5%, 1.8%, an...

  17. Integrated genomic approaches to enhance genetic resistance in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chicken has led the way amongst agricultural animal species in infectious disease control and, in particular, selection for genetic resistance. The generation of the chicken genome sequence and the availability of other empowering tools and resources greatly enhance the ability to select for enh...

  18. Behavioural genetics: why eugenic selection is preferable to enhancement.

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Julian; Hemsley, Melanie; Newson, Ainsley; Foddy, Bennett

    2006-01-01

    Criminal behaviour is but one behavioural tendency for which a genetic influence has been suggested. Whilst this research certainly raises difficult ethical questions and is subject to scientific criticism, one recent research project suggests that for some families, criminal tendency might be predicted by genetics. In this paper, supposing this research is valid, we consider whether intervening in the criminal tendency of future children is ethically justifiable. We argue that, if avoidance of harm is a paramount consideration, such an intervention is acceptable when genetic selection is employed instead of genetic enhancement. Moreover, other moral problems in avoiding having children with a tendency to criminal behaviour, such as the prospect of social discrimination, can also be overcome.

  19. MHC-dependent survival in a wild population: evidence for hidden genetic benefits gained through extra-pair fertilizations.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Lyanne; Barr, Iain; van de Pol, Martijn; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan; Richardson, David S

    2010-08-01

    Females should prefer to be fertilized by males that increase the genetic quality of their offspring. In vertebrates, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a key role in the acquired immune response and have been shown to affect mating preferences. They are therefore important candidates for the link between mate choice and indirect genetic benefits. Higher MHC diversity may be advantageous because this allows a wider range of pathogens to be detected and combated. Furthermore, individuals harbouring rare MHC alleles might better resist pathogen variants that have evolved to evade common MHC alleles. In the Seychelles warbler, females paired with low MHC-diversity males elevate the MHC diversity of their offspring to levels comparable to the population mean by gaining extra-pair fertilizations. Here, we investigate whether increased MHC diversity results in higher life expectancy and whether there are any additional benefits of extra-pair fertilizations. Our 10-year study found a positive association between MHC diversity and juvenile survival, but no additional survival advantage of extra-pair fertilizations. In addition, offspring with a specific allele (Ase-ua4) had a fivefold longer life expectancy than offspring without this allele. Consequently, the interacting effects of sexual selection and pathogen-mediated viability selection appear to be important for maintaining MHC variation in the Seychelles warbler. Our study supports the prediction that MHC-dependent extra-pair fertilizations result in genetic benefits for offspring in natural populations. However, such genetic benefits might be hidden and not necessarily apparent in the widely used fitness comparison of extra- and within-pair offspring.

  20. Experiences gained from implementing mandatory buffer strips in Denmark: how can we enhance their ecosystem services?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronvang, Brian; Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Hille, Sandra; Rubæk, Gitte; Heckrath, Goswin; Gertz, Flemming; Jensen, Henning; Feuerback, Peter; Strand, John; Stutter, Marc

    2015-04-01

    along watercourses from ca. 50,000 ha to ca. 25,000 ha and at the same time they reduced the width of the mandatory BSs from 10 m to 9 m. The aim of this presentation is to share the experience gained in Denmark on establishing mandatory BSs. Furthermore, we will show some preliminary results from two newly initiated research projects (BUFFERTECH and BALTICSEA2020) that studies how to enhance the ecosystem services provided by buffer strips. We will show how intelligently to guide managers when establishing BSs along watercourses at catchment scale utilizing a combined P-index model for soil erosion and a statistical model for P retention in BSs as well as results obtained from new 'Engineered' or 'Constructed' BSs that delays tile drainage flow from field to streams thereby increasing nutrient retention. Acknowledgement The work is supported by the Strategic Research Foundation/Innovation Fund Denmark project 'BUFFERTECH - Optimization of Ecosystem Services Provided by Buffer Strips Using Novel Technological Methods' (Grant No. 1305-00017B) and the BalticSea2020 project 'Integrerade skyddszoner (IBZ)'.

  1. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  2. Governmentality, biopower, and the debate over genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, Ladelle

    2009-08-01

    Although Foucault adamantly refused to make moral pronouncements or dictate moral principles or political programs to his readers, his work offers a number of tools and concepts that can help us develop our own ethical views and practices. One of these tools is genealogical analysis, and one of these concepts is "biopower." Specifically, this essay seeks to demonstrate that Foucault's concept of biopower and his genealogical method are valuable as we consider moral questions raised by genetic enhancement technologies. First, it examines contemporary debate over the development, marketing, and application of such technologies, suggesting that what passes for ethical deliberation is often little more than political maneuvering in a field where stakes are very high and public perceptions will play a crucial role in decisions about which technologies will be funded or disallowed. It goes on to argue that genuine ethical deliberation on these issues requires some serious investigation of their historical context. Accordingly, then, it takes up the oft-heard charge from critics that genetic enhancement technologies are continuous with twentieth-century eugenic projects or will usher in a new age of eugenics. Foucault explicitly links twentieth-century eugenics with the rise of biopower. Through review of some aspects of the twentieth-century eugenics movement alongside some of the rhetoric and claims of enhancement's modern-day proponents, the essay shows ways in which deployment of genetic enhancement technologies is and is not continuous with earlier deployments of biopower.

  3. An Extended Normalization Model of Attention Accounts for Feature-Based Attentional Enhancement of Both Response and Coherence Gain

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. Suresh; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to a sensory feature improves its perception and impairs that of others. Recent work has shown that a Normalization Model of Attention (NMoA) can account for a wide range of physiological findings and the influence of different attentional manipulations on visual performance. A key prediction of the NMoA is that attention to a visual feature like an orientation or a motion direction will increase the response of neurons preferring the attended feature (response gain) rather than increase the sensory input strength of the attended stimulus (input gain). This effect of feature-based attention on neuronal responses should translate to similar patterns of improvement in behavioral performance, with psychometric functions showing response gain rather than input gain when attention is directed to the task-relevant feature. In contrast, we report here that when human subjects are cued to attend to one of two motion directions in a transparent motion display, attentional effects manifest as a combination of input and response gain. Further, the impact on input gain is greater when attention is directed towards a narrow range of motion directions than when it is directed towards a broad range. These results are captured by an extended NMoA, which either includes a stimulus-independent attentional contribution to normalization or utilizes direction-tuned normalization. The proposed extensions are consistent with the feature-similarity gain model of attention and the attentional modulation in extrastriate area MT, where neuronal responses are enhanced and suppressed by attention to preferred and non-preferred motion directions respectively. PMID:27977679

  4. Multiple criteria decision-making process to derive consensus desired genetic gains for a dairy cattle breeding objective for diverse production systems.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, C M; van Arendonk, J A M; Kahi, A K; Komen, H

    2017-04-05

    Dairy cattle industries contribute to food and nutrition security and are a source of income for numerous households in many developing countries. Selective breeding can enhance efficiency in these industries. Developing dairy industries are characterized by diverse production and marketing systems. In this paper, we use weighted goal aggregating procedure to derive consensus trait preferences for different producer categories and processors. We based the study on the dairy industry in Kenya. The analytic hierarchy process was used to derive individual preferences for milk yield (MY), calving interval (CIN), production lifetime (PLT), mature body weight (MBW), and fat yield (FY). Results show that classical classification of production systems into large-scale and smallholder systems does not capture all differences in trait preferences. These differences became apparent when classification was based on productivity at the individual animal level, with high and low intensity producers and processors as the most important groups. High intensity producers had highest preferences for PLT and MY, whereas low intensity producers had highest preference for CIN and PLT; processors preferred MY and FY the most. The highest disagreements between the groups were observed for FY, PLT, and MY. Individual and group preferences were aggregated into consensus preferences using weighted goal programming. Desired gains were obtained as a product of consensus preferences and percentage genetic gains (G%). These were 2.42, 0.22, 2.51, 0.15, and 0.87 for MY, CIN, PLT, MBW, and FY, respectively. Consensus preferences can be used to derive a single compromise breeding objective for situations where the same genetic resources are used in diverse production and marketing circumstances.

  5. Gain enhanced L-band optical fiber amplifiers and tunable fiber lasers with erbium-doped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Leblanc, M.; Schinn, G. W.

    2003-02-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of gain enhanced L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) by either recycling residual ASE or using a second C-band wavelength pump laser and on the experimental demonstration of L-band tunable erbium-doped fiber ring lasers. We observed that by reflecting ASE from pumped erbium-doped fiber (EDF) the L-band EDFA gain can be enhanced of 2-15 dB depending on amplifier designs. We also studied wavelength and power dependence of second pump laser on the gain enhanced L-band EDFA and found that an optimum wavelength for second pump laser was between 1550 and 1560 nm. Finally, a L-band tunable erbium-doped fiber laser was also constructed in which lazing oscillation was observed closed to 1624 nm by recycling residual ASE. This L-band tunable laser has a line-width of about 300 MHz, an output power of 1 mW, and a signal to source spontaneous emission ratio of 60 dB.

  6. Exploiting genomics and natural genetic variation to decode macrophage enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Romanoski, Casey E.; Link, Verena M.; Heinz, Sven; Glass, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome contains on the order of a million enhancer-like regions that are required to establish the identities and functions of specific cell types. Here, we review recent studies in immune cells that have provided insight into the mechanisms that selectively activate certain enhancers in response to cell lineage and environmental signals. We describe a working model wherein distinct classes of transcription factors define the repertoire of active enhancers in macrophages through collaborative and hierarchical interactions, and discuss important challenges to this model, specifically providing examples from T cells. We conclude by discussing the use of natural genetic variation as a powerful approach for decoding transcription factor combinations that play dominant roles in establishing the enhancer landscapes, and the potential that these insights have for advancing our understanding of the molecular causes of human disease. PMID:26298065

  7. Enhanced learning after genetic overexpression of a brain growth protein.

    PubMed

    Routtenberg, A; Cantallops, I; Zaffuto, S; Serrano, P; Namgung, U

    2000-06-20

    Ramón y Cajal proposed 100 years ago that memory formation requires the growth of nerve cell processes. One-half century later, Hebb suggested that growth of presynaptic axons and postsynaptic dendrites consequent to coactivity in these synaptic elements was essential for such information storage. In the past 25 years, candidate growth genes have been implicated in learning processes, but it has not been demonstrated that they in fact enhance them. Here, we show that genetic overexpression of the growth-associated protein GAP-43, the axonal protein kinase C substrate, dramatically enhanced learning and long-term potentiation in transgenic mice. If the overexpressed GAP-43 was mutated by a Ser --> Ala substitution to preclude its phosphorylation by protein kinase C, then no learning enhancement was found. These findings provide evidence that a growth-related gene regulates learning and memory and suggest an unheralded target, the GAP-43 phosphorylation site, for enhancing cognitive ability.

  8. Mating strategies with genomic information reduce rates of inbreeding in animal breeding schemes without compromising genetic gain.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Henryon, M; Sørensen, A C

    2017-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that mating strategies with genomic information realise lower rates of inbreeding (∆F) than with pedigree information without compromising rates of genetic gain (∆G). We used stochastic simulation to compare ∆F and ∆G realised by two mating strategies with pedigree and genomic information in five breeding schemes. The two mating strategies were minimum-coancestry mating (MC) and minimising the covariance between ancestral genetic contributions (MCAC). We also simulated random mating (RAND) as a reference point. Generations were discrete. Animals were truncation-selected for a single trait that was controlled by 2000 quantitative trait loci, and the trait was observed for all selection candidates before selection. The criterion for selection was genomic-breeding values predicted by a ridge-regression model. Our results showed that MC and MCAC with genomic information realised 6% to 22% less ∆F than MC and MCAC with pedigree information without compromising ∆G across breeding schemes. MC and MCAC realised similar ∆F and ∆G. In turn, MC and MCAC with genomic information realised 28% to 44% less ∆F and up to 14% higher ∆G than RAND. These results indicated that MC and MCAC with genomic information are more effective than with pedigree information in controlling rates of inbreeding. This implies that genomic information should be applied to more than just prediction of breeding values in breeding schemes with truncation selection.

  9. Effects of a breeding scheme combined by genomic pre-selection and progeny testing on annual genetic gain in a dairy cattle population.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Takeshi; Togashi, Kenji; Iwama, Satoru; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Moribe, Kimihiro; Nakanishi, Takatoshi; Hagiya, Koichi; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2014-06-01

    The effectiveness of the incorporation of genomic pre-selection into dairy cattle progeny testing (GS-PT) was compared with that of progeny testing (PT) where the fraction of dam to breed bull (DB) selected was 0.01. When the fraction of sires to breed bulls (SB) selected without being progeny tested to produce young bulls (YB) in the next generation was 0.2, the annual genetic gain from GS-PT was 13% to 43% greater when h(2)  = 0.3 and 16% to 53% greater when h(2)  = 0.1 compared with that from PT. Given h(2)  = 0.3, a selection accuracy of 0.8 for both YB and DB, and selected fractions of 0.117 for YB and 0.04 for DB, GS-PT produced 40% to 43% greater annual genetic gain than PT. Given h(2)  = 0.1, a selection accuracy of 0.6 for both YB and DB, and selected fractions of 0.117 for YB and 0.04 for DB, annual genetic gain from GS-PT was 48% to 53% greater than that from PT. When h(2)  = 0.3, progeny testing capacity had little effect on annual genetic gain from GS-PT. However, when h(2)  = 0.1, annual genetic gain from GS-PT increased with increasing progeny testing capacity.

  10. Ejector Enhanced Pulsejet Based Pressure Gain Combustors: An Old Idea With a New Twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin T.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of pressure-gain combustion for gas turbine application is described. The test article consists of an off-the-shelf valved pulsejet, and an optimized ejector, both housed within a shroud. The combination forms an effective can combustor across which there is a modest total pressure rise rather than the usual loss found in conventional combustors. Although the concept of using a pulsejet to affect semi-constant volume (i.e., pressure-gain) combustion is not new, that of combining it with a well designed ejector to efficiently mix the bypass flow is. The result is a device which to date has demonstrated an overall pressure rise of approximately 3.5 percent at an overall temperature ratio commensurate with modern gas turbines. This pressure ratio is substantially higher than what has been previously reported in pulsejet-based combustion experiments. Flow non-uniformities in the downstream portion of the device are also shown to be substantially reduced compared to those within the pulsejet itself. The standard deviation of total pressure fluctuations, measured just downstream of the ejector was only 5.0 percent of the mean. This smoothing aspect of the device is critical to turbomachinery applications since turbine performance is, in general, negatively affected by flow non-uniformities and unsteadiness. The experimental rig will be described and details of the performance measurements will be presented. Analyses showing the thermodynamic benefits from this level of pressure-gain performance in a gas turbine will also be assessed for several engine types. Issues regarding practical development of such a device are discussed, as are potential emissions reductions resulting from the rich burning nature of the pulsejet and the rapid mixing (quenching) associated with unsteady ejectors.

  11. Enhancing the performance of a high-gain free electron laser operating at millimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.; Anderson, B.; Fawley, W.M.; Neil, V.K.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Yarema, S.M.; Paul, A.C.; Hopkins, D.

    1984-10-25

    A high-gain, high extraction efficiency, free electron laser (FEL) amplifier operating at the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at 34.6 GHz has demonstrated a small signal gain of 13.4 dB/m. With a 30 kW input signal, the amplifier has produced a saturated output of 80 MW and a 5% extraction efficiency. Comparison of these results with a linear model at small signal levels indicates that the amplifier can deliver saturated output starting from noise, if the brightness of the electron beam is sufficiently high. The brightness of the ETA is far below that possible with optimized choice of practical design characteristics such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. In particular, the measured brightness of the ETA injector is limited by plasma effects from the present cold, plasma cathode. As part of a coordinated theoretical and experimental effort to improve injector performance, we are using the EBQ gun design code to explore the current limits of gridless, relativistic, Pierce columns with moderate current density (>50 A/cm/sup 2/) at the cathode. The chief component in our experimental effort is a readily modified electron gun that will allow us to test many candidate cathode materials, types, and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MV/cm. 8 references, 5 figures.

  12. Can enhancement be distinguished from prevention in genetic medicine?

    PubMed

    Juengst, E T

    1997-04-01

    In discussions of the ethics of human gene therapy, it has become standard to draw a distinction between the use of human gene transfer techniques to treat health problems and their use to enhance or improve normal human traits. Some dispute the normative force of this distinction by arguing that it is undercut by the legitimate medical use of human gene transfer techniques to prevent disease-such as genetic engineering to bolster immune function, improve the efficiency of DNA repair, or add cellular receptors to capture and process cholesterol. If disease prevention is a proper goal of medicine, these critics argue, and the use of gene transfer techniques to enhance human health maintenance capacities will help achieve that goal, then the "treatment/enhancement" distinction cannot define the limits of legitimate gene therapy. In this paper, I argue that a line can be drawn between prevention and enhancement for gene therapy (and thus between properly medical and nonmedical uses of gene therapy), but only if one is willing to accept two rather old-fashioned claims: 1) Some health problems are best understood as if they were entities in their own right, reifiable as processes or parts in a biological system, with at least as much ontological objectivity and theoretical significance as the functions that they inhibit. 2) Legitimate preventive genetic health care should be limited to efforts to defend people from attack by these more robust pathological entities, rather than changing their bodies to evade social injustices.

  13. Accounting for outliers and heteroskedasticity in multibreed genetic evaluations of postweaning gain of Nelore-Hereford cattle.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, F F; Rosa, G J M; Tempelman, R J

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the utility of hierarchical Bayesian models combining residual heteroskedasticity with robustness for outlier detection and muting and to evaluate the effects of such joint modeling in multibreed genetic evaluations. A 3 x 2 factorial specification of 6 residual variance models based on several distributional (Gaussian, Student's t, or Slash) and variability (homoskedastic or heteroskedastic) assumptions was used to analyze 22,717 postweaning gain records from a Nelore-Hereford population (40,082 animals in the pedigree). To illustrate the utility of the 2 robust distributional specifications (Student's t and Slash) for outlier detection and muting, 3 records from the same contemporary group (an extreme residual outlier, a mild residual outlier, and a near-zero residual) were chosen for further study. The posterior densities of the corresponding weighting variables of these records were used to assess their degree of Gaussian outlyingness and the ability of the robust models to mute the effects of deviant records. The Student's t heteroskedastic provided the best-fit model among the 6 specifications and was preferred for genetic merit inference. Kendall rank correlations of the posterior means of the additive genetic effects of the animals, used to compare the selection order of the Student's t and Gaussian models, were reasonably high across all animals within the most frequent genotypes, ranging from 0.83 to 0.91 and from 0.89 to 0.95 for the homoskedastic and the heteroskedastic versions, respectively. However, when considering only animals ranked in the top 10% by the customary Gaussian homoskedastic model, these rank correlations were reduced considerably, ranging from 0.29 to 0.57 and from 0.72 to 0.85 between the 2 residual densities within the homoskedastic and heteroskedastic versions, respectively. Rank correlations between the homoskedastic and heteroskedastic versions within each of the Gaussian and

  14. Optical integration of laterally modified multiple quantum well structures by implantation enhanced intermixing to realize gain coupled DFB lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäß, V.; Kuhn, J.; Kaden, C.; Härle, V.; Bolay, H.; Scholz, F.; Schweizer, H.; Hillmer, H.; Lösch, R.; Schlapp, W.

    1995-12-01

    We report on the realization of gain coupled distributed feedback (GC-DFB) lasers using masked implantation enhanced intermixing (MIEI) in a full planar technology. The process requires only planar epitaxy steps to minimize ion straggling. We present a detailed investigation on the integration processing steps as implantation, subsequent annealing and regrowth with InP (MOCVD). We also discuss critical technology steps. Surface morphology depends very sensitive on implantation and annealing. Nonradiative recombination caused by defects leads to high losses in optical devices. We achieve good results for an AsH 3 stabilized annealing step in a MOCVD equipment, compared to rapid thermal annealing (RTA), which proceeds as the second epitaxial step. Photoluminescence (PL) studies show the excellent interface quality. High homogeneity and small linewidth after the integration process indicate sufficient quality to realize electrical gain coupled DFB-laser devices by IEI.

  15. What Do the Participants Gain? Group Counselling to Enhance Agency at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhalakka-Ruoho, Marjatta; Ruponen, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    Group counselling was carried out in an IT enterprise. The task was to study structured group counselling as a space for enhancing participants' agency at work. The first research question concerned changes the participants reported regarding the group and their collaborative and individual work. The second research question asked what kinds…

  16. Enhancing Integrative Experiences: Evidence of Student Perceptions of Learning Gains from Cross-Course Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingert, Jason R.; Wasileski, Sally A.; Peterson, Karin; Mathews, Leah Greden; Lanou, Amy Joy; Clarke, David

    2011-01-01

    This article offers food for thought on a strategy used by seven faculty to enhance students' integrative learning by offering cross-course, cross-disciplinary projects and shared activities focused on food. The faculty teach a cluster of ten courses in natural sciences, health sciences, social sciences and humanities that address food themes.…

  17. Impact of demographic, genetic, and bioimpedance factors on gestational weight gain and birth weight in a Romanian population

    PubMed Central

    Mărginean, Claudiu; Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Bănescu, Claudia; Meliţ, Lorena; Tripon, Florin; Iancu, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study had 2 objectives, first, to investigate possible relationships between increased gestational weight gain and demographic, clinical, paraclinical, genetic, and bioimpedance (BIA) characteristics of Romanian mothers, and second, to identify the influence of predictors (maternal and newborns characteristics) on our outcome birth weight (BW). We performed a cross-sectional study on 309 mothers and 309 newborns from Romania, divided into 2 groups: Group I—141 mothers with high gestational weight gain (GWG) and Group II—168 mothers with normal GWG, that is, control group. The groups were evaluated regarding demographic, anthropometric (body mass index [BMI], middle upper arm circumference, tricipital skinfold thickness, weight, height [H]), clinical, paraclinical, genetic (interleukin 6 [IL-6]: IL-6 -174G>C and IL-6 -572C>G gene polymorphisms), and BIA parameters. We noticed that fat mass (FM), muscle mass (MM), bone mass (BM), total body water (TBW), basal metabolism rate (BMR) and metabolic age (P < 0.001), anthropometric parameters (middle upper arm circumference, tricipital skinfold thickness; P < 0.001/P = 0.001) and hypertension (odds ratio = 4.65, 95% confidence interval: 1.27–17.03) were higher in mothers with high GWG. BW was positively correlated with mothers’ FM (P < 0.001), TBW (P = 0.001), BMR (P = 0.02), while smoking was negatively correlated with BW (P = 0.04). Variant genotype (GG+GC) of the IL-6 -572C>G polymorphism was higher in the control group (P = 0.042). We observed that high GWG may be an important predictor factor for the afterward BW, being positively correlated with FM, TBW, BMR, metabolic age of the mothers, and negatively with the mother's smoking status. Variant genotype (GG+GC) of the IL-6 -572C>G gene polymorphism is a protector factor against obesity in mothers. All the variables considered explained 14.50% of the outcome variance. PMID:27399105

  18. Genetically enhanced cows resist intramammary Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Wall, Robert J; Powell, Anne M; Paape, Max J; Kerr, David E; Bannerman, Douglas D; Pursel, Vernon G; Wells, Kevin D; Talbot, Neil; Hawk, Harold W

    2005-04-01

    Mastitis, the most consequential disease in dairy cattle, costs the US dairy industry billions of dollars annually. To test the feasibility of protecting animals through genetic engineering, transgenic cows secreting lysostaphin at concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 14 micrograms/ml [corrected] in their milk were produced. In vitro assays demonstrated the milk's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. Intramammary infusions of S. aureus were administered to three transgenic and ten nontransgenic cows. Increases in milk somatic cells, elevated body temperatures and induced acute phase proteins, each indicative of infection, were observed in all of the nontransgenic cows but in none of the transgenic animals. Protection against S. aureus mastitis appears to be achievable with as little as 3 micrograms/ml [corrected] of lysostaphin in milk. Our results indicate that genetic engineering can provide a viable tool for enhancing resistance to disease and improve the well-being of livestock.

  19. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    PubMed

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  20. Inner Hair Cell Loss Disrupts Hearing and Cochlear Function Leading to Sensory Deprivation and Enhanced Central Auditory Gain.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Richard; Sun, Wei; Ding, Dalian; Chen, Guang-Di; Lobarinas, Edward; Wang, Jian; Radziwon, Kelly; Auerbach, Benjamin D

    2016-01-01

    There are three times as many outer hair cells (OHC) as inner hair cells (IHC), yet IHC transmit virtually all acoustic information to the brain as they synapse with 90-95% of type I auditory nerve fibers. Here we review a comprehensive series of experiments aimed at determining how loss of the IHC/type I system affects hearing by selectively destroying these cells in chinchillas using the ototoxic anti-cancer agent carboplatin. Eliminating IHC/type I neurons has no effect on distortion product otoacoustic emission or the cochlear microphonic potential generated by OHC; however, it greatly reduces the summating potential produced by IHC and the compound action potential (CAP) generated by type I neurons. Remarkably, responses from remaining auditory nerve fibers maintain sharp tuning and low thresholds despite innervating regions of the cochlea with ~80% IHC loss. Moreover, chinchillas with large IHC lesions have surprisingly normal thresholds in quiet until IHC losses exceeded 80%, suggesting that only a few IHC are needed to detect sounds in quiet. However, behavioral thresholds in broadband noise are elevated significantly and tone-in-narrow band noise masking patterns exhibit greater remote masking. These results suggest the auditory system is able to compensate for considerable loss of IHC/type I neurons in quiet but not in difficult listening conditions. How does the auditory brain deal with the drastic loss of cochlear input? Recordings from the inferior colliculus found a relatively small decline in sound-evoked activity despite a large decrease in CAP amplitude after IHC lesion. Paradoxically, sound-evoked responses are generally larger than normal in the auditory cortex, indicative of increased central gain. This gain enhancement in the auditory cortex is associated with decreased GABA-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that when the neural output of the cochlea is reduced, the central auditory system compensates by turning up its gain so that

  1. Inner Hair Cell Loss Disrupts Hearing and Cochlear Function Leading to Sensory Deprivation and Enhanced Central Auditory Gain

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Richard; Sun, Wei; Ding, Dalian; Chen, Guang-Di; Lobarinas, Edward; Wang, Jian; Radziwon, Kelly; Auerbach, Benjamin D.

    2017-01-01

    There are three times as many outer hair cells (OHC) as inner hair cells (IHC), yet IHC transmit virtually all acoustic information to the brain as they synapse with 90–95% of type I auditory nerve fibers. Here we review a comprehensive series of experiments aimed at determining how loss of the IHC/type I system affects hearing by selectively destroying these cells in chinchillas using the ototoxic anti-cancer agent carboplatin. Eliminating IHC/type I neurons has no effect on distortion product otoacoustic emission or the cochlear microphonic potential generated by OHC; however, it greatly reduces the summating potential produced by IHC and the compound action potential (CAP) generated by type I neurons. Remarkably, responses from remaining auditory nerve fibers maintain sharp tuning and low thresholds despite innervating regions of the cochlea with ~80% IHC loss. Moreover, chinchillas with large IHC lesions have surprisingly normal thresholds in quiet until IHC losses exceeded 80%, suggesting that only a few IHC are needed to detect sounds in quiet. However, behavioral thresholds in broadband noise are elevated significantly and tone-in-narrow band noise masking patterns exhibit greater remote masking. These results suggest the auditory system is able to compensate for considerable loss of IHC/type I neurons in quiet but not in difficult listening conditions. How does the auditory brain deal with the drastic loss of cochlear input? Recordings from the inferior colliculus found a relatively small decline in sound-evoked activity despite a large decrease in CAP amplitude after IHC lesion. Paradoxically, sound-evoked responses are generally larger than normal in the auditory cortex, indicative of increased central gain. This gain enhancement in the auditory cortex is associated with decreased GABA-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that when the neural output of the cochlea is reduced, the central auditory system compensates by turning up its gain so that

  2. Cumulative gains enhance striatal response to reward opportunities in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Smith, Ashley R.; Bjork, James M.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.; Momenan, Reza; Hommer, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorder is characterized by a transition from volitional to compulsive responding for drug reward. A possible explanation for this transition may be that alcohol-dependent patients (ADP) show a general propensity for a history of rewarded instrumental responses, and these rewarded responses may boost the activation of motivational neurocircuitry for additional reward. Brain imaging studies of decision-making have demonstrated that ADP relative to controls (CON) often show altered neural activation in response to anticipating and receiving rewards, but the majority of studies have not investigated how past performance affects activation. A potential exists for ADP to show increased sensitivity to reward as a function of reward delivery history. In the current study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural correlates of risky decision-making in ADP (n = 18) and CON (n = 18) while they played a two-choice monetary risk-taking game. In addition to investigating general neural recruitment by risky decision-making, we also modeled each participant’s running total of monetary earnings in order to determine areas of activation that correlated with cumulative reward. We found that ADP and CON showed few differences in behavior or in mesolimbic activation by choice for, and receipt of, risky gains. However, when including a cumulative-earnings covariate, ADP exhibited heightened striatal activation that correlated with total earnings during the choice event in the task. The heightened contextual sensitivity of striatal responses to cumulative earnings in ADP may represent a general neurobiological affective substrate for development of automatized instrumental behavior. PMID:24754451

  3. Gain Enhancement of a Multiband Resonator Using Defected Ground Surface on Epoxy Woven Glass Material

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Arshad, Haslina

    2014-01-01

    A multiband microstrip resonator is proposed in this study which is realized through a rectangular radiator with embedded symmetrical rectangular slots in it and a defected ground surface. The study is presented with detailed parametric analyses to understand the effect of various design parameters. The design and analyses are performed using the FIT based full-wave electromagnetic simulator CST microwave studio suite. With selected parameter values, the resonator showed a peak gain of 5.85 dBi at 5.2 GHz, 6.2 dBi at 8.3 GHz, 3.9 dBi at 9.5 GHz, 5.9 dBi at 12.2 GHz, and 4.7 dBi at 14.6 GHz. Meanwhile, the main lobe magnitude and the 3 dB angular beam width are 6.2 dBi and 86°, 5.9 dBi and 53.7°, 8.5 dBi and 43.9°, 8.6 dBi and 42.1°, and 4.7 dBi and 30.1°, respectively, at the resonant frequencies. The overall resonator has a compact dimension of 0.52λ  × 0.52λ  × 0.027λ at the lower resonant frequency. For practical validation, a lab prototype was built on a 1.6 mm thick epoxide woven glass fabric dielectric material which is measured using a vector network analyzer and within an anechoic chamber. The comparison between the simulated and measured results showed a very good understanding, which implies the practical suitability of the proposed multiband resonator design. PMID:24883354

  4. Stochasticity enhances the gaining of bet-hedging strategies in contact-process-like dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-03-01

    In biology and ecology, individuals or communities of individuals living in unpredictable environments often alternate between different evolutionary strategies to spread and reduce risks. Such behavior is commonly referred to as "bet-hedging." Long-term survival probabilities and population sizes can be much enhanced by exploiting such hybrid strategies. Here, we study the simplest possible birth-death stochastic model in which individuals can choose among a poor but safe strategy, a better but risky alternative, or a combination of both. We show analytically and computationally that the benefits derived from bet-hedging strategies are much stronger for higher environmental variabilities (large external noise) and/or for small spatial dimensions (large intrinsic noise). These circumstances are typically encountered by living systems, thus providing us with a possible justification for the ubiquitousness of bet-hedging in nature.

  5. Application of random regression model to estimate genetic parameters for average daily gains in Lori-Bakhtiari sheep breed of Iran.

    PubMed

    Farhangfar, H; Naeemipour, H; Zinvand, B

    2007-07-15

    A random regression model was applied to estimate (co) variances, heritabilities and additive genetic correlations among average daily gains. The data was a total of 10876 records belonging to 1828 lambs (progenies of 123 sires and 743 dams) born between 1995 and 2001 in a single large size flock of Lori-Bakhtiari sheep breed in Iran. In the model, fixed environmental effects of year-season of birth, sex, birth type, age of dam and random effects of direct and maternal additive genetic and permanent environment were included. Orthogonal polynomial regression (on the Legendre scale) of third order (cubic) was utilized to model the genetic and permanent environmental (co) variance structure throughout the growth trajectory. Direct and maternal heritability estimates of average daily gains ranged from 0.011 to 0.131 and 0.008 to 0.181, respectively in which pre-weaning average daily gain (0-3 in months) had the lowest direct and highest maternal heritability estimates among the other age groups. The highest and lowest positive direct additive genetic correlations were found to be 0.993 and 0.118 between ADG (0-9) and ADG (0-12) and between ADG (0-3) and ADG (0-12), respectively. The direct additive genetic correlations between adjacent age groups were more closely than between remote age groups.

  6. The genetic background of generalized pustular psoriasis: IL36RN mutations and CARD14 gain-of-function variants.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kazumitsu

    2014-06-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is often present in patients with existing or prior psoriasis vulgaris (PV; "GPP with PV"). However, cases of GPP have been known to arise without a history of PV ("GPP alone"). There has long been debate over whether GPP alone and GPP with PV are distinct subtypes that are etiologically different from each other. We recently reported that the majority of GPP alone cases is caused by recessive mutations of IL36RN. In contrast, only a few exceptional cases of GPP with PV were found to have recessive IL36RN mutations. Very recently, we also reported that CARD14 p.Asp176His, a gain-of-function variant, is a predisposing factor for GPP with PV; in contrast, the variant is not associated with GPP alone in the Japanese population. These results suggest that GPP alone is genetically different from GPP with PV. IL36RN mutations are also found in some patients with severe acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, palmar-plantar pustulosis, and acrodermatitis continua of hallopeau. CARD14 mutations and variants are causal or disease susceptibility factors of PV, GPP, or pityriasis rubra pilaris, depending on the mutation or variant position of CARD14. It is clinically important to analyze IL36RN mutations in patients with sterile pustulosis. For example, identifying recessive IL36RN mutations leads to early diagnosis of GPP, even at the first episode of pustulosis. In addition, individuals with IL36RN mutations are very susceptible to GPP or GPP-related generalized pustulosis induced by drugs (e.g., amoxicillin), infections, pregnancy, or menstruation.

  7. Association genetics, geography and ecophysiology link stomatal patterning in Populus trichocarpa with carbon gain and disease resistance trade-offs.

    PubMed

    McKown, Athena D; Guy, Robert D; Quamme, Linda; Klápště, Jaroslav; La Mantia, Jonathan; Constabel, C P; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Hamelin, Richard C; Zifkin, Michael; Azam, M S

    2014-12-01

    Stomata are essential for diffusive entry of gases to support photosynthesis, but may also expose internal leaf tissues to pathogens. To uncover trade-offs in range-wide adaptation relating to stomata, we investigated the underlying genetics of stomatal traits and linked variability in these traits with geoclimate, ecophysiology, condensed foliar tannins and pathogen susceptibility in black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). Upper (adaxial) and lower (abaxial) leaf stomatal traits were measured from 454 accessions collected throughout much of the species range. We calculated broad-sense heritability (H(2) ) of stomatal traits and, using SNP data from a 34K Populus SNP array, performed a genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to uncover genes underlying stomatal trait variation. H(2) values for stomatal traits were moderate (average H(2) = 0.33). GWAS identified genes associated primarily with adaxial stomata, including polarity genes (PHABULOSA), stomatal development genes (BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 2) and disease/wound-response genes (GLUTAMATE-CYSTEINE LIGASE). Stomatal traits correlated with latitude, gas exchange, condensed tannins and leaf rust (Melampsora) infection. Latitudinal trends of greater adaxial stomata numbers and guard cell pore size corresponded with higher stomatal conductance (gs ) and photosynthesis (Amax ), faster shoot elongation, lower foliar tannins and greater Melampsora susceptibility. This suggests an evolutionary trade-off related to differing selection pressures across the species range. In northern environments, more adaxial stomata and larger pore sizes reflect selection for rapid carbon gain and growth. By contrast, southern genotypes have fewer adaxial stomata, smaller pore sizes and higher levels of condensed tannins, possibly linked to greater pressure from natural leaf pathogens, which are less significant in northern ecosystems.

  8. High gain 1.3-μm GaInNAs SOA with fast gain dynamics and enhanced temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Iliadis, N.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Viheriälä, J.; Laakso, A.; Dris, S.; Spyropoulou, M.; Avramopoulos, H.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Guina, M.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are a well-established solution of optical access networks. They could prove an enabling technology for DataCom by offering extended range of active optical functionalities. However, in such costand energy-critical applications, high-integration densities increase the operational temperatures and require powerhungry external cooling. Taking a step further towards improving the cost and energy effectiveness of active optical components, we report on the development of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) SOA operating at 1.3μm that exhibits a gain value of 28 dB and combined with excellent temperature stability owing to the large conduction band offset between GaInNAs quantum well and GaAs barrier. Moreover, the characterization results reveal almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20° to 50° C. The gain recovery time attained values as short as 100 ps, allowing implementation of various signal processing functionalities at 10 Gb/s. The combined parameters are very attractive for application in photonic integrated circuits requiring uncooled operation and thus minimizing power consumption. Moreover, as a result of the insensitivity to heating issues, a higher number of active elements can be integrated on chip-scale circuitry, allowing for higher integration densities and more complex optical on-chip functions. Such component could prove essential for next generation DataCom networks.

  9. Genetic parameters related to environmental variability of weight traits in a selection experiment for weight gain in mice; signs of correlated canalised response

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Escriche, Noelia; Moreno, Almudena; Nieto, Blanca; Piqueras, Pepa; Salgado, Concepción; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Data from an experimental mice population selected from 18 generations to increase weight gain were used to estimate the genetic parameters associated with environmental variability. The analysis involved three traits: weight at 21 days, weight at 42 days and weight gain between 21 and 42 days. A dataset of 5273 records for males was studied. Data were analysed using Bayesian procedures by comparing the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) value of two different models: one assuming homogeneous environmental variances and another assuming them as heterogeneous. The model assuming heterogeneity was better in all cases and also showed higher additive genetic variances and lower common environmental variances. The heterogeneity of residual variance was associated with systematic and additive genetic effects thus making reduction by selection possible. Genetic correlations between the additive genetic effects on mean and environmental variance of the traits analysed were always negative, ranging from -0.19 to -0.38. An increase in the heritability of the traits was found when considering the genetic determination of the environmental variability. A suggested correlated canalised response was found in terms of coefficient of variation but it could be insufficient to compensate for the scale effect associated with an increase of the mean. PMID:18400150

  10. Effect of photonic crystal and frequency selective surface implementation on gain enhancement in the microstrip patch antenna at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Ameneh; Sadeghzadeh, Ramezan Ali; Geran, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, microstrip patch antenna with frequency selective surface (FSS) and photonic band gap (PBG) structures in the frequency range of 0.5-0.7 THz is presented for wireless communications. Proposed patch antenna is designed on a substrate with uniform and non-uniform PBG structures. Here, the effects of substrate thickness, various radii and arrangement of holes on antenna resonance in both PBG forms are studied. Near zero characteristic on uniform and non-uniform PBG substrate is compared and the results show that along with increase in hole radius, antenna operating frequency and bandwidth are increased. Also, the FSS structure is designed as a perfect absorber. Finally, by using FSS and PBG structures simultaneously, gain enhancement, increase in directivity and pattern shaping are studied at THz field. The antenna gain in final structure is increased by 2 dBi (32%) in comparison to simple form and Half-Power beam width is reduced from 100°×80° in simple form to 72°×48° by using FSS and PBG. All simulations and designs are done by Ansoft HFSS and CST Microwave Studio simulation tools with different full wave methods.

  11. Enhanced synthesis and release of dopamine in transgenic mice with gain-of-function α6* nAChRs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Lee, Jang-Won; Oh, Gyeon; Grady, Sharon R; McIntosh, J Michael; Brunzell, Darlene H; Cannon, Jason R; Drenan, Ryan M

    2014-04-01

    α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs)s in the ventral tegmental area to nucleus accumbens (NAc) pathway are implicated in the response to nicotine, and recent work suggests these receptors play a role in the rewarding action of ethanol. Here, we studied mice expressing gain-of-function α6β2* nAChRs (α6L9'S mice) that are hypersensitive to nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine. Evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were enhanced in α6L9'S NAc slices compared to control, non-transgenic (non-Tg) slices. Extracellular DA levels in both non-Tg and α6L9'S slices were further enhanced in the presence of GBR12909, suggesting intact DA transporter function in both mouse strains. Ongoing α6β2* nAChR activation by acetylcholine plays a role in enhancing DA levels, as α-conotoxin MII completely abolished evoked DA release in α6L9'S slices and decreased spontaneous DA release from striatal synaptosomes. In HPLC experiments, α6L9'S NAc tissue contained significantly more DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid compared to non-Tg NAc tissue. Serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and norepinephrine (NE) were unchanged in α6L9'S compared to non-Tg tissue. Western blot analysis revealed increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in α6L9'S NAc. Overall, these results show that enhanced α6β2* nAChR activity in NAc can stimulate DA production and lead to increased extracellular DA levels.

  12. The influence of 5-HT(2C) and MDR1 genetic polymorphisms on antipsychotic-induced weight gain in female schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Medved, Vesna; Bozina, Nada; Hotujac, Ljubomir; Sain, Ivica; Bilusic, Hrvoje

    2008-09-30

    We investigated the relationships between functional genetic variants of the 5-HT(2C) receptor and multidrug-resistant protein (MDR1), coding for P-glycoprotein, and second generation antipsychotic (SDA)-induced weight gain among 108 female schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine or risperidone for up to 4 months. No significant differences in -759C/T allelic and genotype variants of 5-HT(2C) were found between patients who gained more than 7% of their initial weight compared with those who gained less. Haplotype-based analysis of two MDR1 loci, exon 21 G2677T and exon 26 C3435T, revealed a slightly lower representation of the G2677/C3435 haplotype in the >or=7% group. In the subgroup of patients treated with risperidone, we found borderline overrepresentation of 2677T, significant overrepresentation of 3435T variant and borderline overrepresentation of 2677T/3435T haplotype the >or=7% group, whereas G2677/C3435 haplotype was found to be less represented in the >or=7% group. Our data indicate a nonsignificant role of 759C/T 5-HT(2C) in SDA-induced weight gain, and a stronger influence of the MDR1 G2677T and C3435T polymorphisms on risperidone-induced weight gain in female schizophrenic patients. 3435T and 2677T MDR1 variants, both associated with lower P-gp function, might predispose to higher risperidone accessibility to the brain that would lead to stronger effects, including weight gain.

  13. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S.; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar ‘NC 95′. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition. PMID:26626731

  14. Enhanced growth of Juniperus thurifera under a warmer climate is explained by a positive carbon gain under cold and drought.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Teresa E; Camarero, J Julio; Granda, Elena; Pías, Beatriz; Valladares, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Juniperus thurifera L. is an endemic conifer of the western Mediterranean Basin where it is subjected to a severe climatic stress characterized by low winter temperatures and summer drought. Given the trend of increased warming-induced drought stress in this area and the climatic sensitivity of this species, we expect a negative impact of climate change on growth and ecophysiological performance of J. thurifera in the harsh environments where it dominates. To evaluate this, we measured long- and short-term radial growth using dendrochronology, photosynthesis and water-use efficiency in males, females and juveniles in three sites in Central Spain. Climate was monitored and completed with historical records. Mean annual temperature has increased +0.2 °C per decade in the study area, and the main warming trends corresponded to spring (+0.2 °C per decade) and summer (+0.3 °C per decade). Radial growth and maximum photosynthesis peaked in spring and autumn. Positive photosynthetic rates were maintained all year long, albeit at reduced rates in winter and summer. Radial growth was enhanced by wet conditions in the previous autumn and by warm springs and high precipitation in summer of the year of tree-ring formation. Cloud cover during the summer increased growth, while cloudy winters led to impaired carbon gain and reduced growth in the long term. We argue that maintenance of carbon gain under harsh conditions (low winter temperatures and dry summer months) and plastic xylogenesis underlie J. thurifera's ability to profit from changing climatic conditions such as earlier spring onset and erratic summer rainfall. Our results highlight that not only the magnitude but also the sign of the impact of climate change on growth and persistence of Mediterranean trees is species specific.

  15. Lotus tenuis x L. corniculatus interspecific hybridization as a means to breed bloat-safe pastures and gain insight into the genetic control of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in legumes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are secondary metabolites that strongly affect plant quality traits. The concentration and the structure of these metabolites influence the palatability and nutritional value of forage legumes. Hence, modulating PAs in the leaves of forage legumes is of paramount relevance for forage breeders worldwide. The lack of genetic variation in the leaf PA trait within the most important forage species and the difficulties in engineering this pathway via the ectopic expression of regulatory genes, prompted us to pursue alternative strategies to enhance this trait in forage legumes of agronomic interest. The Lotus genus includes forage species which accumulate PAs in edible organs and can thus be used as potential donor parents in breeding programs. Results We recovered a wild, diploid and PA-rich population of L. corniculatus and crossed with L. tenuis. The former grows in an alkaline-salty area in Spain while the latter is a diploid species, grown extensively in South American pastures, which does not accumulate PAs in the herbage. The resulting interspecific hybrids displayed several traits of outstanding agronomic relevance such as rhizome production, PA levels in edible tissues sufficient to prevent ruminal bloating (around 5 mg of PAs/g DW), biomass production similar to the cultivated parent and potential for adaptability to marginal lands. We show that PA levels correlate with expression levels of the R2R3MYB transcription factor TT2 and, in turn, with those of the key structural genes of the epicatechin and catechin biosynthetic pathways leading to PA biosynthesis. Conclusions The L. tenuis x L. corniculatus hybrids, reported herein, represent the first example of the introgression of the PA trait in forage legumes to levels known to provide nutritional and health benefits to ruminants. Apart from PAs, the hybrids have additional traits which may prove useful to breed forage legumes with increased persistence and adaptability to

  16. Colestilan decreases weight gain by enhanced NEFA incorporation in biliary lipids and fecal lipid excretion[S

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto-Kawabata, Kanami; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakai, Kaoru; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelder, Thomas; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; Cohen, Louis H.; Havekes, Louis M.; Princen, Hans M.; van den Hoek, Anita M.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) are cholesterol-lowering drugs that also affect hyperglycemia. The mechanism by which BASs exert these and other metabolic effects beyond cholesterol lowering remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a BAS, colestilan, on body weight, energy expenditure, and glucose and lipid metabolism and its mechanisms of action in high-fat-fed hyperlipidemic APOE*3 Leiden (E3L) transgenic mice. Mildly insulin-resistant E3L mice were fed a high-fat diet with or without 1.5% colestilan for 8 weeks. Colestilan treatment decreased body weight, visceral and subcutaneous fat, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels but increased food intake. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were decreased, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analysis demonstrated improved insulin sensitivity, particularly in peripheral tissues. In addition, colestilan decreased energy expenditure and physical activity, whereas it increased the respiratory exchange ratio, indicating that colestilan induced carbohydrate catabolism. Moreover, kinetic analysis revealed that colestilan increased [3H]NEFA incorporation in biliary cholesterol and phospholipids and increased fecal lipid excretion. Gene expression analysis in liver, fat, and muscle supported the above findings. In summary, colestilan decreases weight gain and improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in high-fat-fed E3L mice by enhanced NEFA incorporation in biliary lipids and increased fecal lipid excretion. PMID:23434610

  17. Recent breeding programs enhanced genetic diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Liu, Xin; He, Weiming; Roorkiwal, Manish; Yang, Wei; Jian, Jianbo; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Gaur, Pooran M; Rathore, Abhishek; Samineni, Srinivasan; Saxena, Rachit K; Xu, Dawen; Singh, Narendra P; Chaturvedi, Sushil K; Zhang, Gengyun; Wang, Jun; Datta, Swapan K; Xu, Xun; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-12-16

    In order to understand the impact of breeding on genetic diversity and gain insights into temporal trends in diversity in chickpea, a set of 100 chickpea varieties released in 14 countries between 1948 and 2012 were re-sequenced. For analysis, the re-sequencing data for 29 varieties available from an earlier study was also included. Copy number variations and presence absence variations identified in the present study have potential to drive phenotypic variations for trait improvement. Re-sequencing of a large number of varieties has provided opportunities to inspect the genetic and genomic changes reflecting the history of breeding, which we consider as breeding signatures and the selected loci may provide targets for crop improvement. Our study also reports enhanced diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties as a result of recent chickpea breeding efforts. The current study will aid the explicit efforts to breed for local adaptation in the context of anticipated climate changes.

  18. Recent breeding programs enhanced genetic diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Liu, Xin; He, Weiming; Roorkiwal, Manish; Yang, Wei; Jian, Jianbo; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Gaur, Pooran M.; Rathore, Abhishek; Samineni, Srinivasan; Saxena, Rachit K.; Xu, Dawen; Singh, Narendra P.; Chaturvedi, Sushil K.; Zhang, Gengyun; Wang, Jun; Datta, Swapan K.; Xu, Xun; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of breeding on genetic diversity and gain insights into temporal trends in diversity in chickpea, a set of 100 chickpea varieties released in 14 countries between 1948 and 2012 were re-sequenced. For analysis, the re-sequencing data for 29 varieties available from an earlier study was also included. Copy number variations and presence absence variations identified in the present study have potential to drive phenotypic variations for trait improvement. Re-sequencing of a large number of varieties has provided opportunities to inspect the genetic and genomic changes reflecting the history of breeding, which we consider as breeding signatures and the selected loci may provide targets for crop improvement. Our study also reports enhanced diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties as a result of recent chickpea breeding efforts. The current study will aid the explicit efforts to breed for local adaptation in the context of anticipated climate changes. PMID:27982107

  19. Thickness-dependent carrier transport and optically enhanced transconductance gain in III-VI multilayer InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Multilayer InSe with a thickness above ˜20 nm, is a direct semiconductor with a peak absorption wavelength approaching λ = 1000 nm, which is a promising candidate for solar-energy conversion and 2D optoelectronics devices. We present herein the experimental observations of thickness-dependent conductivity and photoconductive-responsivity spectrum in multilayer InSe as well as optically enhanced transconductance gain in the multilayer InSe metal-semiconductor-field-effect transistor (MESFET) illuminated by a halogen lamp. The voltage-current (V-I) measurement result shows multilayer InSe belongs to a p-type semiconductor, which can form a p-channel FET device. Thickness (t) dependent conductivity (σ) of multilayer InSe reveals about six-order variation from 5076 (Ω-cm)-1 (t = 5 nm) to 2.56 × 10-3 (Ω-cm)-1 (t = 184 μm, bulk) following a relationship of σ ∝ t -1.38. The highest conductivity in a thin InSe (e.g. t = 5 nm) is due to the increase of carrier density when the thickness is decreased. The photoresponsivity spectrum of a Ag-InSe-Ag multilayer photoconductor demonstrates a prominent peak absorption at 1.1 ˜ 1.3 eV, matches well with the direct-free-exciton energy of the InSe. A multilayer p-InSe MESFET was tested by V-I measurement. The transconductance was measured and determined to be {g}m={≤ft|\\tfrac{\\partial {{{I}}}{{D}}}{\\partial {{{V}}}{{G}}}\\right|}{{{V}}{{SD}}={{2V}}} = ({1.25 +/- 0.008})× {10}-4≤ft(\\tfrac{{{A}}}{{{V}}}\\right). The gm value will enhance about three times when the MESFET was placed under the illumination of a tungsten halogen lamp of a lower power density ˜0.5 mW · cm-2. All the experimental results demonstrate multilayer InSe a promising 2D material available for microelectronics and optoelectronics applications.

  20. Efficiency enhancement of slow-wave electron-cyclotron maser by a second-order shaping of the magnetic field in the low-gain limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si-Jia; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Wang, Kang; Li, Yong-Ming; Jing, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Based on the anomalous Doppler effect, we put forward a proposal to enhance the conversion efficiency of the slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) under the resonance condition. Compared with previous studies, we add a second-order shaping term in the guild magnetic field. Theoretical analyses and numerical calculations show that it can enhance the conversion efficiency in the low-gain limit. The case of the initial velocity spread of electrons satisfying the Gaussian distribution is also analysed numerically.

  1. Multiple Query Evaluation Based on an Enhanced Genetic Algorithm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamine, Lynda; Chrisment, Claude; Boughanem, Mohand

    2003-01-01

    Explains the use of genetic algorithms to combine results from multiple query evaluations to improve relevance in information retrieval. Discusses niching techniques, relevance feedback techniques, and evolution heuristics, and compares retrieval results obtained by both genetic multiple query evaluation and classical single query evaluation…

  2. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T; Hartley, Catherine A; Johnson, David C; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C; Ra, Stephen; Gray, J Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Glatt, Charles E; Hill, Matthew N; Casey, B J; Lee, Francis S

    2015-03-03

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry and behaviour. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviours. These results suggest a gain of function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human.

  3. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human

    PubMed Central

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Hartley, Catherine A.; Johnson, David C.; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C.; Ra, Stephen; Gray, Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Glatt, Charles E.; Hill, Matthew N.; Casey, B. J.; Lee, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry, and behavior. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest a gain-of-function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  4. Discovery of Genetic Variation that Enhances Improvement of Dairy Production and Health in Cattle and Buffalos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis underlying this project is that genome-wide information on genetic variation will increase accuracy of predictions of genetic merit; will enhance heritability and reliability of these predictions through improved pedigree information; and will improve detection of most quantitative tr...

  5. Genetic Assignment Methods for Gaining Insight into the Management of Infectious Disease by Understanding Pathogen, Vector, and Host Movement

    PubMed Central

    Remais, Justin V.; Xiao, Ning; Akullian, Adam; Qiu, Dongchuan; Blair, David

    2011-01-01

    For many pathogens with environmental stages, or those carried by vectors or intermediate hosts, disease transmission is strongly influenced by pathogen, host, and vector movements across complex landscapes, and thus quantitative measures of movement rate and direction can reveal new opportunities for disease management and intervention. Genetic assignment methods are a set of powerful statistical approaches useful for establishing population membership of individuals. Recent theoretical improvements allow these techniques to be used to cost-effectively estimate the magnitude and direction of key movements in infectious disease systems, revealing important ecological and environmental features that facilitate or limit transmission. Here, we review the theory, statistical framework, and molecular markers that underlie assignment methods, and we critically examine recent applications of assignment tests in infectious disease epidemiology. Research directions that capitalize on use of the techniques are discussed, focusing on key parameters needing study for improved understanding of patterns of disease. PMID:21552326

  6. Enhanced genetic tools for engineering multigene traits into green algae.

    PubMed

    Rasala, Beth A; Chao, Syh-Shiuan; Pier, Matthew; Barrera, Daniel J; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic microalgae have the potential to impact many diverse biotechnological industries including energy, human and animal nutrition, pharmaceuticals, health and beauty, and specialty chemicals. However, major obstacles to sophisticated genetic and metabolic engineering in algae have been the lack of well-characterized transformation vectors to direct engineered gene products to specific subcellular locations, and the inability to robustly express multiple nuclear-encoded transgenes within a single cell. Here we validate a set of genetic tools that enable protein targeting to distinct subcellular locations, and present two complementary methods for multigene engineering in the eukaryotic green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The tools described here will enable advanced metabolic and genetic engineering to promote microalgae biotechnology and product commercialization.

  7. Control of Growth Efficiency in Young Plantation Loblolly Pine and Sweetgum through Irrigation and Fertigation Enhancement of Leaf Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    L. Samuelson

    1999-07-07

    The overall objective of this study was to determine if growth efficiency of young plantation loblolly pine and sweetgum can be maintained by intensive forest management and whether increased carbon gain is the mechanism controlling growth efficiency response to resource augmentation. Key leaf physiological processes were examined over two growing seasons in response to irrigation, fertigation (irrigation with a fertilizer solution), and fertigation plus pest control (pine only). Although irrigation improved leaf net photosynthesis in pine and decreased stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit in sweetgum, no consistent physiological responses to fertigation were detected in either species. After 4 years of treatment, a 3-fold increase in woody net primary productivity was observed in both species in response to fertigation. Trees supplemented with fertigation and fertigation plus pest control exhibited the largest increases in growth and biomass. Furthermore, growth efficiency was maintained by fertigation and fertigation plus pest control, despite large increases in crown development and self-shading. Greater growth in response to intensive culture was facilitated by significant gains in leaf mass and whole tree carbon gain rather than detectable increases in leaf level processes. Growth efficiency was not maintained by significant increases in leaf level carbon gain but was possibly influenced by changes in carbon allocation to root versus shoot processes.

  8. Genetic engineering of algae for enhanced biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E; Darzins, Al; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2010-04-01

    There are currently intensive global research efforts aimed at increasing and modifying the accumulation of lipids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, polysaccharides, and other energy storage compounds in photosynthetic organisms, yeast, and bacteria through genetic engineering. Many improvements have been realized, including increased lipid and carbohydrate production, improved H(2) yields, and the diversion of central metabolic intermediates into fungible biofuels. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attracting considerable interest within these efforts due to their relatively high photosynthetic conversion efficiencies, diverse metabolic capabilities, superior growth rates, and ability to store or secrete energy-rich hydrocarbons. Relative to cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae possess several unique metabolic attributes of relevance to biofuel production, including the accumulation of significant quantities of triacylglycerol; the synthesis of storage starch (amylopectin and amylose), which is similar to that found in higher plants; and the ability to efficiently couple photosynthetic electron transport to H(2) production. Although the application of genetic engineering to improve energy production phenotypes in eukaryotic microalgae is in its infancy, significant advances in the development of genetic manipulation tools have recently been achieved with microalgal model systems and are being used to manipulate central carbon metabolism in these organisms. It is likely that many of these advances can be extended to industrially relevant organisms. This review is focused on potential avenues of genetic engineering that may be undertaken in order to improve microalgae as a biofuel platform for the production of biohydrogen, starch-derived alcohols, diesel fuel surrogates, and/or alkanes.

  9. Learning about Genetic Inheritance through Technology-Enhanced Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Michelle; Merritt, Joi; Opperman, Amanda; Porter, Jakob; Erlenbeck, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Genetics is an increasingly important topic in today's society, and one that permeates people's lives on many levels. Students, teachers, and the general public alike are constantly exposed to this topic through popular television shows such as "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," political issues like voting on stem-cell research, and the…

  10. Genetic Engineering of Algae for Enhanced Biofuel Production ▿

    PubMed Central

    Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Darzins, Al; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently intensive global research efforts aimed at increasing and modifying the accumulation of lipids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, polysaccharides, and other energy storage compounds in photosynthetic organisms, yeast, and bacteria through genetic engineering. Many improvements have been realized, including increased lipid and carbohydrate production, improved H2 yields, and the diversion of central metabolic intermediates into fungible biofuels. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attracting considerable interest within these efforts due to their relatively high photosynthetic conversion efficiencies, diverse metabolic capabilities, superior growth rates, and ability to store or secrete energy-rich hydrocarbons. Relative to cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae possess several unique metabolic attributes of relevance to biofuel production, including the accumulation of significant quantities of triacylglycerol; the synthesis of storage starch (amylopectin and amylose), which is similar to that found in higher plants; and the ability to efficiently couple photosynthetic electron transport to H2 production. Although the application of genetic engineering to improve energy production phenotypes in eukaryotic microalgae is in its infancy, significant advances in the development of genetic manipulation tools have recently been achieved with microalgal model systems and are being used to manipulate central carbon metabolism in these organisms. It is likely that many of these advances can be extended to industrially relevant organisms. This review is focused on potential avenues of genetic engineering that may be undertaken in order to improve microalgae as a biofuel platform for the production of biohydrogen, starch-derived alcohols, diesel fuel surrogates, and/or alkanes. PMID:20139239

  11. An Ethical Study on the Uses of Enhancement Genetic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Koji

    A variety of biomedical technologies are being developed that can be used for purposes other than treating diseases. Such “enhancement technologies” can be used to improve our own and future generation's life-chances. While these technologies can help people in many ways, their use raises important ethical issues. Some arguments for anti-enhancement as well as pro-enhancement seem to rest, however, on shaky foundation. Both company engineers and the general public had better learn more from technological, economical and philosophical histories. For such subjects may provide engineers with less opportunities of technological misuses and more powers of self-esteem in addition to self-control.

  12. Genetically enhanced cellulase production in Pseudomonas cellulosa using recombinant DNA technology

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1999-01-01

    An enhanced strain of Pseudomonas celllulosa was obtained by introducing a recombinant genetic construct comprising a heterologous cellulase gene operably connected to a promoter into ATCC 55702, mutagenizing the transformants by treatment with MNNG, and selecting a high cellulase producing transformant. The transformant, designated Pseudomonas cellulosa ATCC XXXX, exhibits enhanced levels of cellulase production relative to the untransformed Pseudomonas cellulosa strain #142 ATCC 55702.

  13. Evaluation of implant strategies in Angus-sired steers with high or low genetic potential for marbling and gain.

    PubMed

    Black, D N; Neville, B W; Crosswhite, M R; Dahlen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Sixty-nine Angus-sired steer calves (332.3 kg initial BW) were used to determine the effects of single or double implant strategies on steers of high or low genetic potential (GP) determined by the GeneMax (Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ) genetic profiling test. Steers were assigned to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design with factors of 1) composite GP score (high, mean GP score of 86.5 [HI]; low, mean GP score of 25.3[LO]) and 2) implant strategy (single, steers implanted on d 70 [1X], or double, steers implanted d 0 and 70 [2X]). All steers were given the same implant (Revalor-S; Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ), with the 2X group implanted on d 0 and 70 and the 1X group implanted only on d 70. A diet containing 1.38 Mcal NEg/kg DM was fed ad libitum, once daily. Ultrasound was used to measure body composition characteristics on d 0 and 70. Steers were harvested after 140 d on feed. At both the d-0 and d-70 ultrasound, HI steers had greater ( < 0.001) percent intramuscular fat (IMF) than LO steers, but no differences ( ≥ 0.24) were observed in LM area (LMA), rib fat thickness (RF), or rump fat thickness (RMFT). Steers in the 2X group had larger ( = 0.02) LMA and less ( = 0.03) IMF on d 70 than 1X steers and no differences ( ≥ 0.50) in RF or RMFT were observed. From d 0 to 70, HI steers had ADG, DMI, and G:F ( ≥ 0.60) similar to LO steers; however, 2X steers had greater ( < 0.001) ADG and were more ( < 0.001) feed efficient compared with 1X steers during the same interval. Over the entire 140-d feeding period, there were no differences ( ≥ 0.6) in BW, ADG, DMI, or G:F between GP groups; however, 2X steers had greater ( = 0.03) ADG compared with 1X steers and still had similar ( ≥ 0.12) DMI and G:F. Upon slaughter, marbling score tended to be impacted by a GP × implant interaction (499.9 ± 18.5, 545.6 ± 18.5, 487.1 ± 18.5, and 469.8 ± 18.5 for HI and 2X, HI and 1X, LO and 2X, and LO and 1X, respectively; = 0.06). No differences ( ≥ 0.7) were observed

  14. Genetic improvement of plants for enhanced bio-ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sanghamitra; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-04-01

    The present world energy situation urgently requires exploring and developing alternate, sustainable sources for fuel. Biofuels have proven to be an effective energy source but more needs to be produced to meet energy goals. Whereas first generation biofuels derived from mainly corn and sugarcane continue to be used and produced, the contentious debate between "feedstock versus foodstock" continues. The need for sources that can be grown under different environmental conditions has led to exploring newer sources. Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive source for production of biofuel, but pretreatment costs to remove lignin are high and the process is time consuming. Genetically modified plants that have increased sugar or starch content, modified lignin content, or produce cellulose degrading enzymes are some options that are being explored and tested. This review focuses on current research on increasing production of biofuels by genetic engineering of plants to have desirable characteristics. Recent patents that have been filed in this area are also discussed.

  15. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources.

  16. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices.

  17. In sport and social justice, is genetic enhancement a game changer?

    PubMed

    Parker, Lisa S

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of genetic enhancement to increase the likelihood of success in sport and life's prospects raises questions for accounts of sport and theories of justice. These questions obviously include the fairness of such enhancement and its relationship to the goals of sport and demands of justice. Of equal interest, however, is the effect on our understanding of individual effort, merit, and desert of either discovering genetic contributions to components of such effort or recognizing the influence of social factors on the development and exercise of individual effort. This paper analyzes arguments about genetic enhancement with the goal of raising questions about how sport and justice regard unchosen, undeserved inequalities and what is assumed to be their opposite-namely, the exercise and results of individual effort. It is suggested that contemplating enhancement of natural assets previously outside human control may reinforce recognition of responsibility to intervene with regard to social advantages so as to support individual effort and improve individuals' life prospects.

  18. Enhanced Genetic Integrity in Mouse Germ Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Murphey, Patricia; McLean, Derek J.; McMahan, C. Alex; Walter, Christi A.; McCarrey, John R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetically based diseases constitute a major human health burden, and de novo germline mutations represent a source of heritable genetic alterations that can cause such disorders in offspring. The availability of transgenic rodent systems with recoverable, mutation reporter genes has been used to assess the occurrence of spontaneous point mutations in germline cells. Previous studies using the lacI mutation reporter transgenic mouse system showed that the frequency of spontaneous mutations is significantly lower in advanced male germ cells than in somatic cell types from the same individuals. Here we used this same mutation reporter transgene system to show that female germ cells also display a mutation frequency that is lower than that in corresponding somatic cells and similar to that seen in male germ cells, indicating this is a common feature of germ cells in both sexes. In addition, we showed that statistically significant differences in mutation frequencies are evident between germ cells and somatic cells in both sexes as early as mid-fetal stages in the mouse. Finally, a comparison of the mutation frequency in a general population of early type A spermatogonia with that in a population enriched for Thy-1-positive spermatogonia suggests there is heterogeneity among the early spermatogonial population such that a subset of these cells are predestined to form true spermatogonial stem cells. Taken together, these results support the disposable soma theory, which posits that genetic integrity is normally maintained more stringently in the germ line than in the soma and suggests that this is achieved by minimizing the initial occurrence of mutations in early germline cells and their subsequent gametogenic progeny relative to that in somatic cells. PMID:23153565

  19. Ethical Concerns About Human Genetic Enhancement in the Malay Science Fiction Novels.

    PubMed

    Isa, Noor Munirah; Hj Safian Shuri, Muhammad Fakhruddin

    2017-03-09

    Advancements in science and technology have not only brought hope to humankind to produce disease-free offspring, but also offer possibilities to genetically enhance the next generation's traits and capacities. Human genetic enhancement, however, raises complex ethical questions, such as to what extent should it be allowed? It has been a great challenge for humankind to develop robust ethical guidelines for human genetic enhancement that address both public concerns and needs. We believe that research about public concerns is necessary prior to developing such guidelines, yet the issues have not been thoroughly investigated in many countries, including Malaysia. Since the novel often functions as a medium for the public to express their concerns, this paper explores ethical concerns about human genetic enhancement expressed in four Malay science fiction novels namely Klon, Leksikon Ledang, Transgenesis Bisikan Rimba and Transgenik Sifar. Religion has a strong influence on the worldview of the Malays therefore some concerns such as playing God are obviously religious. Association of the negative image of scientists as well as the private research companies with the research on human genetic enhancement reflects the authors' concerns about the main motivations for conducting such research and the extent to which such research will benefit society.

  20. Recent Enhancements to the Genetic Risk Prediction Model BRCAPRO

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Emanuele; Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Biswas, Swati

    2015-01-01

    BRCAPRO is a widely used model for genetic risk prediction of breast cancer. It is a function within the R package BayesMendel and is used to calculate the probabilities of being a carrier of a deleterious mutation in one or both of the BRCA genes, as well as the probability of being affected with breast and ovarian cancer within a defined time window. Both predictions are based on information contained in the counselee’s family history of cancer. During the last decade, BRCAPRO has undergone several rounds of successive refinements: the current version is part of release 2.1 of BayesMendel. In this review, we showcase some of the most notable features of the software resulting from these recent changes. We provide examples highlighting each feature, using artificial pedigrees motivated by complex clinical examples. We illustrate how BRCAPRO is a comprehensive software for genetic risk prediction with many useful features that allow users the flexibility to incorporate varying amounts of available information. PMID:25983549

  1. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe for genetic markers on single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Benjamin; Leotaud, John; McCarty, Gregory S.

    2010-03-01

    Methods capable of quickly and inexpensively collecting genetic information are of increasing importance. We report a method of using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe single-stranded DNA for genetic markers. This unique approach is used to analyze unmodified genes of moderate length for genetic markers by hybridizing native test oligonucleotides into a surface-enhanced Raman complex, vastly increasing detection sensitivity as compared to traditional Raman spectroscopy. The Raman complex is formed by sandwiching the test DNA between 40-nm gold nanoparticles and a photolithographically defined gold surface. With this design, we are able to collect characteristic Raman spectra about the test DNA and to detect genetic markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and polymorphic regions. Results show that strands containing one of three different types of polymorphism can be differentiated using statistically significant trends regarding Raman intensity.

  2. Regulation of Ubx expression by epigenetic enhancer silencing in response to Ubx levels and genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Crickmore, Michael A; Ranade, Vikram; Mann, Richard S

    2009-09-01

    For gene products that must be present in cells at defined concentrations, expression levels must be tightly controlled to ensure robustness against environmental, genetic, and developmental noise. By studying the regulation of the concentration-sensitive Drosophila melanogaster Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx), we found that Ubx enhancer activities respond to both increases in Ubx levels and genetic background. Large, transient increases in Ubx levels are capable of silencing all enhancer input into Ubx transcription, resulting in the complete silencing of this gene. Small increases in Ubx levels, brought about by duplications of the Ubx locus, cause sporadic silencing of subsets of Ubx enhancers. Ubx enhancer silencing can also be induced by outcrossing laboratory stocks to D. melanogaster strains established from wild flies from around the world. These results suggest that enhancer activities are not rigidly determined, but instead are sensitive to genetic background. Together, these findings suggest that enhancer silencing may be used to maintain gene product levels within the correct range in response to natural genetic variation.

  3. Genetic engineering of stem cells for enhanced therapy.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Adam; Andrzejewska, Anna; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for overcoming the limitations of current treatment methods. The modification of stem cell properties may be necessary to fully exploit their potential. Genetic engineering, with an abundance of methodology to induce gene expression in a precise and well-controllable manner, is particularly attractive for this purpose. There are virus-based and non-viral methods of genetic manipulation. Genome-integrating viral vectors are usually characterized by highly efficient and long-term transgene expression, at a cost of safety. Non-integrating viruses are also highly efficient in transduction, and, while safer, offer only a limited duration of transgene expression. There is a great diversity of transfectable forms of nucleic acids; however, for efficient shuttling across cell membranes, additional manipulation is required. Both physical and chemical methods have been employed for this purpose. Stem cell engineering for clinical applications is still in its infancy and requires further research. There are two main strategies for inducing transgene expression in therapeutic cells: transient and permanent expression. In many cases, including stem cell trafficking and using cell therapy for the treatment of rapid-onset disease with a short healing process, transient transgene expression may be a sufficient and optimal approach. For that purpose, mRNA-based methods seem ideally suited, as they are characterized by a rapid, highly efficient transfection, with outstanding safety. Permanent transgene expression is primarily based on the application of viral vectors, and, due to safety concerns, these methods are more challenging. There is active, ongoing research toward the development of non-viral methods that would induce permanent expression, such as transposons and mammalian artificial chromosomes.

  4. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  5. Enhancements and justice: problems in determining the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ronald A

    2005-03-01

    There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. Moreover, focusing on the uncertain inequities of the future may result in failure to give priority to more pressing inequities of the present. Especially in a country that recently has enacted tax legislation that will widen existing wealth disparities, concern about the distant threat of a genetic aristocracy appears misplaced.

  6. GenMin: An enhanced genetic algorithm for global optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, I. E.

    2008-06-01

    A new method that employs grammatical evolution and a stopping rule for finding the global minimum of a continuous multidimensional, multimodal function is considered. The genetic algorithm used is a hybrid genetic algorithm in conjunction with a local search procedure. We list results from numerical experiments with a series of test functions and we compare with other established global optimization methods. The accompanying software accepts objective functions coded either in Fortran 77 or in C++. Program summaryProgram title: GenMin Catalogue identifier: AEAR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 35 810 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 436 613 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Computer: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Operating system: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler RAM: 200 KB Word size: 32 bits Classification: 4.9 Nature of problem: A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques are frequently trapped in local minima. Global optimization is hence the appropriate tool. For example, solving a nonlinear system of equations via optimization, employing a least squares type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions (i.e. they are far from zero). Solution method: Grammatical evolution and a stopping rule. Running time: Depending on the

  7. An enhanced nonparametric streamflow disaggregation model with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Salas, J. D.; Prairie, J.

    2010-08-01

    Stochastic streamflow generation is generally utilized for planning and management of water resources systems. For this purpose, a number of parametric and nonparametric models have been suggested in literature. Among them, temporal and spatial disaggregation approaches play an important role particularly to make sure that historical variance-covariance properties are preserved at various temporal and spatial scales. In this paper, we review the underlying features of existing nonparametric disaggregation methods, identify some of their pros and cons, and propose a disaggregation algorithm that is capable of surmounting some of the shortcomings of the current models. The proposed models hinge on k-nearest neighbor resampling, the accurate adjusting procedure, and a genetic algorithm. The models have been tested and compared to an existing nonparametric disaggregation approach using data of the Colorado River system. It has been shown that the model is capable of (1) reproducing the season-to-season correlations including the correlation between the last season of the previous year and the first season of the current year, (2) minimizing or avoiding the generation of flow patterns across the year that are literally the same as those of the historical records, and (3) minimizing or avoiding the generation of negative flows. In addition, it is applicable to intermittent river regimes.

  8. A single injection of gain-of-function mutant PCSK9 adeno-associated virus vector induces cardiovascular calcification in mice with no genetic modification

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Hagita, Sumihiko; Rogers, Maximillian A.; Creager, Michael D.; Pham, Tan; Choi, Jung; Mlynarchik, Andrew K; Pieper, Brett; Kjolby, Mads; Aikawa, Masanori; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying atherosclerotic calcification in vivo requires mouse models with genetic modifications. Previous studies showed that injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) encoding a gain-of-function mutant PCSK9 into mice promotes atherosclerosis. Aim We aim to study cardiovascular calcification induced by PCSK9 AAV in C57BL/6J mice. Methods 10 week-old C57BL/6J mice received a single injection of AAV encoding mutant mPCSK9 (rAAV8/D377Y-mPCSK9). Ldlr−/− mice served as positive controls. Mice consumed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 15 or 20 weeks. Aortic calcification was assessed by fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) of a near-infrared calcium tracer. Results Serum levels of PCSK9 (0.14 µg/ml to 20 µg/ml, p < 0.01) and total cholesterol (82 mg/dL to 820 mg/dL, p < 0.01) increased within one week after injection and remained elevated for 20 weeks. Atherosclerotic lesion size was similar between PCSK9 AAV and Ldlr−/− mice. Aortic calcification was 0.01%±0.01 in PCSK9 AAV mice and 15.3%±6.1 in Ldlr−/− mice at 15 weeks (p < 0.01); by 20 weeks, the PCSK9 AAV mice aortic calcification grew to 12.4%±4.9. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase activity was similar in PCSK9 AAV mice and Ldlr−/− mice at 15 and 20 weeks, respectively. As example of the utility of this model in testing modulators of calcification in vivo, PCSK9 AAV injection to sortilin-deficient mice demonstrated reduced aortic calcification by 46.3% (p < 0.05) compared to littermate controls. Conclusion A single injection of gain-of-function PCSK9 AAV into C57BL/6J mice is a useful tool to study cardiovascular calcification in mice with no genetic manipulation. PMID:27318830

  9. An erythroid enhancer of BCL11A subject to genetic variation determines fetal hemoglobin level

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniel E.; Kamran, Sophia C.; Lessard, Samuel; Xu, Jian; Fujiwara, Yuko; Lin, Carrie; Shao, Zhen; Canver, Matthew C.; Smith, Elenoe C.; Pinello, Luca; Sabo, Peter J.; Vierstra, Jeff; Voit, Richard A.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Porteus, Matthew H.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Lettre, Guillaume; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have ascertained numerous trait-associated common genetic variants, frequently localized to regulatory DNA. We find that common genetic variation at BCL11A associated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level lies in noncoding sequences decorated by an erythroid enhancer chromatin signature. Fine-mapping uncovers a motif-disrupting common variant associated with reduced transcription factor binding, modestly diminished BCL11A expression and elevated HbF. The surrounding sequences function in vivo as a developmental stage-specific lineage-restricted enhancer. Genome engineering reveals the enhancer is required in erythroid but not B-lymphoid cells for BCL11A expression. These findings illustrate how GWAS may expose functional variants of modest impact within causal elements essential for appropriate gene expression. We propose the GWAS-marked BCL11A enhancer represents an attractive target for therapeutic genome engineering for the β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:24115442

  10. An erythroid enhancer of BCL11A subject to genetic variation determines fetal hemoglobin level.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniel E; Kamran, Sophia C; Lessard, Samuel; Xu, Jian; Fujiwara, Yuko; Lin, Carrie; Shao, Zhen; Canver, Matthew C; Smith, Elenoe C; Pinello, Luca; Sabo, Peter J; Vierstra, Jeff; Voit, Richard A; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Porteus, Matthew H; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Lettre, Guillaume; Orkin, Stuart H

    2013-10-11

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have ascertained numerous trait-associated common genetic variants, frequently localized to regulatory DNA. We found that common genetic variation at BCL11A associated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level lies in noncoding sequences decorated by an erythroid enhancer chromatin signature. Fine-mapping uncovers a motif-disrupting common variant associated with reduced transcription factor (TF) binding, modestly diminished BCL11A expression, and elevated HbF. The surrounding sequences function in vivo as a developmental stage-specific, lineage-restricted enhancer. Genome engineering reveals the enhancer is required in erythroid but not B-lymphoid cells for BCL11A expression. These findings illustrate how GWASs may expose functional variants of modest impact within causal elements essential for appropriate gene expression. We propose the GWAS-marked BCL11A enhancer represents an attractive target for therapeutic genome engineering for the β-hemoglobinopathies.

  11. Enhancement of Microbial Biodesulfurization via Genetic Engineering and Adaptive Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Butler, Robert R.; Wu, Fan; Pombert, Jean-François; Kilbane, John J.; Stark, Benjamin C.

    2017-01-01

    In previous work from our laboratories a synthetic gene encoding a peptide (“Sulpeptide 1” or “S1”) with a high proportion of methionine and cysteine residues had been designed to act as a sulfur sink and was inserted into the dsz (desulfurization) operon of Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8. In the work described here this construct (dszAS1BC) and the intact dsz operon (dszABC) cloned into vector pRESX under control of the (Rhodococcus) kstD promoter were transformed into the desulfurization-negative strain CW25 of Rhodococcus qingshengii. The resulting strains (CW25[pRESX-dszABC] and CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC]) were subjected to adaptive selection by repeated passages at log phase (up to 100 times) in minimal medium with dibenzothiophene (DBT) as sole sulfur source. For both strains DBT metabolism peaked early in the selection process and then decreased, eventually averaging four times that of the initial transformed cells; the maximum specific activity achieved by CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC] exceeded that of CW25[pRESX-dszABC]. Growth rates increased by 7-fold (CW25[pRESX-dszABC]) and 13-fold (CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC]) and these increases were stable. The adaptations of CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC] were correlated with a 3-5X increase in plasmid copy numbers from those of the initial transformed cells; whole genome sequencing indicated that during its selection processes no mutations occurred to any of the dsz, S1, or other genes and promoters involved in sulfur metabolism, stress response, or DNA methylation, and that the effect of the sulfur sink produced by S1 is likely very small compared to the cells’ overall cysteine and methionine requirements. Nevertheless, a combination of genetic engineering using sulfur sinks and increasing Dsz capability with adaptive selection may be a viable strategy to increase biodesulfurization ability. PMID:28060828

  12. Analyzing and Quantifying the Gain-of-Function Enhancement of IP3 Receptor Gating by Familial Alzheimer’s Disease-Causing Mutants in Presenilins

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Don-On Daniel; Cheung, King-Ho; Toglia, Patrick; Foskett, J. Kevin; Ullah, Ghanim

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD)-causing mutant presenilins (PS) interact with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca2+ release channels resulting in enhanced IP3R channel gating in an amyloid beta (Aβ) production-independent manner. This gain-of-function enhancement of IP3R activity is considered to be the main reason behind the upregulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in the presence of optimal and suboptimal stimuli and spontaneous Ca2+ signals observed in cells expressing mutant PS. In this paper, we employed computational modeling of single IP3R channel activity records obtained under optimal Ca2+ and multiple IP3 concentrations to gain deeper insights into the enhancement of IP3R function. We found that in addition to the high occupancy of the high-activity (H) mode and the low occupancy of the low-activity (L) mode, IP3R in FAD-causing mutant PS-expressing cells exhibits significantly longer mean life-time for the H mode and shorter life-time for the L mode, leading to shorter mean close-time and hence high open probability of the channel in comparison to IP3R in cells expressing wild-type PS. The model is then used to extrapolate the behavior of the channel to a wide range of IP3 and Ca2+ concentrations and quantify the sensitivity of IP3R to its two ligands. We show that the gain-of-function enhancement is sensitive to both IP3 and Ca2+ and that very small amount of IP3 is required to stimulate IP3R channels in the presence of FAD-causing mutant PS to the same level of activity as channels in control cells stimulated by significantly higher IP3 concentrations. We further demonstrate with simulations that the relatively longer time spent by IP3R in the H mode leads to the observed higher frequency of local Ca2+ signals, which can account for the more frequent global Ca2+ signals observed, while the enhanced activity of the channel at extremely low ligand concentrations will lead to spontaneous Ca2+ signals in cells expressing FAD

  13. A fast-evolving human NPAS3 enhancer gained reporter expression in the developing forebrain of transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Gretel B.; López-Leal, Rodrigo; Lorenzo, Juan R.; Franchini, Lucía F.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental brain gene NPAS3 stands out as a hot spot in human evolution because it contains the largest number of human-specific, fast-evolving, conserved, non-coding elements. In this paper we studied 2xHAR142, one of these elements that is located in the fifth intron of NPAS3. Using transgenic mice, we show that the mouse and chimp 2xHAR142 orthologues behave as transcriptional enhancers driving expression of the reporter gene lacZ to a similar NPAS3 expression subdomain in the mouse central nervous system. Interestingly, the human 2xHAR142 orthologue drives lacZ expression to an extended expression pattern in the nervous system. Thus, molecular evolution of 2xHAR142 provides the first documented example of human-specific heterotopy in the forebrain promoted by a transcriptional enhancer and suggests that it may have contributed to assemble the unique properties of the human brain. PMID:24218632

  14. Genetics of slaughter precocity, carcass weight, and carcass weight gain in Chianina, Marchigiana, and Romagnola young bulls under protected geographical indication.

    PubMed

    Sbarra, F; Mantovani, R; Quaglia, A; Bittante, G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation of age at slaughter (AS), as an indicator of slaughter precocity, carcass weight (CW), and CW gain (CWG = CW × AS(-1)) obtained from young bulls of 3 Italian autochthonous beef cattle breeds [i.e., Chianina (CHI), Marchigiana (MAR), and Romagnola (ROM)]. In addition, the study aimed at evaluating the effect of corrected or uncorrected CW for AS, and analyzing the relationship between adjusted or unadjusted CW with CWG in term of changes in rank correlation in groups of sires with high accuracy. Data were obtained from the Consortium of protected geographical indication (PGI) "Vitellone Bianco dell'Appennino Centrale" (i.e., white young bull of Central Apennines), approved by the European Union. After editing, 20,872 complete records were retained for subsequent Bayesian analysis. Univariate animal model produced h(2) estimates of medium value for AS (i.e., from 0.28 for CHI to 0.39 for the ROM breed). The CW presented h(2) estimates less than AS, ranging from 0.13 for CHI to 0.24 for ROM bulls. The adjustment of CW by AS (CWU-AS) increased the h(2) values for CW in all breeds (i.e., from 0.20 to 0.29). Point estimate of genetic correlations between AS and CW obtained by a bivariate analysis were moderate to low, and negative in all breeds (from -0.08 to -0.29). Rerankings of sire for univariate CW (CWU) analysis and CWU-AS were more noticeable for CHI and ROM (rank correlation of 0.875 and 0.897, respectively) than for the MAR breed (rank correlation of 0.967). Comparing bivariate EBV for CW with EBV for CWU or CWU-AS increased rank correlation to 0.937 for ROM, but for CHI it remained lower (i.e., 0.861), indicating a possible large reranking of sires by correcting CW for AS in this breed. Daily CWG presented h(2) estimates greater than CW and similar or greater than AS. It appears to be a good indicator of instant growth rate capacity of the animal but lacking information on the

  15. Pre-breeding for diversification of primary gene pool and genetic enhancement of grain legumes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shivali; Upadhyaya, H. D.; Varshney, R. K.; Gowda, C. L. L.

    2013-01-01

    The narrow genetic base of cultivars coupled with low utilization of genetic resources are the major factors limiting grain legume production and productivity globally. Exploitation of new and diverse sources of variation is needed for the genetic enhancement of grain legumes. Wild relatives with enhanced levels of resistance/tolerance to multiple stresses provide important sources of genetic diversity for crop improvement. However, their exploitation for cultivar improvement is limited by cross-incompatibility barriers and linkage drags. Pre-breeding provides a unique opportunity, through the introgression of desirable genes from wild germplasm into genetic backgrounds readily used by the breeders with minimum linkage drag, to overcome this. Pre-breeding activities using promising landraces, wild relatives, and popular cultivars have been initiated at International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) to develop new gene pools in chickpea, pigeonpea, and groundnut with a high frequency of useful genes, wider adaptability, and a broad genetic base. The availability of molecular markers will greatly assist in reducing linkage drags and increasing the efficiency of introgression in pre-breeding programs. PMID:23970889

  16. Enhancing the Internationalisation of Distance Education in the Biological Sciences: The DUNE Project and Genetic Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, C. K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Distance Educational Network of Europe (DUNE) project that aims at enhancing the development of distance education in an international context. Highlights issues relating to the delivery of distance-learning courses in a transnational forum. Describes the genetic engineering course that aims at explaining the core techniques of…

  17. Genetic dissection of the α-globin super-enhancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Deborah; Hughes, Jim R.; Rode, Christina; Li, Pik-Shan; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A.; Ayyub, Helena; Butler, Sue; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Gibbons, Richard J.; Smith, Andrew J.H.; Wood, William G.; Higgs, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Many genes determining cell identity are regulated by clusters of mediator-bound enhancer elements collectively referred to as super-enhancers. These have been proposed to manifest higher-order properties important in development and disease. Here, we report a comprehensive functional dissection of one of the strongest putative super-enhancers in erythroid cells. By generating a series of mouse models, deleting each of the five regulatory elements of the α-globin super-enhancer singly and in informative combinations, we demonstrate that each constituent enhancer appears to act independently and in an additive fashion with respect to hematologic phenotype, gene expression, chromatin structure and chromosome conformation, without clear evidence of synergistic or higher-order effects. Our study highlights the importance of functional genetic analyses for the identification of new concepts in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27376235

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of genetically modified flax fibres enhanced with poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-02-01

    Genetically modified flax fibres, derived from transgenic flax with expression of three bacterial genes necessary for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), have been analysed. These transgenic flaxes, enhanced with different amount of the PHB, have been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The integral intensities of the IR bands have been used for estimation of the chemical content of the normal and transgenic flaxes as well as the differences between the natural and genetically modified flax fibres. The spectroscopic data were compared to those obtained from chemical analysis of flax fibres.

  19. Performance enhancement for crystallization unit of a sugar plant using genetic algorithm technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, P. C.; Khanduja, Rajiv; Gupta, Mahesh

    2012-05-01

    This paper deals with the performance enhancement for crystallization unit of a sugar plant using genetic algorithm. The crystallization unit of a sugar industry has three main subsystems arranged in series. Considering exponential distribution for the probable failures and repairs, the mathematical formulation of the problem is done using probabilistic approach, and differential equations are developed on the basis of Markov birth-death process. These equations are then solved using normalizing conditions so as to determine the steady-state availability of the crystallization unit. The performance of each subsystem of crystallization unit in a sugar plant has also been optimized using genetic algorithm. Thus, the findings of the present paper will be highly useful to the plant management for the timely execution of proper maintenance decisions and, hence, to enhance the system performance.

  20. Genetic diversity enhanced by ancient introgression and secondary contact in East Pacific black mangroves.

    PubMed

    Nettel, Alejandro; Dodd, Richard S; Afzal-Rafii, Zara; Tovilla-Hernández, Cristian

    2008-06-01

    Regional distribution of genetic diversity in widespread species may be influenced by hybridization with locally restricted, closely related species. Previous studies have shown that Central American East Pacific populations of the wide-ranged Avicennia germinans, the black mangrove, harbour higher genetic diversity than the rest of its range. Genetic diversity in this region might be enhanced by introgression with the locally restricted Avicennia bicolor. We tested the hypotheses of ancient hybridization using phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and intergenic chloroplast DNA; we also tested for current hybridization by population level analysis of nuclear microsatellites. Our results unveiled ancient ITS introgression between a northern Pacific Central American A. germinans lineage and A. bicolor. However, microsatellite data revealed contemporary isolation between the two species. Polymorphic ITS sequences from Costa Rica and Panama are consistent with a zone of admixture between the introgressant ITS A. germinans lineage and a southern Central American lineage of A. germinans. Interspecific introgression influenced lineage diversity and divergence at the nuclear ribosomal DNA; intraspecific population differentiation and secondary contact are more likely to have enhanced regional genetic diversity in Pacific Central American populations of the widespread A. germinans.

  1. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi-host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H; Jeeves, Rose E; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2015-11-01

    Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as Campylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome-wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 Campylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST-21 and ST-45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans.

  2. Giant enhancement of optical high-order sideband generation and their control in a dimer of two cavities with gain and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahui; Li, Jiahua; Xiao, Qian; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Parity-time (PT ) symmetric systems, which rely on the balanced gain-loss condition and render the Hamiltonian non-Hermitian, have provided a new platform to engineer effective light-matter interactions in recent years. Here we explore the high-order sideband features of the output fields obtained from a PT -symmetric optical system consisting of a passive nonlinear cavity coupled to an active linear cavity. By employing a perturbation technique, we derive analytic formulas used to determine the nonlinear transmission coefficient of optical second-order sideband in this structure. Using experimentally achievable parameters, it is clearly shown that the efficiency of the second-order sideband generation can be greatly enhanced in the PT -symmetric dimer, extremely in the vicinity of the transition point from unbroken- to broken-PT regimes. Moreover, we further analyzed the influences of the system parameters, including the photon-tunneling rate between two cavities, Kerr nonlinearity strength, and optical detuning, on the second-order sideband generation. Subsequently we investigate the higher-order sideband output spectrum by numerical simulations, where the sideband amplitude also is largely enhanced in the PT -symmetric arrangement, compared with the passive-passive double-cavity system. Our obtained results provide a new avenue for acquiring optical high-order sidebands and operating light, which may inspire further applications in chip-scale optical communications and optical frequency combs.

  3. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  4. The genetics of Tamarix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have helped us gain basic knowledge of the Tamarix invasion. We now have a better understanding of the species identities involved in the invasion, their evolutionary relationships, and the contribution of hybridization to the invasion. This information can be used to enhance the eff...

  5. Exopolysaccharide production by a genetically engineered Enterobacter cloacae strain for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Luo, Yijing; Zhong, Weizhang; Xiao, Meng; Yi, Wenjing; Yu, Li; Fu, Pengcheng

    2011-05-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a petroleum biotechnology for manipulating function and/or structure of microbial environments existing in oil reservoirs for prolonged exploitation of the largest source of energy. In this study, an Enterobacter cloacae which is capable of producing water-insoluble biopolymers at 37°C and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at higher temperature. The resultant transformants, GW3-3.0, could produce exopolysaccharide up to 8.83 g l(-1) in molasses medium at 54°C. This elevated temperature was within the same temperature range as that for many oil reservoirs. The transformants had stable genetic phenotype which was genetically fingerprinted by RAPD analysis. Core flooding experiments were carried out to ensure effective controlled profile for the simulation of oil recovery. The results have demonstrated that this approach has a promising application potential in MEOR.

  6. Wild Help for Enhancing Genetic Resistance in Lentil Against Fungal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Wong, Melissa M L; Bett, Kirstin E; Banniza, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris) is one of the cool season grain legume crops and an important source of dietary proteins and fibre. Fungal diseases are main constraints to lentil production and account for significant yield and quality losses. Lentil has a narrow genetic base presumably due to a bottleneck during domestication and as a result, any resistance to fungal diseases in the cultivated genepool is gradually eroded and overcome by pathogens. New sources of resistance have been identified in wild lentil (Lens ervoides). This article provides an overview of harnessing resistance potential of wild germplasm to enhance genetic resistance in lentil cultivars using next-generation sequencing-based genotyping, comparative genomics and marker-assisted selection breeding.

  7. A review of genetic engineering biotechnologies for enhanced chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sessions, John W; Armstrong, David G; Hope, Sandra; Jensen, Brian D

    2017-02-01

    Traditional methods for addressing chronic wounds focus on correcting dysfunction by controlling extracellular elements. This review highlights technologies that take a different approach - enhancing chronic wound healing by genetic modification to wound beds. Featured cutaneous transduction/transfection methods include viral modalities (ie adenoviruses, adeno-associated viruses, retroviruses and lentiviruses) and conventional non-viral modalities (ie naked DNA injections, microseeding, liposomal reagents, particle bombardment and electroporation). Also explored are emerging technologies, focusing on the exciting capabilities of wound diagnostics such as pyrosequencing as well as site-specific nuclease editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 used to both transiently and permanently genetically modify resident wound bed cells. Additionally, new non-viral transfection methods (ie conjugated nanoparticles, multi-electrode arrays, and microfabricated needles and nanowires) are discussed that can potentially facilitate more efficient and safe transgene delivery to skin but also represent significant advances broadly to tissue regeneration research.

  8. Genetic or pharmacological reduction of PERK enhances cortical-dependent taste learning.

    PubMed

    Ounallah-Saad, Hadile; Sharma, Vijendra; Edry, Efrat; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2014-10-29

    Protein translation initiation is controlled by levels of eIF2α phosphorylation (p-eIF2α) on Ser51. In addition, increased p-eIF2α levels impair long-term synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation, whereas decreased levels enhance them. Levels of p-eIF2α are determined by four kinases, of which protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR), PKR-like endoplastic reticulum kinase (PERK), and general control nonderepressible 2 are extensively expressed in the mammalian mature brain. Following identification of PERK as the major kinase to determine basal levels of p-eIF2α in primary neuronal cultures, we tested its function as a physiological constraint of memory consolidation in the cortex, the brain structure suggested to store, at least in part, long-term memories in the mammalian brain. To that aim, insular cortex (IC)-dependent positive and negative forms of taste learning were used. Genetic reduction of PERK expression was accomplished by local microinfusion of a lentivirus harboring PERK Short hairpin RNA, and pharmacological inhibition was achieved by local microinfusion of a PERK-specific inhibitor (GSK2606414) to the rat IC. Both genetic reduction of PERK expression and pharmacological inhibition of its activity reduced p-eIF2α levels and enhanced novel taste learning and conditioned taste aversion, but not memory retrieval. Moreover, enhanced extinction was observed together with enhanced associative memory, suggesting increased cortical-dependent behavioral plasticity. The results suggest that, by phosphorylating eIF2α, PERK functions in the cortex as a physiological constraint of memory consolidation, and its downregulation serves as cognitive enhancement.

  9. Dilute nitride resonant cavity enhanced photodetector with internal gain for the λ ∼ 1.3 μm optical communications window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkan, N.; Erol, A.; Sarcan, F.; Al-Ghuraibawi, L. F. F.; Nordin, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a novel dilute nitride-based resonant cavity enhanced photodetector (RCEPD) operating at 1.286 μm. The RCEPD was fabricated using 21 pairs top and 24 pairs bottom GaAs/AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors for mirrors and 7 nm thick nine GaAs/Ga0.65In0.35N0.02 As0.98 quantum wells as the absorption region. For a 15 μm diameter window, the photocurrent at 1.286 μm is 27 μA and 42 μA, at V = 0 and -1 V, respectively, whereas the dark current is as low as 1.7 nA at -1 V. At the operating wavelength, an excellent wavelength selectivity with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 nm, and a high quantum efficiency of 43% are demonstrated. The device exhibits significant internal gain at very small reverse bias voltages of V ⩾ -2 V with an overall quantum efficiency of 67%. These are the best ever recorded values for a dilute nitride RCEPD.

  10. Genetic conjugation of components in two pneumococcal fusion protein vaccines enhances paediatric mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pope, Caroline; Oliver, Elizabeth H; Ma, Jiangtao; Langton Hewer, Claire; Mitchell, Tim J; Finn, Adam

    2015-03-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonises the upper respiratory tract and can cause pneumonia, meningitis and otitis media. Existing pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are expensive to produce and only protect against 13 of the 90+ pneumococcal serotypes; hence there is an urgent need for the development of new vaccines. We have shown previously in mice that pneumolysin (Ply) and a non-toxic variant (Δ6Ply) enhance antibody responses when genetically fused to pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA), a potentially valuable effect for future vaccines. We investigated this adjuvanticity in human paediatric mucosal primary immune cell cultures. Adenoidal mononuclear cells (AMNC) from children aged 0-15 years (n=46) were stimulated with conjugated, admixed or individual proteins, cell viability and CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses were assessed using flow cytometry and cytokine secretion was measured using multiplex technology. Proliferation of CD4+ T-cells in response to PsaAPly, was significantly higher than responses to individual or admixed proteins (p=0.002). In contrast, an enhanced response to PsaAΔ6Ply compared to individual or admixed proteins only occurred at higher concentrations (p<0.01). Evaluation of cytotoxicity suggested that responses occurred when Ply-induced cytolysis was inhibited, either by fusion or mutation, but importantly an additional toxicity independent immune enhancing effect was also apparent as a result of fusion. Responses were MHC class II dependent and had a Th1/Th17 profile. Genetic fusion of Δ6Ply to PsaA significantly modulates and enhances pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cell responses without the cytolytic effects of some other pneumolysoids. Membrane binding activity of such proteins may confer valuable adjuvant properties as fusion may assist Δ6Ply to deliver PsaA to the APC surface effectively, contributing to the initiation of anti-pneumococcal CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  11. Owning genetic information and gene enhancement techniques: why privacy and property rights may undermine social control of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Moore, A D

    2000-04-01

    In this article I argue that the proper subjects of intangible property claims include medical records, genetic profiles, and gene enhancement techniques. Coupled with a right to privacy these intangible property rights allow individuals a zone of control that will, in most cases, justifiably exclude governmental or societal invasions into private domains. I argue that the threshold for overriding privacy rights and intangible property rights is higher, in relation to genetic enhancement techniques and sensitive personal information, than is commonly suggested. Once the bar is raised, so-to-speak, the burden of overriding it is formidable. Thus many policy decisions that have been recently proposed or enacted--citywide audio and video surveillance, law enforcement DNA sweeps, genetic profiling, national bans on genetic testing and enhancement of humans, to name a few--will have to be backed by very strong arguments.

  12. Genetic modification of plant cell walls to enhance biomass yield and biofuel production in bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanting; Fan, Chunfen; Hu, Huizhen; Li, Ying; Sun, Dan; Wang, Youmei; Peng, Liangcai

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent an enormous biomass resource for the generation of biofuels and chemicals. As lignocellulose property principally determines biomass recalcitrance, the genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed as a powerful solution. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the effects of distinct cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, wall proteins) on the enzymatic digestibility of biomass under various physical and chemical pretreatments in herbaceous grasses, major agronomic crops and fast-growing trees. We also compare the main factors of wall polymer features, including cellulose crystallinity (CrI), hemicellulosic Xyl/Ara ratio, monolignol proportion and uronic acid level. Furthermore, the review presents the main gene candidates, such as CesA, GH9, GH10, GT61, GT43 etc., for potential genetic cell wall modification towards enhancing both biomass yield and enzymatic saccharification in genetic mutants and transgenic plants. Regarding cell wall modification, it proposes a novel groove-like cell wall model that highlights to increase amorphous regions (density and depth) of the native cellulose microfibrils, providing a general strategy for bioenergy crop breeding and biofuel processing technology.

  13. Genetic engineering of crops: a ray of hope for enhanced food security.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Gill, Ritu; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement has been a basic and essential chase since organized cultivation of crops began thousands of years ago. Abiotic stresses as a whole are regarded as the crucial factors restricting the plant species to reach their full genetic potential to deliver desired productivity. The changing global climatic conditions are making them worse and pointing toward food insecurity. Agriculture biotechnology or genetic engineering has allowed us to look into and understand the complex nature of abiotic stresses and measures to improve the crop productivity under adverse conditions. Various candidate genes have been identified and transformed in model plants as well as agriculturally important crop plants to develop abiotic stress-tolerant plants for crop improvement. The views presented here are an attempt toward realizing the potential of genetic engineering for improving crops to better tolerate abiotic stresses in the era of climate change, which is now essential for global food security. There is great urgency in speeding up crop improvement programs that can use modern biotechnological tools in addition to current breeding practices for providing enhanced food security.

  14. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of noradrenaline synthesis enhances the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Weinshenker, David; Ferrucci, Michela; Busceti, Carla L.; Biagioni, Francesca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Liles, L. Cameron; Lenzi, Paola; Murri, Luigi; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC), the major brain noradrenergic nucleus, exacerbate the damage to nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) terminals caused by the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). However, because noradrenergic terminals contain other neuromodulators and the noradrenaline (NA) transporter, which may act as a neuroprotective buffer, it was unclear whether this enhancement of METH neurotoxicity was caused by the loss of noradrenergic innervation or the loss of NA itself. We addressed the specific role of NA by comparing the effects of METH in mice with noradrenergic lesions (DSP-4) and those with intact noradrenergic terminals but specifically lacking NA (genetic or acute pharmacological blockade of the NA biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase; DBH). We found that genetic deletion of DBH (DBH −/− mice) and acute treatment of wild-type mice with a DBH inhibitor (fusaric acid) recapitulated the effects of DSP-4 lesions on METH responses. All three methods of NA depletion enhanced striatal DA release, extracellular oxidative stress (as measured by in vivo microdialysis of DA and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and behavioural stereotypies following repeated METH administration. These effects accompanied a worsening of the striatal DA neuron terminal damage and ultrastructural changes to medium spiny neurons. We conclude that NA itself is neuroprotective and plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of striatal DA terminals to the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of METH. PMID:18042179

  15. Genetically Engineered Alginate Lyase-PEG Conjugates Exhibit Enhanced Catalytic Function and Reduced Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lamppa, John W.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Scanlon, Thomas C.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2011-01-01

    Alginate lyase enzymes represent prospective biotherapeutic agents for treating bacterial infections, particularly in the cystic fibrosis airway. To effectively deimmunize one therapeutic candidate while maintaining high level catalytic proficiency, a combined genetic engineering-PEGylation strategy was implemented. Rationally designed, site-specific PEGylation variants were constructed by orthogonal maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. In contrast to random PEGylation of the enzyme by NHS-ester mediated chemistry, controlled mono-PEGylation of A1-III alginate lyase produced a conjugate that maintained wild type levels of activity towards a model substrate. Significantly, the PEGylated variant exhibited enhanced solution phase kinetics with bacterial alginate, the ultimate therapeutic target. The immunoreactivity of the PEGylated enzyme was compared to a wild type control using in vitro binding studies with both enzyme-specific antibodies, from immunized New Zealand white rabbits, and a single chain antibody library, derived from a human volunteer. In both cases, the PEGylated enzyme was found to be substantially less immunoreactive. Underscoring the enzyme's potential for practical utility, >90% of adherent, mucoid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were removed from abiotic surfaces following a one hour treatment with the PEGylated variant, whereas the wild type enzyme removed only 75% of biofilms in parallel studies. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that site-specific mono-PEGylation of genetically engineered A1-III alginate lyase yielded an enzyme with enhanced performance relative to therapeutically relevant metrics. PMID:21340021

  16. A Method to Exploit the Structure of Genetic Ancestry Space to Enhance Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Corneliu A; Neale, Benjamin M; Ripke, Stephan; Daly, Mark J; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2016-05-05

    One goal of human genetics is to understand the genetic basis of disease, a challenge for diseases of complex inheritance because risk alleles are few relative to the vast set of benign variants. Risk variants are often sought by association studies in which allele frequencies in case subjects are contrasted with those from population-based samples used as control subjects. In an ideal world we would know population-level allele frequencies, releasing researchers to focus on case subjects. We argue this ideal is possible, at least theoretically, and we outline a path to achieving it in reality. If such a resource were to exist, it would yield ample savings and would facilitate the effective use of data repositories by removing administrative and technical barriers. We call this concept the Universal Control Repository Network (UNICORN), a means to perform association analyses without necessitating direct access to individual-level control data. Our approach to UNICORN uses existing genetic resources and various statistical tools to analyze these data, including hierarchical clustering with spectral analysis of ancestry; and empirical Bayesian analysis along with Gaussian spatial processes to estimate ancestry-specific allele frequencies. We demonstrate our approach using tens of thousands of control subjects from studies of Crohn disease, showing how it controls false positives, provides power similar to that achieved when all control data are directly accessible, and enhances power when control data are limiting or even imperfectly matched ancestrally. These results highlight how UNICORN can enable reliable, powerful, and convenient genetic association analyses without access to the individual-level data.

  17. A Method to Exploit the Structure of Genetic Ancestry Space to Enhance Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bodea, Corneliu A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ripke, Stephan; Barclay, Murray; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Chamaillard, Mathias; Colombel, Jean-Frederick; Cottone, Mario; Croft, Anthony; D’Incà, Renata; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hanigan, Katherine; Henderson, Paul; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Karban, Amir; Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Khan, Mohammed Azam; Lémann, Marc; Levine, Arie; Massey, Dunecan; Milla, Monica; Montgomery, Grant W.; Ng, Sok Meng Evelyn; Oikonomou, Ioannis; Peeters, Harald; Proctor, Deborah D.; Rahier, Jean-Francois; Roberts, Rebecca; Rutgeerts, Paul; Seibold, Frank; Stronati, Laura; Taylor, Kirstin M.; Törkvist, Leif; Ublick, Kullak; Van Limbergen, Johan; Van Gossum, Andre; Vatn, Morten H.; Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Wei; Andrews, Jane M.; Bampton, Peter A.; Barclay, Murray; Florin, Timothy H.; Gearry, Richard; Krishnaprasad, Krupa; Lawrance, Ian C.; Mahy, Gillian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Radford-Smith, Graham; Roberts, Rebecca L.; Simms, Lisa A.; Amininijad, Leila; Cleynen, Isabelle; Dewit, Olivier; Franchimont, Denis; Georges, Michel; Laukens, Debby; Peeters, Harald; Rahier, Jean-Francois; Rutgeerts, Paul; Theatre, Emilie; Van Gossum, André; Vermeire, Severine; Aumais, Guy; Baidoo, Leonard; Barrie, Arthur M.; Beck, Karen; Bernard, Edmond-Jean; Binion, David G.; Bitton, Alain; Brant, Steve R.; Cho, Judy H.; Cohen, Albert; Croitoru, Kenneth; Daly, Mark J.; Datta, Lisa W.; Deslandres, Colette; Duerr, Richard H.; Dutridge, Debra; Ferguson, John; Fultz, Joann; Goyette, Philippe; Greenberg, Gordon R.; Haritunians, Talin; Jobin, Gilles; Katz, Seymour; Lahaie, Raymond G.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Nelson, Linda; Ng, Sok Meng; Ning, Kaida; Oikonomou, Ioannis; Paré, Pierre; Proctor, Deborah D.; Regueiro, Miguel D.; Rioux, John D.; Ruggiero, Elizabeth; Schumm, L. Philip; Schwartz, Marc; Scott, Regan; Sharma, Yashoda; Silverberg, Mark S.; Spears, Denise; Steinhart, A. Hillary; Stempak, Joanne M.; Swoger, Jason M.; Tsagarelis, Constantina; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Clarence; Zhao, Hongyu; Aerts, Jan; Ahmad, Tariq; Arbury, Hazel; Attwood, Anthony; Auton, Adam; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Chris; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Barroso, Inês; Barton, Anne; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Bowes, John; Brand, Oliver J.; Braund, Peter S.; Bredin, Francesca; Breen, Gerome; Brown, Morris J.; Bruce, Ian N.; Bull, Jaswinder; Burren, Oliver S.; Burton, John; Byrnes, Jake; Caesar, Sian; Cardin, Niall; Clee, Chris M.; Coffey, Alison J.; Connell, John M.C.; Conrad, Donald F.; Cooper, Jason D.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Downes, Kate; Drummond, Hazel E.; Dudakia, Darshna; Dunham, Andrew; Ebbs, Bernadette; Eccles, Diana; Edkins, Sarah; Edwards, Cathryn; Elliot, Anna; Emery, Paul; Evans, David M.; Evans, Gareth; Eyre, Steve; Farmer, Anne; Ferrier, Nicol; Flynn, Edward; Forbes, Alistair; Forty, Liz; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gibbs, Polly; Gilbert, Paul; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Gray, Emma; Green, Elaine; Groves, Chris J.; Grozeva, Detelina; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hall, Anita; Hammond, Naomi; Hardy, Matt; Harrison, Pile; Hassanali, Neelam; Hebaishi, Husam; Hines, Sarah; Hinks, Anne; Hitman, Graham A.; Hocking, Lynne; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Eleanor; Howard, Philip; Howson, Joanna M.M.; Hughes, Debbie; Hunt, Sarah; Isaacs, John D.; Jain, Mahim; Jewell, Derek P.; Johnson, Toby; Jolley, Jennifer D.; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa A.; Kirov, George; Langford, Cordelia F.; Lango-Allen, Hana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lee, James; Lee, Kate L.; Lees, Charlie; Lewis, Kevin; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Maisuria-Armer, Meeta; Maller, Julian; Mansfield, John; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Martin, Paul; Massey, Dunecan C.O.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McGuffin, Peter; McLay, Kirsten E.; McVean, Gil; Mentzer, Alex; Mimmack, Michael L.; Morgan, Ann E.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mowat, Craig; Munroe, Patricia B.; Myers, Simon; Newman, William; Nimmo, Elaine R.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Ovington, Nigel R.; Owen, Michael J.; Palin, Kimmo; Palotie, Aarno; Parnell, Kirstie; Pearson, Richard; Pernet, David; Perry, John R.B.; Phillips, Anne; Plagnol, Vincent; Prescott, Natalie J.; Prokopenko, Inga; Quail, Michael A.; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rayner, Nigel W.; Reid, David M.; Renwick, Anthony; Ring, Susan M.; Robertson, Neil; Robson, Samuel; Russell, Ellie; St Clair, David; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Schuilenburg, Helen; Scott, Carol E.; Scott, Richard; Seal, Sheila; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shields, Beverley M.; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Smyth, Debbie J.; Somaskantharajah, Elilan; Spanova, Katarina; Steer, Sophia; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevens, Helen E.; Stirrups, Kathy; Stone, Millicent A.; Strachan, David P.; Su, Zhan; Symmons, Deborah P.M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Wendy; Tobin, Martin D.; Travers, Mary E.; Turnbull, Clare; Vukcevic, Damjan; Wain, Louise V.; Walker, Mark; Walker, Neil M.; Wallace, Chris; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Watkins, Nicholas A.; Webster, John; Weedon, Michael N.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Woodburn, Matthew; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Yau, Chris; Young, Allan H.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Brown, Matthew A.; Burton, Paul R.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Compston, Alastair; Farrall, Martin; Gough, Stephen C.L.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Pembrey, Marcus; Satsangi, Jack; Stratton, Michael R.; Worthington, Jane; Hurles, Matthew E.; Duncanson, Audrey; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Parkes, Miles; Rahman, Nazneen; Todd, John A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Craddock, Nick; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Daly, Mark J.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    One goal of human genetics is to understand the genetic basis of disease, a challenge for diseases of complex inheritance because risk alleles are few relative to the vast set of benign variants. Risk variants are often sought by association studies in which allele frequencies in case subjects are contrasted with those from population-based samples used as control subjects. In an ideal world we would know population-level allele frequencies, releasing researchers to focus on case subjects. We argue this ideal is possible, at least theoretically, and we outline a path to achieving it in reality. If such a resource were to exist, it would yield ample savings and would facilitate the effective use of data repositories by removing administrative and technical barriers. We call this concept the Universal Control Repository Network (UNICORN), a means to perform association analyses without necessitating direct access to individual-level control data. Our approach to UNICORN uses existing genetic resources and various statistical tools to analyze these data, including hierarchical clustering with spectral analysis of ancestry; and empirical Bayesian analysis along with Gaussian spatial processes to estimate ancestry-specific allele frequencies. We demonstrate our approach using tens of thousands of control subjects from studies of Crohn disease, showing how it controls false positives, provides power similar to that achieved when all control data are directly accessible, and enhances power when control data are limiting or even imperfectly matched ancestrally. These results highlight how UNICORN can enable reliable, powerful, and convenient genetic association analyses without access to the individual-level data. PMID:27087321

  18. Enhanced genetic analysis of single human bioparticles recovered by simplified micromanipulation from forensic 'touch DNA' evidence.

    PubMed

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-03-09

    DNA profiles can be obtained from 'touch DNA' evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a 'blind-swabbing' approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals' cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim's DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator's DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, 'smart analysis' method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., "clumps") bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material.

  19. A cautionary tale on genetic screens based on a gain-of-expression approach: The case of LanB1.

    PubMed

    de Celis, Jose F; Molnar, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Gain of function screens have being frequently used to search for genes affecting a particular adult character or developmental process. These experiments are made possible by the adoption of the Gal4/UAS system to flies, and by the design of P elements bearing UAS sequences. We recently published two screens in which a large number of newly generated P-UAS insertions were crossed with Gal4 drivers expressed in the pupal veins and in the central region of the wing disc. From the data obtained in these and other screens, it seems that a gain-of-function phenotype is a rare occurrence observed only for about 5-8% of insertion sites. Insertions affecting the expression of signaling molecules were particularly enriched in the screens. In contrast, gain-of-function phenotypes due to insertions not belonging to this class appear to be caused by multiple protein-specific mechanisms that could only be unraveled after extensive analysis. We present some data concerning the overexpression of LamB1, a gene encoding the B subunit of Laminin trimers in Drosophila, and show that Notch protein subcellular localization and signaling is compromised in cells overexpressing LanB1.

  20. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine enhances thermotolerance of photosystem II in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Wen, Xiaogang; Gong, Hongmei; Lu, Qingtao; Yang, Zhipan; Tang, Yunlai; Liang, Zheng; Lu, Congming

    2007-02-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with the ability to accumulate glycinebetaine was established. The wild type and transgenic plants were exposed to heat treatment (25-50 degrees C) for 4 h in the dark and under growth light intensity (300 mumol m(-2) s(-1)). The analyses of oxygen-evolving activity and chlorophyll fluorescence demonstrated that photosystem II (PSII) in transgenic plants showed higher thermotolerance than in wild type plants in particular when heat stress was performed in the light, suggesting that the accumulation of glycinebetaine leads to increased tolerance to heat-enhanced photoinhibition. This increased tolerance was associated with an improvement on thermostability of the oxygen-evolving complex and the reaction center of PSII. The enhanced tolerance was caused by acceleration of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photoinhibition. Under heat stress, there was a significant accumulation of H(2)O(2), O (2) (-) and catalytic Fe in wild type plants but this accumulation was much less in transgenic plants. Heat stress significantly decreased the activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monodehydroascorbate reductase in wild type plants whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased much less or maintained or even increased in transgenic plants. In addition, heat stress increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in wild type plants but this increase was much greater in transgenic plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants also showed higher content of ascorbate and reduced glutathione than that of wild type plants under heat stress. The results suggest that the increased thermotolerance induced by accumulation of glycinebetaine in vivo was associated with the enhancement of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photo inhibition, which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species in transgenic plants.

  1. Curcumin enhances wound healing in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, G S; Mani, H; Gaddipati, J P; Singh, A K; Seth, P; Banaudha, K K; Patnaik, G K; Maheshwari, R K

    1999-01-01

    Tissue repair and wound healing are complex processes that involve inflammation, granulation and tissue remodeling. Interactions of different cells, extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors are involved in wound healing, and are mediated by cytokines and growth factors. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a natural product obtained from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, enhanced cutaneous wound healing in rats and guinea pigs. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of curcumin treatment by oral and topical applications on impaired wound healing in diabetic rats and genetically diabetic mice using a full thickness cutaneous punch wound model. Wounds of animals treated with curcumin showed earlier re-epithelialization, improved neovascularization, increased migration of various cells including dermal myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages into the wound bed, and a higher collagen content. Immunohistochemical localization showed an increase in transforming growth factor-beta1 in curcumin-treated wounds compared to controls. Enhanced transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA expression in treated wounds was confirmed by in situ hybridization, and laser scan cytometry. A delay in the apoptosis patterns was seen in diabetic wounds compared to curcumin treated wounds as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridyl triphosphate nick end labeling analysis. Curcumin was effective both orally and topically. These results show that curcumin enhanced wound repair in diabetic impaired healing, and could be developed as a pharmacological agent in such clinical settings.

  2. A Classical Genetic Solution to Enhance the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Phytochemicals in Andrographis paniculata Nees

    PubMed Central

    Talei, Daryush; Abdul Kadir, Mihdzar; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Andrographolides, the diterpene lactones, are major bioactive phytochemicals which could be found in different parts of the medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. A number of such compounds namely andrographolide (AG), neoandrographolide (NAG), and 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (DDAG) have already attracted a great deal of attention due to their potential therapeutic effects in hard-to-treat diseases such as cancers and HIV. Recently, they have also been considered as substrates for the discovery of novel pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, there is still a huge gap in knowledge on the genetic pattern of the biosynthesis of these bioactive compounds. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the genetic mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis of these phytochemicals using a diallel analysis. The high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the three andrographolides in 210 F1 progenies confirmed that the biosynthesis of these andrographolides was considerably increased via intraspecific hybridization. The results revealed high, moderate and low heterosis for DDAG, AG and NAG, respectively. Furthermore, the preponderance of non-additive gene actions was affirmed in the enhancement of the three andrographolides contents. The consequence of this type of gene action was the occurrence of high broad-sense and low narrow-sense heritabilities for the above mentioned andrographolides. The prevalence of non-additive gene action suggests the suitability of heterosis breeding and hybrid seed production as a preferred option to produce new plant varieties with higher andrographolide contents using the wild accessions of A. paniculata. Moreover, from an evolutionary point of view, the occurrence of population bottlenecks in the Malaysian accessions of A. paniculata was unveiled by observing a low level of additive genetic variance (VA) for all the andrographolides. PMID:24586262

  3. A classical genetic solution to enhance the biosynthesis of anticancer phytochemicals in Andrographis paniculata Nees.

    PubMed

    Valdiani, Alireza; Talei, Daryush; Tan, Soon Guan; Abdul Kadir, Mihdzar; Maziah, Mahmood; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Andrographolides, the diterpene lactones, are major bioactive phytochemicals which could be found in different parts of the medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. A number of such compounds namely andrographolide (AG), neoandrographolide (NAG), and 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (DDAG) have already attracted a great deal of attention due to their potential therapeutic effects in hard-to-treat diseases such as cancers and HIV. Recently, they have also been considered as substrates for the discovery of novel pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, there is still a huge gap in knowledge on the genetic pattern of the biosynthesis of these bioactive compounds. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the genetic mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis of these phytochemicals using a diallel analysis. The high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the three andrographolides in 210 F1 progenies confirmed that the biosynthesis of these andrographolides was considerably increased via intraspecific hybridization. The results revealed high, moderate and low heterosis for DDAG, AG and NAG, respectively. Furthermore, the preponderance of non-additive gene actions was affirmed in the enhancement of the three andrographolides contents. The consequence of this type of gene action was the occurrence of high broad-sense and low narrow-sense heritabilities for the above mentioned andrographolides. The prevalence of non-additive gene action suggests the suitability of heterosis breeding and hybrid seed production as a preferred option to produce new plant varieties with higher andrographolide contents using the wild accessions of A. paniculata. Moreover, from an evolutionary point of view, the occurrence of population bottlenecks in the Malaysian accessions of A. paniculata was unveiled by observing a low level of additive genetic variance (VA ) for all the andrographolides.

  4. Cell type specificity and host genetic polymorphisms influence antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Dambach, Kaitlyn M; Donofrio, Gina C; Tassaneetrithep, Boonrat; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-02-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is implicated in severe, usually secondary, dengue virus (DV) infections. Preexisting heterotypic antibodies, via their Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR) interactions, may increase disease severity through enhanced target cell infection. Greater numbers of infected target cells may contribute to higher viremia and excess cytokine levels often observed in severe disease. Monocytes, macrophages, and immature and mature dendritic cells (DC) are considered major cellular targets of DV. Apheresis of multiple donors allowed isolation of autologous primary myeloid target cell types for head-to-head comparison of infection rates, viral output, and cytokine production under direct infection (without antibody) or ADE conditions (with antibody). All studied cell types except immature DC supported ADE. All cells undergoing ADE secreted proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) at enhancement titers, but distinct cell-type-specific patterns were observed for other relevant proteins (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β] and IL-10). Macrophages produced type I interferons (IFN-α/β) that were modulated by ADE. Mature DC mainly secreted IFN-β. Interestingly, only monocytes secreted IL-10, and only upon antibody-enhanced infection. While ADE infection rates were remarkably consistent in monocytes (10 to 15%) across donors, IL-10 protein levels varied according to previously described regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-10 promoter region. The homozygous GCC haplotype was associated with high-level IL-10 secretion, while the ACC and ATA haplotypes produced intermediate and low levels of IL-10, respectively. Our data suggest that ADE effects are cell type specific, are influenced by host genetics, and, depending on relative infection rates, may further contribute to the complexity of DV pathogenesis.

  5. Enhancing fructooligosaccharides production by genetic improvement of the industrial fungus Aspergillus niger ATCC 20611.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Caixia; Xie, Yijia; Li, Ning; Ning, Zhanguo; Du, Na; Huang, Xirong; Zhong, Yaohua

    2017-03-23

    Aspergillus niger ATCC20611 is one of the most potent filamentous fungi used commercially for production of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), which are prospective components of functional food by stimulating probiotic bacteria in the human gut. However, current strategies for improving FOS yield still rely on production process development. The genetic engineering approach hasn't been applied in industrial strains to increase FOS production level. Here, an optimized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated protoplast transformation system was established in A. niger ATCC 20611 and used for further strain improvement. The pyrithiamine resistance gene (ptrA) was selected as a dominant marker and protoplasts were prepared with high concentration (up to 10(8)g(-1) wet weight mycelium) by using mixed cell wall-lysing enzymes. The transformation frequency with ptrA can reach 30-50 transformants per μg of DNA. In addition, the efficiency of co-transformation with the EGFP reporter gene (egfp) was high (approx. 82%). Furthermore, an activity-improved variant of β-fructofuranosidase, FopA(A178P), was successfully overexpressed in A. niger ATCC 20611 by using the transformation system. The transformant, CM6, exhibited a 58% increase in specific β-fructofuranosidase activity (up to 507U/g), compared to the parental strain (320U/g), and effectively reduced the time needed for completion of FOS synthesis. These results illustrate the feasibility of strain improvement through genetic engineering for further enhancement of FOS production level.

  6. Novel quantitative pigmentation phenotyping enhances genetic association, epistasis, and prediction of human eye colour

    PubMed Central

    Wollstein, Andreas; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Chakravarthy, Usha; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan H.; Soubrane, Gisèle; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Vioque, Jesus; Böhringer, Stefan; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Success of genetic association and the prediction of phenotypic traits from DNA are known to depend on the accuracy of phenotype characterization, amongst other parameters. To overcome limitations in the characterization of human iris pigmentation, we introduce a fully automated approach that specifies the areal proportions proposed to represent differing pigmentation types, such as pheomelanin, eumelanin, and non-pigmented areas within the iris. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using high-resolution digital eye imagery and genotype data from 12 selected SNPs from over 3000 European samples of seven populations that are part of the EUREYE study. In comparison to previous quantification approaches, (1) we achieved an overall improvement in eye colour phenotyping, which provides a better separation of manually defined eye colour categories. (2) Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to be involved in human eye colour variation showed stronger associations with our approach. (3) We found new and confirmed previously noted SNP-SNP interactions. (4) We increased SNP-based prediction accuracy of quantitative eye colour. Our findings exemplify that precise quantification using the perceived biological basis of pigmentation leads to enhanced genetic association and prediction of eye colour. We expect our approach to deliver new pigmentation genes when applied to genome-wide association testing. PMID:28240252

  7. Novel quantitative pigmentation phenotyping enhances genetic association, epistasis, and prediction of human eye colour.

    PubMed

    Wollstein, Andreas; Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Chakravarthy, Usha; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan H; Soubrane, Gisèle; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vioque, Jesus; Böhringer, Stefan; Fletcher, Astrid E; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-02-27

    Success of genetic association and the prediction of phenotypic traits from DNA are known to depend on the accuracy of phenotype characterization, amongst other parameters. To overcome limitations in the characterization of human iris pigmentation, we introduce a fully automated approach that specifies the areal proportions proposed to represent differing pigmentation types, such as pheomelanin, eumelanin, and non-pigmented areas within the iris. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using high-resolution digital eye imagery and genotype data from 12 selected SNPs from over 3000 European samples of seven populations that are part of the EUREYE study. In comparison to previous quantification approaches, (1) we achieved an overall improvement in eye colour phenotyping, which provides a better separation of manually defined eye colour categories. (2) Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to be involved in human eye colour variation showed stronger associations with our approach. (3) We found new and confirmed previously noted SNP-SNP interactions. (4) We increased SNP-based prediction accuracy of quantitative eye colour. Our findings exemplify that precise quantification using the perceived biological basis of pigmentation leads to enhanced genetic association and prediction of eye colour. We expect our approach to deliver new pigmentation genes when applied to genome-wide association testing.

  8. Global Wild Annual Lens Collection: A Potential Resource for Lentil Genetic Base Broadening and Yield Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mohar; Bisht, Ishwari Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Dutta, Manoranjan; Bansal, Kailash Chander; Karale, Moreshwar; Sarker, Ashutosh; Amri, Ahmad; Kumar, Shiv; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWRs) are invaluable gene sources for various traits of interest, yet these potential resources are themselves increasingly threatened by the impact of climate change as well as other anthropogenic and socio-economic factors. The prime goal of our research was to cover all aspects of wild Lens genetic resource management like species characterization, agro-morphological evaluation, diversity assessment, and development of representative sets for its enhanced utilization in lentil base broadening and yield improvement initiatives. We characterized and evaluated extensively, the global wild annual Lens taxa, originating from twenty seven counties under two agro-climatic conditions of India consecutively for three cropping seasons. Results on various qualitative and quantitative characters including two foliar diseases showed wide variations for almost all yield attributing traits including multiple disease resistance in the wild species, L. nigricans and L. ervoides accessions. The core set developed from the entire Lens taxa had maximum representation from Turkey and Syria, indicating rich diversity in accessions originating from these regions. Diversity analysis also indicated wide geographical variations across genepool as was reflected in the core set. Potential use of core set, as an initial starting material, for genetic base broadening of cultivated lentil was also suggested. PMID:25254552

  9. Global wild annual Lens collection: a potential resource for lentil genetic base broadening and yield enhancement.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohar; Bisht, Ishwari Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Dutta, Manoranjan; Bansal, Kailash Chander; Karale, Moreshwar; Sarker, Ashutosh; Amri, Ahmad; Kumar, Shiv; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWRs) are invaluable gene sources for various traits of interest, yet these potential resources are themselves increasingly threatened by the impact of climate change as well as other anthropogenic and socio-economic factors. The prime goal of our research was to cover all aspects of wild Lens genetic resource management like species characterization, agro-morphological evaluation, diversity assessment, and development of representative sets for its enhanced utilization in lentil base broadening and yield improvement initiatives. We characterized and evaluated extensively, the global wild annual Lens taxa, originating from twenty seven counties under two agro-climatic conditions of India consecutively for three cropping seasons. Results on various qualitative and quantitative characters including two foliar diseases showed wide variations for almost all yield attributing traits including multiple disease resistance in the wild species, L. nigricans and L. ervoides accessions. The core set developed from the entire Lens taxa had maximum representation from Turkey and Syria, indicating rich diversity in accessions originating from these regions. Diversity analysis also indicated wide geographical variations across genepool as was reflected in the core set. Potential use of core set, as an initial starting material, for genetic base broadening of cultivated lentil was also suggested.

  10. Pharmacologic and genetic strategies to enhance cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez; Hare, Joshua M

    2011-10-01

    Cell-based therapy is emerging as an exciting potential therapeutic approach for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction (MI). As heart failure (HF) prevalence increases over time, development of new interventions designed to aid cardiac recovery from injury are crucial and should be considered more broadly. In this regard, substantial efforts to enhance the efficacy and safety of cell therapy are continuously growing along several fronts, including modifications to improve the reprogramming efficiency of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS), genetic engineering of adult stem cells, and administration of growth factors or small molecules to activate regenerative pathways in the injured heart. These interventions are emerging as potential therapeutic alternatives and/or adjuncts based on their potential to promote stem cell homing, proliferation, differentiation, and/or survival. Given the promise of therapeutic interventions to enhance the regenerative capacity of multipotent stem cells as well as specifically guide endogenous or exogenous stem cells into a cardiac lineage, their application in cardiac regenerative medicine should be the focus of future clinical research. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure."

  11. Genetic silencing of Nrf2 enhances X-ROS in dysferlin-deficient muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kombairaju, Ponvijay; Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Roche, Joseph A.; Pratt, Stephen J. P.; Lovering, Richard M.; Sussan, Thomas E.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Shi, Guoli; Biswal, Shyam; Ward, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a critical disease modifier in the muscular dystrophies. Recently, we discovered a pathway by which mechanical stretch activates NADPH Oxidase 2 (Nox2) dependent ROS generation (X-ROS). Our work in dystrophic skeletal muscle revealed that X-ROS is excessive in dystrophin-deficient (mdx) skeletal muscle and contributes to muscle injury susceptibility, a hallmark of the dystrophic process. We also observed widespread alterations in the expression of genes associated with the X-ROS pathway and redox homeostasis in muscles from both Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and mdx mice. As nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in redox homeostasis, we hypothesized that Nrf2 deficiency may contribute to enhanced X-ROS signaling by reducing redox buffering. To directly test the effect of diminished Nrf2 activity, Nrf2 was genetically silenced in the A/J model of dysferlinopathy—a model with a mild histopathologic and functional phenotype. Nrf2-deficient A/J mice exhibited significant muscle-specific functional deficits, histopathologic abnormalities, and dramatically enhanced X-ROS compared to control A/J and WT mice, both with functional Nrf2. Having identified that reduced Nrf2 activity is a negative disease modifier, we propose that strategies targeting Nrf2 activation may address the generalized reduction in redox homeostasis to halt or slow dystrophic progression. PMID:24600403

  12. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof.

  13. Genetic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for enhanced production of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been extensively studied for decades because of its health benefits including cancer prevention, anti-atherogenic and anti-obesity effects, and modulation of the immune system. We previously described the production of trans-10, cis-12 CLA in Yarrowia lipolytica by expressing the gene coding for linoleic acid isomerase from Propionibacterium acnes (pai). However the stable strain produced CLA at about 0.08% of dry cell weight (DCW), a level of production which was not high enough for practical applications. The goal of the present study was to enhance production of CLA by genetic engineering of Y. lipolytica strains. Results We have now co-expressed the delta 12-desaturase gene (FADS12, d12) from Mortierella alpina together with the codon-optimized linoleic acid isomerase (opai) gene in Y. lipolytica, expressed under the control of promoter hp16d modified by fusing 12 copies of UAS1B to the original promoter hp4d. A multi-copy integration plasmid was used to further enhance the expression of both genes. Using glucose as the sole carbon source, the genetically-modified Y. lipolytica produced trans-10, cis-12-CLA at a level of up to 10% of total fatty acids and 0.4% of DCW. Furthermore, when the recombinant yeast was grown with soybean oil, trans-10, cis-12-CLA now accumulated at a level of up to 44% of total fatty acids, which represented 30% of DCW after 38.5 h of cultivation. In addition, trans-10, cis-12-CLA was also detected in the growth medium up to 0.9 g/l. Conclusions We have successfully produced trans-10, cis-12-CLA with a titre of 4 g/l of culture (3.1 g/l in cells and 0.9 g/l in culture medium). Our results demonstrate the potential use of Y. lipolytica as a promising microbial cell factory for trans-10, cis-12-CLA production. PMID:23866108

  14. The Impact of PNPLA3 rs738409 Genetic Polymorphism and Weight Gain ≥10 kg after Age 20 on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Non-Obese Japanese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nishioji, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Naomi; Kobayashi, Masao; Kamaguchi, Mai; Sumida, Yoshio; Nishimura, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in non-obese individuals is inadequately elucidated. We aim to investigate the impact of known genetic polymorphisms on NAFLD and the interaction between genetic risks and weight gain on NAFLD in obese and non-obese Japanese individuals. A total of 1164 participants who received health checkups were included. Participants with excessive alcohol consumption, with viral hepatitis or other inappropriate cases were excluded. Fatty liver was diagnosed by ultrasonography. Participants with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2, 18.5–22.9 kg/m2, 23.0–24.9 kg/m2 and ≥25 kg/m2 were classified underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese, respectively. Self-administered questionnaire for lifestyle was assessed and a total of 8 previously reported genetic polymorphisms were chosen and examined. In all, 824 subjects were enrolled. The overall prevalence of NAFLD was 33.0%: 0% in underweight, 15.3% in normal weight, 41.1% in overweight and 71.7% in obese individuals. The prevalence of NAFLD is more affected by the G allele of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 in normal weight (odds ratio (OR) 3.52; 95%-CI: 1.42–8.71; P = 0.0063) and in overweight individuals (OR 2.60; 95%-CI: 1.14–5.91; P = 0.0225) than in obese individuals (not significant). Moreover, the G allele of PNPLA3 rs738409 and weight gain ≥10 kg after age 20 had a joint effect on the risk of NAFLD in the normal weight (OR 12.00; 95% CI: 3.71–38.79; P = 3.3×10−5) and the overweight individuals (OR 13.40; 95% CI: 2.92–61.36; P = 0.0008). The G allele of PNPLA3 rs738409 is a prominent risk factor for NAFLD and the interaction between the PNPLA3 rs738409 and weight gain ≥10 kg after age 20 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, especially in non-obese Japanese individuals. PMID:26485523

  15. Light-extraction enhancement for light-emitting diodes: a firefly-inspired structure refined by the genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, Annick; Mayer, Alexandre

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LED) has increased significantly over the past few years, but the overall efficiency is still limited by total internal reflections due to the high dielectric-constant contrast between the incident and emergent media. The bioluminescent organ of fireflies gave incentive for light-extraction enhance-ment studies. A specific factory-roof shaped structure was shown, by means of light-propagation simulations and measurements, to enhance light extraction significantly. In order to achieve a similar effect for light-emitting diodes, the structure needs to be adapted to the specific set-up of LEDs. In this context simulations were carried out to determine the best geometrical parameters. In the present work, the search for a geometry that maximizes the extraction of light has been conducted by using a genetic algorithm. The idealized structure considered previously was generalized to a broader variety of shapes. The genetic algorithm makes it possible to search simultaneously over a wider range of parameters. It is also significantly less time-consuming than the previous approach that was based on a systematic scan on parameters. The results of the genetic algorithm show that (1) the calculations can be performed in a smaller amount of time and (2) the light extraction can be enhanced even more significantly by using optimal parameters determined by the genetic algorithm for the generalized structure. The combination of the genetic algorithm with the Rigorous Coupled Waves Analysis method constitutes a strong simulation tool, which provides us with adapted designs for enhancing light extraction from light-emitting diodes.

  16. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  17. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  18. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-07

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm(-1) related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  19. Toward responsible stock enhancement: broadcast spawning dynamics and adaptive genetic management in white seabass aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Gruenthal, Kristen M; Drawbridge, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary effects captive-bred individuals that can have on wild conspecifics are necessary considerations for stock enhancement programs, but breeding protocols are often developed without the knowledge of realized reproductive behavior. To help fill that gap, parentage was assigned to offspring produced by a freely mating group of 50 white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis), a representative broadcast spawning marine finfish cultured for conservation. Similar to the well-known and closely related red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), A. nobilis exhibited large variation in reproductive success. More males contributed and contributed more equally than females within and among spawns in a mating system best described as lottery polygyny. Two females produced 27% of the seasonal offspring pool and female breeding effective size averaged 1.85 per spawn and 12.38 seasonally, whereas male breeding effective size was higher (6.42 and 20.87, respectively), with every male contributing 1–7% of offspring. Further, females batch spawned every 1–5 weeks, while males displayed continuous reproductive readiness. Sex-specific mating strategies resulted in multiple successful mate pairings and a breeding effective to census size ratio of ≥0.62. Understanding a depleted species’ mating system allowed management to more effectively utilize parental genetic variability for culture, but the fitness consequences of long-term stocking can be difficult to address. PMID:25568060

  20. Toward responsible stock enhancement: broadcast spawning dynamics and adaptive genetic management in white seabass aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Gruenthal, Kristen M; Drawbridge, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    The evolutionary effects captive-bred individuals that can have on wild conspecifics are necessary considerations for stock enhancement programs, but breeding protocols are often developed without the knowledge of realized reproductive behavior. To help fill that gap, parentage was assigned to offspring produced by a freely mating group of 50 white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis), a representative broadcast spawning marine finfish cultured for conservation. Similar to the well-known and closely related red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), A. nobilis exhibited large variation in reproductive success. More males contributed and contributed more equally than females within and among spawns in a mating system best described as lottery polygyny. Two females produced 27% of the seasonal offspring pool and female breeding effective size averaged 1.85 per spawn and 12.38 seasonally, whereas male breeding effective size was higher (6.42 and 20.87, respectively), with every male contributing 1-7% of offspring. Further, females batch spawned every 1-5 weeks, while males displayed continuous reproductive readiness. Sex-specific mating strategies resulted in multiple successful mate pairings and a breeding effective to census size ratio of ≥0.62. Understanding a depleted species' mating system allowed management to more effectively utilize parental genetic variability for culture, but the fitness consequences of long-term stocking can be difficult to address.

  1. Genetic engineering approaches for enhanced production of biodiesel fuel from microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Efforts are currently underway in several laboratories to develop renewable fuels from biological sources. This group has been involved in research concerning the production of lipid-derived {open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes} fuel from microscopic algae. Lipid accumulation in algae typically occurs during periods of environmental stress, including growth under nutrient-deficient conditions. Biochemical studies have suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-containing enzyme that catalyzes an early step in fatty acid biosynthesis, may be involved in the control of this lipid accumulation process. Therefore, it may be possible to enhance lipid production rates by increasing the activity of this enzyme via genetic engineering. As a first step toward this objective, the authors have cloned the gene that encodes ACC from the eukaryotic alga Cyclotella cryptica, representing the first time that this gene has been isolated from a photosynthetic organism. The amino acid sequence of ACC deducted from this gene exhibits a high degree of similarity to the sequences of animal and yeast ACCs in the biotin carboxylase and carboxyltransferase domains, but less similarity exists in the bioin carboxyl carrier protein domain. Comparison of the genomic nucleotide sequence to the sequences of cDNA clones has revealed the presence of two introns in the gene. The authors are currently constructing expression vectors containing this gene and developing algal transformation protocols to enable over expression of ACC in C. cryptica and all other algal species.

  2. Enhanced ethanol fermentation of brewery wastewater using the genetically modified strain E. coli KO11.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kripa; Chaudhari, Vaibhav; Varanasi, Sasidhar; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2007-02-01

    We have used liquid waste obtained from a beer brewery process to produce ethanol. To increase the productivity, genetically modified organism, Escherichia coli KO11, was used for ethanol fermentation. Yeast was also used to produce ethanol from the same feed stock, and the ethanol production rates and resulting concentrations of sugars and ethanol were compared with those of KO11. In the experiments, first the raw wastewater was directly fermented using two strains with no saccharification enzymes added. Then, commercial enzymes, alpha-amylase, pectinase, or a combination of both, were used for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, and the results were compared with those of the no-enzyme experiments for KO11 and yeast. Under the given conditions with or without the enzymes, yeast produced ethanol more rapidly than E. coli KO11, but the final ethanol concentrations were almost the same. For both yeast and KO11, the enzymes were observed to enhance the ethanol yields by 61-84% as compared to the fermentation without enzymes. The combination of the two enzymes increased ethanol production the most for the both strains. The advantages of using KO11 were not demonstrated clearly as compared to the yeast fermentation results.

  3. Enhanced efficiency of genetic programming toward cardiomyocyte creation through topographical cues

    PubMed Central

    Morez, Constant; Noseda, Michela; Paiva, Marta Abreu; Belian, Elisa; Schneider, Michael D.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of de novo cardiomyocytes through viral over-expression of key transcription factors represents a highly promising strategy for cardiac muscle tissue regeneration. Although the feasibility of cell reprogramming has been proven possible both in vitro and in vivo, the efficiency of the process remains extremely low. Here, we report a chemical-free technique in which topographical cues, more specifically parallel microgrooves, enhance the directed differentiation of cardiac progenitors into cardiomyocyte-like cells. Using a lentivirus-mediated direct reprogramming strategy for expression of Myocardin, Tbx5, and Mef2c, we showed that the microgrooved substrate provokes an increase in histone H3 acetylation (AcH3), known to be a permissive environment for reprogramming by “stemness” factors, as well as stimulation of myocardin sumoylation, a post-translational modification essential to the transcriptional function of this key co-activator. These biochemical effects mimicked those of a pharmacological histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), and like VPA markedly augmented the expression of cardiomyocyte-specific proteins by the genetically engineered cells. No instructive effect was seen in cells unresponsive to VPA. In addition, the anisotropy resulting from parallel microgrooves induced cellular alignment, mimicking the native ventricular myocardium and augmenting sarcomere organization. PMID:26302234

  4. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm-1 related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  5. Genetic Design of Enhanced Valley Splitting towards a Spin Qubit in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Luo, Jun-Wei; Saraiva, Andre; Koiller, Belita; Zunger, Alex

    2013-03-01

    The quantum state of an electron in the Si conduction band holds exceptional promise for quantum computing, owing to its attractive spin coherence properties and adaptability to standard electronics. A paramount challenge is the orbital degeneracy of the lowest conduction band of Si, which is potentially a serious source of decoherence for spin qubits. Hence, isolating a single electron valley state by creating a sufficiently large valley splitting (VS) is a prerequisite for the realization of Si-based spin qubits. Previous explorations of Si quantum wells confined by Si-Ge alloy barriers led thus far to a limited VS of the order of 1 meV or smaller. Here we demonstrate, via an atomically resolved pseudopotential theory, that the monolayer ordering of Si-Ge barriers within reach of modern superlattice growth techniques can be harnessed to enhance the VS by up to one order of magnitude compared to disordered random alloy barriers. A biologically inspired genetic-algorithm search allowed us to identify magic atomic layer sequences of the superlattice barriers that isolate single electron valley state in Si with VS as large as ~9 meV. These results may provide a roadmap for reliable spin-only quantum computing in Si. Funded by DOE through Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Inverse Design, and the Brazilian agencies FAPERJ, CNPq and CAPES

  6. Adaptive allocation of attentional gain.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Miranda; Serences, John T

    2009-09-23

    Humans are adept at distinguishing between stimuli that are very similar, an ability that is particularly crucial when the outcome is of serious consequence (e.g., for a surgeon or air-traffic controller). Traditionally, selective attention was thought to facilitate perception by increasing the gain of sensory neurons tuned to the defining features of a behaviorally relevant object (e.g., color, orientation, etc.). In contrast, recent mathematical models counterintuitively suggest that, in many cases, attentional gain should be applied to neurons that are tuned away from relevant features, especially when discriminating highly similar stimuli. Here we used psychophysical methods to critically evaluate these "ideal observer" models. The data demonstrate that attention enhances the gain of the most informative sensory neurons, even when these neurons are tuned away from the behaviorally relevant target feature. Moreover, the degree to which an individual adopted optimal attentional gain settings by the end of testing predicted success rates on a difficult visual discrimination task, as well as the amount of task improvement that occurred across repeated testing sessions (learning). Contrary to most traditional accounts, these observations suggest that the primary function of attentional gain is not to enhance the representation of target features per se, but instead to optimize performance on the current perceptual task. Additionally, individual differences in gain suggest that the operating characteristics of low-level attentional phenomena are not stable trait-like attributes and that variability in how attention is deployed may play an important role in determining perceptual abilities.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Stress Responses in Soil Bacteria for Enhanced Bioremediation of Mixed Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2000-12-31

    needed. In addition, F199 contains aromatic oxygenases that are relevant to degradation of contaminants at that site and is representative of a large class of similar organisms from Savannah River Identification of the genes responsive to different stresses encountered at contaminated sites will provide a basic understanding of stress responses in soil bacteria and can lead to improved strategies for bioremediation. Enhanced in situ removal of hazardous wastes by stimulating growth of indigenous bacteria with nutrients or electron acceptors such as oxygen has been demonstrated. However, how much and how often to apply these supplements has largely been determined empirically. As a result, a controlled, reproducible, and properly managed degradation of pollutants in the environment is difficult to achieve. Genes inducible by low nutrient and low oxygen conditions can serve as markers for determining the minimal amount of supplements needed. The disappearance and reappearance of such stress responses will determine how much and when nutrients and oxygen are needed to be applied or reapplied. Similar applications of stress-inducible markers are already being applied in bacterial cultures in solution (Selifonova and Eaton, 1996). Stress responses induced by pollutants also have potential use as a biological index for the performance of indigenous bacteria during bioremediation as well as a microbiological risk assessment index for environmental pollutants. For instance, measurement of the stress responses of contaminant-degrading microorganisms would provide information complementary to measurement of enzymatic activity. This more complete picture of the physiological state of the desired organisms can be used to predict their performance. Finally, prior knowledge of the stress responses of competing bacteria could be used to predict their environmental competitiveness. Promoters from stress inducible genes will facilitate the construction of genetically engineered

  8. IR gain monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain. This continues the strategy of last cycle's gain monitor, in proposal 13080.

  9. Exploring the Role of Plant Genetics to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration in Hybrid Poplar Plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wullschleger, S. D.; Garten, C. T.; Classen, A. T.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased in recent decades and are projected to increase even further during the coming century. These projections have prompted scientists and policy-makers to consider how plants and soils can be used to stabilize CO2 concentrations. Although storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems represents an attractive near-term option for mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, enhancing the sequestration potential of managed systems will require advancements in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control rates of carbon transfer and turnover in plants and soils. To address this challenge, a mathematical model was constructed to evaluate how changes in particular plant traits and management practices could affect soil carbon storage beneath hybrid poplar (Populus) plantations. The model was built from four sub-models that describe aboveground biomass, root biomass, soil carbon dynamics, and soil nitrogen transformations for trees growing throughout a user-defined rotation. Simulations could be run over one or multiple rotations. A sensitivity analysis of the model indicated changes in soil carbon storage were affected by variables that could be linked to hybrid poplar traits like rates of aboveground production, partitioning of carbon to coarse and fine roots, and rates of root decomposition. A higher ratio of belowground to aboveground production was especially important and correlated directly with increased soil carbon storage. Faster decomposition rates for coarse and fine dead roots resulted in a greater loss of carbon to the atmosphere as CO2 and less residual organic carbon for transfer to the fast soil carbon pool. Hence, changes in root chemistry that prolonged dead root decomposition rates, a trait that is under potential genetic control, were predicted to increase soil carbon storage via higher soil carbon inputs. Nitrogen limitation of both aboveground biomass production and soil carbon sequestration was

  10. Genetically engineered immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus strains producing antioxidant enzymes exhibit enhanced anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  11. Genetic increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels enhances learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Yukako; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakano, Yoshikazu; Xue, Jing-Hui; Hori, Takuya; Yanamoto, Hiroji

    2008-11-19

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin, is known to promote neuronal differentiation stimulating neurite outgrowth in the developing CNS, and is also known to modulate synaptic plasticity, thereby contributing to learning and memory in the mature brain. Here, we investigated the role of increased levels of intracerebral BDNF in learning and memory function. Using genetically engineered transgenic BDNF overexpressing mice (RTG-BDNF), young adult, homozygous (+/+), heterozygous (+/-), or wild-type (-/-) littermates, we analyzed escape latency to a hidden-platform and swimming velocity in the Morris Water Maze test (MWM) with modifications for the mice. The MWM comprised 4 trials per day over 5 consecutive days (sessions) without prior or subsequent training. In a separate set of animals, BDNF protein levels in the cortex, thalamostriatum and the hippocampus were measured quantitatively using ELISA. In the BDNF (+/-) mice, the BDNF levels in the cortex, the thalamostriatum and the hippocampus were significantly high, compared to the wild-type littermates; 238%, 158%, and 171%, respectively (P<0.01, one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc test in each region). The BDNF levels in the BDNF (+/+) mice were not elevated. The BDNF (+/-), but not the (+/+) mice, demonstrated significantly shorter escape latency, shorter total path length in the MWM, and more frequent arrivals at the location where the platform had been placed previously in the probe trial, compared with the wild-type littermates (P<0.05, at each time pint). Because the maximum swimming velocity was not affected in the BDNF-transgenic mice, increased BDNF levels in the brain were found to enhance spatial learning and memory function. Although it has been postulated that excessive BDNF is deteriorating for neuronal survival or neurite outgrowth, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of paradoxical lack of increase in BDNF levels in the (+/+) mouse brain.

  12. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  13. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  14. Should we select for genetic moral enhancement? A thought experiment using the MoralKinder (MK+) haplotype.

    PubMed

    Faust, Halley S

    2008-01-01

    By using preimplantation haplotype diagnosis, prospective parents are able to select embryos to implant through in vitro fertilization. If we knew that the naturally-occurring (but theoretical) MoralKinder (MK+) haplotype would predispose individuals to a higher level of morality than average, is it permissible or obligatory to select for the MK+ haplotype? I.e., is it moral to select for morality? This paper explores the various potential issues that could arise from genetic moral enhancement.

  15. Welfare Gains from Financial Liberalization

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Robert M.; Ueda, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Financial liberalization has been a controversial issue, as empirical evidence for growth enhancing effects is mixed. Here, we find sizable welfare gains from liberalization (cost to repression), though the gain in economic growth is ambiguous. We take the view that financial liberalization is a government policy that alters the path of financial deepening, while financial deepening is endogenously chosen by agents given a policy and occurs in transition towards a distant steady state. This history-dependent view necessitates the use of simulation analysis based on a growth model. Our application is a specific episode: Thailand from 1976 to 1996. PMID:20806055

  16. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Can antidepressants cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Weight gain is a possible side effect of nearly all antidepressants. ...

  17. Expression of recombinant human α-lactalbumin in milk of transgenic cloned pigs is sufficient to enhance intestinal growth and weight gain of suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Li, Qiuyan; Li, Yan; Wen, Xiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zaihu; Zhang, Jiuming; Yu, Zhengquan; Li, Ning

    2016-06-10

    Human α-lactalbumin (HLA) has very high nutritional value and important physiological functions during the neonatal period. The peptides derived from HLA provide diverse health benefits including antimicrobial, antiviral, immune-modulating, and antihypertensive effects. Thus, it is worth investigating the effects on offspring development of increasing HLA in milk. In this study, we found that recombinant human α-lactalbumin (rHLA) exhibits efficient inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion system. Using a BAC clone containing the complete HLA gene as a candidate vector, we generated two lines of transgenic cloned sows via somatic cell nuclear transfer that over-expressed rHLA. The average concentrations of rHLA in milk from the two lines of transgenic cloned sows were 2.24 ± 0.71 mg/ml and 2.67 ± 1.29 mg/ml. The feeding experiments revealed that rHLA represses dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vivo. Furthermore, the piglets reared by rHLA transgenic cloned sows exhibit better performance in gain of body weight and intestine growth than the control piglets reared by non-transgenic sows. Therefore, these findings indicate that rHLA could serve as a natural precursor for a DPP-IV inhibitor, and the transgenic technology that produced the over-expression of rHLA could be a useful method for pig breeders to improve lactation performance.

  18. Fluorescent genetic barcoding in mammalian cells for enhanced multiplexing capabilities in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Smurthwaite, Cameron A; Hilton, Brett J; O'Hanlon, Ryan; Stolp, Zachary D; Hancock, Bryan M; Abbadessa, Darin; Stotland, Aleksandr; Sklar, Larry A; Wolkowicz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria has revolutionized the field of cell and molecular biology. Since its discovery a growing panel of fluorescent proteins, fluorophores and fluorescent-coupled staining methodologies, have expanded the analytical capabilities of flow cytometry. Here, we exploit the power of genetic engineering to barcode individual cells with genes encoding fluorescent proteins. For genetic engineering, we utilize retroviral technology, which allows for the expression of ectopic genetic information in a stable manner in mammalian cells. We have genetically barcoded both adherent and nonadherent cells with different fluorescent proteins. Multiplexing power was increased by combining both the number of distinct fluorescent proteins, and the fluorescence intensity in each channel. Moreover, retroviral expression has proven to be stable for at least a 6-month period, which is critical for applications such as biological screens. We have shown the applicability of fluorescent barcoded multiplexing to cell-based assays that rely themselves on genetic barcoding, or on classical staining protocols. Fluorescent genetic barcoding gives the cell an inherited characteristic that distinguishes it from its counterpart. Once cell lines are developed, no further manipulation or staining is required, decreasing time, nonspecific background associated with staining protocols, and cost. The increasing number of discovered and/or engineered fluorescent proteins with unique absorbance/emission spectra, combined with the growing number of detection devices and lasers, increases multiplexing versatility, making fluorescent genetic barcoding a powerful tool for flow cytometry-based analysis.

  19. Accuracy of whole-genome prediction using a genetic architecture-enhanced variance-covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Erbe, Malena; He, Jinlong; Ober, Ulrike; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Hao; Simianer, Henner; Li, Jiaqi

    2015-02-09

    Obtaining accurate predictions of unobserved genetic or phenotypic values for complex traits in animal, plant, and human populations is possible through whole-genome prediction (WGP), a combined analysis of genotypic and phenotypic data. Because the underlying genetic architecture of the trait of interest is an important factor affecting model selection, we propose a new strategy, termed BLUP|GA (BLUP-given genetic architecture), which can use genetic architecture information within the dataset at hand rather than from public sources. This is achieved by using a trait-specific covariance matrix ( T: ), which is a weighted sum of a genetic architecture part ( S: matrix) and the realized relationship matrix ( G: ). The algorithm of BLUP|GA (BLUP-given genetic architecture) is provided and illustrated with real and simulated datasets. Predictive ability of BLUP|GA was validated with three model traits in a dairy cattle dataset and 11 traits in three public datasets with a variety of genetic architectures and compared with GBLUP and other approaches. Results show that BLUP|GA outperformed GBLUP in 20 of 21 scenarios in the dairy cattle dataset and outperformed GBLUP, BayesA, and BayesB in 12 of 13 traits in the analyzed public datasets. Further analyses showed that the difference of accuracies for BLUP|GA and GBLUP significantly correlate with the distance between the T: and G: matrices. The new strategy applied in BLUP|GA is a favorable and flexible alternative to the standard GBLUP model, allowing to account for the genetic architecture of the quantitative trait under consideration when necessary. This feature is mainly due to the increased similarity between the trait-specific relationship matrix ( T: matrix) and the genetic relationship matrix at unobserved causal loci. Applying BLUP|GA in WGP would ease the burden of model selection.

  20. IR Gain Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain.

  1. Genetic Transformation of Artemisia carvifolia Buch with rol Genes Enhances Artemisinin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Dilshad, Erum; Cusido, Rosa Maria; Estrada, Karla Ramirez; Bonfill, Mercedes; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    The potent antimalarial drug artemisinin has a high cost, since its only viable source to date is Artemisia annua (0.01–0.8% DW). There is therefore an urgent need to design new strategies to increase its production or to find alternative sources. In the current study, Artemisia carvifolia Buch was selected with the aim of detecting artemisinin and then enhancing the production of the target compound and its derivatives. These metabolites were determined by LC-MS in the shoots of A. carvifolia wild type plants at the following concentrations: artemisinin (8μg/g), artesunate (2.24μg/g), dihydroartemisinin (13.6μg/g) and artemether (12.8μg/g). Genetic transformation of A. carvifolia was carried out with Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 harboring the rol B and rol C genes. Artemisinin content increased 3-7-fold in transgenics bearing the rol B gene, and 2.3-6-fold in those with the rol C gene. A similar pattern was observed for artemisinin analogues. The dynamics of artemisinin content in transgenics and wild type A.carvifolia was also correlated with the expression of genes involved in its biosynthesis. Real time qPCR analysis revealed the differential expression of genes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis, i.e. those encoding amorpha-4, 11 diene synthase (ADS), cytochrome P450 (CYP71AV1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), with a relatively higher transcript level found in transgenics than in the wild type plant. Also, the gene related to trichome development and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis (TFAR1) showed an altered expression in the transgenics compared to wild type A.carvifolia, which was in accordance with the trichome density of the respective plants. The trichome index was significantly higher in the rol B and rol C gene-expressing transgenics with an increased production of artemisinin, thereby demonstrating that the rol genes are effective inducers of plant secondary metabolism. PMID:26444558

  2. Incorporation of genetic technologies associated with applied reproductive technologies to enhance world food production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal breeding and reproductive physiology have been closely related throughout the history of animal production science. Artificial insemination provides the best method of increasing the influence of sires with superior genetics to improve production traits. Multiple ovulation embryo transfer (MO...

  3. Characterization of Greater Middle Eastern genetic variation for enhanced disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Eric M.; Halees, Anason; Itan, Yuval; Spencer, Emily G.; He, Yupeng; Azab, Mostafa Abdellateef; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Belkadi, Aziz; Boisson, Bertrand; Abel, Laurent; Clark, Andrew G.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    The Greater Middle East (GME) has been a central hub of human migration and population admixture. The tradition of consanguinity, variably practiced in the Gulf region, North Africa, and Central Asia 1–3, has resulted in an elevated burden of recessive disease4. Here we generated a whole exome GME variome from 1,111 unrelated subjects. We detected substantial diversity from sub-geographies, continental and subregional admixture, several ancient founder populations with little evidence of bottlenecks. Measured consanguinity was an order-of-magnitude above that of other sampled populations, and included an increased burden of runs of homozygosity (ROH), but no evidence for reduced burden of deleterious variation due to classically theorized ‘genetic purging’. Applying this database to unsolved GME recessive conditions reduced the number of potential disease-causing variants by 4–7-fold. These results reveal the variegated GME genetic architecture and support future human genetic discoveries in Mendelian and population genetics. PMID:27428751

  4. Central Gain Control in Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Benjamin D.; Rodrigues, Paulo V.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss induced by noise or ototoxic drug exposure reduces the neural activity transmitted from the cochlea to the central auditory system. Despite a reduced cochlear output, neural activity from more central auditory structures is paradoxically enhanced at suprathreshold intensities. This compensatory increase in the central auditory activity in response to the loss of sensory input is referred to as central gain enhancement. Enhanced central gain is hypothesized to be a potential mechanism that gives rise to hyperacusis and tinnitus, two debilitating auditory perceptual disorders that afflict millions of individuals. This review will examine the evidence for gain enhancement in the central auditory system in response to cochlear damage. Further, it will address the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this enhancement and discuss the contribution of central gain enhancement to tinnitus and hyperacusis. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms with distinct temporal and spectral profiles are likely to contribute to central gain enhancement. Dissecting the contributions of these different mechanisms at different levels of the central auditory system is essential for elucidating the role of central gain enhancement in tinnitus and hyperacusis and, most importantly, the development of novel treatments for these disorders. PMID:25386157

  5. Genetic analysis of stress responses in soil bacteria for enhanced bioremediation of mixed contaminants. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.K.

    1998-06-01

    'To realize the full potential of bioremediation, the individual bacterial responses to the stresses (lack of nutrients or oxygen; mixed pollutants) encountered at contaminated sites must be understood. This information can then be extrapolated to field applications using indigenous bacteria or genetically engineered micro-organisms. Studying bacterial response to stresses presents an opportunity for improving bioremediation strategies, both with indigenous populations and genetically engineered microbes, and should contribute to environmental management and restoration goals. Enhancing in-situ removal of hazardous wastes by stimulating the growth of indigenous bacteria with nutrients has been demonstrated. But how much and how often to apply these supplements has been difficult to determine, and controlled and reproducible degradation of pollutants in the environment has not yet been achieved. As of May 31st 1998, this report summarizes work after 17 months of a 36 month project.'

  6. Gaining Cyber Dominance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    2014 Carnegie Mellon University Gaining Cyber Dominance Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University NETCOM G3/5/7 TREX January 2015...JAN 2015 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gaining Cyber Dominance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...2014) 4 GCD Overview January 2015 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University FY15 Initiatives Gaining Cyber Dominance Program • Army topology development

  7. Resistance training and the enhancement of the gains in material-handling ability and physical fitness of British Army recruits during basic training.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G; Rayson, M P; Jones, D A

    2002-03-15

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a modified British Army basic training that included resistance training in improving material-handling performance and physical fitness, and to compare the modified training directly with the normal basic training. Forty-three males [19.2 (2.6) years of age, 1764 (72) mm in height, 73.0 (10.6) kg in mass] and nine females [19.1 (2.2) years, 1641 (67) mm, 62.0 (7.2) kg] performed the modified basic training. Testing occurred in the week before and in the final week of the 11-week basic training. Improvements with the modified training were observed for all six material-handling tests, including 8-12% for maximal box lifting, 15-19% for repetitive lifting and carrying and 9-17% for loaded marching (all p < 0.01), and other established measures of aerobic fitness, strength and kinanthropometric characteristics. Significantly greater improvements were observed for the modified training compared with the normal training in maximal box lift to 1.45 m (12.4 versus 1.7%, p < 0.01), 3.2 km loaded march performance with 15 kg (8.9 versus 3.6%, p < 0.05), estimated fat-free mass (4.2 versus 1.5%, p < 0.001), predicted VO(2max) (1 min(-1)) (9.3 versus 4.1%, p < 0.01) and dynamic lift to 1.45 m (15.5 versus 0.2%, p < 0.001). It was concluded that the improvements in material-handling ability and other aspects of physical fitness brought about in recruits by British Army basic training can be enhanced by the use of a physical training programme that includes a carefully designed resistance training element. Of particular note are the improvements shown in performance on material-handling tasks that require muscular strength, as these represent many of the tasks that soldiers encounter in their military careers.

  8. Genetic determination of the enhanced drought resistance of rice maintainer HuHan2B by pedigree breeding

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Haibin; Feng, Fangjun; Lou, Qiaojun; Xia, Hui; Ma, Xiaosong; Liu, Yunhua; Xu, Kai; Yu, Xinqiao; Mei, Hanwei; Luo, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing deficit of fresh water resource in rice growing regions has made the selection of water-saving and drought-resistance rice (WDR) a crucial factor in developing sustainable cultivation. HuHan2B, a new japonica maintainer for WDR breeding, had the same yield potential as recurrent parent HanFengB but showed improved drought resistance in fields. We investigated the genomic content accumulation and candidate genes passed from parent to offspring using the genomic and transcriptomic approaches. The genomic constitution indicated that the genetic similarity was 84% between HuHan2B and HanFengB; additionally, 7,256 genes with specific alleles were inherited by HuHan2B from parents other than HanFengB. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under drought stress showed that biological function was significantly enriched for transcript regulation in HuHan2B, while the oxidation-reduction process was primarily enriched in HanFengB. Furthermore, 36 DEGs with specific inherited alleles in HuHan2B were almost involved in the regulatory network of TFs and target genes. These findings suggested that major-effect genes were congregated and transformed into offspring in manner of interacting network by breeding. Thus, exploiting the potential biological function of allelic-influencing DEGs would be of great importance for improving selection efficiency and the overall genetic gain of multiple complex traits. PMID:27853319

  9. Genetic determination of the enhanced drought resistance of rice maintainer HuHan2B by pedigree breeding.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haibin; Feng, Fangjun; Lou, Qiaojun; Xia, Hui; Ma, Xiaosong; Liu, Yunhua; Xu, Kai; Yu, Xinqiao; Mei, Hanwei; Luo, Lijun

    2016-11-17

    The ongoing deficit of fresh water resource in rice growing regions has made the selection of water-saving and drought-resistance rice (WDR) a crucial factor in developing sustainable cultivation. HuHan2B, a new japonica maintainer for WDR breeding, had the same yield potential as recurrent parent HanFengB but showed improved drought resistance in fields. We investigated the genomic content accumulation and candidate genes passed from parent to offspring using the genomic and transcriptomic approaches. The genomic constitution indicated that the genetic similarity was 84% between HuHan2B and HanFengB; additionally, 7,256 genes with specific alleles were inherited by HuHan2B from parents other than HanFengB. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under drought stress showed that biological function was significantly enriched for transcript regulation in HuHan2B, while the oxidation-reduction process was primarily enriched in HanFengB. Furthermore, 36 DEGs with specific inherited alleles in HuHan2B were almost involved in the regulatory network of TFs and target genes. These findings suggested that major-effect genes were congregated and transformed into offspring in manner of interacting network by breeding. Thus, exploiting the potential biological function of allelic-influencing DEGs would be of great importance for improving selection efficiency and the overall genetic gain of multiple complex traits.

  10. Incorporation of genetic technologies associated with applied reproductive technologies to enhance world food production.

    PubMed

    Cushman, Robert A; McDaneld, Tara G; Kuehn, Larry A; Snelling, Warren M; Nonneman, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Animal breeding and reproductive physiology have been closely related throughout the history of animal production science. Artificial insemination provides the best method of increasing the influence of sires with superior genetics to improve production traits. Multiple ovulation embryo transfer (MOET) provides some ability to increase the genetic influence of the maternal line as well. The addition of genetic technologies to this paradigm allows for improved methods of selecting sires and dams carrying the best genes for production and yield of edible products and resistance to diseases and parasites. However, decreasing the number of influential parents within a population also increases the risk of propagating a recessive gene that could negatively impact the species (Reprod Domest Anim 44:792-796, 2009; BMC Genomics 11:337, 2010). Furthermore, antagonistic genotypic relationships between production traits and fertility (Anim Prod Sci 49:399-412, 2009; Anim Genet 43:442-446, 2012) suggest that care must be taken to ensure that increasing the frequency of genes with a positive influence on production does not negatively impact the fertility of the replacement females entering the herd.

  11. Characterization of Greater Middle Eastern genetic variation for enhanced disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Scott, Eric M; Halees, Anason; Itan, Yuval; Spencer, Emily G; He, Yupeng; Azab, Mostafa Abdellateef; Gabriel, Stacey B; Belkadi, Aziz; Boisson, Bertrand; Abel, Laurent; Clark, Andrew G; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    The Greater Middle East (GME) has been a central hub of human migration and population admixture. The tradition of consanguinity, variably practiced in the Persian Gulf region, North Africa, and Central Asia, has resulted in an elevated burden of recessive disease. Here we generated a whole-exome GME variome from 1,111 unrelated subjects. We detected substantial diversity and admixture in continental and subregional populations, corresponding to several ancient founder populations with little evidence of bottlenecks. Measured consanguinity rates were an order of magnitude above those in other sampled populations, and the GME population exhibited an increased burden of runs of homozygosity (ROHs) but showed no evidence for reduced burden of deleterious variation due to classically theorized 'genetic purging'. Applying this database to unsolved recessive conditions in the GME population reduced the number of potential disease-causing variants by four- to sevenfold. These results show variegated genetic architecture in GME populations and support future human genetic discoveries in Mendelian and population genetics.

  12. Genetic Enhancement of Polyploid Crops Using Tools of Classical Cytogenetics and Modern Biotechnology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional plant breeding has been mainly instrumental in the genetic improvement of crop plants. Sustained improvement of crop species has been achieved through hybridization with landraces and allied species resulting in high-yielding, superior cultivars of staple food crops. Although plant bre...

  13. Weight gain - unintentional

    MedlinePlus

    ... trying to do so can have many causes. Metabolism slows down as you age . This can cause weight gain if you eat too much, eat the wrong foods, or do not get enough exercise. Drugs that can cause weight gain include: Birth ...

  14. Invention and Gain Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Robert J.; Dixon, Stacey

    1989-01-01

    Gain analysis is applied to the invention of the sewing needle as well as different sewing implements and modes of sewing. The analysis includes a two-subject experiment. To validate the generality of gain heuristics and underlying switching processes, the invention of the assembly line is also analyzed. (TJH)

  15. Digital automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Performance analysis, used to evaluated fitness of several circuits to digital automatic gain control (AGC), indicates that digital integrator employing coherent amplitude detector (CAD) is best device suited for application. Circuit reduces gain error to half that of conventional analog AGC while making it possible to automatically modify response of receiver to match incoming signal conditions.

  16. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  17. Genetic manipulation of iron biomineralization enhances MR relaxivity in a ferritin-M6A chimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Radoul, Marina; Lewin, Limor; Cohen, Batya; Oren, Roni; Popov, Stanislav; Davidov, Geula; Vandsburger, Moriel H.; Harmelin, Alon; Bitton, Ronit; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Neeman, Michal; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin has gained significant attention as a potential reporter gene for in vivo imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, due to the ferritin ferrihydrite core, the relaxivity and sensitivity for detection of native ferritin is relatively low. We report here on a novel chimeric magneto-ferritin reporter gene – ferritin-M6A – in which the magnetite binding peptide from the magnetotactic bacteria magnetosome-associated Mms6 protein was fused to the C-terminal of murine h-ferritin. Biophysical experiments showed that purified ferritin-M6A assembled into a stable protein cage with the M6A protruding into the cage core, enabling magnetite biomineralisation. Ferritin-M6A-expressing C6-glioma cells showed enhanced (per iron) r2 relaxivity. MRI in vivo studies of ferritin-M6A-expressing tumour xenografts showed enhanced R2 relaxation rate in the central hypoxic region of the tumours. Such enhanced relaxivity would increase the sensitivity of ferritin as a reporter gene for non-invasive in vivo MRI-monitoring of cell delivery and differentiation in cellular or gene-based therapies. PMID:27211820

  18. CRISPR/Cas9 system as an innovative genetic engineering tool: Enhancements in sequence specificity and delivery methods.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young-Il; Suresh, Bharathi; Kim, Hyongbum; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    While human gene therapy has gained significant attention for its therapeutic promise, CRISPR/Cas9 technology has made a breakthrough as an efficient genome editing tool by emulating prokaryotic immune defense mechanisms. Although many studies have found that CRISPR/Cas9 technology is more efficient, specific and manipulable than previous generations of gene editing tools, it can be further improved by elevating its overall efficiency in a higher frequency of genome modifications and reducing its off-target effects. Here, we review the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology, focusing on enhancement of its sequence specificity, reduction of off-target effects and delivery systems. Moreover, we describe recent successful applications of CRISPR/Cas9 technology in laboratory and clinical studies.

  19. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  20. Enhanced Genetic Analysis of Single Human Bioparticles Recovered by Simplified Micromanipulation from Forensic ‘Touch DNA’ Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K.; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-01-01

    DNA profiles can be obtained from ‘touch DNA’ evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a ‘blind-swabbing’ approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals’ cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim’s DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator’s DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, ‘smart analysis’ method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., “clumps”) bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material. PMID:25867046

  1. Optobionic vision--a new genetically enhanced light on retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Degenaar, Patrick; Grossman, Nir; Memon, Muhammad Ali; Burrone, Juan; Dawson, Martin; Drakakis, Emmanuel; Neil, Mark; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2009-06-01

    The recent discovery that neurons can be photostimulated via genetic incorporation of artificial opsins is creating a revolution in the field of neural stimulation. In this paper we show its potential in the field of retinal prosthesis. We show that we need typically 100 mW cm(-2) in instantaneous light intensity on the neuron in order to stimulate action potentials. We also show how this can be reduced down to safe levels in order to negate thermal and photochromic damage to the eye. We also describe a gallium nitride LED light source which is also able to generate patterns of the required intensity in order to transfer reliable images.

  2. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Page Additional resources An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: Biological Pollutants Help Your Child Gain Control Over ... exhaust, smoke, road dust and factory emissions. Outdoor air quality is also affected by pollen from plants, crops ...

  3. Preventing Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    ... body composition gradually shifts — the proportion of muscle decreases and the proportion of fat increases. This shift slows their metabolism, making it easier to gain weight. In addition, some people become less physically ...

  4. An Enhanced Genetic Approach to Composing Cooperative Learning Groups for Multiple Grouping Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yin, Peng-Yeng; Hwang, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Cooperative learning is known to be an effective educational strategy in enhancing the learning performance of students. The goal of a cooperative learning group is to maximize all members' learning efficacy. This is accomplished via promoting each other's success, through assisting, sharing, mentoring, explaining, and encouragement. To achieve…

  5. Using evolutionary costs to enhance the efficacy of malaria control via genetically manipulated mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Koella, Jacob C; Zaghloul, Lamia

    2008-11-01

    An earlier mathematical model exploring the use of genetically manipulated mosquitoes for malaria control suggested that the prevalence of malaria is reduced significantly only if almost all mosquitoes become completely resistant to malaria. Central to the model was the 'cost of resistance': the reduction of a resistant mosquito's evolutionary fitness in comparison with a sensitive one's. Here, we consider the possibility of obtaining more optimistic outcomes by taking into account the epidemiological (in addition to the evolutionary) consequences of a cost of resistance that decreases the life-span of adult mosquitoes (the most relevant parameter for the parasite's epidemiology). There are two main results. First, if despite its cost, resistance is fixed in the population, increasing the cost of resistance decreases the intensity of transmission. However, this epidemiological effect is weak if resistance is effective enough to be considered relevant for control. Second, if the cost of resistance prevents its fixation, increasing it intensifies transmission. Thus, the epidemiological effect of the cost of resistance cannot compensate for the lower frequency of resistant mosquitoes in the population. Overall, our conclusion remains pessimistic: so that genetic manipulation can become a promising method of malaria control, we need techniques that enable almost all mosquitoes to be almost completely resistant to infection.

  6. Molecular genetic improvements of cyanobacteria to enhance the industrial potential of the microbe: A review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tylor J; Gibbons, Jaimie L; Gu, Liping; Zhou, Ruanbao; Gibbons, William R

    2016-11-01

    The rapid increase in worldwide population coupled with the increasing demand for fossil fuels has led to an increased urgency to develop sustainable sources of energy and chemicals from renewable resources. Using microorganisms to produce high-value chemicals and next-generation biofuels is one sustainable option and is the focus of much current research. Cyanobacteria are ideal platform organisms for chemical and biofuel production because they can be genetically engineered to produce a broad range of products directly from CO2 , H2 O, and sunlight, and require minimal nutrient inputs. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview on advances that have been or could be made to improve strains of cyanobacteria for industrial purposes. First, the benefits of using cyanobacteria as a platform for chemical and biofuel production are discussed. Next, an overview of cyanobacterial strain improvements by genetic engineering is provided. Finally, mutagenesis techniques to improve the industrial potential of cyanobacteria are described. Along with providing an overview on various areas of research that are currently being investigated to improve the industrial potential of cyanobacteria, this review aims to elucidate potential targets for future research involving cyanobacteria as an industrial microorganism. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1357-1371, 2016.

  7. Increasing public involvement in enriching our fish stocks through genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, H O; Quezada, F

    1999-11-01

    A total of 70%, of the world's conventional commercial fish species are now fully exploited, overexploited, depleted or recovering from depletion. This dramatic crash in the capture world fisheries production has led to problems in foods distribution, balance of payments, employment, and ecological depletion. Public support for breeding programs with terrestrial farm animals and plants in agriculture have revolutionized this industry over the past few hundred years. However, new genetic rearing technologies to improve marine animal production through aquaculture that utilize modern biology to obtain sustainable aquaculture and preserve biodiversity provide a promise to address these problems. However aquaculture has not been subject to public discussion and approval. Public involvement, not necessarily acquiescence, provide value added in the decision making process. Public understanding and involvement involves three stages. (i) Public concern over the pool of genetic information; (ii) if aquaculture is to respond to the fisheries crises with innovation, the knowledge gap between public understanding and scientific information must be bridged; and (iii) strategies must be developed for achieving this. Release of recombinant DNA to the environment, and handling exotic species, are useful case studies. Illustrations will be given of communication bridges to the public and ways to involve the public in making policy decisions.

  8. From The Cover: Poly- amino ester-containing microparticles enhance the activity of nonviral genetic vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Steven R.; Lynn, David M.; Ge, Qing; Anderson, Daniel G.; Puram, Sidharth V.; Chen, Jianzhu; Eisen, Herman N.; Langer, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Current nonviral genetic vaccine systems are less effective than viral vaccines, particularly in cancer systems where epitopes can be weakly immunogenic and antigen-presenting cell processing and presentation to T cells is down-regulated. A promising nonviral delivery method for genetic vaccines involves microencapsulation of antigen-encoding DNA, because such particles protect plasmid payloads and target them to phagocytic antigen-presenting cells. However, conventional microparticle formulations composed of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid take too long to release encapsulated payload and fail to induce high levels of target gene expression. Here, we describe a microparticle-based DNA delivery system composed of a degradable, pH-sensitive poly- amino ester and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid. These formulations generate an increase of 3-5 orders of magnitude in transfection efficiency and are potent activators of dendritic cells in vitro. When used as vaccines in vivo, these microparticle formulations, unlike conventional formulations, induce antigen-specific rejection of transplanted syngenic tumor cells.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of Drosophila eyes absent mutants reveals an eye enhancer element.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J E; Bui, Q T; Liu, H; Bonini, N M

    2000-01-01

    The eyes absent (eya) gene is critical for normal eye development in Drosophila and is highly conserved to vertebrates. To define regions of the gene critical for eye function, we have defined the mutations in the four viable eya alleles. Two of these mutations are eye specific and undergo transvection with other mutations in the gene. These were found to be deletion mutations that remove regulatory sequence critical for eye cell expression of the gene. Two other viable alleles cause a reduced eye phenotype and affect the function of the gene in additional tissues, such as the ocelli. These mutations were found to be insertion mutations of different transposable elements within the 5' UTR of the transcript. Detailed analysis of one of these revealed that the transposable element has become subject to regulation by eye enhancer sequences of the eya gene, disrupting normal expression of EYA in the eye. More extended analysis of the deletion region in the eye-specific alleles indicated that the deleted region defines an enhancer that activates gene expression in eye progenitor cells. This enhancer is responsive to ectopic expression of the eyeless gene. This analysis has defined a critical regulatory region required for proper eye expression of the eya gene. PMID:10628984

  10. Heat shock and genetic activation of HSF-1 enhance immunity to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2006-11-01

    The relationship between fever and microbial infections has been known for a number of years, as well as several key mediators involved in its elicitation. However, the mechanisms by which fever confers protection to infected hosts are less clear. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which has been extensively used in recent years to study microbial infections and innate immune responses, has recently been used to study the effect of increased temperature in immunity. Upon heat shock exposure, nematodes become more resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the enhanced resistance to the pathogen requires heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF-1) and a system of small and 90 kDa heat shock proteins (HSPs). Experiments using additional Gram negative and Gram positive pathogens show that HSF-1 is part of a multipathogen defense pathway. In addition, C. elegans innate immunity can be activated enhancing HSF-1 activity by directly overexpressing HSF-1 or by overexpressing DAF-16, which is a forkhead transcription factor that acts upstream HSF-1 in aging and immunity. Blocking the inhibitory signal of the DAF-2 insulin like receptor, which acts upstream DAF-16, also results in an enhanced HSF-1 dependent immunity. In addition, mutations that affect DAF-21, C. elegans homologue of Hsp90 which forms an inhibitory complex with HSF-1, appear to boost immunity by activating the HSF-1 pathway. The role of the HSF-1 pathway in innate immunity and immunosenescence is discussed.

  11. Genetic engineering of rice capable of synthesizing fructans and enhancing chilling tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Akira; Sato, Yutaka; Yoshida, Midori

    2008-01-01

    Fructans are water-soluble fructose oligomers and polymers that are based on sucrose, and have been implicated in protecting plants against water stress. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is highly sensitive to chilling temperatures, and is not able to synthesize fructans. Two wheat fructan-synthesizing enzymes, sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase, encoded by wft2, or sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase, encoded by wft1, were introduced into rice plants, and rice transformants that accumulate fructans were successfully obtained. The mature leaf blades of transgenic rice lines with wft2 or wft1 accumulated 16.2 mg g(-1) FW of oligo- and polysaccharides mainly composed of inulin oligomers of more than DP7, and 3.7 mg g(-1) FW of oligo- and polysaccharides, mainly composed of phlein oligomers of more than DP15, respectively. The transgenic rice seedlings with wft2 accumulated significantly higher concentrations of oligo- and polysaccharides than non-transgenic rice seedlings, and exhibited enhanced chilling tolerance. The oligo- and polysaccharide concentrations of seedlings expressing wft1 were obviously lower than those of lines expressing wft2, and no correlation between oligo- and polysaccharide concentrations and chilling tolerance was detected in wft1-expressing rice lines. The results suggest that transgenic rice lines expressing wheat-derived fructosyltransferase genes accumulated large amounts of fructans in mature leaf blades and exhibited enhanced chilling tolerance at the seedling stage. This is the first report owing that fructan accumulation enhanced tolerance to non-freezing low temperatures.

  12. Biochemical and genetic engineering strategies to enhance hydrogen production in photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Srirangan, Kajan; Pyne, Michael E; Perry Chou, C

    2011-09-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen gas is a promising substitute to carbonaceous fuels owing to its superb conversion efficiency, non-polluting nature, and high energy content. At present, hydrogen is predominately synthesized via chemical reformation of fossil fuels. While various biological methods have been extensively explored, none of them is justified as economically feasible. A sustainable platform for biological production of hydrogen will certainly impact the biofuel market. Among a selection of biological systems, algae and cyanobacteria have garnered major interests as potential cell factories for hydrogen production. In conjunction with photosynthesis, these organisms utilize inexpensive inorganic substrates and solar energy for simultaneous biosynthesis and hydrogen evolution. However, the hydrogen yield associated with these organisms remains far too low to compete with the existing chemical systems. This article reviews recent advances of biochemical, bioprocess, and genetic engineering strategies in circumventing technological limitations to hopefully improve the applicative potential of these photosynthetic hydrogen production systems.

  13. On the Reliability of Nonlinear Modeling using Enhanced Genetic Programming Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, S. M.; Affenzeller, M.; Wagner, S.

    The use of genetic programming (GP) in nonlinear system identification enables the automated search for mathematical models that are evolved by an evolutionary process using the principles of selection, crossover and mutation. Due to the stochastic element that is intrinsic to any evolutionary process, GP cannot guarantee the generation of similar or even equal models in each GP process execution; still, if there is a physical model underlying to the data that are analyzed, then GP is expected to find these structures and produce somehow similar results. In this paper we define a function for measuring the syntactic similarity of mathematical models represented as structure trees; using this similarity function we compare the results produced by GP techniques for a data set representing measurement data of a BMW Diesel engine.

  14. Lactococcus lactis BFE920 activates the innate immune system of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), resulting in protection against Streptococcus iniae infection and enhancing feed efficiency and weight gain in large-scale field studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel; Beck, Bo Ram; Heo, Saet-Byeol; Kim, Jungjoon; Kim, Hyun Duk; Lee, Sun-Min; Kim, Youngchan; Oh, So Young; Lee, Kyungro; Do, HyungKi; Lee, KwanHee; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Song, Seong Kyu

    2013-11-01

    The protective effect of a food-grade lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis BFE920 against disease of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) cultivated on a large scale was studied. Initially, antimicrobial activity of L. lactis against several fish pathogens was evaluated in vitro; the probiotic showed strong antibacterial activity against Streptococcus iniae, Streptococcus parauberis and Enterococcus viikkiensis, and moderate activity against Lactococcus garviae. When olive flounders were fed for two weeks with experimental diets containing varying concentrations of L. lactis (1 × 10(6), 5 × 10(6), 2.5 × 10(7) and 1.25 × 10(8) CFU/g feed), all the experimental feed groups showed 68-77% survival upon challenge with S. iniae. A field-scale feeding trial with L. lactis dietary supplement was conducted in a local fish farm (n = 12,000) for three months, and disease resistance, innate immune parameters and growth performance were evaluated. The average weight gain and feed efficiency were increased up to 6.8% and 8.5%, respectively. At the end of the feeding trial, the olive flounders were challenged with S. iniae. The L. lactis-fed group was protected from S. iniae challenge with a 66% survival rate. This disease protection is due to the flounder's innate immunity activated by the L. lactis administration: increased lysosomal activities and production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. These data clearly indicated that L. lactis BFE920 may be developed as a functional feed additive for protection against diseases, and for enhancement of feed efficiency and weight gain in olive flounder farming.

  15. Enhanced characteristics of genetically modified switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) for high biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most promising renewable and clean energy resources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels. However, the resistance to accessibility of sugars embedded in plant cell walls (so-called recalcitrance) is a major barrier to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. A recent report from the US National Academy of Sciences indicated that, “absent technological breakthroughs”, it was unlikely that the US would meet the congressionally mandated renewable fuel standard of 35 billion gallons of ethanol-equivalent biofuels plus 1 billion gallons of biodiesel by 2022. We here describe the properties of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) biomass that has been genetically engineered to increase the cellulosic ethanol yield by more than 2-fold. Results We have increased the cellulosic ethanol yield from switchgrass by 2.6-fold through overexpression of the transcription factor PvMYB4. This strategy reduces carbon deposition into lignin and phenolic fermentation inhibitors while maintaining the availability of potentially fermentable soluble sugars and pectic polysaccharides. Detailed biomass characterization analyses revealed that the levels and nature of phenolic acids embedded in the cell-wall, the lignin content and polymer size, lignin internal linkage levels, linkages between lignin and xylans/pectins, and levels of wall-bound fucose are all altered in PvMYB4-OX lines. Genetically engineered PvMYB4-OX switchgrass therefore provides a novel system for further understanding cell wall recalcitrance. Conclusions Our results have demonstrated that overexpression of PvMYB4, a general transcriptional repressor of the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway, can lead to very high yield ethanol production through dramatic reduction of recalcitrance. MYB4-OX switchgrass is an excellent model system for understanding recalcitrance, and provides new germplasm for developing switchgrass cultivars as

  16. Male-enhanced expression and genetic conservation of a gene isolated with an anti-H-Y antibody.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y F; Chan, K M; Kan, Y W; Goldberg, E

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis of the serological H-Y antigen as the inducer molecule for mammalian male sex differentiation has been considered an important working model in developmental biology. However, because of the difficulties involved in its detection, supporting evidence in molecular terms is lacking for this hypothesis. The isolation of the gene for the serological H-Y antigen is essential to the acertainment of its proposed functions. Using recombinant DNA technology and specific anti-H-Y sera we have isolated a candidate gene, the MEA gene, for the serological H-Y antigen. Molecular characterization of the MEA gene shows male-enhanced expression and genetic conservation patterns similar to those attributed to the serological H-Y antigen. The isolation of this candidate gene for the serological H-Y antigen. The isolation of this candidate gene for the serological H-Y antigen would allow further investigations to identify the functions for this molecule in molecular terms.

  17. Genetic variation at the 8q24.21 renal cancer susceptibility locus affects HIF binding to a MYC enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Grampp, Steffen; Platt, James L.; Lauer, Victoria; Salama, Rafik; Kranz, Franziska; Neumann, Viviana K.; Wach, Sven; Stöhr, Christine; Hartmann, Arndt; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mole, David R.; Schödel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel–Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) and unrestrained activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Genetic and epigenetic determinants have an impact on HIF pathways. A recent genome-wide association study on renal cancer susceptibility identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an intergenic region located between the oncogenes MYC and PVT1. Here using assays of chromatin conformation, allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome editing, we show that HIF binding to this regulatory element is necessary to trans-activate MYC and PVT1 expression specifically in cells of renal tubular origins. Moreover, we demonstrate that the risk-associated polymorphisms increase chromatin accessibility and activity as well as HIF binding to the enhancer. These findings provide further evidence that genetic variation at HIF-binding sites modulates the oncogenic transcriptional output of the VHL–HIF axis and provide a functional explanation for the disease-associated effects of SNPs in ccRCC. PMID:27774982

  18. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials.

  19. An improved ARS2-derived nuclear reporter enhances the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Hoang, Kevin T D; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to pioneer genetic engineering techniques for high-value protein and biofuel production from algae. To date, most studies of transgenic Chlamydomonas have utilized the chloroplast genome due to its ease of engineering, with a sizeable suite of reporters and well-characterized expression constructs. The advanced manipulation of algal nuclear genomes has been hampered by limited strong expression cassettes, and a lack of high-throughput reporters. We have improved upon an endogenous reporter gene - the ARS2 gene encoding an arylsulfatase enzyme - that was first cloned and characterized decades ago but has not been used extensively. The new construct, derived from ARS2 cDNA, expresses significantly higher levels of reporter protein and transforms more efficiently, allowing qualitative and quantitative screening using a rapid, inexpensive 96-well assay. The improved arylsulfatase expression cassette was used to screen a new transgene promoter from the ARG7 gene, and found that the ARG7 promoter can express the ARS2 reporter as strongly as the HSP70-RBCS2 chimeric promoter that currently ranks as the best available promoter, thus adding to the list of useful nuclear promoters. This enhanced arylsulfatase reporter construct improves the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering within the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, with potential application to other algal strains.

  20. Enhanced sialylation of recombinant erythropoietin in genetically engineered Chinese-hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon Tae; Choi, One; Son, Young Dok; Park, Seung Yeol; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2009-04-01

    Sialic acid, the terminal sugar in N-linked complex glycans, is usually found in glycoproteins and plays a major role in determining the circulatory lifespan of glycoproteins. In the present study we attempted to enhance the sialylation of recombinant EPO (erythropoietin) in CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. To enhance EPO sialylation, we introduced human alpha2,3-ST (alpha2,3-sialyltransferase) and CMP-SAS (CMP-sialic acid synthase) into recombinant human EPO-producing CHO cells. The sialylation of EPO was increased by the expression of alpha2,3-ST alone. Although the co-expression of alpha2,3-ST and CMP-SAS did not further increase sialylation, an increase in the intracellular pool of CMP-sialic acid was noted. On the basis of these observations, it was postulated that the transport capacity of CMP-sialic acid into the Golgi lumen was limited, thereby causing the reduced availability of CMP-sialic acid substrate for sialylation. Therefore, we co-expressed human alpha2,3-ST and CMP-SAS, as well as overexpress Chinese hamster CMP-sialic acid transporter (CMP-SAT) in CHO cells, which produced recombinant human EPO. When alpha2,3-ST, CMP-SAS, and CMP-SAT were overexpressed in CHO cells, there was a corresponding increase in sialylation compared with the co-expression of alpha2,3-ST and CMP-SAS. The present study provides a useful strategy for enhancing the sialylation of therapeutic glycoproteins produced in CHO cells.

  1. Enhancement in motor learning through genetic manipulation of the Lynx1 gene.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Julie M; Walz, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic system is a neuromodulatory neurotransmitter system involved in a variety of brain processes, including learning and memory, attention, and motor processes, among others. The influence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the cholinergic system are moderated by lynx proteins, which are GPI-anchored membrane proteins forming tight associations with nicotinic receptors. Previous studies indicate lynx1 inhibits nicotinic receptor function and limits neuronal plasticity. We sought to investigate the mechanism of action of lynx1 on nicotinic receptor function, through the generation of lynx mouse models, expressing a soluble version of lynx and comparing results to the full length overexpression. Using rotarod as a test for motor learning, we found that expressing a secreted variant of lynx leads to motor learning enhancements whereas overexpression of full-length lynx had no effect. Further, adult lynx1KO mice demonstrated comparable motor learning enhancements as the soluble transgenic lines, whereas previously, aged lynx1KO mice showed performance augmentation only with nicotine treatment. From this we conclude the motor learning is more sensitive to loss of lynx function, and that the GPI anchor plays a role in the normal function of the lynx protein. In addition, our data suggests that the lynx gene plays a modulatory role in the brain during aging, and that a soluble version of lynx has potential as a tool for adjusting cholinergic-dependent plasticity and learning mechanisms in the brain.

  2. Genetic Engineering of Glycinebetaine Production toward Enhancing Stress Tolerance in Plants: Metabolic Limitations1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Hirji, Rozina; Adam, Luc; Rozwadowski, Kevin L.; Hammerlindl, Joe K.; Keller, Wilf A.; Selvaraj, Gopalan

    2000-01-01

    Glycinebetaine (betaine) affords osmoprotection in bacteria, plants and animals, and protects cell components against harsh conditions in vitro. This and a compelling body of other evidence have encouraged the engineering of betaine production in plants lacking it. We have installed the metabolic step for oxidation of choline, a ubiquitous substance, to betaine in three diverse species, Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), by constitutive expression of a bacterial choline oxidase gene. The highest levels of betaine in independent transgenics were 18.6, 12.8, and 13 μmol g−1 dry weight, respectively, values 10- to 20-fold lower than the levels found in natural betaine producers. However, choline-fed transgenic plants synthesized substantially more betaine. Increasing the choline supplementation further enhanced betaine synthesis, up to 613 μmol g−1 dry weight in Arabidopsis, 250 μmol g−1 dry weight in B. napus, and 80 μmol g−1 dry weight in tobacco. These studies demonstrate the need to enhance the endogenous choline supply to support accumulation of physiologically relevant amounts of betaine. A moderate stress tolerance was noted in some but not all betaine-producing transgenic lines based on relative shoot growth. Furthermore, the responses to stresses such as salinity, drought, and freezing were variable among the three species. PMID:10712538

  3. A new class of temporarily phenotypic enhancers identified by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yarui; Li, Bin; Meng, Zhipeng; Jung, Inkyung; Lee, Ah Young; Dixon, Jesse; Maliskova, Lenka; Guan, Kun-liang; Shen, Yin; Ren, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With <2% of the human genome coding for proteins, a major challenge is to interpret the function of the noncoding DNA. Millions of regulatory sequences have been predicted in the human genome through analysis of DNA methylation, chromatin modification, hypersensitivity to nucleases, and transcription factor binding, but few have been shown to regulate transcription in their native contexts. We have developed a high-throughput CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-editing strategy and used it to interrogate 174 candidate regulatory sequences within the 1-Mbp POU5F1 locus in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We identified two classical regulatory elements, including a promoter and a proximal enhancer, that are essential for POU5F1 transcription in hESCs. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a new class of enhancers that contribute to POU5F1 transcription in an unusual way: Disruption of such sequences led to a temporary loss of POU5F1 transcription that is fully restored after a few rounds of cell division. These results demonstrate the utility of high-throughput screening for functional characterization of noncoding DNA and reveal a previously unrecognized layer of gene regulation in human cells. PMID:26813977

  4. Genetic enhancement of microsomal epoxide hydrolase improves metabolic detoxification but impairs cerebral blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Marowsky, Anne; Haenel, Karen; Bockamp, Ernesto; Heck, Rosario; Rutishauser, Sibylle; Mule, Nandkishor; Kindler, Diana; Rudin, Markus; Arand, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a detoxifying enzyme for xenobiotic compounds. Enzymatic activity of mEH can be greatly increased by a point mutation, leading to an E404D amino acid exchange in its catalytic triad. Surprisingly, this variant is not found in any vertebrate species, despite the obvious advantage of accelerated detoxification. We hypothesized that this evolutionary avoidance is due to the fact that the mEH plays a dualistic role in detoxification and control of endogenous vascular signaling molecules. To test this, we generated mEH E404D mice and assessed them for detoxification capacity and vascular dynamics. In liver microsomes from these mice, turnover of the xenobiotic compound phenanthrene-9,10-oxide was four times faster compared to WT liver microsomes, confirming accelerated detoxification. mEH E404D animals also showed faster metabolization of a specific class of endogenous eicosanoids, arachidonic acid-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). Significantly higher DHETs/EETs ratios were found in mEH E404D liver, urine, plasma, brain and cerebral endothelial cells compared to WT controls, suggesting a broad impact of the mEH mutant on endogenous EETs metabolism. Because EETs are strong vasodilators in cerebral vasculature, hemodynamics were assessed in mEH E404D and WT cerebral cortex and hippocampus using cerebral blood volume (CBV)-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Basal CBV0 levels were similar between mEH E404D and control mice in both brain areas. But vascular reactivity and vasodilation in response to the vasodilatory drug acetazolamide were reduced in mEH E404D forebrain compared to WT controls by factor 3 and 2.6, respectively. These results demonstrate a critical role for mEH E404D in vasodynamics and suggest that deregulation of endogenous signaling pathways is the undesirable gain of function associated with the E404D variant.

  5. The genetic-algorithm-enhanced blind system identification for water distribution pipeline leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping

    2007-07-01

    The conventional leak location is based on the correlation of leak acoustic signals acquired spatially separately. By correlation, the time lag is estimated for localizing the leakage. In these methods, the detection distance is a prerequisite that has to be known beforehand. However, in practice, this prerequisite is not always satisfied. In this case, the correlation-based methods are not feasible. Actually, the acquired signals contain the characteristics related to the acoustic propagation channels; thus the blind system identification strategy is applied to estimate the transmission performances of acoustic channels. Then the times due to the propagation of the leak source signal travelling from the leak point to sensors are determined. In this way, for leak location, the detection distance is no longer a prerequisite. In blind system identification, due to the long impulse responses of the leak acoustic channels, the channels are inevitably ill conditioned and sensitive to the initial values. To overcome the ill conditions, the overlap-save and cross-correlation fitting techniques are utilized to identify the long impulse sequences under a built constraint. In order to avoid converging to the local minima, the genetic algorithm is used to minimize the cost functions. The practical detection results show the validity of the proposed scheme.

  6. Genetic design of enhanced valley splitting towards a spin qubit in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Luo, Jun-Wei; Saraiva, Andre; Koiller, Belita; Zunger, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The long spin coherence time and microelectronics compatibility of Si makes it an attractive material for realizing solid-state qubits. Unfortunately, the orbital (valley) degeneracy of the conduction band of bulk Si makes it difficult to isolate individual two-level spin-1/2 states, limiting their development. This degeneracy is lifted within Si quantum wells clad between Ge-Si alloy barrier layers, but the magnitude of the valley splittings achieved so far is small—of the order of 1 meV or less—degrading the fidelity of information stored within such a qubit. Here we combine an atomistic pseudopotential theory with a genetic search algorithm to optimize the structure of layered-Ge/Si-clad Si quantum wells to improve this splitting. We identify an optimal sequence of multiple Ge/Si barrier layers that more effectively isolates the electron ground state of a Si quantum well and increases the valley splitting by an order of magnitude, to ∼9 meV. PMID:24013452

  7. Micelle-Enhanced Bioorthogonal Labeling of Genetically Encoded Azido Groups on the Lipid-Embedded Surface of a GPCR.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Sakmar, Thomas P; Huber, Thomas

    2015-06-15

    Genetically encoded p-azido-phenylalanine (azF) residues in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be targeted with dibenzocyclooctyne-modified (DIBO-modified) fluorescent probes by means of strain-promoted [3+2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SpAAC). Here we show that azF residues situated on the transmembrane surfaces of detergent-solubilized receptors exhibit up to 1000-fold rate enhancement relative to azF residues on water-exposed surfaces. We show that the amphipathic moment of the labeling reagent, consisting of hydrophobic DIBO coupled to hydrophilic Alexa dye, results in strong partitioning of the DIBO group into the hydrocarbon core of the detergent micelle and consequently high local reactant concentrations. The observed rate constant for the micelleenhanced SpAAC is comparable with those of the fastest bioorthogonal labeling reactions known. Targeting hydrophobic regions of membrane proteins by use of micelle-enhanced SpAAC should expand the utility of bioorthogonal labeling strategies.

  8. Enhanced flight performance by genetic manipulation of wing shape in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Robert P.; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Henningsson, Per; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Insect wing shapes are remarkably diverse and the combination of shape and kinematics determines both aerial capabilities and power requirements. However, the contribution of any specific morphological feature to performance is not known. Using targeted RNA interference to modify wing shape far beyond the natural variation found within the population of a single species, we show a direct effect on flight performance that can be explained by physical modelling of the novel wing geometry. Our data show that altering the expression of a single gene can significantly enhance aerial agility and that the Drosophila wing shape is not, therefore, optimized for certain flight performance characteristics that are known to be important. Our technique points in a new direction for experiments on the evolution of performance specialities in animals. PMID:26926954

  9. Enhancement of Phosphate Absorption by Garden Plants by Genetic Engineering: A New Tool for Phytoremediation

    PubMed Central

    Togami, Junichi; Mason, John G.; Chandler, Stephen F.; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Although phosphorus is an essential factor for proper plant growth in natural environments, an excess of phosphate in water sources causes serious pollution. In this paper we describe transgenic plants which hyperaccumulate inorganic phosphate (Pi) and which may be used to reduce environmental water pollution by phytoremediation. AtPHR1, a transcription factor for a key regulator of the Pi starvation response in Arabidopsis thaliana, was overexpressed in the ornamental garden plants Torenia, Petunia, and Verbena. The transgenic plants showed hyperaccumulation of Pi in leaves and accelerated Pi absorption rates from hydroponic solutions. Large-scale hydroponic experiments indicated that the enhanced ability to absorb Pi in transgenic torenia (AtPHR1) was comparable to water hyacinth a plant that though is used for phytoremediation causes overgrowth problems. PMID:23984322

  10. Genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma mediated by a LMO1 super-enhancer polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Oldridge, Derek A.; Wood, Andrew C.; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Crimmins, Ian; Sussman, Robyn; Winter, Cynthia; McDaniel, Lee D.; Diamond, Maura; Hart, Lori S.; Zhu, Shizhen; Durbin, Adam D.; Abraham, Brian J.; Anders, Lars; Tian, Lifeng; Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S.; Khan, Javed; Bramlett, Kelli; Rahman, Nazneen; Capasso, Mario; Iolascon, Achille; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Young, Richard A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Diskin, Sharon J.; Look, A. Thomas; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy that typically arises in early childhood and is derived from the developing sympathetic nervous system. Clinical phenotypes range from localized tumors with excellent outcomes to widely metastatic disease where long-term survival is approximately 40% despite intensive therapy1. A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified common polymorphisms at the LMO1 gene locus that are highly associated with neuroblastoma susceptibility and oncogenic addiction to LMO1 in the tumor cells2. Here we sought to discover the causal DNA variant at this locus and the mechanism by which it leads to neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We first imputed all possible genotypes across the LMO1 locus and then mapped highly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) to areas of chromatin accessibility, evolutionary conservation, and transcription factor binding sites. SNP rs2168101 G>T was the most highly associated variant (combined P=7.47×10-29, Odds Ratio 0.65, 95% CI: 0.60-0.70) and resided in a super-enhancer defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 within the first intron of LMO1. The ancestral G-allele that is associated with tumor formation resides in a conserved GATA transcription factor binding motif. We show that the newly evolved protective TATA allele is associated with decreased total LMO1 expression (P=0.028) in neuroblastoma primary tumors and ablates GATA3 binding (P<0.0001). We demonstrate allelic imbalance favoring the G-containing strand in tumors heterozygous for this SNP as demonstrated both by RNA sequencing (P<0.0001) and reporter assays (P=0.002). These findings show that a recently evolved polymorphism within a super-enhancer element in the first intron of LMO1 influences neuroblastoma susceptibility through differential GATA transcription factor binding and direct modulation of LMO1 expression in cis, and this leads to an oncogenic dependency in tumor cells. PMID:26560027

  11. Genetic Signatures for Enhanced Olfaction in the African Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos, Sofia; Bishop, Jacqueline M.; O’Ryan, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor (OR) superfamily, the largest in the vertebrate genome, is responsible for vertebrate olfaction and is traditionally subdivided into 17 OR families. Recent studies characterising whole-OR subgenomes revealed a ‘birth and death’ model of evolution for a range of species, however little is known about fine-scale evolutionary dynamics within single-OR families. This study reports the first assessment of fine-scale OR evolution and variation in African mole-rats (Bathyergidae), a family of subterranean rodents endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the selective pressures of life underground, enhanced olfaction is proposed to be fundamental to the evolutionary success of the Bathyergidae, resulting in a highly diversified OR gene-repertoire. Using a PCR-sequencing approach, we analysed variation in the OR7 family across 14 extant bathyergid species, which revealed enhanced levels of functional polymorphisms concentrated across the receptors’ ligand-binding region. We propose that mole-rats are able to recognise a broad range of odorants and that this diversity is reflected throughout their OR7 gene repertoire. Using both classic tests and tree-based methods to test for signals of selection, we investigate evolutionary forces across the mole-rat OR7 gene tree. Four well-supported clades emerged in the OR phylogeny, with varying signals of selection; from neutrality to positive and purifying selection. Bathyergid life-history traits and environmental niche-specialisation are explored as possible drivers of adaptive OR evolution, emerging as non-exclusive contributors to the positive selection observed at OR7 genes. Our results reveal unexpected complexity of evolutionary mechanisms acting within a single OR family, providing insightful perspectives into OR evolutionary dynamics. PMID:24699281

  12. Should I Gain Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you're having trouble with your body image, talk about how you feel with someone you like and trust who's been through it — maybe a parent, doctor, counselor, coach, or teacher. continue It's the Growth, Not the Gain No ...

  13. Genetic Regulation of Fate Decisions in Therapeutic T Cells to Enhance Tumor Protection and Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Veliça, Pedro; Zech, Mathias; Henson, Sian; Holler, Angelika; Manzo, Teresa; Pike, Rebecca; Santos E Sousa, Pedro; Zhang, Lei; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Pule, Martin; Stauss, Hans; Chakraverty, Ronjon

    2015-07-01

    A key challenge in the field of T-cell immunotherapy for cancer is creating a suitable platform for promoting differentiation of effector cells while at the same time enabling self-renewal needed for long-term memory. Although transfer of less differentiated memory T cells increases efficacy through greater expansion and persistence in vivo, the capacity of such cells to sustain effector functions within immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments may still be limiting. We have therefore directly compared the impact of effector versus memory differentiation of therapeutic T cells in tumor-bearing mice by introducing molecular switches that regulate cell fate decisions via mTOR. Ectopic expression of RAS homolog enriched in brain (RHEB) increased mTORC1 signaling, promoted a switch to aerobic glycolysis, and increased expansion of effector T cells. By rapidly infiltrating tumors, RHEB-transduced T cells significantly reduced the emergence of immunoedited escape variants. In contrast, expression of proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa (PRAS40) inhibited mTORC1, promoted quiescence, and blocked tumor infiltration. Fate mapping studies following transient expression of PRAS40 demonstrated that mTORC1(low) T cells made no contribution to initial tumor control but instead survived to become memory cells proficient in generating recall immunity. Our data support the design of translational strategies for generating heterogeneous T-cell immunity against cancer, with the appropriate balance between promoting effector differentiation and self-renewal. Unlike pharmacologic inhibitors, the genetic approach described here allows for upregulation as well as inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway and is highly selective for the therapeutic T cells without affecting systemic mTORC1 functions.

  14. Assessing and enhancing the introductory science course in physics and biology: Peer instruction, classroom demonstrations, and genetics vocabulary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagen, Adam Paul

    Most introductory college science courses in the United States are taught in large lectures with students rarely having the opportunity to think critically about the material being presented nor to participate actively. Further, many classes focus on teaching rather than learning, that is, the transfer of information as opposed to actual student understanding. This thesis focuses on three studies about the assessment and enhancement of learning in undergraduate science courses. We describe the results of an international survey on the implementation of Peer Instruction (PI), a collaborative learning pedagogy in which lectures are interspersed with short conceptual questions designed to challenge students to think about the material as it is being presented. We present a portrait of the many instructors teaching with PI and the settings in which it is being used as well as data on the effectiveness of PI in enhancing student learning in diverse settings. The wide variety of implementations suggests that PI is a highly adaptable strategy that can work successfully in almost any environment. We also provide recommendations for those considering adopting PI in their classes. Classroom demonstrations are an important aspect of many introductory science courses, but there is little evidence supporting their educational effectiveness. We explore the effect of different modes of presentation on enhancing student learning from demonstrations. Our results show that students who actively engage with a demonstration by predicting the outcome before it is conducted are better able to recall and explain the scenario posed by that demonstration. As preliminary work for the creation of an inventory of conceptual understanding in introductory biology, we discuss results from a survey of vocabulary familiarity and understanding in an undergraduate genetics course. Students begin introductory classes with significant gaps in their understanding, some of which are retained beyond

  15. Genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma mediated by a LMO1 super-enhancer polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Oldridge, Derek A; Wood, Andrew C; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Crimmins, Ian; Sussman, Robyn; Winter, Cynthia; McDaniel, Lee D; Diamond, Maura; Hart, Lori S; Zhu, Shizhen; Durbin, Adam D; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Tian, Lifeng; Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Khan, Javed; Bramlett, Kelli; Rahman, Nazneen; Capasso, Mario; Iolascon, Achille; Gerhard, Daniela S; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M; Young, Richard A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Diskin, Sharon J; Look, A Thomas; Maris, John M

    2015-12-17

    Neuroblastoma is a paediatric malignancy that typically arises in early childhood, and is derived from the developing sympathetic nervous system. Clinical phenotypes range from localized tumours with excellent outcomes to widely metastatic disease in which long-term survival is approximately 40% despite intensive therapy. A previous genome-wide association study identified common polymorphisms at the LMO1 gene locus that are highly associated with neuroblastoma susceptibility and oncogenic addiction to LMO1 in the tumour cells. Here we investigate the causal DNA variant at this locus and the mechanism by which it leads to neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We first imputed all possible genotypes across the LMO1 locus and then mapped highly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) to areas of chromatin accessibility, evolutionary conservation and transcription factor binding sites. We show that SNP rs2168101 G>T is the most highly associated variant (combined P = 7.47 × 10(-29), odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.70), and resides in a super-enhancer defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 within the first intron of LMO1. The ancestral G allele that is associated with tumour formation resides in a conserved GATA transcription factor binding motif. We show that the newly evolved protective TATA allele is associated with decreased total LMO1 expression (P = 0.028) in neuroblastoma primary tumours, and ablates GATA3 binding (P < 0.0001). We demonstrate allelic imbalance favouring the G-containing strand in tumours heterozygous for this SNP, as demonstrated both by RNA sequencing (P < 0.0001) and reporter assays (P = 0.002). These findings indicate that a recently evolved polymorphism within a super-enhancer element in the first intron of LMO1 influences neuroblastoma susceptibility through differential GATA transcription factor binding and direct modulation of LMO1 expression in cis, and this leads to an oncogenic

  16. Control of the olive fruit fly using genetics-enhanced sterile insect technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major arthropod pest of commercial olive production, causing extensive damage to olive crops worldwide. Current control techniques rely on spraying of chemical insecticides. The sterile insect technique (SIT) presents an alternative, environmentally friendly and species-specific method of population control. Although SIT has been very successful against other tephritid pests, previous SIT trials on olive fly have produced disappointing results. Key problems included altered diurnal mating rhythms of the laboratory-reared insects, resulting in asynchronous mating activity between the wild and released sterile populations, and low competitiveness of the radiation-sterilised mass-reared flies. Consequently, the production of competitive, male-only release cohorts is considered an essential prerequisite for successful olive fly SIT. Results We developed a set of conditional female-lethal strains of olive fly (named Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal; RIDL®), providing highly penetrant female-specific lethality, dominant fluorescent marking, and genetic sterility. We found that males of the lead strain, OX3097D-Bol, 1) are strongly sexually competitive with wild olive flies, 2) display synchronous mating activity with wild females, and 3) induce appropriate refractoriness to wild female re-mating. Furthermore, we showed, through a large proof-of-principle experiment, that weekly releases of OX3097D-Bol males into stable populations of caged wild-type olive fly could cause rapid population collapse and eventual eradication. Conclusions The observed mating characteristics strongly suggest that an approach based on the release of OX3097D-Bol males will overcome the key difficulties encountered in previous olive fly SIT attempts. Although field confirmation is required, the proof-of-principle suppression and elimination of caged wild-type olive fly populations through OX3097D-Bol male releases provides

  17. Genetic deletion or TWEAK blocking antibody administration reduce atherosclerosis and enhance plaque stability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Cristina; Fernández-Laso, Valvanera; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Muñoz-García, Begoña; Moreno, Juan A; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Burkly, Linda C; Egido, Jesús; Martín-Ventura, Jose L; Blanco-Colio, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical complications associated with atherosclerotic plaques arise from luminal obstruction due to plaque growth or destabilization leading to rupture. Tumour necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 12 (TNFSF12) also known as TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a proinflammatory cytokine that participates in atherosclerotic plaque development, but its role in plaque stability remains unclear. Using two different approaches, genetic deletion of TNFSF12 and treatment with a TWEAK blocking mAb in atherosclerosis-prone mice, we have analysed the effect of TWEAK inhibition on atherosclerotic plaques progression and stability. Mice lacking both TNFSF12 and Apolipoprotein E (TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/−) exhibited a diminished atherosclerotic burden and lesion size in their aorta. Advanced atherosclerotic plaques of TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/− or anti-TWEAK treated mice exhibited an increase collagen/lipid and vascular smooth muscle cell/macrophage ratios compared with TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− control mice, reflecting a more stable plaque phenotype. These changes are related with two different mechanisms, reduction of the inflammatory response (chemokines expression and secretion and nuclear factor kappa B activation) and decrease of metalloproteinase activity in atherosclerotic plaques of TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/−. A similar phenotype was observed with anti-TWEAK mAb treatment in TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− mice. Brachiocephalic arteries were also examined since they exhibit additional features akin to human atherosclerotic plaques associated with instability and rupture. Features of greater plaque stability including augmented collagen/lipid ratio, reduced macrophage content, and less presence of lateral xanthomas, buried caps, medial erosion, intraplaque haemorrhage and calcium content were present in TNFSF12−/−ApoE−/− or anti-TWEAK treatment in TNFSF12+/+ApoE−/− mice. Overall, our data indicate that anti-TWEAK treatment has the capacity to diminish

  18. Massive sorghum collection genotyped with SSR markers to enhance use of global genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Billot, Claire; Ramu, Punna; Bouchet, Sophie; Chantereau, Jacques; Deu, Monique; Gardes, Laetitia; Noyer, Jean-Louis; Rami, Jean-François; Rivallan, Ronan; Li, Yu; Lu, Ping; Wang, Tianyu; Folkertsma, Rolf T; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe; Hash, C Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Large ex situ collections require approaches for sampling manageable amounts of germplasm for in-depth characterization and use. We present here a large diversity survey in sorghum with 3367 accessions and 41 reference nuclear SSR markers. Of 19 alleles on average per locus, the largest numbers of alleles were concentrated in central and eastern Africa. Cultivated sorghum appeared structured according to geographic regions and race within region. A total of 13 groups of variable size were distinguished. The peripheral groups in western Africa, southern Africa and eastern Asia were the most homogeneous and clearly differentiated. Except for Kafir, there was little correspondence between races and marker-based groups. Bicolor, Caudatum, Durra and Guinea types were each dispersed in three groups or more. Races should therefore better be referred to as morphotypes. Wild and weedy accessions were very diverse and scattered among cultivated samples, reinforcing the idea that large gene-flow exists between the different compartments. Our study provides an entry to global sorghum germplasm collections. Our reference marker kit can serve to aggregate additional studies and enhance international collaboration. We propose a core reference set in order to facilitate integrated phenotyping experiments towards refined functional understanding of sorghum diversity.

  19. Genetically enhanced asynapsis of autosomal chromatin promotes transcriptional dysregulation and meiotic failure.

    PubMed

    Homolka, David; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2012-02-01

    During meiosis, pairing of homologous chromosomes and their synapsis are essential prerequisites for normal male gametogenesis. Even limited autosomal asynapsis often leads to spermatogenic impairment, the mechanism of which is not fully understood. The present study was aimed at deliberately increasing the size of partial autosomal asynapsis and analysis of its impact on male meiosis. For this purpose, we studied the effect of t(12) haplotype encompassing four inversions on chromosome 17 on mouse autosomal translocation T(16;17)43H (abbreviated T43H). The T43H/T43H homozygotes were fully fertile in both sexes, while +/T43H heterozygous males, but not females, were sterile with meiotic arrest at late pachynema. Inclusion of the t(12) haplotype in trans to the T43H translocation resulted in enhanced asynapsis of the translocated autosome, ectopic phosphorylation of histone H2AX, persistence of RAD51 foci, and increased gene silencing around the translocation break. Increase was also on colocalization of unsynapsed chromatin with sex body. Remarkably, we found that transcriptional silencing of the unsynapsed autosomal chromatin precedes silencing of sex chromosomes. Based on the present knowledge, we conclude that interference of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed autosomes with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation is the most likely cause of asynapsis-related male sterility.

  20. Massive Sorghum Collection Genotyped with SSR Markers to Enhance Use of Global Genetic Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Chantereau, Jacques; Deu, Monique; Gardes, Laetitia; Noyer, Jean-Louis; Rami, Jean-François; Rivallan, Ronan; Li, Yu; Lu, Ping; Wang, Tianyu; Folkertsma, Rolf T.; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe; Hash, C. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Large ex situ collections require approaches for sampling manageable amounts of germplasm for in-depth characterization and use. We present here a large diversity survey in sorghum with 3367 accessions and 41 reference nuclear SSR markers. Of 19 alleles on average per locus, the largest numbers of alleles were concentrated in central and eastern Africa. Cultivated sorghum appeared structured according to geographic regions and race within region. A total of 13 groups of variable size were distinguished. The peripheral groups in western Africa, southern Africa and eastern Asia were the most homogeneous and clearly differentiated. Except for Kafir, there was little correspondence between races and marker-based groups. Bicolor, Caudatum, Durra and Guinea types were each dispersed in three groups or more. Races should therefore better be referred to as morphotypes. Wild and weedy accessions were very diverse and scattered among cultivated samples, reinforcing the idea that large gene-flow exists between the different compartments. Our study provides an entry to global sorghum germplasm collections. Our reference marker kit can serve to aggregate additional studies and enhance international collaboration. We propose a core reference set in order to facilitate integrated phenotyping experiments towards refined functional understanding of sorghum diversity. PMID:23565161

  1. Genetic improvement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains for enhancing cell viability after desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Gema; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romano, Patrizia; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo; Capece, Angela

    2013-08-01

    In the last few decades spontaneous grape must fermentations have been replaced by inoculated fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as active dry yeast (ADY). Among the essential genes previously characterized to overcome the cell-drying/rehydration process, six belong to the group of very hydrophilic proteins known as hydrophilins. Among them, only SIP18 has shown early transcriptional response during dehydration stress. In fact, the overexpression in S. cerevisiae of gene SIP18 increases cell viability after the dehydration process. The purpose of this study was to characterize dehydration stress tolerance of three wild and one commercial S. cerevisiae strains of wine origin. The four strains were submitted to transformation by insertion of the gene SIP18. Selected transformants were submitted to the cell-drying-rehydration process and yeast viability was evaluated by both viable cell count and flow cytometry. The antioxidant capacity of SIP18p was illustrated by ROS accumulation reduction after H2 O2 attack. Growth data as cellular duplication times and lag times were calculated to estimate cell vitality after the cell rehydration process. The overexpressing SIP18 strains showed significantly longer time of lag phase despite less time needed to stop the leakage of intracellular compounds during the rehydration process. Subsequently, the transformants were tested in inoculated grape must fermentation at laboratory scale in comparison to untransformed strains. Chemical analyses of the resultant wines indicated that no significant change for the content of secondary compounds was detected. The obtained data showed that the transformation enhances the viability of ADY without affecting fermentation efficiency and metabolic behaviour.

  2. Genetics- and genomics-based interventions for nutritional enhancement of grain legume crops: status and outlook.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Abhishek; Sahrawat, Kanwar L; Kumar, Shiv; Joshi, Rohit; Parihar, Ashok K; Singh, Ummed; Singh, Deepak; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-05-01

    Meeting the food demands and ensuring nutritional security of the ever increasing global population in the face of degrading natural resource base and impending climate change is the biggest challenge of the twenty first century. The consequences of mineral/micronutrient deficiencies or the hidden hunger in the developing world are indeed alarming and need urgent attention. In addressing the problems associated with mineral/micronutrient deficiency, grain legumes as an integral component of the farming systems in the developing world have to play a crucial role. For resource-poor populations, a strategy based on selecting and/or developing grain legume cultivars with grains denser in micronutrients, by biofortification, seems the most appropriate and attractive approach to address the problem. This is evident from the on-going global research efforts on biofortification to provide nutrient-dense grains for use by the poorest of the poor in the developing countries. Towards this end, rapidly growing genomics technologies hold promise to hasten the progress of breeding nutritious legume crops. In conjunction with the myriad of expansions in genomics, advances in other 'omics' technologies particularly plant ionomics or ionome profiling open up novel opportunities to comprehensively examine the elemental composition and mineral networks of an organism in a rapid and cost-effective manner. These emerging technologies would effectively guide the scientific community to enrich the edible parts of grain legumes with bio-available minerals and enhancers/promoters. We believe that the application of these new-generation tools in turn would provide crop-based solutions to hidden hunger worldwide for achieving global nutritional security.

  3. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  4. Myxoma Virus Oncolytic Efficiency Can Be Enhanced Through Chemical or Genetic Disruption of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Chad R.; Favis, Nicole A.; Agopsowicz, Kate C.; Hitt, Mary M.; Evans, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L+) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies. PMID:24391902

  5. Phenotypic and Marker-Assisted Genetic Enhancement of Parental Lines of Rajalaxmi, an Elite Rice Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Dash, Amit K; Rao, Ravi N; Rao, G J N; Verma, Ram L; Katara, Jawahar L; Mukherjee, Arup K; Singh, Onkar N; Bagchi, Torit B

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic male sterile line system comprising CRMS 32A and its maintainer line CRMS 32B is a popular choice for the development of new hybrids in India as CRMS 32A, having Kalinga 1 cytoplasm (other than WA), is a viable alternative to WA cytoplasm. However, both lines are susceptible to bacterial blight (BB), a major disease on rice. As enhancement of host plant resistance is the most effective and economical strategy to control this disease, four resistance genes (Xa4, xa5, xa13, and Xa21) were transferred from a BB pyramid line of IR64, into the A and B lines using a marker-assisted backcrossing (MAB) breeding strategy. During the transfer of genes into CRMS 32B, foreground selection was applied using markers associated with the genes, and plants having resistance alleles of the donor, are selected. Selection for morphological and quality traits was practiced to select plants similar to the recurrent parent. The four gene and three gene pyramid lines exhibited high levels of resistance against the BB pathogen when challenged with eight virulent isolates. Using genome wide based SSR markers for background selection, pyramids having >95% of the recurrent parent genome were identified. With CRMS 32B gene pyramid as donor, the four resistance genes were transferred into the A line through repeated backcrosses and the A line pyramids also exhibited high level of resistance against BB. Through a combination of selection at phenotypic and molecular levels, four BB resistance genes were successfully introduced into two parental lines (CRMS 32 B and A) of Rajalaxmi, an elite popular hybrid. The pyramided B lines did exhibit high levels of resistance against BB. Selection for morphological and quality traits and background selection hastened the recovery of the recurrent parent genome in the recombinants. Through repeated backcrosses, all the four resistance genes were transferred to CRMS 32A and test crosses suggest that the maintenance ability of the improved CRMS

  6. Genetic dissection of neural circuits by Tol2 transposon-mediated Gal4 gene and enhancer trapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Kazuhide; Suster, Maximiliano L; Mizusawa, Kanta; Nagayoshi, Saori; Kotani, Tomoya; Urasaki, Akihiro; Kishimoto, Yasuyuki; Hibi, Masahiko; Kawakami, Koichi

    2008-01-29

    Targeted gene expression is a powerful approach to study the function of genes and cells in vivo. In Drosophila, the P element-mediated Gal4-UAS method has been successfully used for this purpose. However, similar methods have not been established in vertebrates. Here we report the development of a targeted gene expression methodology in zebrafish based on the Tol2 transposable element and its application to the functional study of neural circuits. First, we developed gene trap and enhancer trap constructs carrying an engineered yeast Gal4 transcription activator (Gal4FF) and transgenic reporter fish carrying the GFP or the RFP gene downstream of the Gal4 recognition sequence (UAS) and showed that the Gal4FF can activate transcription through UAS in zebrafish. Second, by using this Gal4FF-UAS system, we performed large-scale screens and generated a large collection of fish lines that expressed Gal4FF in specific tissues, cells, and organs. Finally, we developed transgenic effector fish carrying the tetanus toxin light chain (TeTxLC) gene downstream of UAS, which is known to block synaptic transmission. We crossed the Gal4FF fish with the UAS:TeTxLC fish and analyzed double transgenic embryos for defects in touch response. From this analysis, we discovered that targeted expression of TeTxLC in distinct populations of neurons in the brain and the spinal cord caused distinct abnormalities in the touch response behavior. These studies illustrate that our Gal4FF gene trap and enhancer trap methods should be an important resource for genetic analysis of neuronal functions and behavior in vertebrates.

  7. New functions of the Drosophila rhomboid gene during embryonic and adult development are revealed by a novel genetic method, enhancer piracy.

    PubMed

    Noll, R; Sturtevant, M A; Gollapudi, R R; Bier, E

    1994-08-01

    Localized expression of the Drosophila rhomboid (rho) gene has been proposed to hyperactivate EGF-Receptor signaling in specific cells during development of the embryo and adult. In this report we use a novel transposon based genetic method, enhancer piracy, to drive ectopic expression of a rho cDNA transgene by endogenous genomic enhancers. Many enhancer piracy transposon-rho insertions cause dominant phenotypes, over half of which cannot be duplicated by ubiquitous expression of rho. Genetic interactions between various dominant enhancer piracy alleles and mutations in the EGF-R/RAS signaling pathway indicate that many of these novel phenotypes result from ectopic activation of EGF-R signaling. Patterned mis-expression of the rho cDNA transgene correlates in several cases with localized dominant enhancer piracy phenotypes. Enhancer piracy lines reveal an unanticipated role for rho in imaginal disc formation and provide the first evidence that mis-expression of rho is sufficient for converting entire intervein sectors into veins. Enhancer piracy may prove to be a general strategy for obtaining dominant alleles of a gene of interest in diverse insects, worms, plants, and potentially in vertebrates such as mice and fish.

  8. A rapid method for detection of genetically modified organisms based on magnetic separation and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Guven, Burcu; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Tamer, Ugur; Çalık, Pınar

    2012-01-07

    In this study, a new method combining magnetic separation (MS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was developed to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). An oligonucleotide probe which is specific for 35 S DNA target was immobilized onto gold coated magnetic nanospheres to form oligonucleotide-coated nanoparticles. A self assembled monolayer was formed on gold nanorods using 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and the second probe of the 35 S DNA target was immobilized on the activated nanorod surfaces. Probes on the nanoparticles were hybridized with the target oligonucleotide. Optimization parameters for hybridization were investigated by high performance liquid chromatography. Optimum hybridization parameters were determined as: 4 μM probe concentration, 20 min immobilization time, 30 min hybridization time, 55 °C hybridization temperature, 750 mM buffer salt concentration and pH: 7.4. Quantification of the target concentration was performed via SERS spectra of DTNB on the nanorods. The correlation between the target concentration and the SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 25-100 nM. The analyses were performed with only one hybridization step in 40 min. Real sample analysis was conducted using Bt-176 maize sample. The results showed that the developed MS-SERS assay is capable of detecting GMOs in a rapid and selective manner.

  9. Enhanced drought tolerance in Arabidopsis via genetic manipulation aimed at the reduction of glucosamine-induced ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Seung Hee; Noh, Ha-na; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hojoung

    2010-11-01

    In animals, high glucose exerts some of its deleterious effects by activation of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), a branch of the glycolytic pathway that produces amino sugars (Daniels et al. in Mol Endocrinol 7:1041-1048, 1993; Du et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:12222-12226, 2000). Glucosamine (GlcN) is a naturally occurring amino sugar produced by amidation of fructose-6-phosphate. Previously, we observed that glucosamine (GlcN) inhibits hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana by a process involving the significant increase of reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the relationship between GlcN-induced ROS generation and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis by generating two types of transgenic plant. Scavenging of endogenous GlcN by ectopic expression of E. coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (NagB) was observed to confer enhanced tolerance to oxidative, drought, and cold stress. Consistent with this result, overproduction of GlcN by the ectopic expression of E. coli glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlmS) induced cell death at an early stage. Taken together, these data suggest that genetic manipulation of endogenous GlcN level can effectively lead to the generation of abiotic stress-tolerant transgenic crop plants.

  10. AAV8-Mediated In Vivo Overexpression of miR-155 Enhances the Protective Capacity of Genetically Attenuated Malarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hentzschel, Franziska; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Börner, Kathleen; Heiss, Kirsten; Knapp, Bettina; Sattler, Julia M; Kaderali, Lars; Castoldi, Mirco; Bindman, Julia G; Malato, Yann; Willenbring, Holger; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, caused by protozoan Plasmodium parasites, remains a prevalent infectious human disease due to the lack of an efficient and safe vaccine. This is directly related to the persisting gaps in our understanding of the parasite's interactions with the infected host, especially during the clinically silent yet essential liver stage of Plasmodium development. Previously, we and others showed that genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) that arrest in the liver induce sterile immunity, but only upon multiple administrations. Here, we comprehensively studied hepatic gene and miRNA expression in GAP-injected mice, and found both a broad activation of IFNγ-associated pathways and a significant increase of murine microRNA-155 (miR-155), that was especially pronounced in non-parenchymal cells including liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Remarkably, ectopic upregulation of this miRNA in the liver of mice using robust hepatotropic adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vectors enhanced GAP's protective capacity substantially. In turn, this AAV8-mediated miR-155 expression permitted a reduction of GAP injections needed to achieve complete protection against infectious parasite challenge from previously three to only one. Our study highlights a crucial role of mammalian miRNAs in Plasmodium liver infection in vivo and concurrently implies their great potential as future immune-augmenting agents in improved vaccination regimes against malaria and other diseases. PMID:25189739

  11. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nyla; Chaudhary, Zubeda; Gulfraz, Muhammad; Rashid, Hamid; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3) gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB). In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3) gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3. PMID:26361473

  12. Helicopter high gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, T. B.; Nunn, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    High gain control is explored through a design study of the CH-47B helicopter. The plans are designed to obtain the maximum bandwidth possible given the hardware constraints. Controls are designed with modal control theory to specific bandwidths and closed loop mode shapes. Comparisons are made to an earlier complementary filter approach. Bandwidth improvement by removal of limitations is explored in order to establish hardware and mechanization options. Improvements in the pitch axis control system and in the rate gyro sensor noise characteristics in all axes are discussed. The use of rotor state feedback is assessed.

  13. Gaining a Professional Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonen, Ruth; Griffith, Phyllis

    1998-01-01

    The American School Food Service Association has two recognition programs: the recently revised School Foodservice and Nutrition Certification Program and the new School Foodservice and Nutrition Specialist Credentialing Program. The credentialing program was created to enhance school food-service professionals' image and improve their management…

  14. FEL gain optimisation and spontaneous radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, L.M.; Srivastava, A.; Pandya, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    Colson have evaluated FEL gains for small deviations from perfect electron beam injection, with radiation of the same polarisation as that of the wiggler fields. We find that for optimum gain the polarisation of the optical field should be the same as that of the spontaneous emission under these conditions. With a helical wiggler the axial oscillations resulting from small departures from perfect electron beam injection lead to injection dependent unequal amplitudes and phases of the spontaneous radiation in the two transverse directions. Viewed along the axis therefore the spontaneous emission is elliptically polarised. The azimuth of the ellipse varies with the difference of phase of the two transverse components of spontaneous emission but the eccentricity remains the same. With planar wigglers the spontaneous emission viewed in the axial direction is linearly polarised, again with an injection dependent azimuth. For optimum coherent gain of a radiation field its polarisation characteristics must be the same as those of the spontaneous radiation with both types of wiggler. Thus, with a helical wiggler and the data reported earlier, an increase of 10% in the FEL gain at the fundamental frequency and of 11% at the fifth harmonic has been calculated in the small gain per pass limit. Larger enhancements in gain may result from more favourable values of input parameters.

  15. Bipolar Medications and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Bipolar medications and weight gain Do all bipolar medications cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M. ... disorder can be treated with a number of medications. Some of these medications can increase your appetite ...

  16. Acting to gain information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenchein, Stanley J.; Burns, J. Brian; Chapman, David; Kaelbling, Leslie P.; Kahn, Philip; Nishihara, H. Keith; Turk, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This report is concerned with agents that act to gain information. In previous work, we developed agent models combining qualitative modeling with real-time control. That work, however, focused primarily on actions that affect physical states of the environment. The current study extends that work by explicitly considering problems of active information-gathering and by exploring specialized aspects of information-gathering in computational perception, learning, and language. In our theoretical investigations, we analyzed agents into their perceptual and action components and identified these with elements of a state-machine model of control. The mathematical properties of each was developed in isolation and interactions were then studied. We considered the complexity dimension and the uncertainty dimension and related these to intelligent-agent design issues. We also explored active information gathering in visual processing. Working within the active vision paradigm, we developed a concept of 'minimal meaningful measurements' suitable for demand-driven vision. We then developed and tested an architecture for ongoing recognition and interpretation of visual information. In the area of information gathering through learning, we explored techniques for coping with combinatorial complexity. We also explored information gathering through explicit linguistic action by considering the nature of conversational rules, coordination, and situated communication behavior.

  17. Leading Gainful Employment Metric Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristina; MacPherson, Derek

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will address the importance of intercampus involvement in reporting of gainful employment student-level data that will be used in the calculation of gainful employment metrics by the U.S. Department of Education. The authors will discuss why building relationships within the institution is critical for effective gainful employment…

  18. CONDITIONS FOR CSR MICROBUNCHING GAIN SUPPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Cheng Ying; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; di Mitri, Simone

    2016-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport arcs, may result in phase space degradation. On one hand, the CSR can perturb electron transverse motion in dispersive regions along the beamline, causing emittance growth. On the other hand, the CSR effect on the longitudinal beam dynamics could result in microbunching gain enhancement. For transport arcs, several schemes have been proposed* to suppress the CSR-induced emittance growth. Similarly, several scenarios have been introduced** to suppress CSR-induced microbunching gain, which however mostly aim for linac-based machines. In this paper we try to provide sufficient conditions for suppression of CSR-induced microbunching gain along a transport arc, analogous to*. Several example lattices are presented, with the relevant microbunching analyses carried out by our semi-analytical Vlasov solver***. The simulation results show that lattices satisfying the proposed conditions indeed have microbunching gain suppressed. We expect this analysis can shed light on lattice design approach that could suppress the CSR-induced microbunching gain.

  19. Simultaneous expression of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and hepatitis B surface antigen/somatostatin (HBsAg/SS) fusion genes in a construct in the skeletal muscle enhances rabbit weight gain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-wei; Liu, Song-cai; Hao, Lin-lin; Zhang, Yong-liang; Zhang, Qianqian; Ren, Xiao-hui; Jiang, Qing-yan

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin (SS) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) are synthesized and secreted by the hypothalamus, which can control the synthesis and secretion of the growth hormone (GH) from the hypophysis as well as regulate the GH concentrations in animals and humans. In this article, we describe the regulation of animal growth using plasmid DNA encoding both the GHRH gene and the SS gene fused with the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) gene. We constructed a series of expression plasmids to express the GHRH and HBsAg-SS fusion genes individually as well as collectively. The fusion gene and GHRH were successfully expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, as proven by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting tests. Poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) plasmid-encapsulating microspheres were prepared and injected intramuscularly into the leg skeletal muscles of rabbits. Weight gain/day and the levels of insulinlike growth factor-I (IGF-I), SS, and hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) were monitored. During days 30 postinjection, increase in weight gain/day and IGF- I concentration and decrease in SS were observed in treatment groups. From days 15 to 30 postinjection, the weight gain/day significantly increased (P < 0.05) by 129.13%, 106.8%, and 72.82% relative to the control group in the co-expression GHRH and fusion gene (named P-G-HS), fusion gene (named P-HS), and GHRH (named P-G) groups, respectively. And most importantly, the P-G-HS group showed significant weight gain/day (P < 0.05) relative to the P-G and P-HS groups. A significant increase in the IGF-I concentration and decrease in the SS level relative to the control group were also observed. The results indicated that the combination of plasmid-mediated GHRH supplementation and positive immunization against SS led to more robust weight gain/day in rabbits.

  20. Genetic modification of adeno-associated viral vector type 2 capsid enhances gene transfer efficiency in polarized human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    White, April F; Mazur, Marina; Sorscher, Eric J; Zinn, Kurt R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2008-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disease characterized by defects in the expression of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Gene therapy offers better hope for the treatment of CF. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are capable of stable expression with low immunogenicity. Despite their potential in CF gene therapy, gene transfer efficiency by AAV is limited because of pathophysiological barriers in these patients. Although a few AAV serotypes have shown better transduction compared with the AAV2-based vectors, gene transfer efficiency in human airway epithelium has still not reached therapeutic levels. To engineer better AAV vectors for enhanced gene delivery in human airway epithelium, we developed and characterized mutant AAV vectors by genetic capsid modification, modeling the well-characterized AAV2 serotype. We genetically incorporated putative high-affinity peptide ligands to human airway epithelium on the GH loop region of AAV2 capsid protein. Six independent mutant AAV were constructed, containing peptide ligands previously reported to bind with high affinity for known and unknown receptors on human airway epithelial cells. The vectors were tested on nonairway cells and nonpolarized and polarized human airway epithelial cells for enhanced infectivity. One of the mutant vectors, with the peptide sequence THALWHT, not only showed the highest transduction in undifferentiated human airway epithelial cells but also indicated significant transduction in polarized cells. Interestingly, this modified vector was also able to infect cells independently of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor. Incorporation of this ligand on other AAV serotypes, which have shown improved gene transfer efficiency in the human airway epithelium, may enhance the application of AAV vectors in CF gene therapy.

  1. Monitoring substrate and products in a bioprocess with FTIR spectroscopy coupled to artificial neural networks enhanced with a genetic-algorithm-based method for wavelength selection.

    PubMed

    Franco, Vanina G; Perín, Juan C; Mantovani, Víctor E; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2006-01-15

    An experiment was developed as a simple alternative to existing analytical methods for the simultaneous quantitation of glucose (substrate) and glucuronic acid (main product) in the bioprocesses Kombucha by using FTIR spectroscopy coupled to multivariate calibration (partial least-squares, PLS-1 and artificial neural networks, ANNs). Wavelength selection through a novel ranked regions genetic algorithm (RRGA) was used to enhance the predictive ability of the chemometric models. Acceptable results were obtained by using the ANNs models considering the complexity of the sample and the speediness and simplicity of the method. The accuracy on the glucuronic acid determination was calculated by analysing spiked real fermentation samples (recoveries ca. 115%).

  2. A Model Inquiry-Based Genetics Experiment for Introductory Biology Students: Screening for Enhancers & Suppressors of Ptpmeg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setty, Sumana; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.

    2015-01-01

    It has been noted that undergraduate project-based laboratories lead to increased interest in scientific research and student understanding of biological concepts. We created a novel, inquiry-based, multiweek genetics research project studying Ptpmeg, for the Introductory Biology Laboratory course at Brandeis University. Ptpmeg is a protein…

  3. Theory of noise in high-gain surface plasmon-polariton amplifiers incorporating dipolar gain media.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Israel; Berini, Pierre

    2011-10-10

    A theoretical analysis of noise in high-gain surface plasmon-polariton amplifiers incorporating dipolar gain media is presented. An expression for the noise figure is obtained in terms of the spontaneous emission rate into the amplified surface plasmon-polariton taking into account the different energy decay channels experienced by dipoles in close proximity to the metallic surface. Two amplifier structures are examined: a single-interface between a metal and a gain medium and a thin metal film bounded by identical gain media on both sides. A realistic configuration is considered where the surface plasmon-polariton undergoing amplification has a Gaussian field profile in the plane of the metal and paraxial propagation along the amplifier's length. The noise figure of these plasmonic amplifiers is studied considering three prototypical gain media with different permittivities. It is shown that the noise figure exhibits a strong dependance on the real part of the permittivities of the metal and gain medium, and that its minimum value is 4/π(∼3.53 dB). The origin of this minimum value is discussed. It is also shown that amplifier configurations supporting strongly confined surface plasmon-polaritons suffer from a large noise figure, which follows from an enhanced spontaneous emission rate due to the Purcell effect.

  4. Post-Zygotic and Inter-Individual Structural Genetic Variation in a Presumptive Enhancer Element of the Locus between the IL10Rβ and IFNAR1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Kancherla Reddy; Przerada, Szymon; Paprocka, Hanna; Zywicka, Anna; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Srutek, Ewa; Jankowski, Michal; Zegarski, Wojciech; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Although historically considered as junk-DNA, tandemly repeated sequence motifs can affect human phenotype. For example, variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) with embedded enhancers have been shown to regulate gene transcription. The post-zygotic variation is the presence of genetically distinct populations of cells in an individual derived from a single zygote, and this is an understudied aspect of genome biology. We report somatically variable VNTR with sequence properties of an enhancer, located upstream of IFNAR1. Initially, SNP genotyping of 63 monozygotic twin pairs and multiple tissues from 21 breast cancer patients suggested a frequent post-zygotic mosaicism. The VNTR displayed a repeated 32 bp core motif in the center of the repeat, which was flanked by similar variable motifs. A total of 14 alleles were characterized based on combinations of segments, which showed post-zygotic and inter-individual variation, with up to 6 alleles in a single subject. Somatic variation occurred in ∼24% of cases. In this hypervariable region, we found a clustering of transcription factor binding sites with strongest sequence similarity to mouse Foxg1 transcription factor binding motif. This study describes a VNTR with sequence properties of an enhancer that displays post-zygotic and inter-individual genetic variation. This element is within a locus containing four related cytokine receptors: IFNAR2, IL10Rβ, IFNAR1 and IFNGR2, and we hypothesize that it might function in transcriptional regulation of several genes in this cluster. Our findings add another level of complexity to the variation among VNTR-based enhancers. Further work may unveil the normal function of this VNTR in transcriptional control and its possible involvement in diseases connected with these receptors, such as autoimmune conditions and cancer. PMID:24023707

  5. Non-semantic contributions to "semantic" redundancy gain.

    PubMed

    Shepherdson, Peter; Miller, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Recently, two groups of researchers have reported redundancy gains (enhanced performance with multiple, redundant targets) in tasks requiring semantic categorization. Here we report two experiments aimed at determining whether the gains found by one of these groups resulted from some form of semantic coactivation. We asked undergraduate psychology students to complete choice RT tasks requiring the semantic categorization of visually presented words, and compared performance with redundant targets from the same semantic category to performance with redundant targets from different semantic categories. If the redundancy gains resulted from the combination of information at a semantic level, they should have been greater in the former than the latter situation. However, our results showed no significant differences in redundancy gain (for latency and accuracy) between same-category and different-category conditions, despite gains appearing in both conditions. Thus, we suggest that redundancy gain in the semantic categorization task may result entirely from statistical facilitation or combination of information at non-semantic levels.

  6. EnigmaVis: online interactive visualization of genome-wide association studies of the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium.

    PubMed

    Novak, Nic M; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Hibar, Derrek P; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2012-06-01

    In an attempt to increase power to detect genetic associations with brain phenotypes derived from human neuroimaging data, we recently conducted a large-scale, genome-wide association meta-analysis of hippocampal, brain, and intracranial volume through the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium. Here, we present a freely available online interactive tool, EnigmaVis, which makes it easy to visualize the association results generated by the consortium alongside allele frequency, genes, and functional annotations. EnigmaVis runs natively within the web browser, and generates plots that show the level of association between brain phenotypes at user-specified genomic positions. Uniquely, EnigmaVis is dynamic; users can interact with elements on the plot in real time. This software will be useful when exploring the effect on brain structure of particular genetic variants influencing neuropsychiatric illness and cognitive function. Future projects of the consortium and updates to EnigmaVis will also be displayed on the site. EnigmaVis is freely available online at http://enigma.loni.ucla.edu/enigma-vis/

  7. A chemical genetic screen uncovers a small molecule enhancer of the N-acylethanolamine degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Faure, Lionel; Chapman, Kent D.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2017-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a group of fatty acid amides that play signaling roles in diverse physiological processes in eukaryotes. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades NAE into ethanolamine and free fatty acid to terminate its signaling function. In animals, chemical inhibitors of FAAH have been used for therapeutic treatment of pain and as tools to probe deeper into biochemical properties of FAAH. In a chemical genetic screen for small molecules that dampened the inhibitory effect of N-lauroylethanolamine (NAE 12:0) on Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth, we identified 6-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-2,4(3 H,6 H)-dione (or MDPD). MDPD alleviated the growth inhibitory effects of NAE 12:0, in part by enhancing the enzymatic activity of Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH). In vitro, biochemical assays showed that MDPD enhanced the apparent Vmax of AtFAAH but did not alter the affinity of AtFAAH for its NAE substrates. Structural analogs of MDPD did not affect AtFAAH activity or dampen the inhibitory effect of NAE 12:0 on seedling growth indicating that MDPD is a specific synthetic chemical activator of AtFAAH. Collectively, our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an unbiased chemical genetic approach to identify new pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH- and NAE-mediated physiological processes in plants. PMID:28112243

  8. Recent and Projected Increases in Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Can Enhance Gene Flow between Wild and Genetically Altered Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Ziska, Lewis H.; Gealy, David R.; Tomecek, Martha B.; Jackson, Aaron K.; Black, Howard L.

    2012-01-01

    Although recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide can alter plant phenological development, these changes have not been quantified in terms of floral outcrossing rates or gene transfer. Could differential phenological development in response to rising CO2 between genetically modified crops and wild, weedy relatives increase the spread of novel genes, potentially altering evolutionary fitness? Here we show that increasing CO2 from an early 20th century concentration (300 µmol mol−1) to current (400 µmol mol−1) and projected, mid-21st century (600 µmol mol−1) values, enhanced the flow of genes from wild, weedy rice to the genetically altered, herbicide resistant, cultivated population, with outcrossing increasing from 0.22% to 0.71% from 300 to 600 µmol mol−1. The increase in outcrossing and gene transfer was associated with differential increases in plant height, as well as greater tiller and panicle production in the wild, relative to the cultivated population. In addition, increasing CO2 also resulted in a greater synchronicity in flowering times between the two populations. The observed changes reported here resulted in a subsequent increase in rice dedomestication and a greater number of weedy, herbicide-resistant hybrid progeny. Overall, these data suggest that differential phenological responses to rising atmospheric CO2 could result in enhanced flow of novel genes and greater success of feral plant species in agroecosystems. PMID:22649533

  9. A chemical genetic screen uncovers a small molecule enhancer of the N-acylethanolamine degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Faure, Lionel; Chapman, Kent D.; ...

    2017-01-23

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a group of fatty acid amides that play signaling roles in diverse physiological processes in eukaryotes. We used fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades NAE into ethanolamine and free fatty acid to terminate its signaling function. In animals, chemical inhibitors of FAAH for therapeutic treatment of pain and as tools to probe deeper into biochemical properties of FAAH. In a chemical genetic screen for small molecules that dampened the inhibitory effect of N-lauroylethanolamine (NAE 12:0) on Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth, we identified 6-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-2,4(3 H,6 H)-dione (or MDPD). MDPD alleviated the growth inhibitory effects of NAE 12:0, inmore » part by enhancing the enzymatic activity of Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH). In vitro, biochemical assays showed that MDPD enhanced the apparent Vmax of AtFAAH but did not alter the affinity of AtFAAH for its NAE substrates. Furthermore, structural analogs of MDPD did not affect AtFAAH activity or dampen the inhibitory effect of NAE 12:0 on seedling growth indicating that MDPD is a specific synthetic chemical activator of AtFAAH. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an unbiased chemical genetic approach to identify new pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH- and NAE-mediated physiological processes in plants.« less

  10. Application of sonication in combination with vacuum infiltration enhances the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation in Indian soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Arun, Muthukrishnan; Subramanyam, Kondeti; Mariashibu, Thankaraj Salammal; Theboral, Jeevaraj; Shivanandhan, Ganeshan; Manickavasagam, Markandan; Ganapathi, Andy

    2015-02-01

    Soybean is a recalcitrant crop to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Development of highly efficient, reproducible, and genotype-independent transformation protocol is highly desirable for soybean genetic improvement. Hence, an improved Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation protocol has been developed for cultivar PK 416 by evaluating various parameters including Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (LBA4404, EHA101, and EHA105 harboring pCAMBIA1304 plasmid), sonication duration, vacuum infiltration pressure, and vacuum duration using cotyledonary node explants of soybean prepared from 7-day-old seedlings. The transformed plants were successfully developed through direct organogenesis system. Transgene expression was assessed by GUS histochemical and gfp visual assays, and integration was analyzed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Among the different combinations and durations evaluated, a maximum transformation efficiency of 18.6 % was achieved when the cotyledonary node explants of cv. PK 416 were sonicated for 20 s and vacuum infiltered for 2 min at 250 mmHg in A. tumefaciens EHA105 suspension. The amenability of the standardized protocol was tested on four more soybean cultivars JS 90-41, Hara Soy, Co 1, and Co 2 in which all the cultivars responded favorably with transformation efficiency ranging from 13.3 to 16.6 %. The transformation protocol developed in the present study would be useful to transform diverse soybean cultivars with desirable traits.

  11. Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L...Distribution A An antenna for mounting on a ground plane includes a dielectric substrate for mounting on the ground plane. A conductive patch...GAIN MICROSTRIP PATCH ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the

  12. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory predict gains in mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C

    2013-01-01

    Visuospatial competencies are related to performance in mathematical domains in adulthood, but are not consistently related to mathematics achievement in children. We confirmed the latter for first graders and demonstrated that children who show above average first-to-fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory have an advantage over other children in mathematics. The study involved the assessment of the mathematics and reading achievement of 177 children in kindergarten to fifth grade, inclusive, and their working memory capacity and processing speed in first and fifth grade. Intelligence was assessed in first grade and their second to fourth grade teachers reported on their in-class attentive behavior. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory span (d = 2.4) were larger than gains in the capacity of the central executive (d = 1.6) that in turn were larger than gains in phonological memory span (d = 1.1). First to fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory and in speed of numeral processing predicted end of fifth grade mathematics achievement, as did first grade central executive scores, intelligence, and in-class attentive behavior. The results suggest there are important individual differences in the rate of growth of visuospatial memory during childhood and that these differences become increasingly important for mathematics learning.

  13. Hitchhiking selection is driving intron gain in a pathogenic fungus.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Patrick C; Torriani, Stefano F F; Croll, Daniel; Stukenbrock, Eva H; McDonald, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    The variability of intron density among eukaryotes is puzzling and still debated. Most previous studies have been limited because of the near absence of intron presence-absence polymorphism (IPAP) within species or because comparisons could be made only between distantly related species. We conducted population genetic analyses on eight loci showing IPAP to investigate the effect of natural selection on intron dynamics in a global collection of the panmictic fungal plant pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici and its very close relatives. Five of these loci likely represent recent intron gains because their absence is fixed among the closest relatives of Z. tritici, and three likely represent recent intron losses because their presence is fixed among the close relatives. We analyzed signatures of selection by comparing allele frequencies, nucleotide diversities, and rates of recombination and found compelling evidence that at least two out of the five intron-gain loci, a SWIM zinc-finger gene and a sugar transporter, are under directional selection favoring alleles that gained the intron. Our results suggest that the intron-present alleles of these loci are sweeping to fixation, providing a genetic hitchhiking mechanism to explain rapid intron gain in Z. tritici. The overall findings are consistent with the hypothesis that intron gains are more likely to be driven by selection while intron losses are more likely to be due to neutral processes such as genetic drift.

  14. The Potential for Enhancing the Power of Genetic Association Studies in African Americans through the Reuse of Existing Genotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; John, Esther M.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Stram, Daniel O.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the feasibility of reusing existing control data obtained in genetic association studies in order to reduce costs for new studies. We discuss controlling for the population differences between cases and controls that are implicit in studies utilizing external control data. We give theoretical calculations of the statistical power of a test due to Bourgain et al (Am J Human Genet 2003), applied to the problem of dealing with case-control differences in genetic ancestry related to population isolation or population admixture. Theoretical results show that there may exist bounds for the non-centrality parameter for a test of association that places limits on study power even if sample sizes can grow arbitrarily large. We apply this method to data from a multi-center, geographically-diverse, genome-wide association study of breast cancer in African-American women. Our analysis of these data shows that admixture proportions differ by center with the average fraction of European admixture ranging from approximately 20% for participants from study sites in the Eastern United States to 25% for participants from West Coast sites. However, these differences in average admixture fraction between sites are largely counterbalanced by considerable diversity in individual admixture proportion within each study site. Our results suggest that statistical correction for admixture differences is feasible for future studies of African-Americans, utilizing the existing controls from the African-American Breast Cancer study, even if case ascertainment for the future studies is not balanced over the same centers or regions that supplied the controls for the current study. PMID:20824062

  15. Optimal deployment of attentional gain during fine discriminations.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Miranda; Byers, Anna; Serences, John T

    2012-05-30

    Most models assume that top-down attention enhances the gain of sensory neurons tuned to behaviorally relevant stimuli (on-target gain). However, theoretical work suggests that when targets and distracters are highly similar, attention should enhance the gain of neurons that are tuned away from the target, because these neurons better discriminate neighboring features (off-target gain). While it is established that off-target neurons support difficult fine discriminations, it is unclear if top-down attentional gain can be optimally applied to informative off-target sensory neurons or if gain is always applied to on-target neurons, regardless of task demands. To test the optimality of attentional gain in human visual cortex, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and an encoding model to estimate the response profile across a set of hypothetical orientation-selective channels during a difficult discrimination task. The results suggest that top-down attention can adaptively modulate off-target neural populations, but only when the discriminanda are precisely specified in advance. Furthermore, logistic regression revealed that activation levels in off-target orientation channels predicted behavioral accuracy on a trial-by-trial basis. Overall, these data suggest that attention does not only increase the gain of sensory-evoked responses, but may bias population response profiles in an optimal manner that respects both the tuning properties of sensory neurons and the physical characteristics of the stimulus array.

  16. Optimal deployment of attentional gain during fine discriminations

    PubMed Central

    Scolari, Miranda; Byers, Anna; Serences, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Most models assume that top-down attention enhances the gain of sensory neurons tuned to behaviorally-relevant stimuli (on-target gain). However, theoretical work suggests that when targets and distracters are highly similar, attention should enhance the gain of neurons that are tuned away from the target, because these neurons better discriminate neighboring features (off-target gain). While it is established that off-target neurons support difficult fine discriminations, it is unclear if top-down attentional gain can be optimally applied to informative off-target sensory neurons or if gain is always applied to on-target neurons, irrespective of task demands. To test the optimality of attentional gain in human visual cortex, we used fMRI and an encoding model to estimate the response profile across a set of hypothetical orientation-selective channels during a difficult discrimination task. The results suggest that top-down attention can adaptively modulate off-target neural populations, but only when the discriminanda are precisely specified in advance. Furthermore, logistic regression revealed that activation levels in off-target orientation channels predicted behavioral accuracy on a trial-by-trial basis. Overall, these data suggest that attention does not always increase the gain of sensory-evoked responses, but instead may bias population response profiles in an optimal manner that respects both the tuning properties of sensory neurons and the physical characteristics of the stimulus array. PMID:22649250

  17. Requiem for nutrition as the cause of IQ gains: Raven's gains in Britain 1938-2008.

    PubMed

    Flynn, James R

    2009-03-01

    The hypothesis that enhanced nutrition is mainly responsible for massive IQ gains over time borrows plausibility from the height gains of the 20th century. However, evidence shows that the two trends are largely independent. A detailed analysis of IQ trends on the Raven's Progressive Matrices tests in Britain dramatizes the poverty of the nutrition hypothesis. A multiple factor hypothesis that operates on three levels is offered as an alternative instrument of causal explanation. The Raven's data show that over the 65 years from circa 1942 to the present, taking ages 5-15 together, British school children have gained 14 IQ points for a rate of 0.216 points per year. However, since 1979, gains have declined with age and between the ages of 12-13 and 14-15, small gains turn into small losses. This is confirmed by Piagetian data and poses the possibility that the cognitive demands of teen-age subculture have been stagnant over perhaps the last 30 years.

  18. Genetic Enhancement as Care or as Domination? The Ethics of Asymmetrical Relationships in the Upbringing of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junker-Kenny, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Should a society oriented towards justice provide parents with the possibility of enhancing their children's genes? The opposing arguments of authors in the Rawls School and of the theorist of communicative action, Jurgen Habermas, are analysed in terms of their key concepts. Their positions are then assessed from the point of view of the…

  19. The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project: A Public-Private Partnership (PPP) to increase genetic diversity in US maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project is a mission-oriented, cooperative research effort of the United States Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), land grant universities, private industry, and international agricultural research centers to broaden the ger...

  20. Information Gain Based Dimensionality Selection for Classifying Text Documents

    SciTech Connect

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

    2013-06-01

    Selecting the optimal dimensions for various knowledge extraction applications is an essential component of data mining. Dimensionality selection techniques are utilized in classification applications to increase the classification accuracy and reduce the computational complexity. In text classification, where the dimensionality of the dataset is extremely high, dimensionality selection is even more important. This paper presents a novel, genetic algorithm based methodology, for dimensionality selection in text mining applications that utilizes information gain. The presented methodology uses information gain of each dimension to change the mutation probability of chromosomes dynamically. Since the information gain is calculated a priori, the computational complexity is not affected. The presented method was tested on a specific text classification problem and compared with conventional genetic algorithm based dimensionality selection. The results show an improvement of 3% in the true positives and 1.6% in the true negatives over conventional dimensionality selection methods.

  1. A Web-based database of genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma enhanced with network-driven data exploration tools.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Antonopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzinasiou, Foteini; Lill, Christina M; Bourdakou, Marilena M; Sakellariou, Argiris; Kypreou, Katerina; Stefanaki, Irene; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P A; Bertram, Lars; Stratigos, Alexander J; Spyrou, George M

    2014-01-01

    The publicly available online database MelGene provides a comprehensive, regularly updated, collection of data from genetic association studies in cutaneous melanoma (CM), including random-effects meta-analysis results of all eligible polymorphisms. The updated database version includes data from 192 publications with information on 1114 significantly associated polymorphisms across 280 genes, along with new front-end and back-end capabilities. Various types of relationships between data are calculated and visualized as networks. We constructed 13 different networks containing the polymorphisms and the genes included in MelGene. We explored the derived network representations under the following questions: (i) are there nodes that deserve consideration regarding their network connectivity characteristics? (ii) What is the relation of either the genome-wide or nominally significant CM polymorphisms/genes with the ones highlighted by the network representation? We show that our network approach using the MelGene data reveals connections between statistically significant genes/ polymorphisms and other genes/polymorphisms acting as 'hubs' in the reconstructed networks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first database containing data from a comprehensive field synopsis and systematic meta-analyses of genetic polymorphisms in CM that provides user-friendly tools for in-depth molecular network visualization and exploration. The proposed network connections highlight potentially new loci requiring further investigation of their relation to melanoma risk. Database URL: http://www.melgene.org.

  2. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain with Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase Activity Shows an Enhanced Genetic Transformation Ability in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Satoko; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Sha; Takayama, Mariko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has the unique ability to mediate inter-kingdom DNA transfer, and for this reason, it has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. To increase the transformation frequency in plant genetic engineering, we focused on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a negative factor in the Agrobacterium-plant interaction. Recent studies have shown contradictory results regarding the effects of GABA on vir gene expression, leading to the speculation that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. In this study, we examined the effect of GABA on T-DNA transfer using a tomato line with a low GABA content. Compared with the control, the T-DNA transfer frequency was increased in the low-GABA tomato line, indicating that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. Therefore, we bred a new A. tumefaciens strain with GABA transaminase activity and the ability to degrade GABA. The A. tumefaciens strain exhibited increased T-DNA transfer in two tomato cultivars and Erianthus arundinacues and an increased frequency of stable transformation in tomato. PMID:28220841

  3. The potential for modification in cloning and vitrification technology to enhance genetic progress in beef cattle in Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, Andrew W; Walton, Simon; Swain, David L; Walsh, Kerry B; Vajta, Gábor

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in embryology and related research offer considerable possibilities to accelerate genetic improvement in cattle breeding. Such progress includes optimization and standardization of laboratory embryo production (in vitro fertilization - IVF), introduction of a highly efficient method for cryopreservation (vitrification), and dramatic improvement in the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning) in terms of required effort, cost, and overall outcome. Handmade cloning (HMC), a simplified version of somatic cell nuclear transfer, offers the potential for relatively easy and low-cost production of clones. A potentially modified method of vitrification used at a centrally located laboratory facility could result in cloned offspring that are economically competitive with elite animals produced by more traditional means. Apart from routine legal and intellectual property issues, the main obstacle that hampers rapid uptake of these technologies by the beef cattle industry is a lack of confidence from scientific and commercial sources. Once stakeholder support is increased, the combined application of these methods makes a rapid advance toward desirable traits (rapid growth, high-quality beef, optimized reproductive performance) a realistic goal. The potential impact of these technologies on genetic advancement in beef cattle herds in which improvement of stock is sought, such as in northern Australia, is hard to overestimate.

  4. Electrophoresis-Enhanced Detection of Deoxyribonucleic Acids on a Membrane-Based Lateral Flow Strip Using Avian Influenza H5 Genetic Sequence as the Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Chuang; Chen, Chih-Hung; Fu, Ja-Wei; Yang, Huan-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a simple strategy to detect a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on a membrane-based lateral flow (MBLF) strip without tedious gel preparation, gel electrophoresis, and EtBr-staining processes. The method also enhances the detection signal of the genetic sample. A direct electric field was applied over two ends of the MBLF strips to induce an electrophoresis of DNAs through the strips. The signal enhancement was demonstrated by the detection of the H5 subtype of avian influenza virus (H5 AIV). This approach showed an excellent selectivity of H5 AIV from other two control species, Arabidopsis thaliana and human PSMA5. It also showed an effective signal repeatability and sensitivity over a series of analyte concentrations. Its detection limit could be enhanced, from 40 ng to 0.1 ng by applying 12 V. The nano-gold particles for the color development were labeled on the capture antibody, and UV-VIS and TEM were used to check if the labeling was successful. This detection strategy could be further developed to apply on the detection of drug-allergic genes at clinics or detection of infectious substances at incident sites by a simple manipulation with an aid of a mini-PCR machine and auxiliary kits. PMID:24603637

  5. Bone's early responses to mechanical loading differ in distinct genetic strains of chick: selection for enhanced growth reduces skeletal adaptability.

    PubMed

    Pitsillides, A A; Rawlinson, S C; Mosley, J R; Lanyon, L E

    1999-06-01

    Bone's functional competence is established and maintained, at least partly, by mechanisms involving appropriate adaptation to mechanical loading. These appear to fail in chickens selectively bred either for maximum egg (Egg-type) or meat (Meat-type) production, which show high rates of fracture and skeletal abnormality, respectively. By measuring several early strain-induced responses in cultured embryonic tibiotarsi from commercially bred (Egg-type and Meat-type) and wild-type (Wild-type) chicks, we have investigated the possibility that these skeletal failures are the product of a compromised ability to respond appropriately to loading-induced mechanical strain. Axial loads engendering peak dynamic (1 Hz) longitudinal strains of between -1300 microepsilon and -1500 microepsilon (for 10 minutes) in vitro in tibiotarsi from the three types of 18-day-old chicks increased periosteal osteoblast glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in both Wild-type (26%, p < 0.01) and Egg-type (49%, p < 0.001) chicks in situ, while Meat-type chicks did not show any significant changes (11%). Load-induced increases in medium nitrite accumulation (stable nitric oxide [NO] metabolite) were produced in Egg-type and Wild-type tibiotarsi (82 +/- 12%, p < 0.01; 39 +/- 8%, p < 0.01), respectively. In contrast, loading produced no change in NO release from Meat-type chick tibiotarsi. These changes in NO release correlated with load-related increases in G6PD activity (R2 = 0.98, p < 0.05) in the different chick types. Wild-type and Meat-type tibiotarsal periosteal osteoblasts responded in a biphasic manner to exogenous prostacyclin (PGI2), with maximal stimulation of G6PD activity at 10(-7) M and 10(-6) M PGI2. However, Egg-type chick osteoblasts showed smaller, progressive increases up to 10(-5) M PGI2. These results indicate that early phases of the adaptive response to loading differ in different genetic strains of embryonic chick; that skeletal abnormalities which develop in

  6. Loss/gain-induced ultrathin antireflection coatings.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Lai, Yun

    2016-06-28

    Tradional antireflection coatings composed of dielectric layers usually require the thickness to be larger than quarter wavelength. Here, we demonstrate that materials with permittivity or permeability dominated by imaginary parts, i.e. lossy or gain media, can realize non-resonant antireflection coatings in deep sub-wavelength scale. Interestingly, while the reflected waves are eliminated as in traditional dielectric antireflection coatings, the transmitted waves can be enhanced or reduced, depending on whether gain or lossy media are applied, respectively. We provide a unified theory for the design of such ultrathin antireflection coatings, showing that under different polarizations and incident angles, different types of ultrathin coatings should be applied. Especially, under transverse magnetic polarization, the requirement shows a switch between gain and lossy media at Brewster angle. As a proof of principle, by using conductive films as a special type of lossy antireflection coatings, we experimentally demonstrate the suppression of Fabry-Pérot resonances in a broad frequency range for microwaves. This valuable functionality can be applied to remove undesired resonant effects, such as the frequency-dependent side lobes induced by resonances in dielectric coverings of antennas. Our work provides a guide for the design of ultrathin antireflection coatings as well as their applications in broadband reflectionless devices.

  7. Loss/gain-induced ultrathin antireflection coatings

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Lai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Tradional antireflection coatings composed of dielectric layers usually require the thickness to be larger than quarter wavelength. Here, we demonstrate that materials with permittivity or permeability dominated by imaginary parts, i.e. lossy or gain media, can realize non-resonant antireflection coatings in deep sub-wavelength scale. Interestingly, while the reflected waves are eliminated as in traditional dielectric antireflection coatings, the transmitted waves can be enhanced or reduced, depending on whether gain or lossy media are applied, respectively. We provide a unified theory for the design of such ultrathin antireflection coatings, showing that under different polarizations and incident angles, different types of ultrathin coatings should be applied. Especially, under transverse magnetic polarization, the requirement shows a switch between gain and lossy media at Brewster angle. As a proof of principle, by using conductive films as a special type of lossy antireflection coatings, we experimentally demonstrate the suppression of Fabry-Pérot resonances in a broad frequency range for microwaves. This valuable functionality can be applied to remove undesired resonant effects, such as the frequency-dependent side lobes induced by resonances in dielectric coverings of antennas. Our work provides a guide for the design of ultrathin antireflection coatings as well as their applications in broadband reflectionless devices. PMID:27349750

  8. High current gain transistor laser

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Song; Qiao, Lijun; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A transistor laser (TL), having the structure of a transistor with multi-quantum wells near its base region, bridges the functionality gap between lasers and transistors. However, light emission is produced at the expense of current gain for all the TLs reported up to now, leading to a very low current gain. We propose a novel design of TLs, which have an n-doped InP layer inserted in the emitter ridge. Numerical studies show that a current flow aperture for only holes can be formed in the center of the emitter ridge. As a result, the common emitter current gain can be as large as 143.3, which is over 15 times larger than that of a TL without the aperture. Besides, the effects of nonradiative recombination defects can be reduced greatly because the flow of holes is confined in the center region of the emitter ridge. PMID:27282466

  9. Genetic enhancement of visual learning by activation of protein kinase C pathways in small groups of rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Rong; Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Lu, Xiu-Gui; Lee, Brian; Liu, Meng; Sun, Mei; Franklin, Corinna; Cook, Robert G; Geller, Alfred I

    2005-09-14

    Although learning and memory theories hypothesize that memories are encoded by specific circuits, it has proven difficult to localize learning within a cortical area. Neural network theories predict that activation of a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit can activate that circuit. Consequently, altering the physiology of a small group of neurons might potentiate a specific circuit and enhance learning, thereby localizing learning to that circuit. In this study, we activated protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in small groups of neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. We microinjected helper virus-free herpes simplex virus vectors that expressed a constitutively active PKC into POR cortex. This PKC was expressed predominantly in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex. This intervention increased phosphorylation of five PKC substrates that play critical roles in neurotransmitter release (GAP-43 and dynamin) or glutamatergic neurotransmission (specific subunits of AMPA or NMDA receptors and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate). Additionally, activation of PKC pathways in cultured cortical neurons supported activation-dependent increases in release of glutamate and GABA. This intervention enhanced the learning rate and accuracy of visual object discriminations. In individual rats, the numbers of transfected neurons positively correlated with this learning. During learning, neuronal activity was increased in neurons proximal to the transfected neurons. These results demonstrate that potentiating small groups of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex enhances visual object learning. More generally, these results suggest that learning can be mediated by specific cortical circuits.

  10. Plasmid-amplified comS enhances genetic competence and suppresses sinR in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Nakano, M M; Lee, O H; Zuber, P

    1996-09-01

    The establishment of genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by a vast signal transduction network involving the products of genes that function in several postexponential-phase processes. Two of these proteins, SinR and DegU, serve as molecular switches that influence a cell's decision to undergo either sporulation or genetic competence development. In order to determine the roles of SinR and DegU in competence control, multicopy suppression experiments with plasmid-amplified comS, SinR, and degU genes were undertaken. Multicopy comS was found to elevate competence gene transcription and transformation efficiency in both wild-type and sinR mutant cells but not in degU mutant cells. Multicopy degU failed to suppress comS or sinR mutations. No suppression of comS or degU by multicopy sinR was observed. The expression of a comS'::'lacZ translational fusion and srf-lacZ operon fusion was examined in sinR cells and cells bearing plasmid-amplified sinR. The expression of comS'::'lacZ gene fusion was reduced by the sinR mutation, but both comS'::'lacZ and srf-lacZ were repressed by multicopy sinR. Cells bearing plasmid-amplified sinR were poorly competent. These results suggest that sinR is required for optimal comS expression but not transcription from the srf promoter and that SinR at high concentrations represses srf transcription initiation.

  11. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN after a spinal cord injury enhances regenerative growth of CST axons and motor function recovery in mice.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Camelia A; Steward, Oswald

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies indicate that conditional genetic deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in neonatal mice enhances the ability of axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury (SCI) in adults. Here, we assessed whether deleting PTEN in adult neurons post-SCI is also effective, and whether enhanced regenerative growth is accompanied by enhanced recovery of voluntary motor function. PTEN(loxP/loxP) mice received moderate contusion injuries at cervical level 5 (C5). One group received unilateral injections of adeno-associated virus expressing CRE (AAV-CRE) into the sensorimotor cortex; controls received a vector expressing green fluorescent protein (AAV-GFP) or injuries only (no vector injections). Forelimb function was tested for 14weeks post-SCI using a grip strength meter (GSM) and a hanging task. The corticospinal tract (CST) was traced by injecting mini-ruby BDA into the sensorimotor cortex. Forelimb gripping ability was severely impaired immediately post-SCI but recovered slowly over time. The extent of recovery was significantly greater in PTEN-deleted mice in comparison to either the AAV-GFP group or the injury only group. BDA tract tracing revealed significantly higher numbers of BDA-labeled axons in caudal segments in the PTEN-deleted group compared to control groups. In addition, in the PTEN-deleted group, there were exuberant collaterals extending from the main tract rostral to the lesion and into and around the scar tissue at the injury site. These results indicate that PTEN deletion in adult mice shortly post-SCI can enhance regenerative growth of CST axons and forelimb motor function recovery.

  12. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN after a spinal cord injury enhances regenerative growth of CST axons and motor function recovery in mice

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Camelia A.; Steward, Oswald

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that conditional genetic deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in neonatal mice enhances the ability of axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury (SCI) in adults. Here, we assessed whether deleting PTEN in adult neurons post-SCI is also effective, and whether enhanced regenerative growth is accompanied by enhanced recovery of voluntary motor function. PTENloxP/loxP mice received moderate contusion injuries at cervical level 5 (C5). One group received unilateral injections of adeno-associated virus expressing CRE (AAV-CRE) into the sensorimotor cortex; controls received a vector expressing green fluorescent protein (AAV-GFP) or injuries only (no vector injections). Forelimb function was tested for 14 weeks post-SCI using a grip strength meter (GSM) and a hanging task. The corticospinal tract (CST) was traced by injecting mini-ruby BDA into the sensorimotor cortex. Forelimb gripping ability was severely impaired immediately post-SCI but recovered slowly over time. The extent of recovery was significantly greater in PTEN-deleted mice in comparison to either the AAV-GFP group or the injury only group. BDA tract tracing revealed significantly higher numbers of BDA-labeled axons in caudal segments in the PTEN-deleted group compared to control groups. In addition, in the PTEN-deleted group, there were exuberant collaterals extending from the main tract rostral to the lesion, into and around the scar tissue at the injury site. These results indicate that PTEN deletion in adult mice shortly post-SCI can enhance regenerative growth of CST axons and forelimb motor function recovery. PMID:25704959

  13. How cancer cells hijack DNA double-strand break repair pathways to gain genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Jeggo, Penny A; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    DNA DSBs (double-strand breaks) are a significant threat to the viability of a normal cell, since they can result in loss of genetic material if mitosis or replication is attempted in their presence. Consequently, evolutionary pressure has resulted in multiple pathways and responses to enable DSBs to be repaired efficiently and faithfully. Cancer cells, which are under pressure to gain genomic instability, have a striking ability to avoid the elegant mechanisms by which normal cells maintain genomic stability. Current models suggest that, in normal cells, DSB repair occurs in a hierarchical manner that promotes rapid and efficient rejoining first, with the utilization of additional steps or pathways of diminished accuracy if rejoining is unsuccessful or delayed. In the present review, we evaluate the fidelity of DSB repair pathways and discuss how cancer cells promote the utilization of less accurate processes. Homologous recombination serves to promote accuracy and stability during replication, providing a battlefield for cancer to gain instability. Non-homologous end-joining, a major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells, usually operates with high fidelity and only switches to less faithful modes if timely repair fails. The transition step is finely tuned and provides another point of attack during tumour progression. In addition to DSB repair, a DSB signalling response activates processes such as cell cycle checkpoint arrest, which enhance the possibility of accurate DSB repair. We consider the ways by which cancers modify and hijack these processes to gain genomic instability.

  14. Triticale development in Algeria: genetic gains through decades.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Benbelkacem; Fatiha, Sadli

    2014-01-01

    Algeria started working on triticale since the late seventies, it was first as a scientific curiosity (1974-1980), the production of this crop began in the early eighties and expanded well for a decade (10.000ha) then decreased for another decade due to lack of subsidies and serious interest from decision makers putting all their effort in wheat production which is the predominant crop in the country. Since the 1990s up to date, it is developing again mainly based on feed market requirements (20.500ha in 2001) and a better consideration by stakeholders. Triticale is now developed by the informal seed system. Triticale is grown in Algeria under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions, including dryland and marginal soils. Under high input and rainfall environments, the best triticale cultivars have comparable grain yield with wheat but slightly lower to barley. This advantage is larger under dry conditions. Our study was dealing with an evaluation of the progress made in time since their introduction and selection of triticale varieties. The study was conducted on twenty five varieties and advanced lines, selected in the different phases of triticale development, during the three last seasons (2009 - 2012) in two contrasting regions (semi arid and high input environment) showed very interesting results and a linear improvement in grain yield and its components, and also in the feeding quality traits. The improvement was apparent in both sites; although result data was higher in number in the high input environment, the increase rate was larger in the semi arid area of study. In the favorable area, grain yield increased from 2.94t/ha for the varieties developed in the early phase (late 1970s), to 3.98t/ha for the varieties released in the second phase (1990s) up to 5.45t/ha for the latest varieties developed in the 2000s. Grain yield increased in the dry area from 2.42t/ha to 4.92t/ha. The trend is almost the same for all yield components and even for forage quality traits.

  15. Factors Affecting Auditory Training Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Roberta M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine which of nine variables were most related to success in auditory training, using as Ss 43 students at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Findings showed that the single largest contributing factor to postcourse gain was the entering English score. (PHR)

  16. Genetic Selection for Enhanced Folding In Vivo Targets the Cys14-Cys38 Disulfide Bond in Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Foit, Linda; Mueller-Schickert, Antje; Mamathambika, Bharath S.; Gleiter, Stefan; Klaska, Caitlyn L.; Ren, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The periplasm provides a strongly oxidizing environment; however, periplasmic expression of proteins with disulfide bonds is often inefficient. Here, we used two different tripartite fusion systems to perform in vivo selections for mutants of the model protein bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) with the aim of enhancing its expression in Escherichia coli. This trypsin inhibitor contains three disulfides that contribute to its extreme stability and protease resistance. The mutants we isolated for increased expression appear to act by eliminating or destabilizing the Cys14-Cys38 disulfide in BPTI. In doing so, they are expected to reduce or eliminate kinetic traps that exist within the well characterized in vitro folding pathway of BPTI. These results suggest that elimination or destabilization of a disulfide bond whose formation is problematic in vitro can enhance in vivo protein folding. The use of these in vivo selections may prove a valuable way to identify and eliminate disulfides and other rate-limiting steps in the folding of proteins, including those proteins whose in vitro folding pathways are unknown. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 973–984. PMID:21110786

  17. Chemical genetics screen for enhancers of rapamycin identifies a specific inhibitor of an SCF family E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Aghajan, Mariam; Jonai, Nao; Flick, Karin; Fu, Fei; Luo, Manlin; Cai, Xiaolu; Ouni, Ikram; Pierce, Nathan; Tang, Xiaobo; Lomenick, Brett; Damoiseaux, Robert; Hao, Rui; Del Moral, Pierre M; Verma, Rati; Li, Ying; Li, Cheng; Houk, Kendall N; Jung, Michael E; Zheng, Ning; Huang, Lan; Deshaies, Raymond J; Kaiser, Peter; Huang, Jing

    2010-07-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) plays a central role in eukaryotic cell growth control. With prevalent hyperactivation of the mammalian TOR (mTOR) pathway in human cancers, strategies to enhance TOR pathway inhibition are needed. We used a yeast-based screen to identify small-molecule enhancers of rapamycin (SMERs) and discovered an inhibitor (SMER3) of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF)(Met30) ubiquitin ligase, a member of the SCF E3-ligase family, which regulates diverse cellular processes including transcription, cell-cycle control and immune response. We show here that SMER3 inhibits SCF(Met30) in vivo and in vitro, but not the closely related SCF(Cdc4). Furthermore, we demonstrate that SMER3 diminishes binding of the F-box subunit Met30 to the SCF core complex in vivo and show evidence for SMER3 directly binding to Met30. Our results show that there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining specific inhibitors to modulate function of individual SCF complexes.

  18. Enhanced antibiotic production by Streptomyces sindenensis using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, C K M; Khan, Mahvish; Praveen, Vandana; Khan, Saif; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic production with Streptomyces sindenensis MTCC 8122 was optimized under submerged fermentation conditions by artificial neural network (ANN) coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex (NMDS). Feed forward back-propagation ANN was trained to establish the mathematical relationship among the medium components and length of incubation period for achieving maximum antibiotic yield. The optimization strategy involved growing the culture with varying concentrations of various medium components for different incubation periods. Under non-optimized condition, antibiotic production was found to be 95 microgram/ml, which nearly doubled (176 microgram/ml) with the ANN-GA optimization. ANN-NMDS optimization was found to be more efficacious, and maximum antibiotic production (197 microgram/ml) was obtained by cultivating the cells with (g/l) fructose 2.7602, MgSO4 1.2369, (NH4)2PO4 0.2742, DL-threonine 3.069%, and soyabean meal 1.952%, for 9.8531 days of incubation, which was roughly 12% higher than the yield obtained by ANN coupled with GA under the same conditions.

  19. The enhanced locating performance of an integrated cross-correlation and genetic algorithm for radio monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Tang; Wu, Chi-Lin; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2014-04-24

    The rapid development of wireless broadband communication technology has affected the location accuracy of worldwide radio monitoring stations that employ time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) location technology. In this study, TDOA-based location technology was implemented in Taiwan for the first time according to International Telecommunications Union Radiocommunication (ITU-R) recommendations regarding monitoring and location applications. To improve location accuracy, various scenarios, such as a three-dimensional environment (considering an unequal locating antenna configuration), were investigated. Subsequently, the proposed integrated cross-correlation and genetic algorithm was evaluated in the metropolitan area of Tainan. The results indicated that the location accuracy at a circular error probability of 50% was less than 60 m when a multipath effect was present in the area. Moreover, compared with hyperbolic algorithms that have been applied in conventional TDOA-based location systems, the proposed algorithm yielded 17-fold and 19-fold improvements in the mean difference when the location position of the interference station was favorable and unfavorable, respectively. Hence, the various forms of radio interference, such as low transmission power, burst and weak signals, and metropolitan interference, was proved to be easily identified, located, and removed.

  20. The Enhanced Locating Performance of an Integrated Cross-Correlation and Genetic Algorithm for Radio Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Tang; Wu, Chi-Lin; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of wireless broadband communication technology has affected the location accuracy of worldwide radio monitoring stations that employ time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) location technology. In this study, TDOA-based location technology was implemented in Taiwan for the first time according to International Telecommunications Union Radiocommunication (ITU-R) recommendations regarding monitoring and location applications. To improve location accuracy, various scenarios, such as a three-dimensional environment (considering an unequal locating antenna configuration), were investigated. Subsequently, the proposed integrated cross-correlation and genetic algorithm was evaluated in the metropolitan area of Tainan. The results indicated that the location accuracy at a circular error probability of 50% was less than 60 m when a multipath effect was present in the area. Moreover, compared with hyperbolic algorithms that have been applied in conventional TDOA-based location systems, the proposed algorithm yielded 17-fold and 19-fold improvements in the mean difference when the location position of the interference station was favorable and unfavorable, respectively. Hence, the various forms of radio interference, such as low transmission power, burst and weak signals, and metropolitan interference, was proved to be easily identified, located, and removed. PMID:24763254

  1. Genetic predisposition to low bone mass is paralleled by an enhanced sensitivity to signals anabolic to the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judex, Stefan; Donahue, Leah-Rae; Rubin, Clinton

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the adult skeleton is determined, in large part, by its genome. Whether genetic variations may influence the effectiveness of interventions to combat skeletal diseases remains unknown. The differential response of trabecular bone to an anabolic (low-level mechanical vibration) and a catabolic (disuse) mechanical stimulus were evaluated in three strains of adult mice. In low bone-mineral-density C57BL/6J mice, the low-level mechanical signal caused significantly larger bone formation rates (BFR) in the proximal tibia, but the removal of functional weight bearing did not significantly alter BFR. In mid-density BALB/cByJ mice, mechanical stimulation also increased BFR, whereas disuse significantly decreased BFR. In contrast, neither anabolic nor catabolic mechanical signals influenced any index of bone formation in high-density C3H/HeJ mice. Together, data from this study indicate that the sensitivity of trabecular tissue to both anabolic and catabolic stimuli is influenced by the genome. Extrapolated to humans, these results may explain in part why prophylaxes for low bone mass are not universally effective, yet also indicate that there may be a genotypic indication of people who are at reduced risk of suffering from bone loss.

  2. Gain compression effect on the modulation dynamics of an optically injection-locked semiconductor laser using gain lever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarraute, J.-M.; Schires, K.; LaRochelle, S.; Grillot, F.

    2016-03-01

    The modulation response of an optically-injected gain lever semiconductor laser is studied and calculations show that a gain-lever laser operating under medium to strong optical injection provides a unique and robust configuration for ultra large bandwidth enhancement. Modulation bandwidths above nine times the relaxation oscillation frequency of the free-running laser can be reached using injection-locking conditions that are reasonable for practical applications. The impact of the gain compression on the modulation dynamic is discussed for the first time. This work is of prime importance for the development of directly-modulated broadband optical sources for high-speed operation at 40 Gbps and beyond.

  3. Genetic inactivation of pleiotrophin triggers amphetamine-induced cell loss in the substantia nigra and enhances amphetamine neurotoxicity in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Gramage, E; Rossi, L; Granado, N; Moratalla, R; Herradón, G

    2010-09-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a neurotrophic factor with important effects in survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons that has been suggested to play important roles in drug of abuse-induced neurotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we have studied the effects of amphetamine (10 mg/kg, four times, every 2 h) on the nigrostriatal pathway of PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-) mice. We found that amphetamine causes a significantly enhanced loss of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum of PTN-/- mice compared to wild type (WT+/+) mice. In addition, we found a significant decrease ( approximately 20%) of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons only in the substantia nigra of amphetamine-treated PTN-/- mice, whereas this area of WT+/+ animals remained unaffected after amphetamine treatment. This effect was accompanied by enhanced amphetamine-induced astrocytosis in the substantia nigra of PTN-/- mice. Interestingly, we found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation levels of p42 extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK2) in both saline- and amphetamine-treated PTN-/- mice, whereas phosphorylation of p44 ERK (ERK1) was almost abolished in the striatum of PTN-/- mice compared to WT+/+ mice, suggesting that basal deficiencies in the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 could underlie the higher vulnerability of PTN-/- mice to amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects. The data suggest an important role of PTN in the protection of nigrostriatal pathways against amphetamine insult.

  4. Genetic expression programming-based DBA for enhancing peer-assisted music-on-demand service in EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Andrew Tanny; Hwang, I.-Shyan; Nikoukar, AliAkbar; Lee, Jhong-Yue

    2015-03-01

    Today, the popularity of peer-assisted music-on-demand (MoD) has increased significantly worldwide. This service allows users to access large music library tracks, listen to music, and share their playlist with other users. Unlike the conventional voice traffic, such an application maintains music quality that ranges from 160 kbps to 320 kbps, which most likely consumes more bandwidth than other traffics. In the access network, Ethernet passive optical network (EPON) is one of the best candidates for delivering such a service because of being cost-effective and with high bandwidth. To maintain music quality, a stutter needs to be prevented because of either network effects or when the due user was not receiving enough resources to play in a timely manner. Therefore, in this paper, we propose two genetic expression programming (GEP)-based dynamic bandwidth allocations (DBAs). The first DBA is a generic DBA that aims to find an optimum formula for voice, video, and data services. The second DBA aims to find optimum formulas so that Optical Line Terminal (OLT) can satisfy not only the voice and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) MoD traffics but also reduce the stutter. Optical Network Unit (ONU) traits such as REPORT and GATE messages, cycle time, and mean packet delay are set to be predictor variables. Simulation results show that our proposed DBAs can satisfy the voice and P2P MoD services packet delay and monitor other overall system performances such as expedited forwarding (EF) jitter, packet loss, bandwidth waste, and system throughputs.

  5. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Coffea arabica (L.) is greatly enhanced by using established embryogenic callus cultures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Following genome sequencing of crop plants, one of the main challenges today is determining the function of all the predicted genes. When gene validation approaches are used for woody species, the main obstacle is the low recovery rate of transgenic plants from elite or commercial cultivars. Embryogenic calli have frequently been the target tissue for transformation, but the difficulty in producing or maintaining embryogenic tissues is one of the main problems encountered in genetic transformation of many woody plants, including Coffea arabica. Results We identified the conditions required for successful long-term proliferation of embryogenic cultures in C. arabica and designed a highly efficient and reliable Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method based on these conditions. The transformation protocol with LBA1119 harboring pBin 35S GFP was established by evaluating the effect of different parameters on transformation efficiency by GFP detection. Using embryogenic callus cultures, co-cultivation with LBA1119 OD600 = 0.6 for five days at 20 °C enabled reproducible transformation. The maintenance conditions for the embryogenic callus cultures, particularly a high auxin to cytokinin ratio, the age of the culture (optimum for 7-10 months of proliferation) and the use of a yellow callus phenotype, were the most important factors for achieving highly efficient transformation (> 90%). At the histological level, successful transformation was related to the number of proembryogenic masses present. All the selected plants were proved to be transformed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Conclusion Most progress in increasing transformation efficiency in coffee has been achieved by optimizing the production conditions of embryogenic cultures used as target tissues for transformation. This is the first time that a strong positive effect of the age of the culture on transformation efficiency was demonstrated. Our results make Agrobacterium

  6. Cryopreservation enhances embryogenic capacity of Gentiana cruciata (L.) suspension culture and maintains (epi)genetic uniformity of regenerants.

    PubMed

    Mikuła, Anna; Tomiczak, Karolina; Rybczyński, Jan J

    2011-04-01

    The embryogenic cell suspension culture of Gentiana cruciata, cryopreserved by the encapsulation/dehydration method, survived both short- (48 h) and long-term (1.5 years) cryostorage with more than 80% viability. To assess the influence of cryotreatments on the embryogenic potential, a proembryogenic mass was encapsulated and exposed to the following treatments: (1) osmotic dehydration (OD), (2) OD + air desiccation (AD) and (3) OD + AD + cryostorage (LN). The somatic embryogenesis efficiency increased ten times after osmotic dehydration. The AD and LN cryotreatments did not cause any significant alterations in somatic embryo production. We monitored the (epi)genetic stability of 288 regenerants derived from: non-cryotreated, short-term, and long-term cryostored tissue using metAFLP markers and ten primer combinations. Changes in the sequence and DNA methylation levels were studied by subjecting the DNA to digestion with two pairs of isoschisomer restriction enzymes (KpnI/MseI and Acc65I/MseI). Two new AFLP unique DNA fragments at the DNA sequence level, with no differences at the methylation level, were found between regenerants derived from cryopreserved tissue, compared with the non-cryotreated controls. The Acc65I/MseI methylation levels for the three groups of regenerants were not significantly different. Cluster analysis was capable of identifying a number of sub-clusters. Only one of the sub-clusters comprises almost all regenerants derived from non-cryotreated and short-term cryostored tissue. Plantlets derived from long-term cryostored tissue were grouped into separate clusters. The observed AFLP alterations did not appear to be associated with the use of cryopreservation, but were probably related to the process of in vitro culture.

  7. Introductory molecular genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Moulds, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with an overview of the current principles of genetics and molecular genetics. Over this foundation, it adds detailed and specialized information: a description of the translation, transcription, expression and regulation of DNA and RNA; a description of the manipulation of genetic material via promoters, enhancers, and gene splicing; and a description of cloning techniques, especially those for blood group genes. The last chapter looks to the impact of molecular genetics on transfusion medicine.

  8. Photomultiplier tube gain regulating system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved system for regulating the gain of a photomultiplier tube, and was designed for use with the photomultiplier tubes of a GeMSAEC fast analyzers. It has the following advantages over the prior system: noise is virtually eliminated; sample analysis can begin after 3 to 4 revolutions of the rotor; fluorescent and light scattering solutions can be used as a reference; and the reference solution can be in any cuvette on the rotor.

  9. Hotspots of aberrant enhancer activity punctuate the colorectal cancer epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrea J.; Saiakhova, Alina; Corradin, Olivia; Luppino, Jennifer M.; Lovrenert, Katreya; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Morrow, James J.; Mack, Stephen C.; Dhillon, Gursimran; Beard, Lydia; Myeroff, Lois; Kalady, Matthew F.; Willis, Joseph; Bradner, James E.; Keri, Ruth A.; Berger, Nathan A.; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Scacheri, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to mutations in genes, aberrant enhancer element activity at non-coding regions of the genome is a key driver of tumorigenesis. Here, we perform epigenomic enhancer profiling of a cohort of more than forty genetically diverse human colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens. Using normal colonic crypt epithelium as a comparator, we identify enhancers with recurrently gained or lost activity across CRC specimens. Of the enhancers highly recurrently activated in CRC, most are constituents of super enhancers, are occupied by AP-1 and cohesin complex members, and originate from primed chromatin. Many activate known oncogenes, and CRC growth can be mitigated through pharmacologic inhibition or genome editing of these loci. Nearly half of all GWAS CRC risk loci co-localize to recurrently activated enhancers. These findings indicate that the CRC epigenome is defined by highly recurrent epigenetic alterations at enhancers which activate a common, aberrant transcriptional programme critical for CRC growth and survival. PMID:28169291

  10. Ex vivo nanofiber expansion and genetic modification of human cord blood-derived progenitor/stem cells enhances vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Das, Hiranmoy; Abdulhameed, Nasreen; Joseph, Matthew; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Mao, Hai-Quan; Pompili, Vincent J

    2009-01-01

    The stem cell therapy for treating ischemic diseases is promising; however, the limited availability and compromised quality of progenitor cells in aged and diseased patients limit its therapeutic use. Here we report a nanofiber-based ex vivo stem cell expansion technology and proangiogenic growth factors overexpression of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived progenitor cells to enhance angiogenic potential of therapeutic stem cells. The progenitor cells were expanded approximately 225-fold on nanofiber-based serum-free ex vivo expansion culture technique without inducing differentiation. The expanded cells express high levels of stem cell homing receptor, CXCR4, and adhesion molecule, LFA-1. The nanofiber-expanded stem cells uptake AcLDL effectively, and migrate efficiently in an in vitro transmigration assay. These expanded cells can also differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro. In a NOD/SCID mouse hind limb vascular injury model, nanofiber-expanded cells were more effective in blood flow restoration and this effect was further augmented by VEGF(164) and PDGF-BB, growth factor overexpression. The data indicate that nanofiber-based ex vivo expansion technology can provide an essential number of therapeutic stem cells. Additionally, proangiogenic growth factors overexpression in progenitor cells can potentially improve autologous or allogeneic stem cell therapy for ischemic diseases.

  11. Hot topic: Enhancing omega-3 fatty acids in milk fat of dairy cows by using stearidonic acid-enriched soybean oil from genetically modified soybeans.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Santos, G; O'Donnell, A M; Vicini, J L; Hartnell, G F; Bauman, D E

    2010-01-01

    Very long chain n-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) are important in human cardiac health and the prevention of chronic diseases, but food sources are limited. Stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4n-3) is an n-3 fatty acid that humans are able to convert to EPA. In utilizing SDA-enhanced soybean oil (SBO) derived from genetically modified soybeans, our objectives were to examine the potential to increase the n-3 fatty acid content of milk fat and to determine the efficiency of SDA uptake from the digestive tract and transfer to milk fat. Three multiparous, rumen-fistulated Holstein cows were assigned randomly in a 3 x 3 Latin square design to the following treatments: 1) control (no oil infusion); 2) abomasal infusion of SDA-enhanced SBO (SDA-abo); and 3) ruminal infusion of SDA-enhanced SBO (SDA-rum). The SDA-enhanced SBO contained 27.1% SDA, 10.4% alpha-linolenic acid, and 7.2% gamma-linolenic acid. Oil infusions provided 57 g/d of SDA with equal amounts of oil infused into either the rumen or abomasum at 6-h intervals over a 7-d infusion period. Cow numbers were limited and no treatment differences were detected for DMI or milk production (22.9+/-0.5 kg/d and 32.3+/-0.9 kg/d, respectively; least squares means +/- SE), milk protein percentage and yield (3.24+/-0.04% and 1.03+/-0.02 kg/d), or lactose percentage and yield (4.88+/-0.05% and 1.55+/-0.05 kg/d). Treatment also had no effect on milk fat yield (1.36+/-0.03 kg/d), but milk fat percentage was lower for the SDA-rum treatment (4.04+/-0.04% vs. 4.30+/-0.04% for control and 4.41+/-0.05% for SDA-abo). The SDA-abo treatment increased n-3 fatty acids to 3.9% of total milk fatty acids, a value more than 5-fold greater than that for the control. Expressed as a percentage of total milk fatty acids, values (least squares means +/- SE) for the SDA-abo treatment were 1.55+/-0.03% for alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3), 1.86+/-0.02 for SDA, 0.23 +/- <0.01 for eicosatetraenoic acid (20:4n-3), and 0

  12. Coimmunization with an optimized IL15 plasmid adjuvant enhances humoral immunity via stimulating B cells induced by genetically engineered DNA vaccines expressing consensus JEV and WNV E DIII.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Mathura P; Kutzler, Michele A; Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Yan, Jian; Liu, Harrison; Shah, Vidhi; Bawa, Amrit; Selling, Bernard; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B

    2009-07-09

    The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are responsible for a large proportion of viral encephalitis in humans. Currently, there is no FDA approved specific treatment for either, though there are attempts to develop vaccines against both viruses. In this study, we proposed novel genetically engineered DNA vaccines against these two neurotrophic flaviviruses. The structural domain III (DIII) of E protein from these viruses is reported to carry dominant epitopes that induce neutralizing antibodies. Therefore we created consensus sequence of DIII domain across numerous strains of JEV and WNV. Based on the consensus amino acid sequence, synthetic codon and RNA optimized DIII-expressing DNA vaccine constructs with an efficient leader sequence were synthesized for immunization studies. In addition, we also constructed a genetically engineered IL15 DNA vaccine molecular adjuvant for co-stimulating the immune response against DIII clones. Vaccine constructs were delivered into BALB/C mice intramuscularly followed by electroporation using the CELLECTRA in vivo electroporator. We have observed that the combined delivery of both WNV DIII and IL15-ECRO DNA vaccine constructs resulted in not only the highest level of antibody against DIII, but also enhanced cross reactivity with two other antigens tested. Also, coimmunization with IL15 plasmid further increased the immune response by four- to five-fold. Importantly, we have shown that IL15 coimmunization adjuvanted humoral responses against DIII antigens by elevating the level of antibody secreting B cells. Such a DNA vaccine approach may better help to control potential travel related infectious agents such as JEV.

  13. Genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells for improved islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ye, Zhaoyang; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-10-03

    The use of adult stem cells for therapeutic purposes has met with great success in recent years. Among several types of adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) and other sources have gained popularity for basic research and clinical applications because of their therapeutic potential in treating a variety of diseases. Because of their tissue regeneration potential and immune modulation effect, MSCs were recently used as cell-based therapy to promote revascularization, increase pancreatic β-cell proliferation, and avoid allograft rejection in islet transplantation. Taking advantage of the recent progress in gene therapy, genetically modified MSCs can further enhance and expand the therapeutic benefit of primary MSCs while retaining their stem-cell-like properties. This review aims to gain a thorough understanding of the current obstacles to successful islet transplantation and discusses the potential role of primary MSCs before or after genetic modification in islet transplantation.

  14. Stochastic Gain in Population Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Schuster, Heinz Georg

    2004-07-01

    We introduce an extension of the usual replicator dynamics to adaptive learning rates. We show that a population with a dynamic learning rate can gain an increased average payoff in transient phases and can also exploit external noise, leading the system away from the Nash equilibrium, in a resonancelike fashion. The payoff versus noise curve resembles the signal to noise ratio curve in stochastic resonance. Seen in this broad context, we introduce another mechanism that exploits fluctuations in order to improve properties of the system. Such a mechanism could be of particular interest in economic systems.

  15. Scalar gain interpretation of large order filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    A technique is developed which demonstrates how to interpret a large fully-populated filter gain matrix as a set of scalar gains. The inverse problem is also solved, namely, how to develop a large-order filter gain matrix from a specified set of scalar gains. Examples are given to illustrate the method.

  16. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic silencing of mircoRNA-506-3p enhances COTL1 oncogene expression to foster non-small lung cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanqi; Yang, Peiying; Jiang, Xingkang; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Binxu; Zhang, Yao; Jia, Yingjie

    2017-01-03

    Although previous studies suggested that microRNA-506-3p (miR-506-3p) was frequently downregulated, and functioned as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, the biological role and intrinsic regulatory mechanisms of miR-506-3p in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain elusive. The present study found miR-506-3p expression was downregulated in advanced NSCLC tissues and cell lines. The expression of miR-506-3p in NSCLC was inversely correlated with larger tumor size, advanced TNM stage and lymph node metastasis. In addition, we also found patients with lower expression of miR-506-3p had a poor prognosis than those patients with higher expression of miR-506-3p. Function studies demonstrated that aberrant miR-506-3p expression modulates tumor cell growth, cell mobility, cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations manifested that coactosin-like protein 1 (COTL1) was a direct downstream target of miR-506-3p. Knockdown of COTL1 mimicked the tumor-suppressive effects of miR-506-3p overexpression in A549 cells, whereas COTL1 overexpression enhanced the tumorigenic function in HCC827 cells. Importantly, we also found GATA3 transcriptionally actives miR-506-3p expression, and the long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 (UCA1) exerts oncogenic function in NSCLC by competitively 'sponging' miRNA-506. Together, our combined results elucidated genetic and epigenetic silencing of miR-506-3p enhances COTL1 oncogene expression to foster NSCLC progression.

  18. High-level hemicellulosic arabinose predominately affects lignocellulose crystallinity for genetically enhancing both plant lodging resistance and biomass enzymatic digestibility in rice mutants.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengcheng; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Kai; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Ran; Feng, Yongqing; Yi, Xiaoyan; Zou, Weihua; Wang, Lingqiang; Wu, Changyin; Tian, Jinshan; Lu, Tiegang; Xie, Guosheng; Peng, Liangcai

    2015-05-01

    Rice is a major food crop with enormous biomass residue for biofuels. As plant cell wall recalcitrance basically decides a costly biomass process, genetic modification of plant cell walls has been regarded as a promising solution. However, due to structural complexity and functional diversity of plant cell walls, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of cell wall modifications that could not much alter plant growth, but cause an enhancement in biomass enzymatic digestibility. To address this issue, we performed systems biology analyses of a total of 36 distinct cell wall mutants of rice. As a result, cellulose crystallinity (CrI) was examined to be the key factor that negatively determines either the biomass enzymatic saccharification upon various chemical pretreatments or the plant lodging resistance, an integrated agronomic trait in plant growth and grain production. Notably, hemicellulosic arabinose (Ara) was detected to be the major factor that negatively affects cellulose CrI probably through its interlinking with β-1,4-glucans. In addition, lignin and G monomer also exhibited the positive impact on biomass digestion and lodging resistance. Further characterization of two elite mutants, Osfc17 and Osfc30, showing normal plant growth and high biomass enzymatic digestion in situ and in vitro, revealed the multiple GH9B candidate genes for reducing cellulose CrI and XAT genes for increasing hemicellulosic Ara level. Hence, the results have suggested the potential cell wall modifications for enhancing both biomass enzymatic digestibility and plant lodging resistance by synchronically overexpressing GH9B and XAT genes in rice.

  19. A lovastatin-elicited genetic program inhibits M2 macrophage polarization and enhances T cell infiltration into spontaneous mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Mira, Emilia; Carmona-Rodríguez, Lorena; Tardáguila, Manuel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; González-Martín, Alicia; Almonacid, Luis; Casas, Josefina; Fabriás, Gemma; Mañes, Santos

    2013-12-01

    Beyond their ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis, the statins have pleiotropic effects that include anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Statins could have clinical utility, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutics, in the treatment of cancer. The mechanisms that underlie the anti-tumor activity of the statins are nonetheless poorly defined. No studies have analyzed how they alter the tumor-associated leukocyte infiltrate, a central factor that influences tumor stroma and cancer evolution. Here we used HER2/neu transgenic (Tg-neu) mice to analyze the effect of lovastatin (Lov) on the inflammatory reaction of spontaneous mammary tumors. Lov treatment of tumor-bearing Tg-neu mice did not alter growth of established tumors, but significantly reduced the number of new oncogenic lesions in these mice. Moreover, Lov inhibited the growth of newly implanted Tg-neu tumors in immunocompetent but not in immunodeficient mice. We found that Lov enhanced tumor infiltration by effector T cells, and reduced the number of immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic M2-like tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Concomitantly, the drug improved the structure and function of the tumor vasculature, measured as enhanced tumor oxygenation and penetration of cytotoxic drugs. Microarray analysis identified a Lov-elicited genetic program in Tg-neu tumors that might explain these effects; we observed Lov-induced downregulation of placental growth factor, which triggers aberrant angiogenesis and M2-like TAM polarization. Our results identify a role for lovastatin in the shaping and re-education of the inflammatory infiltrate in tumors, with functional consequences in angiogenesis and antitumor immunity.

  20. Genetic Enhancer Analysis Reveals that FLORAL ORGAN NUMBER2 and OsMADS3 Cooperatively Regulate Maintenance and Determinacy of the Flower Meristem in Rice.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yukiko; Tanaka, Wakana; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Kurata, Tetsuya; Hirano, Hiro-Yuki

    2017-03-22

    Meristems such as the shoot apical meristem and flower meristem (FM) act as a reservoir of stem cells, which reproduce themselves and supply daughter cells for the differentiation of lateral organs. In Oryza sativa (rice), FLORAL ORGAN NUMBER2 (FON2) gene, which is similar to Arabidopsis CLAVATA3, is involved in meristem maintenance. In fon2 mutants, the numbers of floral organs are increased due to an enlargement of the FM. To identify new factors regulating meristem maintenance in rice, we performed a genetic screening of mutants that enhanced the fon2 mutation, and found a mutant line (2B-424) in which pistil number was dramatically increased. By using a map-based approach and next-generation sequencing, we found that the line 2B-424 had a complete loss-of-function mutation (a large deletion) in OsMADS3, a class C MADS-box gene that is known to be involved in stamen specification. Disruption of OsMADS3 in the fon2 mutant by CRISPR-Cas9 technology caused a flower phenotype similar to that of 2B-424, confirming that the gene responsible for enhancement of fon2 was OsMADS3. Morphological analysis showed that the fon2 and osmads3 mutations synergistically affected pistil development and FM determinacy. We also found that whorl 3 was duplicated in mature flowers and the FM was enlarged at an early developmental stage in severe osmads3 single mutants. These findings suggest that OsMADS3 is involved not only in FM determinacy in late flower development but also in FM activity in early flower development.

  1. Enhanced genetic algorithm optimization model for a single reservoir operation based on hydropower generation: case study of Mosul reservoir, northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqeeli, Yousif H; Lee, T S; Abd Aziz, S

    2016-01-01

    Achievement of the optimal hydropower generation from operation of water reservoirs, is a complex problems. The purpose of this study was to formulate and improve an approach of a genetic algorithm optimization model (GAOM) in order to increase the maximization of annual hydropower generation for a single reservoir. For this purpose, two simulation algorithms were drafted and applied independently in that GAOM during 20 scenarios (years) for operation of Mosul reservoir, northern Iraq. The first algorithm was based on the traditional simulation of reservoir operation, whilst the second algorithm (Salg) enhanced the GAOM by changing the population values of GA through a new simulation process of reservoir operation. The performances of these two algorithms were evaluated through the comparison of their optimal values of annual hydropower generation during the 20 scenarios of operating. The GAOM achieved an increase in hydropower generation in 17 scenarios using these two algorithms, with the Salg being superior in all scenarios. All of these were done prior adding the evaporation (Ev) and precipitation (Pr) to the water balance equation. Next, the GAOM using the Salg was applied by taking into consideration the volumes of these two parameters. In this case, the optimal values obtained from the GAOM were compared, firstly with their counterpart that found using the same algorithm without taking into consideration of Ev and Pr, secondly with the observed values. The first comparison showed that the optimal values obtained in this case decreased in all scenarios, whilst maintaining the good results compared with the observed in the second comparison. The results proved the effectiveness of the Salg in increasing the hydropower generation through the enhanced approach of the GAOM. In addition, the results indicated to the importance of taking into account the Ev and Pr in the modelling of reservoirs operation.

  2. Genetic and epigenetic silencing of mircoRNA-506-3p enhances COTL1 oncogene expression to foster non-small lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Binxu; Zhang, Yao; Jia, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies suggested that microRNA-506-3p (miR-506-3p) was frequently downregulated, and functioned as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, the biological role and intrinsic regulatory mechanisms of miR-506-3p in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain elusive. The present study found miR-506-3p expression was downregulated in advanced NSCLC tissues and cell lines. The expression of miR-506-3p in NSCLC was inversely correlated with larger tumor size, advanced TNM stage and lymph node metastasis. In addition, we also found patients with lower expression of miR-506-3p had a poor prognosis than those patients with higher expression of miR-506-3p. Function studies demonstrated that aberrant miR-506-3p expression modulates tumor cell growth, cell mobility, cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations manifested that coactosin-like protein 1 (COTL1) was a direct downstream target of miR-506-3p. Knockdown of COTL1 mimicked the tumor-suppressive effects of miR-506-3p overexpression in A549 cells, whereas COTL1 overexpression enhanced the tumorigenic function in HCC827 cells. Importantly, we also found GATA3 transcriptionally actives miR-506-3p expression, and the long non-coding RNA urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 (UCA1) exerts oncogenic function in NSCLC by competitively ‘sponging’ miRNA-506. Together, our combined results elucidated genetic and epigenetic silencing of miR-506-3p enhances COTL1 oncogene expression to foster NSCLC progression. PMID:27893417

  3. Pharmacological management of atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; ElFakih, Yamily; Uzcátegui, Euderruh; Sandia, Ignacio; Tálamo, Eduardo; Araujo de Baptista, Enma; Beaulieu, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Excessive bodyweight gain was reported during the 1950s as an adverse effect of typical antipsychotic drug treatment, but the magnitude of bodyweight gain was found to be higher with the atypical antipsychotic drugs that were introduced after 1990. Clozapine and olanzapine produce the greatest bodyweight gain, ziprasidone and aripiprazole have a neutral influence, and quetiapine and risperidone cause an intermediate effect. In the CATIE study, the percentage of patients with bodyweight gain of >7% compared with baseline differed significantly between the antipsychotic drugs, i.e. 30%, 16%, 14%, 12% and 7% for olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, perphenazine (a typical antipsychotic) and ziprasidone, respectively (p<0.001). Appetite stimulation is probably a key cause of bodyweight gain, but genetic polymorphisms modify the bodyweight response during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. In addition to nutritional advice, programmed physical activity, cognitive-behavioural training and atypical antipsychotic switching, pharmacological adjunctive treatments have been assessed to counteract excessive bodyweight gain. In some clinical trials, nizatidine, amantadine, reboxetine, topiramate, sibutramine and metformin proved effective in preventing or reversing atypical antipsychotic-induced bodyweight gain; however, the results are inconclusive since few randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have been conducted. Indeed, most studies were short-term trials without adequate statistical power and, in the case of metformin, nizatidine and sibutramine, the results are contradictory. The tolerability profile of these agents is adequate. More studies are needed before formal recommendations on the use of these drugs can be made. Meanwhile, clinicians are advised to use any of these adjunctive treatments according to their individual pharmacological and tolerability profiles, and the patient's personal and family history of bodyweight gain and metabolic dysfunction.

  4. [Antipsychotic-induced weight gain--pharmacogenetic studies].

    PubMed

    Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Godlewska, Beata; Marmurowska-Michałowskal, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Drug-naive patients with schizophrenia often present metabolic abnormalities and obesity. Weight gain may be the side effect of treatment with many antipsychotic drugs. Genetic effects, besides many other factors, are known to influence obesity in patients with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. Numerous studies of several genes' polymorphisms have been performed. -759C/T polymorphism of 5HT2C gene attracted most attention. In 5 independent studies of this polymorphism the association between T allele with the lower AP-induced weight gain was detected. No associations could be detected between weight gain and other polymorphisms of serotonergic system genes as well as histaminergic system genes. Studies of adrenergic and dopaminergic system have neither produced any unambiguous results. Analysis of the newest candidate genes (SAP-25, leptin gene) confirmed the role of genetic factors in AP-induced weight gain. It is worth emphasising, that the studies have been conducted in relatively small and heterogenic groups and that various treatment strategies were used.

  5. Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Simon, C; Nakashima, I; Andrews, D

    1993-07-01

    Maternal weight gain is the most important, manageable determinant of infant birth weight among adolescents. Negative attitudes toward weight gain may adversely affect maternal weight gain. We hypothesized that (a) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain are more common among younger pregnant adolescents, and (b) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain adversely affect adolescent maternal weight gain. The study subjects, 99, radially diverse, pregnant 13 through 18 year olds, completed the 18-item, Likert-format, Pregnancy and Weight Gain Attitude Scale. Responses to the questionnaire indicated that most (83.8%) of the adolescents we interviewed had a positive attitude toward pregnancy weight gain when they entered prenatal care. Univariate analyses revealed that attitudes toward weight gain were unrelated to the respondents' ages but inversely related to their prepregnant weights (-0.16; p = 0.06) and the severity of their symptoms of depression (r = -0.26; p = 0.004). Attitudes toward weight gain were also directly related to their family support (r = 0.17; p = 0.06). Weight gain was significantly related to 4 of the 18 scale items but not to the total attitude scale score. We conclude that (a) the developmental task of formulating a positive body image does not foster more negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain among younger adolescents; (b) negative weight gain attitudes are most common among heavier adolescents, depressed adolescents, and adolescents who do not perceive their families as supportive; and (c) negative weight gain attitudes could adversely affect pregnancy weight gain.

  6. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  7. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Before or between pregnancies > Genetic counseling Genetic counseling E-mail to a friend Please fill ... a genetic counselor in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , ...

  8. Information gains from cosmological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Seehars, S.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Nicola, A.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the `surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat ΛCDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter w. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 bits). The other cosmological probes, including weak lensing (1.7 bits) and {H0} measures (1.7 bits), have contributed information but at a lower level. Furthermore, we do not find any significant surprise when updating the constraints of WMAP9 with any of the other experiments, meaning that they are consistent with WMAP9. However, when we choose Planck15 as the prior, we find that, accounting for the full multi-dimensionality of the parameter space, the weak lensing measurements of CFHTLenS produce a large surprise of 4.4 bits which is statistically significant at the 8 σ level. We discuss how the relative entropy provides a versatile and robust framework to compare cosmological probes in the context of current and future surveys.

  9. Are videogame training gains specific or general?

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Many recent studies using healthy adults document enhancements in perception and cognition from playing commercial action videogames (AVGs). Playing action games (e.g., Call of Duty, Medal of Honor) is associated with improved bottom-up lower-level information processing skills like visual-perceptual and attentional processes. One proposal states a general improvement in the ability to interpret and gather statistical information to predict future actions which then leads to better performance across different perceptual/attentional tasks. Another proposal claims all the tasks are separately trained in the AVGs because the AVGs and laboratory tasks contain similar demands. We review studies of action and non-AVGs to show support for the latter proposal. To explain transfer in AVGs, we argue that the perceptual and attention tasks share common demands with the trained videogames (e.g., multiple object tracking (MOT), rapid attentional switches, and peripheral vision). In non-AVGs, several studies also demonstrate specific, limited transfer. One instance of specific transfer is the specific enhancement to mental rotation after training in games with a spatial emphasis (e.g., Tetris). In contrast, the evidence for transfer is equivocal where the game and task do not share common demands (e.g., executive functioning). Thus, the “common demands” hypothesis of transfer not only characterizes transfer effects in AVGs, but also non-action games. Furthermore, such a theory provides specific predictions, which can help in the selection of games to train human cognition as well as in the design of videogames purposed for human cognitive and perceptual enhancement. Finally this hypothesis is consistent with the cognitive training literature where most post-training gains are for tasks similar to the training rather than general, non-specific improvements. PMID:24782722

  10. Are videogame training gains specific or general?

    PubMed

    Oei, Adam C; Patterson, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Many recent studies using healthy adults document enhancements in perception and cognition from playing commercial action videogames (AVGs). Playing action games (e.g., Call of Duty, Medal of Honor) is associated with improved bottom-up lower-level information processing skills like visual-perceptual and attentional processes. One proposal states a general improvement in the ability to interpret and gather statistical information to predict future actions which then leads to better performance across different perceptual/attentional tasks. Another proposal claims all the tasks are separately trained in the AVGs because the AVGs and laboratory tasks contain similar demands. We review studies of action and non-AVGs to show support for the latter proposal. To explain transfer in AVGs, we argue that the perceptual and attention tasks share common demands with the trained videogames (e.g., multiple object tracking (MOT), rapid attentional switches, and peripheral vision). In non-AVGs, several studies also demonstrate specific, limited transfer. One instance of specific transfer is the specific enhancement to mental rotation after training in games with a spatial emphasis (e.g., Tetris). In contrast, the evidence for transfer is equivocal where the game and task do not share common demands (e.g., executive functioning). Thus, the "common demands" hypothesis of transfer not only characterizes transfer effects in AVGs, but also non-action games. Furthermore, such a theory provides specific predictions, which can help in the selection of games to train human cognition as well as in the design of videogames purposed for human cognitive and perceptual enhancement. Finally this hypothesis is consistent with the cognitive training literature where most post-training gains are for tasks similar to the training rather than general, non-specific improvements.

  11. Review of High Gain FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2007-01-19

    For understanding on basic radiation mechanism of the high-gain FEL based on SASE, the author presents electron-crystal interpretation of FEL radiation. In the electron-crystal, electrons are localized at regularly spaced multi-layers, which represents micro-bunching, whose spacing is equal to the radiation wavelength, and the multi-layers are perpendicular to beam axis, thus, diffracted wave creates Bragg's spots in forward and backward directions. Due to the Doppler's effect, frequency of the back-scattered wave is up-converted, generates forwardly focused X-ray. The Bragg's effect contributes focusing the X-ray beam into a spot, thus peak power becomes extremely higher by factor of typically 107. This is the FEL radiation. As well known, the total numbers of scattered photons in Bragg's spots is equal to the total elastic scattering photons from the atoms contained in the crystal. Therefore, total power in the FEL laser is same as the spontaneous radiation power from the undulator for the same beam parameter. The FEL radiation phenomenon is simple interference effect. In today's presentations, we use the laser pointer, and we frequently experience difficulty in pointing precisely or steadily in one place on the screen, since the laser spot is very small and does not spread. Exactly same to this, X-ray FEL is a highly focused beam, and pointing stability dominates productivity of experiment, thus we need special care on beam stability from linear accelerator.

  12. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist.

  13. Factors influencing weight gain after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Gallagher-Lepak, S; Zhu, Y R; Porth, C; Kelber, S; Roza, A M; Adams, M B

    1993-10-01

    Weight gain following renal transplantation occurs frequently but has not been investigated quantitatively. A retrospective chart review of 115 adult renal transplant recipients was used to describe patterns of weight gain during the first 5 years after transplantation. Only 23 subjects (21%) were overweight before their transplant. Sixty-six subjects (57%) experienced a weight gain of greater than or equal to 10%, and 49 subjects (43%) were overweight according to Metropolitan relative weight criteria at 1 year after transplantation. There was an inverse correlation between advancing age and weight gain, with the youngest patients (18-29 years) having a 13.3% weight gain and the oldest patients (age greater than 50 years) having the lowest gain of 8.3% at 1 year (P = 0.047). Black recipients experienced a greater weight gain than whites during the first posttransplant year (14.6% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.043), and maintained or increased this difference over the 5-year period. Men and women experienced comparable weight gain during the first year (9.5% vs. 12.1%), but women continued to gain weight throughout the 5-year study (21.0% total weight gain). The men remained stable after the first year (10.8% total weight gain). Recipients who experienced at least a 10% weight gain also increased their serum cholesterol (mean 261 vs. 219) and triglyceride (mean 277 vs. 159) levels significantly, whereas those without weight gain did not. Weight gain did not correlate with cumulative steroid dose, donor source (living-related versus cadaver), rejection history, pre-existing obesity, the number of months on dialysis before transplantation, or posttransplant renal function. Posttransplant weight gain is related mainly to demographic factors, not to treatment factors associated with the transplant. The average weight gain during the first year after renal transplantation is approximately 10%. This increased weight, coupled with changes in lipid metabolism, may be significant in

  14. Nicotine Replacement: Effects on Postcessation Weight Gain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Janet; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined nicotine replacement effects on postcessation weight gain in smoking cessation volunteers. Randomly assigned abstinent subjects to active nicotine or placebo gum conditions for 10 weeks. Analyses revealed strong evidence for gum effect on weight gain, with active gum users gaining mean total of 3.8 pounds compared with 7.8 pounds for…

  15. Is Weight Gain after Smoking Cessation Inevitable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talcott, Gerald W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied weight gain after smoking cessation in a naturalistic setting where all smokers quit and risk factors for postcessation weight gain were modified. Results showed no significant weight changes for smokers who quit. Suggests that an intensive program featuring dietary guidelines and increased physical activity can attenuate weight gain. (RJM)

  16. Electrical and Optical Gain Lever Effects in InGaAs Double Quantum Well Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M D; Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Nikolic, R J; Vernon, S P; Kallman, J S; Behymer, E M

    2007-01-03

    In multisection laser diodes, the amplitude or frequency modulation (AM or FM) efficiency can be improved using the gain lever effect. To study gain lever, InGaAs double quantum well (DQW) edge emitting lasers have been fabricated with integrated passive waveguides and dual sections providing a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1. Both the electrical and the optical gain lever have been examined. An electrical gain lever with greater than 7 dB enhancement of AM efficiency was achieved within the range of appropriate DC biasing currents, but this gain dropped rapidly outside this range. We observed a 4 dB gain in the optical AM efficiency under non-ideal biasing conditions. This value agreed with the measured gain for the electrical AM efficiency under similar conditions. We also examined the gain lever effect under large signal modulation for digital logic switching applications. To get a useful gain lever for optical gain quenched logic, a long control section is needed to preserve the gain lever strength and a long interaction length between the input optical signal and the lasing field of the diode must be provided. The gain lever parameter space has been fully characterized and validated against numerical simulations of a semi-3D hybrid beam propagation method (BPM) model for the coupled electron-photon rate equation. We find that the optical gain lever can be treated using the electrical injection model, once the absorption in the sample is known.

  17. BDNF: no gain without pain?

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter A

    2014-12-26

    Injury to the adult nervous system promotes the expression and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Because it promotes neuronal growth, survival and neurogenesis, BDNF may initiate compensatory processes that mitigate the deleterious effects of injury, disease or stress. Despite this, BDNF has been implicated in several injury-induced maladaptive processes including pain, spasticity and convulsive activity. This review will concentrate on the predominant role of BDNF in the initiation and maintenance of chronic and/or neuropathic pain at the spinal, peripheral and central levels. Within the spinal dorsal horn, the pattern of BDNF-induced changes in synaptic transmission across five different, identified neuronal phenotypes bears a striking resemblance to that produced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of peripheral nerves. The appearance of this "pain footprint" thus reflects multiple sensitizing actions of microglial-derived BDNF. These include changes in the chloride equilibrium potential, decreased excitatory synaptic drive to inhibitory neurons, complex changes in inhibitory (GABA/glycinergic) synaptic transmission, increases in excitatory synaptic drive to excitatory neurons and the appearance of oscillatory activity. BDNF effects are confined to changes in synaptic transmission as there is little change in the passive or active properties of neurons in the superficial dorsal horn. Actions of BDNF in the brain stem and periphery also contribute to the onset and persistence of chronic pain. In spite of its role in compensatory processes that facilitate the recovery of the nervous system from injury, the widespread maladaptive actions of BDNF mean that there is literally "no gain without pain".

  18. Gestational weight gain among Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lam, Kim; Raine, Susan P

    2014-01-01

    To describe gestational weight gain among Hispanic women and to examine psychological, social, and cultural contexts affecting weight gain. A total of 282 Hispanic women were surveyed post-partum before leaving the hospital. Women were queried about their prepregnancy weight and weight gained during pregnancy. Adequacy of gestational weight gain was based on guidelines set by the Institute of Medicine in 2009. Independent risk factors for excessive or insufficient weight gain were examined by logistic regression. Most women were unmarried (59 %), with a mean age of 28.4 ± 6.6 years and an average weight gain of 27.9 ± 13.3 lbs. Approximately 45 % of women had gained too much, 32 % too little, and only 24 % had an adequate amount of weight gain. The mean birth weight was 7.3, 7.9, and 6.8 lbs among the adequate, excessive, and insufficient weight gain groups. Among women who exercised before pregnancy, two-thirds continued to do so during pregnancy; the mean gestational weight gain of those who continued was lower than those who stopped (26.8 vs. 31.4 lbs, p = 0.04). Independent risk factors for excessive weight gain were being unmarried, U.S. born, higher prepregnancy body mass index, and having indifferent or negative views about weight gain. Independent risk factors for insufficient weight gain were low levels of support and late initiation of prenatal care. Depression, stress, and a woman's or her partner's happiness regarding pregnancy were unrelated to weight gain. The results of this study can be used by prenatal programs to identify Hispanic women at risk for excessive or insufficient gestational weight gain.

  19. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) and thyroglobulin (TG) genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for two years to equalize CSN1S1 and TG genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epista...

  20. Cognitive Enhancement and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement--augmenting normal cognitive capacities--is not new. Literacy, numeracy, computers, and the practices of science are all cognitive enhancements. Science is now making new cognitive enhancements possible. Biomedical cognitive enhancements (BCEs) include the administration of drugs, implants of genetically engineered or…

  1. Controlling gain one photon at a time.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gregory W; Rieke, Fred

    2013-05-14

    Adaptation is a salient property of sensory processing. All adaptational or gain control mechanisms face the challenge of obtaining a reliable estimate of the property of the input to be adapted to and obtaining this estimate sufficiently rapidly to be useful. Here, we explore how the primate retina balances the need to change gain rapidly and reliably when photons arrive rarely at individual rod photoreceptors. We find that the weakest backgrounds that decrease the gain of the retinal output signals are similar to those that increase human behavioral threshold, and identify a novel site of gain control in the retinal circuitry. Thus, surprisingly, the gain of retinal signals begins to decrease essentially as soon as background lights are detectable; under these conditions, gain control does not rely on a highly averaged estimate of the photon count, but instead signals from individual photon absorptions trigger changes in gain. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00467.001.

  2. Gain-of-function of mutated C-CBL tumour suppressor in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Masashi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Shih, Lee-Yung; Otsu, Makoto; Kato, Motohiro; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Tamura, Azusa; Honda, Hiroaki; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Kumano, Keiki; Oda, Hideaki; Yamagata, Tetsuya; Takita, Junko; Gotoh, Noriko; Nakazaki, Kumi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Onodera, Masafumi; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Harada, Hiroshi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Chiba, Shigeru; Mori, Hiraku; Ozawa, Keiya; Omine, Mitsuhiro; Hirai, Hisamaru; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Koeffler, H Phillip; Ogawa, Seishi

    2009-08-13

    Acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) is a common feature of cancer genomes, leading to loss of heterozygosity. aUPD is associated not only with loss-of-function mutations of tumour suppressor genes, but also with gain-of-function mutations of proto-oncogenes. Here we show unique gain-of-function mutations of the C-CBL (also known as CBL) tumour suppressor that are tightly associated with aUPD of the 11q arm in myeloid neoplasms showing myeloproliferative features. The C-CBL proto-oncogene, a cellular homologue of v-Cbl, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and negatively regulates signal transduction of tyrosine kinases. Homozygous C-CBL mutations were found in most 11q-aUPD-positive myeloid malignancies. Although the C-CBL mutations were oncogenic in NIH3T3 cells, c-Cbl was shown to functionally and genetically act as a tumour suppressor. C-CBL mutants did not have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, but inhibited that of wild-type C-CBL and CBL-B (also known as CBLB), leading to prolonged activation of tyrosine kinases after cytokine stimulation. c-Cbl(-/-) haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) showed enhanced sensitivity to a variety of cytokines compared to c-Cbl(+/+) HSPCs, and transduction of C-CBL mutants into c-Cbl(-/-) HSPCs further augmented their sensitivities to a broader spectrum of cytokines, including stem-cell factor (SCF, also known as KITLG), thrombopoietin (TPO, also known as THPO), IL3 and FLT3 ligand (FLT3LG), indicating the presence of a gain-of-function that could not be attributed to a simple loss-of-function. The gain-of-function effects of C-CBL mutants on cytokine sensitivity of HSPCs largely disappeared in a c-Cbl(+/+) background or by co-transduction of wild-type C-CBL, which suggests the pathogenic importance of loss of wild-type C-CBL alleles found in most cases of C-CBL-mutated myeloid neoplasms. Our findings provide a new insight into a role of gain-of-function mutations of a tumour suppressor associated with aUPD in the pathogenesis of

  3. New Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  4. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Genetic Disorders Home For Patients Search FAQs Genetic Disorders ... Spanish Genetic Disorders FAQ094, April 2014 PDF Format Genetic Disorders Pregnancy What are genes? What are chromosomes? ...

  5. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal’s wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  6. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  7. Global Patterns of Protein Domain Gain and Loss in Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Domains are modules within proteins that can fold and function independently and are evolutionarily conserved. Here we compared the usage and distribution of protein domain families in the free-living proteomes of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya and reconstructed species phylogenies while tracing the history of domain emergence and loss in proteomes. We show that both gains and losses of domains occurred frequently during proteome evolution. The rate of domain discovery increased approximately linearly in evolutionary time. Remarkably, gains generally outnumbered losses and the gain-to-loss ratios were much higher in akaryotes compared to eukaryotes. Functional annotations of domain families revealed that both Archaea and Bacteria gained and lost metabolic capabilities during the course of evolution while Eukarya acquired a number of diverse molecular functions including those involved in extracellular processes, immunological mechanisms, and cell regulation. Results also highlighted significant contemporary sharing of informational enzymes between Archaea and Eukarya and metabolic enzymes between Bacteria and Eukarya. Finally, the analysis provided useful insights into the evolution of species. The archaeal superkingdom appeared first in evolution by gradual loss of ancestral domains, bacterial lineages were the first to gain superkingdom-specific domains, and eukaryotes (likely) originated when an expanding proto-eukaryotic stem lineage gained organelles through endosymbiosis of already diversified bacterial lineages. The evolutionary dynamics of domain families in proteomes and the increasing number of domain gains is predicted to redefine the persistence strategies of organisms in superkingdoms, influence the make up of molecular functions, and enhance organismal complexity by the generation of new domain architectures. This dynamics highlights ongoing secondary evolutionary adaptations in akaryotic microbes, especially Archaea. PMID:24499935

  8. Characterization of newly gained introns in Daphnia populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenli; Kuzoff, Robert; Wong, Chen Khuan; Tucker, Abraham; Lynch, Michael

    2014-08-14

    As one of the few known species in an active phase of intron proliferation, the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex is an especially attractive system for interrogating the gain and loss of introns in natural populations. In this study, we used a comparative population-genomic approach to identify and characterize 90 recently gained introns in this species. Molecular clock analyses indicate that these introns arose between 3.9 × 10(5) and 1.45 × 10(4) years ago, with a spike in intron proliferation approximately 5.2 × 10(4) to 1.22 × 10(5) years ago. Parallel gains at homologous positions contribute to 47.8% (43/90) of discovered new introns. A disproportionally large number of new introns were found in historically isolated populations in Oregon. Nonetheless, derived, intron-bearing alleles were also identified in a wide range of geographic locations, suggesting intron gain and, to a lesser degree, intron loss are important sources of genetic variation in natural populations of Daphnia. A majority (55/90 or 61.1%) of the identified neointrons have associated internal direct repeats with lengths and compositions that are unlikely to occur by chance, suggesting repeated bouts of staggered double-strand breaks (DSBs) during their evolution. Accordingly, internal, staggered DSBs may contribute to a passive trend toward increased length and sequence diversity in nascent introns.

  9. Nitrogen incorporation effects on gain properties of GaInNAs lasers : experiment and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Thranhardt, A.; Mawst, L. J.; Hader, J.; Schlichenmaier, C.; Tansu, N.; Yeh, J. -Y.; Belenky, G.; Chow, Weng Wah; Shterengas, L.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Koch, S. W.; Kuznetsova, I.

    2005-05-01

    Gain properties of GaInNAs lasers with different nitrogen concentrations in the quantum wells are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Whereas nitrogen incorporation induces appreciable modifications in the spectral extension and the carrier density dependence of the gain, it is found that the linewidth enhancement factor is reduced by inclusion of nitrogen, but basically unaffected by different nitrogen content due to the balancing between gain and index changes.

  10. Genomic-Based Optimum Contribution in Conservation and Genetic Improvement Programs with Antagonistic Fitness and Productivity Traits.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Molano, Enrique; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Banos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Animal selection for genetic improvement of productivity may lead to an increase in inbreeding through the use of techniques that enhance the reproductive capability of selected animals. Therefore, breeding strategies aim to balance maintaining genetic variability and acceptable fitness levels with increasing productivity. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of genomic-based optimum contribution strategies at addressing this objective when fitness and productivity are genetically antagonistic traits. Strategies are evaluated in directional selection (increasing productivity) or conservation (maintaining fitness) scenarios. In the former case, substantial rates of genetic gain can be achieved while greatly constraining the rate of increase in inbreeding. Under a conservation approach, inbreeding depression can be effectively halted while also achieving a modest rate of genetic gain for productivity. Furthermore, the use of optimum contribution strategies when combined with a simple non-random mating scheme (minimum kinship method) showed an additional delay in the increase of inbreeding in the short term. In conclusion, genomic-based optimum contribution methods can be effectively used to control inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and still allow genetic gain for productivity traits even when fitness and productivity are antagonistically correlated.

  11. Chromosomal gains at 9q characterize enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Andreas; Ott, German; Makulik, Angela; Katzenberger, Tiemo; Starostik, Petr; Eichler, Thorsten; Puppe, Bernhard; Bentz, Martin; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Chott, Andreas

    2002-11-01

    Genetic alterations in enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) are unknown so far. In this series, 38 cases of ETL were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). CGH revealed chromosomal imbalances in 87% of cases analyzed, with recurrent gains of genetic material involving chromosomes 9q (in 58% of cases), 7q (24%), 5q (18%), and 1q (16%). Recurrent losses of genetic material occurred on chromosomes 8p and 13q (24% each), and 9p (18%). In this first systematic genetic study on ETL, chromosomal gains on 9q (minimal overlapping region 9q33-q34) were found to be highly characteristic of ETL. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on four cases of ETL, using a probe for 9q34, indicated frequent and multiple gains of chromosomal material at 9q34 (up to nine signals per case). Among 16 patients with ETL who survived initial disease presentation, patients with more than three chromosomal gains or losses (n = 11) followed a worse clinical course than those with three or less imbalances (n = 5). The observation of similar genetic alterations in ETL and in primary gastric (n = 4) and colonic (n = 1) T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, is suggestive of a genetic relationship of gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas at either localization.

  12. Transient gain analysis of gain-switched semiconductor lasers during pulse lasing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Ito, Takashi; Asahara, Akifumi; Nakamae, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yoshita, Masahiro; Kim, Changsu; Zhang, Baoping; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Suemoto, Tohru; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2015-12-10

    We analyzed the transient gain properties of three gain-switched semiconductor lasers with different materials and cavity structures during pulse lasing. All the semiconductor lasers were pumped with impulse optical pumping, and all the generated gain-switched output pulses were well described by exponential functions in their rise parts, wherein the transient gains were derived according to the rate-equation theoretical model. In spite of the different laser structures and materials, the results consistently demonstrated that a higher transient gain produces shorter output pulses, indicating the dominant role of higher transient gain in the generation of even shorter gain-switched pulses with semiconductor lasers.

  13. Microchannel plate modal gain variations with temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the modal gain of two high-gain curved-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) at various operating temperatures are presented. Both MCPs were fabricated from the Long Life glass with 12-micron diam channels on 15-micron centers. The modal gain was found to decrease with increasing temperature at a rate of -0.1 percent C. This reduction of gain with temperature is attributed primarily to an axial temperature gradient along each MCP channel creating a nonuniform electric field within the channel that lowers the effective output gain. A lowering of the secondary electron yield resulting from increased phonon scattering of secondary electrons released within the walls of the MCP channels was assessed, but was found to have a negligible contribution to the drop in gain with temperature.

  14. Optical antenna gain. I - Transmitting antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The gain of centrally obscured optical transmitting antennas is analyzed in detail. The calculations, resulting in near- and far-field antenna gain patterns, assume a circular antenna illuminated by a laser operating in the TEM-00 mode. A simple polynomial equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn that display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the beam in the far field as a function of antenna aperture size and its central obscuration. The results are presented in a series of graphs that allow the rapid and accurate evaluation of the antenna gain which may then be substituted into the conventional range equation.

  15. Optical antenna gain. 1: transmitting antennas.

    PubMed

    Klein, B J; Degnan, J J

    1974-09-01

    The gain of centrally obscured optical transmitting antennas is analyzed in detail. The calculations, resulting in near- and far-field antenna gain patterns, assume a circular antenna illuminated by a laser operating in the TEM(00) mode. A simple polynomial equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn that display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the beam in the far field as a function of antenna aperture size and its central obscuration. The results are presented in a series of graphs that allow the rapid and accurate evaluation of the antenna gain which may then be substituted into the conventional range equation.

  16. Gestational weight gain trajectories in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Lee-Baggley, Dayna; Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify gestational weight gain trajectories, stratified by prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), of women with singleton pregnancies who received prenatal care in a primary care setting, and to compare these trajectories with the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight gain recommendations. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Halifax, NS. Participants Women who received prenatal care at the Dalhousie Family Medicine clinics in Halifax from 2009 to 2013. Main outcome measures For each prenatal visit, gestational age and weight measurements were obtained. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the gestational weight gain trajectories. The upper limit of the guideline-recommended weekly gestational weight gain was compared with the 95% CI of the observed mean weekly gestational weight gain for each prepregnancy BMI category. Results A total of 280 women were included in the analyses. There was a significant interaction between prepregnancy BMI category and gestational weight gain over time (P < .001), with gestational weight gain being significantly lower among women with prepregnancy BMI of 30.0 kg/m2 or greater compared with those with BMI of 18.5 to less than 25.0 kg/m2 and 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2. When comparing women’s weight gain with the recommendations, women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 had the most guideline discordance, deviating from the weight gain recommendations at 20 weeks’ gestation. Conclusion These results are relevant and of benefit to women and clinicians wishing to address excess gestational weight gain, and to researchers and policy makers developing interventions aimed at curbing gestational weight gain in primary care. Although our results showed women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 gained the most excess, guideline-discordant weight, interventions should target all women planning or experiencing a pregnancy.

  17. Unstable resonators with a distributed focusing gain.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T R

    1994-08-20

    The geometrical optics approximation is used to form a model of axisymmetric unstable resonators having distributed focus, gain, and loss. A tapered reflectivity feedback mirror is included. The rate equations for propagation through the focusing gain medium are derived. A unique grid is found for propagation without interpolation along eigenrays in each direction. Numerical examples show the effects of distributed gain and focus on the axial and transverse intensity distributions.

  18. Measurement of Antenna Bore-Sight Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortinberry, Jarrod; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The absolute or free-field gain of a simple antenna can be approximated using standard antenna theory formulae or for a more accurate prediction, numerical methods may be employed to solve for antenna parameters including gain. Both of these methods will result in relatively reasonable estimates but in practice antenna gain is usually verified and documented via measurements and calibration. In this paper, a relatively simple and low-cost, yet effective means of determining the bore-sight free-field gain of a VHF/UHF antenna is proposed by using the Brewster angle relationship.

  19. Error margin for antenna gain measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, V.

    2002-01-01

    The specification of measured antenna gain is incomplete without knowing the error of the measurement. Also, unless gain is measured many times for a single antenna or over many identical antennas, the uncertainty or error in a single measurement is only an estimate. In this paper, we will examine in detail a typical error budget for common antenna gain measurements. We will also compute the gain uncertainty for a specific UHF horn test that was recently performed on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) antenna range. The paper concludes with comments on these results and how they compare with the 'unofficial' JPL range standard of +/- ?.

  20. Optimum wavelet based masking for the contrast enhancement of medical images using enhanced cuckoo search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Anitha, J

    2016-04-01

    Unsharp masking techniques are a prominent approach in contrast enhancement. Generalized masking formulation has static scale value selection, which limits the gain of contrast. In this paper, we propose an Optimum Wavelet Based Masking (OWBM) using Enhanced Cuckoo Search Algorithm (ECSA) for the contrast improvement of medical images. The ECSA can automatically adjust the ratio of nest rebuilding, using genetic operators such as adaptive crossover and mutation. First, the proposed contrast enhancement approach is validated quantitatively using Brain Web and MIAS database images. Later, the conventional nest rebuilding of cuckoo search optimization is modified using Adaptive Rebuilding of Worst Nests (ARWN). Experimental results are analyzed using various performance matrices, and our OWBM shows improved results as compared with other reported literature.

  1. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  2. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  3. Correcting the Normalized Gain for Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; Stewart, Gay

    2010-01-01

    The normalized gain, "g", has been an important tool for the characterization of conceptual improvement in physics courses since its use in Hake's extensive study on conceptual learning in introductory physics. The normalized gain is calculated from the score on a pre-test administered before instruction and a post-test administered…

  4. Gain Shift Corrections at Chi-Nu

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Tristan Brooks; Devlin, Matthew James

    2016-08-30

    Ambient conditions have the potential to cause changes in liquid scintillator detector gain that vary with time and temperature. These gain shifts can lead to poor resolution in both energy as well as pulse shape discrimination. In order to correct for these shifts in the Chi-Nu high energy array, a laser system has been developed for calibration of the pulse height signals.

  5. 75 FR 43615 - Program Integrity: Gainful Employment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Education 34 CFR Part 668 Program Integrity: Gainful Employment; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol... RIN 1840-AD04 Program Integrity: Gainful Employment AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education... against the education and training (and increased employment income) that higher education can provide....

  6. Physical and psychological consequences of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, I

    1999-01-01

    Obesity and overweight are clearly associated with many serious conditions, including type II diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. Excess weight also increases the risk of death. Recent evidence suggests that weight gain itself, even if persons remain within the "normal" weight range, also increases the risk of medical illnesses and premature death. Persons who gain 5.0 to 7.9 kg (11 to 17.3 lb) as adults are 1.9 times more likely to develop type II diabetes mellitus and 1.25 times more likely to develop coronary heart disease than those who lose weight or maintain a stable weight after age 18 years. Gaining 11 to 20 kg (24.2 to 44 lb) or more in adulthood increases the risk of ischemic stroke 1.69 to 2.52 times. The relationship between weight gain and breast cancer has been difficult to study, primarily because postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy can mask the effect of weight gain on cancer risk. Accordingly, weight gain in adulthood has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer only among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy. In addition to its adverse effects on disease outcomes, weight gain also impairs physical functioning, reduces quality of life, and is associated with poor mental health. These psychological and mental health consequences of weight gain can become an added burden for patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders.

  7. Complying with physician gain-sharing restrictions.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, P K

    1998-05-01

    Many IDSs are considering implementing gain-sharing programs as a way to motivate their physicians to provide high-quality, cost-effective services. Before embarking on such programs, however, IDSs need to understand the legal requirements associated with such programs to ensure that the gain-sharing arrangement is in compliance with Federal law.

  8. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  9. Sudden Gains During Therapy of Social Phobia

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Schulz, Stefan M.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Moscovitch, David A.; Suvak, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the phenomenon of sudden gains in 107 participants with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who received either cognitive–behavioral group therapy or exposure group therapy without explicit cognitive interventions, which primarily used public speaking situations as exposure tasks. Twenty-two out of 967 session-to-session intervals met criteria for sudden gains, which most frequently occurred in Session 5. Individuals with sudden gains showed similar improvements in the 2 treatment groups. Although cognitive–behavioral therapy was associated with more cognitive changes than exposure therapy, cognitive changes did not precede sudden gains. In general, the results of this study question the clinical significance of sudden gains in social phobia treatment. PMID:16881776

  10. Photoinduced field modulation in multiquantum well heterostructures: A new photocurrent gain mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Giancarlo; Capasso, Federico; Tsang, Won-Tien; Hutchinson, Albert L.

    A new photocurrent gain mechanism in multiquantum well structures has been observed. Unlike conventional photoconductors, the gain in these devices is caused not by a modulation of the conductivity, but by a modulation of the electric field. The physical basis of this phenomenon is the partial screening of the electric field in the wells due to the pile-up of photocarriers. At constant bias voltage this leads to an enhancement of the field in the barrier layers. In structures with injecting contacts this mechanism enhances electron injection and therefore gives rise to photocurrent gain.

  11. Why Research on the Pharmacogenetics of Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleister, Heidi M.; Valdovinos, Maria Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Weight gain is an often-observed side effect of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and is particularly significant in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). The majority of individuals treated with AAPs will gain at least 10% of their initial body weight over the course of therapy (Umbricht & Kane, 1996). One's genetic constitution is an…

  12. Neural mechanisms of gain-loss asymmetry in temporal discounting.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Saori C; Yamada, Katsunori; Yoneda, Hiroyasu; Ohtake, Fumio

    2014-04-16

    Humans typically discount future gains more than losses. This phenomenon is referred to as the "sign effect" in experimental and behavioral economics. Although recent studies have reported associations between the sign effect and important social problems, such as obesity and incurring multiple debts, the biological basis for this phenomenon remains poorly understood. Here, we hypothesized that enhanced loss-related neural processing in magnitude and/or delay representation are causes of the sign effect. We examined participants performing intertemporal choice tasks involving future gains or losses and compared the brain activity of those who exhibited the sign effect and those who did not. When predicting future losses, significant differences were apparent between the two participant groups in terms of striatal activity representing delay length and in insular activity representing sensitivity to magnitude. Furthermore, participants with the sign effect exhibited a greater insular response to the magnitude of loss than to that of gain, and also a greater striatal response to the delay of loss than to that of gain. These findings may provide a new biological perspective for the development of novel treatments and preventive measures for social problems associated with the sign effect.

  13. Recent and projected increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration can enhance gene flow between wild and genetically altered rice (Oryza sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide can alter plant phenological development, these changes have not been quantified in terms of floral outcrossing rates or gene transfer. Could differential phenological development in response to rising CO2 between genetically mod...

  14. A Reverse Genetic System Provides a Powerful Tool in the Design of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses with Enhanced Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fact that the foot-and-mouth disease viral (FMDV) RNA can be made infectious in the absence of other components of the virion allows the recovery of genetically engineered new viruses from in vitro-generated RNA molecules. We utilize infectious cDNA technology to produce recombinant FMDV, retain...

  15. Does radiation-induced abrogation of skin Langerhans cell functions lead to enhanced incidence of skin tumors in patients with genetic disorders of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented which states that persons with the genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum and ataxia-telangiectasia, manifested by a deficiency of DNA repair, develop cutaneous tumors due to the elimination of reticuloendothelial system cells (Langerhans cells) in the skin, and the subsequent loss of control of epidermal cellular elements. 84 references.

  16. Gain properties of an uncoated and chiral coated slotted sphere embedded in a chiral background.

    PubMed

    Awan, Z A

    2016-10-10

    The gain properties of an uncoated and a chiral coated slotted sphere embedded in a chiral background have been investigated using numerical simulations. In this paper, it is found that a chiral background medium enhances the gain of an uncoated slotted sphere in the forward direction as compared to the free space background. It is shown that the forward direction gain of a chiral coated slotted sphere embedded in a chiral background increases with the increase in the background chirality. It is further determined that the maximum gain moves away from the polar direction toward the forward direction as the chirality of the coating increases for a fixed background chirality. Also, this maximum gain gradually decreases as the chirality of the coating increases. An interesting feature of an angular window is introduced for a chiral coated slotted sphere embedded in a chiral background where the gain is nearly constant for a specific range of angles.

  17. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  18. Nonunity gain minimal-disturbance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sabuncu, Metin; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Mista, Ladislav Jr.; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Filip, Radim; Leuchs, Gerd

    2007-09-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optimal nonunity gain Gaussian scheme for partial measurement of an unknown coherent state that causes minimal disturbance of the state. The information gain and the state disturbance are quantified by the noise added to the measurement outcomes and to the output state, respectively. We derive the optimal trade-off relation between the two noises and we show that the tradeoff is saturated by nonunity gain teleportation. Optimal partial measurement is demonstrated experimentally using a linear optics scheme with feedforward.

  19. Frequency Dependence of APATS Antenna Gain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    ESD-TR-82-120 HTR-8354 3FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 0 By G. A. ROBERTSHAW MARCH 1982 Prepared for DEPUTY FOR SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL...FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER MTR-8354 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) G. A. ROBERTSHAW F19628-81-C...employed, each channel will lose 1.76 dB of gain. * E.g., if "a" is aperture length in array azimuth plane, frequency dependence begins for 0 > srFl

  20. Genetic characterization of Chikungunya virus in the Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Marion; Kamgang, Basile; Berthet, Nicolas; Tricou, Vianney; Ngoagouni, Carine; Gessain, Antoine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus transmitted by the bite of mosquito vectors. Over the past 10 years, the virus has gained mutations that enhance its transmissibility by the Aedes albopictus vector, resulting in massive outbreaks in the Indian Ocean, Asia and Central Africa. Recent introduction of competent A. albopictus vectors into the Central African Republic (CAR) pose a threat of a Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) epidemic in this region. We undertook this study to assess the genetic diversity and background of CHIKV strains isolated in the CAR between 1975 and 1984 and also to estimate the ability of local strains to adapt to A. albopictus. Our results suggest that, local CHIKV strains have a genetic background compatible with quick adaptation to A. albopictus, as previously observed in other Central African countries. Intense surveillance of the human and vector populations is necessary to prevent or anticipate the emergence of a massive CHIKF epidemic in the CAR.

  1. Optical properties of nanowire metamaterials with gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Joaquim; Adam, Jost; Rego, Davi; Esquerre, Vitaly; Bordo, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    The transmittance, reflectance and absorption of a nanowire metamaterial with optical gain are numerically simulated and investigated. It is assumed that the metamaterial is represented by aligned silver nanowires embedded into a semiconductor matrix, made of either silicon or gallium phosphide. The gain in the matrix is modeled by adding a negative imaginary part to the dielectric function of the semiconductor. It is found that the optical coefficients of the metamaterial depend on the gain magnitude in a non-trivial way: they can both increase and decrease with gain depending on the lattice constant of the metamaterial. This peculiar behavior is explained by the field redistribution between the lossy metal nanowires and the amplifying matrix material. These findings are significant for a proper design of nanowire metamaterials with low optical losses for diverse applications.

  2. Experience matters: information acquisition optimizes probability gain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonathan D; McKenzie, Craig R M; Cottrell, Garrison W; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-07-01

    Deciding which piece of information to acquire or attend to is fundamental to perception, categorization, medical diagnosis, and scientific inference. Four statistical theories of the value of information-information gain, Kullback-Liebler distance, probability gain (error minimization), and impact-are equally consistent with extant data on human information acquisition. Three experiments, designed via computer optimization to be maximally informative, tested which of these theories best describes human information search. Experiment 1, which used natural sampling and experience-based learning to convey environmental probabilities, found that probability gain explained subjects' information search better than the other statistical theories or the probability-of-certainty heuristic. Experiments 1 and 2 found that subjects behaved differently when the standard method of verbally presented summary statistics (rather than experience-based learning) was used to convey environmental probabilities. Experiment 3 found that subjects' preference for probability gain is robust, suggesting that the other models contribute little to subjects' search behavior.

  3. Can Beta Blockers Cause Weight Gain?

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can beta blockers cause weight gain? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, ... can occur as a side effect of some beta blockers, especially the older ones, such as atenolol (Tenormin) ...

  4. Effect of gain compression above and below threshold on the chirp characteristics of 1.55 µm distributed feedback laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousuf, Abida; Najeeb-ud-din, Hakim

    2016-12-01

    We have observed and quantified the adiabatic and transient chirp in a directly modulated laser. The wavelength excursion for both chirp terms is well characterized by the phase rate equation model that describes the chirp behavior. In this study, the effect of gain compression and linewidth enhancement factor, below and above threshold, on the chirp characteristics is investigated by simulation. We have observed the trade-off between the two chirp terms i.e., transient part of the chirp is reduced by the strong damping introduced by gain compression, while as the adiabatic part increases with gain compression. We have observed that above threshold the α-factor increases with bias current, which is attributed to the enhancement of gain compression coefficient. It is shown that the higher the maximum gain, the lower the effects of gain compression and lower the α-factor. Finally, the effects of gain compression on the transmission characteristics are investigated.

  5. Tradeoff on gain-flatness and gain-stabilization of erbium doped fiber amplifier with FBGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyin, Garidi; OuYang, Yunlun; Ma, Yu; Chang, Jinlong; Liu, Changxing; Yang, Jiuru

    2014-07-01

    It is a challenge to get gain-stabilization and gain-flatness of erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) in C-band, simultaneously. In this article, we establish a gain-clamped EDFA model based uniform fiber grating-pair and optimize the reflectivity of grating by the designed targets. The tradeoff between stabilization and flatness can be obtained when an ideal reflectivity is adopted. The numerical results show that the gain-stabilization is controlled in +/-0.1dB and gain-flatness is less than +/-1.41dB in the range from 1535nm to 1565nm.

  6. 34 CFR 462.43 - How is educational gain measured?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Educational Gain? § 462.43 How is educational gain measured? (a)(1) Educational gain is measured by comparing... educational functioning level. To measure educational gain, the local eligible provider would compare...

  7. Soft x-ray laser gain measurements in a recombining plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Milchberg, H.; Keane, C.; Voorhees, D.

    1985-03-01

    An enhancement of approx. 100 of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission of the CVI 182 A line (one-pass gain approx. = 6.5) was measured in a recombining, magnetically confined plasma column by two independent techniques using intensity calibrated XUV monochromators. Additional confirmation that the enhancement was due to stimulated emission has been obtained with a soft x-ray mirror.

  8. Context-specific adaptation of saccade gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Clendaniel, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies established that vestibular reflexes can have two adapted states (e.g., gain) simultaneously, and that a context cue (e.g., vertical eye position) can switch between the two states. The present study examined this phenomenon of context-specific adaptationfor horizontal saccades, using a variety of contexts. Our overall goal was to assess the efficacy of different context cues in switching between adapted states. A standard double-step paradigm was used to adapt saccade gain. In each experiment, we asked for a simultaneous gain decrease in one context and gain increase in another context, and then determined if a change in the context would invoke switching between the adapted states. Horizontal eye position worked well as a context cue: saccades with the eyes deviated to the right could be made to have higher gains while saccades with the eyes deviated to the left could be made to have lower gains. Vertical eye position was less effective. This suggests that the more closely related a context cue is to the response being adapted, the more effective it is. Roll tilt of the head, and upright versus supine orientations, were somewhat effective in context switching; these paradigms contain orientation of gravity with respect to the head as part of the context.

  9. Determination of the STIS CCD Gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Allyssa; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Lockwood, Sean A.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has been aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for almost 20 years. The STIS instrument team at Space Telescope Science Institute has continuously endeavored to provide high quality scientific data to the astronomical community, in part by monitoring the health and stability of the instrument. Because the change in gain value over time is a proxy for detector health, we measured the gain of the STIS CCD for amplifiers A, C and D using the mean-variance method, which has not been used to measure the CCD gain on STIS since before it was installed on HST. Here we present our methodology and results using data from the HST program 14424, which indicate a <3.5% change in the gain for amplifier D from when it was originally calculated pre-flight. We compare the various CCD gain measurements made over the history of STIS and discuss the extent to which the data and the different measurement techniques allow real changes to be distinguished from small systematic measurement errors. For the time being, we recommend the continued use of the currently adopted calibration pipeline values of 1.000 and 4.016 e-/DN for amplifier D at the nominal gain settings 1 and 4 e-/DN, respectively, as these are the values that were adopted when determining the other instrument calibrations.

  10. Phenotypic H-Antigen Typing by Mass Spectrometry Combined with Genetic Typing of H Antigens, O Antigens, and Toxins by Whole-Genome Sequencing Enhances Identification of Escherichia coli Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Huixia; Domish, Larissa; Sloan, Angela; Hernandez, Drexler; McCorrister, Stuart; Robinson, Alyssia; Walker, Matthew; Peterson, Lorea A. M.; Majcher, Miles; Ratnam, Sam; Haldane, David J. M.; Bekal, Sadjia; Wylie, John; Chui, Linda; Tyler, Shaun; Xu, Bianli; Reimer, Aleisha; Nadon, Celine; Knox, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phenotypic H-antigen typing (MS-H) combined with whole-genome-sequencing-based genetic identification of H antigens, O antigens, and toxins (WGS-HOT) was used to type 60 clinical Escherichia coli isolates, 43 of which were previously identified as nonmotile, H type undetermined, or O rough by serotyping or having shown discordant MS-H and serotyping results. Whole-genome sequencing confirmed that MS-H was able to provide more accurate data regarding H antigen expression than serotyping. Further, enhanced and more confident O antigen identification resulted from gene cluster based typing in combination with conventional typing based on the gene pair comprising wzx and wzy and that comprising wzm and wzt. The O antigen was identified in 94.6% of the isolates when the two genetic O typing approaches (gene pair and gene cluster) were used in conjunction, in comparison to 78.6% when the gene pair database was used alone. In addition, 98.2% of the isolates showed the existence of genes for various toxins and/or virulence factors, among which verotoxins (Shiga toxin 1 and/or Shiga toxin 2) were 100% concordant with conventional PCR based testing results. With more applications of mass spectrometry and whole-genome sequencing in clinical microbiology laboratories, this combined phenotypic and genetic typing platform (MS-H plus WGS-HOT) should be ideal for pathogenic E. coli typing. PMID:27307455

  11. Effect of body weight gain on insulin sensitivity after retirement from exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, Constantine B.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the body-weight gain after retirement from an exercise-training program on the retained increase in insulin sensitivity elicited by the training was investigated in exercise-trained (ET) rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance and insulin suppression tests immediately after training and during retirement. Results show that, compared with sedentary controls, exercise training enhanced insulin-induced glucose uptake, but the enhanced sensitivity was gradually lost with the end of running activity until after seven days of retirement, when it became equal to that of controls. This loss of enhanced sensitivity to insulin was associated with an accelerated gain in body weight beginning one day after the start of retirement. However, those animals that gained weight only at rates similar to those of control rats, retained their enhanced sensitivity to insulin.

  12. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  13. Antidepressant-induced undesirable weight gain: prevention with rimonabant without interference with behavioral effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Gobshtis, Nikolai; Ben-Shabat, Shimon; Fride, Ester

    2007-01-12

    Antidepressant pharmacotherapy has dramatically improved the quality of life for many patients. However, prolonged use may induce weight gain, resulting in enhanced risk for treatment noncompliance. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists decrease food intake and body weight, but may also affect mood. We investigated in female Sabra mice first, whether acute treatment with the cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (5-(4-Chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, SR141716, 5 mg/kg) interfered with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (15 mg/kg) or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in the Porsolt forced swimming test. Second, whether chronic treatment (3 months) with desipramine (5 mg/kg) enhanced weight gain and whether cotreatment with rimonabant (2 mg/kg), prevented the excessive weight gain, while retaining antidepressant effectiveness. Motor activity and anxiety-like behavior were also investigated. The acute studies indicated that rimonabant did not influence 'antidepressant' activity of desipramine or fluoxetine. In the chronic studies, desipramine enhanced weight gain, despite the observation that the injection procedure reduced weight gain. The enhanced weight gain continued at least 35 days after treatment ended. Rimonabant reduced weight gain to which no tolerance developed and which persisted at least 30 days beyond treatment. Mice cotreated with rimonabant and desipramine had body weights closer to controls or to those receiving rimonabant alone than to those treated with desipramine alone. The antidepressant effects of desipramine were maintained throughout treatment; this was not altered by the chronic rimonabant treatment at any time, although rimonabant together with desipramine transiently enhanced anxiety-like behavior. These observations suggest that combined treatment with antidepressants and cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist to prevent undesirable weight

  14. Genetic variance and covariance components for feed intake, average daily gain, and postweaning gain in growing beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed is the single most expensive cost related to a beef cattle production enterprise. Data collection to determine feed efficient animals is also costly. Currently a 70 d performance test is recommended for accurate calculation of efficiency. Previous research has suggested intake tests can be l...

  15. Epigenomic profiling of primary gastric adenocarcinoma reveals super-enhancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Wen Fong; Xing, Manjie; Xu, Chang; Yao, Xiaosai; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Lim, Mei Chee; Cao, Fan; Lim, Kevin; Babu, Deepak; Poon, Lai-Fong; Lin Suling, Joyce; Qamra, Aditi; Irwanto, Astrid; Qu Zhengzhong, James; Nandi, Tannistha; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Chan, Yang Sun; Tay, Su Ting; Lee, Ming Hui; Davies, James O J; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ong, Hock Soo; Chow, Pierce; Wong, Chow Yin; Rha, Sun Young; Liu, Jianjun; Hillmer, Axel M; Hughes, Jim R; Rozen, Steve; Teh, Bin Tean; Fullwood, Melissa Jane; Li, Shang; Tan, Patrick

    2016-09-28

    Regulatory enhancer elements in solid tumours remain poorly characterized. Here we apply micro-scale chromatin profiling to survey the distal enhancer landscape of primary gastric adenocarcinoma (GC), a leading cause of global cancer mortality. Integrating 110 epigenomic profiles from primary GCs, normal gastric tissues and cell lines, we highlight 36,973 predicted enhancers and 3,759 predicted super-enhancers respectively. Cell-line-defined super-enhancers can be subclassified by their somatic alteration status into somatic gain, loss and unaltered categories, each displaying distinct epigenetic, transcriptional and pathway enrichments. Somatic gain super-enhancers are associated with complex chromatin interaction profiles, expression patterns correlated with patient outcome and dense co-occupancy of the transcription factors CDX2 and HNF4α. Somatic super-enhancers are also enriched in genetic risk SNPs associated with cancer predisposition. Our results reveal a genome-wide reprogramming of the GC enhancer and super-enhancer landscape during tumorigenesis, contributing to dysregulated local and regional cancer gene expression.

  16. Epigenomic profiling of primary gastric adenocarcinoma reveals super-enhancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Wen Fong; Xing, Manjie; Xu, Chang; Yao, Xiaosai; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Lim, Mei Chee; Cao, Fan; Lim, Kevin; Babu, Deepak; Poon, Lai-Fong; Lin Suling, Joyce; Qamra, Aditi; Irwanto, Astrid; Qu Zhengzhong, James; Nandi, Tannistha; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Chan, Yang Sun; Tay, Su Ting; Lee, Ming Hui; Davies, James O. J.; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ong, Hock Soo; Chow, Pierce; Wong, Chow Yin; Rha, Sun Young; Liu, Jianjun; Hillmer, Axel M.; Hughes, Jim R.; Rozen, Steve; Teh, Bin Tean; Fullwood, Melissa Jane; Li, Shang; Tan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory enhancer elements in solid tumours remain poorly characterized. Here we apply micro-scale chromatin profiling to survey the distal enhancer landscape of primary gastric adenocarcinoma (GC), a leading cause of global cancer mortality. Integrating 110 epigenomic profiles from primary GCs, normal gastric tissues and cell lines, we highlight 36,973 predicted enhancers and 3,759 predicted super-enhancers respectively. Cell-line-defined super-enhancers can be subclassified by their somatic alteration status into somatic gain, loss and unaltered categories, each displaying distinct epigenetic, transcriptional and pathway enrichments. Somatic gain super-enhancers are associated with complex chromatin interaction profiles, expression patterns correlated with patient outcome and dense co-occupancy of the transcription factors CDX2 and HNF4α. Somatic super-enhancers are also enriched in genetic risk SNPs associated with cancer predisposition. Our results reveal a genome-wide reprogramming of the GC enhancer and super-enhancer landscape during tumorigenesis, contributing to dysregulated local and regional cancer gene expression. PMID:27677335

  17. The sister chromatid cohesion pathway suppresses multiple chromosome gain and chromosome amplification.

    PubMed

    Covo, Shay; Puccia, Christopher M; Argueso, Juan Lucas; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Gain or loss of chromosomes resulting in aneuploidy can be important factors in cancer and adaptive evolution. Although chromosome gain is a frequent event in eukaryotes, there is limited information on its genetic control. Here we measured the rates of chromosome gain in wild-type yeast and sister chromatid cohesion (SCC) compromised strains. SCC tethers the newly replicated chromatids until anaphase via the cohesin complex. Chromosome gain was measured by selecting and characterizing copper-resistant colonies that emerged due to increased copies of the metallothionein gene CUP1. Although all defective SCC diploid strains exhibited increased rates of chromosome gain, there were 15-fold differences between them. Of all mutants examined, a hypomorphic mutation at the cohesin complex caused the highest rate of chromosome gain while disruption of WPL1, an important regulator of SCC and chromosome condensation, resulted in the smallest increase in chromosome gain. In addition to defects in SCC, yeast cell type contributed significantly to chromosome gain, with the greatest rates observed for homozygous mating-type diploids, followed by heterozygous mating type, and smallest in haploids. In fact, wpl1-deficient haploids did not show any difference in chromosome gain rates compared to wild-type haploids. Genomic analysis of copper-resistant colonies revealed that the "driver" chromosome for which selection was applied could be amplified to over five copies per diploid cell. In addition, an increase in the expected driver chromosome was often accompanied by a gain of a small number of other chromosomes. We suggest that while chromosome gain due to SCC malfunction can have negative effects through gene imbalance, it could also facilitate opportunities for adaptive changes. In multicellular organisms, both factors could lead to somatic diseases including cancer.

  18. Edemagenic gain and interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Quick, C M; Stewart, R H; Drake, R E; Cox, C S; Laine, G A

    2008-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, interstitial fluid volume is tightly regulated by balancing microvascular filtration and lymphatic return to the central venous circulation. Even though microvascular filtration and lymphatic return are governed by conservation of mass, their interaction can result in exceedingly complex behavior. Without making simplifying assumptions, investigators must solve the fluid balance equations numerically, which limits the generality of the results. We thus made critical simplifying assumptions to develop a simple solution to the standard fluid balance equations that is expressed as an algebraic formula. Using a classical approach to describe systems with negative feedback, we formulated our solution as a "gain" relating the change in interstitial fluid volume to a change in effective microvascular driving pressure. The resulting "edemagenic gain" is a function of microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)), effective lymphatic resistance (R(L)), and interstitial compliance (C). This formulation suggests two types of gain: "multivariate" dependent on C, R(L), and K(f), and "compliance-dominated" approximately equal to C. The latter forms a basis of a novel method to estimate C without measuring interstitial fluid pressure. Data from ovine experiments illustrate how edemagenic gain is altered with pulmonary edema induced by venous hypertension, histamine, and endotoxin. Reformulation of the classical equations governing fluid balance in terms of edemagenic gain thus yields new insight into the factors affecting an organ's susceptibility to edema.

  19. Gain and energy storage in holmium YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.; Deyst, John P.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated that Q-switched holmium lasers are capable of high-gain and high-energy operation at 300 K. Small-signal gain coefficients of 0.50 and 0.12/cm have been measured in YLF and YAG, respectively. Small-signal gains of 0.50/cm are comparable to those achievable in Nd:YAG and are not typical of low-gain materials. This large gain in the Ho:YLF material is made possible by operating the amplifier in the ground state depletion mode. The amplifier performance data and associated analysis presented demonstrate that efficient energy storage is possible with very high excited state ion densities of the Ho 5I7 upper laser level. This is an important result since upconversion can limit the 5I7 population. Although upconversion was still present in this experiment, it was possible to achieve efficient energy storage, demonstrating that the problem is manageable even at high excitation densities in YLF.

  20. New night vision goggle gain definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, Vyacheslav B.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Larason, Thomas C.

    2015-05-01

    A new definition is proposed for the calibration of Night Vision Goggle (NVG) gains. This definition is based on the measurement of radiometric input and output quantities of the NVG. While the old definition used the "equivalent fL" which is a non SI traceable luminance unit, the new definition utilizes the radiance quantities that are traceable to the SI units through NIST standards. The new NVG gain matches the previous one as a result of the application of a correction coefficient originating from the conversion of the radiance to luminance units. The new definition was tested at the NIST Night Vision Calibration Facility and the measurement results were compared to the data obtained with a Hoffman Test Set Model ANV-126. Comparing the radiometric quantities of the Hoffman Test Set and those measured by the NIST transfer standard radiometer, indicates that the observed differences up to 15% were due to the calibration and experimental errors of the ANV-126 Test Set. In view of different spectral characteristics of luminophores that can be utilized in the NVG design, the simulation of the NVG output for gain measurement was performed. The NVG output was simulated with a sphere-based source using different LEDs and the measured gain was compared to that obtained with the ANV-126 internal luminance meter. The NVG gain uncertainty analysis was performed for the Type A, B, and C goggles.

  1. Genetic, Physiological, and Gene Expression Analyses Reveal That Multiple QTL Enhance Yield of Rice Mega-Variety IR64 under Drought

    PubMed Central

    Swamy B. P., Mallikarjuna; Ahmed, Helal Uddin; Henry, Amelia; Mauleon, Ramil; Dixit, Shalabh; Vikram, Prashant; Tilatto, Ram; Verulkar, Satish B.; Perraju, Puvvada; Mandal, Nimai P.; Variar, Mukund; S., Robin; Chandrababu, Ranganath; Singh, Onkar N.; Dwivedi, Jawaharlal L.; Das, Sankar Prasad; Mishra, Krishna K.; Yadaw, Ram B.; Aditya, Tamal Lata; Karmakar, Biswajit; Satoh, Kouji; Moumeni, Ali; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Leung, Hei; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a highly drought sensitive crop, and most semi dwarf rice varieties suffer severe yield losses from reproductive stage drought stress. The genetic complexity of drought tolerance has deterred the identification of agronomically relevant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that can be deployed to improve rice yield under drought in rice. Convergent evidence from physiological characterization, genetic mapping, and multi-location field evaluation was used to address this challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings Two pairs of backcross inbred lines (BILs) from a cross between drought-tolerant donor Aday Sel and high-yielding but drought-susceptible rice variety IR64 were produced. From six BC4F3 mapping populations produced by crossing the +QTL BILs with the −QTL BILs and IR64, four major-effect QTL - one each on chromosomes 2, 4, 9, and 10 - were identified. Meta-analysis of transcriptome data from the +QTL/−QTL BILs identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) significantly associated with QTL on chromosomes 2, 4, 9, and 10. Physiological characterization of BILs showed increased water uptake ability under drought. The enrichment of DEGs associated with root traits points to differential regulation of root development and function as contributing to drought tolerance in these BILs. BC4F3-derived lines with the QTL conferred yield advantages of 528 to 1875 kg ha−1 over IR64 under reproductive-stage drought stress in the targeted ecosystems of South Asia. Conclusions/Significance Given the importance of rice in daily food consumption and the popularity of IR64, the BC4F3 lines with multiple QTL could provide higher livelihood security to farmers in drought-prone environments. Candidate genes were shortlisted for further characterization to confirm their role in drought tolerance. Differential yield advantages of different combinations of the four QTL reported here indicate that future research should include optimizing QTL

  2. The relationship between parental genetic or phenotypic divergence and progeny variation in the maize nested association mapping population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The choice of populations for quantitative genetics experiments impacts inferences about genetic architecture and prospective selection gains. Plant breeding and quantitative genetics studies are often conducted in one or a few among many possible biparental families. Trait genotypic variation withi...

  3. New Results in Astrodynamics Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, V.; Hartmann, J. W.; Williams, S. N.; Mason, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Generic algorithms have gained popularity as an effective procedure for obtaining solutions to traditionally difficult space mission optimization problems. In this paper, a brief survey of the use of genetic algorithms to solve astrodynamics problems is presented and is followed by new results obtained from applying a Pareto genetic algorithm to the optimization of low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft missions.

  4. Genetic Base Changes for January 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic bases were updated previously in the United States in 1965, 1974, 1984, 1989, 1995, 2000, and 2005, and the next base change is scheduled for January 2010. Changing the base every 5 years subtracts accumulated genetic gain so that all animals are compared with a more recent cow population, w...

  5. A novel design of ultra-broadband, high-gain and high-linearity variable gain distributed amplifier in 0.13 μm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharvand, Zainab; Hakimi, Ahmad; Rashedi, Esmat

    2016-12-01

    A high-gain, high-linearity and ultra-broadband variable gain distributed amplifier (VGDA) based on employing multiple techniques is presented to substantially increase the gain. The complete design is composed of two major parts including a VGDA part followed by a single stage distributed amplifier (SSDA) part. The VGDA part makes it possible to achieve different gain settings. For high gain considerations, the SSDA part cascades with the VGDA part that takes the benefits of the multiplicative gain mechanism. A theory is presented to enhance the linearity without imposing further DC power consumption. This idea has been validated by simulation results as expected. The design is analysed and simulated in the standard 0.13 μm CMOS technology. It presents the large gain tuning range of 35 dB, from -5 dB attenuation gain up to +30 dB maximum amplification gain, in relation to the control voltage (Vctr) that varies between 0.42 and 1.1 V. At the maximum amplification gain setting, it presents a DC up to 16 GHz 3 dB bandwidth, an average noise figure of 3.2 dB and an IIP3 of -2 dB m. Furthermore, it dissipates 46.42 mW from 0.7 and 0.9 V power supplies of the drain lines of VGDA and SSDA parts, respectively. Additionally, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been performed to predict an estimate of the accuracy of performance of the proposed design under various conditions.

  6. Genetic and field management strategies to enhance the nutritional value of rice grains and limit accumulation of undesirable elements such as arsenic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancing the nutritional value of rice grains is of particular interest because rice is a primary dietary component for more than half of the world’s population, and is a primary source of nutrients in many underdeveloped countries. Because rice can be grown under both flooded and unflooded field ...

  7. Gain loss asymmetry for emerging stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpio, Krzysztof; Załuska–Kotur, Magdalena A.; Orłowski, Arkadiusz

    2007-03-01

    Stock indexes for some European emerging markets are analyzed using an investment-horizon approach. Austrian ATX index and Dow Jones have been studied and compared with several emerging European markets. The optimal investment horizons are plotted as a function of an absolute return value. Gain-loss asymmetry, originally found for American DJIA index, is observed for all analyzed data. It is shown, that this asymmetry has different character for emerging and for established markets. For established markets, gain curve lies typically above loss curve, whereas in the case of emerging markets the situation is just the opposite. We propose a measure quantifying the gain-loss asymmetry that clearly exhibits a difference between emerging and established markets.

  8. [Atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain].

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Beata R; Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Marmurowska-Michałowska, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Introduction of a new group of antipsychotic drugs, called atypical because of the proprieties differing them from classical neuroleptics, gave hope for the beginning of a new era in treatment of psychoses, including schizophrenia. Different mechanisms of action not only resulted in a broader spectrum of action and high efficacy but also in a relative lack of extrapiramidal symptoms. However, atypical neuroleptics are not totally free from adverse effects. Symptoms such as sedation, metabolic changes and weight gain, often very quick and severe - present also in the case of classical drugs, but put to the background by extrapiramidal symptoms--have become prominent. Weight gain is important both from the clinical and subjective point of view--as associated with serious somatic consequences and as a source of enormous mental distress. These problems are addressed in this review, with the focus on weight gain associated with the use of specific atypical neuroleptics.

  9. Genetically modified human placenta‑derived mesenchymal stem cells with FGF‑2 and PDGF‑BB enhance neovascularization in a model of hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Su, Chao; Chen, Xiancheng; Zhang, Dongmei; Wan, Yang; Ye, Tinghong; Shen, Guobo; Wang, Yongsheng; Shi, Huashan; Yang, Li; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-10-01

    Ischemic diseases represent a challenging worldwide health burden. The current study investigated the therapeutic potential of genetically modified human placenta‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and platelet‑derived growth factor‑BB (PDGF‑BB) genes in hindlimb ischemia. Mesenchymal stem cells obtained from human term placenta were transfected ex vivo with adenoviral bicistronic vectors carrying the FGF2 and PDGF‑BB genes (Ad‑F‑P). Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was surgically induced by excision of the right femoral artery in New Zealand White rabbits. Ad‑F‑P genetically modified hPDMSCs, Ad‑null (control vector)‑modified hPDMSCs, unmodified hPDMSCs or media were intramuscularly implanted into the ischemic limbs 7 days subsequent to the induction of ischemia. Four weeks after cell therapy, angiographic analysis revealed significantly increased collateral vessel formation in the Ad‑F‑P‑hPDMSC group compared with the control group. Histological examination revealed markedly increased capillary and arteriole density in the Ad‑F‑P‑hPDMSC group. The xenografted hPDMSCs survived in the ischemic tissue for at least 4 weeks subsequent to cell therapy. The current study demonstrated that the combination of hPDMSC therapy with FGF2 and PDGF‑BB gene therapy effectively induced collateral vessel formation and angiogenesis, suggesting a novel strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  10. A genetic screen for suppressors and enhancers of the Drosophila cdk1-cyclin B identifies maternal factors that regulate microtubule and microfilament stability.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jun-Yuan; Haghnia, Marjan; Trusty, Cory; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Schubiger, Gerold

    2002-01-01

    Coordination between cell-cycle progression and cytoskeletal dynamics is important for faithful transmission of genetic information. In early Drosophila embryos, increasing maternal cyclin B leads to higher Cdk1-CycB activity, shorter microtubules, and slower nuclear movement during cycles 5-7 and delays in nuclear migration to the cortex at cycle 10. Later during cycle 14 interphase of six cycB embryos, we observed patches of mitotic nuclei, chromosome bridges, abnormal nuclear distribution, and small and large nuclei. These phenotypes indicate disrupted coordination between the cell-cycle machinery and cytoskeletal function. Using these sensitized phenotypes, we performed a dosage-sensitive genetic screen to identify maternal proteins involved in this process. We identified 10 suppressors classified into three groups: (1) gene products regulating Cdk1 activities, cdk1 and cyclin A; (2) gene products interacting with both microtubules and microfilaments, Actin-related protein 87C; and (3) gene products interacting with microfilaments, chickadee, diaphanous, Cdc42, quail, spaghetti-squash, zipper, and scrambled. Interestingly, most of the suppressors that rescue the astral microtubule phenotype also reduce Cdk1-CycB activities and are microfilament-related genes. This suggests that the major mechanism of suppression relies on the interactions among Cdk1-CycB, microtubule, and microfilament networks. Our results indicate that the balance among these different components is vital for normal early cell cycles and for embryonic development. Our observations also indicate that microtubules and cortical microfilaments antagonize each other during the preblastoderm stage. PMID:12454065

  11. Genetics & sport: bioethical concerns.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues pertaining to the use of genetic insights and techniques in sport. Initially, it considers a range of scientific findings that have stimulated debate about the ethical issues associated with genetics applied to sport. It also outlines some of the early policy responses to these discoveries from world leading sports organizations, along with knowledge about actual use of gene technologies in sport. Subsequently, it considers the challenges with distinguishing between therapeutic use and human enhancement within genetic science, which is a particularly important issue for the world of sport. Next, particular attention is given to the use of genetic information, which raises questions about the legitimacy and reliability of genetic tests, along with the potential public value of having DNA databanks to economize in health care. Finally, the ethics of gene transfer are considered, inviting questions into the values of sport and humanity. It argues that, while gene modification may seem conceptually similar to other forms of doping, the requirements upon athletes are such that new forms of enhancement become increasingly necessary to discover. Insofar as genetic science is able to create safer, more effective techniques of human modification, then it may be an appealing route through which to modify athletes to safeguard the future of elite sports as enterprises of human excellence.

  12. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  13. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatment decisions. PMID:26316867

  14. Gain vs phase in BOTDA setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Gil, Alexia; Angulo-Vinuesa, Xabier; Soto, Marcelo A.; Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Thévenaz, Luc; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    We evaluate the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) determination error when using the Brillouin phase spectrum (BPS) instead of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) in BOTDA setups. We compare the error obtained in the BFS determination in both cases, both with theoretical arguments and experimental data. In comparison to the gain, for an equal SNR and linewidth, the phase generally provides a better fit of the BFS for smaller frequency spans. This result opens a possible way to reduce the measurement time of certain BOTDA systems by using the phase feature.

  15. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  16. Gain Modulation by Nicotine in Macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Anita A.; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetylcholine is a ubiquitous cortical neuromodulator implicated in cognition. In order to understand the potential for acetylcholine to play a role in visual attention, we studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization and function in area V1 of the macaque. We found nAChRs presynaptically at thalamic synapses onto excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurons in the primary thalamorecipient layer 4c. Furthermore, consistent with the release enhancement suggested by this localization, we discovered that nicotine increases responsiveness and lowers contrast threshold in layer 4c neurons. We also found that nAChRs are expressed by GABAergic interneurons in V1 but rarely by pyramidal neurons, and that nicotine suppresses visual responses outside layer 4c. All sensory systems incorporate gain control mechanisms, or processes which dynamically alter input/output relationships. We demonstrate that at the site of thalamic input to visual cortex, the effect of this nAChR-mediated gain is an enhancement of the detection of visual stimuli. PMID:18031686

  17. Quantitative genetics of disease traits.

    PubMed

    Wray, N R; Visscher, P M

    2015-04-01

    John James authored two key papers on the theory of risk to relatives for binary disease traits and the relationship between parameters on the observed binary scale and an unobserved scale of liability (James Annals of Human Genetics, 1971; 35: 47; Reich, James and Morris Annals of Human Genetics, 1972; 36: 163). These two papers are John James' most cited papers (198 and 328 citations, November 2014). They have been influential in human genetics and have recently gained renewed popularity because of their relevance to the estimation of quantitative genetics parameters for disease traits using SNP data. In this review, we summarize the two early papers and put them into context. We show recent extensions of the theory for ascertained case-control data and review recent applications in human genetics.

  18. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000510.htm Genetic counseling To use the sharing features on this ... cystic fibrosis or Down syndrome. Who May Want Genetic Counseling? It is up to you whether or ...

  19. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  20. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  1. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  2. Alcohol gains access to appetitive learning through adolescent heavy drinking.

    PubMed

    DiLeo, Alyssa; Wright, Kristina M; Mangone, Elizabeth; McDannald, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent heavy alcohol drinking increases the risk for alcohol use disorders in adulthood, yet mechanisms conferring increased risk are not well understood. We propose that adolescent alcohol drinking shapes alcohol's aversive or appetitive properties in adulthood. Alcohol normally drives aversive learning and alcohol-predictive cues are avoided. We hypothesize that through adolescent heavy drinking alcohol gains access to appetitive learning. A primary consequence is that alcohol-predictive cues become valued and sought out. To test this hypothesis, we gave genetically heterogeneous, male Long Evans rats voluntary, chronic intermittent access to water or alcohol throughout adolescence and then identified moderate and heavy alcohol drinkers. After a short abstinence period, we assessed the aversive or appetitive properties of alcohol using flavor learning procedures. We compared alcohol to the known appetitive properties of sugar. Flavor learning in adult rats who were alcohol-naïve or adolescent moderate alcohol drinkers revealed alcohol to be aversive and sugar to be appetitive. The same flavor learning procedures revealed both alcohol and sugar to be appetitive in adult rats who were adolescent heavy drinkers. The results demonstrate that alcohol gains access to neurobehavioral circuits for appetitive learning through adolescent heavy alcohol drinking.

  3. Gain and saturation parameters of a multikilowatt PIE CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikumb, S. K.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Seguin, V. A.; Reshef, H.

    1987-07-01

    Details of an experimental investigation of the small signal gain and saturation parameter of a 10 kW CW photoinitiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited (PIE) CO2 laser are presented. Measurements were made as a function of several device operational conditions, such as gas pressure, input electrical power, pulser ionization, and flow velocity. Gain profiles were also obtained, both from anode to cathode, and in the direction of gas flow. The results document the effectiveness of the PIE excitation technique, while providing detailed information on the gain medium. Such data are essential to the design of an efficient optical extraction system.

  4. Net Photorefractive Gain In Gallium Arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1990-01-01

    Prerequisite includes applied electric field. Electric field applied to GaAs crystal in which two infrared beams interfere. Depending on quality of sample and experimental conditions, net photorefractive gain obtained. Results offer possibility of new developments in real-time optical processing of signals by use of near-infrared lasers of low power.

  5. Managing your weight gain during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... basis for a healthy pregnancy. For most pregnant women, the right amount of calories is: 1,800 calories per ... are already overweight when they get pregnant. Other women gain ... on eating the right foods and staying active. If you do not ...

  6. X chromosome gain in male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Oto, Enrico; Monti, Valentina; Cucchi, Maria C; Masetti, Riccardo; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Foschini, Maria P

    2015-12-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon disease whose molecular profile is not well known. X chromosome gain has been described as a marker of aggressive behavior in female breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the X chromosome in male breast cancer. Twenty cases of male breast invasive ductal carcinoma were retrieved and compared with 10 cases of gynecomastia. Cases were tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization to assess a cytogenetic profile for the X chromosome. The X chromosome status was compared with histopathologic features and stage at presentation. All MBC cases harbored an X chromosome gain (100%) in a variable percentage of neoplastic cells, ranging from 31% to 85% (mean, 59%). On the contrary, all cases of gynecomastia showed wild X chromosome asset. The patients' age at surgery and tumor grading showed a statistically significant correlation (P = .0188-.04), with the percentages of neoplastic cells showing an X chromosome gain. These data suggest that this X chromosome gain plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of male breast epithelial cells.

  7. 75 FR 63763 - Program Integrity: Gainful Employment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 668 RIN 1840-AD04 Program Integrity: Gainful Employment AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of public meeting sessions. SUMMARY: The Secretary...

  8. Weight Gain Through Self-Control Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulanick, Nancy; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Underweight subjects were assigned to either a self-reinforcement condition, a self-punishment condition, or to a discussion/reflection control condition. The subjects received one treatment session per week over a five-week period. After treatment, the self-reinforcement groups gained significantly more pounds (kilograms) than either of the other…

  9. Gain of a single gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is a gaseous detector used in particle detection and is known for its high rate capability. Ever since its invention in 1997, GEM was applied in many areas and recently has been proposed to be installed in the CMS high η regions for upgrade at LHC, CERN. A complete understanding of the working and gain behaviour does not exist. GEM gain is influenced by charging up and this has been variedly interpreted in literature lacking consensus. I have attempted in this work through simulations and measurements to achieve a better understanding of single GEM gain and how it is affected by various factors. Specific experimental methods which evolved with subsequent measurements were employed to systematically study the charging up effect. Information from simulations was applied to characterize measurements thereby enabling the development of a model for charging up. Conductivity mechanism of the dielectric used in GEM was analyzed and the resistivity measured. Gain free of charging up effects was measured and this is appropriate for comparison with simulations.

  10. Body weight gain and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Isabelle; Derost, Philippe; Ulla, Miguel; Marques, Ana; Debilly, Bérangère; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Chéreau, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jean Jacques; Boirie, Yves; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Durif, Franck

    2011-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical technique that has now been available for some 25 years. It is used in the treatment of various motor disorders, e.g. Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor and dystonia, and neuropsychiatric illnesses, e.g. obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome. The surgical targets of DBS include the thalamic ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim), the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and more recently the subthalamic nucleus (STN), currently considered as the reference target in the treatment of PD. In the last ten years, most studies in PD patients have described a rapid and marked weight gain in the months following DBS of the STN. This weight gain sometimes induces obesity and can have metabolic repercussions. The physiopathological mechanisms responsible for the weight gain are multifactorial (changes in energy metabolism and eating behaviour, reduction of motor complications, etc.). This review reports current knowledge concerning weight changes in patients treated by DBS with different surgical targets. It also describes the mechanisms responsible for weight gain and the health outcome for the patients.

  11. Sudden Gains during Therapy of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Schultz, Stefan M.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Moscovitch, David A.; Suvak, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the phenomenon of sudden gains in 107 participants with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who received either cognitive-behavioral group therapy or exposure group therapy without explicit cognitive interventions, which primarily used public speaking situations as exposure tasks. Twenty-two out of 967…

  12. Optical gain by a simple photoisomerization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Del Monte, Francisco; Meerholz, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    Organic holographic materials are pursued as versatile and cheap data-storage materials. It is generally assumed that under steady-state conditions, only photorefractive holographic media exhibit a non-local response to a light-intensity pattern, which results in an asymmetric two-beam coupling or `gain', where intensity is transferred from one beam to the other as a measure of writing efficiency. Here, we demonstrate non-local holographic recording in a non-photorefractive material. We demonstrate that reversible photoisomerization gratings recorded in a non-photorefractive azo-based material exhibit large optical gain coefficients beyond 1,000cm-1, even for polarization gratings. The grating characteristics differ markedly from classical photorefractive features, but can be modelled by considering the influence of the Poynting vector on the photoisomerization. The external control of the Poynting vector enables manipulation of the gain coefficient, including its sign (the direction of energy exchange), a novel phenomenon we refer to as `gain steering'. A very high sensitivity of about 100cm2J-1 was achieved. This high sensitivity, combined with a high spatial resolution, suggests a great technical advantage for applications in image processing and phase conjugation.

  13. Gainful Employment: The Real Issue. Policy Memo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Sometimes a proposed piece of legislation or new rule can catalyze debate about a key issue. That seems to be the case for the "gainful employment" rule currently being proposed by the Department of Education (DOE). The rule addresses a very real problem: The large amounts of debt being taken on by some students, mainly those attending for-profit…

  14. Autonomous Exploration Using an Information Gain Metric

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    factors of the utility function, biasing the behavior toward either exploration or relocation. The simulated experiments demonstrate improved...also presented. 15. SUBJECT TERMS information gain, exploration, intelligent behaviors , simultaneous localization and mapping, SLAM, entropy 16...addition, the data collected over a variety of graph entropy scale values demonstrate the behavior of the algorithm when loop closures are

  15. Enhancing the accumulation of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana via iterative metabolic engineering and genetic crossing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemi; Haslam, Richard P; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Li, Tianbi; Bauer, Joerg; Napier, Johnathan A; Sayanova, Olga

    2012-12-01

    The synthesis and accumulation of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid has previously been demonstrated in the seeds of transgenic plants. However, the obtained levels are relatively low, indicating the need for further studies and the better definition of the interplay between endogenous lipid synthesis and the non-native transgene-encoded activities. In this study we have systematically compared three different transgenic configurations of the biosynthetic pathway for eicosapentaenoic acid, using lipidomic profiling to identify metabolic bottlenecks. We have also used genetic crossing to stack up to ten transgenes in Arabidopsis. These studies indicate several potential approaches to optimize the accumulation of target fatty acids in transgenic plants. Our data show the unexpected channeling of heterologous C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids into minor phospholipid species, and also the apparent negative metabolic regulation of phospholipid-dependent Δ6-desaturases. Collectively, this study confirms the benefits of iterative approaches to metabolic engineering of plant lipid synthesis.

  16. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  17. From genetic improvement to commercial-scale mass culture of a Chilean strain of the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis with enhanced productivity of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Patricia I.; Inostroza, Ingrid; Pizarro, Mario; Pérez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a red ketocarotenoid, widely used as a natural red colourant in marine fish aquaculture and poultry and, recently, as an antioxidant supplement for humans and animals. The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the richest natural sources of this pigment. However, its slow growth rate and complex life cycle make mass culture difficult for commercial purposes. The aims of this research were (i) to standardize and apply a genetic improvement programme to a Chilean strain of H. pluvialis in order to improve its carotenogenic capacity and (ii) to evaluate the performance of a selected mutant strain in commercial-sized (125 000 L) open ponds in the north of Chile. Haematococcus pluvialis strain 114 was mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate. The level of mutagen dose (exposure time and concentration) was one that induced at least 90 % mortality. Surviving colonies were screened for resistance to the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor diphenylamine (25 µM). Resistant mutants were grown in a 30-mL volume for 30 days, after which the total carotenoid content was determined by spectrophotometry. Tens of mutants with improved carotenogenic capacity compared with the wild-type strain were isolated by the application of these standardized protocols. Some mutants exhibited curious morphological features such as spontaneous release of astaxanthin and loss of flagella. One of the mutants was grown outdoors in commercial-sized open ponds of 125 000 L in the north of Chile. Grown under similar conditions, the mutant strain accumulated 30 % more astaxanthin than the wild-type strain on a per dry weight basis and 72 % more on a per culture volume basis. We show that random mutagenesis/selection is an effective strategy for genetically improving strains of H. pluvialis and that improved carotenogenic capacity is maintained when the volume of the cultures is scaled up to a commercial size. PMID:23789055

  18. Npc1 deficiency in the C57BL/6J genetic background enhances Niemann-Pick disease type C spleen pathology.

    PubMed

    Parra, Julio; Klein, Andrés D; Castro, Juan; Morales, María Gabriela; Mosqueira, Matías; Valencia, Ilse; Cortés, Victor; Rigotti, Attilio; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2011-09-30

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive neurovisceral lipid storage disorder. The affected genes are NPC1 and NPC2. Mutations in either gene lead to intracellular cholesterol accumulation. There are three forms of the disease, which are categorized based on the onset and severity of the disease: the infantile form, in which the liver and spleen are severely affected, the juvenile form, in which the liver and brain are affected, and the adult form, which affects the brain. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in the Npc1 gene originated in the BALB/c inbred strain mimics the juvenile form of the disease. To study the influence of genetic background on the expression of NPC disease in mice, we transferred the Npc1 mutation from the BALB/c to C57BL/6J inbred background. We found that C57BL/6J-Npc1(-/-) mice present with a much more aggressive form of the disease, including a shorter lifespan than BALB/c-Npc1(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the amount of cholesterol in the brains of Npc1(-/-) mice of either mouse strain. However, Npc1(-/-) mice with the C57BL/6J genetic background showed striking spleen damage with a marked buildup of cholesterol and phospholipids at an early age, which correlated with large foamy cell clusters. In addition, C57BL/6J Npc1(-/-) mice presented red cell abnormalities and abundant ghost erythrocytes that correlated with a lower hemoglobin concentration. We also found abnormalities in white cells, such as cytoplasmic granulation and neutrophil hypersegmentation that included lymphopenia and atypias. In conclusion, Npc1 deficiency in the C57BL6/J background is associated with spleen, erythrocyte, and immune system abnormalities that lead to a reduced lifespan.

  19. From genetic improvement to commercial-scale mass culture of a Chilean strain of the green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis with enhanced productivity of the red ketocarotenoid astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Patricia I; Inostroza, Ingrid; Pizarro, Mario; Pérez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a red ketocarotenoid, widely used as a natural red colourant in marine fish aquaculture and poultry and, recently, as an antioxidant supplement for humans and animals. The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the richest natural sources of this pigment. However, its slow growth rate and complex life cycle make mass culture difficult for commercial purposes. The aims of this research were (i) to standardize and apply a genetic improvement programme to a Chilean strain of H. pluvialis in order to improve its carotenogenic capacity and (ii) to evaluate the performance of a selected mutant strain in commercial-sized (125 000 L) open ponds in the north of Chile. Haematococcus pluvialis strain 114 was mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate. The level of mutagen dose (exposure time and concentration) was one that induced at least 90 % mortality. Surviving colonies were screened for resistance to the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor diphenylamine (25 µM). Resistant mutants were grown in a 30-mL volume for 30 days, after which the total carotenoid content was determined by spectrophotometry. Tens of mutants with improved carotenogenic capacity compared with the wild-type strain were isolated by the application of these standardized protocols. Some mutants exhibited curious morphological features such as spontaneous release of astaxanthin and loss of flagella. One of the mutants was grown outdoors in commercial-sized open ponds of 125 000 L in the north of Chile. Grown under similar conditions, the mutant strain accumulated 30 % more astaxanthin than the wild-type strain on a per dry weight basis and 72 % more on a per culture volume basis. We show that random mutagenesis/selection is an effective strategy for genetically improving strains of H. pluvialis and that improved carotenogenic capacity is maintained when the volume of the cultures is scaled up to a commercial size.

  20. Enhanced dependency of KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer cells on RAD51-dependent homologous recombination repair identified from genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kalimutho, Murugan; Bain, Amanda L; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Nag, Purba; Nanayakkara, Devathri M; Harten, Sarah K; Harris, Janelle L; Subramanian, Goutham N; Sinha, Debottam; Shirasawa, Senji; Srihari, Sriganesh; Burma, Sandeep; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2017-02-07

    Activating KRAS mutations drive colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and influence response to anti-EGFR-targeted therapy. Despite recent advances in understanding Ras signaling biology and the revolution in therapies for melanoma using BRAF inhibitors, no targeted agents have been effective in KRAS-mutant cancers, mainly due to activation of compensatory pathways. Here, by leveraging the largest synthetic lethal genetic interactome in yeast, we identify that KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer cells have augmented homologous recombination repair (HRR) signaling. We found that KRAS mutation resulted in slowing and stalling of the replication fork and accumulation of DNA damage. Moreover, we found that KRAS-mutant HCT116 cells have an increase in MYC-mediated RAD51 expression with a corresponding increase in RAD51 recruitment to irradiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) compared to genetically complemented isogenic cells. MYC depletion using RNA interference significantly reduced IR-induced RAD51 foci formation and HRR. On the contrary, overexpression of either HA-tagged wild-type (WT) MYC or phospho-mutant S62A increased RAD51 protein levels and hence IR-induced RAD51 foci. Likewise, depletion of RAD51 selectively induced apoptosis in HCT116-mutant cells by increasing DSBs. Pharmacological inhibition targeting HRR signaling combined with PARP inhibition selectivity killed KRAS-mutant cells. Interestingly, these differences were not seen in a second isogenic pair of KRAS WT and mutant cells (DLD-1), likely due to their nondependency on the KRAS mutation for survival. Our data thus highlight a possible mechanism by which KRAS-mutant-dependent cells drive HRR in vitro by upregulating MYC-RAD51 expression. These data may offer a promising therapeutic vulnerability in colorectal cancer cells harboring otherwise nondruggable KRAS mutations, which warrants further investigation in vivo.

  1. Production of D-lactic acid in a continuous membrane integrated fermentation reactor by genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae: enhancement in D-lactic acid carbon yield.

    PubMed

    Mimitsuka, Takashi; Sawai, Kenji; Kobayashi, Koji; Tsukada, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Norihiro; Yamada, Katsushige; Ogino, Hiroyasu; Yonehara, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    Poly d-lactic acid is an important polymer because it improves the thermostability of poly l-lactic acid by stereo complex formation. To demonstrate potency of continuous fermentation using a membrane-integrated fermentation reactor (MFR) system, continuous fermentation using genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces d-lactic acid was performed at the low pH and microaerobic conditions. d-Lactic acid continuous fermentation using the MFR system by genetically modified yeast increased production rate by 11-fold compared with batch fermentation. In addition, the carbon yield of d-lactic acid in continuous fermentation was improved to 74.6 ± 2.3% compared to 39.0 ± 1.7% with batch fermentation. This dramatic improvement in carbon yield could not be explained by a reduction in carbon consumption to form cells compared to batch fermentation. Further detailed analysis at batch fermentation revealed that the carbon yield increased to 76.8% at late stationary phase. S. cerevisiae, which exhibits the Crabtree-positive effect, demonstrated significant changes in metabolic activities at low sugar concentrations (Rossignol et al., Yeast, 20, 1369-1385, 2003). Moreover, lactate-producing S. cerevisiae requires ATP supplied not only from the glycolytic pathway but also from the TCA cycle (van Maris et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 70, 2898-2905, 2004). Our finding was revealed that continuous fermentation, which can maintain the conditions of both a low sugar concentration and air supply, results in Crabtree-positive and lactate-producing S. cerevisiae for suitable conditions of d-lactic acid production with respect to redox balance and ATP generation because of releasing the yeast from the Crabtree effect.

  2. Method and system for edge cladding of laser gain media

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Caird, John Allyn; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene

    2014-03-25

    A gain medium operable to amplify light at a gain wavelength and having reduced transverse ASE includes an input surface and an output surface opposing the input surface. The gain medium also includes a central region including gain material and extending between the input surface and the output surface along a longitudinal optical axis of the gain medium. The gain medium further includes an edge cladding region surrounding the central region and extending between the input surface and the output surface along the longitudinal optical axis of the gain medium. The edge cladding region includes the gain material and a dopant operable to absorb light at the gain wavelength.

  3. Association of gestational weight gain expectations with advice on actual weight gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine pregnant women's gestational weight gain expectations/advice from various sources (i.e., self, family/friends, physician) and the impact of these sources of expectations/advice on actual measured gestational weight gain. Pregnant women (n=230, 87.4% Caucasian, second pregnancy) in a cohor...

  4. 34 CFR 462.43 - How is educational gain measured?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How is educational gain measured? 462.43 Section 462.43... ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MEASURING EDUCATIONAL GAIN IN THE NATIONAL REPORTING SYSTEM FOR... Educational Gain? § 462.43 How is educational gain measured? (a)(1) Educational gain is measured by...

  5. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kanth, VV; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-01-01

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An individual’s susceptibility to the disease is governed by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have identified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC), Cathepsin B (CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor (CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in “intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism” namely Claudin-2 (CLDN2) and Carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) gene have also been identified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, this review is an attempt to compile the available information on the topic. PMID:25400986

  6. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Ravi Kanth, Vv; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-11-15

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An individual's susceptibility to the disease is governed by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have identified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC), Cathepsin B (CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor (CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in "intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism" namely Claudin-2 (CLDN2) and Carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) gene have also been identified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, this review is an attempt to compile the available information on the topic.

  7. Purified herpes simplex type 1 glycoprotein D (gD) genetically fused with the type 16 human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein enhances antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses and confers protective antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Porchia, Bruna F M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Cariri, Francisco A M O; Santana, Vinícius C; Amorim, Jaime H; Balan, Andrea; Braga, Catarina J M; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2011-12-05

    Type 1 herpes virus (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) enhances antigen-specific immune responses, particularly CD8(+) T cell responses, in mice immunized with DNA vaccines encoding hybrid proteins genetically fused with the target antigen at a site near the C-terminal end. These effects are attributed to the interaction of gD with the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and the concomitant blockade of a coinhibitory mechanism mediated by the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA). However, questions concerning the requirement for endogenous synthesis of the antigen or the adjuvant/antigen fusion itself have not been addressed so far. In the present study, we investigated these points using purified recombinant gDs, genetically fused or not with type 16 papilloma virus (HPV-16) E7 oncoprotein. Soluble recombinant gDs, but not denatured forms, retained the ability to bind surface-exposed cellular receptors of HVEM-expressing U937 cells. In addition, in vivo administration of the recombinant proteins, particularly gD genetically fused with E7 (gDE7), promoted the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. More relevantly, mice immunized with the gDE7 protein developed complete preventive and partial therapeutic antitumor protection, as measured in mice following the implantation of TC-1 cells expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the T cell adjuvant effects of the HSV-1 gD protein did not require endogenous synthesis and could be demonstrated in mice immunized with purified recombinant proteins.

  8. Improvement of FK506 production in Streptomyces tsukubaensis by genetic enhancement of the supply of unusual polyketide extender units via utilization of two distinct site-specific recombination systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Qinglin; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan; Liu, Wen

    2012-08-01

    FK506 is a potent immunosuppressant that has a wide range of clinical applications. Its 23-member macrocyclic scaffold, mainly with a polyketide origin, features two methoxy groups at C-13 and C-15 and one allyl side chain at C-21, due to the region-specific incorporation of two unusual extender units derived from methoxymalonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) and allylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA), respectively. Whether their intracellular formations can be a bottleneck for FK506 production remains elusive. In this study, we report the improvement of FK506 yield in the producing strain Streptomyces tsukubaensis by the duplication of two sets of pathway-specific genes individually encoding the biosyntheses of these two extender units, thereby providing a promising approach to generate high-FK506-producing strains via genetic manipulation. Taking advantage of the fact that S. tsukubaensis is amenable to two actinophage (ΦC31 and VWB) integrase-mediated recombination systems, we genetically enhanced the biosyntheses of methoxymalonyl-ACP and allylmalonyl-CoA, as indicated by transcriptional analysis. Together with the optimization of glucose supplementation, the maximal FK506 titer eventually increased by approximately 150% in comparison with that of the original strain. The strategy of engineering the biosynthesis of unusual extender units described here may be applicable to improving the production of other polyketide or nonribosomal peptide natural products that contain pathway-specific building blocks.

  9. TCRs genetically linked to CD28 and CD3ε do not mispair with endogenous TCR chains and mediate enhanced T cell persistence and anti-melanoma activity.

    PubMed

    Govers, Coen; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Roszik, János; van Brakel, Mandy; Berrevoets, Cor; Szöőr, Árpád; Panoutsopoulou, Konstantina; Broertjes, Marieke; Van, Tan; Vereb, György; Szöllősi, János; Debets, Reno

    2014-11-15

    Adoptive transfer of T cells that are gene engineered to express a defined TCR represents a feasible and promising therapy for patients with tumors. However, TCR gene therapy is hindered by the transient presence and effectiveness of transferred T cells, which are anticipated to be improved by adequate T cell costimulation. In this article, we report the identification and characterization of a novel two-chain TCR linked to CD28 and CD3ε (i.e., TCR:28ε). This modified TCR demonstrates enhanced binding of peptide-MHC and mediates enhanced T cell function following stimulation with peptide compared with wild-type TCR. Surface expression of TCR:28ε depends on the transmembrane domain of CD28, whereas T cell functions depend on the intracellular domains of both CD28 and CD3ε, with IL-2 production showing dependency on CD28:LCK binding. TCR:28ε, but not wild-type TCR, induces detectable immune synapses in primary human T cells, and such immune synapses show significantly enhanced accumulation of TCR transgenes and markers of early TCR signaling, such as phosphorylated LCK and ERK. Importantly, TCR:28ε does not show signs of off-target recognition, as evidenced by lack of TCR mispairing, as well as preserved specificity. Notably, when testing TCR:28ε in immune-competent mice, we observed a drastic increase in T cell survival, which was accompanied by regression of large melanomas with limited recurrence. Our data argue that TCR transgenes that contain CD28, and, thereby, may provide T cell costimulation in an immune-suppressive environment, represent candidate receptors to treat patients with tumors.

  10. A common genetic variant in TLR1 enhances human neutrophil priming and impacts length of intensive care stay in pediatric sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Laura C.; Hook, Jessica S.; Philiph, Amanda R.; Hilkin, Brieanna M.; Bing, Xinyu; Ahn, Chul; Wong, Hector R.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Moreland, Jessica G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) achieve an intermediate or “primed” state of activation following stimulation with certain agonists. Primed PMN have enhanced responsiveness to subsequent stimuli, which can be beneficial in eliminating microbes but may cause host tissue damage in certain disease contexts including sepsis. As PMN priming by TLR4 agonists is well-described, we hypothesized that ligation of TLR2/1 or TLR2/6 would prime PMN. Surprisingly, PMN from only a subset of donors were primed in response to the TLR2/1 agonist, Pam3CSK4, although PMN from all donors were primed by the TLR2/6 agonist, FSL-1. Priming responses included generation of intracellular and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), MAPK phosphorylation, integrin activation, secondary granule exocytosis, and cytokine secretion. Genotyping studies revealed that PMN responsiveness to Pam3CSK4 was enhanced by a common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TLR1 (rs5743618). Notably, PMN from donors with the SNP had higher surface levels of TLR1, and were demonstrated to have enhanced association of TLR1 with the ER chaperone gp96. We analyzed TLR1 genotypes in a pediatric sepsis database and found that patients with sepsis or septic shock who had a positive blood culture and were homozygous for the SNP associated with neutrophil priming had prolonged pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) length of stay. We conclude that this TLR1 SNP leads to excessive PMN priming in response to cell stimulation. Based on our finding that septic children with this SNP had longer PICU stays, we speculate that this SNP results in hyperinflammation in diseases such as sepsis. PMID:26729809

  11. Gain of an axially slotted cylinder covered with a chiral coating and embedded in a chiral medium.

    PubMed

    Awan, Z A

    2015-07-01

    The gain characteristics of an axially slotted cylinder coated with a chiral layer and placed in another chiral background have been investigated using numerical simulations. The effects of various types of chiral coatings and chiral backgrounds upon the gain pattern have been studied. It is shown that an increase in the chirality of the coating enhances the gain in the forward direction and reduces the gain in the backward direction for the fixed chirality of the background. It is also studied that, by increasing the chirality of the background medium, the gain in the backward direction also increases. It is further found that the chiral nihility coating makes the gain pattern nearly isotropic, and this gain is almost independent of the chirality of the background chiral medium.

  12. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  13. Association of LEPR and ANKK1 Gene Polymorphisms with Weight Gain in Epilepsy Patients Receiving Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xueding; Zhou, Yafang; Ni, Guanzhong; Su, Qibiao; Chen, Ziyi; Chen, Zhuojia; Li, Jiali; Chen, Xinmeng; Hou, Xiangyu; Xie, Wen; Xin, Shuang; Zhou, Liemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Weight gain is the most frequent adverse effect of valproic acid (VPA) treatment, resulting in poor compliance and many endocrine disturbances. Similarities in the weight change of monozygotic twins receiving VPA strongly suggests that genetic factors are involved in this effect. However, few studies have been conducted to identify the relevant genetic polymorphisms. Additionally, the causal relationship between the VPA concentration and weight gain has been controversial. Thus, we investigated the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several appetite stimulation and energy homeostasis genes and the steady state plasma concentrations (Css) of VPA on the occurrence of weight gain in patients. Methods: A total of 212 epilepsy patients receiving VPA were enrolled. Nineteen SNPs in 11 genes were detected using the Sequenom MassArray iPlex platform, and VPA Css was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: After 6 months of treatment, 20.28% of patients were found to gain a significant amount of weight (weight gained ≥7%). Three SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR), ankyrin repeat kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1), and α catalytic subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) showed significant associations with VPA-induced weight gain (p < 0.001, p = 0.017 and p = 0.020, respectively). After Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, the genotypic association of LEPR rs1137101, the allelic association of LEPR rs1137101, and ANKK1 rs1800497 with weight gain remained significant. However, the VPA Css in patents who gained weight were not significantly different from those who did not gain weight (p = 0.121). Conclusions: LEPR and ANKK1 genetic polymorphisms may have value in predicting VPA-induced weight gain. PMID:25740917

  14. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine leads to alleviate salt-induced potassium efflux and enhances salt tolerance in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dandan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Cuicui; Meng, Qingwei; Li, Gang; Chen, Tony H H; Yang, Xinghong

    2017-04-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. 'Moneymaker') was transformed with the choline oxidase gene codA from Arthrobacter globiformis, which was modified to allow for targeting to both chloroplasts and the cytosol. Glycine betaine (GB) was accumulated in transformed plants, while no detectable GB was found in wild-type (WT) plants. Compared to WT plants, transgenic lines showed significantly higher photosynthetic rates (Pn) and antioxidant enzyme activities and lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in the leaves when exposed to salt stress. Furthermore, compared with WT plants, K(+) efflux decreased and Na(+) efflux increased in roots of transgenic plants under salt stress; resulted in lower Na(+)/K(+) ratios in transgenic lines. The exogenous application of GB also significantly reduced NaCl-induced K(+) efflux and increased Na(+) efflux in WT plants. A qRT-PCR assay indicated that GB enhanced NaCl-induced expression of genes encoding the K(+) transporter, Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, and H(+)-ATPase. These results suggest that the enhanced salt tolerance conferred by codA in transgenic tomato plants might be due to the regulation of ion channel and transporters by GB, which would allow high potassium levels and low sodium levels to be maintained in transgenic plants under salt stress condition.

  15. A systematic analysis of TCA Escherichia coli mutants reveals suitable genetic backgrounds for enhanced hydrogen and ethanol production using glycerol as main carbon source.

    PubMed

    Valle, Antonio; Cabrera, Gema; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Trivedi, Drupad K; Ratray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston; Cantero, Domingo; Bolivar, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels; however, the low price of glycerol feed-stocks