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Sample records for enhancing glut-2 glucokinase

  1. Rosiglitazone stimulates the release and synthesis of insulin by enhancing GLUT-2, glucokinase and BETA2/NeuroD expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Noh, Jung-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, You-Cheol; Yang, Tae-Young; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Kwang-Won; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2008-03-14

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma} is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, and its ligands, the thiazolidinediones, might directly stimulate insulin release and insulin synthesis in pancreatic {beta}-cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on insulin release and synthesis in pancreatic {beta}-cell (INS-1). Insulin release and synthesis were stimulated by treatment with RGZ for 24 h. RGZ upregulated the expressions of GLUT-2 and glucokinase (GCK). Moreover, it was found that RGZ increased the expression of BETA2/NeuroD gene which could regulate insulin gene expression. These results suggest that RGZ could stimulate the release and synthesis of insulin through the upregulation of GLUT-2, GCK, and BETA2/NeuroD gene expression.

  2. Effects and mechanism of duodenal-jejunal bypass and sleeve gastrectomy on GLUT2 and glucokinase in diabetic Goto–Kakizaki rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study investigated the effects and mechanism of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the expression of liver GLUT2 and glucokinase (GCK) in diabetic rats. Methods Animal models of Goto–Kakizaki (GK) rats were established for the investigation of DJB and SG. Results of weight, food intake, fasting plasma glucose level, oral glucose tolerance test and insulin were compared. Liver tissues were harvested 8 weeks postoperatively. Reverse transcription-PCR and western blot were used to detect liver GLUT2 and GCK mRNA and protein expression after operation. Results Fasting plasma glucose levels of DJB group and SG group in GK rats were markedly declined at 3 days and l, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively (P <0.01), whereas the levels of the sham-operated group only dropped at 3 days and 1 week postoperatively, and there were no significant differences 2 weeks postoperatively (P >0.05). In the liver of GK rats, GLUT2 mRNA level and protein expression after DJB were higher than those in sham-operated group and control group. GLUT2 mRNA level and protein expression after SG were significantly lower than those in control group (P <0.01). GCK mRNA and protein experienced similar expression change. Conclusions Both DJB and SG can decrease the plasma glucose levels of GK rats, whereas they have different effects on the expression of liver GLUT2 and GCK. PMID:22686706

  3. Overexpression of leptin receptors in pancreatic islets of Zucker diabetic fatty rats restores GLUT-2, glucokinase, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May-Yun; Koyama, Kazunori; Shimabukuro, Michio; Mangelsdorf, David; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1998-01-01

    The high-Km glucose transporter, GLUT-2, and the high-Km hexokinase of β cells, glucokinase (GK), are required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). GLUT-2 expression in β cells of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats is profoundly reduced at the onset of β-cell dysfunction of diabetes. Because ZDF rats are homozygous for a mutation in their leptin receptor (OB-R) gene and are therefore leptin-insensitive, we expressed the wild-type OB-R gene in diabetic islets by infusing a recombinant adenovirus (AdCMV-OB-Rb) to determine whether this reversed the abnormalities. Leptin induced a rise in phosphorylated STAT3, indicating that the transferred wild-type OB-R was functional. GLUT-2 protein rose 17-fold in AdCMV-OB-Rb-treated ZDF islets without leptin, and leptin caused no further rise. GK protein rose 7-fold without and 12-fold with leptin. Preproinsulin mRNA increased 64% without leptin and rose no further with leptin, but leptin was required to restore GSIS. Clofibrate and 9-cis-retinoic acid, the partner ligands for binding to peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor α (PPARα) and retinoid X receptor, up-regulated GLUT-2 expression in islets of normal rats, but not in ZDF rats, in which PPARα is very low. Because the fat content of islets of diabetic ZDF rats remains high unless they are treated with leptin, it appears that restoration of GSIS requires normalization of intracellular nutrient homeostasis, whereas up-regulation of GLUT-2 and GK is leptin-independent, requiring only high expression of OB-Rb. PMID:9751766

  4. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances SGLT1 and GLUT2 Expression to Increase Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lei; Hu, Wei Wei; Xia, Lu; Xia, Mi; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus that causes villus atrophy, followed by crypt hyperplasia, reduces the activities of intestinal digestive enzymes, and disrupts the absorption of intestinal nutrients. In vivo, TGEV primarily targets and infects intestinal epithelial cells, which play an important role in glucose absorption via the apical and basolateral transporters Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), respectively. In this study, we therefore sought to evaluate the effects of TGEV infection on glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression. Our data demonstrate that infection with TGEV resulted in increased glucose uptake and augmented expression of EGFR, SGLT1 and GLUT2. Moreover, inhibition studies showed that EGFR modulated glucose uptake in control and TGEV infected cells. Finally, high glucose absorption was subsequently found to promote TGEV replication. PMID:27851758

  5. Myrtenal ameliorates hyperglycemia by enhancing GLUT2 through Akt in the skeletal muscle and liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, Ayyasamy; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2016-08-25

    Insulin signaling pathway is an important role in glucose utilization in tissues. Our Previous study has established that myrtenal has antihyperglycemic effect against diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to explore the molecular mechanism of myrtenal in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Experimental diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin (STZ) (40 mg/kg bw) in Wistar albino rats. Diabetic rats were administered myrtenal (80 mg/kg bw) for a period of 28 days. Diabetic rats showed an increased the levels of plasma glucose, decreased the levels of plasma insulin, down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), Akt and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in liver and insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), Akt and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein expression in skeletal muscle. However, myrtenal treated diabetic rats revealed decreased the levels of plasma glucose, improved the plasma insulin levels, up-regulation of IRS2, Akt and GLUT2 in liver and IRS2, Akt and GLUT4 protein expression in skeletal muscle. The up-regulation of glucose transporters enhances the glucose uptake in liver and skeletal muscle. The histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis of the pancreas also corroborates with the above findings. Our findings suggest that myrtenal could be a potent phytochemical in the management of diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Translocation of Transfected GLUT2 to the Apical Membrane in Rat Intestinal IEC-6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ye; Sarr, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we transfected the full length cDNA of GLUT2 into IEC-6 cells (which lack GLUT2 expression) to investigate GLUT2 translocation in enterocytes. AIM To investigate cellular mechanisms of GLUT2 translocation and its signaling pathway. METHODS Rat glut2 cDNA was transfected into IEC-6 cells. Glucose uptake was measured by incubating cell monolayers with glucose (0.5 to 50 mM), containing 14C-d-glucose and 3H-L-glucose to measure stereospecific, carrier-mediated and passive uptake, resp. We imaged GLUT2 immunoreactivity by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We evaluated the GLUT2 inhibitor (1mM phloretin), SGLT1 inhibitor (0.5 mM phlorizin), disrupting microtubular integrity (2 µM nocodazole and 0.5 µM cytochalasin B), PKC inhibitors (50 nM calphostin C and 10 µM chelerythrine), and PKC activator (50 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: PMA). RESULTS In GLUT2-IEC cells, the Km (54.5 mM) increased compared with non-transfected IEC-6 cells (7.8 mM); phloretin (GLUT2 inhibitor) inhibited glucose uptake to that of non-transfected IEC-6 cells (p<0.05). Nocodazole and cytochalasin B (microtubule disrupters) inhibited uptake by 43–58% only at glucose concentrations ≥ 25 and 50 mM and the 10-min incubations. Calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) reproduced the inhibition of nocodazole; PMA (a PKC activator) enhanced glucose uptake by 69%. Exposure to glucose increased the GFP signal at the apical membrane of GLUT-1EC Cells. CONCLUSION IEC-6 cells lacking GLUT2 translocate GLUT2 apically when transfected to express GLUT2. Translocation of GLUT2 occurs through glucose stimulation via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway and requires integrity of the microtubular skeletal structure. PMID:22116644

  7. Translocation of transfected GLUT2 to the apical membrane in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ye; Sarr, Michael G

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we transfected the full length cDNA of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) into IEC-6 cells (which lack GLUT2 expression) to investigate GLUT2 translocation in enterocytes. The purpose of this study was to investigate cellular mechanisms of GLUT2 translocation and its signaling pathway. Rat GLUT2 cDNA was transfected into IEC-6 cells. Glucose uptake was measured by incubating cell monolayers with glucose (0.5-50 mM), containing (14)C-D-glucose and (3)H-L-glucose, to measure stereospecific, carrier-mediated and passive uptake. We imaged GLUT2 immunoreactivity by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We evaluated the GLUT2 inhibitor (1 mM phloretin), SGLT1 inhibitor (0.5 mM phlorizin), disrupting microtubular integrity (2 μM nocodazole and 0.5 μM cytochalasin B), protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (50 nM calphostin C and 10 μM chelerythrine), and PKC activator (50 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: PMA). In GLUT2-IEC cells, the K(m) (54.5 mM) increased compared with non-transfected IEC-6 cells (7.8 mM); phloretin (GLUT2 inhibitor) inhibited glucose uptake to that of non-transfected IEC-6 cells (P < 0.05). Nocodazole and cytochalasin B (microtubule disrupters) inhibited uptake by 43-58% only at glucose concentrations ≥25 and 50 mM and the 10-min incubations. Calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) reproduced the inhibition of nocodazole; PMA (a PKC activator) enhanced glucose uptake by 69%. Exposure to glucose increased the GFP signal at the apical membrane of GLUT-1EC cells. IEC-6 cells lacking GLUT2 translocate GLUT2 apically when transfected to express GLUT2. Translocation of GLUT2 occurs through glucose stimulation via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway and requires integrity of the microtubular skeletal structure.

  8. The glucose sensor protein glucokinase is expressed in glucagon-producing alpha-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heimberg, H; De Vos, A; Moens, K; Quartier, E; Bouwens, L; Pipeleers, D; Van Schaftingen, E; Madsen, O; Schuit, F

    1996-01-01

    Expression of glucokinase in hepatocytes and pancreatic 6-cells is of major physiologic importance to mammalian glucose homeostasis. Liver glucokinase catalyzes the first committed step in the disposal of glucose, and beta-cell glucokinase catalyzes a rate-limiting step required for glucose-regulated insulin release. The present study reports the expression of glucokinase in rat glucagon-producing alpha-cells, which are negatively regulated by glucose. Purified rat alpha-cells express glucokinase mRNA and protein with the same transcript length, nucleotide sequence, and immunoreactivity as the beta-cell isoform. Glucokinase activity accounts for more than 50% of glucose phosphorylation in extracts of alpha-cells and for more than 90% of glucose utilization in intact cells. The glucagon-producing tumor MSL-G-AN also contained glucokinase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity. These data indicate that glucokinase may serve as a metabolic glucose sensor in pancreatic alpha-cells and, hence, mediate a mechanism for direct regulation of glucagon release by extracellular glucose. Since these cells do not express Glut2, we suggest that glucose sensing does not necessarily require the coexpression of Glut2 and glucokinase. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692940

  9. GLUT2, glucose sensing and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thorens, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The glucose transporter isoform GLUT2 is expressed in liver, intestine, kidney and pancreatic islet beta cells, as well as in the central nervous system, in neurons, astrocytes and tanycytes. Physiological studies of genetically modified mice have revealed a role for GLUT2 in several regulatory mechanisms. In pancreatic beta cells, GLUT2 is required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In hepatocytes, suppression of GLUT2 expression revealed the existence of an unsuspected glucose output pathway that may depend on a membrane traffic-dependent mechanism. GLUT2 expression is nevertheless required for the physiological control of glucose-sensitive genes, and its inactivation in the liver leads to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, revealing a liver-beta cell axis, which is likely to be dependent on bile acids controlling beta cell secretion capacity. In the nervous system, GLUT2-dependent glucose sensing controls feeding, thermoregulation and pancreatic islet cell mass and function, as well as sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Electrophysiological and optogenetic techniques established that Glut2 (also known as Slc2a2)-expressing neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius can be activated by hypoglycaemia to stimulate glucagon secretion. In humans, inactivating mutations in GLUT2 cause Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, which is characterised by hepatomegaly and kidney disease; defects in insulin secretion are rare in adult patients, but GLUT2 mutations cause transient neonatal diabetes. Genome-wide association studies have reported that GLUT2 variants increase the risks of fasting hyperglycaemia, transition to type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and cardiovascular diseases. Individuals with a missense mutation in GLUT2 show preference for sugar-containing foods. We will discuss how studies in mice help interpret the role of GLUT2 in human physiology.

  10. Effects of isoleucine on glucose uptake through the enhancement of muscular membrane concentrations of GLUT1 and GLUT4 and intestinal membrane concentrations of Na+/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT-1) and GLUT2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Yang, Qing; Ren, Man; Qiao, Shiyan; He, Pingli; Li, Defa; Zeng, Xiangfang

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of regulation of glucose transport contributes to our understanding of whole-body glucose homoeostasis and human metabolic diseases. Isoleucine has been reported to participate in regulation of glucose levels in many studies; therefore, this study was designed to examine the effect of isoleucine on intestinal and muscular GLUT expressions. In an animal experiment, muscular GLUT and intestinal GLUT were determined in weaning pigs fed control or isoleucine-supplemented diets. Supplementation of isoleucine in the diet significantly increased piglet average daily gain, enhanced GLUT1 expression in red muscle and GLUT4 expression in red muscle, white muscle and intermediate muscle (P<0·05). In additional, expressions of Na+/glucose co-transporter 1 and GLUT2 were up-regulated in the small intestine when pigs were fed isoleucine-supplemented diets (P<0·05). C2C12 cells were used to examine the expressions of muscular GLUT and glucose uptake in vitro. In C2C12 cells supplemented with isoleucine in the medium, cellular 2-deoxyglucose uptake was increased (P<0·05) through enhancement of the expressions of GLUT4 and GLUT1 (P<0·05). The effect of isoleucine was greater than that of leucine on glucose uptake (P<0·05). Compared with newborn piglets, 35-d-old piglets have comparatively higher GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT5 expressions. The results of this study demonstrated that isoleucine supplementation enhanced the intestinal and muscular GLUT expressions, which have important implications that suggest that isoleucine could potentially increase muscle growth and intestinal development by enhancing local glucose uptake in animals and human beings.

  11. Glucokinase activator PSN-GK1 displays enhanced antihyperglycaemic and insulinotropic actions.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, M C T; White, J R; Taylor, A; Chatfield, R; Wargent, E; Printz, R L; Sulpice, T; McCormack, J G; Procter, M J; Reynet, C; Widdowson, P S; Wong-Kai-In, P

    2007-06-01

    We evaluated the insulinotropic and antihyperglycaemic actions of glucokinase activators (GKAs), especially through acute and subchronic studies in rodent diabetes models with (2R)-2-(4-cyclopropanesulphonylphenyl)-N-(5-fluorothiazol-2-yl)-3-(tetrahydropyran-4-yl)propionamide (PSN-GK1), a novel and potent GKA. The action of PSN-GK1 on or in the following were investigated: (1) on human liver glucokinase, insulin secretion from MIN6 cells and 2-deoxy-D: -[(3)H]glucose (2-DG) uptake into rat hepatocytes; and (2) in Zucker diabetic fatty rats and in non-diabetic C57Bl/6, diabetic db/db and ob/ob mice. At 5 mmol/l glucose, PSN-GK1 activated glucokinase (4.3-fold, median effective concentration [EC(50)] 130 nmol/l), increased MIN6 insulin secretion (26-fold, EC(50) 267 nmol/l) and 2-DG hepatocytic uptake (threefold, EC(50) 1 micromol/l); at higher glucose concentrations, EC(50)s and fold-effectiveness were both lower. In C57Bl/6 mice, PSN-GK1 reduced blood glucose at 1 and 10 mg/kg (by mouth), but insulin was increased significantly at only the higher dose. In hyperinsulinaemic 10-mmol/l glucose clamps, PSN-GK1 increased 2-DG incorporation into liver glycogen sixfold, directly demonstrating liver effects. PSN-GK1 improved glycaemic profiles in db/db mice and Zucker diabetic fatty rats, diabetic animal models in which GKA efficacy has not previously been described, without causing hypoglycaemia. In ob/ob mice, it dose-dependently reduced excursions in OGTTs. Moreover, after subchronic administration, no tachyphylaxis was evident and glycaemia was improved without alterations to lipid levels, liver weight, glycogen content or body weight. PSN-GK1 was potently antihyperglycaemic through its effects on insulin release and hepatic glucose metabolism. It is one of the most potent GKAs described in the literature and is active in diabetic animal models where GKAs have not been reported to show efficacy to date. Ongoing human trials are investigating the potential of this novel

  12. C-Abl inhibitor imatinib enhances insulin production by β cells: c-Abl negatively regulates insulin production via interfering with the expression of NKx2.2 and GLUT-2.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Pengcheng; Li, Shiwu; Yuan, Lihui; Xia, Tina; Xie, Chao; Clare-Salzler, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Imatinib, were shown to have increased serum levels of C-peptide. Imatinib specifically inhibits the tyrosine kinase, c-Abl. However, the mechanism of how Imatinib treatment can lead to increased insulin level is unclear. Specifically, there is little investigation into whether Imatinib directly affects β cells to promote insulin production. In this study, we showed that Imatinib significantly induced insulin expression in both glucose-stimulated and resting β cells. In line with this finding, c-Abl knockdown by siRNA and overexpression of c-Abl markedly enhanced and inhibited insulin expression in β cells, respectively. Unexpectedly, high concentrations of glucose significantly induced c-Abl expression, suggesting c-Abl may play a role in balancing insulin production during glucose stimulation. Further studies demonstrated that c-Abl inhibition did not affect the major insulin gene transcription factor, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) expression. Of interest, inhibition of c-Abl enhanced NKx2.2 and overexpression of c-Abl in β cells markedly down-regulated NKx2.2, which is a positive regulator for insulin gene expression. Additionally, we found that c-Abl inhibition significantly enhanced the expression of glucose transporter GLUT2 on β cells. Our study demonstrates a previously unrecognized mechanism that controls insulin expression through c-Abl-regulated NKx2.2 and GLUT2. Therapeutic targeting β cell c-Abl could be employed in the treatment of diabetes or β cell tumor, insulinoma.

  13. GLUT2 Accumulation in Enterocyte Apical and Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Omar, Amal; Monteiro-Sepulveda, Milena; Poitou, Christine; Le Gall, Maude; Cotillard, Aurélie; Gilet, Jules; Garbin, Kevin; Houllier, Anne; Château, Danièle; Lacombe, Amélie; Veyrie, Nicolas; Hugol, Danielle; Tordjman, Joan; Magnan, Christophe; Serradas, Patricia; Clément, Karine; Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In healthy rodents, intestinal sugar absorption in response to sugar-rich meals and insulin is regulated by GLUT2 in enterocyte plasma membranes. Loss of insulin action maintains apical GLUT2 location. In human enterocytes, apical GLUT2 location has not been reported but may be revealed under conditions of insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Subcellular location of GLUT2 in jejunal enterocytes was analyzed by confocal and electron microscopy imaging and Western blot in 62 well-phenotyped morbidly obese subjects and 7 lean human subjects. GLUT2 locations were assayed in ob/ob and ob/+ mice receiving oral metformin or in high-fat low-carbohydrate diet–fed C57Bl/6 mice. Glucose absorption and secretion were respectively estimated by oral glucose tolerance test and secretion of [U-14C]-3-O-methyl glucose into lumen. RESULTS In human enterocytes, GLUT2 was consistently located in basolateral membranes. Apical GLUT2 location was absent in lean subjects but was observed in 76% of obese subjects and correlated with insulin resistance and glycemia. In addition, intracellular accumulation of GLUT2 with early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) was associated with reduced MGAT4a activity (glycosylation) in 39% of obese subjects on a low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet. Mice on a low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet for 12 months also exhibited endosomal GLUT2 accumulation and reduced glucose absorption. In ob/ob mice, metformin promoted apical GLUT2 and improved glucose homeostasis. Apical GLUT2 in fasting hyperglycemic ob/ob mice tripled glucose release into intestinal lumen. CONCLUSIONS In morbidly obese insulin-resistant subjects, GLUT2 was accumulated in apical and/or endosomal membranes of enterocytes. Functionally, apical GLUT2 favored and endosomal GLUT2 reduced glucose transepithelial exchanges. Thus, altered GLUT2 locations in enterocytes are a sign of intestinal adaptations to human metabolic pathology. PMID:21852673

  14. PTP1B deficiency increases glucose uptake in neonatal hepatocytes: involvement of IRA/GLUT2 complexes.

    PubMed

    González-Rodriguez, Agueda; Nevado, Carmen; Escrivá, Fernando; Sesti, Giorgio; Rondinone, Cristina M; Benito, Manuel; Valverde, Angela M

    2008-08-01

    The contribution of the liver to glucose utilization is essential to maintain glucose homeostasis. Previous data from protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B-deficient mice demonstrated that the liver is a major site for PTP1B action in the periphery. In this study, we have investigated the consequences of PTP1B deficiency in glucose uptake in hepatocytes from neonatal and adult mice. The lack of PTP1B increased basal glucose uptake in hepatocytes from neonatal (3-5 days old) but not adult (10-12 wk old) mice. This occurs without changes in hexokinase, glucokinase, and glucose 6-phosphatase enzymatic activities. By contrast, the glucose transporter GLUT2 was upregulated at the protein level in neonatal hepatocytes and livers from PTP1B-deficient neonates. These results were accompanied by a significant increase in the net free intrahepatic glucose levels in the livers of PTP1B(-/-) neonates. The association between GLUT2 and insulin receptor (IR) A isoform was increased in PTP1B(-/-) neonatal hepatocytes compared with the wild-type. Indeed, PTP1B deficiency in neonatal hepatocytes shifted the ratio of isoforms A and B of the IR by increasing the amount of IRA and decreasing IRB. Moreover, overexpression of IRA in PTP1B(-/-) neonatal hepatocytes increased the amount of IRA/GLUT2 complexes. Conversely, hepatocytes from adult mice only expressed IRB. Since IRA plays a direct role in the regulation of glucose uptake in neonatal hepatocytes through its specific association with GLUT2, we propose the increase in IRA/GLUT2 complexes due to PTP1B deficiency as the molecular mechanism of the increased glucose uptake in the neonatal stage.

  15. Evolution of glucose utilization: Glucokinase and glucokinase regulator protein

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Tan, Huanran

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is an essential nutrient that must be distributed throughout the body to provide energy to sustain physiological functions. Glucose is delivered to distant tissues via be blood stream, and complex systems have evolved to maintain the levels of glucose within a narrow physiological range. Phosphorylation of glucose, by glucokinase, is an essential component of glucose homeostasis, both from the regulatory and metabolic point-of-view. Here we review the evolution of glucose utilization from the perspective of glucokinase. We discuss the origin of glucokinase, its evolution within the hexokinase gene family, and the evolution of its interacting regulatory partner, glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR). Evolution of the structure and sequence of both glucokinase and GCKR have been necessary to optimize glucokinase in its role in glucose metabolism. PMID:24075984

  16. Water transport by GLUT2 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zeuthen, Thomas; Zeuthen, Emil; MacAulay, Nanna

    2007-01-01

    The glucose transporter GLUT2 has been shown to also transport water. In the present paper we investigated the relation between sugar and water transport in human GLUT2 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sugar transport was determined from uptakes of non-metabolizable glucose analogues, primarily 3-O-methyl-d-glucopyranoside; key experimental results were confirmed using d(+)-glucose. Water transport was derived from changes in oocyte volume monitored at a high resolution (20 pl, 1 s). Expression of GLUT2 induced a sugar permeability, PS, of about 5 × 10−6 cm s−1 and a passive water permeability, Lp, of 5.5 × 10−5 cm s−1. Accordingly, the passive water permeability of a GLUT2 protein is about 10 times higher than its sugar permeability. Both permeabilities were abolished by phloretin. Isosmotic addition of sugar to the bathing solution (replacing mannitol) induced two parallel components of water influx in GLUT2, one by osmosis and one by cotransport. The osmotic driving force arose from sugar accumulation at the intracellular side of the membrane and was given by an intracellular diffusion coefficient for sugar of 10−6 cm2 s−1, one-fifth of the free solution value. The diffusion coefficient was determined in oocytes coexpressing GLUT2 and the water channel AQP1 where water transport was predominantly osmotic. By the cotransport mechanism about 35 water molecules were transported for each sugar molecule by a mechanism within the GLUT2. These water molecules could be transported uphill, against an osmotic gradient, energized by the flux of sugar. This capacity for cotransport is 10 times smaller than that of the Na+-coupled glucose transporters (SGLT1). The physiological role of GLUT2 for intestinal transport under conditions of high luminal sugar concentrations is discussed. PMID:17158169

  17. Osmotic water transport with glucose in GLUT2 and SGLT.

    PubMed

    Naftalin, Richard J

    2008-05-15

    Carrier-mediated water cotransport is currently a favored explanation for water movement against an osmotic gradient. The vestibule within the central pore of Na(+)-dependent cotransporters or GLUT2 provides the necessary precondition for an osmotic mechanism, explaining this phenomenon without carriers. Simulating equilibrative glucose inflow via the narrow external orifice of GLUT2 raises vestibular tonicity relative to the external solution. Vestibular hypertonicity causes osmotic water inflow, which raises vestibular hydrostatic pressure and forces water, salt, and glucose into the outer cytosolic layer via its wide endofacial exit. Glucose uptake via GLUT2 also raises oocyte tonicity. Glucose exit from preloaded cells depletes the vestibule of glucose, making it hypotonic and thereby inducing water efflux. Inhibiting glucose exit with phloretin reestablishes vestibular hypertonicity, as it reequilibrates with the cytosolic glucose and net water inflow recommences. Simulated Na(+)-glucose cotransport demonstrates that active glucose accumulation within the vestibule generates water flows simultaneously with the onset of glucose flow and before any flow external to the transporter caused by hypertonicity in the outer cytosolic layers. The molar ratio of water/glucose flow is seen now to relate to the ratio of hydraulic and glucose permeability rather than to water storage capacity of putative water carriers.

  18. GLUT2-mediated glucose uptake and availability are required for embryonic brain development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Juez, Rubén; Rovira, Mireia; Crespo, Diego; van der Vaart, Michiel; Spaink, Herman P; Planas, Josep V

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2; gene name SLC2A2) has a key role in the regulation of glucose dynamics in organs central to metabolism. Although GLUT2 has been studied in the context of its participation in peripheral and central glucose sensing, its role in the brain is not well understood. To decipher the role of GLUT2 in brain development, we knocked down slc2a2 (glut2), the functional ortholog of human GLUT2, in zebrafish. Abrogation of glut2 led to defective brain organogenesis, reduced glucose uptake and increased programmed cell death in the brain. Coinciding with the observed localization of glut2 expression in the zebrafish hindbrain, glut2 deficiency affected the development of neural progenitor cells expressing the proneural genes atoh1b and ptf1a but not those expressing neurod. Specificity of the morphant phenotype was demonstrated by the restoration of brain organogenesis, whole-embryo glucose uptake, brain apoptosis, and expression of proneural markers in rescue experiments. These results indicate that glut2 has an essential role during brain development by facilitating the uptake and availability of glucose and support the involvement of glut2 in brain glucose sensing. PMID:25294126

  19. Characterization of a Novel Glucokinase Activator in Rat and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Li, Pingping; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Lagakos, William; DeWolf, Walter E.; Alford, Taylor; Chicarelli, Mark Joseph; Williams, Lance; Anderson, Deborah A.; Baer, Brian R.; McVean, Maralee; Conn, Marion; Véniant, Murielle M.; Coward, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is a hexokinase isozyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. Glucokinase activators are being investigated as potential diabetes therapies because of their effects on hepatic glucose output and/or insulin secretion. Here, we have examined the efficacy and mechanisms of action of a novel glucokinase activator, GKA23. In vitro, GKA23 increased the affinity of rat and mouse glucokinase for glucose, and increased glucose uptake in primary rat hepatocytes. In vivo, GKA23 treatment improved glucose homeostasis in rats by enhancing beta cell insulin secretion and suppressing hepatic glucose production. Sub-chronic GKA23 treatment of mice fed a high-fat diet resulted in improved glucose homeostasis and lipid profile. PMID:24533087

  20. The ergogenic supplement β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) attenuates insulin resistance through suppressing GLUT-2 in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, Maha H; El-Awady, Mohammed S; Megahed, Nirmeen; Gameil, Nariman M

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of the ergogenic supplement β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) on insulin resistance induced by high-fructose diet (HFD) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed 60% HFD for 12 weeks and HMB (320 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), orally) for 4 weeks. HFD significantly increased fasting insulin, fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1C), liver glycogen content, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, while it decreased glucose and insulin tolerance. Furthermore, HFD significantly increased serum triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) levels, while it significantly decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Moreover, HFD significantly increased mRNA expression of glucose transporter type-2 (GLUT-2), the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) but decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) in liver. Aortic relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired and histopathology showed severe hepatic steatosis. HMB significantly increased insulin tolerance and decreased fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HBA1C, hepatic glycogen content, serum TG, LDL-C, and VLDL-C. Additionally, HMB enhanced ACh-induced relaxation, ameliorated hepatic steatosis, and decreased mRNA expression of GLUT-2. In conclusion, HMB may attenuate insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis through inhibiting GLUT-2 in liver.

  1. Molecular physiology of mammalian glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Iynedjian, P B

    2009-01-01

    The glucokinase (GCK) gene was one of the first candidate genes to be identified as a human "diabetes gene". Subsequently, important advances were made in understanding the impact of GCK in the regulation of glucose metabolism. Structure elucidation by crystallography provided insight into the kinetic properties of GCK. Protein interaction partners of GCK were discovered. Gene expression studies revealed new facets of the tissue distribution of GCK, including in the brain, and its regulation by insulin in the liver. Metabolic control analysis coupled to gene overexpression and knockout experiments highlighted the unique impact of GCK as a regulator of glucose metabolism. Human GCK mutants were studied biochemically to understand disease mechanisms. Drug development programs identified small molecule activators of GCK as potential antidiabetics. These advances are summarized here, with the aim of offering an integrated view of the role of GCK in the molecular physiology and medicine of glucose homeostasis.

  2. Insights into the role of neuronal glucokinase

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, Ivan; Hussain, Sufyan S.; Gardiner, James V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucokinase is a key component of the neuronal glucose-sensing mechanism and is expressed in brain regions that control a range of homeostatic processes. In this review, we detail recently identified roles for neuronal glucokinase in glucose homeostasis and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia and in regulating appetite. We describe clinical implications from these advances in our knowledge, especially for developing novel treatments for diabetes and obesity. Further research required to extend our knowledge and help our efforts to tackle the diabetes and obesity epidemics is suggested. PMID:27189932

  3. Loss of Sugar Detection by GLUT2 Affects Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, Emilie; Le Gall, Maude; Even, Patrick; Houllier, Anne; Serradas, Patricia; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2007-01-01

    Background Mammals must sense the amount of sugar available to them and respond appropriately. For many years attention has focused on intracellular glucose sensing derived from glucose metabolism. Here, we studied the detection of extracellular glucose concentrations in vivo by invalidating the transduction pathway downstream from the transporter-detector GLUT2 and measured the physiological impact of this pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings We produced mice that ubiquitously express the largest cytoplasmic loop of GLUT2, blocking glucose-mediated gene expression in vitro without affecting glucose metabolism. Impairment of GLUT2-mediated sugar detection transiently protected transgenic mice against starvation and streptozotocin-induced diabetes, suggesting that both low- and high-glucose concentrations were not detected. Transgenic mice favored lipid oxidation, and oral glucose was slowly cleared from blood due to low insulin production, despite massive urinary glucose excretion. Kidney adaptation was characterized by a lower rate of glucose reabsorption, whereas pancreatic adaptation was associated with a larger number of small islets. Conclusions/Significance Molecular invalidation of sugar sensing in GLUT2-loop transgenic mice changed multiple aspects of glucose homeostasis, highlighting by a top-down approach, the role of membrane glucose receptors as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:18074013

  4. Fructose transporters GLUT5 and GLUT2 expression in adult patients with fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Li, Xinhua; Ho, Sherry Sy; Leong, Sai Mun; Wong, Reuben K; Koay, Evelyn Sc; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2014-02-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms and malabsorption following fructose ingestion (fructose intolerance) are common in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). The underlying mechanism is unclear, but is hypothesized to be related an abnormality of intestinal fructose transporter proteins. To assess the expression of the main intestinal fructose transporter proteins, glucose transport protein 5 (GLUT5) and 2 (GLUT2), in FGID. The expression of GLUT5 and GLUT2 protein and mRNA in small intestinal biopsy tissue was investigated using real-time reverse-transcription PCR and Western immunoblotting in 11 adults with FGID and fructose intolerance ascertained by breath testing and in 15 controls. Median expression levels of GLUT5 mRNA normalized to beta-actin were 0.18 (interquartile range, IQR, 0.13-0.21) in patients and 0.17 (IQR 0.12-0.19) in controls (p > 0.05). Respective levels of GLUT2 mRNA were 0.26 (IQR 0.20-0.31) and 0.26 (IQR 0.19-0.31) (p > 0.05). Median expression levels of GLUT5 protein normalized to alpha-tubulin were 0.95 (IQR 0.52-1.68) in patients and 0.95 (IQR 0.59-1.15) in controls (p > 0.05). Respective protein expression levels for GLUT2 were 1.56 (IQR 1.06-2.14) and 1.35 (IQR 0.96-1.79) (p > 0.05). Human fructose intolerance may not be associated with marked changes in GLUT5 and GLUT2 expression. Replication of these results in a larger subject group, including measures of transporter activation and membrane and subcellular localization, is warranted.

  5. Glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus regulates glucose intake

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Richardson, Errol; Ma, Yue; Holton, Christopher; De Backer, Ivan; Buckley, Niki; Dhillo, Waljit; Bewick, Gavin; Zhang, Shuai; Carling, David; Bloom, Steve; Gardiner, James

    2014-01-01

    The brain relies on a constant supply of glucose, its primary fuel, for optimal function. A taste-independent mechanism within the CNS that promotes glucose delivery to the brain has been postulated to maintain glucose homeostasis; however, evidence for such a mechanism is lacking. Here, we determined that glucokinase activity within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is involved in regulation of dietary glucose intake. In fasted rats, glucokinase activity was specifically increased in the arcuate nucleus but not other regions of the hypothalamus. Moreover, pharmacologic and genetic activation of glucokinase in the arcuate nucleus of rodent models increased glucose ingestion, while decreased arcuate nucleus glucokinase activity reduced glucose intake. Pharmacologic targeting of potential downstream glucokinase effectors revealed that ATP-sensitive potassium channel and P/Q calcium channel activity are required for glucokinase-mediated glucose intake. Additionally, altered glucokinase activity affected release of the orexigenic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y in response to glucose. Together, our results suggest that glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus specifically regulates glucose intake and that appetite for glucose is an important driver of overall food intake. Arcuate nucleus glucokinase activation may represent a CNS mechanism that underlies the oft-described phenomena of the “sweet tooth” and carbohydrate craving. PMID:25485685

  6. A phospho-BAD BH3 helix activates glucokinase by a mechanism distinct from that of allosteric activators

    PubMed Central

    Szlyk, Benjamin; Braun, Craig R.; Ljubicic, Sanda; Patton, Elaura; Bird, Gregory H.; Osundiji, Mayowa A.; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Walensky, Loren D.; Danial, Nika N.

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase is a glucose-phosphorylating enzyme that regulates insulin release and hepatic metabolism, and its loss-of-function is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Glucokinase activators (GKAs) are attractive therapeutics in diabetes, however, clinical data indicate that their benefits can be offset by hypoglycemia due to marked allosteric enhancement of the enzyme’s glucose affinity. We show that a phospho-mimetic of the BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3) alpha-helix derived from human BAD, a glucokinase binding partner, increases the enzyme catalytic rate without dramatically changing glucose affinity, providing a new mechanism for pharmacologic activation of glucokinase. Remarkably, BAD BH3 phospho-mimetic mediates these effects by engaging a novel region near the enzyme’s active site. This interaction increases insulin secretion in human islets and restores the function of naturally-occurring human glucokinase mutants at the active site. Thus, BAD phospho-mimetics may serve as a novel class of GKAs. PMID:24317490

  7. GLUT2 and TAS1R2 Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Izakovicova Holla, Lydie; Borilova Linhartova, Petra; Lucanova, Svetlana; Kastovsky, Jakub; Musilova, Kristina; Bartosova, Michaela; Kukletova, Martina; Kukla, Lubomir; Dusek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most frequent multifactorial diseases. Among the numerous factors influencing the risk of caries, genetics plays a substantial role, with heritability ranging from 40 to 60%. Gene variants affecting taste preference and glucose transport were recently associated with caries risk. The aim of this study was to analyze two common polymorphisms in the sweet taste receptor (TAS1R2) and glucose transporter (GLUT2) genes in children with dental caries and healthy controls in the Czech population. A total of 637 unrelated Caucasian children, aged 11-13 years, were included in this case-control study. One hundred and fifty-five subjects were caries-free (with decayed/missing/filled teeth, DMFT = 0) and 482 children were caries-affected (DMFT ≥ 1). The TAS1R2 (Ile191Val, rs35874116) and GLUT2 (Thr110Ile, rs5400) genotypes were determined using the 5' nuclease TaqMan® assay for allelic discrimination. Compared with subjects with the common Thr allele, carriers of the Ile allele of GLUT2 had significantly more frequently dental caries (p < 0.05, OR = 1.639, 95% CI: 1.089-2.466). Similarly, children with the Val allele for the TAS1R2 Ile191Val polymorphism were more frequently affected by caries than children who carried the Ile allele (p < 0.05, OR = 1.413, 95% CI: 1.014-1.969). In contrast, no significant associations between GLUT2 and/or TAS1R2 polymorphisms and fillings were found, but allele frequencies of the TAS1R2 variant were marginally significantly different between children with DMFT = 0 and DMFT ≥1 (p = 0.053, OR = 1.339, 95% CI: 0.996-1.799). However, no significant interaction between both genes and risk of dental caries was found. In conclusion, GLUT2 and TASR1 polymorphisms may influence the risk of caries in the Czech population. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Dual allosteric activation mechanisms in monomeric human glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, A Carl; Larion, Mioara; Bowler, Joseph M; Ramsey, Kristen M; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Miller, Brian G

    2015-09-15

    Cooperativity in human glucokinase (GCK), the body's primary glucose sensor and a major determinant of glucose homeostatic diseases, is fundamentally different from textbook models of allostery because GCK is monomeric and contains only one glucose-binding site. Prior work has demonstrated that millisecond timescale order-disorder transitions within the enzyme's small domain govern cooperativity. Here, using limited proteolysis, we map the site of disorder in unliganded GCK to a 30-residue active-site loop that closes upon glucose binding. Positional randomization of the loop, coupled with genetic selection in a glucokinase-deficient bacterium, uncovers a hyperactive GCK variant with substantially reduced cooperativity. Biochemical and structural analysis of this loop variant and GCK variants associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia reveal two distinct mechanisms of enzyme activation. In α-type activation, glucose affinity is increased, the proteolytic susceptibility of the active site loop is suppressed and the (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum of (13)C-Ile-labeled enzyme resembles the glucose-bound state. In β-type activation, glucose affinity is largely unchanged, proteolytic susceptibility of the loop is enhanced, and the (1)H-(13)C HMQC spectrum reveals no perturbation in ensemble structure. Leveraging both activation mechanisms, we engineer a fully noncooperative GCK variant, whose functional properties are indistinguishable from other hexokinase isozymes, and which displays a 100-fold increase in catalytic efficiency over wild-type GCK. This work elucidates specific structural features responsible for generating allostery in a monomeric enzyme and suggests a general strategy for engineering cooperativity into proteins that lack the structural framework typical of traditional allosteric systems.

  9. Regulation of glucokinase activity in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Clarke, B L; Scheck, A C; Brown, J

    1986-09-30

    The factors which regulate soluble and particulate glucokinase and hexokinase activity in the liver of domestic chickens has been investigated. Pretreatment with oral administration (via tube feeding) of glucose plus injection of insulin resulted in a significant increase in the activity of soluble (p less than 0.01) and particulate (p less than 0.01) glucokinase activity whereas fasting for 48 hours reduced glucokinase and hexokinase activity (p less than 0.01) in the particulate fraction only. Treatment of fed chickens for 2 weeks with thyroxine (50 micrograms: i.m. daily) plus triiodothyronine (50 micrograms) resulted in a marginal decrease (NS) in soluble glucokinase activity but significantly increased soluble hexokinase (p less than 0.05) activity. Thyroidectomized animals showed a decline in both soluble glucokinase (p less than 0.01) and hexokinase (p less than 0.025) activity. There was no effect of thyroid hormone manipulation on particulate glucokinase activity although there was a significant reduction in particulate hexokinase activity (p less than 0.05) in thyroidectomized birds. These data establish a physiological role for the glucokinase enzyme activity in avian carbohydrate metabolism and suggest that in contrast with the mammal, the particulate fraction is the more physiologically important enzyme.

  10. Assessment of insulin sensitivity in glucokinase-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Clément, K; Pueyo, M E; Vaxillaire, M; Rakotoambinina, B; Thuillier, F; Passa, P; Froguel, P; Robert, J J; Velho, G

    1996-01-01

    The chronic hyperglycaemia of glucokinase-deficient diabetes results from a glucose-sensing defect in pancreatic beta cells and abnormal hepatic glucose phosphorylation. We have evaluated the contribution of insulin resistance to this form of chronic hyperglycaemia. Insulin sensitivity, assessed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method in 35 kindreds with glucokinase mutations, was found to be significantly decreased in 125 glucokinase-deficient subjects as compared to 141 unaffected first-degree relatives. Logistic regression analysis showed that in glucokinase-deficient subjects a decrease in insulin sensitivity was associated with deterioration of the glucose tolerance status. A euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp was performed in 14 glucokinase-deficient subjects and 12 unrelated control subjects. In six patients and six control subjects the clamp was coupled to dideutero-glucose infusion to measure glucose turnover. Average glucose infusion rates (GIR) at 1 and 5 mU.kg body weight.min-1 insulin infusion rates were significantly lower in (the glucokinase-deficient) patients than in control subjects. Although heterogeneous results were observed, in 8 out of the 14 patients GIRs throughout the experiment were lower than 1 SD below the mean of the control subjects. Hepatic glucose production at 1 mU.kg body weight-1.min-1 insulin-infusion rate was significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. In conclusion, insulin resistance correlates with the deterioration of glucose tolerance and contributes to the hyperglycaemia of glucokinase-deficient diabetes. Taken together, our results are most consistent with insulin resistance being considered secondary to the chronic hyperglycaemia and/or hypoinsulinaemia of glucokinase-deficiency. Insulin resistance might also result from interactions between the unbalanced glucose metabolism and susceptibility gene(s) to low insulin sensitivity likely to be present in this population.

  11. Ghrelin Facilitates GLUT2-, SGLT1- and SGLT2-mediated Intestinal Glucose Transport in Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Ramesh, Naresh; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is an important biological process that involves a variety of regulatory mechanisms. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin, a multifunctional gut-brain hormone, modulates intestinal glucose transport in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Three intestinal glucose transporters, the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and the sodium/glucose co-transporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2), were studied. Immunostaining of intestinal sections found colocalization of ghrelin and GLUT2 and SGLT2 in mucosal cells. Some cells containing GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 coexpressed the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Intraperitoneal glucose administration led to a significant increase in serum ghrelin levels, as well as an upregulation of intestinal preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyltransferase and ghs-r1 expression. In vivo and in vitro ghrelin treatment caused a concentration- and time-dependent modulation (mainly stimulatory) of GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2. These effects were abolished by the GHS-R1a antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, suggesting that ghrelin actions on glucose transporters are mediated by GHS-R1a via the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Finally, ghrelin stimulated the translocation of GLUT2 into the plasma membrane of goldfish primary intestinal cells. Overall, data reported here indicate an important role for ghrelin in the modulation of glucoregulatory machinery and glucose homeostasis in fish. PMID:28338019

  12. Ghrelin Facilitates GLUT2-, SGLT1- and SGLT2-mediated Intestinal Glucose Transport in Goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Ramesh, Naresh; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-03-24

    Glucose homeostasis is an important biological process that involves a variety of regulatory mechanisms. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin, a multifunctional gut-brain hormone, modulates intestinal glucose transport in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Three intestinal glucose transporters, the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and the sodium/glucose co-transporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2), were studied. Immunostaining of intestinal sections found colocalization of ghrelin and GLUT2 and SGLT2 in mucosal cells. Some cells containing GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 coexpressed the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Intraperitoneal glucose administration led to a significant increase in serum ghrelin levels, as well as an upregulation of intestinal preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyltransferase and ghs-r1 expression. In vivo and in vitro ghrelin treatment caused a concentration- and time-dependent modulation (mainly stimulatory) of GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2. These effects were abolished by the GHS-R1a antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, suggesting that ghrelin actions on glucose transporters are mediated by GHS-R1a via the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Finally, ghrelin stimulated the translocation of GLUT2 into the plasma membrane of goldfish primary intestinal cells. Overall, data reported here indicate an important role for ghrelin in the modulation of glucoregulatory machinery and glucose homeostasis in fish.

  13. In vivo regulation of GLUT2 mRNA in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) in response to acute and chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Terova, Genciana; Rimoldi, Simona; Brambilla, Fabio; Gornati, Rosalba; Bernardini, Giovanni; Saroglia, Marco

    2009-04-01

    The expression and regulation of sodium-independent glucose transporter (GLUT)-2, in relation to hypoxia has not yet been explored in fish or other vertebrates. In this study, the complete open-reading frame for sea bass GLUT2 was isolated and deposited in the GenBank. The predicted 12 transmembrane domains of the protein (508 amino acids) are presented. A phylogenetic tree was constructed on GLUT2 sequences of sea bass and those of other teleost, amphibian, avian, and mammalian species. We also analyzed acute and chronic hypoxia-induced changes in the expression of hepatic GLUT2 mRNA, using one-tube, two-temperature, real-time RT-PCR with which gene expression can be absolutely quantified by the standard curve method. The number of GLUT2 mRNA copies was significantly increased in response to both acute (1.9 mg/L, dissolved oxygen for 4 h) and chronic (4.3 mg/L, DO for 15 days) hypoxia conditions. The hypoxia-related changes in GLUT2 mRNA copy number support the view that GLUT2 is involved in the adaptation response to hypoxia in sea bass, a marine hypoxia-sensitive species. We realize that the GLUT2 mRNA levels in our study do not measure the physiological effects produced by the protein. Thus, we can only speculate that, under hypoxic conditions, GLUT2 probably functions to allow the glucose produced from liver glycogen to leave the hepatocytes.

  14. Hypoglycemia-activated GLUT2 neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius stimulate vagal activity and glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Christophe M; Sanno, Hitomi; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Picard, Alexandre; Magnan, Christophe; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Thorens, Bernard

    2014-03-04

    Glucose-sensing neurons in the brainstem participate in the regulation of energy homeostasis but have been poorly characterized because of the lack of specific markers to identify them. Here we show that GLUT2-expressing neurons of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius form a distinct population of hypoglycemia-activated neurons. Their response to low glucose is mediated by reduced intracellular glucose metabolism, increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity, and closure of leak K(+) channels. These are GABAergic neurons that send projections to the vagal motor nucleus. Light-induced stimulation of channelrhodospin-expressing GLUT2 neurons in vivo led to increased parasympathetic nerve firing and glucagon secretion. Thus GLUT2 neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius link hypoglycemia detection to counterregulatory response. These results may help identify the cause of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, a major threat in the insulin treatment of diabetes.

  15. High human GLUT1, GLUT2, and GLUT3 expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuxin; Hu, Zongli; Liu, Zhizhao; Wang, Yi; Chen, Xuqing; Chen, Guoping

    2009-01-01

    In this study, three subfamily members of the human 12-transmembrane-domain cell-surface receptors GLUT1, GLUT2, and GLUT3 were heterologously expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe utilizing GST-GLUT fusion proteins. These fusion proteins were driven by the full-length nmt1 promoter (Pnmt1) derived from S. pombe. The transcription levels of the GST-GLUT fusion proteins were very high upon induction by removing thiamine from the media. One-step purification of the recombinant fusion proteins was achieved by GST-affinity chromatography. Approximately 300 microg of highly purified fusion protein were obtained from 3 g of wet cell paste (1 liter of cell culture), indicating that human membrane proteins can be efficiently expressed and purified in the fission yeast. With its available extensive genetic information and ease of genetic manipulation, the fission yeast is potentially a highly efficient host to express eukaryotic membrane proteins.

  16. Sweet taste receptors in rat small intestine stimulate glucose absorption through apical GLUT2

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Oliver J; Affleck, Julie; Patel, Nick; Kellett, George L

    2007-01-01

    Natural sugars and artificial sweeteners are sensed by receptors in taste buds. T2R bitter and T1R sweet taste receptors are coupled through G-proteins, α-gustducin and transducin, to activate phospholipase C β2 and increase intracellular calcium concentration. Intestinal brush cells or solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) have a structure similar to lingual taste cells and strongly express α-gustducin. It has therefore been suggested over the last decade that brush cells may participate in sugar sensing by a mechanism analogous to that in taste buds. We provide here functional evidence for an intestinal sensing system based on lingual taste receptors. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry revealed that all T1R members are expressed in rat jejunum at strategic locations including Paneth cells, SCCs or the apical membrane of enterocytes; T1Rs are colocalized with each other and with α-gustducin, transducin or phospholipase C β2 to different extents. Intestinal glucose absorption consists of two components: one is classical active Na+–glucose cotransport, the other is the diffusive apical GLUT2 pathway. Artificial sweeteners increase glucose absorption in the order acesulfame potassium ∼ sucralose > saccharin, in parallel with their ability to increase intracellular calcium concentration. Stimulation occurs within minutes by an increase in apical GLUT2, which correlates with reciprocal regulation of T1R2, T1R3 and α-gustducin versus T1R1, transducin and phospholipase C β2. Our observation that artificial sweeteners are nutritionally active, because they can signal to a functional taste reception system to increase sugar absorption during a meal, has wide implications for nutrient sensing and nutrition in the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:17495045

  17. Species and tissue distribution of the regulatory protein of glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Vandercammen, A; Van Schaftingen, E

    1993-09-01

    Rat liver is known to contain a regulatory protein that inhibits glucokinase (hexokinase IV or D) competitively versus glucose. This inhibition is greatly reinforced by the presence of fructose 6-phosphate and antagonized by fructose 1-phosphate and by KCl. This protein was now measured in various rat tissues and in the livers of various species by the inhibition it exerts on rat liver glucokinase. Rat, mouse, rabbit, guinea-pig and pig liver, all of which contain glucokinase, also contained between 60 and 200 units/g of tissue of a regulatory protein displaying the properties mentioned above. By contrast, this protein could not be detected in cat, goat, chicken or trout liver, or in rat brain, heart, skeletal muscle, kidney and spleen, all tissues from which glucokinase is missing. Fructose 1-phosphate stimulated glucokinase in extracts of human liver, indicating the presence of regulatory protein. In addition, antibodies raised against rat regulatory protein allowed the detection of an approximately 60 kDa polypeptide in rat, guinea pig, rabbit and human liver. The livers of the toad Bufo marinus, of Xenopus laevis and of the turtle Pseudemys scripta elegans contained a regulatory protein similar to that of the rat, with, however, the major difference that it was not sensitive to fructose 6-phosphate or fructose 1-phosphate. In rat liver, the regulatory protein was detectable 4 days before birth. Its concentration increased afterwards to reach the adult level at day 30 of extrauterine life, whereas glucokinase only appeared after day 15. In the liver of the adult rat, starvation and streptozotocin-diabetes caused a 50-60% decrease in the concentration of regulatory protein after 7 days, whereas glucokinase activity fell to about 20% of its initial level. When 4-day-starved rats were refed, or when diabetic rats were treated with insulin, the concentration of regulatory protein slowly increased to reach about 85% of the control level after 3 days, whereas the

  18. Acetylation of glucokinase regulatory protein decreases glucose metabolism by suppressing glucokinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jo, Seong-Ho; Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), mainly expressed in the liver and pancreatic β-cells, is critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis. GK expression and kinase activity, respectively, are both modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Post-translationally, GK is regulated by binding the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), resulting in GK retention in the nucleus and its inability to participate in cytosolic glycolysis. Although hepatic GKRP is known to be regulated by allosteric mechanisms, the precise details of modulation of GKRP activity, by post-translational modification, are not well known. Here, we demonstrate that GKRP is acetylated at Lys5 by the acetyltransferase p300. Acetylated GKRP is resistant to degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway, suggesting that acetylation increases GKRP stability and binding to GK, further inhibiting GK nuclear export. Deacetylation of GKRP is effected by the NAD+-dependent, class III histone deacetylase SIRT2, which is inhibited by nicotinamide. Moreover, the livers of db/db obese, diabetic mice also show elevated GKRP acetylation, suggesting a broader, critical role in regulating blood glucose. Given that acetylated GKRP may affiliate with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), understanding the mechanism of GKRP acetylation in the liver could reveal novel targets within the GK-GKRP pathway, for treating T2DM and other metabolic pathologies. PMID:26620281

  19. Diabetes increases facilitative glucose uptake and GLUT2 expression at the rat proximal tubule brush border membrane

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Joanne; Carvou, Nicolas J C; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of renal glucose transport involves the reabsorption of filtered glucose from the proximal tubule lumen across the brush border membrane (BBM) via a sodium-dependent transporter, SGLT, and exit across the basolateral membrane via facilitative, GLUT-mediated, transport. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on BBM glucose transport. We found that diabetes increased facilitative glucose transport at the BBM by 67.5 % (P < 0.05) – an effect that was abolished by overnight fasting. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated GLUT2 expression at the BBM during diabetes, but the protein was undetectable at the BBM of control animals or diabetic animals that had been fasted overnight. Our findings indicate that streptozotocin-induced diabetes causes the insertion of GLUT2 into the BBM and this may provide a low affinity/high capacity route of entry into proximal tubule cells during hyperglycaemia. PMID:12963802

  20. Diabetes increases facilitative glucose uptake and GLUT2 expression at the rat proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    PubMed

    Marks, Joanne; Carvou, Nicolas J C; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J

    2003-11-15

    The mechanism of renal glucose transport involves the reabsorption of filtered glucose from the proximal tubule lumen across the brush border membrane (BBM) via a sodium-dependent transporter, SGLT, and exit across the basolateral membrane via facilitative, GLUT-mediated, transport. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on BBM glucose transport. We found that diabetes increased facilitative glucose transport at the BBM by 67.5 % (P < 0.05)--an effect that was abolished by overnight fasting. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated GLUT2 expression at the BBM during diabetes, but the protein was undetectable at the BBM of control animals or diabetic animals that had been fasted overnight. Our findings indicate that streptozotocin-induced diabetes causes the insertion of GLUT2 into the BBM and this may provide a low affinity/high capacity route of entry into proximal tubule cells during hyperglycaemia.

  1. Recent updates on glucokinase activators for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ajmer Singh; Sekhon, Bhupinder Singh; Lather, Viney

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-phosphorylating enzyme, glucokinase (GK) plays a major role in glucose homeostasis primarily through its regulatory actions in pancreatic β-cells and liver hepatocytes. Conversion of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate by GK promotes glycogen synthesis in liver hepatocytes, and insulin release in the pancreatic β-cells. Small molecules called glucokinase activators (GKAs) which bind to an allosteric activator site of the GK enzyme have indeed been discovered and developed, and thus hold great promise as new, effective and safe antidiabetic agents. GKAs enhance the catalytic activity of GK and promising clinical trials in humans demonstrated that they are highly useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Most of the reported GKAs include amide derivatives like benzamides, acrylamides, carboxamides, acetamides and acrylamides. Examples include Piragliatin, AZD1656, AZD6370, R1440 GKA2, GKA 50, YH GKA, PSN 010, and LY2121260. Recent findings on GKAs including lead compounds and overview of current hypothesis on mechanism of GK activation along with summary of the recently published patents as well as the GKAs of natural origin are reported in the present review.

  2. Rare Sugar Syrup Containing d-Allulose but Not High-Fructose Corn Syrup Maintains Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Sensitivity Partly via Hepatic Glucokinase Translocation in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Tomoya; Yamada, Takako; Hayashi, Noriko; Iida, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yasuo; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Toyoda, Yukiyasu

    2017-04-05

    Ingestion of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with the risk of both diabetes and obesity. Rare sugar syrup (RSS) has been developed by alkaline isomerization of HFCS and has anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. However, the influence of RSS on glucose metabolism has not been explored. We investigated whether long-term administration of RSS maintains glucose tolerance and whether the underlying mechanism involves hepatic glucokinase translocation. Wistar rats were administered water, RSS, or HFCS in drinking water for 10 weeks and then evaluated for glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, liver glycogen content, and subcellular distribution of liver glucokinase. RSS significantly suppressed body weight gain and abdominal fat mass (p < 0.05). The glucose tolerance test revealed significantly higher blood glucose levels in the HFCS group compared to the water group, whereas the RSS group had significantly lower blood glucose levels from 90 to 180 min (p < 0.05). At 30, 60, and 90 min, the levels of insulin in the RSS group were significantly lower than those in the water group (p < 0.05). The amount of hepatic glycogen was more than 3 times higher in the RSS group than that in the other groups. After glucose loading, the nuclear export of glucokinase was significantly increased in the RSS group compared to the water group. These results imply that RSS maintains glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, at least partly, by enhancing nuclear export of hepatic glucokinase.

  3. Control of glucokinase translocation in rat hepatocytes by sorbitol and the cytosolic redox state.

    PubMed Central

    Agius, L

    1994-01-01

    In rat hepatocytes cultured in 5 mM glucose, glucokinase activity is present predominantly in a bound state, and during permeabilization of the cells with digitonin in the presence of Mg2+ less than 20% of glucokinase activity is released. However, incubation of hepatocytes with a higher [glucose] [concn. giving half-maximal activation (A50) 15 mM] or with fructose (A50 50 microM) causes translocation of glucokinase from its Mg(2+)-dependent binding site to an alternative site [Agius and Peak (1993) Biochem. J. 296, 785-796]. A comparison of various substrates showed that sorbitol (A50 8 microM) was 6-fold more potent than fructose at causing glucokinase translocation, whereas tagatose was as potent and mannitol was > 10-fold less potent (A50 550 microM). These substrates also stimulate glucose conversion into glycogen with a similar relative potency, suggesting that conversion of glucose into glycogen is dependent on the binding and/or location of glucokinase within the hepatocyte. Ethanol and glycerol inhibited the effects of fructose, sorbitol and glucose on glucokinase translocation, whereas dihydroxy-acetone had a small additive effect at sub-maximal substrate stimulation. The converse effects of glycerol and dihydroxy-acetone suggest a role for the cytosolic NADH/NAD+ redox state in controlling glucokinase translocation. Titrations with three competitive inhibitors of glucokinase did not provide evidence for involvement of glucokinase flux in glucose-induced glucokinase translocation: N-acetylglucosamine inhibited glucose conversion into glycogen, but not glucose-induced glucokinase translocation; glucosamine partially suppressed glucose-induced and fructose-induced glucokinase translocation, at concentrations that caused total inhibition of glucose conversion into glycogen; D-mannoheptulose increased glucokinase release and had an additive effect with glucose. 3,3'-Tetramethylene-glutaric acid (5 mM), an inhibitor of aldose reductase, inhibited glucokinase

  4. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of p-coumaric acid in diabetic rats, role of pancreatic GLUT 2: In vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Amalan, Venkatesan; Vijayakumar, Natesan; Indumathi, Dhananjayan; Ramakrishnan, Arumugam

    2016-12-01

    P-coumaric acid (p-CA, 3-[4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-propenoic acid), the major component widely found in nutritious plant foods, has various antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticancer property. To evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic mechanisms, via the effects on carbohydrate, lipids and lipoproteins responses in adult male albino Wistar rats were examined by treated with p-CA. Rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ, 40mg/kg b.w.) by intraperitonially (i.p.) 30days for the induction of experimental diabetes mellitus. Diabetic rats were treated with p-CA orally at a dose of 100mg/kg b.w. The potential defending character of p-CA against diabetic rats was evaluated by performing the various biochemical parameters and glucose transporter such as GLUT2 mRNA expression of pancreas. Administration of p-CA significantly lowers the blood glucose level, gluconeogenic enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase whereas increases the activities of hexokinase, glucose-6 phosphatase dehydrogenase and GSH via by increasing level of insulin. p-CA reduces the total cholesterol and triglycerides in both plasma and tissues i.e. liver and kidney. p-CA also decreases the LDL-C, VLDL-C and it considerably increase the level of HDL-C. A significant decreased expression of GLUT 2 mRNA in the pancreas was recorded in the supplementation of p-CA treated groups. Taken together, these results suggest that p-CA modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via GLUT 2 activation in the pancreatic and has potentially beneficial effects in improving or treating metabolic disorders.

  5. Developmental changes in the expression of the GLUT2 and GLUT4 genes in the longissimus dorsi muscle of Yorkshire and Tibetan pigs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Yang, X M; Gu, Y R; Tao, X; Zhong, Z Z; Gong, J J; Chen, X H; Lv, X B

    2015-02-13

    Glucose transporter proteins 2 and 4 (GLUT2 and GLUT4) play important roles in glucose transport and energy metabolism. Changes in the levels of GLUT2 and GLUT4 mRNA were measured in longissimus dorsi muscle from the lean Yorkshire and fat Tibetan pig breeds at six different time points (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 months) with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions. The results showed that GLUT2 and GLUT4 mRNA were abundantly expressed in the longissimus dorsi muscle and that the developmental expression patterns were similar in both breeds. Tibetan pigs exhibited higher intramuscular fat and GLUT2 mRNA levels, while Yorkshire pigs exhibited a higher myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and GLUT4 mRNA levels. Furthermore, the changes in the GLUT4 mRNA levels were strongly and positively correlated with the CSA over a period of six months. These results exhibit time- and breed-specific expression patterns of GLUT2 and GLUT4, which highlight their potential as candidate genes for assessing adipose deposition and muscle development in pigs. These differences in the expression of GLUT family genes may also have indications for meat quality.

  6. Oat β-glucan depresses SGLT1- and GLUT2-mediated glucose transport in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6).

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Nazanin N; Purslow, Peter P; Tosh, Susan M; Bakovic, Marica

    2016-06-01

    Oat β-glucan consumption is linked to reduced risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity by lowering glycemic response and serum level of low-density lipoproteins. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of action of oat β-glucan at the interface between the gut wall and the lumen responsible for attenuating glucose levels. We proposed that viscous oat β-glucan acts as a physical barrier to glucose uptake in normally absorptive gut epithelial cells IEC-6 by affecting the expression of intestinal glucose transporters. Concentration and time-dependent changes in glucose uptake were established by using a nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. The effectiveness of nutrient transport in IEC-6 cells was shown by significant differences in glucose uptake and corresponding transporter expression. The expressions of glucose transporters sodium-glucose-linked transport protein 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) increased with time (0-60 minutes) and glucose levels (5-25 mmol/L). The suppression of glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression by increasing concentrations (4-8 mg/mL) of oat β-glucan demonstrated a direct effect of the physical properties of oat β-glucan on glucose transport. These results affirmed oat β-glucan as a dietary agent for minimizing postprandial glucose and showed that modulating the activity of the key intestinal glucose transporters with oat β-glucan could be an effective way of lowering blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of development of hepatic glucokinase in the neonatal rat by the diet.

    PubMed

    Walker, D G; Eaton, S W

    1967-11-01

    1. Feeding a high-glucose diet to weanling rats showed that high hepatic glucokinase activities could be induced at 18 days of age, i.e. 2 days after development of the enzyme begins. 2. The normal development of glucokinase activity can be retarded by weaning rats on to carbohydrate-free, high-fat and high-protein diets. 3. Precocious development of the enzyme before 16 days of age cannot be induced by oral glucose administration. 4. It is concluded that the ability to synthesize glucokinase develops very rapidly and that the nature of the diet determines the normal developmental pattern.

  8. Time-course changes in immunoreactivities of glucokinase and glucokinase regulatory protein in the gerbil hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Kim, In Hye; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Yan, Bing Chun; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Tae Hun; Seo, Jeong Yeol; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2013-12-01

    Glucose is a main energy source for normal brain functions. Glucokinase (GK) plays an important role in glucose metabolism as a glucose sensor, and GK activity is modulated by glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP). In this study, we examined the changes of GK and GKRP immunoreactivities in the gerbil hippocampus after 5 min of transient global cerebral ischemia. In the sham-operated-group, GK and GKRP immunoreactivities were easily detected in the pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampus. GK and GKRP immunoreactivities in the pyramidal neurons were distinctively decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA), not CA2/3, 3 days after ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). Five days after I-R, GK and GKRP immunoreactivities were hardly detected in the CA1, not CA2/3, pyramidal neurons; however, at this point in time, GK and GKRP immunoreactivities were newly expressed in astrocytes, not microglia, in the ischemic CA1. In brief, GK and GKRP immunoreactivities are changed in pyramidal neurons and newly expressed in astrocytes in the ischemic CA1 after transient cerebral ischemia. These indicate that changes of GK and GKRP expression may be related to the ischemia-induced neuronal damage/death.

  9. Opposite Clinical Phenotypes of Glucokinase Disease: Description of a Novel Activating Mutation and Contiguous Inactivating Mutations in Human Glucokinase (GCK) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbetti, Fabrizio; Cobo-Vuilleumier, Nadia; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Toni, Sonia; Ciampalini, Paolo; Massa, Ornella; Rodriguez-Bada, Pablo; Colombo, Carlo; Lenzi, Lorenzo; Garcia-Gimeno, María A.; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J.; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Banin, Patrizia; Aledo, Juan C.; Baixeras, Elena; Sanz, Pascual; Cuesta-Muñoz, Antonio L.

    2009-01-01

    Glucokinase is essential for glucose-stimulated insulin release from the pancreatic β-cell, serving as glucose sensor in humans. Inactivating or activating mutations of glucokinase lead to different forms of glucokinase disease, i.e. GCK-monogenic diabetes of youth, permanent neonatal diabetes (inactivating mutations), and congenital hyperinsulinism, respectively. Here we present a novel glucokinase gene (GCK)-activating mutation (p.E442K) found in an infant with neonatal hypoglycemia (1.5 mmol/liter) and in two other family members suffering from recurrent hypoglycemic episodes in their childhood and adult life. In contrast to the severe clinical presentation in the index case, functional studies showed only a slight activation of the protein (relative activity index of 3.3). We also report on functional studies of two inactivating mutations of the GCK (p.E440G and p.S441W), contiguous to the activating one, that lead to monogenic diabetes of youth. Interestingly, adult family members carrying the GCK pE440G mutation show an unusually heterogeneous and progressive diabetic phenotype, a feature not typical of GCK-monogenic diabetes of youth. In summary, we identified a novel activating GCK mutation that although being associated with severe neonatal hypoglycemia is characterized by the mildest activation of the glucokinase enzyme of all previously reported. PMID:19884385

  10. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+ATP-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+ATP-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. l-Amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and PYY

  11. In vivo and ex vivo 19-fluorine magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of beta-cells and pancreatic islets using GLUT-2 specific contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sayuan; Louchami, Karim; Kolster, Hauke; Jacobsen, Anna; Zhang, Ying; Thimm, Julian; Sener, Abdullah; Thiem, Joachim; Malaisse, Willy; Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-11-01

    The assessment of the β-cell mass in experimental models of diabetes and ultimately in patients is a hallmark to understand the relationship between reduced β-cell mass/function and the onset of diabetes. It has been shown before that the GLUT-2 transporter is highly expressed in both β-cells and hepatocytes and that D-mannoheptulose (DMH) has high uptake specificity for the GLUT-2 transporter. As 19-fluorine MRI has emerged as a new alternative method for MRI cell tracking because it provides potential non-invasive localization and quantification of labeled cells, the purpose of this project is to validate β-cell and pancreatic islet imaging by using fluorinated, GLUT-2 targeting mannoheptulose derivatives ((19) FMH) both in vivo and ex vivo. In this study, we confirmed that, similar to DMH, (19) FMHs inhibit insulin secretion and increase the blood glucose level in mice temporarily (approximately two hours). We were able to assess the distribution of (19) FMHs in vivo with a temporal resolution of about 20 minutes, which showed a quick removal of (19) FMH from the circulation (within two hours). Ex vivo MR spectroscopy confirmed a preferential uptake of (19) FMH in tissue with high expression of the GLUT-2 transporter, such as liver, endocrine pancreas and kidney. No indication of further metabolism was found. In summary, (19) FMHs are potentially suitable for visualizing and tracking of GLUT-2 expressed cells. However, current bottlenecks of this technique related to the quick clearance of the compound and relative low sensitivity of (19) F MRI need to be overcome. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A tale of two glucose transporters: how GLUT2 re-emerged as a contender for glucose transport into the human beta cell.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, M; Gloyn, A L

    2012-09-01

    Finding novel causes for monogenic forms of diabetes is important as, alongside the clinical implications of such a discovery, it can identify critical proteins and pathways required for normal beta cell function in humans. It is increasingly apparent that there are significant differences between rodent and human islets. One example that has generated interest is the relative importance of the glucose transporter GLUT2 in rodent and human beta cells. The central role of GLUT2 in rodent beta cells is well established, but a number of studies have suggested that other glucose transporters, namely GLUT1 and GLUT3, may play an important role in facilitating glucose transport into human beta cells. In this issue of Diabetologia Sansbury et al (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2595-0 ) report homozygous loss of function mutations in SLC2A2, which encodes GLUT2, as a rare cause of neonatal diabetes. Evidence for a beta cell defect in these subjects comes from very low birthweights, lack of endogenous insulin secretion and a requirement for insulin therapy. Neonatal diabetes is not a consistent feature of SLC2A2 mutations. It is only found in a small percentage of cases (~4%) and the diabetes largely resolves before 18 months of age. This discovery is significant as it suggests that GLUT2 plays an important role in human beta cells, but the interplay and relative roles of other transporters differ from those in rodents. This finding should encourage efforts to delineate the precise role of GLUT2 in the human beta cell at different developmental time points and is a further reminder of critical differences between human and rodent islets.

  13. Shared control of hepatic glycogen synthesis by glycogen synthase and glucokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gomis, R R; Ferrer, J C; Guinovart, J J

    2000-01-01

    We have used recombinant adenoviruses (AdCMV-RLGS and AdCMV-GK) to overexpress the liver isoforms of glycogen synthase (GS) and glucokinase (GK) in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Glucose activated overexpressed GS in a dose-dependent manner and caused the accumulation of larger amounts of glycogen in the AdCMV-RLGS-treated hepatocytes. The concentration of intermediate metabolites of the glycogenic pathway, such as glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and UDP-glucose, were not significantly altered. GK overexpression also conferred on the hepatocyte an enhanced capacity to synthesize glycogen in response to glucose, as described previously [Seoane, Gómez-Foix, O'Doherty, Gómez-Ara, Newgard and Guinovart (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 23756-23760], although, in this case, they accumulated Glc-6-P. When GS and GK were simultaneously overexpressed, the accumulation of glycogen was enhanced in comparison with cells overexpressing either GS or GK. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver GS catalyses the rate-limiting step of hepatic glycogen synthesis. However, hepatic glycogen deposition from glucose is submitted to a system of shared control in which the 'controller', GS, is, in turn, controlled by GK. This control is indirectly exerted through Glc-6-P, which 'switches on' GS dephosphorylation and activation. PMID:11042138

  14. Insulin-positive, Glut2-low cells present within mouse pancreas exhibit lineage plasticity and are enriched within extra-islet endocrine cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Beamish, Christine A; Strutt, Brenda J; Arany, Edith J; Hill, David J

    2016-04-18

    Regeneration of insulin-producing β-cells from resident pancreas progenitors requires an understanding of both progenitor identity and lineage plasticity. One model suggested that a rare β-cell sub-population within islets demonstrated multi-lineage plasticity. We hypothesized that β-cells from young mice (postnatal day 7, P7) exhibit such plasticity and used a model of islet dedifferentiation toward a ductal epithelial-cell phenotype to test this theory. RIPCre;Z/AP(+/+) mice were used to lineage trace the fate of β-cells during dedifferentiation culture by a human placental alkaline phosphatase (HPAP) reporter. There was a significant loss of HPAP-expressing β-cells in culture, but remaining HPAP(+) cells lost insulin expression while gaining expression of the epithelial duct cell marker cytokeratin-19 (Ck19). Flow cytometry and recovery of β-cell subpopulations from whole pancreas vs. islets suggest that the HPAP(+)Ck19(+) cells had derived from insulin-positive, glucose-transporter-2-low (Ins(+)Glut2(LO)) cells, representing 3.5% of all insulin-expressing cells. The majority of these cells were found outside of islets within clusters of <5 β-cells. These insulin(+)Glut2(LO) cells demonstrated a greater proliferation rate in vivo and in vitro as compared to insulin(+)Glut2(+) cells at P7, were retained into adulthood, and a subset differentiated into endocrine, ductal, and neural lineages, illustrating substantial plasticity. Results were confirmed using RIPCre;ROSA- eYFP mice. Quantitative PCR data indicated these cells possess an immature β-cell phenotype. These Ins(+)Glut2(LO) cells may represent a resident population of cells capable of forming new, functional β-cells, and which may be potentially exploited for regenerative therapies in the future.

  15. Chronic ethanol consumption inhibits glucokinase transcriptional activity by Atf3 and triggers metabolic syndrome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Dae Yeon; Song, Eun Hyun; Park, Keon Jae; Kim, Gyu Hee; Jeong, Eun Ae; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Bong-Jo; Song, Jihyun; Roh, Gu Seob; Gao, Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2014-09-26

    Chronic ethanol consumption induces pancreatic β-cell dysfunction through glucokinase (Gck) nitration and down-regulation, leading to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Gck gene expression and promoter activity in pancreatic β-cells were suppressed by chronic ethanol exposure in vivo and in vitro, whereas expression of activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) and its binding to the putative Atf/Creb site (from -287 to -158 bp) on the Gck promoter were up-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro ethanol-induced Atf3 inhibited the positive effect of Pdx-1 on Gck transcriptional regulation, enhanced recruitment of Hdac1/2 and histone H3 deacetylation, and subsequently augmented the interaction of Hdac1/Pdx-1 on the Gck promoter, which were diminished by Atf3 siRNA. In vivo Atf3-silencing reversed ethanol-mediated Gck down-regulation and β-cell dysfunction, followed by the amelioration of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Together, we identified that ethanol-induced Atf3 fosters β-cell dysfunction via Gck down-regulation and that its loss ameliorates metabolic syndrome and could be a potential therapeutic target in treating type 2 diabetes. The Atf3 gene is associated with the induction of type 2 diabetes and alcohol consumption-induced metabolic impairment and thus may be the major negative regulator for glucose homeostasis.

  16. Structure based design, synthesis and biological evaluation of amino phosphonate derivatives as human glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Kilaru, Ravendra Babu; Chamarthi, Nagaraju; Pvgk, Sarma; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2017-06-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is a potential therapeutic target of type 2 diabetes and GK activators (GKAs) represent a promising class of small organic molecules which enhance GK activity. Based on the configuration and conformation of the allosteric site of GK, we have designed a novel class of amino phosphonate derivatives in order to develop potent GKAs. The QSAR model developed using numerous descriptors revealed its potential with the best effective statistical values of RMSE=1.52 and r(2)=0.30. Moreover, application of this model on the present test set GKAs proved to be worthy to predict their activities as a better linear relationship was observed with RMSE=0.14 and r(2)=0.88. ADME studies and Lipinski filters encouraged them as safer therapeutics. The molecular dynamics and docking studies against the GK allosteric site revealed that all GKAs bind with best affinities and the complexes are strengthened by H-bonding, phosphonate salt bridges, hydrophobic and arene cat ionic interactions. Finally, in vitro evaluation with human liver GK revealed their potential to increase the GK activity by different folds. The results from QSAR, ADME, molecular docking and in vitro assays strongly suggested that the present molecules could be used as effective and safer therapeutics to control and manage type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Nutritional regulation of glucokinase: a cross-species story.

    PubMed

    Panserat, Stéphane; Rideau, Nicole; Polakof, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    The glucokinase (GK) enzyme (EC 2.7.1.1.) is essential for the use of dietary glucose because it is the first enzyme to phosphorylate glucose in excess in different key tissues such as the pancreas and liver. The objective of the present review is not to fully describe the biochemical characteristics and the genetics of this enzyme but to detail its nutritional regulation in different vertebrates from fish to human. Indeed, the present review will describe the existence of the GK enzyme in different animal species that have naturally different levels of carbohydrate in their diets. Thus, some studies have been performed to analyse the nutritional regulation of the GK enzyme in humans and rodents (having high levels of dietary carbohydrates in their diets), in the chicken (moderate level of carbohydrates in its diet) and rainbow trout (no carbohydrate intake in its diet). All these data illustrate the nutritional importance of the GK enzyme irrespective of feeding habits, even in animals known to poorly use dietary carbohydrates (carnivorous species).

  18. Investigation on the mechanism by which fructose, hexitols and other compounds regulate the translocation of glucokinase in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, L; Veiga-da-Cunha, M; Van Schaftingen, E

    1997-01-01

    In isolated hepatocytes in suspension, the effect of sorbitol but not that of fructose to increase the concentration of fructose 1-phosphate and to stimulate glucokinase was abolished by 2-hydroxymethyl-4-(4-N,N-dimethylamino-1-piperazino)-pyrimidine (SDI 158), an inhibitor of sorbitol dehydrogenase. In hepatocytes in primary culture, fructose was metabolized at approximately one-quarter of the rate of sorbitol, and was therefore much less potent than the polyol in increasing the concentration of fructose 1-phosphate and the translocation of glucokinase. In cultures, sorbitol, commercial mannitol, fructose, D-glyceraldehyde or high concentrations of glucose caused fructose 1-phosphate formation and glucokinase translocation in parallel. Commercial mannitol was contaminated by approx. 1% sorbitol, which accounted for its effects. The effects of sorbitol, fructose and elevated concentrations of glucose were partly inhibited by ethanol, glycerol and glucosamine. Mannoheptulose increased translocation without affecting fructose 1-phosphate concentration. Kinetic studies performed with recombinant human beta-cell glucokinase indicated that this sugar, in contrast with N-acetylglucosamine, binds to glucokinase competitively with the regulatory protein. All these observations indicate that translocation is promoted by agents that favour the dissociation of the glucokinase-regulatory-protein complex either by binding to the regulatory protein (fructose I-phosphate) or to glucokinase (glucose, mannoheptulose). They support the hypothesis that the regulatory protein of glucokinase acts as an anchor for this enzyme that slows down its release from digitonin-permeabilized cells. PMID:9003425

  19. Pancreatic beta-cell glucokinase: closing the gap between theoretical concepts and experimental realities.

    PubMed

    Matschinsky, F M; Glaser, B; Magnuson, M A

    1998-03-01

    There remains a wide gap between theoretical concepts and experimental realities in the enzyme kinetics and biochemical genetics of the pancreatic beta-cell glucokinase-glucose sensor. It is the goal of present efforts in many laboratories to bridge this gap. This perspective intends to provide a timely review of this crucial aspect of research in glucose homeostasis. It deals briefly with some fundamentals of glucokinase enzyme kinetics, offers some pertinent biochemical genetic considerations, takes stock of the current experimental database of the field by emphasizing human studies and referring to recent mouse studies, and ventures a few extrapolations into the future of this endeavor.

  20. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  1. High-fat diet with stress impaired islets' insulin secretion by reducing plasma estradiol and pancreatic GLUT2 protein levels in rats' proestrus phase.

    PubMed

    Salimi, M; Zardooz, H; Khodagholi, F; Rostamkhani, F; Shaerzadeh, F

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether two estrus phases (proestrus and diestrus) in female rats may influence the metabolic response to a high-fat diet and/or stress, focusing on pancreatic insulin secretion and content. Animals were divided into high-fat and normal diet groups, then each group was subdivided into stress and non-stress groups, and finally, each one of these was divided into proestrus and diestrus subgroups. At the end of high-fat diet treatment, foot-shock stress was applied to the animals. Then, blood samples were taken to measure plasma factors. Finally, the pancreas was removed for determination of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) protein levels and assessment of insulin content and secretion of the isolated islets. In the normal and high-fat diet groups, stress increased plasma corticosterone concentration in both phases. In both study phases, high-fat diet consumption decreased estradiol and increased leptin plasma levels. In the high-fat diet group in response to high glucose concentration, a reduction in insulin secretion was observed in the proestrus phase compared with the same phase in the normal diet group in the presence and absence of stress. Also, high-fat diet decreased the insulin content of islets in the proestrus phase compared with the normal diet. High-fat diet and/or stress caused a reduction in islet GLUT2 protein levels in both phases. In conclusion, it seems possible that high-fat diet alone or combined with foot-shock, predispose female rats to impaired insulin secretion, at least in part, by interfering with estradiol levels in the proestrus phase and decreasing pancreatic GLUT2 protein levels.

  2. Identification of mangiferin as a potential Glucokinase activator by structure-based virtual ligand screening

    PubMed Central

    Min, Qiuxia; Cai, Xinpei; Sun, Weiguang; gao, Fei; Li, Zhimei; Zhang, Qian; Wan, Luo-Sheng; Li, Hua; Chen, Jiachun

    2017-01-01

    The natural product mangiferin (compound 7) has been identified as a potential glucokinase activator by structure-based virtual ligand screening. It was proved by enzyme activation experiment and cell-based assays in vitro, with potency in micromolar range. Meanwhile, this compound showed good antihyperglycemic activity in db/db mice without obvious side effects such as excessive hypoglycaemia. PMID:28317897

  3. Treatment of diabetes and long-term survival after insulin and glucokinase gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Callejas, David; Mann, Christopher J; Ayuso, Eduard; Lage, Ricardo; Grifoll, Iris; Roca, Carles; Andaluz, Anna; Ruiz-de Gopegui, Rafael; Montané, Joel; Muñoz, Sergio; Ferre, Tura; Haurigot, Virginia; Zhou, Shangzhen; Ruberte, Jesús; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A; Garcia, Felix; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes is associated with severe secondary complications, largely caused by poor glycemic control. Treatment with exogenous insulin fails to prevent these complications completely, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. We previously demonstrated that it is possible to generate a "glucose sensor" in skeletal muscle through coexpression of glucokinase and insulin, increasing glucose uptake and correcting hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Here, we demonstrate long-term efficacy of this approach in a large animal model of diabetes. A one-time intramuscular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors of serotype 1 encoding for glucokinase and insulin in diabetic dogs resulted in normalization of fasting glycemia, accelerated disposal of glucose after oral challenge, and no episodes of hypoglycemia during exercise for >4 years after gene transfer. This was associated with recovery of body weight, reduced glycosylated plasma proteins levels, and long-term survival without secondary complications. Conversely, exogenous insulin or gene transfer for insulin or glucokinase alone failed to achieve complete correction of diabetes, indicating that the synergistic action of insulin and glucokinase is needed for full therapeutic effect. This study provides the first proof-of-concept in a large animal model for a gene transfer approach to treat diabetes.

  4. Polymorphism of Glucokinase Gene in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Yoon; Choi, Jung-Hee; Woo, Jeong-Taek; Paeng, Jeong-Ryung; Yang, In-Myung; Kim, Sung-Woon; Kim, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young-Seol; Kim, Kwang-Won; Choi, Young-Kil

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a strong genetic component to NIDDM. To clarify the role of glucokinase gene in the development of NIDDM, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of glucokinase gene and 3′ microsatellite polymorphism analyses by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) were performed in NIDDM and control subjects. Compared to NIDDM with 1.3 kb allele/Pvu I digestion of glucokinase, 10% of NIDDM did not demonstrate 1.3 kb allele and these patients were charcterized by increased insulin secretion. In 3′ microsatellite polymorphism analysis, autoradiography of PCR products revealed three different alleles, including Z, Z+2 and Z+4. Z was the most common allele in both NIDDM and nondiabetic controls. There was no significant allele associated with NIDDM. Frequency of the homozygote Z/Z genotype was significantly lower in NIDDM subjects (16.7%) compared to normal control (46.7%) (p<0.05). There was no difference in clinical findings according to 3′ microsatellite genotypes in NIDDM. These data suggest that there does not appear to be a significant glucokinase allele associated with NIDDM but Z/Z genotype may play a suppressive role in the pathogenesis of a certain type of NIDDM in Korea. Further studies may be required to identify the molecular basis of this association. PMID:7913622

  5. Short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition alters intestinal structure, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA and protein, and proglucagon mRNA abundance in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, K A; Drozdowski, L A; Thomson, A B; McBurney, M I

    1998-07-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a complex physiologic process that is not completely understood. Intravenous short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) enhance intestinal adaptation after 80% enterectomy in rats. The purpose of this study was to examine rapid responses to SCFA-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the normal small intestine. After jugular catheterization, 31 Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 258 +/- 3 g) were randomly assigned to receive standard TPN or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous TPN solution supplemented with SCFAs (TPN+SCFA). Intestinal samples were obtained after 24 or 72 h of nutrient infusion. TPN+SCFA for 24 h increased (P < 0.05) the ileal RNA concentration (microg RNA/mg ileum) whereas TPN+SCFA for 72 h increased (P < 0.05) the ileal DNA concentration (microg DNA/mg ileum) and decreased (P < 0.05) the ileal protein concentration (microg protein/mg ileum). Ileal proglucagon mRNA abundance was elevated (P < 0.05) after 24 h of TPN+SCFA infusion and returned to levels seen with control TPN by 72 h. Glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the TPN+SCFA groups at both time points when compared with control TPN groups. Ileal GLUT2 protein abundance in the 72-h TPN+SCFA group was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of all other groups. Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT-1) mRNA and protein abundance and uptake of D-fructose and D-glucose did not differ between groups. Jejunal uptake of L-glucose and lauric acid was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after 72 h of TPN+SCFA than after 24 h, whereas the 24- and 72-h TPN groups did not differ. In summary, SCFAs led to rapid changes in ileal proglucagon and glucose transporter expression in rats receiving TPN and provide insights into therapeutic management of individuals with short bowel syndrome or intestinal malabsorption syndromes.

  6. Biochemical and biophysical investigations of the interaction between human glucokinase and pro-apoptotic BAD.

    PubMed

    Rexford, Alix; Zorio, Diego A R; Miller, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme glucokinase (GCK) and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD reportedly reside within a five-membered complex that localizes to the mitochondria of mammalian hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. Photochemical crosslinking studies using a synthetic analog of BAD's BH3 domain and in vitro transcription/translation experiments support a direct interaction between BAD and GCK. To investigate the biochemical and biophysical consequences of the BAD:GCK interaction, we developed a method for the production of recombinant human BAD. Consistent with published reports, recombinant BAD displays high affinity for Bcl-xL (KD = 7 nM), and phosphorylation of BAD at S118, within the BH3 domain, abolishes this interaction. Unexpectedly, we do not detect association of recombinant, full-length BAD with recombinant human pancreatic GCK over a range of protein concentrations using various biochemical methods including size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Furthermore, fluorescence polarization assays and isothermal titration calorimetry detect no direct interaction between GCK and BAD BH3 peptides. Kinetic characterization of GCK in the presence of high concentrations of recombinant BAD show modest (<15%) increases in GCK activity, observable only at glucose concentrations well below the K0.5 value. GCK activity is unaffected by BAD BH3 peptides. These results raise questions as to the mechanism of action of stapled peptide analogs modeled after the BAD BH3 domain, which reportedly enhance the Vmax value of GCK and stimulate insulin release in BAD-deficient islets. Based on our results, we postulate that the BAD:GCK interaction, and any resultant regulatory effect(s) upon GCK activity, requires the participation of additional members of the mitochondrial complex.

  7. Glucokinase expression is regulated by glucose through O-GlcNAc glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Steffi F; Steenackers, Agata; Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Mir, Anne-Marie; Mortuaire, Marlène; Lefebvre, Tony; Guinez, Céline

    2016-09-16

    Blood glucose fluctuates with the fasting-feeding cycle. One of the liver's functions is to maintain blood glucose concentrations within a physiological range. Glucokinase (GCK) or hexokinase IV, is the main enzyme that regulates the flux and the use of glucose in the liver leading to a compensation of hyperglycemia. In hepatocytes, GCK catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. This critical enzymatic reaction is determinant for the metabolism of glucose in the liver which includes glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. In liver, simultaneous increase of glucose and insulin enhances GCK activity and gene expression, changes its subcellular location and interaction with regulatory proteins. The post-translational O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) acts as a glucose-sensitive modification and is believed to take part in hepatic glucose sensing by modifying key regulatory proteins. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether GCK is modified by O-GlcNAcylation in the liver of mice and investigated the role that this modification plays in regulating GCK protein expression. We demonstrated that endogenous GCK expression correlated with O-GlcNAc levels in the pathophysiological model ob/ob mice. More specifically, in response to the pharmacological inhibition of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) contents of GCK increased. Using the GlcNAc specific lectin succinylated-WGA and click chemistry labeling approaches, we demonstrated that GCK is modified by O-GlcNAcylation. Further, we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated Ogt knock-down not only decreases O-GlcNAc content but also GCK protein level. Altogether, our in vivo and in vitro results demonstrate that GCK expression is regulated by nutrient-sensing O-GlcNAc cycling in liver.

  8. Biochemical and biophysical investigations of the interaction between human glucokinase and pro-apoptotic BAD

    PubMed Central

    Rexford, Alix; Zorio, Diego A. R.

    2017-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme glucokinase (GCK) and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD reportedly reside within a five-membered complex that localizes to the mitochondria of mammalian hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. Photochemical crosslinking studies using a synthetic analog of BAD’s BH3 domain and in vitro transcription/translation experiments support a direct interaction between BAD and GCK. To investigate the biochemical and biophysical consequences of the BAD:GCK interaction, we developed a method for the production of recombinant human BAD. Consistent with published reports, recombinant BAD displays high affinity for Bcl-xL (KD = 7 nM), and phosphorylation of BAD at S118, within the BH3 domain, abolishes this interaction. Unexpectedly, we do not detect association of recombinant, full-length BAD with recombinant human pancreatic GCK over a range of protein concentrations using various biochemical methods including size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and isothermal titration calorimetry. Furthermore, fluorescence polarization assays and isothermal titration calorimetry detect no direct interaction between GCK and BAD BH3 peptides. Kinetic characterization of GCK in the presence of high concentrations of recombinant BAD show modest (<15%) increases in GCK activity, observable only at glucose concentrations well below the K0.5 value. GCK activity is unaffected by BAD BH3 peptides. These results raise questions as to the mechanism of action of stapled peptide analogs modeled after the BAD BH3 domain, which reportedly enhance the Vmax value of GCK and stimulate insulin release in BAD-deficient islets. Based on our results, we postulate that the BAD:GCK interaction, and any resultant regulatory effect(s) upon GCK activity, requires the participation of additional members of the mitochondrial complex. PMID:28182770

  9. Glucokinase Activation Ameliorates ER Stress–Induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Jun; Togashi, Yu; Sakamoto, Eri; Kaji, Mitsuyo; Tajima, Kazuki; Orime, Kazuki; Inoue, Hideaki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The derangement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis triggers β-cell apoptosis, leading to diabetes. Glucokinase upregulates insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2) expression in β-cells, but the role of glucokinase and IRS-2 in ER stress has been unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of glucokinase activation by glucokinase activator (GKA) on ER stress in β-cells. GKA administration improved β-cell apoptosis in Akita mice, a model of ER stress–mediated diabetes. GKA increased the expression of IRS-2 in β-cells, even under ER stress. Both glucokinase-deficient Akita mice and IRS-2–deficient Akita mice exhibited an increase in β-cell apoptosis, compared with Akita mice. β-cell–specific IRS-2–overexpressing (βIRS-2-Tg) Akita mice showed less β-cell apoptosis than Akita mice. IRS-2–deficient islets were vulnerable, but βIRS-2-Tg islets were resistant to ER stress–induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, GKA regulated the expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and other ER stress–related genes in an IRS-2–independent fashion in islets. GKA suppressed the expressions of CHOP and Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) and protected against β-cell apoptosis under ER stress in an ERK1/2-dependent, IRS-2–independent manner. Taken together, GKA ameliorated ER stress–mediated apoptosis by harmonizing IRS-2 upregulation and the IRS-2–independent control of apoptosis in β-cells. PMID:23801577

  10. Chard (Beta vulgaris L. var. cicla) extract ameliorates hyperglycemia by increasing GLUT2 through Akt2 and antioxidant defense in the liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Gezginci-Oktayoglu, Selda; Sacan, Ozlem; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Ipci, Yesim; Kabasakal, Levent; Sener, Goksel; Yanardag, Refiye

    2014-01-01

    Chard is a plant used as an alternative hypoglycemic agent by diabetic people in Turkey. The aim of this study was to examine the molecular mechanism of hypoglycemic effects of chard extract. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6-7 months old) were divided into five groups for this investigation: (1) control, (2) hyperglycemic, (3) hyperglycemic+chard, (4) hyperglycemic+insulin, (5) hyperglycemic+chard+insulin. Fourteen days after animals were rendered hyperglycemic by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin, the chard water extract (2 g/kg/day) or/and insulin (6 U/kg/day) was administered for 45 days. Hypoglycemic effect of chard extract was demonstrated by a significant reduction in the fasting blood glucose and increased glycogen levels in liver of chard extract-treated hyperglycemic rats. Moreover, activity of adenosine deaminase, which is suggested as an important enzyme for modulating the bioactivity of insulin, was decreased by chard treatment. Immunostaining analysis showed increased nuclear translocation of Akt2 and synthesis of GLUT2 in the hepatocytes of chard or/and insulin-treated hyperglycemic rats. The oxidative stress was decreased and antioxidant defense was increased by chard extract or/and insulin treatment to hyperglycemic rats according to the decreased malondialdehyde formation, the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, myeloperoxidase and increased glutathione levels. These findings suggest that chard extract might improve glucose response by increasing GLUT2 through Akt2 and antioxidant defense in the liver.

  11. Structure—function analysis of the α5 and the α13 helices of human glucokinase: Description of two novel activating mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pedelini, Leda; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida; Marina, Alberto; Gomez-Zumaquero, Juan M.; Rodriguez-Bada, Pablo; López-Enriquez, Soledad; Soriguer, Federico C.; Cuesta-Muñoz, Antonio L.; Sanz, Pascual

    2005-01-01

    It was recently described that the α5 and the α13 helices of human pancreatic glucokinase play a major role in the allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In order to understand the structural importance of these helices, we have performed site-directed mutagenesis to generate glucokinase derivatives with altered residues. We have analyzed the kinetic parameters of these mutated forms and compared them with wild-type and previously defined activating mutations in these helices (A456V and Y214C). We found two new activating mutations, A460R and Y215A, which increase the affinity of the enzyme for glucose. Our results suggest that substitutions in the α5 or the α13 helices that favor the closed, active conformation of the enzyme, either by improving the interaction with surrounding residues or by improving the flexibility of the region defined by these two helices, enhance the affinity of the enzyme for glucose, and therefore its performance as a glucose phosphorylating enzyme. PMID:15987895

  12. Symplocos cochinchinensis enhances insulin sensitivity via the down regulation of lipogenesis and insulin resistance in high energy diet rat model.

    PubMed

    Antu, Kalathookunnel Antony; Riya, Mariam Philip; Nair, Anupama; Mishra, Arvind; Srivastava, Arvind K; Raghu, Kozhiparambil Gopalan

    2016-12-04

    This plant has been utilized in Indian system of medicine for treatment of diabetes. This is clearly evident from the composition of Ayurvedic preparation for diabetes 'Nisakathakadi Kashayam' where this is one of the main ingredients of this preparation AIM OF THE STUDY: The study aims in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the insulin sensitizing effects of Symplocos cochinchinensis ethanol extract (SCE) using a high fructose and saturated fat (HFS) fed insulin resistant rat model. Experimental groups consisted of normal diet (ND), ND+SCE 500mg/kg bwd, HFS+vehicle, HFS+metformin 100mg/kg bwd, HFS+SCE 250/500mg/kg bwd. Initially the animals were kept under HFS diet for 8 weeks, and at the end of 8 week period, animals were found to develop insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Post-administration of SCE, metformin or vehicle were carried out for 3 weeks. Gene and protein expressions relevant to insulin signalling pathway were analysed. HFS significantly altered the normal physiology of animals via proteins and genes relevant to metabolism like stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD1), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), glucose 6 phosphatase (G6Pase), phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), protein tyrosine phosphatse 1B (PTP1B), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and glucokinase. SCE administration attenuates the insulin resistance in HFS rat by the down regulation of SCD1 gene expression that modulates SREBP-1c dependent and independent hepatic lipid accumulation. SCE enhances insulin sensitivity via the down regulation of lipogenesis and insulin resistance in HFS rat model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Glucokinase of Escherichia coli: induction in response to the stress of overexpressing foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Arora, K K; Pedersen, P L

    1995-06-01

    A variety of stressful conditions, such as heat shock, ethanol, osmotic shock, glucose deprivation, and oxidative stress, are known to induce the synthesis of specific proteins. Here, we report the induction in Escherichia coli of a protein elicited in response to a hitherto unidentified stress condition, i.e., the overexpression of foreign proteins. The induced protein identified as glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2) is produced at a level > or = 20-fold higher than the level in wild-type E. coli when foreign proteins are expressed under the control of the alkaline phosphatase (phoA) promoter. The bacterial glucokinase is shown to have a mass of approximately 47 kDa determined by a "renaturation activity stain assay" in situ following sodium dodecyl sulfate-poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and exhibits a high specificity for the phosphorylation of glucose. The apparent Km values for glucose and ATP for the enzyme are 0.15 and 0.50 mM, respectively, indicating that the E. coli enzyme is a low Km glucose hexokinase. The enzyme cross-reacts with rabbit antisera raised against hexokinase from higher eukaryotes, implicating some sequence similarity with mammalian hexokinases. Under normal conditions, E. coli glucokinase plays a minor role in glucose metabolism. However, under anabolic stress conditions, this glycolytic enzyme may be required to supplement levels of glucose 6-phosphate. Alternatively, glucokinase, which is predicted in analogy to other hexose-utilizing kinases to have structural folds characteristic of hsp 70, may itself, or in combination with other E. coli proteins, function in the stabilization of newly synthesized proteins.

  14. Structural insight into the glucokinase-ligands interactions. Molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Ermakova, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a key role in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism. Inactivation of GK is associated with diabetes, and an increase of its activity is linked to hypoglycemia. Possibility to regulate the GK activity using small chemical compounds as allosteric activators induces the scientific interest to the study of the activation mechanism and to the development of new allosteric glucokinase activators. Interaction of glucokinase with ligands is the first step of the complicated mechanism of regulation of the GK functioning. In this paper, we study the interaction of GK with native (glucose) and synthetic (allosteric activators) ligands using molecular docking method. Calculations demonstrate the ability of molecular docking programs to accurately reproduce crystallized ligand poses and conformations and to calculate a free energy of binding with satisfactory accuracy. Correlation between the free energy of binding and the bioactivity of activators is discussed. These results provide a new insight into protein-ligand interactions and can be used for the engineering of new activators.

  15. The purification and characterization of glucokinase from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Goward, C R; Hartwell, R; Atkinson, T; Scawen, M D

    1986-01-01

    Homogeneous glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2) from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated on the large scale by using four major steps: precipitation of extraneous material at pH 5.5, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, pseudo-affinity chromatography on Procion Brown H-3R-Sepharose 4B and gel filtration on Ultrogel AcA 34. The purified enzyme had a specific activity of about 330 units/mg of protein and was shown to exist as a dimer of subunit Mr 33,000. Kinetic parameters for the enzyme were determined with a variety of substrates. The glucokinase was highly specific for alpha-D-glucose, and the only other sugar substrate utilized was N-acetyl-alpha-D-glucosamine. The enzyme shows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value of 150 microM for alpha-D-glucose. The glucokinase was maximally active at pH 9.0. PMID:3099754

  16. Polymorphisms in sweet taste genes (TAS1R2 and GLUT2), sweet liking, and dental caries prevalence in an adult Italian population.

    PubMed

    Robino, Antonietta; Bevilacqua, Lorenzo; Pirastu, Nicola; Situlin, Roberta; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Gasparini, Paolo; Navarra, Chiara Ottavia

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between sweet taste genes and dental caries prevalence in a large sample of adults. In addition, the association between sweet liking and sugar intake with dental caries was investigated. Caries was measured by the decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) index in 647 Caucasian subjects (285 males and 362 females, aged 18-65 years), coming from six villages in northeastern Italy. Sweet liking was assessed using a 9-point scale, and the mean of the liking given by each individual to specific sweet food and beverages was used to create a sweet liking score. Simple sugar consumption was estimated by a dietary history interview, considering both added sugars and sugar present naturally in foods. Our study confirmed that polymorphisms in TAS1R2 and GLUT2 genes are related to DMFT index. In particular, GG homozygous individuals for rs3935570 in TAS1R2 gene (p value = 0.0117) and GG homozygous individuals for rs1499821 in GLUT2 gene (p value = 0.0273) showed higher DMFT levels compared to both heterozygous and homozygous for the alternative allele. Furthermore, while the relationship sugar intake-DMFT did not achieve statistical significance (p value = 0.075), a significant association was identified between sweet liking and DMFT (p value = 0.004), independent of other variables. Our study showed that sweet taste genetic factors contribute to caries prevalence and highlighted the role of sweet liking as a predictor of caries risk. Therefore, these results may open new perspectives for individual risk identification and implementation of target preventive strategies, such as identifying high-risk patients before caries development.

  17. Hyperglycemia Induced by Glucokinase Deficiency Accelerates Atherosclerosis Development and Impairs Lesion Regression in Combined Heterozygous Glucokinase and the Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adingupu, Damilola D.; Andréasson, Anne-Christine; Ahnmark, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Models combining diabetes and atherosclerosis are important in evaluating the cardiovascular (CV) effects and safety of antidiabetes drugs in the development of treatments targeting CV complications. Our aim was to evaluate if crossing the heterozygous glucokinase knockout mouse (GK+/−) and hyperlipidemic mouse deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE−/−) will generate a disease model exhibiting a diabetic and macrovascular phenotype. Methods. The effects of defective glucokinase on the glucose metabolism and on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis on high-fat diets were studied in both genders of GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice. Coronary vascular function of the female GK+/−ApoE−/− and ApoE−/− mice was also investigated. Results. GK+/−ApoE−/− mice show a stable hyperglycemia which was increased on Western diet. In oral glucose tolerance test, GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed significant glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Plasma lipids were comparable with ApoE−/− mice; nevertheless the GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed slightly increased atherosclerosis development. Conclusions. The GK+/−ApoE−/− mice showed a stable and reproducible hyperglycemia, accelerated atherosclerotic lesion progression, and no lesion regression after lipid lowering. This novel model provides a promising tool for drug discovery, enabling the evaluation of compound effects against both diabetic and cardiovascular endpoints simultaneously in one animal model. PMID:27774459

  18. Regulation of liver glucokinase activity in rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Francini, Flavio; Castro, María C; Gagliardino, Juan J; Massa, María L

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the relative role of different regulatory mechanisms, particularly 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFK2/FBPase-2), in liver glucokinase (GK) activity in intact animals with fructose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. We measured blood glucose, triglyceride and insulin concentration, glucose tolerance, liver triglyceride content, GK activity, and GK and PFK2 protein and gene expression in fructose-rich diet (FRD) and control rats. After 3 weeks, FRD rats had significantly higher blood glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels, and liver triglyceride content, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose tolerance. FRD rats also had significantly higher GK activity in the cytosolic fraction (18.3 +/- 0.35 vs. 11.27 +/- 0.34 mU/mg protein). Differences in GK protein concentration (116% and 100%) were not significant, suggesting a potentially impaired GK translocation in FRD rats. Although GK transcription level was similar, PFK2 gene expression and protein concentration were 4- and 5-fold higher in the cytosolic fraction of FRD animals. PFK2 immunological blockage significantly decreased GK activity in control and FRD rats; in the latter, this blockage decreased GK activity to control levels. Results suggest that increased liver GK activity might participate in the adaptative response to fructose overload to maintain glucose/triglyceride homeostasis in intact animals. Under these conditions, PFK2 increase would be the main enhancer of GK activity.

  19. Nuclear import of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cells is mediated by a nuclear localization signal and modulated by SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Bente Berg; Fjeld, Karianne; Solheim, Marie Holm; Shirakawa, Jun; Zhang, Enming; Keindl, Magdalena; Hu, Jiang; Lindqvist, Andreas; Døskeland, Anne; Mellgren, Gunnar; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Wierup, Nils; Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2017-10-15

    The localization of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cell nuclei is a controversial issue. Although previous reports suggest such a localization, the mechanism for its import has so far not been identified. Using immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation and mass spectrometry, we present evidence in support of glucokinase localization in beta-cell nuclei of human and mouse pancreatic sections, as well as in human and mouse isolated islets, and murine MIN6 cells. We have identified a conserved, seven-residue nuclear localization signal ((30)LKKVMRR(36)) in the human enzyme. Substituting the residues KK(31,32) and RR(35,36) with AA led to a loss of its nuclear localization in transfected cells. Furthermore, our data indicates that SUMOylation of glucokinase modulates its nuclear import, while high glucose concentrations do not significantly alter the enzyme nuclear/cytosolic ratio. Thus, for the first time, we provide data in support of a nuclear import of glucokinase mediated by a redundant mechanism, involving a nuclear localization signal, and which is modulated by its SUMOylation. These findings add new knowledge to the functional role of glucokinase in the pancreatic beta-cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. C5-Alkyl-2-methylurea-Substituted Pyridines as a New Class of Glucokinase Activators

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) activators represent a class of type 2 diabetes therapeutics actively pursued due to the central role that GK plays in regulating glucose homeostasis. Herein we report a novel C5-alkyl-2-methylurea-substituted pyridine series of GK activators derived from our previously reported thiazolylamino pyridine series. Our efforts in optimizing potency, enzyme kinetic properties, and metabolic stability led to the identification of compound 26 (AM-9514). This analogue showed a favorable combination of in vitro potency, enzyme kinetic properties, acceptable pharmacokinetic profiles in preclinical species, and robust efficacy in a rodent PD model. PMID:25516785

  1. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of benzamide derivatives as glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weiwei; Ning, Mengmeng; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhu, Qingzhang; Leng, Ying; Zhang, Ao

    2012-05-01

    A series of benzamide derivatives were assembled by using the privileged-fragment-merging (PFM) strategy and their SAR studies as glucokinase activators were described. Compounds 5 and 16b were identified having a suitable balance of potency and activation profile. They showed EC(50) values of 28.3 and 44.8 nM, and activation folds of 2.4 and 2.2, respectively. However, both compounds displayed a minor reduction in plasma glucose levels on imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Unfavorable pharmacokinetic profiles (PK) were also observed on these two compounds.

  2. Discovery of novel dual-action antidiabetic agents that inhibit glycogen phosphorylase and activate glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaojie; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Qingzhang; Leng, Ying; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Dual-target-directed agents simultaneously inhibiting glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and activating glucokinase (GK) could decelerate the inflow of glucose from glycogenolysis and accelerate the outflow of glucose in the liver, therefore allow for a better control over hyperglycaemia in a synergetic manner. A series of hybrid compounds were designed by structure-assisted and ligand-based strategies. In vitro bioassays found two novel compounds (1j, 6g) worthy of further optimization on balance of dual action to GP and GK. In addition, for single-target activity, two compounds exhibited more potent GP inhibitory activity and four compounds showed better GK activation than their corresponding references.

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor anagliptin ameliorates diabetes in mice with haploinsufficiency of glucokinase on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Keizo; Kubota, Naoto; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Tetsuya; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tokuyama, Kumpei; Hashimoto, Shinji; Goto, Moritaka; Jomori, Takahito; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia with insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion. DPP-4 inhibitors have attracted attention as a new class of anti-diabetic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effects of anagliptin, a highly selective DPP-4 inhibitor, on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in high-fat diet-fed mice with haploinsufficiency of glucokinase (GckKO) as animal models of type 2 diabetes. Wild-type and GckKO mice were administered two doses of anagliptin by dietary admixture (0.05% and 0.3%) for 10weeks. Both doses of anagliptin significantly inhibited the plasma DPP-4 activity and increased the plasma active GLP-1 levels in both the wild-type and GckKO mice to a similar degree. After 10weeks of treatment with 0.3% anagliptin, body weight gain and food intake were significantly suppressed in both wild-type and GckKO mice. In addition, 0.3% anagliptin ameliorated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in both genotypes of mice. On the other hand, treatment with 0.05% anagliptin was not associated with any significant change of the body weight, food intake or insulin sensitivity in either genotype of mice, but it did improve the glucose tolerance by enhancing insulin secretion and increasing the β-cell mass in both genotypes of mice. High-dose anagliptin treatment improved glucose tolerance by suppression of body weight gain and amelioration of insulin resistance, whereas low-dose anagliptin treatment improved glucose tolerance by enhancing insulin secretion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Selection and characterization of a glucokinase-deficient mutant of Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.T. Jr.; Lavine, J.E.; Morse, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    The authors isolated a mutant of Tetrahymena thermophila that is resistant to inhibition of growth by the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose. The mutant exhibits a deficiency in a cytoplasmic glucokinase. This enzymatic defect and the attendant inability to convert 2-deoxyglucose to toxic phosphorylated derivatives is apparently the sole basis for the mutant phenotype since transport of glucose and 2-deoxyglucose is unimpaired; there is no elevation of glucose-6-phosphatase activity, which could decrease the level of toxic 2-deoxyglucose metabolites. Genetic analyses have shown that the mutant allele is recessive and inherited as a single Mendelian mutation. The glucokinase-deficient strain described here is useful for the selection of other mutants in this organism and for the investigation of various cellular processes initiated or modulated by glucose and its analogs. The authors have exploited the molecular defect in this strain to investigate the initial steps in the cyclic AMP-mediated repression of galactokinase gene expression which is caused by glucose.

  5. Glucokinase regulatory proten genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3...

  6. Global fit analysis of glucose binding curves reveals a minimal model for kinetic cooperativity in human glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Larion, Mioara; Miller, Brian G

    2010-10-19

    Human pancreatic glucokinase is a monomeric enzyme that displays kinetic cooperativity, a feature that facilitates enzyme-mediated regulation of blood glucose levels in the body. Two theoretical models have been proposed to describe the non-Michaelis-Menten behavior of human glucokinase. The mnemonic mechanism postulates the existence of one thermodynamically favored enzyme conformation in the absence of glucose, whereas the ligand-induced slow transition model (LIST) requires a preexisting equilibrium between two enzyme species that interconvert with a rate constant slower than turnover. To investigate whether either of these mechanisms is sufficient to describe glucokinase cooperativity, a transient-state kinetic analysis of glucose binding to the enzyme was undertaken. A complex, time-dependent change in enzyme intrinsic fluorescence was observed upon exposure to glucose, which is best described by an analytical solution comprised of the sum of four exponential terms. Transient-state glucose binding experiments conducted in the presence of increasing glycerol concentrations demonstrate that three of the observed rate constants decrease with increasing viscosity. Global fit analyses of experimental glucose binding curves are consistent with a kinetic model that is an extension of the LIST mechanism with a total of four glucose-bound binary complexes. The kinetic model presented herein suggests that glucokinase samples multiple conformations in the absence of ligand and that this conformational heterogeneity persists even after the enzyme associates with glucose.

  7. Biochemical characterization of novel glucokinase mutations isolated from Spanish maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY2) patients.

    PubMed

    Estalella, Itziar; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida; Marina, Alberto; Castaño, Luis; Sanz, Pascual

    2008-01-01

    Mature-onset diabetes of the young, type 2 (MODY2) is associated with mutations in the glucokinase (GCK) gene that result in impaired glucokinase activity. Although more than 200 inactivating GCK mutations have been reported, only less than 20% of these mutations have been functionally characterized. In this work, we describe the biochemical characterization of six missense glucokinase mutations associated with MODY2 from Spanish patients, namely, Y61S, V182L, C233R, E265K, A379V, and K420E. All these mutations produced enzymes that presented reduced enzymatic activity in various degrees, from a mild affectation (K420E) to a more severe effect (C233R). Mutation severity correlated with the importance of the structural changes introduced by the mutations. For example, C233R affected a critical residue of the active center of the enzyme and rendered a protein with undetectable enzymatic activity. These data add new information on the structure-function relationship of human glucokinase.

  8. One-step purification and immobilization of thermophilic polyphosphate glucokinase from Thermobifida fusca YX: glucose-6-phosphate generation without ATP.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hehuan; Myung, Suwan; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of stable and active polyphosphate glucokinase (PPGK, EC 2.7.1.63) would be vital to cascade enzyme biocatalysis that does not require a costly ATP input. An open reading frame Tfu_1811 from Thermobifida fusca YX encoding a putative PPGK was cloned and the recombinant protein fused with a family 3 cellulose-binding module (CBM-PPGK) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Mg²⁺ was an indispensible activator. This enzyme exhibited the highest activity in the presence of 4 mM Mg²⁺ at 55°C and pH 9.0. Under its suboptimal conditions (pH 7.5), the k (cat) and K(m) values of CBM-PPGK on glucose were 96.9 and 39.7 s⁻¹ as well as 0.77 and 0.45 mM at 37°C and 50°C respectively. The thermoinactivation of CBM-PPGK was independent of its mass concentration. Through one-step enzyme purification and immobilization on a high-capacity regenerated amorphous cellulose, immobilized CBM-PPGK had an approximately eightfold half lifetime enhancement (i.e., t(1/2) = 120 min) as compared to free enzyme at 50°C. To our limited knowledge, this enzyme was the first thermostable PPGK reported. Free PPGK and immobilized CBM-PPGK had total turnover number values of 126,000 and 961,000 mol product per mol enzyme, respectively, suggesting their great potential in glucose-6-phosphate generation based on low-cost polyphosphate.

  9. Relevant associations of the glucokinase regulatory protein/glucokinase gene variation with TAG concentrations in a high-cardiovascular risk population: modulation by the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Guillén, Marisa; Vicente Sorli, Jose; Portolés, Olga; Guillem-Saiz, Patricia; Ignacio Gonzalez, Jose; Qi, Lu; Corella, Dolores

    2013-01-28

    The SNP rs1260326 (P446L) and rs1799884 (-30G>A) for the glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) and glucokinase (GCK) genes, respectively, have been associated with opposing effects on TAG and glucose concentrations. However, their genetic modulation by diet (dietary patterns or foods) remains to be investigated. We studied 945 high-cardiovascular risk subjects aged 67 (sd 6) years who participated in the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea-Valencia Study. Demographic, clinical, biochemical and genetic data were obtained. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) and food intake were measured by validated questionnaires. Carriers of the L allele of GKCR had significantly higher TAG concentrations (PP: 1.34 (SD 0.05) mmol/l v. PL+LL: 1.54 (SD 0.03) mmol/l; P= 0.014) and LL carriers had lower glucose concentrations (PL+PP: 6.85 (SD 0.08) mmol/l v. LL: 6.40 (SD 0.16) mmol/l; P= 0.032) after multivariate adjustment. Conversely, homozygous subjects for the variant allele (A) in the GCK gene had significantly lower TAG (GG+GA: 1.48 (SD 0.03) mmol/l v. AA: 1.17 (SD 0.18) mmol/l; P= 0.033) and a higher risk of diabetes (OR 3.3, 95 % CI 1.2, 9.2). Combined effects for both SNP increased TAG concentrations by 37 % (P= 0.033). Adherence to the MD modulated the effects of GCKR polymorphism on TAG: subjects with genetic risk had lower TAG (L-allele carriers; PP: 1.48 (SD 0.14) mmol/l v. PL+LL: 1.51 (SD 0.08) mmol/l; P= 0.917) compared with those with a higher adherence. Analysis of the joint effects of the GCKR and individual food items identified significant associations (olive oil (P= 0.035), vegetables (P= 0.012), red meat (P= 0.017), butter (P= 0.039), sweetened carbonated beverages (P= 0.036) and nuts (P= 0.038)). In conclusion, we found that rs1260326 (GCKR) is significantly associated with higher TAG concentrations, but is modulated by adherence to the MD.

  10. FGT-1 Is a Mammalian GLUT2-Like Facilitative Glucose Transporter in Caenorhabditis elegans Whose Malfunction Induces Fat Accumulation in Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Shun; Morielli, Anthony D.; Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is an attractive animal model for biological and biomedical research because it permits relatively easy genetic dissection of cellular pathways, including insulin/IGF-like signaling (IIS), that are conserved in mammalian cells. To explore C. elegans as a model system to study the regulation of the facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT), we have characterized the GLUT gene homologues in C. elegans: fgt-1, R09B5.11, C35A11.4, F53H8.3, F48E3.2, F13B12.2, Y61A9LA.1, K08F9.1 and Y37A1A.3. The exogenous expression of these gene products in Xenopus oocytes showed transport activity to unmetabolized glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose only in FGT-1. The FGT-1-mediated transport activity was inhibited by the specific GLUT inhibitor phloretin and exhibited a Michaelis constant (Km) of 2.8 mM. Mannose, galactose, and fructose were able to inhibit FGT-1-mediated 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake (P < 0.01), indicating that FGT-1 is also able to transport these hexose sugars. A GFP fusion protein of FGT-1 was observed only on the basolateral membrane of digestive tract epithelia in C. elegans, but not in other tissues. FGT-1::eGFP expression was observed from early embryonic stages. The knockdown or mutation of fgt-1 resulted in increased fat staining in both wild-type and daf-2 (mammalian insulin receptor homologue) mutant animals. Other common phenotypes of IIS mutant animals, including dauer formation and brood size reduction, were not affected by fgt-1 knockdown in wild-type or daf-2 mutants. Our results indicated that in C. elegans, FGT-1 is mainly a mammalian GLUT2-like intestinal glucose transporter and is involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:23826391

  11. Structure of the human glucokinase gene and identification of a missense mutation in a Japanese patient with early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Hirohisa; Yazaki, Yoshio; Kadowaki, Takashi ); Kadowaki, Hiroko; Simokawa, Kotaro; Akanuma, Yasuo ); Koda, Naoya; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu )

    1992-12-01

    Glucokinase is thought to play a glucose-sensor role in the pancreas, and abnormalities in its structure, function, and regulation can induce diabetes. The authors isolated the human glucokinase gene, and determined its genomic structure including exon-intron boundaries. Structure of the glucokinase gene in human was very similar to that in rat. Then, by screening Japanese diabetic patients using polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct-sequencing strategies, they identified a missense mutation substituting ariginine (AGG) for glycine (GGG) at position 261 in exon 7 of the glucokinase gene in a patient with early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Features for instantaneous emissions of low-level infrared signals of glucokinase enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sergio; Mella, Héctor; Reyes, Claudio; Meza, Pablo; Gallardo, Maria J; Staforelli, Juan P

    2015-03-10

    A noncontact infrared (IR) imaging-based methodology and signal recovery tools are applied on an enzyme reaction as a test target. The method is implemented by a long-wave (8-12 μm) IR microbolometer imaging array and a germanium-based IR optical vision. The reaction is carried out by the glucokinase, which produces a rapid exothermal release of energy that is weak, and, even worse, the IR video captured by the uncooled microbolometer detector is affected by spatial and temporal noise with specific complexities. Hitherto, IR-based signal recovery tools have worked with a standard acquisition frequency, which is clearly beyond the time scale of a real scenario. The implications of this (and similar) rapid reactions motivate the designs of a signal recovery method using prior information of the processes to extract and quantify the spontaneity of the enzymatic reaction in a three-dimensional (space and time) single and noncontact online measurement.

  13. A fresh view of glycolysis and glucokinase regulation: history and current status.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Sigurd

    2014-05-02

    This minireview looks back at a century of glycolysis research with a focus on the mechanisms of flux regulation. Traditionally, glycolysis is regarded as a feeder pathway that prepares glucose for further catabolism and energy production. However, glycolysis is much more than that, in particular in those tissues that express the low affinity glucose-phosphorylating enzyme glucokinase. This enzyme equips the glycolytic pathway with a special steering function for the regulation of intermediary metabolism. In beta cells, glycolysis acts as a transducer for triggering and amplifying physiological glucose-induced insulin secretion. On the basis of these considerations, I have defined a glycolytic flux regulatory unit composed of the two fructose ester steps of this pathway with various enzymes and metabolites that regulate glycolysis.

  14. The discovery of a novel series of glucokinase activators based on a pyrazolopyrimidine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Peter; Brink, D Mikael; Fägerhag, Jonas; Jurva, Ulrik; Robb, Graeme R; Schnecke, Volker; Svensson Henriksson, Anette; Waring, Michael J; Westerlund, Christer

    2012-12-15

    Glucokinase is a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis since it phosphorylates glucose to give glucose-6-phosphate, which is the first step in glycolysis. GK activators have been proven to lower blood-glucose, and therefore have potential as treatments for type 2 diabetes. Here the discovery of pyrazolopyrimidine GKAs is reported. An original singleton hit from a high-throughput screen with micromolar levels of potency was optimised to give compounds with nanomolar activities. Key steps in this success were the introduction of an extra side-chain, which increased potency, and changing the linking functionality from a thioether to an ether, which led to improved potency and lipophilic ligand efficiency. This also led to more stable compounds with improved profiles in biological assays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Fresh View of Glycolysis and Glucokinase Regulation: History and Current Status*

    PubMed Central

    Lenzen, Sigurd

    2014-01-01

    This minireview looks back at a century of glycolysis research with a focus on the mechanisms of flux regulation. Traditionally, glycolysis is regarded as a feeder pathway that prepares glucose for further catabolism and energy production. However, glycolysis is much more than that, in particular in those tissues that express the low affinity glucose-phosphorylating enzyme glucokinase. This enzyme equips the glycolytic pathway with a special steering function for the regulation of intermediary metabolism. In beta cells, glycolysis acts as a transducer for triggering and amplifying physiological glucose-induced insulin secretion. On the basis of these considerations, I have defined a glycolytic flux regulatory unit composed of the two fructose ester steps of this pathway with various enzymes and metabolites that regulate glycolysis. PMID:24637025

  16. Brain glucose sensing, glucokinase and neural control of metabolism and islet function.

    PubMed

    Ogunnowo-Bada, E O; Heeley, N; Brochard, L; Evans, M L

    2014-09-01

    It is increasingly apparent that the brain plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis, including the maintenance of blood glucose. This is achieved by various efferent pathways from the brain to periphery, which help control hepatic glucose flux and perhaps insulin-stimulated insulin secretion. Also, critically important for the brain given its dependence on a constant supply of glucose as a fuel--emergency counter-regulatory responses are triggered by the brain if blood glucose starts to fall. To exert these control functions, the brain needs to detect rapidly and accurately changes in blood glucose. In this review, we summarize some of the mechanisms postulated to play a role in this and examine the potential role of the low-affinity hexokinase, glucokinase, in the brain as a key part of some of this sensing. We also discuss how these processes may become altered in diabetes and related metabolic diseases.

  17. Hepatic glucokinase expression is associated with lipogenesis and fatty liver in humans.

    PubMed

    Peter, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Cegan, Alexander; Walenta, Mareike; Wagner, Silvia; Königsrainer, Alfred; Königsrainer, Ingmar; Machicao, Fausto; Schick, Fritz; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin

    2011-07-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) phosphorylates glucose to form glucose 6-phosphate and thereby regulates hepatic glucose disposal and activates hepatic lipogenesis. Hepatic GCK activity is regulated on the level of GCK mRNA expression and by the inhibitory glucokinase regulatory protein. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relation between GCK mRNA expression and markers of lipogenesis as well as liver fat content in human liver biopsies. Additionally, we investigated whether genetic variation in the liver specific GCK promoter determines liver fat content in humans. Hepatic mRNA expression and liver triglyceride content was analyzed in 50 human liver biopsies. In a second cohort of 330 individuals, liver fat was precisely measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Hepatic GCK mRNA expression is associated with triglyceride content in human liver biopsies (r = 0.50, P = 0.0002). Furthermore, hepatic GCK mRNA expression is associated with lipogenic gene expression (fatty acid synthase, r = 0.49, P = 0.0003; acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-α, r = 0.44, P = 0.0015, and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-β, r = 0.48, P = 0.0004) and the de novo lipogenesis index (r = 0.36, P = 0.01). In support of these findings, the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2041547 in the liver-specific GCK promoter is associated with liver fat content in prediabetic individuals (P = 0.047). In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that GCK mRNA expression is associated with markers of de novo lipogenesis and liver triglyceride content in humans. This suggests that increased GCK activity may induce fatty liver and its metabolic and hepatic consequences in humans. Thus, the widely used approach to nonspecifically activate β-cell and hepatic GCK to treat diabetes mellitus is therefore questionable and may cause serious side effects.

  18. Permanent neonatal diabetes caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in the glucokinase gene.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Cabezas, O; Díaz González, F; Aragonés, A; Argente, J; Campos-Barros, A

    2008-06-01

    Glucokinase deficiency is an unfrequent cause of permanent neonatal diabetes (PND), as only seven patients have been reported, either homozygous for a missense or frameshift mutation or compound heterozygous for both of them. We report here the first known case caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation (Y61X) in the glucokinase gene (GCK) that introduces a premature stop codon, generating a truncated protein that is predicted to be completely inactive as it lacks both the glucose- and the adenosine triphosphate-binding sites. The proband, born to consanguineous parents, was a full-term, intra-uterine growth-retarded male newborn who presented with a glycaemia of 129 mg/dL (7.16 mmol/L) on his second day of life, increasing thereafter up to 288 mg/dL (15.98 mmol/L) and 530 mg/dL (29.41 mmol/L) over the next 24 h, in the face of low serum insulin (<3 muIU/mL; <20.83 pmol/L). He was put on insulin on the third day of life. Insulin has never been discontinued since then. The patient was tested negative for anti-insulin and islet cell antibodies at age 5 months. His father had non-progressive, impaired fasting glucose for several years. The mother was found to be mildly hyperglycaemic only when her glucose was checked after the child was diagnosed. In conclusion, biallelic GCK loss should be considered as a potential cause of PND in children born to consanguineous parents, even if they are not known to be diabetic at the time of PND presentation.

  19. Predictive blood glucose lowering efficacy by Glucokinase activators in high fat fed female Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Coope, G J; Atkinson, A M; Allott, C; McKerrecher, D; Johnstone, C; Pike, K G; Holme, P C; Vertigan, H; Gill, D; Coghlan, M P; Leighton, B

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Glucokinase (GK) is the rate-limiting enzyme of hepatic glucose metabolism and acts as a sensor for glucose-stimulated insulin release in β-cells. Here we examine whether the lowering of blood glucose levels in the rat by small molecule glucokinase activators (GKAs) can be predicted from in vitro enzyme potencies and plasma compound exposure. Experimental approach: We developed an insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic animal model, the high fat fed female Zucker (fa/fa) rat (HFFZ), and measured the acute in vivo glucose-lowering efficacy of a number of GKAs in an oral glucose tolerance test. Key results: Four GKAs (at 1 to 30 mg kg−1), with different in vitro enzyme potencies, dose-dependently improved oral glucose tolerance in HFFZ rats (10–40% decrease glucose area under the curve (AUC) from vehicle control). The extent of glucose lowering, or the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect, of a GKA was directly related to the total compound concentration in the plasma; the pharmacokinetic (PK) measurement. This PK-PD relationship was extended across a series of GKAs by accounting for differences in protein binding and in the in vitro potency. Conclusions and implications: When the unbound GKA compound level is greater than the in vitro enzyme potency there was significant blood glucose lowering in vivo. This latter relationship was upheld in non-diabetic Wistar rats orally dosed with a GKA. The robust and predictive nature of the PK-PD relationship for GKAs may prove of value in testing these agents in early human clinical studies. PMID:16921397

  20. A modest glucokinase overexpression in the liver promotes fed expression levels of glycolytic and lipogenic enzyme genes in the fasted state without altering SREBP-1c expression.

    PubMed

    Scott, D K; Collier, J J; Doan, T T T; Bunnell, A S; Daniels, M C; Eckert, D T; O'Doherty, R M

    2003-12-01

    Hepatic genes crucial for carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis are regulated by insulin and glucose metabolism. However, the relative contributions of insulin and glucose to the regulation of metabolic gene expression are poorly defined in vivo. To address this issue, adenovirus-mediated hepatic overexpression of glucokinase was used to determine the effects of increased hepatic glucose metabolism on gene expression in fasted or ad libitum fed rats. In the fasted state, a 3 fold glucokinase overexpression was sufficient to mimic feeding-induced increases in pyruvate kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA levels, demonstrating a primary role for glucose metabolism in the regulation of these genes in vivo. Conversely, glucokinase overexpression was unable to mimic feeding-induced alterations of fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase I or PEPCK mRNAs, indicating insulin as the primary regulator of these genes. Interestingly, glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA was increased by glucokinase overexpression in both the fasted and fed states, providing evidence, under these conditions, for the dominance of glucose over insulin signaling for this gene in vivo. Importantly, glucokinase overexpression did not alter sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-c mRNA levels in vivo and glucose signaling did not alter the expression of this gene in primary hepatocytes. We conclude that a modest hepatic overexpression of glucokinase is sufficient to alter expression of metabolic genes without changing the expression of SREBP-1c.

  1. Anti-diabetic potential of Catharanthus roseus Linn. and its effect on the glucose transport gene (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4) in streptozotocin induced diabetic wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaqha, Waleed M; Khan, Mohsin; Salam, Nasir; Azzi, Arezki; Chaudhary, Anis Ahmad

    2015-10-21

    Catharanthus roseus is an important Ayurvedic medication in traditional medicine. It is potentially used in countries like India, South Africa, China and Malaysia for the healing of diabetes mellitus. Although, the molecular mechanisms behind this effect are yet to be exclusively explored. Due to the great antidiabetic and hyperlipidemic potential of c. roseus, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of ethanolic extract of c. roseus might add to glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family messenger RNA (mRNA) in liver. STZ-induced diabetic rats treated by ethanolic extract of c. roseus 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg; and one group treated with Metformin (100 mg/kg). After final administration of treatment of 4 weeks, blood samples were collected under fasting conditions, and the body weights (BWs) were measured. Total RNA from liver was extracted with the Qiagen RNEasy Micro kit (GERMANY) as described in the manufacturer's instructions. First-strand complementary DNA (cDNA) was synthesized at 40 °C by priming with oligo-dT12-18 (Invitrogen, USA) and using Super ScriptII reverse transcriptase according to the protocol provided by the manufacturer (Invitrogen, USA). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications for GLUT-4 (gene ID: 25139) were conducted using Light-Cycler 480 (Roche, USA) with the SyBr® I nucleic acid stain (Invitrogen, USA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Polymerase chain reaction products of β-actin primer gene were used as an internal standard. The proposed study was framed to look at the antidiabetic efficacy of ethanolic extract of c. roseus and an expression of GLUT-2 and GLUT-4 gene in streptozotocin induced diabetic wistar rats. The doses were administered orally at a rate of 100 and 200 mg/kg and detrain the glucose transport system in liver for 4 weeks. The observed results showed a good positive correlation between intracellular calcium and insulin

  2. Ischemic preconditioning maintains the immunoreactivities of glucokinase and glucokinase regulatory protein in neurons of the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region following transient cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    CHO, YOUNG SHIN; CHO, JUN HWI; SHIN, BICH-NA; CHO, GEUM-SIL; KIM, IN HYE; PARK, JOON HA; AHN, JI HYEON; OHK, TAEK GEUN; CHO, BYUNG-RYUL; KIM, YOUNG-MYEONG; HONG, SEONGKWEON; WON, MOO-HO; LEE, JAE-CHUL

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is involved in the control of blood glucose homeostasis. In the present study, the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on the immunoreactivities of GK and its regulatory protein (GKRP) following 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia was investigated in gerbils. The gerbils were randomly assigned to four groups (sham-operated group, ischemia-operated group, IPC + sham-operated group and IPC + ischemia-operated group). IPC was induced by subjecting the gerbils to 2 min of ischemia, followed by 1 day of recovery. In the ischemia-operated group, a significant loss of neurons was observed in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) at 5 days post-ischemia; however, in the IPC+ischemia-operated group, the neurons in the SP were well protected. Following immunohistochemical investigation, the immunoreactivities of GK and GKRP in the neurons of the SP were markedly decreased in the CA1, but not the CA2/3, from 2 days post-ischemia, and were almost undetectable in the SP 5 days post-ischemia. In the IPC + ischemia-operated group, the immunoreactivities of GK and GKRP in the SP of the CA1 were similar to those in the sham-group. In brief, the findings of the present study demonstrated that IPC notably maintained the immunoreactivities of GK and GKRP in the neurons of the SP of CA1 following ischemia-reperfusion. This indicated that GK and GKRP may be necessary for neuron survival against transient cerebral ischemia. PMID:26134272

  3. Caffeic acid, naringenin and quercetin enhance glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucose sensitivity in INS-1E cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S; Oksbjerg, N; Young, J F; Jeppesen, P B

    2014-07-01

    Caffeic acid, naringenin and quercetin are naturally occurring phenolic compounds (PCs) present in many plants as secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was to investigate their effect on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in INS-1E cells and to explore their effect on expression of genes involved in β-cell survival and function under normoglycaemic and glucotoxic conditions. For acute studies, INS-1E cells were grown in 11 mM glucose (72 h) and then incubated with the PCs (1 h) with 3.3/16.7 mM glucose; whereas, for chronic studies, the cells were grown in 11 mM glucose (72 h) with/without the PCs, and then incubated with 3.3/16.7 mM glucose (1 h); thereafter, GSIS was measured. For GSIS and gene expression studies (GES) under glucotoxic conditions, two sets of cells were grown in 11/25 mM glucose with/without the PCs (72 h): one was used for GES, using real time RT-PCR, and the other was exposed to 3.3/16.7 mM glucose, followed by measurement of GSIS. The study demonstrated that the PCs can enhance GSIS under hyperglycaemic and glucotoxic conditions in INS-1E cells. Moreover, these compounds can differentially, yet distinctly change the expression profile of genes [Glut2 (glucose transporter 2), Gck (glucokinase), Ins1 (insulin 1), Ins2, Beta2 (neurogenic differentiation protein 1), Pdx1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein 1), Akt1 (RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase encoding gene), Akt2 (RAC-β serine/threonine-protein kinase encoding gene), Irs1 (insulin receptor substrate 1), Acc1 (acetyl CoA carboxylase 1), Bcl2 (β-cell lymphoma 2 protein), Bax (Bcl-2 associated X protein), Casp3 (Caspase 3), Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70), and Hsp90] involved in β-cell stress, survival and function. The results indicate that the PCs tested enhance GSIS and glucose sensitivity in INS-1E cells. They also modulate gene expression profiles to improve β-cell survival and function during glucotoxicity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Leucine regulation of glucokinase and ATP synthase sensitizes glucose-induced insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jichun; Wong, Ryan K; Park, MieJung; Wu, Jianmei; Cook, Joshua R; York, David A; Deng, Shaoping; Markmann, James; Naji, Ali; Wolf, Bryan A; Gao, Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    We have recently shown that leucine culture upregulates ATP synthase beta-subunit (ATPSbeta) and increases ATP level, cytosolic Ca(2+), and glucose-induced insulin secretion in rat islets. The aim is to test whether glucokinase expression is also affected in rat islets and its role in glucose sensitization during leucine culture. Leucine culture increased glucose-induced NAD(P)H level at 1 and 2 days but not at 1 week. The half-maximal effective concentration of the glucose response curve for NAD(P)H was left-shifted from 5-7 to 2-3 mmol/l. The effect was dose dependent and rapamycin insensitive. Leucine culture did not affect glyceraldehyde effects on NAD(P)H. Leucine pretreatment for 30 min had no effects on NAD(P)H levels. Leucine culture for 2 days also increased glucose-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, ATP level, and insulin secretion. Leucine increase of glucokinase mRNA levels occurred as early as day 1 and lasted through 1 week. That of ATPSbeta did not occur until day 2 and lasted through 1 week. Leucine effects on both mRNAs were dose dependent. The upregulation of both genes was confirmed by Western blotting. Leucine culture also increased glucose-induced insulin secretion, ATP level, glucokinase, and ATPSbeta levels of type 2 diabetic human islets. In conclusion, leucine culture upregulates glucokinase, which increases NAD(P)H level, and ATPSbeta, which increases oxidation of NADH and production of ATP. The combined upregulation of both genes increases glucose-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) and insulin secretion.

  5. The design and synthesis of indazole and pyrazolopyridine based glucokinase activators for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Tu, Meihua; Filipski, Kevin J; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Bian, Jianwei; Aspnes, Gary E; Sammons, Matthew F; Song, Wei; Li, Jian-Cheng; Jones, Christopher S; Patel, Leena; Rasmusson, Tim; Zeng, Dongxiang; Karki, Kapil; Hamilton, Michael; Hank, Richard; Atkinson, Karen; Litchfield, John; Aiello, Robert; Baker, Levenia; Barucci, Nicole; Bourassa, Patricia; Bourbonais, Francis; Bourbounais, Francis; D'Aquila, Theresa; Derksen, David R; MacDougall, Margit; Robertson, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Glucokinase activators represent a promising potential treatment for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Herein, we report the identification and optimization of a series of novel indazole and pyrazolopyridine based activators leading to the identification of 4-(6-(azetidine-1-carbonyl)-5-fluoropyridin-3-yloxy)-2-ethyl-N-(5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)-2H-indazole-6-carboxamide (42) as a potent activator with favorable preclinical pharmacokinetic properties and in vivo efficacy.

  6. Overexpression of a glucokinase point mutant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lu, G; Teng, X; Zheng, Z; Zhang, R; Peng, L; Zheng, F; Liu, J; Huang, H; Xiong, H

    2016-04-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) is an important enzyme critical for glucose metabolism, and has been targeted as such in the pursuit of a cure for diabetes mellitus. We show that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic murine model exhibits low GCK expression with high blood glucose levels; moreover, aggravated glomerulonephritis is observed in the model when there is IL10 deficiency. Although T cells infiltrate into the liver and pancreas in STZ-induced diabetes mice, T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells decrease significantly with STZ addition in in vitro polarization. Using a mutant GCK gene (GCK 262) with a knocked out cytosine at position 2643 results in lower protein expression and more ubiquitination-led protein degradation compared with wild-type GCK (GCK 261). We further observed that hsa-mir-1302 can bind to 3'-untranslated region of mutant GCK, which can decrease GCK mRNA translation. Finally, delivery of mutant GCK by subcutaneous injection is more effective at decreasing blood glucose in the STZ-treated (STZ) murine diabetes model than insulin treatment alone. Similarly, mutant GCK consistently and moderately decreases blood glucose levels in GK rats over a period of 12 and 70 days without inducing hypoglycemia, whereas insulin is only effective over 12 h. These results suggest that mutant GCK may be a future cure for diabetes.

  7. Dynamic localization of glucokinase and its regulatory protein in hypothalamic tanycytes.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Magdiel; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefanía; Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de Los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose.

  8. Glial glucokinase expression in adult and post-natal development of the hypothalamic region.

    PubMed

    Millán, Carola; Martínez, Fernando; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Lizama, Isabel; Yañez, Maria Jose; Llanos, Paula; Reinicke, Karin; Rodríguez, Federico; Peruzzo, Bruno; Nualart, Francisco; García, Maria Angeles

    2010-05-25

    It has recently been proposed that hypothalamic glial cells sense glucose levels and release lactate as a signal to activate adjacent neurons. GK (glucokinase), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic beta-cells, is also expressed in the hypothalamus. However, it has not been clearly determined if glial and/or neuronal cells express this protein. Interestingly, tanycytes, the glia that cover the ventricular walls of the hypothalamus, are in contact with CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), the capillaries of the arcuate nucleus and adjacent neurons; this would be expected for a system that can detect and communicate changes in glucose concentration. Here, we demonstrated by Western-blot analysis, QRT-PCR [quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR)] and in situ hybridization that GK is expressed in tanycytes. Confocal microscopy and immuno-ultrastructural analysis revealed that GK is localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm of beta1-tanycytes. Furthermore, GK expression increased in these cells during the second week of post-natal development. Based on this evidence, we propose that tanycytes mediate, at least in part, the mechanism by which the hypothalamus detects changes in glucose concentrations.

  9. Overexpression of a glucokinase point mutant in the treatment of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, G; Teng, X; Zheng, Z; Zhang, R; Peng, L; Zheng, F; Liu, J; Huang, H; Xiong, H

    2016-01-01

    Glucokinase (GCK) is an important enzyme critical for glucose metabolism, and has been targeted as such in the pursuit of a cure for diabetes mellitus. We show that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic murine model exhibits low GCK expression with high blood glucose levels; moreover, aggravated glomerulonephritis is observed in the model when there is IL10 deficiency. Although T cells infiltrate into the liver and pancreas in STZ-induced diabetes mice, T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells decrease significantly with STZ addition in in vitro polarization. Using a mutant GCK gene (GCK 262) with a knocked out cytosine at position 2643 results in lower protein expression and more ubiquitination-led protein degradation compared with wild-type GCK (GCK 261). We further observed that hsa-mir-1302 can bind to 3′-untranslated region of mutant GCK, which can decrease GCK mRNA translation. Finally, delivery of mutant GCK by subcutaneous injection is more effective at decreasing blood glucose in the STZ-treated (STZ) murine diabetes model than insulin treatment alone. Similarly, mutant GCK consistently and moderately decreases blood glucose levels in GK rats over a period of 12 and 70 days without inducing hypoglycemia, whereas insulin is only effective over 12 h. These results suggest that mutant GCK may be a future cure for diabetes. PMID:26752353

  10. Structural Variations of Human Glucokinase Glu256Lys in MODY2 Condition Using Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Kandlapalli, Kalpana; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sarma, P V G K; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is the predominant hexokinase that acts as glucose sensor and catalyses the formation of Glucose-6-phosphate. The mutations in GK gene influence the affinity for glucose and lead to altered glucose levels in blood causing maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (MODY2) condition, which is one of the prominent reasons of type 2 diabetic condition. In view of the importance of mutated GK resulting in hyperglycemic condition, in the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in intact and 256 E-K mutated GK structures and their energy values and conformational variations were correlated. Energy variations were observed in mutated GK (3500 Kcal/mol) structure with respect to intact GK (5000 Kcal/mol), and it showed increased γ -turns, decreased β -turns, and more helix-helix interactions that affected substrate binding region where its volume increased from 1089.152 Å(2) to 1246.353 Å(2). Molecular docking study revealed variation in docking scores (intact = -12.199 and mutated = -8.383) and binding mode of glucose in the active site of mutated GK where the involvement of A53, S54, K56, K256, D262 and Q286 has resulted in poor glucose binding which probably explains the loss of catalytic activity and the consequent prevailing of high glucose levels in MODY2 condition.

  11. Structural Variations of Human Glucokinase Glu256Lys in MODY2 Condition Using Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Kandlapalli, Kalpana; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sarma, P. V. G. K.; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is the predominant hexokinase that acts as glucose sensor and catalyses the formation of Glucose-6-phosphate. The mutations in GK gene influence the affinity for glucose and lead to altered glucose levels in blood causing maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (MODY2) condition, which is one of the prominent reasons of type 2 diabetic condition. In view of the importance of mutated GK resulting in hyperglycemic condition, in the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in intact and 256 E-K mutated GK structures and their energy values and conformational variations were correlated. Energy variations were observed in mutated GK (3500 Kcal/mol) structure with respect to intact GK (5000 Kcal/mol), and it showed increased γ-turns, decreased β-turns, and more helix-helix interactions that affected substrate binding region where its volume increased from 1089.152 Å2 to 1246.353 Å2. Molecular docking study revealed variation in docking scores (intact = −12.199 and mutated = −8.383) and binding mode of glucose in the active site of mutated GK where the involvement of A53, S54, K56, K256, D262 and Q286 has resulted in poor glucose binding which probably explains the loss of catalytic activity and the consequent prevailing of high glucose levels in MODY2 condition. PMID:23476789

  12. A glucokinase gene mutation in a young boy with diabetes mellitus, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Emelyanov, Andrey O; Sechko, Elena; Koksharova, Ekaterina; Sklyanik, Igor; Kuraeva, Tamara; Mayorov, Alexander; Peterkova, Valentina; Dedov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with a glucokinase (GCK) mutation, and diabetes with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. For 4 years, the patient intermittently received insulin medications Actrapid HM and Protaphane HM (total dose 5 U/day), with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of 6.6%–7.0%. After extensive screening the patient was found to carry a heterozygous mutation (p.E256K) in GCK (MIM #138079, reference sequence NM_000162.3). Insulin therapy was replaced by metformin at 1,700 mg/day. One year later, his HbA1c level was 6.9%, postprandial glycemia at 120 min of oral glucose tolerance test was 15.4 mmol/L, hyperinsulinemia had increased to 508.9 mU/L, homeostasis model assessment index was 114.2 and the Matsuda index was 0.15. Insulin resistance was confirmed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test – M-index was 2.85 mg/kg/min. This observation is a rare case of one of the clinical variants of diabetes, which should be taken into account by a vigilant endocrinologist due to the need for nonstandard diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:28331372

  13. The Structural and Functional Characterization of Mammalian ADP-dependent Glucokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Jan P.; Goroncy, Alexander K.; Ronimus, Ron S.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate is a reaction central to the metabolism of all life. ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADPGK) catalyzes glucose-6-phosphate production, utilizing ADP as a phosphoryl donor in contrast to the more well characterized ATP-requiring hexokinases. ADPGK is found in Archaea and metazoa; in Archaea, ADPGK participates in a glycolytic role, but a function in most eukaryotic cell types remains unknown. We have determined structures of the eukaryotic ADPGK revealing a ribokinase-like tertiary fold similar to archaeal orthologues but with significant differences in some secondary structural elements. Both the unliganded and the AMP-bound ADPGK structures are in the “open” conformation. The structures reveal the presence of a disulfide bond between conserved cysteines that is positioned at the nucleotide-binding loop of eukaryotic ADPGK. The AMP-bound ADPGK structure defines the nucleotide-binding site with one of the disulfide bond cysteines coordinating the AMP with its main chain atoms, a nucleotide-binding motif that appears unique to eukaryotic ADPGKs. Key amino acids at the active site are structurally conserved between mammalian and archaeal ADPGK, and site-directed mutagenesis has confirmed residues essential for enzymatic activity. ADPGK is substrate inhibited by high glucose concentration and shows high specificity for glucose, with no activity for other sugars, as determined by NMR spectroscopy, including 2-deoxyglucose, the glucose analogue used for tumor detection by positron emission tomography. PMID:26555263

  14. Regulation of β cell glucokinase by S-nitrosylation and association with nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Mark A.; Piston, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) activity plays a key role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells. Insulin regulates GK activity by modulating its association with secretory granules, although little is known about the mechanisms involved in regulating this association. Using quantitative imaging of multicolor fluorescent proteins fused to GK, we found that the dynamic association of GK with secretory granules is modulated through nitric oxide (NO). Our results in cultured β cells show that insulin stimulates NO production and leads to S-nitrosylation of GK. Furthermore, inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) activity blocks insulin-stimulated changes in both GK association with secretory granules and GK conformation. Mutation of cysteine 371 to serine blocks S-nitrosylation of GK and causes GK to remain tightly bound to secretory granules. GK was also found to interact stably with neuronal NOS as detected by coimmunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Finally, attachment of a nuclear localization signal sequence to NOS drives GK to the nucleus in addition to its normal cytoplasmic and granule targeting. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of GK localization and activity in pancreatic β cells is directly related to NO production and that the association of GK with secretory granules occurs through its interaction with NOS. PMID:12707306

  15. Novel, highly potent systemic glucokinase activators for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiayi; Lin, Songnian; Myers, Robert W; Addona, George; Berger, Joel P; Campbell, Brian; Chen, Hsuan-Shen; Chen, Zhesheng; Eiermann, George J; Elowe, Nadine H; Farrer, Brian T; Feng, Wen; Fu, Qinghong; Kats-Kagan, Roman; Kavana, Michael; Malkani, Sunita; McMasters, Daniel R; Mitra, Kaushik; Pachanski, Michele J; Tong, Xinchun; Trujillo, Maria E; Xu, Libo; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Fengqi; Zhang, Rui; Parmee, Emma R

    2017-05-01

    Glucokinase (GK, hexokinase IV) is a unique hexokinase that plays a central role in mammalian glucose homeostasis. Glucose phosphorylation by GK in the pancreatic β-cell is the rate-limiting step that controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Similarly, GK-mediated glucose phosphorylation in hepatocytes plays a major role in increasing hepatic glucose uptake and metabolism and possibly lowering hepatic glucose output. Small molecule GK activators (GKAs) have been identified that increase enzyme activity by binding to an allosteric site. GKAs offer a novel approach for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and as such have garnered much attention. We now report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel series of 2,5,6-trisubstituted indole derivatives that act as highly potent GKAs. Among them, Compound 1 was found to possess high in vitro potency, excellent physicochemical properties, and good pharmacokinetic profile in rodents. Oral administration of Compound 1 at doses as low as 0.03mg/kg led to robust blood glucose lowering efficacy in 3week high fat diet-fed mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell glucokinase: from basics to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Matschinsky, Franz M

    2002-12-01

    Glucokinase (GK) serves as glucose sensor in pancreatic beta-cells and in other glucose sensor cells in the body. Biochemical genetic studies have characterized many activating and inactivating GK mutants that have been discovered in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia or diabetes, all inherited as autosomal dominant traits. Mathematical modeling of the kinetic data of recombinant human wild-type and mutant GK accurately predicts the effects of GK mutations on the threshold of glucose-stimulated insulin release and glucose homeostasis. Structure/function studies of the enzyme suggest the existence of a hitherto unknown allosteric activator site of the enzyme that has significant implications for the physiological chemistry of GK-containing cells, particularly the pancreatic beta-cells. Glucose is the preeminent positive regulator of beta-cell GK expression and involves molecular mechanisms that are still to be elucidated in detail, but seem to have a specific requirement for increased glucose metabolism. Pharmaceutical chemists, motivated by the clear tenets of the GK glucose-sensor paradigm, have searched for and have discovered a novel class of GK activator molecules. The therapeutic application of this basic discovery offers a new principle for drug therapy of diabetes.

  17. Low prevalence of glucokinase gene mutations in gestational diabetic patients with good glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, H R; Santos, I C R; Réa, R R; Almeida, A C R; Fadel-Picheth, C M T; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Rego, F G M; Picheth, G

    2012-05-18

    Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis. Gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of gestational complications in pregnant women and fetuses. We screened for mutations in coding and flanking regions of the GCK gene in pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes in a Brazilian population. A sample of 200 pregnant women classified as healthy (control, N = 100) or with gestational diabetes (N = 100) was analyzed for mutations in the GCK gene. All gestational diabetes mellitus patients had good glycemic control maintained by diet alone and no complications during pregnancy. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Thirteen of the 200 subjects had GCK gene mutations. The mutations detected were in intron 3 (c.43331A>G, new), intron 6 (c.47702T>C, rs2268574), intron 9 (c.48935C>T, rs2908274), and exon 10 (c.49620G>A, rs13306388). None of these GCK mutations were found to be significantly associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In summary, we report a low frequency of GCK mutations in a pregnant Brazilian population and describe a new intronic variation (c.43331A>G, intron 3). We conclude that mutations in GCK introns and in non-translatable regions of the GCK gene do not affect glycemic control and are not correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  18. Investigation of the role of epigenetic modification of the rat glucokinase gene in fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Bogdarina, Irina; Murphy, Helena C; Burns, Shamus P; Clark, Adrian J L

    2004-01-30

    Fetal malnutrition is associated with development of impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes and hypertension in later life in humans and several mammalian species. The mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon of fetal programming are unknown. We hypothesize that adverse effects in utero and early life may influence the basal expression levels of certain genes such that they are re-set with long-term consequences for the organism. An excellent candidate mechanism for this re-setting process is DNA methylation, since post-natal methylation patterns are largely established in utero. We have sought to test this hypothesis by investigating the glucokinase gene (Gck) in rat offspring programmed using a maternal low protein diet model (MLP). Northern blot reveals that fasting levels of Gck expression are reduced after programming, although this distinction disappears after feeding. Bisulphite sequencing of the hepatic Gck promoter indicates a complete absence of methylation at the 12 CpG sites studied in controls and MLP animals. Non-expressing cardiac tissue also showed no DNA methylation in this region, whereas brain and all fetal tissues were fully methylated. These findings are not consistent with the hypothesis that programming results from differential methylation of Gck. However, it remains possible that programming may influence methylation patterns in Gck at a distance from the promoter, or in genes encoding factors that regulate basal Gck expression.

  19. Dynamic Localization of Glucokinase and Its Regulatory Protein in Hypothalamic Tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Ordenes, Patricio; Millán, Carola; Yañez, María José; Llanos, Paula; Villagra, Marcos; Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Martínez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco; Uribe, Elena; de los Angeles García-Robles, María

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), the hexokinase involved in glucose sensing in pancreatic β cells, is also expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, which cover the ventricular walls of the basal hypothalamus and are implicated in an indirect control of neuronal activity by glucose. Previously, we demonstrated that GK was preferentially localized in tanycyte nuclei in euglycemic rats, which has been reported in hepatocytes and is suggestive of the presence of the GK regulatory protein, GKRP. In the present study, GK intracellular localization in hypothalamic and hepatic tissues of the same rats under several glycemic conditions was compared using confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In the hypothalamus, increased GK nuclear localization was observed in hyperglycemic conditions; however, it was primarily localized in the cytoplasm in hepatic tissue under the same conditions. Both GK and GKRP were next cloned from primary cultures of tanycytes. Expression of GK by Escherichia coli revealed a functional cooperative protein with a S0.5 of 10 mM. GKRP, expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inhibited GK activity in vitro with a Ki 0.2 µM. We also demonstrated increased nuclear reactivity of both GK and GKRP in response to high glucose concentrations in tanycyte cultures. These data were confirmed using Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts. Results indicate that GK undergoes short-term regulation by nuclear compartmentalization. Thus, in tanycytes, GK can act as a molecular switch to arrest cellular responses to increased glucose. PMID:24739934

  20. Glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene polymorphism affects postprandial lipemic response in a dietary intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haiqing; Pollin, Toni I.; Damcott, Coleen M.; McLenithan, John C.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Postprandial triglyceridemia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, most of the genes that influence postprandial triglyceridemia are not known. We evaluated whether a common nonsynonymous SNP rs1260326/P446L in the glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene influenced variation in the postprandial lipid response after a high-fat challenge in seven hundred and seventy participants in the Amish HAPI Heart Study who underwent an oral high-fat challenge and had blood samples taken in the fasting state and during the postprandial phase at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours. We found that the minor T allele at rs1260326 was associated with significantly higher fasting TG levels after adjusting for age, sex, and family structure (Pa = 0.06 for additive model, and Pr=0.0003 for recessive model). During the fat challenge, the T allele was associated with significantly higher maximum TG level (Pa = 0.006), incremental maximum TG level (Pa = 0.006), TG area under the curve (Pa = 0.02) and incremental TG area under the curve (Pa = 0.03). Our data indicate that the rs1260326 T allele of GCKR is associated with both higher fasting levels of TG as well as the postprandial TG response, which may result in higher atherogenic risk. PMID:19526250

  1. Arterial oxygen partial pressures reduce the insulin-dependent induction of the perivenously located glucokinase in rat hepatocyte cultures: mimicry of arterial oxygen pressures by H2O2.

    PubMed Central

    Kietzmann, T; Roth, U; Freimann, S; Jungermann, K

    1997-01-01

    Liver glucokinase (GK) is localized predominantly in the perivenous zone. GK mRNA was induced by insulin maximally under venous O2 partial pressure (pO2) and only half-maximally under arterial pO2. CoCl2 and desferrioxamine mimicked venous pO2 and enhanced the insulin-dependent induction of GK mRNA under arterial pO2. H2O2 mimicked arterial pO2 and reduced insulin-induced GK mRNA under venous pO2 to the lower arterial levels. Thus the zonal O2 gradient in liver seems to have a key role in the heterogenous expression of the GK gene. PMID:9003396

  2. Structure-based approach to the identification of a novel group of selective glucosamine analogue inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi glucokinase.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Edward L; Deinema, Mason S; Kearns, Sean P; Frey, Tyler A; Tanghe, Scott; Perry, Kay; Roy, Timothy A; Gracz, Hanna S; Rodriguez, Ana; D'Antonio, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Glucokinase and hexokinase from pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi are potential drug targets for antiparasitic chemotherapy of Chagas' disease. These glucose kinases phosphorylate d-glucose with co-substrate ATP and yield glucose 6-phosphate and are involved in essential metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. An inhibitor class was conceived that is selective for T. cruzi glucokinase (TcGlcK) using structure-based drug design involving glucosamine having a linker from the C2 amino that terminates with a hydrophobic group either being phenyl, p-hydroxyphenyl, or dioxobenzo[b]thiophenyl groups. The synthesis and characterization for two of the four compounds are presented while the other two compounds were commercially available. Four high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of TcGlcK inhibitor complexes are reported along with enzyme inhibition constants (Ki) for TcGlcK and Homo sapiens hexokinase IV (HsHxKIV). These glucosamine analogue inhibitors include three strongly selective TcGlcK inhibitors and a fourth inhibitor, benzoyl glucosamine (BENZ-GlcN), which is a similar variant exhibiting a shorter linker. Carboxybenzyl glucosamine (CBZ-GlcN) was found to be the strongest glucokinase inhibitor known to date, having a Ki of 0.71±0.05μM. Also reported are two biologically active inhibitors against in vitro T. cruzi culture that were BENZ-GlcN and CBZ-GlcN, with intracellular amastigote growth inhibition IC50 values of 16.08±0.16μM and 48.73±0.69μM, respectively. These compounds revealed little to no toxicity against mammalian NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and provide a key starting point for further drug development with this class of compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucokinase and hexokinase expression and activities in rainbow trout tissues: changes with food deprivation and refeeding.

    PubMed

    Soengas, José L; Polakof, Sergio; Chen, Xi; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Moon, Thomas W

    2006-09-01

    The expression and activities of glucokinase (GK) and hexokinase (HK) were assessed in different tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under different feeding conditions (fed, fasted for 14 days, and refed for 7 days). Two different HK-I cDNAs were identified with different tissue distributions. One transcript named heart or H-HK-I was observed in the four brain regions assessed, white muscle, kidney, and gills but not in liver or erythrocytes. A second transcript named liver or L-HK-I was found in all tissues surveyed. GK mRNA was identified only in liver and the four brain regions. GK expression was altered by feeding conditions, especially in liver and hypothalamus where food deprivation decreased and re-feeding increased expression; changes in expression reflected activity changes and changes in tissue glycogen levels. In contrast, feeding conditions did not alter expression of either HK-I transcript but did alter tissue HK activities. The reduced phosphorylating capacity noted with food deprivation correlates primarily with changes in tissue HK, whereas increased capacity, as with refeeding, was associated with changes in GK; these changes fit with the different K(m) values of the GK and HK enzymes. These results provide evidence for the hypothalamus acting as a glucosensor in trout, as hyperglycemia produced increased GK expression and activity, as well as increased glycogen levels. Thus, even though trout use glucose poorly, none of the parameters tested here relate to this inability to use glucose and suggest that, at least, rainbow trout, if given an appropriate carbohydrate diet, could metabolically adjust to such a diet.

  4. Phosphorylation of Staphylococcus aureus Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Affects the Function of Glucokinase and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Dudipeta; Kumar, Pasupuleti Santhosh; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Swarupa, Vimjam; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Sunitha, Manne Mudhu; Choudhary, Abhijith; Krishna Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha

    2017-01-01

    Background: When Staphylococcus aureus is grown in the presence of high concentration of external glucose, this sugar is phosphorylated by glucokinase (glkA) to form glucose-6-phosphate. This product subsequently enters into anabolic phase, which favors biofilm formation. The presence of ROK (repressor protein, open reading frame, sugar kinase) motif, phosphate-1 and -2 sites, and tyrosine kinase sites in glkA of S. aureus indicates that phosphorylation must regulate the glkA activity. The aim of the present study was to identify the effect of phosphorylation on the function of S. aureus glkA and biofilm formation. Methods: Pure glkA and protein-tyrosine kinase (BYK) of S. aureus ATCC 12600 were obtained by fractionating the cytosolic fractions of glkA1 and BYK-1 expressing recombinant clones through nickel metal chelate column. The pure glkA was used as a substrate for BYK, and the phosphorylation of glkA was confirmed by treating with reagent A and resolving in SDS-PAGE, as well as staining with reagent A. The kinetic parameters of glkA and phosphorylated glkA were determined spectrophotometrically, and in silico tools were used for validation. S. aureus was grown in brain heart infusion broth, which was supplemented with glucose, and then biofilm units were calculated. Results: Fourfold elevated glkA activity was observed upon the phosphorylation by BYK. Protein-protein docking analysis revealed that glkA structure docked close to the adenosine triphosphate-binding site of BYK structure corroborating the kinetic results. Further, S. aureus grown in the presence of elevated glucose concentration exhibited an increase in the rate of biofilm formation. Conclusion: The elevated function of glkA is an essential requirement for increased biofilm units in S. aureus, a key pathogenic factor that helps its survival and the progress of infection. PMID:27695030

  5. Glucokinase inhibitor glucosamine stimulates feeding and activates hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ligang; Yueh, Chen-Yu; Lam, Daniel D; Shaw, Jill; Osundiji, Mayowa; Garfield, Alastair S; Evans, Mark; Heisler, Lora K

    2011-09-12

    Maintaining glucose levels within the appropriate physiological range is necessary for survival. The identification of specific neuronal populations, within discreet brain regions, sensitive to changes in glucose concentration has led to the hypothesis of a central glucose-sensing system capable of directly modulating feeding behaviour. Glucokinase (GK) has been identified as a glucose-sensor responsible for detecting such changes both within the brain and the periphery. We previously reported that antagonism of centrally expressed GK by administration of glucosamine (GSN) was sufficient to induce protective glucoprivic feeding in rats. Here we examine a neurochemical mechanism underlying this effect and report that GSN stimulated food intake is highly correlated with the induction of the neuronal activation marker cFOS within two nuclei with a demonstrated role in central glucose sensing and appetite, the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Furthermore, GSN stimulated cFOS within the ARC was observed in orexigenic neurons expressing the endogenous melanocortin receptor antagonist agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), but not those expressing the anorectic endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH). In the LHA, GSN stimulated cFOS was found within arousal and feeding associated orexin/hypocretin (ORX), but not orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) expressing neurons. Our data suggest that GK within these specific feeding and arousal related populations of AgRP/NPY and ORX neurons may play a modulatory role in the sensing of and appetitive response to hypoglycaemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  7. Regulation of glucokinase activity in liver of hibernating ground squirrel Spermophilus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Khu, L Ya; Storey, K B; Rubtsov, A M; Goncharova, N Yu

    2014-07-01

    The kinetic properties of glucokinase (GLK) from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels Spermophilus undulatus have been studied. Entrance of ground squirrels into hibernation from their active state is accompanied by a sharp decrease in blood glucose (Glc) level (from 14 to 2.9 mM) and with a significant (7-fold) decrease of GLK activity in the liver cytoplasm. Preparations of native GLK practically devoid of other molecular forms of hexokinase were obtained from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels. The dependence of GLK activity upon Glc concentration for the enzyme from active ground squirrel liver showed a pronounced sigmoid character (Hill coefficient, h=1.70 and S0.5=6.23 mM; the experiments were conducted at 25°C in the presence of enzyme stabilizers, K+ and DTT). The same dependence of enzyme activity on Glc concentration was found for GLK from rat liver. However, on decreasing the temperature to 2°C (simulation of hibernation conditions), this dependency became almost hyperbolic (h=1.16) and GLK affinity for substrate was reduced (S0.5=23 mM). These parameters for hibernating ground squirrels (body temperature 5°C) at 25°C were found to be practically equal to the corresponding values obtained for GLK from the liver of active animals (h=1.60, S0.5=9.0 mM, respectively); at 2°C sigmoid character was less expressed and affinity for Glc was drastically decreased (h=1.20, S0.5=45 mM). The calculations of GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels based on enzyme kinetic characteristics and seasonal changes in blood Glc concentrations have shown that GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels is decreased about 5500-fold.

  8. LncRNA NONRATT021972 siRNA normalized the dysfunction of hepatic glucokinase through AKT signaling in T2DM rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Miaomiao; Zou, Lifang; Peng, Lichao; Liu, Shuangmei; Wu, Bing; Yi, Zhihua; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Chunping; Xu, Hong; Xu, Yurong; Tang, Mengxia; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Jia, Tianyu; Zhao, Shanhong; Liang, Shangdong; Li, Guilin

    2017-08-01

    Hepatic glucokinase (GK) expression and activity are decreased in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibits the synthesis of GK. In hepatocytes, the activation of the protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) signaling pathway enhances GK expression and inhibits the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. The dysfunction of certain long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) has been associated with a variety of diseases. This study explored the effects of the lncRNA NONRATT021972 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the dysfunction of hepatic GK through AKT signaling in T2DM rats. Livers from type 2 diabetic rats and hepatocytes cultured in high glucose and high fatty acid media were studied. The changes in expression of AKT, GK and GSK 3β were detected by western blotting or RT-PCR. The application of bioinformatics technology (CatRAPID) was used to identify the targets of NONRATT021972 RNA. We found that lncRNA NONRATT021972 levels in the liver were increased in type 2 diabetic rats, and the increase was associated with an increase in the blood glucose levels. The NONRATT021972 siRNA enhanced phospho-AKT (p-AKT) levels, GK expression and hepatic glycogen synthesis. This siRNA also reduced phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β) levels and hyperglycemia in T2DM rats, as well as in hepatocytes cultured in high glucose media with fatty acids. CatRAPID predicted that there was the interaction between NONRATT021972 and p-AKT. LncRNA NONRATT021972 siRNA may have beneficial effects on T2DM.

  9. Chromium dinicocysteinate supplementation can lower blood glucose, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1, creatinine, apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFkB, Akt, and Glut-2 in livers of Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sushil K.; Croad, Jennifer L.; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Rains, Justin L.; Bull, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    Aim Chromium and cysteine supplementation can improve glucose metabolism in animal studies. This study examined the hypothesis that a cysteinate complex of chromium is significantly beneficial than either of them in lowering blood glucose and vascular inflammation markers in ZDF rats. Methods Starting at the age of 6 wks, ZDF rats were supplemented orally (daily gavages for 8 more wks) with saline-placebo (D) or chromium (400µg Cr/KgBW) as chromium-dinicocysteinate (CDNC), chromium-dinicotinate (CDN), or chromium-picolinate (CP) or equimolar L-cysteine (LC, img/Kg BW), and fed Purina 5008 diet for 8 wks. ZDF rats of 6 wks age before any supplementations and onset of diabetes were considered as baseline (BL). Results D rats showed elevated levels of fasting blood glucose, HbA1, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1 and oxidative stress (LP) and lower adiponectin and vitamin C, when compared to BL rats. In comparison to D group, CDNC group had significantly lower blood glucose, HbA1, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1 and LP and increased vitamin C and adiponectin levels. CDN, CP or LC showed significantly less or no effect on these biomarkers. Only CDNC lowered blood creatinine levels in comparison to D. While CDN and CP had no effect, activation of NFkB, Akt and GLUT-2 levels were decreased, IRS-1 activation increased in livers of CDNC-rats. CDNC effect on glycemia, NFkB, Akt and IRS-1 in liver was significantly greater compared with LC. Blood chromium levels did not differ between Cr-groups. Exogenous vitamin C supplementation significantly inhibited MCP-1 secretion in U937 monocytes cultured in high-glucose-medium. Conclusions CDNC is a potent hypoglycemic compound with anti-inflammatory activity apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFkB, Akt, and Glut-2 and increased IRS-1 activation in livers of type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:20306473

  10. Design and Synthesis of Acetylenyl Benzamide Derivatives as Novel Glucokinase Activators for the Treatment of T2DM

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel acetylenyl-containing benzamide derivatives were synthesized and screened using an in vitro assay measuring increases in glucokinase activity stimulated by 10 mM glucose concentration and glucose uptake in rat hepatocytes. Lead optimization of an acetylenyl benzamide series led to the discovery of several active compounds via in vitro enzyme assays (EC50 < 40 nM) and in vivo OGTT assays (AUC reduction > 40% at 50 mg/kg). Of the active compounds tested, 3-(3-amino-phenylethynyl)-5-(2-methoxy-1-methyl-ethoxy)-N-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-benzamide (19) was identified as a potent glucokinase activator exhibiting an EC50 of 27 nM and eliciting a 2.16-fold increase in glucose uptake. Compound 19 caused a glucose AUC reduction of 47.4% (30 mg/kg) in an OGTT study in C57BL/6J mice compared to 22.6% for sitagliptin (30 mg/kg). Single treatment of the compound 19 in C57BL/6J mice elicited basal glucose lowering activity without any significant evidence for hypoglycemia risk. Compound 19 was therefore selected as a candidate for further preclinical development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25815149

  11. Effects of a Novel Glucokinase Activator, HMS5552, on Glucose Metabolism in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huili

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role in the control of whole-body glucose homeostasis. We investigated the possible effects of a novel glucokinase activator (GKA), HMS5552, to the GK in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: control group, diabetic group, low-dose (10 mg/kg) HMS5552-treated diabetic group (HMS-L), and high-dose (30 mg/kg) HMS5552-treated diabetic group (HMS-H). HMS5552 was administered intragastrically to the T2DM rats for one month. The levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, fasting plasma insulin (FINS), and glucagon (FG) were determined, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. The expression patterns of proteins and genes associated with insulin resistance and GK activity were assayed. Compared with diabetic rats, the FINS level was significantly decreased in the HMS5552-treated diabetic rats. HMS5552 treatment significantly lowered the blood glucose levels and improved GK activity and insulin resistance. The immunohistochemistry, western blot, and semiquantitative RT-PCR results further demonstrated the effects of HMS5552 on the liver and pancreas. Our data suggest that the novel GKA, HMS5552, exerts antidiabetic effects on the liver and pancreas by improving GK activity and insulin resistance, which holds promise as a novel drug for the treatment of T2DM patients. PMID:28191470

  12. Correlation of rare coding variants in the gene encoding human glucokinase regulatory protein with phenotypic, cellular, and kinetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rees, Matthew G; Ng, David; Ruppert, Sarah; Turner, Clesson; Beer, Nicola L; Swift, Amy J; Morken, Mario A; Below, Jennifer E; Blech, Ilana; Mullikin, James C; McCarthy, Mark I; Biesecker, Leslie G; Gloyn, Anna L; Collins, Francis S

    2012-01-01

    Defining the genetic contribution of rare variants to common diseases is a major basic and clinical science challenge that could offer new insights into disease etiology and provide potential for directed gene- and pathway-based prevention and treatment. Common and rare nonsynonymous variants in the GCKR gene are associated with alterations in metabolic traits, most notably serum triglyceride levels. GCKR encodes glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), a predominantly nuclear protein that inhibits hepatic glucokinase (GCK) and plays a critical role in glucose homeostasis. The mode of action of rare GCKR variants remains unexplored. We identified 19 nonsynonymous GCKR variants among 800 individuals from the ClinSeq medical sequencing project. Excluding the previously described common missense variant p.Pro446Leu, all variants were rare in the cohort. Accordingly, we functionally characterized all variants to evaluate their potential phenotypic effects. Defects were observed for the majority of the rare variants after assessment of cellular localization, ability to interact with GCK, and kinetic activity of the encoded proteins. Comparing the individuals with functional rare variants to those without such variants showed associations with lipid phenotypes. Our findings suggest that, while nonsynonymous GCKR variants, excluding p.Pro446Leu, are rare in individuals of mixed European descent, the majority do affect protein function. In sum, this study utilizes computational, cell biological, and biochemical methods to present a model for interpreting the clinical significance of rare genetic variants in common disease.

  13. Association between glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) and apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene polymorphisms and triacylglycerol concentrations in fasting, postprandial, and fenofibrate-treated states

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Variation in the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) and glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) genes has been associated with fasting plasma triacylglycerol. Objective: We investigated the combined effects of the GCKR rs780094C-->T,...

  14. A Common Missense Variant in the Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Gene (GCKR) Is Associated with Increased Plasma Triglyceride and C-Reactive Protein but Lower Fasting Glucose Concentrations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE-Using the genome-wide-association approach, we recently identified the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR, rs780094) region as a novel quantitative trait locus for plasma triglyceride concentration in Europeans. Here, we sought to study the association of GCKR variants with metaboli...

  15. Glucokinase activation repairs defective bioenergetics of islets of Langerhans isolated from type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Liu, Chengyang; Buettger, Carol W; Sotiris, Johanna; Collins, Heather W; Li, Changhong; Stanley, Charles A; Wilson, David F; Grimsby, Joseph; Sarabu, Ramakanth; Naji, Ali; Matschinsky, Franz M

    2012-01-01

    It was reported previously that isolated human islets from individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) show reduced glucose-stimulated insulin release. To assess the possibility that impaired bioenergetics may contribute to this defect, glucose-stimulated respiration (Vo(2)), glucose usage and oxidation, intracellular Ca(2+), and insulin secretion (IS) were measured in pancreatic islets isolated from three healthy and three type 2 diabetic organ donors. Isolated mouse and rat islets were studied for comparison. Islets were exposed to a "staircase" glucose stimulus, whereas IR and Vo(2) were measured. Vo(2) of human islets from normals and diabetics increased sigmoidally from equal baselines of 0.25 nmol/100 islets/min as a function of glucose concentration. Maximal Vo(2) of normal islets at 24 mM glucose was 0.40 ± 0.02 nmol·min(-1)·100 islets(-1), and the glucose S(0.5) was 4.39 ± 0.10 mM. The glucose stimulation of respiration of islets from diabetics was lower, V(max) of 0.32 ± 0.01 nmol·min(-1)·100 islets(-1), and the S(0.5) shifted to 5.43 ± 0.13 mM. Glucose-stimulated IS and the rise of intracellular Ca(2+) were also reduced in diabetic islets. A clinically effective glucokinase activator normalized the defective Vo(2), IR, and free calcium responses during glucose stimulation in islets from type 2 diabetics. The body of data shows that there is a clear relationship between the pancreatic islet energy (ATP) production rate and IS. This relationship was similar for normal human, mouse, and rat islets and the data for all species fitted a single sigmoidal curve. The shared threshold rate for IS was ∼13 pmol·min(-1)·islet(-1). Exendin-4, a GLP-1 analog, shifted the ATP production-IS curve to the left and greatly potentiated IS with an ATP production rate threshold of ∼10 pmol·min(-1)·islet(-1). Our data suggest that impaired β-cell bioenergetics resulting in greatly reduced ATP production is critical in the molecular pathogenesis of type 2

  16. Glucokinase activation repairs defective bioenergetics of islets of Langerhans isolated from type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Doliba, Nicolai M.; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Liu, Chengyang; Buettger, Carol W.; Sotiris, Johanna; Collins, Heather W.; Li, Changhong; Stanley, Charles A.; Wilson, David F.; Grimsby, Joseph; Sarabu, Ramakanth; Naji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    It was reported previously that isolated human islets from individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) show reduced glucose-stimulated insulin release. To assess the possibility that impaired bioenergetics may contribute to this defect, glucose-stimulated respiration (V̇o2), glucose usage and oxidation, intracellular Ca2+, and insulin secretion (IS) were measured in pancreatic islets isolated from three healthy and three type 2 diabetic organ donors. Isolated mouse and rat islets were studied for comparison. Islets were exposed to a “staircase” glucose stimulus, whereas IR and V̇o2 were measured. V̇o2 of human islets from normals and diabetics increased sigmoidally from equal baselines of 0.25 nmol/100 islets/min as a function of glucose concentration. Maximal V̇o2 of normal islets at 24 mM glucose was 0.40 ± 0.02 nmol·min−1·100 islets−1, and the glucose S0.5 was 4.39 ± 0.10 mM. The glucose stimulation of respiration of islets from diabetics was lower, Vmax of 0.32 ± 0.01 nmol·min−1·100 islets−1, and the S0.5 shifted to 5.43 ± 0.13 mM. Glucose-stimulated IS and the rise of intracellular Ca2+ were also reduced in diabetic islets. A clinically effective glucokinase activator normalized the defective V̇o2, IR, and free calcium responses during glucose stimulation in islets from type 2 diabetics. The body of data shows that there is a clear relationship between the pancreatic islet energy (ATP) production rate and IS. This relationship was similar for normal human, mouse, and rat islets and the data for all species fitted a single sigmoidal curve. The shared threshold rate for IS was ∼13 pmol·min−1·islet−1. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 analog, shifted the ATP production-IS curve to the left and greatly potentiated IS with an ATP production rate threshold of ∼10 pmol·min−1·islet−1. Our data suggest that impaired β-cell bioenergetics resulting in greatly reduced ATP production is critical in the molecular pathogenesis of type 2

  17. Asymptomatic Congenital Hyperinsulinism due to a Glucokinase-Activating Mutation, Treated as Adrenal Insufficiency for Twelve Years

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Kae; Kyo, Chika; Kosugi, Rieko; Ogawa, Tatsuo; Inoue, Tatsuhide

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) caused by a glucokinase- (GCK-) activating mutation shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and its severity ranges from mild to severe. A 43-year-old female with asymptomatic hypoglycemia (47 mg/dL) was diagnosed as partial adrenal insufficiency and the administration of hydrocortisone (10 mg/day) was initiated. Twelve years later, her 8-month-old grandchild was diagnosed with CHI. Heterozygosity of exon 6 c.590T>C (p.M197T) was identified in a gene analysis of GCK, which was also detected in her son and herself. The identification of GCK-activating mutations in hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia patients may be useful for a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology involved and preventing unnecessary glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:28163940

  18. Pancreatic beta-cell-specific targeted disruption of glucokinase gene. Diabetes mellitus due to defective insulin secretion to glucose.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Y; Sakura, H; Yasuda, K; Iwamoto, K; Takahashi, N; Ito, K; Kasai, H; Suzuki, H; Ueda, O; Kamada, N

    1995-12-22

    Mice carrying a null mutation in the glucokinase (GK) gene in pancreatic beta-cells, but not in the liver, were generated by disrupting the beta-cell-specific exon. Heterozygous mutant mice showed early-onset mild diabetes due to impaired insulin-secretory response to glucose. Homozygotes showed severe diabetes shortly after birth and died within a week. GK-deficient islets isolated from homozygotes showed defective insulin secretion in response to glucose, while they responded to other secretagogues: almost normally to arginine and to some extent to sulfonylureas. These data provide the first direct proof that GK serves as a glucose sensor molecule for insulin secretion and plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis. GK-deficient mice serve as an animal model of the insulin-secretory defect in human non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  19. Low glucokinase activity and high rates of gluconeogenesis contribute to hyperglycemia in barn owls (Tyto alba) after a glucose challenge.

    PubMed

    Myers, M R; Klasing, K C

    1999-10-01

    Barn owls (Tyto alba) and leghorn chickens were fed a low protein high glucose (33.44% protein, 23.67% glucose) or a high protein low glucose (55.35% protein, 1.5% glucose) diet. After an intravenous glucose infusion, the peak in plasma glucose was not affected by diet in either species and was 22.6 and 39.4 mmol/L in chickens and barn owls, respectively. Glucose levels returned to normal within 30 min in chickens, but remained elevated for 3.5 h in barn owls. An oral glucose challenge also resulted in greater and longer hyperglycemia in barn owls than in chickens. The activities of hepatic glucokinase, malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase of barn owls were 16, 35, and 333% of the levels in chickens. Malic enzyme (P = 0.024) was less affected by dietary glucose level in barn owls than in chickens. Cultured hepatocytes from chickens produced 43% more glucose from lactate than hepatocytes from barn owls and, conversely, barn owl hepatocytes produced 87% more glucose from threonine than chickens (P = 0.001). Gluconeogenesis from lactate was greatly suppressed by high media glucose in chicken hepatocytes but not in those of barn owls (P = 0.0001 for species by glucose level interaction). When threonine was the substrate, gluconeogenesis was suppressed by increased glucose in both species but to a greater relative extent in chickens (P = 0.007 for species by glucose level interaction). Owls were glucose intolerant at least in part because of low hepatic glucokinase activity and an inadequate suppression of gluconeogenesis in the presence of exogenous glucose, apparently because they evolved with large excesses of amino acids and limited glucose in their normal diet.

  20. Characterization of the heterozygous glucokinase knockout mouse as a translational disease model for glucose control in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D J; Atkinson, A M; Wilkinson, G P; Coope, G J; Charles, A D; Leighton, B

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The global heterozygous glucokinase (GK) knockout (gkwt/del) male mouse, fed on a high-fat (60% by energy) diet, has provided a robust and reproducible model of hyperglycaemia. This model could be highly relevant to some facets of human type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to investigate the ability of standard therapeutic agents to lower blood glucose at translational doses, and to explore the glucose-lowering potential of novel glucokinase activators (GKAs) in this model. Experimental Approach We measured the ability of insulin, metformin, glipizide, exendin-4 and sitagliptin, after acute or repeat dose administration, to lower free-feeding glucose levels in gkwt/del mice. Further, we measured the ability of novel GKAs, GKA23, GKA71 and AZD6370 to control glucose either alone or in combination with some standard agents. Key Results A single dose of insulin (1 unit·kg−1), metformin (150, 300 mg·kg−1), glipizide (0.1, 0.3 mg·kg−1), exendin-4 (2, 20 μg·kg−1) and GKAs reduced free-feeding glucose levels. Sitagliptin (10 mg·kg−1), metformin (300 mg·kg−1) and AZD6370 (30, 400 mg·kg−1) reduced glucose excursions on repeat dosing. At a supra-therapeutic dose (400 mg·kg−1), AZD6370 also lowered basal levels of glucose without inducing hypoglycaemia. Conclusion and Implications Standard glucose-lowering therapeutic agents demonstrated significant acute glucose lowering in male gkwt/del mice at doses corresponding to therapeutic free drug levels in man, suggesting the potential of these mice as a translatable model of human T2D. Novel GKAs also lowered glucose in this mouse model. PMID:24772483

  1. Chromium dinicocysteinate supplementation can lower blood glucose, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1, creatinine, apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFkappaB, Akt, and Glut-2 in livers of zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sushil K; Croad, Jennifer L; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Rains, Justin L; Bull, Rebeca

    2010-09-01

    Chromium and cysteine supplementation can improve glucose metabolism in animal studies. This study examined the hypothesis that a cysteinate complex of chromium is significantly beneficial than either of them in lowering blood glucose and vascular inflammation markers in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Starting at the age of 6 wk, ZDF rats were supplemented orally (daily gavages for 8 more weeks) with saline-placebo (D) or chromium (400 microg Cr/Kg body weight) as chromium dinicocysteinate (CDNC), chromium dinicotinate (CDN) or chromium picolinate (CP) or equimolar L-cysteine (LC, img/Kg body weight), and fed Purina 5008 diet for 8 wk. ZDF rats of 6 wk age before any supplementations and onset of diabetes were considered as baseline. D rats showed elevated levels of fasting blood glucose, HbA(1), CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1 and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) and lower adiponectin and vitamin C, when compared with baseline rats. In comparison to D group, CDNC group had significantly lower blood glucose, HbA(1), CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1 and lipid peroxidation and increased vitamin C and adiponectin levels. CDN, CP or LC showed significantly less or no effect on these biomarkers. Only CDNC lowered blood creatinine levels in comparison to D. While CDN and CP had no effect, activation of NFkappaB, Akt and glucose transporter-2 levels were decreased, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) activation increased in livers of CDNC-rats. CDNC effect on glycemia, NFkappaB, Akt and IRS-1 in liver was significantly greater compared with LC. Blood chromium levels did not differ between Cr-groups. Exogenous vitamin C supplementation significantly inhibited MCP-1 secretion in U937 monocytes cultured in high-glucose-medium. CDNC is a potent hypoglycemic compound with anti-inflammatory activity apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFkappaB, Akt, and Glut-2 and increased IRS-1 activation in livers of type 2 diabetic rats.

  2. Stat 5B, activated by insulin in a Jak-independent fashion, plays a role in glucokinase gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Sawka-Verhelle, D; Tartare-Deckert, S; Decaux, J F; Girard, J; Van Obberghen, E

    2000-06-01

    Stat proteins are SH2 domain-containing transcription factors that are activated by various cytokines and growth factors. In a previous work, we have identified Stat 5B as a substrate of the insulin receptor based on yeast two-hybrid and mammalian cell transfection studies. In the present study, we have approached the biological relevance of the interaction between the insulin receptor and the transcription factor Stat 5B. Firstly, we show that both insulin and insulin-like growth factor I lead to tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat 5B, and this promotes binding of the transcription factor to the beta-casein promoter containing a Stat 5 binding site. Further, we demonstrate that insulin stimulates the transcriptional activity of Stat 5B. Activation of Stat 5B by insulin appears to be Jak2-independent, whereas Jak2 is required for GH-induced Stat 5B activation. Hence the pathway by which Stat 5B is activated by insulin is different from that used by GH. In addition, by using Jak1- and Tyk2-deficient cells we exclude the involvement of both Jak1 and Tyk2 in Stat 5B activation by insulin. Taken together, our results strengthen the notion that insulin receptor can directly activate Stat 5B. More importantly, we have identified a Stat 5 binding site in the human hepatic glucokinase promoter, and we show that insulin leads to a Stat 5B-dependent increase in transcription of a reporter gene carrying this promoter. These observations favor the idea that Stat 5B plays a role in mediating the expression of the glucokinase gene induced by insulin. As a whole, our results provide evidence for the occurrence of a newly identified circuit in insulin signaling in which the cell surface receptor is directly linked to nuclear events through a transcription factor. Further, we have revealed an insulin target gene whose expression is, at least in part, dependent on Stat 5B activation and/or binding.

  3. Evidence for the Presence of Glucosensor Mechanisms Not Dependent on Glucokinase in Hypothalamus and Hindbrain of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Librán-Pérez, Marta; Velasco, Cristina; López-Patiño, Marcos A.; Míguez, Jesús M.; Soengas, José L.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesize that glucosensor mechanisms other than that mediated by glucokinase (GK) operate in hypothalamus and hindbrain of the carnivorous fish species rainbow trout and stress affected them. Therefore, we evaluated in these areas changes in parameters which could be related to putative glucosensor mechanisms based on liver X receptor (LXR), mitochondrial activity, sweet taste receptor, and sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT-1) 6h after intraperitoneal injection of 5 mL.Kg-1 of saline solution alone (normoglycaemic treatment) or containing insulin (hypoglycaemic treatment, 4 mg bovine insulin.Kg-1 body mass), or D-glucose (hyperglycaemic treatment, 500 mg.Kg-1 body mass). Half of tanks were kept at a 10 Kg fish mass.m-3 and denoted as fish under normal stocking density (NSD) whereas the remaining tanks were kept at a stressful high stocking density (70 kg fish mass.m-3) denoted as HSD. The results obtained in non-stressed rainbow trout provide evidence, for the first time in fish, that manipulation of glucose levels induce changes in parameters which could be related to putative glucosensor systems based on LXR, mitochondrial activity and sweet taste receptor in hypothalamus, and a system based on SGLT-1 in hindbrain. Stress altered the response of parameters related to these systems to changes in glycaemia. PMID:25996158

  4. Compound 19e, a Novel Glucokinase Activator, Protects against Cytokine-Induced Beta-Cell Apoptosis in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon Sin; Seo, Eunhui; Park, Kaapjoo; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Previously, compound 19e, a novel heteroaryl-containing benzamide derivative, was identified as a potent glucokinase activator (GKA) and showed a glucose-lowering effect in diabetic mice. In this study, the anti-apoptotic actions of 19e were evaluated in INS-1 pancreatic beta-cells co-treated with TNF-α and IL-1β to induce cell death. Compound 19e protected INS-1 cells from cytokine-induced cell death, and the effect was similar to treatment with another GKA or exendin-4. Compound 19e reduced annexin-V stained cells and the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein, as well as upregulated the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 protein. Compound 19e inhibited apoptotic signaling via induction of the ATP content, and the effect was correlated with the downregulation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Further, 19e increased NAD-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity, and the anti-apoptotic effect of 19e was attenuated by SIRT1 inhibitor or SIRT1 siRNA treatment. Our results demonstrate that the novel GKA, 19e, prevents cytokine-induced beta-cell apoptosis via SIRT1 activation and has potential as a therapeutic drug for the preservation of pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:28405188

  5. Unique phylogenetic relationships of glucokinase and glucosephosphate isomerase of the amitochondriate eukaryotes Giardia intestinalis, Spironucleus barkhanus and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Henze, K; Horner, D S; Suguri, S; Moore, D V; Sánchez, L B; Müller, M; Embley, T M

    2001-12-27

    Glucokinase (GK) and glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI), the first two enzymes of the glycolytic pathway of the diplomonads Giardia intestinalis and Spironucleus barkhanus, Type I amitochondriate eukaryotes, were sequenced. GPI of the parabasalid Trichomonas vaginalis was also sequenced. The diplomonad GKs belong to a family of specific GKs present in cyanobacteria, in some proteobacteria and also in T. vaginalis, a Type II amitochondriate protist. These enzymes are not part of the hexokinase family, which is broadly distributed among eukaryotes, including the Type I amitochondriate parasite Entamoeba histolytica. G. intestinalis GK expressed in Escherichia coli was specific for glucose and glucosamine, as are its eubacterial homologs. The sequence of diplomonad and trichomonad GPIs formed a monophyletic group more closely related to cyanobacterial and chloroplast sequences than to cytosolic GPIs of other eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The findings show that certain enzymes of the energy metabolism of these amitochondriate protists originated from sources different than those of other eukaryotes. The observation that the two diplomonads and T. vaginalis share the same unusual GK and GPI is consistent with gene trees that suggest a close relationship between diplomonads and parabasalids. The intriguing relationships of these enzymes to cyanobacterial (and chloroplast) enzymes might reflect horizontal gene transfer between the common ancestor of the diplomonad and parabasalid lineages and the ancestor of cyanobacteria.

  6. Glucokinase mutation–a rare cause of recurrent hypoglycemia in adults: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ajala, Oluremi N.; Huffman, David M.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia occurs frequently in patients both in the inpatient and outpatient settings. While most hypoglycemia unrelated to diabetes treatment results from excessive endogenous insulin action, rare cases involve functional and congenital mutations in glycolytic enzymes of insulin regulation. Case A 21-year-old obese woman presented to the emergency department with complaints of repeated episodes of lethargy, syncope, dizziness, and sweating. She was referred from an outside facility on suspicion of insulinoma, with severe hypoglycemia unresponsive to repeated dextrose infusions. Her plasma glucose was 20 mg/dl at presentation, 44 mg/dl on arrival at our facility, and remained low in spite of multiple dextrose infusions. The patient had been treated for persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy at our neonatal facility and 4 years ago was diagnosed as having an activating glucokinase (GCK) mutation. She was then treated with octreotide and diazoxide with improvement in symptoms and blood glucose levels. Conclusion Improved diagnostication and management of uncommon genetic mutations as typified in this patient with an activating mutation of the GCK gene has expanded the spectrum of disease in adult medicine. This calls for improved patient information dissemination across different levels and aspects of the health care delivery system to ensure cost-effective and timely health care. PMID:27802864

  7. Identification and analysis of novel R308K mutation in glucokinase of type 2 diabetic patient and its kinetic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Pasupuleti, Santhosh Kumar; Gopal, Sowjenya; Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna, Sarma; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role in glucose homeostasis and the mutations in GK gene result in pathogenic complications known as Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young 2, an autosomal dominant form of diabetic condition. In the present study, GK was purified from human liver tissue and the pure enzyme showed single band in SDS-PAGE with a molecular weight of 50 kDa. The kinetics of pure GK showed enzyme activity of 0.423±0.02 µM glucose-6-phosphate (G6P)/mL/Min and Km value of 6.66±0.02 µM. These values were compared in the liver biopsy of a clinically proven type 2 diabetic patient, where GK kinetics showed decreased enzyme activity of 0.16±0.025 µM G6P/mL/Min and increased Km of 23±0.9 µM, indicating the hyperglycemic condition in the patient. The genetic analysis of 10th exon of GK gene from this patient showed a R308K mutation. To substantiate these results, comparative molecular dynamics and docking studies were carried out where a higher docking score (-10.218 kcal/mol) was observed in the mutated GK than wild-type GK structure (-12.593 kcal/mol) indicating affinity variations for glucose. During the simulation process, glucose was expelled out from the mutant conformation but not from wild-type GK, making glucose unavailable for phosphorylation. Therefore, these results conclusively explain hyperglycemic condition in this patient. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators. PMID:28207836

  9. Studies on recombinant glucokinase (r-glk) protein of Brucella abortus as a candidate vaccine molecule for brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Vrushabhendrappa; Singh, Amit Kumar; Balakrishna, Konduru; Sripathy, Murali Harishchandra; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-09-29

    Brucellosis is one of the most prevalent zoonotic diseases of worldwide distribution caused by the infection of genus Brucella. Live attenuated vaccines such as B. abortus S19, B. abortus RB51 and B. melitensis Rev1 are found most effective against brucellosis infection in animals, contriving a number of serious side effects and having chances to revert back into their active pathogenic form. In order to engineer a safe and effective vaccine candidate to be used in both animals and human, a recombinant subunit vaccine molecule comprising the truncated region of glucokinase (r-glk) gene from B. abortus S19 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 host. Female BALB/c mice immunized with purified recombinant protein developed specific antibody titer of 1:64,000. The predominant IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes signified development of Th1 directed immune responses. In vitro cell cytotoxicity assay using anti-r-glk antibodies incubated with HeLa cells showed 81.20% and 78.5% cell viability against lethal challenge of B. abortus 544 and B. melitensis 16M, respectively. The lymphocyte proliferative assay indicated a higher splenic lymphocyte responses at 25μg/ml concentration of protein which implies the elevated development of memory immune responses. In contrast to control, the immunized group of mice intra-peritoneal (I.P.) challenged with B. abortus 544 were significantly protected with no signs of necrosis and vacuolization in their liver and spleen tissue. The elevated B-cell response associated with Th1 adopted immunity, significant in vitro cell viability as well as protection afforded in experimental animals after challenge, supplemented with histopathological analysis are suggestive of r-glk protein as a prospective candidate vaccine molecule against brucellosis.

  10. Dose-ranging study with the glucokinase activator AZD1656 as monotherapy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kiyosue, A; Hayashi, N; Komori, H; Leonsson-Zachrisson, M; Johnsson, E

    2013-10-01

    To assess the glucose-lowering effects of monotherapy with the glucokinase activator AZD1656 in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study performed in Japan (NCT01152385). Patients (n = 224) were randomized to AZD1656 (40-200, 20-140 or 10-80 mg titrated doses) or placebo. The primary variable was the placebo-corrected change from baseline to 4 months in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and safety were also assessed. HbA1c was reduced numerically from baseline by 0.3-0.8% with AZD1656 and by 0.1% with placebo over the first 2 months of treatment, after which effects of AZD1656 started to decline. The changes from baseline to 4 months in HbA1c were not significant for the AZD1656 40-200 mg group versus placebo [mean (95% CI) placebo-corrected change: -0.22 (-0.65, 0.20)%; p = 0.30]. Formal significance testing was not carried out for the other two AZD1656 dose groups. A higher percentage of patients on AZD1656 achieved HbA1c ≤ 7% after 4 months versus placebo, but responder rates were low. Results for FPG reflected those for HbA1c. Cases of hypoglycaemia were rare with AZD1656 (one patient) and no safety concerns were raised. Although initially favourable plasma glucose reductions were observed, there was a loss of effect over time with sustained AZD1656 treatment. The study design did not allow an evaluation of the reasons for this lack of long-term efficacy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Genetic Variant Interacts with Omega-3 PUFA to Influence Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Mc Monagle, Jolene; Gulseth, Hanne L.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Shaw, Danielle I.; Karlström, Brita; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Blaak, Ellen E.; Helal, Olfa; Malczewska-Malec, Małgorzata; Defoort, Catherine; Risérus, Ulf; Saris, Wim H. M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Drevon, Christian A.; Roche, Helen M.; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Objective To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects. Design Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort. Results Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019), C-peptide (P = 0.004), HOMA-IR (P = 0.008) and CRP (P = 0.032) as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446). In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele. Conclusions We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195 PMID:21674002

  12. TMG-123, a novel glucokinase activator, exerts durable effects on hyperglycemia without increasing triglyceride in diabetic animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yu; Tamura, Azusa; Hasebe, Makiko; Kanou, Masanobu; Kato, Hirotsugu; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi

    2017-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role for maintaining glucose homeostasis with regulating glucose uptake in liver and insulin secretion in pancreas. GK activators have been reported to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, clinical development of GK activators has failed due to the loss of glucose-lowering effects and increased plasma triglyceride levels after chronic treatment. Here, we generated a novel GK activator, TMG-123, examined its in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characteristics, and evaluated its risks of aforementioned clinical issues. TMG-123 selectively activated GK enzyme activity without increasing Vmax. TMG-123 improved glucose tolerance without increasing plasma insulin levels in both insulin-deficient (Goto-Kakizaki rats) and insulin-resistant (db/db mice) models. The beneficial effect on glucose tolerance was greater than results observed with clinically available antidiabetic drugs such as metformin and glibenclamide in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. TMG-123 also improved glucose tolerance in combination with metformin. After 4 weeks of administration, TMG-123 reduced the Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting liver and plasma triglyceride levels in Goto-Kakizaki rats and Diet-Induced Obesity mice. Moreover, TMG-123 sustained its effect on Hemoglobin A1c levels even after 24 weeks of administration without affecting triglycerides. Taken together, these data indicate that TMG-123 exerts glucose-lowering effects in both insulin-deficient and -resistant diabetes, and sustains reduced Hemoglobin A1c levels without affecting hepatic and plasma triglycerides even after chronic treatment. Therefore, TMG-123 is expected to be an antidiabetic drug that overcomes the concerns previously reported with other GK activators.

  13. Analysis of the glucokinase gene in Mexican families displaying early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus including MODY families.

    PubMed

    del Bosque-Plata, L; García-García, E; Ramírez-Jiménez, S; Cabello-Villegas, J; Riba, L; Gómez-León, A; Vega-Hernández, G; Altamirano-Bustamante, N; Calzada-León, R; Robles-Valdés, C; Mendoza-Morfín, F; Curiel-Pérez, O; Tusié-Luna, M T

    1997-11-12

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 5% of the general population. Genetic factors play an important role in the development of the disease. While in other populations NIDDM is usually diagnosed after the fifth decade of life, in Mexico a large proportion of patients develop the disease at an early age (between the third and the fourth decade). In Caucasian population, mutations in the glucokinase gene, the TCF1, and TCF14 genes, have been identified in a subgroup of early-onset NIDDM patients denominated MODY (maturity-onset diabetes of the young), which show an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. As a first step in the molecular characterization of Mexican families displaying early-onset NIDDM we searched for mutations in the glucokinase gene through SSCP analysis and/or direct sequencing in 26 individuals from 22 independent families, where at least four can be classified as MODY. No mutations were detected in the exons or the intron-exon boundaries of the gene in any of the screened individuals. The phenotype and clinical profile of some of the studied patients is compatible with that of patients carrying mutations in the TCF1 or TCF14 genes, while others may carry mutations in different loci. Through computer simulation analysis we identified at least four informative families which will be used for further linkage studies.

  14. Maternal diabetes alters birth weight in glucokinase-deficient (MODY2) kindred but has no influence on adult weight, height, insulin secretion or insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Velho, G; Hattersley, A T; Froguel, P

    2000-08-01

    Altered fetal insulin secretion caused by fetal or maternal glucokinase mutations influence birth weight. Here, we attempt to answer two additional questions: firstly, whether this variation in birth weight (from low birth weight to macrosomia) has an effect on adult height or weight. Secondly, whether maternal hyperglycaemia during fetal life has an effect on metabolic phenotypes of the adult offspring. We studied 447 family members from 37 MODY2 kindred, divided into four groups according to the presence or absence of a glucokinase mutation in the subject (S+ or S-, respectively) and his/her mother (M+ or M-). Birth weight data were obtained from a questionnaire sent to the mothers. Birth weight was reduced in the presence of a fetal mutation (M-S+) and increased in the presence of a maternal mutation (M+ S-). These effects are additive as similar birth weights were observed in M+ S+ and M-S- offspring. Adult height, weight or body mass index (weight/height2) were, however, similar in the four groups of subjects. Non-diabetic adult offspring, regardless of the glycaemic status of the mothers (M+ S- or M-S-), had similar insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, blood pressures and lipid profiles. These variables as well as the severity of hyperglycaemia were similar in adult M+ S+ and M-S+ MODY2 subjects. Maternal environment and fetal genotypes could alter growth in utero by changing fetal insulin secretion but these effects do not result in a persistent programming in latter life.

  15. The human glucokinase gene beta-cell-type promoter: an essential role of insulin promoter factor 1/PDX-1 in its activation in HIT-T15 cells.

    PubMed

    Watada, H; Kajimoto, Y; Umayahara, Y; Matsuoka, T; Kaneto, H; Fujitani, Y; Kamada, T; Kawamori, R; Yamasaki, Y

    1996-11-01

    The glycolytic enzyme glucokinase plays a primary role in the glucose-responsive secretion of insulin, and defects of this enzyme can cause NIDDM. As a step toward understanding the molecular basis of glucokinase (GK) gene regulation, we assessed the structure and regulation of the human GK gene beta-cell-type promoter. The results of reporter gene analyses using HIT-T15 cells revealed that the gene promoter was comprised of multiple cis-acting elements, including two primarily important cis-motifs: a palindrome structure, hPal-1, and the insulin gene cis-motif A element-like hUPE3. While both elements were bound specifically by nuclear proteins, it was the homeodomain-containing transcription factor insulin promoter factor 1 (IPF1)/STF-1/PDX-1 that bound to the hUPE3 site: IPF1, when expressed in CHO-K1 cells, became bound to the hUPE3 site and activated transcription. An anti-IPF1 antiserum used in gel-mobility shift analysis supershifted the DNA protein complex formed with the hUPE3 probe and nuclear extracts from HIT-T15 cells, thus supporting the involvement of IPF1 in GK gene activation in HIT-T15 cells. In contrast to the insulin gene, however, neither the synergistic effect of the Pan1 expression on the IPF1-induced promoter activation nor the glucose responsiveness of the activity was observed for the GK gene promoter. These results revealed some conservative but unique features for the transcriptional regulation of the beta-cell-specific genes in humans. Being implicated in insulin and GK gene regulations as a common transcription factor, IPF1/STF-1/PDX-1 is likely to play an essential role in maintaining normal beta-cell functions.

  16. Functional Characterization of MODY2 Mutations Highlights the Importance of the Fine-Tuning of Glucokinase and Its Role in Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    García-Herrero, Carmen-María; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Azriel, Sharona; Gutierrez-Nogués, Angel; Aragonés, Angel; Vincent, Olivier; Campos-Barros, Angel; Argente, Jesús; Navas, María-Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) acts as a glucose sensor in the pancreatic beta-cell and regulates insulin secretion. Heterozygous mutations in the human GK-encoding GCK gene that reduce the activity index increase the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion threshold and cause familial, mild fasting hyperglycaemia, also known as Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 2 (MODY2). Here we describe the biochemical characterization of five missense GK mutations: p.Ile130Thr, p.Asp205His, p.Gly223Ser, p.His416Arg and p.Ala449Thr. The enzymatic analysis of the corresponding bacterially expressed GST-GK mutant proteins show that all of them impair the kinetic characteristics of the enzyme. In keeping with their position within the protein, mutations p.Ile130Thr, p.Asp205His, p.Gly223Ser, and p.His416Arg strongly decrease the activity index of GK, affecting to one or more kinetic parameters. In contrast, the p.Ala449Thr mutation, which is located in the allosteric activator site, does not affect significantly the activity index of GK, but dramatically modifies the main kinetic parameters responsible for the function of this enzyme as a glucose sensor. The reduced Kcat of the mutant (3.21±0.28 s−1 vs 47.86±2.78 s−1) is balanced by an increased glucose affinity (S0.5 = 1.33±0.08 mM vs 7.86±0.09 mM) and loss of cooperativity for this substrate. We further studied the mechanism by which this mutation impaired GK kinetics by measuring the differential effects of several competitive inhibitors and one allosteric activator on the mutant protein. Our results suggest that this mutation alters the equilibrium between the conformational states of glucokinase and highlights the importance of the fine-tuning of GK and its role in glucose sensing. PMID:22291974

  17. The use of docking-based comparative intermolecular contacts analysis to identify optimal docking conditions within glucokinase and to discover of new GK activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mutasem O.; Habash, Maha; Khanfar, Mohammad A.

    2014-05-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is involved in normal glucose homeostasis and therefore it is a valid target for drug design and discovery efforts. GK activators (GKAs) have excellent potential as treatments of hyperglycemia and diabetes. The combined recent interest in GKAs, together with docking limitations and shortages of docking validation methods prompted us to use our new 3D-QSAR analysis, namely, docking-based comparative intermolecular contacts analysis (dbCICA), to validate docking configurations performed on a group of GKAs within GK binding site. dbCICA assesses the consistency of docking by assessing the correlation between ligands' affinities and their contacts with binding site spots. Optimal dbCICA models were validated by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and comparative molecular field analysis. dbCICA models were also converted into valid pharmacophores that were used as search queries to mine 3D structural databases for new GKAs. The search yielded several potent bioactivators that experimentally increased GK bioactivity up to 7.5-folds at 10 μM.

  18. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Mikako; KANEDA, Asako; SUGIYAMA, Tae; IIDA, Ryousuke; OTOKUNI, Keiko; KABURAGI, Misako; MATSUOKA, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk+/−) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk+/− mice ranged from 0.41–0.68 versus that in wild (Gk+/+) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95–1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk+/− strain fed the CD, and Gk+/− strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk+/− strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  19. Glucokinase and IRS-2 are required for compensatory beta cell hyperplasia in response to high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Yasuo; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Matsui, Junji; Suzuki, Ryo; Komeda, Kajuro; Hara, Akemi; Toyoda, Yukiyasu; Miwa, Ichitomo; Aizawa, Shinichi; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Hashimoto, Shinji; Eto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akinobu; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Glucokinase (Gck) functions as a glucose sensor for insulin secretion, and in mice fed standard chow, haploinsufficiency of beta cell-specific Gck (Gck(+/-)) causes impaired insulin secretion to glucose, although the animals have a normal beta cell mass. When fed a high-fat (HF) diet, wild-type mice showed marked beta cell hyperplasia, whereas Gck(+/-) mice demonstrated decreased beta cell replication and insufficient beta cell hyperplasia despite showing a similar degree of insulin resistance. DNA chip analysis revealed decreased insulin receptor substrate 2 (Irs2) expression in HF diet-fed Gck(+/-) mouse islets compared with wild-type islets. Western blot analyses confirmed upregulated Irs2 expression in the islets of HF diet-fed wild-type mice compared with those fed standard chow and reduced expression in HF diet-fed Gck(+/-) mice compared with those of HF diet-fed wild-type mice. HF diet-fed Irs2(+/-) mice failed to show a sufficient increase in beta cell mass, and overexpression of Irs2 in beta cells of HF diet-fed Gck(+/-) mice partially prevented diabetes by increasing beta cell mass. These results suggest that Gck and Irs2 are critical requirements for beta cell hyperplasia to occur in response to HF diet-induced insulin resistance.

  20. Glucokinase and IRS-2 are required for compensatory β cell hyperplasia in response to high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Yasuo; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Matsui, Junji; Suzuki, Ryo; Komeda, Kajuro; Hara, Akemi; Toyoda, Yukiyasu; Miwa, Ichitomo; Aizawa, Shinichi; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Hashimoto, Shinji; Eto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akinobu; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Glucokinase (Gck) functions as a glucose sensor for insulin secretion, and in mice fed standard chow, haploinsufficiency of β cell–specific Gck (Gck+/–) causes impaired insulin secretion to glucose, although the animals have a normal β cell mass. When fed a high-fat (HF) diet, wild-type mice showed marked β cell hyperplasia, whereas Gck+/– mice demonstrated decreased β cell replication and insufficient β cell hyperplasia despite showing a similar degree of insulin resistance. DNA chip analysis revealed decreased insulin receptor substrate 2 (Irs2) expression in HF diet–fed Gck+/– mouse islets compared with wild-type islets. Western blot analyses confirmed upregulated Irs2 expression in the islets of HF diet–fed wild-type mice compared with those fed standard chow and reduced expression in HF diet–fed Gck+/– mice compared with those of HF diet–fed wild-type mice. HF diet–fed Irs2+/– mice failed to show a sufficient increase in β cell mass, and overexpression of Irs2 in β cells of HF diet–fed Gck+/– mice partially prevented diabetes by increasing β cell mass. These results suggest that Gck and Irs2 are critical requirements for β cell hyperplasia to occur in response to HF diet–induced insulin resistance. PMID:17200721

  1. Identifying Glucokinase Monogenic Diabetes in a Multiethnic Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Cohort: New Pregnancy Screening Criteria and Utility of HbA1c.

    PubMed

    Rudland, Victoria L; Hinchcliffe, Marcus; Pinner, Jason; Cole, Stuart; Mercorella, Belinda; Molyneaux, Lynda; Constantino, Maria; Yue, Dennis K; Ross, Glynis P; Wong, Jencia

    2016-01-01

    Glucokinase monogenic diabetes (GCK-maturity-onset diabetes of the young [MODY]) should be differentiated from gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) because management differs. New pregnancy-specific screening criteria (NSC) have been proposed to identify women who warrant GCK genetic testing. We tested NSC and HbA1c in a multiethnic GDM cohort and examined projected referrals for GCK testing. Using a GDM database, 63 of 776 women had a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test suggestive of GCK-MODY. Of these 63 women, 31 agreed to undergo GCK testing. NSC accuracy and HbA1c were examined. Projected referrals were calculated by applying the NSC to a larger GDM database (n = 4,415). Four of 31 women were confirmed as having GCK-MODY (prevalence ∼0.5-1/100 with GDM). The NSC identified all Anglo-Celtic women but did not identify one Indian woman. The NSC will refer 6.1% of GDM cases for GCK testing, with more Asian/Indian women referred despite lower disease prevalence. Antepartum HbA1c was not higher in those with GCK-MODY. The NSC performed well in Anglo-Celtic women. Ethnic-specific criteria should be explored. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. A combination of HNF-4 and Foxo1 is required for reciprocal transcriptional regulation of glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase genes in response to fasting and feeding.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Keiko; Sakamaki, Jun-ichi; Ishida, Junji; Shimamoto, Yoko; Nishihara, Shigeki; Kodama, Norio; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Tanimoto, Keiji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2008-11-21

    Glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) regulate rate-limiting reactions in the physiologically opposed metabolic cascades, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. Expression of these genes is conversely regulated in the liver in response to fasting and feeding. We explored the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of these genes by nutritional condition and found that reciprocal function of HNF-4 and Foxo1 plays an important role in this process. In the GK gene regulation, Foxo1 represses HNF-4-potentiated transcription of the gene, whereas it synergizes with HNF-4 in activating the G6Pase gene transcription. These opposite actions of Foxo1 concomitantly take place in the cells under no insulin stimulus, and such gene-specific action was promoter context-dependent. Interestingly, HNF-4-binding elements (HBEs) in the GK and G6Pase promoters were required both for the insulin-stimulated GK gene activation and insulin-mediated G6Pase gene repression. Indeed, mouse in vivo imaging showed that mutating the HBEs in the GK and G6Pase promoters significantly impaired their reactivity to the nutritional states, even in the presence of intact Foxo1-binding sites (insulin response sequences). Thus, in the physiological response of the GK and G6Pase genes to fasting/feeding conditions, Foxo1 distinctly decodes the promoter context of these genes and differently modulates the function of HBE, which then leads to opposite outcomes of gene transcription.

  3. Lifestyle Intervention for Weight Loss and Cardiometabolic Changes in the Setting of Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) Inhibition: GCKR-Leu446Pro Variant in Look AHEAD

    PubMed Central

    Belalcazar, L. Maria; Papandonatos, George D.; Erar, Bahar; Peter, Inga; Alkofide, Hadeel; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Brautbar, Ariel; Kahn, Steven E.; Knowler, William C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) inhibitors offer a novel treatment approach for glucose control in diabetes; however their cardiometabolic effects, particularly in relation to increased triglycerides and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are of concern. GCKR Leu446Pro is a common variant associated with reduced GCKR function, increased triglycerides and CRP. Methods and Results We investigated whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) would avert the unfavorable cardiometabolic effects associated with GCKR Leu446Pro when compared to a diabetes support and education arm (DSE) in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes with triglyceride (n=3,214) and CRP (n=1,411) data participating in a randomized lifestyle intervention study for weight loss, Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes). Once demographics, medication use and baseline adiposity and fitness were accounted for, ILI did not modify the baseline association of GCKR-Leu446Pro with elevated triglycerides (β± SE= 0.067 ± 0.013, p= 1.5×10−7 and β± SE= 0.052 ± 0.015, p=5×10−4) or with elevated CRP (β± SE= 0.136 ± 0.034, p=5.1×10−5and β± SE= 0.903 ± 0.038, p=0.015) in the overall sample and Non-Hispanic Whites, respectively. The lack of a protective effect from ILI at 1-year when compared to DSE (ILI versus DSE interaction for triglyceride and CRP change, respectively: p= 0.64 and 0.37 in the overall sample; p= 0.27 and 0.05 in Non-Hispanic Whites) persisted after additional adjustment for changes in adiposity and fitness. Conclusions Moderate improvements in adiposity and fitness with ILI did not mitigate the adverse cardiometabolic effects of GCKR inhibition in overweight/obese individuals with diabetes. PMID:26578543

  4. Association between glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) and apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene polymorphisms and triacylglycerol concentrations in fasting, postprandial, and fenofibrate-treated states123

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Corella, Dolores; Shen, Jian; Arnett, Donna K; Yiannakouris, Nikos; Tai, E Syong; Orho-Melander, Marju; Tucker, Katherine L; Tsai, Michael; Straka, Robert J; Province, Michael; Kai, Chew Suok; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Guillen, Marisa; Parnell, Laurence D; Borecki, Ingrid; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Variation in the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) and glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) genes has been associated with fasting plasma triacylglycerol. Objective: We investigated the combined effects of the GCKR rs780094C→T, APOA5 −1131T→C, and APOA5 56C→G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on fasting triacylglycerol in several independent populations and the response to a high-fat meal and fenofibrate interventions. Design: We used a cross-sectional design to investigate the association with fasting triacylglycerol in 8 populations from America, Asia, and Europe (n = 7730 men and women) and 2 intervention studies in US whites (n = 1061) to examine postprandial triacylglycerol after a high-fat meal and the response to fenofibrate. We defined 3 combined genotype groups: 1) protective (homozygous for the wild-type allele for all 3 SNPs); 2) intermediate (any mixed genotype not included in groups 1 and 3); and 3) risk (carriers of the variant alleles at both genes). Results: Subjects within the risk group had significantly higher fasting triacylglycerol and a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia than did subjects in the protective group across all populations. Moreover, subjects in the risk group had a greater postprandial triacylglycerol response to a high-fat meal and greater fenofibrate-induced reduction of fasting triacylglycerol than did the other groups, especially among persons with hypertriglyceridemia. Subjects with the intermediate genotype had intermediate values (P for trend <0.001). Conclusions: SNPs in GCKR and APOA5 have an additive effect on both fasting and postprandial triacylglycerol and contribute to the interindividual variability in response to fenofibrate treatment. PMID:19056598

  5. Immunohistochemical evidence for the presence of glucokinase in the gonadotropes and thyrotropes of the anterior pituitary gland of rat and monkey.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Robert L; Stout, Laurence E; Brelje, T Clark; Jetton, Thomas L; Matschinsky, Franz M

    2007-06-01

    A recent report provides new evidence for the presence of glucokinase (GK) in the anterior pituitary. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was used to identify the cells containing GK in the pituitary of rats and monkeys. In rats, GK was detected as a generalized cytoplasmic staining in a discrete population of cells in the anterior pituitary. In colocalization experiments, the majority of cells expressing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) also contained GK. In addition to the gonadotropes, GK was observed in a subpopulation of corticotropes and thyrotropes. GK was not detected in cells expressing growth hormone or prolactin. In monkeys, GK was also observed in a discrete population of cells. Intracellular distribution differed from the rat in that GK in most cells was concentrated in a perinuclear location that appeared to be associated with the Golgi apparatus. However, similar to rats, colocalization experiments showed that the majority of cells expressing FSH or LH also contained GK. In addition to the gonadotropes, GK was observed in a subpopulation of corticotropes and thyrotropes. In the monkey, only a few cells had generalized cytoplasmic staining for GK. These experiments provide further evidence for the presence of GK in the anterior pituitary. Although some corticotropes and thyrotropes contained GK, the predominant cell type expressing GK was gonadotropes. In view of the generally accepted role of GK as a glucose sensor in a variety of cells including the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells as the prototypical example, it is hypothesized that hormone synthesis and/or release in pituitary cells containing GK may be directly influenced by blood glucose.

  6. Comparison of the circulating metabolite profile of PF-04991532, a hepatoselective glucokinase activator, across preclinical species and humans: potential implications in metabolites in safety testing assessment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Litchfield, John; Bergman, Arthur; Atkinson, Karen; Kazierad, David; Gustavson, Stephanie M; Di, Li; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2015-02-01

    A previous report from our laboratory disclosed the identification of PF-04991532 [(S)-6-(3-cyclopentyl-2-(4-trifluoromethyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)propanamido)nicotinic acid] as a hepatoselective glucokinase activator for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lack of in vitro metabolic turnover in microsomes and hepatocytes from preclinical species and humans suggested that metabolism would be inconsequential as a clearance mechanism of PF-04991532 in vivo. Qualitative examination of human circulating metabolites using plasma samples from a 14-day multiple ascending dose clinical study, however, revealed a glucuronide (M1) and monohydroxylation products (M2a and M2b/M2c) whose abundances (based on UV integration) were greater than 10% of the total drug-related material. Based on this preliminary observation, mass balance/excretion studies were triggered in animals, which revealed that the majority of circulating radioactivity following the oral administration of [¹⁴C]PF-04991532 was attributed to an unchanged parent (>70% in rats and dogs). In contrast with the human circulatory metabolite profile, the monohydroxylated metabolites were not detected in circulation in either rats or dogs. Available mass spectral evidence suggested that M2a and M2b/M2c were diastereomers derived from cyclopentyl ring oxidation in PF-04991532. Because cyclopentyl ring hydroxylation on the C-2 and C-3 positions can generate eight possible diastereomers, it was possible that additional diastereomers may have also formed and would need to be resolved from the M2a and M2b/M2c peaks observed in the current chromatography conditions. In conclusion, the human metabolite scouting study in tandem with the animal mass balance study allowed early identification of PF-04991532 oxidative metabolites, which were not predicted by in vitro methods and may require additional scrutiny in the development phase of PF-04991532.

  7. Hepatic glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase responses to dietary glucose and starch in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles reared at two temperatures.

    PubMed

    Enes, P; Panserat, S; Kaushik, S; Oliva-Teles, A

    2008-01-01

    The effects of carbohydrate sources/complexity and rearing temperature on hepatic glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activities and gene expression were studied in gilthead sea bream juveniles. Two isonitrogenous (50% crude protein) and isolipidic (19% crude lipids) diets were formulated to contain 20% waxy maize starch or 20% glucose. Triplicate groups of fish (63.5 g initial body weight) were fed each diet to near satiation during four weeks at 18 degrees C or 25 degrees C. Growth, feed intake, feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio, were higher at the higher water temperature. At each water temperatures fish growth and feed efficiency were higher with the glucose diet. Plasma glucose levels were not influenced by water temperature but were higher in fish fed the glucose diet. Hepatosomatic index and liver glycogen were higher at the lower water temperature and within each water temperature in fish fed the glucose diet. No effect of water temperature on enzymes activities was observed, except for hexokinase and GK which were higher at 25 degrees C. Hepatic hexokinase and pyruvate kinase activities were not influenced by diet composition, whereas glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was higher in fish fed the glucose diet. Higher GK activity was observed in fish fed the glucose diet. GK gene expression was higher at 25 degrees C in fish fed the waxy maize starch diet while in fish fed the glucose diet, no temperature effect on GK gene expression was observed. Hepatic G6Pase activities and gene expression were neither influenced by dietary carbohydrates nor water temperature. Overall, our data suggest that in gilthead sea bream juveniles hepatocytes dietary carbohydrate source and temperature affect more intensively GK, the enzyme responsible for the first step of glucose uptake, than G6Pase the enzyme involved in the last step of glucose hepatic release.

  8. The 0.1% of the population with glucokinase monogenic diabetes can be recognized by clinical characteristics in pregnancy: the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy cohort.

    PubMed

    Chakera, Ali J; Spyer, Gill; Vincent, Nicola; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2014-01-01

    Identifying glucokinase monogenic diabetes (GCK-MODY) in pregnancy is important, as management is different from management for other forms of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and there is no increased maternal risk of type 2 diabetes. We calculated the population prevalence of GCK-MODY in pregnancy and determined the clinical characteristics that differentiate pregnant women with GCK-MODY from those with GDM. We calculated the population prevalence of GCK-MODY in pregnancy by testing a subset of patients from the population-based Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy (Atlantic DIP) study (n = 5,500). We sequenced for GCK mutations in 247 women with a fasting glucose ≥5.1 mmol/L and 109 randomly selected control subjects with normal fasting glucose. Using data from the cases found and 40 previously identified GCK-MODY pregnancies, we analyzed whether clinical criteria could be used to differentiate GCK-MODY from GDM. Four women with fasting glucose ≥5.1 mmol/L were diagnosed with GCK-MODY. No cases were identified with normal fasting glucose. The population prevalence of GCK-MODY is 1.1 in 1,000 (95% CI 0.3-2.9 in 1,000) and prevalence in GDM is 0.9% (95% CI 0.3-2.3). Fasting glucose and BMI significantly differentiate GCK-MODY from GDM (P < 0.0001). Combined criteria of BMI <25 kg/m(2) and fasting glucose ≥5.5 mmol/L has a sensitivity 68%, specificity 96%, and number needed to test of 2.7 women with GDM to find one case of GCK-MODY. Our large population cohort of pregnant women tested estimates the population prevalence of GCK-MODY of 1.1 in 1,000. We have shown routine clinical criteria that can identify which women should be tested for GCK-MODY in pregnancy.

  9. Identification of the mechanism of action of a glucokinase activator from oral glucose tolerance test data in type 2 diabetic patients based on an integrated glucose-insulin model.

    PubMed

    Jauslin, Petra M; Karlsson, Mats O; Frey, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    A mechanistic drug-disease model was developed on the basis of a previously published integrated glucose-insulin model by Jauslin et al. A glucokinase activator was used as a test compound to evaluate the model's ability to identify a drug's mechanism of action and estimate its effects on glucose and insulin profiles following oral glucose tolerance tests. A kinetic-pharmacodynamic approach was chosen to describe the drug's pharmacodynamic effects in a dose-response-time model. Four possible mechanisms of action of antidiabetic drugs were evaluated, and the corresponding affected model parameters were identified: insulin secretion, glucose production, insulin effect on glucose elimination, and insulin-independent glucose elimination. Inclusion of drug effects in the model at these sites of action was first tested one-by-one and then in combination. The results demonstrate the ability of this model to identify the dual mechanism of action of a glucokinase activator and describe and predict its effects: Estimating a stimulating drug effect on insulin secretion and an inhibiting effect on glucose output resulted in a significantly better model fit than any other combination of effect sites. The model may be used for dose finding in early clinical drug development and for gaining more insight into a drug candidate's mechanism of action.

  10. Zinc Finger Nuclease Mediated Knockout of ADP-Dependent Glucokinase in Cancer Cell Lines: Effects on Cell Survival and Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Susan; Morrison, Shona; Connor, Tim; Su, Jiechuang; Print, Cristin G.; Ronimus, Ron S.; McGee, Sean L.; Wilson, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) are powerful tools for editing genes in cells. Here we use ZFNs to interrogate the biological function of ADPGK, which encodes an ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADPGK), in human tumour cell lines. The hypothesis we tested is that ADPGK utilises ADP to phosphorylate glucose under conditions where ATP becomes limiting, such as hypoxia. We characterised two ZFN knockout clones in each of two lines (H460 and HCT116). All four clones had frameshift mutations in all alleles at the target site in exon 1 of ADPGK, and were ADPGK-null by immunoblotting. ADPGK knockout had little or no effect on cell proliferation, but compromised the ability of H460 cells to survive siRNA silencing of hexokinase-2 under oxic conditions, with clonogenic survival falling from 21±3% for the parental line to 6.4±0.8% (p = 0.002) and 4.3±0.8% (p = 0.001) for the two knockouts. A similar increased sensitivity to clonogenic cell killing was observed under anoxia. No such changes were found when ADPGK was knocked out in HCT116 cells, for which the parental line was less sensitive than H460 to anoxia and to hexokinase-2 silencing. While knockout of ADPGK in HCT116 cells caused few changes in global gene expression, knockout of ADPGK in H460 cells caused notable up-regulation of mRNAs encoding cell adhesion proteins. Surprisingly, we could discern no consistent effect on glycolysis as measured by glucose consumption or lactate formation under anoxia, or extracellular acidification rate (Seahorse XF analyser) under oxic conditions in a variety of media. However, oxygen consumption rates were generally lower in the ADPGK knockouts, in some cases markedly so. Collectively, the results demonstrate that ADPGK can contribute to tumour cell survival under conditions of high glycolytic dependence, but the phenotype resulting from knockout of ADPGK is cell line dependent and appears to be unrelated to priming of glycolysis in these lines. PMID:23799003

  11. Mutations in exons 10 and 11 of human glucokinase result in conformational variations in the active site of the structure contributing to poor substrate binding - explains hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Nandakumar; Mahto, Manoj Kumar; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sarma, P V G K; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the glucokinase (GK) gene play a critical role in the establishment of type 2 diabetes. In our earlier study, R308K mutation in GK in a clinically proven type 2 diabetic patient showed, structural and functional variations that contributed immensely to the hyperglycemic condition. In the extension of this work, a cohort of 30 patients with established type 2 diabetic condition were chosen and the exons 10 and 11 of GK were PCR-amplified and sequenced. The sequence alignment showed A379S, D400Y, E300A, E395A, E395G, H380N, I348N, L301M, M298I, M381G, M402R, R308K, R394P, R397S, and S398R mutations in 12 different patients. The structural analysis of these mutated GKs, showed a variable number of β-α-β units, hairpins, β-bulges, strands, helices, helix-helix interactions, β-turns, and γ-turns along with the RMSD variations when compared to wild-type GK. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the substrate showed variable binding orientations and could not fit into the active site of these mutated structures; moreover, it was expelled out of the conformations. Therefore, these structural variations in GK due to mutations could be one of the strongest reasons for the hyperglycemic levels in these type 2 diabetic patients.

  12. The association between Mediterranean Diet Score and glucokinase regulatory protein gene variation on the markers of cardiometabolic risk: an analysis in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study.

    PubMed

    Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Forouhi, Nita G

    2014-07-14

    Consumption of a Mediterranean diet (MD) and genetic variation in the glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene have been reported to be associated with TAG and glucose metabolism. It is uncertain whether there is any interaction between these factors. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to test the association of adherence to a MD and rs780094 (G>A) SNP in the GCKR gene with the markers of cardiometabolic risk, and to investigate the interaction between genetic variation and MD adherence. We studied 20 986 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. The relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED: range 0-18) was used to assess MD adherence. Linear regression was used to estimate the association between the rMED, genotype and cardiometabolic continuous traits, adjusting for potential confounders. In adjusted analyses, we observed independent associations of MD adherence and genotype with cardiometabolic risk, with the highest risk group (AA genotype; lowest rMED) having higher concentrations of TAG, total cholesterol and apoB (12·5, 2·3 and 3·1%, respectively) v. those at the lowest risk (GG genotype; highest rMED). However, the associations of MD adherence with metabolic markers did not differ by genotype, with no significant gene-diet interactions for lipids or for glycated Hb. In conclusion, we found independent associations of the rMED and of the GCKR genotype with cardiometabolic profile, but found no evidence of interaction between them.

  13. Hybrid of 1-deoxynojirimycin and polysaccharide from mulberry leaves treat diabetes mellitus by activating PDX-1/insulin-1 signaling pathway and regulating the expression of glucokinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Li, You-Gui; Ji, Dong-Feng; Zhong, Shi; Lv, Zhi-Qiang; Lin, Tian-Bao; Chen, Shi; Hu, Gui-Yan

    2011-04-12

    1-Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) discovered from mulberry trees has been reported to be a potent inhibitor of intestinal α-glycosidases (sucrase, maltase, glucoamylase), and many polysaccharides were useful in protecting against alloxan-induced pancreatic islets damage through their scavenging ability. This study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect and potential mechanism(s) of the hybrid of DNJ and polysaccharide (HDP) from mulberry leaves on alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Daily oral treatment with HDP (150 mg/kg body weight) to diabetic mice for 12 weeks, body weight and blood glucose were determined every week, oral glucose tolerance test was performed after 4 and 8 weeks, biochemical values were measured using assay kits and gene expressions were investigated by RT-PCR. A significant decline in blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, triglyceride, aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase levels and an evident increase in body weight, plasma insulin level and high density lipoprotein were observed in HDP treated diabetic mice. The polysaccharide (P1) showed a significant scavenging hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anion radical effects in vitro, which indicated that P1 could protect alloxan-induced pancreatic islets from damage by scavenging the free radicals and repaired the destroyed pancreatic β-cells. Pharmacokinetics assay showed that DNJ could be absorbed from the gastrointestinal mucosa and diffused rapidly into the liver, resulted in postprandial blood glucose decrease and alleviated the toxicity caused by sustained supra-physiological glucose to pancreatic β-cells. RT-PCR results indicated that HDP could modulate the hepatic glucose metabolism and gluconeogenesis by up/down-regulating the expression of rate-limiting enzymes (glucokinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase) in liver and up-regulating the pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1), insulin-1 and insulin-2 expressions in pancreas. These findings

  14. A polymorphism in the glucokinase gene that raises plasma fasting glucose, rs1799884, is associated with diabetes mellitus and prostate cancer: findings from a population-based, case-control study (the ProtecT study)

    PubMed Central

    Murad, Ali S; Smith, George Davey; Lewis, Sarah J; Cox, Angela; Donovan, Jenny L; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Martin, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified a positive association between prostate cancer and recent onset type 2 diabetes mellitus but an increasingly inverse association with greater duration of type 2 diabetes. The mecha- nisms underlying these paradoxical associations are not clear. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the glucokinase gene, rs1799884, is associated with higher circulating plasma fasting glucose and with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We report a case-control study nested within the population-based Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) study ISRCTN20141297. Men aged 50-69 years based around 9 UK cities were invited for a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test between June 2002 and November 2006. 1,551 cases and 2,993 controls were geno-typed. We observed suggestive evidence for a positive association between the AA variant rs1799884 and PSA-detected prostate cancer (ORAA V GG= 1.40, 95% CI= 0.95 to 2.07). There was little evidence that this effect was greater for more advanced stage/ grade cancers (ORAA V GG= 1.78, 95% CI= 0.99 to 3.21) versus less advanced cancers (ORAA V GG= 1.23, 95% CI= 0.77 to 1.94) (p for interaction = 0.33). The rs1799884 genotype was not associated with PSA concentration, suggesting that any effect on prostate cancer risk is not attributable to PSA detection bias. Our results provide suggestive evidence for a link between a genotype associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and PSA-detected prostate cancer. We hypothesize that hyperglycaemia may be important in mediating this relationship. PMID:21537389

  15. Simulation of human plasma concentration-time profiles of the partial glucokinase activator PF-04937319 and its disproportionate N-demethylated metabolite using humanized chimeric mice and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi; Chijiwa, Hiroyuki; Okuzono, Takeshi; Ishiguro, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Nishinoaki, Sho; Ninomiya, Shin-Ichi; Mitsui, Marina; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-07

    1. The partial glucokinase activator N,N-dimethyl-5-((2-methyl-6-((5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzofuran-4-yl)oxy)pyrimidine-2-carboxamide (PF-04937319) is biotransformed in humans to N-methyl-5-((2-methyl-6-((5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzofuran-4-yl)oxy)pyrimidine-2-carboxamide (M1), accounting for ∼65% of total exposure at steady state. 2. As the disproportionately abundant nature of M1 could not be reliably predicted from in vitro metabolism studies, we evaluated a chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on TK-NOG background for its ability to retrospectively predict human disposition of PF-04937319. Since livers of chimeric mice were enlarged by hyperplasia and contained remnant mouse hepatocytes, hepatic intrinsic clearances normalized for liver weight, metabolite formation and liver to plasma concentration ratios were plotted against the replacement index by human hepatocytes and extrapolated to those in the virtual chimeric mouse with 100% humanized liver. 3. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic analyses using the above parameters revealed that simulated concentration curves of PF-04937319 and M1 were approximately superimposed with the observed clinical data in humans. 4. Finally, qualitative profiling of circulating metabolites in humanized chimeric mice dosed with PF-04937319 or M1 also revealed the presence of a carbinolamide metabolite, identified in the clinical study as a human-specific metabolite. The case study demonstrates that humanized chimeric mice may be potentially useful in preclinical discovery towards studying disproportionate or human-specific metabolism of drug candidates.

  16. Kinetic studies of rat liver hexokinase D ('glucokinase') in non-co-operative conditions show an ordered mechanism with MgADP as the last product to be released.

    PubMed Central

    Monasterio, Octavio; Cárdenas, María Luz

    2003-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of rat liver hexokinase D ('glucokinase') was studied under non-co-operative conditions with 2-deoxyglucose as substrate, chosen to avoid uncertainties derived from the co-operativity observed with the physiological substrate, glucose. The enzyme shows hyperbolic kinetics with respect to both 2-deoxyglucose and MgATP(2-), and the reaction follows a ternary-complex mechanism with K (m)=19.2+/-2.3 mM for 2-deoxyglucose and 0.56+/-0.05 mM for MgATP(2-). Product inhibition by MgADP(-) was mixed with respect to MgATP(2-) and was largely competitive with respect to 2-deoxyglucose, suggesting an ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate and MgADP(-) as last product. Dead-end inhibition by N -acetylglucosamine, AMP and the inert complex CrATP [the complex of ATP with chromium in the 3+ oxidation state, i.e. Cr(III)-ATP], studied with respect to both substrates, also supports an ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate. AMP appears to bind both to the free enzyme and to the E*dGlc complex. Experiments involving protection against inactivation by 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) support the existence of the E*MgADP(-) and E*AMP complexes suggested by the kinetic studies. MgADP(-), AMP, 2-deoxyglucose, glucose and mannose were strong protectors, supporting the existence of binary complexes with the enzyme. Glucose 6-phosphate failed to protect, even at concentrations as high as 100 mM, and MgATP(2-) protected only slightly (12%). The inactivation results support the postulated ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate and MgADP(-) as last product. In addition, the straight-line dependence observed when the reciprocal value of the inactivation constant was plotted against the sugar-ligand concentration supports the view that there is just one sugar-binding site in hexokinase D. PMID:12513690

  17. Triglyceride response to an intensive lifestyle intervention is enhanced in carriers of the GCKR Pro446Leu polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pollin, Toni I; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Saxena, Richa; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kahn, Steven E; Goldberg, Ronald B; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2011-07-01

    Glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) regulates the trafficking and enzymatic activity of hepatic glucokinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glycogen synthesis and glycolysis. The intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs780094 (intron 16) and the missense SNP rs1260326 (P446L) in the GCKR gene are strongly associated with increased circulating triglyceride and C-reactive protein levels and, paradoxically, reductions in diabetes incidence, fasting glucose levels, and insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: We sought to replicate these associations and evaluate interactions with lifestyle and metformin interventions in the multiethnic Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). We genotyped the two GCKR SNP in 3346 DPP participants and evaluated association with progression to diabetes and both baseline levels and changes in triglycerides, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), oral disposition index, and inflammatory markers along with their interactions with DPP interventions. GCKR variation did not predict development of type 2 diabetes. At baseline, the 446L allele was associated with higher triglyceride and C-reactive protein levels (both P < 0.0001) and lower fasting glucose (P = 0.001) and HOMA-IR (P = 0.06). The lifestyle intervention was associated with a decrease in magnitude of the effect of the 446L allele on triglyceride levels (interaction P = 0.04). Metformin was more effective in reducing HOMA-IR in carriers of the P446 allele (interaction P = 0.05). Intensive lifestyle intervention appears to partially mitigate the effect of the 446L allele on higher triglycerides, whereas the P446 allele appears to enhance responsiveness to the HOMA-IR-lowering effect of metformin.

  18. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  19. Moral Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Opponents of biomedical enhancement often claim that, even if such enhancement would benefit the enhanced, it would harm others. But this objection looks unpersuasive when the enhancement in question is a moral enhancement — an enhancement that will expectably leave the enhanced person with morally better motives than she had previously. In this article I (1) describe one type of psychological alteration that would plausibly qualify as a moral enhancement, (2) argue that we will, in the medium-term future, probably be able to induce such alterations via biomedical intervention, and (3) defend future engagement in such moral enhancements against possible objections. My aim is to present this kind of moral enhancement as a counter-example to the view that biomedical enhancement is always morally impermissible. PMID:19132138

  20. Overexpression of RGPR-p117 enhances regucalcin gene expression in cloned normal rat kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Natsumi; Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2005-12-01

    A novel protein RGPR-p117 was discovered as a regucalcin gene promoter region-related protein that binds to the TTGGC motif using a yeast one-hybrid system. Whether overexpression of RGPR-p117 can modulate gene expression in the cloned normal rat kidney proximal tubular epithelial NRK52E cells was investigated. NRK52E cells (wild-type) or HA-RGPR-p117/phCMV2-transfected NRK52E cells were cultured in Dulbecco's minimum essential medium (DMEM) containing 5% bovine serum (BS). Proliferation of NRK52E cells (wild-type) was not significantly altered by overexpression of HA-RGPR-p117. The expression of rat regucalcin, alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, glucokinase, 11beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, which contains TTGGC motif in the promoter region of their genes, was seen in NRK52E cells (wild-type) by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of these genes, regucalcin mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in transfectants. The expression of p21 or glycero-aldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA was not significantly changed in transfectants. The results of Western blot analysis showed that regucalcin protein was significantly increased in transfectants. The enhancement of regucalcin mRNA expression in transfectants was significantly suppressed in the presence of staurosporine (10(-10) M), an inhibitor of protein kinase C. This enhancement was not significantly changed in the presence of dibucaine (10(-8) M), PD98059 (10(-8) M) or vanadate (10(-6) M). This study demonstrates that overexpression of RGPR-p117 enhances the expression of regucalcin mRNA and its protein level in NRK52E cells. RGPR-p117 may play a role as a transcriptional factor.

  1. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  2. LKB1 deletion with the RIP2.Cre transgene modifies pancreatic β-cell morphology and enhances insulin secretion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gao; Tarasov, Andrei I.; McGinty, James A.; French, Paul M.; McDonald, Angela; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), also called STK11, is a protein kinase mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. LKB1 phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and several related protein kinases. Whereas deletion of both catalytic isoforms of AMPK from the pancreatic β-cell and hypothalamic neurons using the rat insulin promoter (RIP2).Cre transgene (βAMPKdKO) diminishes insulin secretion in vivo, deletion of LKB1 in the β-cell with an inducible Pdx-1.CreER transgene enhances insulin secretion in mice. To determine whether the differences between these models reflect genuinely distinct roles for the two kinases in the β-cell or simply differences in the timing and site(s) of deletion, we have therefore created mice deleted for LKB1 with the RIP2.Cre transgene. In marked contrast to βAMPKdKO mice, βLKB1KO mice showed diminished food intake and weight gain, enhanced insulin secretion, unchanged insulin sensitivity, and improved glucose tolerance. In line with the phenotype of Pdx1-CreER mice, total β-cell mass and the size of individual islets and β-cells were increased and islet architecture was markedly altered in βLKB1KO islets. Signaling by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to eIF4-binding protein-1 and ribosomal S6 kinase was also enhanced. In contrast to Pdx1-CreER-mediated deletion, the expression of Glut2, glucose-induced changes in membrane potential and intracellular Ca2+ were sharply reduced in βLKB1KO mouse islets and the stimulation of insulin secretion was modestly inhibited. We conclude that LKB1 and AMPK play distinct roles in the control of insulin secretion and that the timing of LKB1 deletion, and/or its loss from extrapancreatic sites, influences the final impact on β-cell function. PMID:20354156

  3. Enhancing the Sweetness of Yoghurt through Metabolic Remodeling of Carbohydrate Metabolism in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Kim I.; Curic-Bawden, Mirjana; Junge, Mette P.; Janzen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus are used in the fermentation of milk to produce yoghurt. These species normally metabolize only the glucose moiety of lactose, secreting galactose and producing lactic acid as the main metabolic end product. We used multiple serial selection steps to isolate spontaneous mutants of industrial strains of S. thermophilus and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus that secreted glucose rather than galactose when utilizing lactose as a carbon source. Sequencing revealed that the S. thermophilus strains had mutations in the galKTEM promoter, the glucokinase gene, and genes encoding elements of the glucose/mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS). These strains metabolize galactose but are unable to phosphorylate glucose internally or via the PTS. The L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus mutants had mutations in genes of the glucose/mannose PTS and in the pyruvate kinase gene. These strains cannot grow on exogenous glucose but are proficient at metabolizing internal glucose released from lactose by β-galactosidase. The resulting strains can be combined to ferment milk, producing yoghurt with no detectable lactose, moderate levels of galactose, and high levels of glucose. Since glucose tastes considerably sweeter than either lactose or galactose, the sweetness of the yoghurt is perceptibly enhanced. These strains were produced without the use of recombinant DNA technology and can be used for the industrial production of yoghurt with enhanced intrinsic sweetness and low residual levels of lactose. IMPORTANCE Based on a good understanding of the physiology of the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, we were able, by selecting spontaneously occurring mutants, to change dramatically the metabolic products secreted into the growth medium. These mutants consume substantially more of the lactose, metabolize some of the galactose, and secrete the

  4. Biocatalyst Enhancement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing availability of enzyme collections has assisted attempts by pharmaceutical producers to adopt green chemistry approaches to manufacturing. A joint effort between an enzyme producer and a pharmaceutical manufacturer has been enhanced over the past three years by ena...

  5. Biocatalyst Enhancement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing availability of enzyme collections has assisted attempts by pharmaceutical producers to adopt green chemistry approaches to manufacturing. A joint effort between an enzyme producer and a pharmaceutical manufacturer has been enhanced over the past three years by ena...

  6. Soy Leaf Extract Containing Kaempferol Glycosides and Pheophorbides Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Enhancing Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Suppressing Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Ji, Hyeon-Seon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Park, Ho-Yong; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyung; Yun, Bong-Sik; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of an ethanol extract of soy leaves (ESL) in db/db mice. Control groups (db/+ and db/db) were fed a normal diet (ND), whereas the db/db-ESL group was fed ND with 1% ESL for 8 weeks. Dietary ESL improved glucose tolerance and lowered plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels. The pancreatic insulin content of the db/db-ESL group was significantly greater than that of the db/db group. ESL supplementation altered pancreatic IRS1, IRS2, Pdx1, Ngn3, Pax4, Ins1, Ins2, and FoxO1 expression. Furthermore, ESL suppressed lipid accumulation and increased glucokinase activity in the liver. ESL primarily contained kaempferol glycosides and pheophorbides. Kaempferol, an aglycone of kaempferol glycosides, improved β-cell proliferation through IRS2-related FoxO1 signaling, whereas pheophorbide a, a product of chlorophyll breakdown, improved insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation through IRS1-related signaling with protein kinase A in MIN6 cells. ESL effectively regulates glucose homeostasis by enhancing IRS-mediated β-cell insulin signaling and suppressing SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice.

  7. Enhancing bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Koenigsberg, S.

    1997-02-01

    Oxygen is often the limiting factor in aerobic bioremediation. Without adequate oxygen, contaminant degradation will either cease or proceed by highly inefficient anaerobic processes. Researchers at Regenesis Bioremediation Products recently develope a technology to combat this problem, Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) a unique formulation of magnesium peroxide release oxygen slowly when hydrated. ORC is idea for supporting bioremediation of underground storage tank releases. ORC treatment represents a low intensity approach to remediation - simple, passive, low-cost, long term enhancement of a natural attenuation. 1 fig.

  8. Cooking enhances beneficial effects of pea seed coat consumption on glucose tolerance, incretin, and pancreatic hormones in high-fat-diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Zohre; Yang, Kaiyuan; Yang, Han; Jin, Alena; Ozga, Jocelyn; Chan, Catherine B

    2015-04-01

    Pulses, including dried peas, are nutrient- and fibre-rich foods that improve glucose control in diabetic subjects compared with other fibre sources. We hypothesized feeding cooked pea seed coats to insulin-resistant rats would improve glucose tolerance by modifying gut responses to glucose and reducing stress on pancreatic islets. Glucose intolerance induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with high-fat diet (HFD; 10% cellulose as fibre) was followed by 3 weeks of HFD with fibre (10%) provided by cellulose, raw-pea seed coat (RP), or cooked-pea seed coat (CP). A fourth group consumed low-fat diet with 10% cellulose. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (oGTT, ipGTT) were done. CP rats had 30% and 50% lower glucose and insulin responses in oGTT, respectively, compared with the HFD group (P < 0.05) but ipGTT was not different. Plasma islet and incretin hormone concentrations were measured. α- and β-cell areas in the pancreas and density of K- and L-cells in jejunum and ileum were quantified. Jejunal expression of hexose transporters was measured. CP feeding increased fasting glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses (P < 0.05), but K- and L-cells densities were comparable to HFD, as was abundance of SGLT1 and GLUT2 mRNA. No significant difference in β-cell area between diet groups was observed. α-cell area was significantly smaller in CP compared with RP rats (P < 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrate that CP feeding can reverse adverse effects of HFD on glucose homeostasis and is associated with enhanced incretin secretion and reduced α-cell abundance.

  9. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

  10. EDITORIAL: Enhancing nanolithography Enhancing nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Lithography was invented in late 18th century Bavaria by an ambitious young playwright named Alois Senefelder. Senefelder experimented with stone, wax, water and ink in the hope of finding a way of reproducing text so that he might financially gain from a wider distribution of his already successful scripts. His discovery not only facilitated the profitability of his plays, but also provided the world with an affordable printing press that would ultimately democratize the dissemination of art, knowledge and literature. Since Senefelder, experiments in lithography have continued with a range of innovations including the use of electron beams and UV that allow increasingly higher-resolution features [1, 2]. Applications for this have now breached the limits of paper printing into the realms of semiconductor and microelectronic mechanical systems technology. In this issue, researchers demonstrate a technique for fabricating periodic features in poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) [3]. Their method combines field enhancements from silica nanospheres with laser-interference lithography to provide a means of patterning a polymer that has the potential to open the market of low-end, high-volume microelectronics. Laser-interference lithography has already been used successfully in patterning. Researchers in Korea used laser-interference lithography to generate stamps for imprinting a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure into green light emitting diodes (LEDs) [4]. The imprinted patterns comprised depressions 100 nm deep and 180 nm wide with a periodicity of 295 nm. In comparison with unpatterned LEDs, the intensity of photoluminescence was enhanced by a factor of seven in the LEDs that had the photonic crystal structures imprinted in them. The potential of exploiting field enhancements around nanostructures for new technologies has also attracted a great deal of attention. Researchers in the USA and Australia have used the field

  11. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  12. Dietary supplementation with xylanase-expressing B. amyloliquefaciens R8 improves growth performance and enhances immunity against Aeromonas hydrophila in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Saputra, Febriyansyah; Shiu, Ya-Li; Chen, Yo-Chia; Puspitasari, Asthervina Widyastami; Danata, Ridha Handriany; Liu, Chun-Hung; Hu, Shao-Yang

    2016-11-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens has attracted attention as a probiotic in aquaculture due to its immunostimulatory activity against pathogenic infection. Xylanases are extensively used in animal feed to degrade plant ingredients, enhancing nutrient utilization and increasing the growth rate of various animals. In the present study, the effects of dietary supplementation with B. amyloliquefaciens and xylanase-expressing B. amyloliquefaciens R8 on the growth of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and immunity against Aeromonas hydrophila were evaluated. The results showed that the xylanase activity in the intestine, weight gain (WG), feed efficiency (FE) and condition factor (CF) of Nile tilapia fed B. amyloliquefaciens R8 for 2 months were significantly increased compared with those of the fish fed the control diet and B. amyloliquefaciens. Moreover, the mRNA expression of growth- and metabolism-related genes, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (igf-1), glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD), and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), was significantly induced in Nile tilapia fed administered B. amyloliquefaciens R8, and this group also exhibited a higher survival rate than the control fish following a challenge with A. hydrophila. The phagocytic activity and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leukocytes as well as the serum lysozyme activity of B. amyloliquefaciens R8-fed Nile tilapia were significantly higher than those of fish fed the control diet for 2 months. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in the head kidney leukocytes of Nile tilapia fed B. amyloliquefaciens R8 differed from those of fish fed the control diet, but this was not significant. These results indicate that dietary supplementation with xylanase-expressing B. amyloliquefaciens R8 improves growth performance and enhances immunity and disease resistance against A. hydrophila in Nile tilapia.

  13. Taurine supplementation modulates glucose homeostasis and islet function.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Everardo M; Latorraca, Marcia Q; Araujo, Eliana; Beltrá, Marta; Oliveras, Maria J; Navarro, Mónica; Berná, Genoveva; Bedoya, Francisco J; Velloso, Licio A; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Franz

    2009-07-01

    Taurine is a conditionally essential amino acid for human that is involved in the control of glucose homeostasis; however, the mechanisms by which the amino acid affects blood glucose levels are unknown. Using an animal model, we have studied these mechanisms. Mice were supplemented with taurine for 30 d. Blood glucose homeostasis was assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT). Islet cell function was determined by insulin secretion, cytosolic Ca2+ measurements and glucose metabolism from isolated islets. Islet cell gene expression and translocation was examined via immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Insulin signaling was studied by Western blot. Islets from taurine-supplemented mice had: (i) significantly higher insulin content, (ii) increased insulin secretion at stimulatory glucose concentrations, (iii) significantly displaced the dose-response curve for glucose-induced insulin release to the left, (iv) increased glucose metabolism at 5.6 and 11.1-mmol/L concentrations; (v) slowed cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) oscillations in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations; (vi) increased insulin, sulfonylurea receptor-1, glucokinase, Glut-2, proconvertase and pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1) gene expression and (vii) increased PDX-1 expression in the nucleus. Moreover, taurine supplementation significantly increased both basal and insulin stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in skeletal muscle and liver tissues. Finally, taurine supplemented mice showed an improved IPGTT. These results indicate that taurine controls glucose homeostasis by regulating the expression of genes required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, taurine enhances peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  14. Mangiferin Facilitates Islet Regeneration and β-Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cell Cycle and β-Cell Regeneration Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Lian; Li, Chun-Yang; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yuan-De; Lu, Bang-Min; Shi, Zheng; An, Na; Zhao, Liang-Kai; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Bao, Jin-Ku; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Mangiferin, a xanthonoid found in plants including mangoes and iris unguicularis, was suggested in previous studies to have anti-hyperglycemic function, though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study was designed to determine the therapeutic effect of mangiferin by the regeneration of β-cells in mice following 70% partial pancreatectomy (PPx), and to explore the mechanisms of mangiferin-induced β-cell proliferation. For this purpose, adult C57BL/6J mice after 7–14 days post-PPx, or a sham operation were subjected to mangiferin (30 and 90 mg/kg body weight) or control solvent injection. Mangiferin-treated mice exhibited an improved glycemia and glucose tolerance, increased serum insulin levels, enhanced β-cell hyperplasia, elevated β-cell proliferation and reduced β-cell apoptosis. Further dissection at the molecular level showed several key regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin D1, D2 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were significantly up-regulated in mangiferin-treated mice. In addition, critical genes related to β-cell regeneration, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1), neurogenin 3 (Ngn3), glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2), Forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo-1), and glucokinase (GCK), were found to be promoted by mangiferin at both the mRNA and protein expression level. Thus, mangiferin administration markedly facilitates β-cell proliferation and islet regeneration, likely by regulating essential genes in the cell cycle and the process of islet regeneration. These effects therefore suggest that mangiferin bears a therapeutic potential in preventing and/or treating the diabetes. PMID:24853132

  15. PDZ-domain containing-2 (PDZD2) drives the maturity of human fetal pancreatic progenitor-derived islet-like cell clusters with functional responsiveness against membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kwan Keung; Suen, Po Man; Lau, Tse Kin; Ko, Wing Hung; Yao, Kwok Ming; Leung, Po Sing

    2009-09-01

    We recently reported the isolation and characterization of a population of pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) from early trimester human fetal pancreata. The PPCs, being the forerunners of adult pancreatic cell lineages, were amenable to growth and differentiation into insulin-secreting islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) upon stimulation by adequate morphogens. Of note, a novel morphogenic factor, PDZ-domain containing-2 (PDZD2) and its secreted form (sPDZD2) were ubiquitously expressed in the PPCs. Our goals for this study were to evaluate the potential role of sPDZD2 in stimulating PPC differentiation and to establish the optimal concentration for such stimulation. We found that 10(-9)M sPDZD2 promoted PPC differentiation, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pancreatic endocrine markers (PDX-1, NGN3, NEURO-D, ISL-1, NKX 2.2, NKX 6.1) and INSULIN mRNA. Inhibited endogenous production of sPDZD2 suppressed expression of these factors. Secreted PDZD2 treatment significantly elevated the C-peptide content of the ICCs and increased the basal rate of insulin secretion. However, they remained unresponsive to glucose stimulation, reflected by a minimal increase in GLUT-2 and GLUCOKINASE mRNA expression. Interestingly, sPDZD2 treatment induced increased expression of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)1.2) in the ICCs, triggering calcium ion influx under KCl stimulation and conferring an ability to secrete insulin in response to KCl. Pancreatic progenitor cells from 10- and 13-week fetal pancreata showed peak expression of endogenous sPDZD2, implying that sPDZD2 has a specific role in islet development during the first trimester. In conclusion, our data suggest that sPDZD2 promotes functional maturation of human fetal PPC-derived ICCs, thus enhancing its transplanting potentials.

  16. Enhancement in Sport, and Enhancement outside Sport

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Sport is one of the first areas in which enhancement has become commonplace. It is also one of the first areas in which the use of enhancement technologies has been heavily regulated. Some have thus seen sport as a testing ground for arguments about whether to permit enhancement. However, I argue that there are fairness-based objections to enhancement in sport that do not apply as strongly in some other areas of human activity. Thus, I claim that there will often be a stronger case for permitting enhancement outside of sport than for permitting enhancement in sport. I end by considering some methodological implications of this conclusion. PMID:19750128

  17. Genetic enhancements and expectations.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, K

    2009-07-01

    Some argue that genetic enhancements and environmental enhancements are not importantly different: environmental enhancements such as private schools and chess lessons are simply the old-school way to have a designer baby. I argue that there is an important distinction between the two practices--a distinction that makes state restrictions on genetic enhancements more justifiable than state restrictions on environmental enhancements. The difference is that parents have no settled expectations about genetic enhancements.

  18. Dietary supplementation of a mixture of Lactobacillus strains enhances performance of broiler chickens raised under heat stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Wesam Altaher, Yassir; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Ebrahimi, Roohollah; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Idrus, Zulkifli; Tufarelli, Vincenzo; Liang, Juan Boo

    2016-07-01

    High ambient temperature is a major problem in commercial broiler production in the humid tropics because high producing broiler birds consume more feed, have higher metabolic activity, and thus higher body heat production. To evaluate the effects of two previously isolated potential probiotic strains ( Lactobacillus pentosus ITA23 and Lactobacillus acidophilus ITA44) on broilers growing under heat stress condition, a total of 192 chicks were randomly allocated into four treatment groups of 48 chickens each as follows: CL, birds fed with basal diet raised in 24 °C; PL, birds fed with basal diet plus 0.1 % probiotic mixture raised in 24 °C; CH, birds fed with basal diet raised in 35 °C; and PH, birds fed with basal diet plus 0.1 % probiotic mixture raised in 35 °C. The effects of probiotic mixture on the performance, expression of nutrient absorption genes of the small intestine, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and microbial population of cecal contents, antioxidant capacity of liver, and fatty acid composition of breast muscle were investigated. Results showed that probiotic positively affected the final body weight under both temperature conditions (PL and PH groups) compared to their respective control groups (CL and CH). Probiotic supplementation numerically improved the average daily gain (ADG) under lower temperature, but significantly improved ADG under the higher temperature ( P < 0.05) by sustaining high feed intake. Under the lower temperature environment, supplementation of the two Lactobacillus strains significantly increased the expression of the four sugar transporter genes tested (GLUT2, GLUT5, SGLT1, and SGLT4) indicating probiotic enhances the absorption of this nutrient. Similar but less pronounced effect was also observed under higher temperature (35 °C) condition. In addition, the probiotic mixture improved bacterial population of the cecal contents, by increasing beneficial bacteria and decreasing Escherichia coli population, which could be

  19. Dietary supplementation of a mixture of Lactobacillus strains enhances performance of broiler chickens raised under heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Wesam Altaher, Yassir; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Ebrahimi, Roohollah; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Idrus, Zulkifli; Tufarelli, Vincenzo; Liang, Juan Boo

    2016-07-01

    High ambient temperature is a major problem in commercial broiler production in the humid tropics because high producing broiler birds consume more feed, have higher metabolic activity, and thus higher body heat production. To evaluate the effects of two previously isolated potential probiotic strains (Lactobacillus pentosus ITA23 and Lactobacillus acidophilus ITA44) on broilers growing under heat stress condition, a total of 192 chicks were randomly allocated into four treatment groups of 48 chickens each as follows: CL, birds fed with basal diet raised in 24 °C; PL, birds fed with basal diet plus 0.1 % probiotic mixture raised in 24 °C; CH, birds fed with basal diet raised in 35 °C; and PH, birds fed with basal diet plus 0.1 % probiotic mixture raised in 35 °C. The effects of probiotic mixture on the performance, expression of nutrient absorption genes of the small intestine, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and microbial population of cecal contents, antioxidant capacity of liver, and fatty acid composition of breast muscle were investigated. Results showed that probiotic positively affected the final body weight under both temperature conditions (PL and PH groups) compared to their respective control groups (CL and CH). Probiotic supplementation numerically improved the average daily gain (ADG) under lower temperature, but significantly improved ADG under the higher temperature (P < 0.05) by sustaining high feed intake. Under the lower temperature environment, supplementation of the two Lactobacillus strains significantly increased the expression of the four sugar transporter genes tested (GLUT2, GLUT5, SGLT1, and SGLT4) indicating probiotic enhances the absorption of this nutrient. Similar but less pronounced effect was also observed under higher temperature (35 °C) condition. In addition, the probiotic mixture improved bacterial population of the cecal contents, by increasing beneficial bacteria and decreasing Escherichia coli population, which could

  20. Ditigal-Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R.; Gonzalez, R.

    1984-01-01

    Programable system enhances digitally monocular and stereographic images at video rates. Provides automatic and interactive enhancement modes based on histogram modification and intensity-mapping techniques.

  1. Autonomy and Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G Owen; Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Some have objected to human enhancement on the grounds that it violates the autonomy of the enhanced. These objections, however, overlook the interesting possibility that autonomy itself could be enhanced. How, exactly, to enhance autonomy is a difficult problem due to the numerous and diverse accounts of autonomy in the literature. Existing accounts of autonomy enhancement rely on narrow and controversial conceptions of autonomy. However, we identify one feature of autonomy common to many mainstream accounts: reasoning ability. Autonomy can then be enhanced by improving people's reasoning ability, in particular through cognitive enhancement; given how valuable autonomy is usually taken to be, this gives us extra reason to pursue such cognitive enhancements. Moreover, autonomy-based objections will be especially weak against such enhancements. As we will argue, those who are worried that enhancements will inhibit people's autonomy should actually embrace those enhancements that will improve autonomy.

  2. Cognitive Enhancement and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement--augmenting normal cognitive capacities--is not new. Literacy, numeracy, computers, and the practices of science are all cognitive enhancements. Science is now making new cognitive enhancements possible. Biomedical cognitive enhancements (BCEs) include the administration of drugs, implants of genetically engineered or…

  3. Cognitive Enhancement and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement--augmenting normal cognitive capacities--is not new. Literacy, numeracy, computers, and the practices of science are all cognitive enhancements. Science is now making new cognitive enhancements possible. Biomedical cognitive enhancements (BCEs) include the administration of drugs, implants of genetically engineered or…

  4. Justice, fairness, and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Julian

    2006-12-01

    This article begins by considering four traditional definitions of enhancement, then proposes a fifth, the Welfarist definition. It then considers fairness-based objections to enhancement, using the example of performance enhancement in sport. In so doing it defines sport and the values proper to it, surveys alternative theories of justice, considers the natural distribution of capabilities and disabilities, and draws a distinction between social, psychological, and biological enhancement. The article advances a new argument that justice requires enhancement.

  5. Enhancement and Civic Virtue

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Will; Douglas, Thomas; Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Opponents of biomedical enhancement frequently adopt what Allen Buchanan has called the Personal Goods Assumption. On this assumption, the benefits of biomedical enhancement will accrue primarily to those individuals who undergo enhancements, not to wider society. Buchanan has argued that biomedical enhancements might in fact have substantial social benefits by increasing productivity. We outline another way in which enhancements might benefit wider society: by augmenting civic virtue and thus improving the functioning of our political communities. We thus directly confront critics of biomedical enhancement who argue that it will lead to a loss of social cohesion and a breakdown in political life. PMID:24882886

  6. Chemical penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Newton, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers are utilized in topical preparations as a method for enhancing permeation of drugs across the skin. In particular, they are utilized for transdermal delivery of medications in an attempt to produce a systemic response, to avoid first-pass metabolism, and to decrease the gastrointestinal transit time observed with oral medications. A review of the selection of chemical penetration enhancers, their mechanism of action, the most common chemical penetration enhancers in each class, and alternatives will be discussed in detail.

  7. Identification and characterization of a FOXA2-regulated transcriptional enhancer at a type 2 diabetes intronic locus that controls GCKR expression in liver cells.

    PubMed

    López Rodríguez, Maykel; Kaminska, Dorota; Lappalainen, Kati; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Laakso, Markku

    2017-07-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic loci associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the underlying biological mechanisms for many of these associations remain unknown. GWAS signals close to the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR) have been reported for lipid and glucose metabolism traits and the risk of T2D. We investigated the regulatory function of an intronic locus at GCKR represented by the lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs780094. We used ENCODE project histone modification and transcription factor binding data to determine the regulatory features of a GCKR intronic locus formed by the high linkage disequilibrium rs780094(C/T), rs780095(G/A), and rs780096(G/C) SNPs. Characterization of the transcriptional activity of this region was assessed by luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. ChIP-qPCR was used to determine the levels of haplotype specific transcription factor binding and histone marks. A CRISPR-dCas9 transcriptional activator system and qPCR were used to activate the locus and measure GCKR expression, respectively. Differential haplotype expression was measured from human liver biopsies. The ENCODE data suggest the existence of a liver-specific intragenic enhancer at the locus represented by s780094. We observed that FOXA2 increased the transcriptional activity of this region in a haplotype specific way (CGG > TAC; rs780094, rs780095, and rs780096). In addition, the CGG haplotype showed higher binding to FOXA2 and higher levels of the H3K27Ac histone mark. The epigenetic activation of this locus increased the expression of endogenous GCKR in HepG2 cells, confirming that GCKR is the direct target gene of the enhancer. Finally, we confirmed that the CGG haplotype exhibits higher levels of transcription in human liver. Our results demonstrate the existence of a liver-specific FOXA2-regulated transcriptional enhancer at an intronic T2D locus represented by

  8. Smart Image Enhancement Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Contrast and lightness measures are used to first classify the image as being one of non-turbid and turbid. If turbid, the original image is enhanced to generate a first enhanced image. If non-turbid, the original image is classified in terms of a merged contrast/lightness score based on the contrast and lightness measures. The non-turbid image is enhanced to generate a second enhanced image when a poor contrast/lightness score is associated therewith. When the second enhanced image has a poor contrast/lightness score associated therewith, this image is enhanced to generate a third enhanced image. A sharpness measure is computed for one image that is selected from (i) the non-turbid image, (ii) the first enhanced image, (iii) the second enhanced image when a good contrast/lightness score is associated therewith, and (iv) the third enhanced image. If the selected image is not-sharp, it is sharpened to generate a sharpened image. The final image is selected from the selected image and the sharpened image.

  9. [Medical image enhancement: Sharpening].

    PubMed

    Kats, L; Vered, M

    2015-04-01

    Most digital imaging systems provide opportunities for image enhancement operations. These are applied to improve the original image and to make the image more appealing visually. One possible means of enhancing digital radiographic image is sharpening. The purpose of sharpening filters is to improve image quality by removing noise or edge enhancement. Sharpening filters may make the radiographic images subjectively more appealing. But during this process, important radiographic features may disappear while artifacts that simulate pathological process might be generated. Therefore, it is of utmost importance for dentists to be familiar with and aware of the use of image enhancement operations, provided by medical digital imaging programs.

  10. Credit Enhancement Overview Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Financing Solutions Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Provides considerations for state and local policymakers and energy efficiency program administrators designing and implementing successful credit enhancement strategies for residential and commercial buildings.

  11. Thermal Stabilty of Glucokinase (GK) as Influenced by the Substrate Glucose, an Allosteric Glucokinase Activator Drug (GKA) and the Osmolytes Glycerol and Urea

    PubMed Central

    Zelent, B.; Buettger, C.; Grimsby, J.; Sarabu, R.; Vanderkooi, J.M.; Wand, A.J.; Matschinsky, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how glycerol, urea, glucose and a GKA influence kinetics and stability of wildtype and mutant GK. Glycerol and glucose stabilized GK additively. Glycerol barely affected the TF spectra of all GKs but decreased kcat, glucose S0.5 and KD values and ATP KM while leaving cooperativity unchanged. Glycerol sensitized all GKs to GKA as shown by TF. Glucose increased TF of GKs without influence of glycerol on the effect. Glycerol and GKA affected kinetics and binding additively. The activation energies for thermal denaturation of GK were a function of glucose with KDs of 3 and 1mM without and with glycerol, respectively. High urea denatured wild type GK reversibly at 20 and 60 °C and urea treatment of irreversibly heat denatured GK allowed refolding as demonstrated by TF including glucose response. We concluded: Glycerol stabilizes GK indirectly without changing the folding structure of the apoenzyme, by restructuring the surface water of the protein, whereas glucose stabilizes GK directly by binding to its substrate site and inducing a compact conformation. Glucose or glycerol (alone or combined) are unable to prevent irreversible heat denaturation above 40 °C. However, urea denatures GK reversibly even at 60 °C by binding to the protein backbone and directly interacting with hydrophobic side chains. It prevents irreversible aggregation allowing complete refolding when urea is removed. This study establishes the foundation for exploring numerous instability mutants among the more than 600 variant GKs causing diabetes in animals and humans. PMID:22446163

  12. Constitutively active heat shock factor 1 enhances glucose-driven insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Utsugi, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Yoshio; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Tomura, Hideaki; Kawazu, Shoji; Okajima, Fumikazu; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2011-06-01

    Weak pancreatic β-cell function is a cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase regulates insulin secretion via phosphorylation of glucose. The present study focused on a system for the self-protection of pancreatic cell by expressing heat shock factor (HSF) and heat shock protein (HSP) to improve insulin secretion without inducing hypoglycemia. We previously generated a constitutively active form of human HSF1 (CA-hHSF1). An adenovirus expressing CA-hHSF1 using the cytomegalovirus promoter was generated to infect mouse insulinoma cells (MIN6 cells). An adenovirus expressing CA-hHSF1 using a human insulin promoter (Ins-CA-hHSF1) was also generated to infect rats. We investigated whether CA-hHSF1 induces insulin secretion in MIN6 cells and whether Ins-CA-hHSF1 can improve blood glucose and serum insulin levels in healthy Wister rats and type 2 diabetes mellitus model rats. CA-hHSF1 expression increased insulin secretion 1.27-fold compared with the overexpression of wild-type hHSF1 in MIN6 cells via induction of HSP90 expression and subsequent activation of glucokinase. This mechanism is associated with activation of both glucokinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Ins-CA-hHSF1 improved blood glucose levels in neonatal streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Furthermore, Ins-CA-hHSF1 reduced oral glucose tolerance testing results in healthy Wister rats because of an insulin spike at 15 minutes; however, it did not induce hypoglycemia. CA-hHSF1 induced insulin secretion both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that gene therapy with Ins-CA-hHSF1 will be able to be used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance without causing hypoglycemia at fasting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C.; Fittes, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Digital technique for television systems can be used with remote manipulators. Algorithm is used to divide image into N-by-N picture elements which may be individually enhanced. Enhancement may be controlled with joystick. Similar arrangement simplifies remote manipulator operation.

  14. Image-Enhancement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Christine G.; Stacy, Kathryn

    1993-01-01

    ENHANCETOOL computer program has capabilities for interactive enhancement of digital images. Includes particularly useful combination of algorithms not existing in single interactive program. Software package also provides means through which additional image-enhancement algorithms easily integrated and made available to user. Written in C Language.

  15. Enhanced oil recovery update

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.V

    1989-03-01

    Technology continues to grow in the realm of enhanced oil recovery. Since 1950 several processes have proven economic for oil recovery. Others are still in their infancy and must be custom designed for each reservoir. This paper gives a general overview of these processes. The author focuses on the latest technology and the outlook for enhanced oil recovery operations.

  16. Enhancing Drug Court Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper; Ireland, Connie; Kleinpeter, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of enhanced drug court services in a large county in Southern California. These enhanced services, including specialty counseling groups, educational/employment resources, and increased Residential Treatment (RT) beds, were designed to increase program retention and successful completion (graduation) of drug court.…

  17. Enhancing Drug Court Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper; Ireland, Connie; Kleinpeter, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of enhanced drug court services in a large county in Southern California. These enhanced services, including specialty counseling groups, educational/employment resources, and increased Residential Treatment (RT) beds, were designed to increase program retention and successful completion (graduation) of drug court.…

  18. Enhancement of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, W.

    Recent publications on enhancement of heat transfer are reviewed, emphasizing the effects of roughness elements, fins, and porous surfaces. Enhancement of forced convective heat transfer on roughened surfaces, performance evaluation of enhanced surfaces, viscous flows in cooled tubes and tubes with swirlers, and active methods of enhancement are addressed. Aspects of pool boiling heat transfer are considered, including nucleate boiling heat transfer on rough surfaces and porous surfaces, and maximum and minimum heat fluxes. Evaporative heat transfer is discussed for thin-film evaporation on structured surfaces and liquid spray cooling of a heated surface. Condensation heat transfer on external surfaces is covered, including filmwise condensation on vertical finned and fluted surfaces and on horizontal tubes. In-tube boiling and condensation are treated, discussing their enhancement by fins and inserts, as well as critical heat flux in coiled, rifled, and corrugated tubes.

  19. Should we enhance animals?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Much bioethical discussion has been devoted to the subject of human enhancement through various technological means such as genetic modification. Although many of the same technologies could be, indeed in many cases already have been, applied to non-human animals, there has been very little consideration of the concept of “animal enhancement”, at least not in those specific terms. This paper addresses the notion of animal enhancement and the ethical issues surrounding it. A definition of animal enhancement is proposed that provides a framework within which to consider these issues; and it is argued that if human enhancement can be considered to be a moral obligation, so too can animal enhancement. PMID:19880704

  20. EDITORIAL: Nano-enhanced! Nano-enhanced!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-08-01

    In the early 19th century, a series of engineering and scientific breakthroughs by Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot, James Watt and many others led to the foundations of thermodynamics and a new pedigree of mechanical designs that reset the standards of engineering efficiency. The result was the industrial revolution. In optical- and electronics- based nanotechnology research, a similarly subtle bargain is being made; we cannot alter the fact that systems have a finite response to external excitations, but what we can do is enhance that response. The promising attributes of ZnO have long been recognised; its large band gap and high exciton binding energy lend it to a number of applications from laser diodes, LEDs, optical waveguides and switches, and acousto-optic applications to sun cream. When this material is grown into nanowires and nanorods, the material gains a whole new dimension, as quantum confinement effects come into play. Discovery of the enhanced radiative recombination, which has potential for exploitation in many optical and opto-electronic applications, drove intensive research into investigating these structures and into finding methods to synthesise them with optimised properties. This research revealed further subtleties in the properties of these materials. One example is the work by researchers in the US reporting synthesis procedures that produced a yield—defined as the weight ratio of ZnO nanowires to the original graphite flakes—of 200%, and which also demonstrated, through photoluminescence analysis of nanowires grown on graphite flakes and substrates, that graphite induces oxygen vacancies during annealing, which enhances the deep-level to near-band-edge emission ratio [1]. Other one-dimensional materials that provide field emission enhancements include carbon nanotubes, and work has been performed to find ways of optimising the emission efficiency from these structures, such as through control of the emitter density [2]. One of the

  1. Possible signaling cascades involved in attenuation of alloxan-induced oxidative stress and hyperglycemia in mice by ethanolic extract of Syzygium jambolanum: drug-DNA interaction with calf thymus DNA as target.

    PubMed

    Samadder, Asmita; Chakraborty, Debrup; De, Arnab; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Bhadra, Kakali; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2011-10-09

    We injected alloxan (100 mg/kg b.w.) in mice (Mus musculus) intra-peritoneally to induce hyperglycemia and divided the hyperglycemic mice into two sub-groups: one was fed ethanolic extract of Syzygium jambolanum (EESJ) (20 mg/kg b.w. for 8 weeks) and the other 85% ethyl alcohol ("vehicle"-control). Chromatographic and mass spectroscopic studies of EESJ revealed two principal components, one corresponding to an iridoid glycoside. We estimated blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, glucokinase, and fructosamine and analyzed the expression of marker proteins like insulin, GLUT2, and GLUT4. We also studied anti-oxidant biomarkers like lipid peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, total thiole and catalase. We assayed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and several inflammatory and apoptotic signal proteins like NFkB, IFNγ, iNOS, Bcl(2,) Bax, STAT1 and Caspase3. We further evaluated the effects of hyperglycemia on DNA through comet assay and DNA fragmentation study and assessed drug-DNA interaction by comparative analysis of circular dichroism (CD) spectral data and melting temperature profiles (T(m)) of calf thymus DNA treated with or without EESJ. We observed an elevation of all biomarkers for oxidative stress, generation of ROS and activation of NFkB and down regulation in expression of insulin, GLUT2 and glucokinase in hyperglycemic mice. Administration of EESJ reversed these changes. Histo-pathological observations of pancreas, liver and kidney also revealed relevant changes. Data of CD and (T(m)) indicated an interaction of EESJ with calf thymus DNA, indicating change in structure and conformation. Thus, EESJ has anti-oxidant as well as anti-hyperglycemic activities in diabetic mice, and potentially useful in management of hyperglycemia.

  2. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    DOEpatents

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  3. Prototype vein contrast enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Herbert D.; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Vrancken, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    A proof-of-principle prototype Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) has been designed and constructed. The VCE is an instrument that makes vein access easier by capturing an infrared image of peripheral veins, enhancing the vein-contrast using software image processing, and projecting the enhanced vein-image back onto the skin using a modified commercial projector. The prototype uses software alignment to achieve alignment accuracy between the captured infrared image and the projected visible image of better than 0.06 mm. Figure 1 shows the prototype demonstrated in our laboratory.

  4. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  5. Rethinking enhancement in sport.

    PubMed

    Miah, Andy

    2006-12-01

    This article explores the arguments surrounding the use of human enhancement technologies in sport, arguing for a reconceptualization of the doping debate. First, it develops an overview and critique of the legislative structures on enhancement. Subsequently, a conceptual framework for understanding the role of technological effects in sport is advanced. Finally, two case studies (hypoxic chambers and gene transfer) receive specific attention, through which it is argued that human enhancement technologies can enrich the practice of elite sports rather than diminish them. In conclusion, it is argued that elite sports are at a pivotal moment in their history as an increasing range of enhancements makes less relevant the protection of the natural human through anti-doping.

  6. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan [Middle Island, NY

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  7. Moral enhancement and freedom.

    PubMed

    Harris, John

    2011-02-01

    This paper identifies human enhancement as one of the most significant areas of bioethical interest in the last twenty years. It discusses in more detail one area, namely moral enhancement, which is generating significant contemporary interest. The author argues that so far from being susceptible to new forms of high tech manipulation, either genetic, chemical, surgical or neurological, the only reliable methods of moral enhancement, either now or for the foreseeable future, are either those that have been in human and animal use for millennia, namely socialization, education and parental supervision or those high tech methods that are general in their application. By that is meant those forms of cognitive enhancement that operate across a wide range of cognitive abilities and do not target specifically 'ethical' capacities. The paper analyses the work of some of the leading contemporary advocates of moral enhancement and finds that in so far as they identify moral qualities or moral emotions for enhancement they have little prospect of success. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. MORAL ENHANCEMENT AND FREEDOM

    PubMed Central

    Harris, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper identifies human enhancement as one of the most significant areas of bioethical interest in the last twenty years. It discusses in more detail one area, namely moral enhancement, which is generating significant contemporary interest. The author argues that so far from being susceptible to new forms of high tech manipulation, either genetic, chemical, surgical or neurological, the only reliable methods of moral enhancement, either now or for the foreseeable future, are either those that have been in human and animal use for millennia, namely socialization, education and parental supervision or those high tech methods that are general in their application. By that is meant those forms of cognitive enhancement that operate across a wide range of cognitive abilities and do not target specifically ‘ethical’ capacities. The paper analyses the work of some of the leading contemporary advocates of moral enhancement and finds that in so far as they identify moral qualities or moral emotions for enhancement they have little prospect of success. PMID:21133978

  9. Mechanisms of Memory Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing quest for memory enhancement is one that grows necessary as the global population increasingly ages. The extraordinary progress that has been made in the past few decades elucidating the underlying mechanisms of how long-term memories are formed has provided insight into how memories might also be enhanced. Capitalizing on this knowledge, it has been postulated that targeting many of the same mechanisms, including CREB activation, AMPA/NMDA receptor trafficking, neuromodulation (e.g. via dopamine, adrenaline, cortisol or acetylcholine) and metabolic processes (e.g. via glucose and insulin) may all lead to the enhancement of memory. These and other mechanisms and/or approaches have been tested via genetic or pharmacological methods in animal models, and several have been investigated in humans as well. In addition, a number of behavioral methods, including exercise and reconsolidation, may also serve to strengthen and enhance memories. By capitalizing on this knowledge and continuing to investigate these promising avenues, memory enhancement may indeed be achieved in the future. PMID:23151999

  10. Surface Enhanced Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Chitra

    2013-05-01

    Miniaturization of quantum technologies have led to physics that require the marriage of atomic physics and nanomaterials science. Some of the resulting areas of research are hybrid quantum devices, single-molecule spectroscopies, table-top intense field generators, etc. I will present an area of research that I dub ``Surface-enhanced quantum control'' that is an exciting way of controlling light and nanomatter. By combining the electromagnetic enhancement properties of plasmonic nanomaterials with the modification of the atomic properties, we can achieve an unprecedented level of control over quantum dynamics. I will present examples of surface-enhanced state purification, in which quantum states near metal nanostructures can be rapidly purified by the application of a weak near-resonant control field. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSERC Discovery Grant Program and the NSERC Strategic Network for Bioplasmonic Systems.

  11. Degraded document image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agam, G.; Bal, G.; Frieder, G.; Frieder, O.

    2007-01-01

    Poor quality documents are obtained in various situations such as historical document collections, legal archives, security investigations, and documents found in clandestine locations. Such documents are often scanned for automated analysis, further processing, and archiving. Due to the nature of such documents, degraded document images are often hard to read, have low contrast, and are corrupted by various artifacts. We describe a novel approach for the enhancement of such documents based on probabilistic models which increases the contrast, and thus, readability of such documents under various degradations. The enhancement produced by the proposed approach can be viewed under different viewing conditions if desired. The proposed approach was evaluated qualitatively and compared to standard enhancement techniques on a subset of historical documents obtained from the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum. In addition, quantitative performance was evaluated based on synthetically generated data corrupted under various degradation models. Preliminary results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Rituals enhance consumption.

    PubMed

    Vohs, Kathleen D; Wang, Yajin; Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I

    2013-09-01

    Four experiments tested the novel hypothesis that ritualistic behavior potentiates and enhances ensuing consumption--an effect found for chocolates, lemonade, and even carrots. Experiment 1 showed that participants who engaged in ritualized behavior, compared with those who did not, evaluated chocolate as more flavorful, valuable, and deserving of behavioral savoring. Experiment 2 demonstrated that random gestures do not boost consumption as much as ritualistic gestures do. It further showed that a delay between a ritual and the opportunity to consume heightens enjoyment, which attests to the idea that ritual behavior stimulates goal-directed action (to consume). Experiment 3 found that performing a ritual oneself enhances consumption more than watching someone else perform the same ritual, suggesting that personal involvement is crucial for the benefits of rituals to emerge. Finally, Experiment 4 provided direct evidence of the underlying process: Rituals enhance the enjoyment of consumption because of the greater involvement in the experience that they prompt.

  13. Christian Self-Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Jochen E; Sedikides, Constantine; Schrade, Alexandra

    2017-02-16

    People overestimate themselves in domains that are central to their self-concept. Critically, the psychological status of this "self-centrality principle" remains unclear. One view regards the principle as an inextricable part of human nature and, thus, as universal and resistant to normative pressure. A contrasting view regards the principle as liable to pressure (and subsequent modification) from self-effacement norms, thus questioning its universality. Advocates of the latter view point to Christianity's robust self-effacement norms, which they consider particularly effective in curbing self-enhancement, and ascribe Christianity an ego-quieting function. Three sets of studies examined the self-centrality principle among Christians. Studies 1A and 1B (N = 2,118) operationalized self-enhancement as better-than-average perceptions on the domains of commandments of faith (self-centrality: Christians ≫ nonbelievers) and commandments of communion (self-centrality: Christians > nonbelievers). Studies 2A-2H (N = 1,779) operationalized self-enhancement as knowledge overclaiming on the domains of Christianity (self-centrality: Christians ≫ nonbelievers), communion (self-centrality: Christians > nonbelievers), and agency (self-centrality: Christians ≈ nonbelievers). Studies 3A-3J (N = 1,956) operationalized self-enhancement as grandiose narcissism on the domains of communion (self-centrality: Christians > nonbelievers) and agency (self-centrality: Christians ≈ nonbelievers). The results converged across studies, yielding consistent evidence for Christian self-enhancement. Relative to nonbelievers, Christians self-enhanced strongly in domains central to the Christian self-concept. The results also generalized across countries with differing levels of religiosity. Christianity does not quiet the ego. The self-centrality principle is resistant to normative pressure, universal, and rooted in human nature. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Enhancing Shear Thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madraki, Fatemeh; Hormozi, Sarah; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    A cornstarch suspension is the quintessential particulate system that exhibits shear thickening. By adding large non-Brownian spheres to a cornstarch suspension, we show that shear thickening can be significantly enhanced. More precisely, the shear thickening transition is found to be increasingly shifted to lower critical shear rates. This enhancement is found to be mainly controlled by the concentration of the large particles. ANR(ANR-13-IS09-0005-01), ANR(ANR-11-LABX-0092), MIDEX (ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02), NSF (CBET-1554044-CAREER).

  15. Biomedical enhancements as justice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeesoo

    2015-02-01

    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a radical advance in how we compensate the most disadvantaged members of society.

  16. Long-Term Administration of Dehydroepiandrosterone Accelerates Glucose Catabolism via Activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 Signaling Pathway in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Ge, Chongyang; Yu, Lei; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has a fat-reducing effect, while little information is available on whether DHEA regulates glucose metabolism, which would in turn affect fat deposition. To investigate the effects of DHEA on glucose metabolism, rats were administered a high-fat diet containing either 0 (HCG), 25 (HLG), 50 (HMG), or 100 (HHG) mg·kg-1 DHEA per day via gavage for 8 weeks. Results showed that long-term administration of DHEA inhibited body weight gain in rats on a high-fat diet. No statistical differences in serum glucose levels were observed, whereas hepatic glycogen content in HMG and HHG groups and muscle glycogen content in HLG and HMG groups were higher than those in HCG group. Glucokinase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphofructokinase-2 activities in HMG and HHG groups, pyruvate kinase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in HMG group, and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in all DHEA treatment groups were increased compared with those in HCG group. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogen phosphorylase mRNA levels were decreased in HMG and HHG groups, whereas glycogen synthase-2 mRNA level was increased in HMG group compared with those in HCG. The abundance of Glut2 mRNA in HMG and HHG groups and Glut4 mRNA in HMG group was higher than that in HCG group. DHEA treatment increased serum leptin content in HMG and HHG groups compared with that in HCG group. Serum insulin content and insulin receptor mRNA level in HMG group and insulin receptor substrate-2 mRNA level in HMG and HHG group were increased compared with those in HCG group. Furthermore, Pi3k mRNA level in HMG and Akt mRNA level in HMG and HHG groups were significantly increased than those in HCG group. These data showed that DHEA treatment could enhance glycogen storage and accelerate glucose catabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet, and this effect may be associated with the activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 signaling pathway. PMID:27410429

  17. Music Enhances Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campabello, Nicolette; De Carlo, Mary Jane; O'Neil, Jean; Vacek, Mary Jill

    An action research project implemented musical strategies to affect and enhance student recall and memory. The target population was three suburban elementary schools near a major midwestern city: (1) a kindergarten classroom contained 32-38 students; (2) a second grade classroom contained 23 students and five Individualized Education Program…

  18. Enhancing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

  19. Enhancing Learning and Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Robert F., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 16 papers on programs and approaches that have been developed around the world to enhance learning and thinking skills for children and adults. Papers are divided among three main sections focussing respectively on issues and applications, specific applications to school content, and assessment and evaluation. Papers have the…

  20. Investigations into Character Enhancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents six different investigations of character enhancement that attempts to answer three questions: (1) who are you; (2) what is your destination; and (3) who is your captain? Intends to build relationships among ideas such as perspective taking, seeing and making connections with the other, and understanding more about ethical development.…

  1. Enhancing Workgroup Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on enhancing workgroup performance in human resource development (HRD). "Formation of Cross-Cultural Global Teams: Making Informed Choices on Team Composition" (Robert L. Dilworth) describes how a mixed class of U.S. and international students identified their cultural and learning…

  2. Teaching to Enhance Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Tony

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I present a conceptual argument for "teaching-led research" in which university lecturers construct courses that directly and positively influence their research, while at the same time, safeguard and enhance the student experience. A research-pedagogy for higher education considers the link between teaching and research,…

  3. Enhancing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

  4. Simulations of Enhanced Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorland, W.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Liu, Q. P.; Jones, C. S.; Beer, M. A.; Hammett, G. W.

    1996-11-01

    Most existing tokamaks routinely achieve enhanced confinement regimes. Designs for new, larger tokamaks therefore are typically predicated upon reliable enhanced confinement performance. However, most enhanced confinement regimes rely (to some degree) upon sheared E×B flows to stabilize the turbulence that otherwise limits the confinement. For example, the pedestal H-mode transport barrier is typically attributed to shear stabilization [Biglari, Diamond and Terry, Phys. Fl. B, 2 1 (1990)]. Unfortunately, it is easily shown that sheared E×B stabilization of microinstabilities such as the ITG mode does not scale favorably with machine size. Here, using nonlinear gyrofluid simulations in general geometry, we attempt to quantify the confinement enhancement that can be expected from velocity shear stabilization for conventional reactor plasmas. We also consider other microinstability stabilization mechanisms(See related presentations by Beer, Kotschenreuther, Manickam, and Ramos, this conference.) (strong density peaking, Shafranov shift stabilization, dots) and unconventional reactor configurations.^2 Experimental datasets from JET, DIII-D, C-Mod and TFTR are analyzed, and ITER operation is considered.

  5. Cognition-Enhancing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2004-01-01

    New drugs that enhance cognition in cognitively healthy individuals present difficult public policy challenges. While their use is not inherently unethical, steps must be taken to ensure that they are safe, that they are widely available to promote equality of opportunity, and that individuals are free to decide whether or not to use them. PMID:15330974

  6. Investigations into Character Enhancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents six different investigations of character enhancement that attempts to answer three questions: (1) who are you; (2) what is your destination; and (3) who is your captain? Intends to build relationships among ideas such as perspective taking, seeing and making connections with the other, and understanding more about ethical development.…

  7. Measuring and Enhancing Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahboub, Kamyar C.; Portillo, Margaret B.; Liu, Yinhui; Chandraratna, Susantha

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess ways by which creativity may be enhanced in a design-oriented course. In order to demonstrate the validity of the approach, a statistically based study was employed. Additionally, the experiment was replicated in two design-oriented fields at the University of Kentucky. These fields were civil engineering…

  8. Enhancing Workgroup Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on enhancing workgroup performance in human resource development (HRD). "Formation of Cross-Cultural Global Teams: Making Informed Choices on Team Composition" (Robert L. Dilworth) describes how a mixed class of U.S. and international students identified their cultural and learning…

  9. Electrostatically Enhanced Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed device removes fine particles from high-pressure exhaust gas of chemical reactor. Negatively charged sectors on rotating disks in vortex generator attracts positively charged particles from main stream of exhaust gas. Electrostatic charge enhances particle-separating action of vortex. Gas without particles released to atmosphere.

  10. Measuring and Enhancing Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahboub, Kamyar C.; Portillo, Margaret B.; Liu, Yinhui; Chandraratna, Susantha

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess ways by which creativity may be enhanced in a design-oriented course. In order to demonstrate the validity of the approach, a statistically based study was employed. Additionally, the experiment was replicated in two design-oriented fields at the University of Kentucky. These fields were civil engineering…

  11. Graphically Enhanced Science Notebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minogue, James; Wiebe, Eric; Madden, Lauren; Bedward, John; Carter, Mike

    2010-01-01

    A common mode of communication in the elementary classroom is the science notebook. In this article, the authors outline the ways in which "graphically enhanced science notebooks" can help engage students in complete and robust inquiry. Central to this approach is deliberate attention to the efficient and effective use of student-generated…

  12. Teaching to Enhance Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Tony

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I present a conceptual argument for "teaching-led research" in which university lecturers construct courses that directly and positively influence their research, while at the same time, safeguard and enhance the student experience. A research-pedagogy for higher education considers the link between teaching and research,…

  13. Payload Documentation Enhancement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Betty G.

    1999-01-01

    In late 1998, the Space Shuttle Program recognized a need to revitalize its payload accommodations documentation. As a result a payload documentation enhancement project was initiated to review and update payload documentation and improve the accessibility to that documentation by the Space Shuttle user community.

  14. Enhanced processive cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Jarvis, Eric; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Linger, Jeffrey G.; Podkaminer, Kara; Baker, John O.; Taylor, II, Larry; Xu, Qi; Singh, Arjun

    2017-06-20

    Nucleic acid sequences encoding chimeric polypeptides that exhibit enhanced cellulase activities are disclosed herein. These nucleic acids may be expressed in hosts such as fungi, which in turn may be cultured to produce chimeric polypeptides. Also disclosed are chimeric polypeptides and their use in the degradation of cellulosic materials.

  15. Ultrasound enhanced soil washing

    SciTech Connect

    Meegoda, J.; Ho, W.; Bhattacharajee, M.; Wei, C.F.; Cohen, D.M.; Magee, R.S.; Frederick, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    The development of an ultrasonic enhanced soil-washing process requires a comprehensive, well-designed experimental program, with the results carefully analyzed on the basis of known ultrasonic cleaning mechanisms. There has been no systematic work carried out to develop information on the important variables that can affect the efficacy of ultrasonic enhancement of contaminant removal from soil. The goal of this study is to examine the potential of ultrasonic energy to enhance soil washing and to optimize conditions. Ultrasonic energy potentially can be used in enhancing contaminant removal from the entire soil mix, or it can be used as a polishing operation on the fines portion of the soil mixture after traditional soil washing operations. The research study was designed to demonstrate that ultrasonic energy can: improve process performance, e.g., remove contaminants to lower residual concentrations; and improve process economics, e.g., shorter treatment (residence) times, less surfactant use. This process was demonstrated using soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Contrast enhancement of transparencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.; Lee, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    System can enhance or reduce contrast of photographic transparency for printing or projection by using constructive and destructive interference of collimated laser beam. System is potentially less expensive than electronic CRT methods and is more accurate than trial-and-error manual techniques.

  17. Tea enhances insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A; Polansky, Marilyn M

    2002-11-20

    The most widely known health benefits of tea relate to the polyphenols as the principal active ingredients in protection against oxidative damage and in antibacterial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and antimutagenic activities, but polyphenols in tea may also increase insulin activity. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin-enhancing properties of tea and its components. Tea, as normally consumed, was shown to increase insulin activity >15-fold in vitro in an epididymal fat cell assay. Black, green, and oolong teas but not herbal teas, which are not teas in the traditional sense because they do not contain leaves of Camellia senensis, were all shown to increase insulin activity. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of tea extracts utilizing a Waters SymmetryPrep C18 column showed that the majority of the insulin-potentiating activity for green and oolong teas was due to epigallocatechin gallate. For black tea, the activity was present in several regions of the chromatogram corresponding to, in addition to epigallocatechin gallate, tannins, theaflavins, and other undefined compounds. Several known compounds found in tea were shown to enhance insulin with the greatest activity due to epigallocatechin gallate followed by epicatechin gallate, tannins, and theaflavins. Caffeine, catechin, and epicatechin displayed insignificant insulin-enhancing activities. Addition of lemon to the tea did not affect the insulin-potentiating activity. Addition of 5 g of 2% milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity one-third, and addition of 50 g of milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity approximately 90%. Nondairy creamers and soy milk also decreased the insulin-enhancing activity. These data demonstrate that tea contains in vitro insulin-enhancing activity and the predominant active ingredient is epigallocatechin gallate.

  18. Piezoelectrically Enhanced Photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Robert A.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Bell, Lloyd Douglas; Strittmatter, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Doping of photocathodes with materials that have large piezoelectric coefficients has been proposed as an alternative means of increasing the desired photoemission of electrons. Treating cathode materials to increase emission of electrons is called "activation" in the art. It has been common practice to activate photocathodes by depositing thin layers of suitable metals (usually, cesium). Because cesium is unstable in air, fabrication of cesiated photocathodes and devices that contain them must be performed in sealed tubes under vacuum. It is difficult and costly to perform fabrication processes in enclosed, evacuated spaces. The proposed piezoelectrically enhanced photocathodes would have electron-emission properties similar to those of cesiated photocathodes but would be stable in air, and therefore could be fabricated more easily and at lower cost. Candidate photocathodes include nitrides of elements in column III of the periodic table . especially compounds of the general formula Al(x)Ga(1.x)N (where 0< or = x < or =.1). These compounds have high piezoelectric coefficients and are suitable for obtaining response to ultraviolet light. Fabrication of a photocathode according to the proposal would include inducement of strain in cathode layers during growth of the layers on a substrate. The strain would be induced by exploiting structural mismatches among the various constituent materials of the cathode. Because of the piezoelectric effect in this material, the strain would give rise to strong electric fields that, in turn, would give rise to a high concentration of charge near the surface. Examples of devices in which piezoelectrically enhanced photocathodes could be used include microchannel plates, electron- bombarded charge-coupled devices, image tubes, and night-vision goggles. Piezoelectrically enhanced photocathode materials could also be used in making highly efficient monolithic photodetectors. Highly efficient and stable piezoelectrically enhanced

  19. Microcavity Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, Benjamin J.

    Raman scattering can accurately identify molecules by their intrinsic vibrational frequencies, but its notoriously weak scattering efficiency for gases presents a major obstacle to its practical application in gas sensing and analysis. This work explores the use of high finesse (≈50 000) Fabry-Perot microcavities as a means to enhance Raman scattering from gases. A recently demonstrated laser ablation method, which carves out a micromirror template on fused silica--either on a fiber tip or bulk substrates-- was implemented, characterized, and optimized to fabricate concave micromirror templates ˜10 mum diameter and radius of curvature. The fabricated templates were coated with a high-reflectivity dielectric coating by ion-beam sputtering and were assembled into microcavities ˜10 mum long and with a mode volume ˜100 mum 3. A novel gas sensing technique that we refer to as Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) was demonstrated using the assembled microcavities. PERS works by enhancing the pump laser's intensity through resonant recirculation at one longitudinal mode, while simultaneously, at a second mode at the Stokes frequency, the Purcell effect increases the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a change to the intra-cavity photon density of states. PERS was shown to enhance the rate of spontaneous Raman scattering by a factor of 107 compared to the same volume of sample gas in free space scattered into the same solid angle subtended by the cavity. PERS was also shown capable of resolving several Raman bands from different isotopes of CO2 gas for application to isotopic analysis. Finally, the use of the microcavity to enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from CO2 gas was demonstrated.

  20. Glucokinase (GCK) Mutations and Their Characterization in MODY2 Children of Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Tinto, Nadia; Carluccio, Carla; Capobianco, Valentina; Coto, Iolanda; Cola, Arturo; Iafusco, Dario; Franzese, Adriana; Zagari, Adriana; Navas, Maria Angeles; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY2) is a monogenic autosomal disease characterized by a primary defect in insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. It results from GCK gene mutations that impair enzyme activity. Between 2006 and 2010, we investigated GCK mutations in 66 diabetic children from southern Italy with suspected MODY2. Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (DHPLC) and sequence analysis revealed 19 GCK mutations in 28 children, six of which were novel: p.Glu40Asp, p.Val154Leu, p.Arg447Glyfs, p.Lys458_Cys461del, p.Glu395_Arg397del and c.580-2A>T. We evaluated the effect of these 19 mutations using bioinformatic tools such as Polymorphism Phenotyping (Polyphen), Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) and in silico modelling. We also conducted a functional study to evaluate the pathogenic significance of seven mutations that are among the most severe mutations found in our population, and have never been characterized: p.Glu70Asp, p.His137Asp, p.Phe150Tyr, p.Val154Leu, p.Gly162Asp, p.Arg303Trp and p.Arg392Ser. These seven mutations, by altering one or more kinetic parameters, reduced enzyme catalytic activity by >40%. All mutations except p.Glu70Asp displayed thermal-instability, indeed >50% of enzyme activity was lost at 50°C/30 min. Thus, these seven mutations play a pathogenic role in MODY2 insurgence. In conclusion, this report revealed six novel GCK mutations and sheds some light on the structure-function relationship of human GCK mutations and MODY2. PMID:22761713

  1. Surface-enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovits, Martin

    1985-07-01

    In 1978 it was discovered, largely through the work of Fleischmann, Van Duyne, Creighton, and their coworkers that molecules adsorbed on specially prepared silver surfaces produce a Raman spectrum that is at times a millionfold more intense than expected. This effect was dubbed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Since then the effect has been demonstrated with many molecules and with a number of metals, including Cu, Ag, Au, Li, Na, K, In, Pt, and Rh. In addition, related phenomena such as surface-enhanced second-harmonic generation, four-wave mixing, absorption, and fluorescence have been observed. Although not all fine points of the enhancement mechanism have been clarified, the majority view is that the largest contributor to the intensity amplification results from the electric field enhancement that occurs in the vicinity of small, interacting metal particles that are illuminated with light resonant or near resonant with the localized surface-plasmon frequency of the metal structure. Small in this context is gauged in relation to the wavelength of light. The special preparations required to produce the effect, which include among other techniques electrochemical oxidation-reduction cycling, deposition of metal on very cold substrates, and the generation of metal-island films and colloids, is now understood to be necessary as a means of producing surfaces with appropriate electromagnetic resonances that may couple to electromagnetic fields either by generating rough films (as in the case of the former two examples) or by placing small metal particles in close proximity to one another (as in the case of the latter two). For molecules chemisorbed on SERS-active surface there exists a "chemical enhancement" in addition to the electromagnetic effect. Although difficult to measure accurately, the magnitude of this effect rarely exceeds a factor of 10 and is best thought to arise from the modification of the Raman polarizability tensor of the adsorbate

  2. Enhancing medical database security.

    PubMed

    Pangalos, G; Khair, M; Bozios, L

    1994-08-01

    A methodology for the enhancement of database security in a hospital environment is presented in this paper which is based on both the discretionary and the mandatory database security policies. In this way the advantages of both approaches are combined to enhance medical database security. An appropriate classification of the different types of users according to their different needs and roles and a User Role Definition Hierarchy has been used. The experience obtained from the experimental implementation of the proposed methodology in a major general hospital is briefly discussed. The implementation has shown that the combined discretionary and mandatory security enforcement effectively limits the unauthorized access to the medical database, without severely restricting the capabilities of the system.

  3. Enhanced Microfluidic Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovangrandi, Laurent (Inventor); Ricco, Antonio J. (Inventor); Kovacs, Gregory (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for enhanced microfluidic impedance spectroscopy include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. Flow in the channel is laminar. A dielectric constant of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than a dielectric constant of the core fluid. Electrical impedance is measured in the channel between at least a first pair of electrodes. In some embodiments, enhanced optical measurements include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. An optical index of refraction of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than an optical index of refraction of the core fluid. An optical property is measured in the channel.

  4. Image enhancement by holography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroke, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The speed of the holographic image deblurring method has recently been further enhanced by a new speed in the realization of the powerful holographic image-deblurring filter. The filter makes it possible to carry out the deblurring, in the optical computer used, in times of the order of one second. The experimental achievements using the holographic image-enhancement method are illustrated with examples ranging from out-of-focus or motion-blurred photographs, including 'amateur' photos recorded on Polaroid film, to the sharpening of the best available electron micrographs of viruses. Images recorded with X-rays, notably from rocket-borne photos of the sun, and out-of-focus photographs from cameras in NASA satellites have been similarly deblurred.

  5. Enhanced mercury oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Gretta, W.J.; Wu, S.; Kikkawa, H.

    2009-06-15

    A new catalyst offers a new way to enhance mercury control from bituminous coal-fired power plants. Hitachi has developed an SCR catalyst which satisfies high Hg{sup 0} oxidation and low SO{sub 2} oxidation requirements under high temperatures (716 to 770 F). This triple action catalysts, TRAC can significantly enhance mercury oxidation and reduce or eliminate the need for additional mercury control measures such as activated carbon injection. After laboratory testing, pilot-scale tests confirmed an activity of 1.4-1.7 times higher than that of conventional SCR catalyst. The new catalyst has been successfully applied in a commercial PRB-fired boiler without the need for halogens to be added to the fuel feed or flue gas. 2 figs.

  6. Image enhancement by holography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroke, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The speed of the holographic image deblurring method has recently been further enhanced by a new speed in the realization of the powerful holographic image-deblurring filter. The filter makes it possible to carry out the deblurring, in the optical computer used, in times of the order of one second. The experimental achievements using the holographic image-enhancement method are illustrated with examples ranging from out-of-focus or motion-blurred photographs, including 'amateur' photos recorded on Polaroid film, to the sharpening of the best available electron micrographs of viruses. Images recorded with X-rays, notably from rocket-borne photos of the sun, and out-of-focus photographs from cameras in NASA satellites have been similarly deblurred.

  7. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  8. Light enhances learned fear

    PubMed Central

    Warthen, Daniel M.; Wiltgen, Brian J.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    The ability to learn, remember, and respond to emotional events is a powerful survival strategy. However, dysregulated behavioral and physiological responses to these memories are maladaptive. To fully understand learned fear and the pathologies that arise during response malfunction we must reveal the environmental variables that influence learned fear responses. Light, a ubiquitous environmental feature, modulates cognition and anxiety. We hypothesized that light modulates responses to learned fear. Using tone-cued fear conditioning, we found that light enhances behavioral responses to learned fear in C57BL/6J mice. Mice in light freeze more in response to a conditioned cue than mice in darkness. The absence of significant freezing during a 2-wk habituation period and during intertrial intervals indicated that light specifically modulates freezing to the learned acoustic cue rather than the context of the experimental chamber. Repeating our assay in two photoreceptor mutant models, Pde6brd1/rd1 and Opn4−/− mice, revealed that light-dependent enhancement of conditioned fear is driven primarily by the rods and/or cones. By repeating our protocol with an altered lighting regimen, we found that lighting conditions acutely modulate responses when altered between conditioning and testing. This is manifested either as an enhancement of freezing when light is added during testing or as a depression of freezing when light is removed during testing. Acute enhancement, but not depression, requires both rod/cone- and melanopsin-dependent photoreception. Our results demonstrate a modulation by light of behavioral responses to learned fear. PMID:21808002

  9. Light enhances learned fear.

    PubMed

    Warthen, Daniel M; Wiltgen, Brian J; Provencio, Ignacio

    2011-08-16

    The ability to learn, remember, and respond to emotional events is a powerful survival strategy. However, dysregulated behavioral and physiological responses to these memories are maladaptive. To fully understand learned fear and the pathologies that arise during response malfunction we must reveal the environmental variables that influence learned fear responses. Light, a ubiquitous environmental feature, modulates cognition and anxiety. We hypothesized that light modulates responses to learned fear. Using tone-cued fear conditioning, we found that light enhances behavioral responses to learned fear in C57BL/6J mice. Mice in light freeze more in response to a conditioned cue than mice in darkness. The absence of significant freezing during a 2-wk habituation period and during intertrial intervals indicated that light specifically modulates freezing to the learned acoustic cue rather than the context of the experimental chamber. Repeating our assay in two photoreceptor mutant models, Pde6b(rd1/rd1) and Opn4(-/-) mice, revealed that light-dependent enhancement of conditioned fear is driven primarily by the rods and/or cones. By repeating our protocol with an altered lighting regimen, we found that lighting conditions acutely modulate responses when altered between conditioning and testing. This is manifested either as an enhancement of freezing when light is added during testing or as a depression of freezing when light is removed during testing. Acute enhancement, but not depression, requires both rod/cone- and melanopsin-dependent photoreception. Our results demonstrate a modulation by light of behavioral responses to learned fear.

  10. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  11. Enhancing shear thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madraki, Yasaman; Hormozi, Sarah; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Guazzelli, Élisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    A cornstarch suspension is the quintessential particulate system that exhibits shear thickening. By adding large non-Brownian spheres to a cornstarch suspension, we show that shear thickening can be significantly enhanced. More precisely, the shear-thickening transition is found to be increasingly shifted to lower critical shear rates. This influence of the large particles on the discontinuous shear-thickening transition is shown to be more dramatic than that on the viscosity or the yield stress of the suspension.

  12. [About moral enhancement].

    PubMed

    Goffi, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    First, a short summary of the moral enhancement debate is drawn up. Then an argument first put forward by J. Harris is explored: this argument is directly related to I. Perrson's and J. Savulescu's conception of moral life. To conclude, it is suggested that they advocate a naïve idea of technology, conceived as a neutral means for value loaded ends.

  13. Sweeteners and sweetness enhancers.

    PubMed

    Belloir, Christine; Neiers, Fabrice; Briand, Loïc

    2017-07-01

    The current review summarizes and discusses current knowledge on sweeteners and sweetness enhancers. The perception of sweet taste is mediated by the type 1 taste receptor 2 (T1R2)/type 1 taste receptor 3 (T1R3) receptor, which is expressed in the oral cavity, where it provides input on the caloric and macronutrient contents of ingested food. This receptor recognizes all the compounds (natural or artificial) perceived as sweet by people. Sweeteners are highly chemically diverse including natural sugars, sugar alcohols, natural and synthetic sweeteners, and sweet-tasting proteins. This single receptor is also the target for developing novel sweet enhancers. Importantly, the expression of a functional T1R2/T1R3 receptor is described in numerous extraoral tissues. In this review, the physiological impact of sweeteners is discussed. Sweeteners and sweetness enhancers are perceived through the T1R2/T1R3 taste receptor present both in mouth and numerous extraoral tissues. The accumulated knowledge on sugar substitutes raises the issue of potential health effects.

  14. Placebo can enhance creativity

    PubMed Central

    Rozenkrantz, Liron; Mayo, Avraham E.; Ilan, Tomer; Hart, Yuval

    2017-01-01

    Background The placebo effect is usually studied in clinical settings for decreasing negative symptoms such as pain, depression and anxiety. There is interest in exploring the placebo effect also outside the clinic, for enhancing positive aspects of performance or cognition. Several studies indicate that placebo can enhance cognitive abilities including memory, implicit learning and general knowledge. Here, we ask whether placebo can enhance creativity, an important aspect of human cognition. Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group who smelled and rated an odorant (n = 45), and a placebo group who were treated identically but were also told that the odorant increases creativity and reduces inhibitions (n = 45). Subjects completed a recently developed automated test for creativity, the creative foraging game (CFG), and a randomly chosen subset (n = 57) also completed two manual standardized creativity tests, the alternate uses test (AUT) and the Torrance test (TTCT). In all three tests, participants were asked to create as many original solutions and were scored for originality, flexibility and fluency. Results The placebo group showed higher originality than the control group both in the CFG (p<0.04, effect size = 0.5) and in the AUT (p<0.05, effect size = 0.4), but not in the Torrance test. The placebo group also found more shapes outside of the standard categories found by a set of 100 CFG players in a previous study, a feature termed out-of-the-boxness (p<0.01, effect size = 0.6). Conclusions The findings indicate that placebo can enhance the originality aspect of creativity. This strengthens the view that placebo can be used not only to reduce negative clinical symptoms, but also to enhance positive aspects of cognition. Furthermore, we find that the impact of placebo on creativity can be tested by CFG, which can quantify multiple aspects of creative search without need for manual coding. This approach opens the way to explore the behavioral

  15. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  16. Enhance separations with electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhara, H.S.

    1994-05-01

    To satisfy growing environmental regulations, control energy costs, or just to stay competitive, one must improve existing separation technologies and make them more efficient. New challenges in food processing and requirements for novel purification technologies in the biotech industry also will require more efficient separation techniques. This paper discusses some enhanced separation processes based on the application of an electric field in the combined-fields approach. In a combined-fields approach, the emphasis is on the generation of additional driving forces to work simultaneously with the conventional driving force of the process. Here the authors concentrate on the application of an electric field to generate the additional driving force.

  17. Enhancing transgender health care.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, E

    2001-01-01

    As awareness of transgender men and women grows among health care educators, researchers, policymakers, and clinicians of all types, the need to create more inclusive settings also grows. Greater sensitivity and relevant information and services are required in dealing with transgender men and women. These individuals need their identities to be recognized as authentic, they need better access to health care resources, and they need education and prevention material appropriate to their experience. In addition, a need exists for activities designed to enhance understanding of transgender health issues and to spur innovation. PMID:11392924

  18. Ernutet Crater - Enhanced Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-16

    This enhanced color composite image, made with data from the framing camera aboard NASA's Dawn spacecraft, shows the area around Ernutet crater. The bright red portions appear redder with respect to the rest of Ceres. In a 2017 study in the journal Science, researchers from the Dawn science team found that these red areas around Ernutet are associated with evidence of organic material. Images taken using blue (440 nanometers), green (750 nanometers) and infrared (960 nanometers) spectral filters were combined to create the view. Ernutet Crater measures about 32 miles (52 kilometers) in diameter and is located in the northern hemisphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21419

  19. Enhanced by Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of south polar layered terrain. Their appearance in this July 2005 springtime image is enhanced by bright patches of carbon dioxide frost. The frost is left over from the previous southern winter season; by summer, the frost would be gone.

    Location near: 84.6oS, 203.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  20. Enhanced Emergency Smoke Venting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Boeing Airworthiness Offices in both Renton and Everett. The search disclosed at least 26 letters between Boeing and the FAA on the subject of smoke...the ventilation airflow rates and utilizing the effect of the additional outflow valve. .-. 12 FAA Report No. DOT/ FAA /CT-86/41-I, " Aircraft ...lTr !r DOT/ FAA !CT-88/22 Enhanced Emergency FAA Technical Center Sm oke Atlantic City International Airport Venting N.J. 08405 T.DTIC, Q\\SEP 0 21988

  1. Charon in Enhanced Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-01

    NASA's New Horizons captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Charon just before closest approach on July 14, 2015. The image combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the spacecraft's Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC); the colors are processed to best highlight the variation of surface properties across Charon. Charon's color palette is not as diverse as Pluto's; most striking is the reddish north (top) polar region, informally named Mordor Macula. Charon is 754 miles (1,214 kilometers) across; this image resolves details as small as 1.8 miles (2.9 kilometers). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19968

  2. Quality Enhancement: Governing Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Vicky; Cheng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a critique of current debates about what quality enhancement is for and what it does. It outlines a conceptual framework drawing on different understandings of quality assurance and quality enhancement in higher education, which helps to refine the role of quality enhancement in improving student learning. The paper analyses…

  3. Computer enhancement of radiographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekaney, A.; Keane, J.; Desautels, J.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of three relevant noise processes and the image degradation associated with Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) X-ray/scanning system was conducted for application to computer enhancement of radiographs using MSFC's digital filtering techniques. Graininess of type M, R single coat and R double coat X-ray films was quantified as a function of density level using root-mean-square (RMS) granularity. Quantum mottle (including film grain) was quantified as a function of the above film types, exposure level, specimen material and thickness, and film density using RMS granularity and power spectral density (PSD). For various neutral-density levels the scanning device used in digital conversion of radiographs was examined for noise characteristics which were quantified by RMS granularity and PSD. Image degradation of the entire pre-enhancement system (MG-150 X-ray device; film; and optronics scanner) was measured using edge targets to generate modulation transfer functions (MTF). The four parameters were examined as a function of scanning aperture sizes of approximately 12.5 25 and 50 microns.

  4. Telemetry-Enhancing Scripts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimone, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Scripts Providing a Cool Kit of Telemetry Enhancing Tools (SPACKLE) is a set of software tools that fill gaps in capabilities of other software used in processing downlinked data in the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) flight and test-bed operations. SPACKLE tools have helped to accelerate the automatic processing and interpretation of MER mission data, enabling non-experts to understand and/or use MER query and data product command simulation software tools more effectively. SPACKLE has greatly accelerated some operations and provides new capabilities. The tools of SPACKLE are written, variously, in Perl or the C or C++ language. They perform a variety of search and shortcut functions that include the following: Generating text-only, Event Report-annotated, and Web-enhanced views of command sequences; Labeling integer enumerations with their symbolic meanings in text messages and engineering channels; Systematic detecting of corruption within data products; Generating text-only displays of data-product catalogs including downlink status; Validating and labeling of commands related to data products; Performing of convenient searches of detailed engineering data spanning multiple Martian solar days; Generating tables of initial conditions pertaining to engineering, health, and accountability data; Simplified construction and simulation of command sequences; and Fast time format conversions and sorting.

  5. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  6. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  7. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  8. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  9. Direct vs. Indirect Moral Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G Owen

    2015-09-01

    Moral enhancement is an ostensibly laudable project. Who wouldn't want people to become more moral? Still, the project's approach is crucial. We can distinguish between two approaches for moral enhancement: direct and indirect. Direct moral enhancements aim at bringing about particular ideas, motives or behaviors. Indirect moral enhancements, by contrast, aim at making people more reliably produce the morally correct ideas, motives or behaviors without committing to the content of those ideas, motives and/or actions. I will argue, on Millian grounds, that the value of disagreement puts serious pressure on proposals for relatively widespread direct moral enhancement. A more acceptable path would be to focus instead on indirect moral enhancements while staying neutral, for the most part, on a wide range of substantive moral claims. I will outline what such indirect moral enhancement might look like, and why we should expect it to lead to general moral improvement.

  10. Teacher Enhancement Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall-Bradley, Tina

    1994-01-01

    During the 1980's, a period of intense concern over educational quality in the United States, few indicators of U.S. student achievement garnered the interest of policy makers and pundits as successfully as the results of international testing in mathematics and science. This concern was so great that as a part of the Goals 2000 initiative, President George Bush indicated that 'By the year 2000, U.S. students should be first in the world in mathematics and science.' The Clinton Administration is placing a major emphasis, not only on rigorous academic standards and creating a new system for assessing students' progress, but also including professional development as a major focus. The argument being that teachers need more sustained, intensive training to prepare them to teach to higher standards. Executive order 12821 mandates that national laboratories 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science'. These and other issues led to the development of ideas for a project that addresses the need for excellence in mathematics, science and technology instruction. In response to these initiatives the NASA/LaRC Teacher Enhancement Institute was proposed. The TEI incorporated systemic reform perspectives, enhanced content knowledge for teachers, and teacher preparation. Emphasis was also placed on recruiting those educators who teach in impoverished urban school districts with at-risk student populations who have been traditionally under represented in science, mathematics, technology and engineering. Participants in the Teacher Enhancement Institute were 37 teachers from grades K-8, teaching in Region 2 in the state of Virginia, as well as 2 preservice teachers from Norfolk State University and one teacher from Dublin, Virginia, where a Science

  11. Global Enhanced Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Team can quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the world. The above MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) map shows the density of plant growth over the entire globe. Very low values of EVI (white and brown areas) correspond to barren areas of rock, sand, or snow. Moderate values (light greens) represent shrub and grassland, while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests (dark greens). The MODIS EVI gives scientists a new tool for monitoring major fluctuations in vegetation and understanding how they affect, and are affected by, regional climate trends. For more information, read NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Land Group/Vegetation Indices, Alfredo Huete, Principal Investigator, and Kamel Didan, University of Arizona

  12. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  13. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  14. Structure Size Enhanced Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Kirschner, Matthias

    Direct volume visualization requires the definition of transfer functions (TFs) for the assignment of opacity and color. Multi-dimensional TFs are based on at least two image properties, and are specified by means of 2D histograms. In this work we propose a new type of a 2D histogram which combines gray value with information about the size of the structures. This structure size enhanced (SSE) histogram is an intuitive approach for representing anatomical features. Clinicians — the users we are focusing on — are much more familiar with selecting features by their size than by their gradient magnitude value. As a proof of concept, we employ the SSE histogram for the definition of two-dimensional TFs for the visualization of 3D MRI and CT image data.

  15. Digitally Enhanced Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Spurious interference limits the performance of many interferometric measurements. Digitally enhanced interferometry (DEI) improves measurement sensitivity by augmenting conventional heterodyne interferometry with pseudo-random noise (PRN) code phase modulation. DEI effectively changes the measurement problem from one of hardware (optics, electronics), which may deteriorate over time, to one of software (modulation, digital signal processing), which does not. DEI isolates interferometric signals based on their delay. Interferometric signals are effectively time-tagged by phase-modulating the laser source with a PRN code. DEI improves measurement sensitivity by exploiting the autocorrelation properties of the PRN to isolate only the signal of interest and reject spurious interference. The properties of the PRN code determine the degree of isolation.

  16. Enhanced oil recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Goldsberry, Fred L.

    1989-01-01

    All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

  17. Global Enhanced Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Team can quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the world. The above MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) map shows the density of plant growth over the entire globe. Very low values of EVI (white and brown areas) correspond to barren areas of rock, sand, or snow. Moderate values (light greens) represent shrub and grassland, while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests (dark greens). The MODIS EVI gives scientists a new tool for monitoring major fluctuations in vegetation and understanding how they affect, and are affected by, regional climate trends. For more information, read NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Land Group/Vegetation Indices, Alfredo Huete, Principal Investigator, and Kamel Didan, University of Arizona

  18. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOEpatents

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  19. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease.

  20. Pulverized Pulchritude Enhanced Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-01-26

    This close view of Rhea prominently shows two large impact basins on the ancient and battered moon. The great age of these basins is suggested by the large number of smaller craters that are overprinted within them. Terrain visible in this view is on the side of Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across) that faces away from Saturn. North on Rhea is up and tilted 30 degrees to the left. This enhanced color view was created by combining images taken using filters sensitive to ultraviolet, visible green and infrared light. The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Dec. 23, 2005, at a distance of approximately 341,000 kilometers (212,000 miles) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 42 degrees. The image scale is 2 kilometers (1 mile) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07686

  1. Enhancing multiple disciplinary teamwork.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E

    2008-01-01

    Multiple disciplinary research provides an opportunity to bring together investigators across disciplines to provide new views and develop innovative approaches to important questions. Through this shared experience, novel paradigms are formed, original frameworks are developed, and new language is generated. Integral to the successful construction of effective cross-disciplinary teams is the recognition of antecedent factors that affect the development of the team such as intrapersonal, social, physical environmental, organizational, and institutional influences. Team functioning is enhanced with well-developed behavioral, affective, interpersonal, and intellectual processes. Outcomes of effective multiple disciplinary research teams include novel ideas, integrative models, new training programs, institutional change, and innovative policies that can also influence the degree to which antecedents and processes contribute to team performance. Ongoing evaluation of team functioning and achievement of designated outcomes ensures the continued development of the multiple disciplinary team and confirmation of this approach as important to the advancement of science.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  3. Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanloz, R.; Stone, H.

    2013-12-31

    DOE, through the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, requested this study, identifying a focus on: i) assessment of technologies and approaches for subsurface imaging and characterization so as to be able to validate EGS opportunities, and ii) assessment of approaches toward creating sites for EGS, including science and engineering to enhance permeability and increase the recovery factor. Two days of briefings provided in-depth discussion of a wide range of themes and challenges in EGS, and represented perspectives from industry, government laboratories and university researchers. JASON also contacted colleagues from universities, government labs and industry in further conversations to learn the state of the field and potential technologies relevant to EGS.

  4. Wideband speech enhancement addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, M. R.; Aschkenasy, E.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the completion of the development and construction of a speech enhancement unit (SEU). This is an electronic instrument that automatically detects and attenuates tones, clicks, and wideband random noises that may accompany speech signals that are transmitted, recorded, or reproduced electronically. An earlier version of this device was tested extensively by the Air Force and then was returned to Queens College for modification and completion of the system. During the period that is covered by this report, a number of major changes were made in the SEU, leading to a device that is simpler to use, more effective, and more broadly useful in its intended area or application. Some of the changes that were made in the SEU were aimed at reducing the degree of operator intervention that was required. To this end, the SEU was greatly simplified and made more automatic. The manual Digital Spectrum Shaping (DSS) system and most of the manual controls were removed. A new system was added for adjusting the level of the input signal. It keeps the signal at the level that maximizes the effectiveness of the noise attenuation processes. The INTEL process for attenuating wideband random noise was incorporated into the SEU. To make it possible for the speech enhancement unit to operate in real-time with all processes active, the hardware and software of the system were modified extensively. The MAP was upgraded by adding a second arithmetic processor and a high speed memory. The existing programs and algorithms were rewritten to reduce their execution times. These and the INTEL programs were modified to fully exploit the capabilities of the upgraded MAP.

  5. Morphine enhances macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Singhal, P C; Sharma, P; Kapasi, A A; Reddy, K; Franki, N; Gibbons, N

    1998-02-15

    Laboratory data indicate that morphine decreases the numbier of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages (Mphi) and compromises their phagocytic capability for immune complexes and bacteria. We hypothesize that morphine decreases the number of, as well as compromises the phagocytic capability of, Mphi by programming their death. We studied the effect of morphine on Mphi apoptosis in vivo as well as in vitro. Peritoneal Mphi harvested from morphine-treated rats showed DNA fragmentation. Morphine enhanced murine Mphi (J 774.16) apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Human monocytes treated with morphine showed a classic ladder pattern in gel electrophoretic and end-labeling studies. Morphine promoted nitric oxide (NO) production both under basal and LPS-activated states. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine monoacetate (L-NMMA), inhibitors of NO synthase, attenuated the morphine-induced generation of NO by Mphi. Morphine also enhanced Mphi mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). Since morphine-induced Mphi apoptosis was inhibited by L-NAME and L-NMMA, it appears that morphine-induced Mphi apoptosis may be mediated through the generation of NO. Morphine promoted the synthesis of Bax and p53 proteins by Mphi. Moreover, IL-converting enzyme (ICE)-1 inhibitor attenuated morphine-induced Mphi apoptosis. These studies suggest that morphine activates the induction phase of the apoptotic pathway through accumulation of p53. The effector phase of morphine-induced apoptosis appears to proceed through the accumulation of Bax and activation of ICE-1. The present study provides a basis for a hypothesis that morphine may be directly compromising immune function by promoting Mphi apoptosis in patients with opiate addiction.

  6. Glucose enhances rat islet function via stimulating CART expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wan; Zhang, Yuqing; Bai, Mengyao; Zhou, Feiye; Deng, Ruyuan; Ji, Xueying; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Yun; Zhou, Libin; Wang, Xiao

    2016-12-02

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an anorexigenic peptide widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, as well as in endocrine cells. CART is markedly upregulated in the β-cells of several rodent models of type-2 diabetes. The stimulatory effect of exogenous CART peptide on insulin secretion is cAMP dependent. Glucose is the most important regulator of islet function. However, the role of CART in glucose-potentiated insulin secretion remains unclear. Here, our results showed that glucose time- and dose-dependently elicited CART mRNA expression in rat islets. Both the glucokinase agonist GKA50 and the long-acting GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 increased CART mRNA expression. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89 and the inactivation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) suppressed forskolin-stimulated CART mRNA expression. Furthermore, CART overexpression amplified insulin secretion from rat islets in response to glucose and forskolin, and ameliorated dexamethasone-impaired insulin secretion. These findings suggest that islet-derived CART is involved, at least in part, in high glucose-potentiated pancreatic β-cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ecologically Enhancing Coastal Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Arthur, Mairi; Naylor, Larissa; Hansom, Jim; Burrows, Mike; Boyd, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hard engineering structures continue to proliferate in the coastal zone globally in response to increasing pressures associated with rising sea levels, coastal flooding and erosion. These structures are typically plain-cast by design and function as poor ecological surrogates for natural rocky shores which are highly topographically complex and host a range of available microhabitats for intertidal species. Ecological enhancement mitigates some of these negative impacts by integrating components of nature into the construction and design of these structures to improve their sustainability, resilience and multifunctionality. In the largest UK ecological enhancement trial to date, 184 tiles (15x15cm) of up to nine potential designs were deployed on vertical concrete coastal infrastructure in 2016 at three sites across the UK (Saltcoats, Blackness and Isle of Wight). The surface texture and complexity of the tiles were varied to test the effect of settlement surface texture at the mm-cm scale of enhancement on the success of colonisation and biodiversity in the mid-upper intertidal zone in order to answer the following experimental hypotheses: • Tiles with mm-scale geomorphic complexity will have greater barnacle abundances • Tiles with cm-scale geomorphic complexity will have greater species richness than mm-scale tiles. A range of methods were used in creating the tile designs including terrestrial laser scanning of creviced rock surfaces to mimic natural rocky shore complexity as well as artificially generated complexity using computer software. The designs replicated the topographic features of high ecological importance found on natural rocky shores and promoted species recruitment and community composition on artificial surfaces; thus enabling us to evaluate biological responses to geomorphic complexity in a controlled field trial. At two of the sites, the roughest tile designs (cm scale) did not have the highest levels of barnacle recruits which were

  8. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

    2010-03-31

    Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was performed

  9. Hypothalamic POMC Deficiency Improves Glucose Tolerance Despite Insulin Resistance by Increasing Glycosuria

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jessica M.; Fagel, Brian; Lam, Daniel D.; Qi, Nathan; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is essential for the physiological regulation of energy balance; however, its role in glucose homeostasis remains less clear. We show that hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc)POMC-deficient mice, which develop severe obesity and insulin resistance, unexpectedly exhibit improved glucose tolerance and remain protected from hyperglycemia. To explain these paradoxical phenotypes, we hypothesized that an insulin-independent pathway is responsible for the enhanced glucose tolerance. Indeed, the mutant mice demonstrated increased glucose effectiveness and exaggerated glycosuria relative to wild-type littermate controls at comparable blood glucose concentrations. Central administration of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan II in mutant mice reversed alterations in glucose tolerance and glycosuria, whereas, conversely, administration of the antagonist Agouti-related peptide (Agrp) to wild-type mice enhanced glucose tolerance. The glycosuria of ArcPOMC-deficient mice was due to decreased levels of renal GLUT 2 (rGLUT2) but not sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 and was associated with reduced renal catecholamine content. Epinephrine treatment abolished the genotype differences in glucose tolerance and rGLUT2 levels, suggesting that reduced renal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is the underlying mechanism for the observed glycosuria and improved glucose tolerance in ArcPOMC-deficient mice. Therefore, the ArcPOMC-SNS-rGLUT2 axis is potentially an insulin-independent therapeutic target to control diabetes. PMID:26467632

  10. Cognitive Enhancement: Treating or Cheating?

    PubMed

    Whetstine, Leslie M

    2015-09-01

    In this article I provide an overview of the moral and medical questions surrounding the use of cognitive enhancers. This discussion will be framed in light of 4 key considerations: (1) is there a difference between therapy and enhancement? (2) How safe are these interventions? (3) Is the use of nootropics cheating? (4) Would enhancers create a further divide of social inequality where only the very wealthy have access to them?

  11. Waste water filtration enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Removal of submicron particles from process solutions and waste water is now economically achievable using a new Tyvek{reg sign} media in conventional filtration equipment. This new product greatly enhances filtration and allows use of the much improved filter aids and polymers which were recently developed. It has reduced operating costs and ensures a clean effluent discharge to the environment. This significant technical development is especially important to those who discharge to a small stream with low 7Q10 flow and must soon routinely pass the Toxicity tests that are being required by many States for NPDES permit renewal. The Savannah River Plant produces special nuclear materials for the US Government. Aluminum forming and metal finishing operations in M-Area, that manufacture fuel and target assemblies for the nuclear reactors, discharge to a waste water treatment facility using BAT hydroxide precipitation and filtration. The new Tyvek{reg sign} media and filter aids have achieved 55% less solids in the filtrate discharged to Tims Branch Creek, 15% less hazardous waste (dry filter cake), 150%-370% more filtration capacity, 74% lower materials purchase cost, 10% lower total M-Area manufacturing cost, and have improved safety. Performance with the improved polymers is now being evaluated.

  12. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  13. Enhanced local tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomography is enhanced to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. In a first method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, the relative attenuation data is inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA. to define the location S of the density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA. is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA.. In a second method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, a gradient value for a mollified local tomography function .gradient..function..sub..LAMBDA..epsilon. (x.sub.ij) is determined along the discontinuity; and the value of the jump of the density across the discontinuity curve (or surface) S is estimated from the gradient values.

  14. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesotas Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  15. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  16. Enhanced geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    McLarty, L.; Grabowski, P.

    1998-07-01

    A vast amount of geothermal energy is stored in the upper portion of the earth's crust; this energy is accessible with current drilling technology. The US Geological Survey has estimated that in the US, the heat energy stored in the upper 10 kilometers of the earth's crust is over 33 {times} 10{sup 24} Joules. Only a small fraction of this energy could conceivably be extracted. However, just one tenth of one percent of this energy is sufficient to provide the US with all its current level of non-transportation energy needs for over 500 years. Current technology is being used widely to extract geothermal energy in areas where subterranean water contacted hot rock formations, became heated, and was trapped by an impermeable layer in the earth's crust, forming a geothermal hydrothermal reservoir. The water serves as a medium to transport the heat to the surface through a conventional well similar to an oil well. Unfortunately, hydrothermal reservoirs are not widespread and represent only a minuscule portion of the geothermal energy that is accessible with current technology. Scientists and engineers in the US, Europe, Japan, and Australia, are developing systems that extract heat from the earth where there is insufficient permeability or water in the rock formation to transport the heat to the surface. Such systems are referred to as Enhanced Geothermal Systems.

  17. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease. PMID:28031863

  18. Analog enhancement of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Nachazel, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows how analog methods for edge sharpening, contrast enhancement, and expansion of the range of gray levels of particular interest are effective for easy on-line application to video viewing of X-ray roentgenograms or to fluoroscopy. The technique for analog enhancement of radiographic images is a modified version of the system designed by Fuchs et al. (1972), whereby an all directional second derivative signal called detail signal is used to produce both vertical and horizontal enhancement of the image. Particular attention is given to noise filtration and contrast enhancement. Numerous radiographs supplement the text.

  19. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2007-03-31

    This 11th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from January 1st through March 31st of 2007. It summarizes the completion of the Prototype testing activity and initial full-scale dryer design, Budget Period 2 activity during that time period. The Design Team completed process design and layouts of air, water, and coal systems. Heyl-Patterson completed dryer drawings and has sent RFPs to several fabricators for build and assembly. Several meetings were held with Barr engineers to finalize arrangement of the drying, air jig, and coal handling systems. Honeywell held meetings do discuss the control system logic and hardware location. By the end of March we had processed nearly 300,000 tons of lignite through the dryer. Outage preparation maintenance activities on a coal transfer hopper restricted operation of the dryer in February and March. The Outage began March 17th. We will not dry coal again until early May when the Outage on Unit No.2 completes. The Budget Period 1 (Phase 1) final report was submitted this quarter. Comments were received from NETL and are being reviewed. The Phase 2 Project Management Plan was submitted to NETL in January 2007. This deliverable also included the Financing Plan. An application for R&D 100 award was submitted in February. The project received an award from the Minnesota Professional Engineering Society's Seven Wonders of Engineering Award and Minnesota ACEC Grand Award in January. To further summarize, the focus this quarter has been on finalizing commercial design and the layout of four dryers behind each Unit. The modification to the coal handling facilities at Coal Creek and incorporation of air jigs to further beneficiate the segregated material the dryers will reject 20 to 30 % of the mercury and sulfur is segregated however this modification will recover the carbon in that stream.

  20. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr

    2012-05-08

    this work, the structure consisted of rectangular nano-grooves (NGs) arranged in a subwavelength grating on a metal surface is presented that provides a dramatic increase in the metal’s absorption, field localization, and field enhancement. When light is polarized perpendicular to the orientation of the grooves a standing SPP wave is excited along the vertical walls in the NGs, that act as Fabry-Perot resonators. By adjusting the geometry of the NGs and the period of the subwavelength grating the resonance can be fine tuned to a desired position, for example, the laser fundamental wavelength, anywhere from the UV to the near infrared (NIR). Two types of gratings are presented: (a) a gold grating with period of 600 nm, and (b) an aluminum-gold grating with a period of 100 nm; both with resonance at 720 nm. In each case, strong on-resonance absorption was observed, with over 98% for grating (b). Unlike the grating-coupled SPP waves, where the angle is well defined by the momentum matching condition, the resonant NGs allow coupling to the standing modes at a range of angles of incidence, referred to as the angular bandwidth. A new model for the on-resonance absorption based on the ensamble action of the NGs is presented that serves as the basis for a design of an NG grating with an ultrawide spectral as well as angular bandwidth. For sample (b), the angular bandwidth is 80 degrees, corresponding to an opening angle of 160 degrees. The photoemission enhancement for such a grating was measured to be seven orders of magnitude for a four-photon photoemission. This is an incredible result demonstrating the power of the plasmonic grating presented, which is an efficient light trapper and field enhancer for a non-linear processes. These results demonstrate that the metal photocathode prepared with a NG grating on the metal surface will provide sufficient pulse charge driven by a 1 μJ 15fs pulsed laser at 800 nm for the optimum FEL operation.

  1. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr N.

    this work, the structure consisted of rectangular nano-grooves (NGs) arranged in a subwavelength grating on a metal surface is presented that provides a dramatic increase in the metal's absorption, field localization, and field enhancement. When light is polarized perpendicular to the orientation of the grooves a standing SPP wave is excited along the vertical walls in the NGs, that act as Fabry-Perot resonators. By adjusting the geometry of the NGs and the period of the subwavelength grating the resonance can be fine tuned to a desired position, for example, the laser fundamental wavelength, anywhere from the UV to the near infrared (NIR). Two types of gratings are presented: (a) a gold grating with period of 600 nm, and (b) an aluminum-gold grating with a period of 100 nm; both with resonance at 720 nm. In each case, strong on-resonance absorption was observed, with over 98% for grating (b). Unlike the grating-coupled SPP waves, where the angle is well defined by the momentum matching condition, the resonant NGs allow coupling to the standing modes at a range of angles of incidence, referred to as the angular bandwidth. A new model for the on-resonance absorption based on the ensamble action of the NGs is presented that serves as the basis for a design of an NG grating with an ultrawide spectral as well as angular bandwidth. For sample (b), the angular bandwidth is 80 degrees, corresponding to an opening angle of 160 degrees. The photoemission enhancement for such a grating was measured to be seven orders of magnitude for a four-photon photoemission. This is an incredible result demonstrating the power of the plasmonic grating presented, which is an efficient light trapper and field enhancer for a non-linear processes. These results demonstrate that the metal photocathode prepared with a NG grating on the metal surface will provide sufficient pulse charge driven by a 1mu J 15 fs pulsed laser at 800 nm for the optimum FEL operation.

  2. Digital TV image enhancement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biernson, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Efficient, digital image-enhancement process has been developed for high-resolution slow-scan TV images. Scan converter is no longer subject to registration errors, which become more serious as resolution increases. To implement feedback image enhancement system, digital processing is used; otherwise there is excessive loss of image information, particularly in video delay lines.

  3. Environmental control of photosynthetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Punnett, T

    1971-01-22

    The transition from granular to homogeneous chloroplasts in vivo in Egeria densa caused by environmental conditions was paralleled by a decrease in photosynthetic enhancement from 30 percent to nearly zero. The drop in enhancement can be explained either by a change in the partitioning of light energy between the two photosystems or a change to a single photosystem.

  4. Quadrupole-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Simon P; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Qian, Zhaoxia; Fang, Ying; Park, So-Jung; Link, Stephan; Engheta, Nader; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2014-09-23

    Dark, nonradiating plasmonic modes are important in the Raman enhancement efficiency of nanostructures. However, it is challenging to engineer such hotspots with predictable enhancement efficiency through synthesis routes. Here, we demonstrate that spiky nanoshells have designable quadrupole resonances that efficiently enhance Raman scattering with unprecedented reproducibility on the single particle level. The efficiency and reproducibility of Quadrupole Enhanced Raman Scattering (QERS) is due to their heterogeneous structure, which broadens the quadrupole resonance both spatially and spectrally. This spectral breadth allows for simultaneous enhancement of both the excitation and Stokes frequencies. The quadrupole resonance can be tuned by simple modifications of the nanoshell geometry. The combination of tunability, high efficiency, and reproducibility makes these nanoshells an excellent candidate for applications such as biosensing, nanoantennaes, and photovoltaics.

  5. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, Amy E.

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  6. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bullinger

    2006-04-03

    This 7th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from January 1st through March 31st of 2006. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity, dryer/process construction, and testing. The Design Team began conferencing again as construction completed and the testing program began. Primary focus this quarter was construction/installation completion. Phase 1 extension recommendation, and subsequent new project estimate, Forms 424 and 4600 were accepted by DOE headquarters. DOE will complete the application and amended contract. All major mechanical equipment was run, checked out, and tested this quarter. All water, air, and coal flow loops were run and tested. The system was run on January 30th, shut down to adjust equipment timing in the control system on the 31st, and run to 75 ton//hour on February 1st. It ran for seven to eight hours per day until March 20th when ''pairs'' testing ( 24 hour running) began. ''Pairs'' involves comparative testing of unit performance with seven ''wet'' pulverizers versus six ''wet'' and one ''dry''. During the interim, more operators were brought up to speed on system operation and control was shifted to the main Unit No.2 Control Room. The system is run now from the Unit control board operator and an equipment operator checks the system during regular rounds or when an alarm needs verification. The flawless start-up is unprecedented in the industry and credit should be made to the diligence and tenacity of Coal Creek maintenance/checkout staff. Great River Energy and Headwaters did not meet to discuss the Commercialization Plan this quarter. The next meeting is pending data from the drying system. Discussions with Basin Electric, Otter Tail, and Dairyland continue and confidentiality secured as we promote dryers in their stations. Lighting and fire protection were completed in January. Invoices No.12 through No.20 are completed and forwarded following preliminary

  7. Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2007-01-01

    An enhanced method of elliptic grid generation has been invented. Whereas prior methods require user input of certain grid parameters, this method provides for these parameters to be determined automatically. "Elliptic grid generation" signifies generation of generalized curvilinear coordinate grids through solution of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Usually, such grids are fitted to bounding bodies and used in numerical solution of other PDEs like those of fluid flow, heat flow, and electromagnetics. Such a grid is smooth and has continuous first and second derivatives (and possibly also continuous higher-order derivatives), grid lines are appropriately stretched or clustered, and grid lines are orthogonal or nearly so over most of the grid domain. The source terms in the grid-generating PDEs (hereafter called "defining" PDEs) make it possible for the grid to satisfy requirements for clustering and orthogonality properties in the vicinity of specific surfaces in three dimensions or in the vicinity of specific lines in two dimensions. The grid parameters in question are decay parameters that appear in the source terms of the inhomogeneous defining PDEs. The decay parameters are characteristic lengths in exponential- decay factors that express how the influences of the boundaries decrease with distance from the boundaries. These terms govern the rates at which distance between adjacent grid lines change with distance from nearby boundaries. Heretofore, users have arbitrarily specified decay parameters. However, the characteristic lengths are coupled with the strengths of the source terms, such that arbitrary specification could lead to conflicts among parameter values. Moreover, the manual insertion of decay parameters is cumbersome for static grids and infeasible for dynamically changing grids. In the present method, manual insertion and user specification of decay parameters are neither required nor allowed. Instead, the decay parameters are

  8. Environmental engineering education enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, E.

    2012-04-01

    Since higher education plays a central role in the development of both human beings and modern societies, enhancing social, cultural and economic development, active citizenship, ethical values and expertises for a sustainable growth, environment respectful, the European Commission promotes a wide range of programmes. Among the EC programmes, the TEMPUS - Trans European Mobility Programme for University Studies, with the support of the DG EAC of the European Commission, has contributed to many aspects of general interest for higher education. Curricula harmonization, LifeLong Learning Programme development, ICT use, quality assessment, accreditation, innovation learning methods, growth of networks of institutions trusting each other, are the focused aspects. Such a solid cooperation framework is surely among the main outcomes of the TEMPUS Projects leaded by the University of Firenze UNIFI (Italy), DEREC - Development of Environment and Resources Engineering Curriculum (2005-2008), and its spin-off DEREL - Development of Environment and Resources Engineering Learning (2010-2013), and VICES - Videoconferencing Educational Services (2009-2012). DEREC and DEREL TEMPUS projects, through the co-operation of Universities in Italy, Austria, Germany, Greece, Macedonia, Albania and Serbia, are aimed at the development of first and second level curricula in "Environment and Resources Engineering" at the Ss. Cyril and Methodius University - UKIM Skopje (MK). In the DEREC Project the conditions for offering a joint degree title in the field of Environmental Engineering between UNIFI and UKIM Skopje were fulfilled and a shared educational programme leading to the mutual recognition of degree titles was defined. The DEREL project, as logical continuation of DEREC, is aimed to introduce a new, up-to-date, postgraduate second level curriculum in Environment and Resources Engineering at UKIM Skopje, University of Novi Sad (RS) and Polytechnic University of Tirana (AL). following

  9. [Neuro-enhancement. Brain doping].

    PubMed

    Förstl, H

    2009-07-01

    Cognitive enhancement, the increase in the mental ability by psychoactive substances and other interventions has received a renewed boost through the development of innovative principle. More than 100 drugs are currently being developed, tested or used for cognitive enhancement. Cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, dimebon, ampakines, fluoxetine and other antidepressants, methylphenidate and modafinil are candidates awaiting a larger distribution as cognitive enhancers in healthy individuals, if their advantages can be demonstrated. Beyond more general neuro-ethical reservations regarding neuro-enhancement, future research will need to address the following neuropsychiatric issues: (1) will the benefits of longer term neuro-enhancement outweigh potential disadvantages such as rebound effects and other neurobiological and psychosocial trade-offs? (2) What will be the neuropsychiatric sequelae of a soft coercion towards drug usage at work and for recreational purposes? (3) Will there be new and specific neuropsychiatric diseases due to long-term usage of neuro-enhancers in a larger population? Novel strategies of neuro-enhancement will have to demonstrate their superiority compared with more traditional and well-established interventions such as coffee and cake.

  10. Fuzzy-Contextual Contrast Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anil; Verma, Om; Khanna, Chintan

    2017-02-08

    This paper presents contrast enhancement algorithms based on fuzzy contextual information of the images. We introduce fuzzy similarity index and fuzzy contrast factor to capture the neighborhood characteristics of a pixel. A new histogram, using fuzzy contrast factor of each pixel is developed, and termed as the fuzzy dissimilarity histogram (FDH). A cumulative distribution function (CDF) is formed with normalized values of FDH and used as a transfer function to obtain the contrast enhanced image. The algorithm gives good contrast enhancement and preserves the natural characteristic of the image. In order to develop a contextual intensity transfer function, we introduce a fuzzy membership function based on fuzzy similarity index and coefficient of variation of the image. The contextual intensity transfer function is designed using the fuzzy membership function to achieve final contrast enhanced image. The overall algorithm is referred as the fuzzy contextual contrast-enhancement (FCCE) algorithm. The proposed algorithms are compared with conventional and state-of-art contrast enhancement algorithms. The quantitative and visual assessment of the results is performed. The results of quantitative measures are statistically analyzed using t-test. The exhaustive experimentation and analysis show the proposed algorithm efficiently enhances contrast and yields in natural visual quality images.

  11. Excitation enhancement and extraction enhancement with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin; Zhen, Bo; Chua, Song-Liang; Lee, Jeongwon; Joannopoulos, John

    2015-03-03

    Disclosed herein is a system for stimulating emission from at least one an emitter, such as a quantum dot or organic molecule, on the surface of a photonic crystal comprising a patterned dielectric substrate. Embodiments of this system include a laser or other source that illuminates the emitter and the photonic crystal, which is characterized by an energy band structure exhibiting a Fano resonance, from a first angle so as to stimulate the emission from the emitter at a second angle. The coupling between the photonic crystal and the emitter may result in spectral and angular enhancement of the emission through excitation and extraction enhancement. These enhancement mechanisms also reduce the emitter's lasing threshold. For instance, these enhancement mechanisms enable lasing of a 100 nm thick layer of diluted organic molecules solution with reduced threshold intensity. This reduction in lasing threshold enables more efficient organic light emitting devices and more sensitive molecular sensing.

  12. Resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Christoph; Masters, Barry R.

    2013-05-01

    We survey the history of resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy and their impact on current research in biomedicine. Often these techniques are labeled superresolution, or enhanced resolution microscopy, or light-optical nanoscopy. First, we introduce the development of diffraction theory in its relation to enhanced resolution; then we explore the foundations of resolution as expounded by the astronomers and the physicists and describe the conditions for which they apply. Then we elucidate Ernst Abbe's theory of optical formation in the microscope, and its experimental verification and dissemination to the world wide microscope communities. Second, we describe and compare the early techniques that can enhance the resolution of the microscope. Third, we present the historical development of various techniques that substantially enhance the optical resolution of the light microscope. These enhanced resolution techniques in their modern form constitute an active area of research with seminal applications in biology and medicine. Our historical survey of the field of resolution enhancement uncovers many examples of reinvention, rediscovery, and independent invention and development of similar proposals, concepts, techniques, and instruments. Attribution of credit is therefore confounded by the fact that for understandable reasons authors stress the achievements from their own research groups and sometimes obfuscate their contributions and the prior art of others. In some cases, attribution of credit is also made more complex by the fact that long term developments are difficult to allocate to a specific individual because of the many mutual connections often existing between sometimes fiercely competing, sometimes strongly collaborating groups. Since applications in biology and medicine have been a major driving force in the development of resolution enhancing approaches, we focus on the contribution of enhanced resolution to these fields.

  13. Resolution enhancement in tilted coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Keith Morley, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution is applied to remove source wavelet effects from seismograms. The results are resolution enhancement that enables detection of thin layers. Following enhancement of resolution, low frequency and high angle reflectors, particularly at great depth, appear as low amplitude and semi-invisible reflectors that are difficult to track and pick. A new approach to enhance resolution is introduced that estimates a derivative using continuous wavelet transform in tilted coordinates. The results are compared with sparse spike deconvolution, curvelet deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain. The positive consequence of the new method is to increase sampling of high dip features by changing the coordinate system from Cartesian to tilted. To compare those methods a complex data set was chosen that includes high angle faults and chaotic mass transport complex. Image enhancement using curvelet deconvolution shows a chaotic system as a non-chaotic one. The results show that sparse spike deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain are able to enhance resolution more than curvelet deconvolution especially at great depth but it is impossible to follow steep dip reflectors after resolution enhancement using these methods, especially when their apparent dips are more than 45°. By estimating derivatives in a continuous wavelet transform from tilted data sets similar resolution enhancement as the other deconvolution methods is achieved but additionally steep dipping reflectors are imaged much better than others. Subtracted results of the enhanced resolution data set using new method and the other introduced methods show that steeply dipping reflectors are highlighted as a particular ability of the new method. The results show that high frequency recovery in Cartesian co-ordinate is accompanied by inability to image steeply dipping reflectors especially at great depths. Conversely recovery of high frequency data and imaging of the data

  14. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  15. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  16. Tip enhanced Raman scattering: plasmonic enhancements for nanoscale chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Marr, James M.; Wang, Hao

    2014-04-01

    Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) is an emerging technique that uses a metalized scanning probe microscope tip to spatially localize electric fields that enhances Raman scattering enabling chemical imaging on nanometer dimensions. Arising from the same principles as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), TERS offers unique advantages associated with controling the size, shape, and location of the enhancing nanostructure. In this article we discuss the correlations between current understanding of SERS and how this relates to TERS, as well as how TERS provides new understanding and insights. The relationship between plasmon resonances and Raman enhancements is emphasized as the key to obtaining optimal TERS results. Applications of TERS, including chemical analysis of carbon nanotubes, organic molecules, inorganic crystals, nucleic acids, proteins, cells and organisms, are used to illustrate the information that can be gained. Under ideal conditions TERS is capable of single molecule sensitivity and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The ability to control plasmonic enhancements for chemical analysis suggests new experiments and opportunities to understand molecular composition and interactions on the nanoscale.

  17. Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP)

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    class I; 35% are in class II; 25%, class III; and 5%, class IV. Surveys (8) suggest that from 5% to 15% of patients with HF have persistent severe symptoms, and that the remainder of patients with HF is evenly divided between those with mild and moderately severe symptoms. To date, the diagnosis and management of chronic HF has concentrated on patients with the clinical syndrome of HF accompanied by severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Major changes in treatment have resulted from a better understanding of the pathophysiology of HF and the results of large clinical trials. Treatment for chronic HF includes lifestyle management, drugs, cardiac surgery, or implantable pacemakers and defibrillators. Despite pharmacologic advances, which include diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, spironolactone, and digoxin, many patients remain symptomatic on maximally tolerated doses. (6) The Technology Patients are typically treated by a trained technician in a medically supervised environment for 1 hour daily for a total of 35 hours over 7 weeks. The procedure involves sequential inflation and deflation of compressible cuffs wrapped around the patient’s calves, lower thighs and upper thighs. In addition to 3 sets of cuffs, the patient has finger plethysmogram and electrocardiogram (ECG) attachments that are connected to a control and display console. External counterpulsation was used in the United States to treat cardiogenic shock after acute myocardial infarction. (9;10) More recently, an enhanced version namely “enhanced external counterpulsation” (EECP) was introduced as a noninvasive procedure for outpatient treatment of patients with severe, uncontrollable cardiac ischemia. EECP is said to increase coronary perfusion pressure and reduce the myocardial oxygen demand. Currently, EECP is not applicable for all patients with refractory angina pectoris. For example, many patients are considered ineligible for therapy due to co

  18. Enhancement of muddy footwear impressions.

    PubMed

    Theeuwen, A B; van Barneveld, S; Drok, J W; Keereweer, I; Lesger, B; Limborgh, J C; Naber, W M; Schrok, R; Velders, T

    2001-06-01

    Methods for chemical enhancement of muddy footwear impressions were compared in order to differentiate between utilisation at the scene of crime, the local (regional) police laboratory and the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI)

  19. WEATHERABILITY OF ENHANCED DEGRADABLE PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this study was to assess the performance and the asociated variability of several selected enhanced degradable plastic materials under a variety of different exposure conditions. Other objectives were to identify the major products formed during degradation ...

  20. WEATHERABILITY OF ENHANCED DEGRADABLE PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this study was to assess the performance and the asociated variability of several selected enhanced degradable plastic materials under a variety of different exposure conditions. Other objectives were to identify the major products formed during degradation ...

  1. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  2. IN SITU ENHANCED SOURCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This html report describes and compares the performance of in situ technologies designed to accelerate the removal of organic contaminants from unconsolidated soils and aquifers. The research was conducted through the Enhanced Source Removal (ESR) Program within the Subsurface Pr...

  3. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  4. Moderate eugenics and human enhancement.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Though the reputation of eugenics has been tarnished by history, eugenics per se is not necessarily a bad thing. Many advocate a liberal new eugenics--where individuals are free to choose whether or not to employ genetic technologies for reproductive purposes. Though genetic interventions aimed at the prevention of severe genetic disorders may be morally and socially acceptable, reproductive liberty in the context of enhancement may conflict with equality. Enhancement could also have adverse effects on utility. The enhancement debate requires a shift in focus. What the equality and/or utility costs of enhancement will be is an empirical question. Rather than philosophical speculation, more social science research is needed to address it. Philosophers, meanwhile, should address head-on the question of how to strike a balance between liberty, equality, and utility in cases of conflict (in the context of genetics).

  5. Ultrasonic enhancement of battery diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hilton, R; Dornbusch, D; Branson, K; Tekeei, A; Suppes, G J

    2014-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that sonic energy can be harnessed to enhance convection in Galvanic cells during cyclic voltammetry; however, the practical value of this approach is limited due to the lack of open volumes for convection patterns to develop in most batteries. This study evaluates the ability of ultrasonic waves to enhance diffusion in membrane separators commonly used in sandwich-architecture batteries. Studies include the measuring of open-circuit performance curves to interpret performances in terms of reductions in concentration overpotentials. The use of a 40 kHz sonicator bath can consistently increase the voltage of the battery and reduce overpotential losses up to 30%. This work demonstrates and quantifies battery enhancement due to enhanced diffusion made possible with ultrasonic energy.

  6. Enhanced backscattering at grazing angles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zu-Han; Fuks, I M; Ciftan, Mikael

    2002-12-02

    Backscattering signals at small grazing angles are important for space vehicle atmospheric reentrance and subsurface radar sensing applications. They are also useful in Fourier-transform infrared grazing-angle microscopy. Recently we performed an experimental study of far-field scattering at small grazing angles, in particular, of enhanced backscattering at grazing angles. For a randomly weak rough dielectric film upon a reflecting metal substrate, a large enhanced backscattering peak was measured. Experimental results are compared with small perturbation theoretical predictions.

  7. Cognitive Enhancers for Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Smits, Jasper A. J.; Asnaani, Anu; Gutner, Cassidy A.; Otto, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective intervention for anxiety disorders. However, a significant number of people do not respond or only show partial response even after an adequate course of the treatment. Recent research has shown that the efficacy of the intervention can be improved by the use of cognitive enhancers that augment the core learning processes of cognitive-behavior therapy. This manuscript provides a review of the current state of cognitive enhancers for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:21134394

  8. Multispectral enhancement towards digital staining.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Pinky A; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-01-01

    Digital staining can be considered as a special form of image enhancement wherein the concern is not only to increase the contrast between the background objects and objects of interest, but to also impart the colors that mark the objects' unique reactions to a specific stain. In this paper, we extended the previously proposed multispectral enhancement methods such that the colors of the background pixels can also be changed. In the previous multispectral enhancement methods a shifting factor is provided to the original spectrum. To implement digital staining, a spectral transformation process is introduced prior to spectral shifting. The enhancement method is applied to multispectral images of H&E stained liver tissue. The resulting digitally stained images show good correlation with the serial-section images of the tissue which are physically stained with Masson's trichrome. We have presented a multispectral enhancement method that can be adjusted to produce digitally stained-images. The current experimental results show the viability of the method. However, to achieve robust enhancement performance issues that arise from variations in staining conditions has to be addressed as well. This would be part of our future work.

  9. Chemically enhanced in situ recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, T.; Pitts, M.; Wyatt, K.

    1996-08-01

    Chemically enhanced recovery is a promising alternative to current technologies for management of subsurface releases of organic liquids. Through the inclusion of surfactants, solvents, polymers, and/or alkaline agents to a waterflood, the transport of targeted organic compounds can be increased and rates of recovery enhanced. By far, the vast majority of work done in the field of chemically enhanced recovery has been at a laboratory scale. The following text focuses on chemically enhanced recovery from a field application perspective with emphasis given to chlorinated solvents in a low permeability setting. While chlorinated solvents are emphasized, issues discussed are also relevant to organic liquids less dense than water such as petroleum products. Topics reviewed include: (1) Description of technology; (2) General technology considerations; (3) Low permeability media considerations; (4) Cost and reliability considerations; (5) Commercial availability; and (6) Case histories. Through this paper an appreciation is developed of both the potential and limitations of chemically enhanced recovery. Excluded from the scope of this paper is the in situ destruction of organic compounds through processes such as chemical or biological oxidation, chemically enhanced recovery of inorganic compounds, and ex situ soil treatment processes. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  11. The Misfortunes of Moral Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Marco Antonio

    2016-10-01

    In Unfit for the Future, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu present a sophisticated argument in defense of the imperative of moral enhancement. They claim that without moral enhancement, the future of humanity is seriously compromised. The possibility of ultimate harm, caused by a dreadful terrorist attack or by a final unpreventable escalation of the present environmental crisis aggravated by the availability of cognitive enhancement, makes moral enhancement a top priority. It may be considered optimistic to think that our present moral capabilities can be successfully improved by means of moral education, moral persuasion, and fear of punishment. So, without moral enhancement, drastic restrictions on human freedom would become the only alternative to prevent those dramatic potential outcomes. In this article, I will try to show that we still have reason to be less pessimistic and that Persson & Savulescu's arguments are fortunately unconvincing. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Enhanced imaging process for xeroradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, William D.; Zanrosso, Eddie M.

    1993-09-01

    An enhanced mammographic imaging process has been developed which is based on the conventional powder-toner selenium technology used in the Xerox 125/126 x-ray imaging system. The process is derived from improvements in the amorphous selenium x-ray photoconductor, the blue powder toner and the aerosol powder dispersion process. Comparisons of image quality and x-ray dose using the Xerox aluminum-wedge breast phantom and the Radiation Measurements Model 152D breast phantom have been made between the new Enhanced Process, the standard Xerox 125/126 System and screen-film at mammographic x-ray exposure parameters typical for each modality. When comparing the Enhanced Xeromammographic Process with the standard 125/126 System, a distinct advantage is seen for the Enhanced equivalent mass detection and superior fiber and speck detection. The broader imaging latitude of enhanced and standard Xeroradiography, in comparison to film, is illustrated in images made using the aluminum-wedge breast phantom.

  13. Mechanical stress and glucose concentration modulate glucose transport in cultured rat podocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara; Bryl, Ewa; Witkowski, Jacek M; Latawiec, Elzbieta; Angielski, Stefan; Stepinski, Jan

    2005-02-01

    Recent studies show that mechanical stress modifies both morphology and protein expression in podocytes. Ambient glucose is another factor modulating protein synthesis in these cells. In diabetes, podocytes experience elevated glucose concentrations as well as mechanical strain generated by high intracapillary pressures. Both these factors are responsible for podocyte injury, leading to impairment of kidney glomerular function. In the present study, we examined the effects of glucose concentration and mechanical stress on glucose uptake in podocytes. Following a 24 h pre-incubation in low (2.5 mM, LG), normal (5.6 mM, NG) or high (30 mM, HG) glucose media, cultured rat podocytes were exposed to 4 h mechanical stress. We used the labelled glucose analogue, [3H]2-deoxy-D-glucose, to measure glucose uptake. The distribution of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT2 and GLUT4 was assessed by flow cytometry. In the control (static) cells, glucose uptake was similar in the three glucose groups. In mechanically stressed podocytes, glucose uptake increased 2-fold in the LG and NG groups but increased 3-fold in the HG group. In the NG cells, mechanical load increased the membrane expression of GLUT2 and reduced the membrane-bound GLUT4. In stretched HG cells, the membrane expression of both GLUT2 and GLUT4 was decreased. High glucose decreased the plasma membrane GLUT2 content in the stretched cells, whereas both static and stretched podocytes showed an elevation in GLUT4. Mechanical stress potentiated glucose uptake in podocytes and this effect was enhanced by high ambient glucose. The decreased expression of GLUT2 and GLUT4 on the surface of stretched cells suggests that the activity of other glucose transporters may be regulated by mechanical stress in podocytes.

  14. Differential responses of intestinal glucose transporter mRNA transcripts to levels of dietary sugars.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Hase, K; Takagi, T; Fujii, T; Taketani, Y; Minami, H; Oka, T; Nakabou, Y

    1993-10-01

    Dietary sugars are known to stimulate intestinal glucose transport activity, but the specific signals involved are unknown. The Na(+)-dependent glucose co-transporter (SGLT1), the liver-type facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) and the intestinal-type facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT5) are all expressed in rat jejunum [Miyamoto, Hase, Taketani, Minami, Oka, Nakabou and Hagihira (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 181, 1110-1117]. In the present study we have investigated the effects of dietary sugars on these glucose transporter genes. A high-glucose diet stimulated glucose transport activity and increased the levels of SGLT1 and GLUT2 mRNAs in rat jejunum. 3-O-Methylglucose, D-galactose, D-fructose, D-mannose and D-xylose can mimic the regulatory effect of glucose on the SGLT1 mRNA level in rat jejunum. However, only D-galactose and D-fructose increased the levels of GLUT2 mRNA. The GLUT5 mRNA level was increased significantly only by D-fructose. Our results suggest that the increase in intestinal transport activity in rats caused by dietary glucose is due to an increase in the levels of SGLT1 and GLUT2 mRNAs, and that these increases in mRNA may be caused by an enhancement of the transcriptional rate. Furthermore, for expression of the SGLT1 gene, the signal need not be a metabolizable or transportable substrate whereas, for expression of the GLUT2 gene, metabolism of the substrate in the liver may be necessary for signalling. Only D-fructose is an effective signal for expression of the GLUT5 gene.

  15. Human enhancement: The new eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E.

    2014-01-01

    Supporters of human enhancement through genetic and other reproductive technologies claim that the new liberal eugenics, based on science and individual consent differs from the old eugenics which was unscientific and coercive. Supporters claim it is the parent's moral obligation to produce the best children possible. At this time, a defective gene that is identified in an unborn child cannot be repaired. To prevent the manifestation of the undesirable trait the unborn child is destroyed. The arguments in support of human enhancement are based on an ethic of consequence that could allow for nearly any means as long as the desired end is reached. Medical enhancement may affect the parent–child family unit; the parents’ love for the child may be conditioned on the expected results. The new eugenics, although based on science, continues to pursue the same goal as the old eugenics, the development of a superior individual and the elimination of those considered inferior. PMID:25249705

  16. Moral enhancement requires multiple virtues.

    PubMed

    Hughes, James J

    2015-01-01

    Some of the debates around the concept of moral enhancement have focused on whether the improvement of a single trait, such as empathy or intelligence, would be a good in general, or in all circumstances. All virtue theories, however, both secular and religious, have articulated multiple virtues that temper and inform one another in the development of a mature moral character. The project of moral enhancement requires a reengagement with virtue ethics and contemporary moral psychology to develop an empirically grounded model of the virtues and a fuller model of character development. Each of these virtues may be manipulable with electronic, psychopharmaceutical, and genetic interventions. A set of interdependent virtues is proposed, along with some of the research pointing to ways such virtues could be enhanced.

  17. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J.; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones. PMID:27396411

  18. Sexual dimorphism and human enhancement.

    PubMed

    Casal, Paula

    2013-12-01

    Robert Sparrow argues that because of women's longer life expectancy philosophers who advocate the genetic modification of human beings to enhance welfare rather than merely supply therapy are committed to favouring the selection of only female embryos, an implication he deems sufficiently implausible to discredit their position. If Sparrow's argument succeeds, then philosophers who advocate biomedical moral enhancement also seem vulnerable to a similar charge because of men's greater propensity for various forms of harmful wrongdoing. This paper argues there are various flaws in Sparrow's argument that render it unsuccessful. The paper also examines whether dimorphism reduction is a more desirable outcome than male elimination, thereby further illustrating the difficulties besetting the distinction between therapy and enhancement.

  19. Image enhancement for radiography inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wong, Brian Stephen; Guan, Tui Chen

    2005-04-01

    The x-ray radiographic testing method is often used for detecting defects as a non-destructive testing method (NDT). In many cases, NDT is used for aircraft components, welds, etc. Hence, the backgrounds are always more complex than a piece of steel. Radiographic images are low contrast, dark and high noise image. It is difficult to detect defects directly. So, image enhancement is a significant part of automated radiography inspection system. Histogram equalization and median filter are the most frequently used techniques to enhance the radiographic images. In this paper, the adaptive histogram equalization and contrast limited histogram equalization are compared with histogram equalization. The adaptive wavelet thresholding is compared with median filter. Through comparative analysis, the contrast limited histogram equalization and adaptive wavelet thresholding can enhance perception of defects better.

  20. Human enhancement: The new eugenics.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-08-01

    Supporters of human enhancement through genetic and other reproductive technologies claim that the new liberal eugenics, based on science and individual consent differs from the old eugenics which was unscientific and coercive. Supporters claim it is the parent's moral obligation to produce the best children possible. At this time, a defective gene that is identified in an unborn child cannot be repaired. To prevent the manifestation of the undesirable trait the unborn child is destroyed. The arguments in support of human enhancement are based on an ethic of consequence that could allow for nearly any means as long as the desired end is reached. Medical enhancement may affect the parent-child family unit; the parents' love for the child may be conditioned on the expected results. The new eugenics, although based on science, continues to pursue the same goal as the old eugenics, the development of a superior individual and the elimination of those considered inferior.

  1. Expert system for productivity enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Kengskool, K.

    1986-01-01

    This research develops a microcomputer based expert system that assists a human operator with productivity enhancement of work activities using the Method Improvement design strategy. The specific problem domain of this expert system is one of manual jobs performed by one operator at one workplace where the operator totally controls the cycle time of the operation. The specific output of the research is an expert system that effectively and efficiently aids practitioners in performing work system modeling, and enhancement tasks. The research methodology utilizes the Principles of Method Improvement and attempts to incorporate key features of expert system design. The usefulness of this new approach to work system modeling and enhancement is validated through a critical review of the expert system by potential users of the system.

  2. [Nootropes (cognition enhancers) and neuroprotectors].

    PubMed

    Vornin, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2007-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing and future nootropic drugs (cognition enhancers) with different mechanisms of action and heterogenous chemical structures, which have been developed on the basis of knowledge of the mechanisms of learning, memory and forgetting, as well as degenerative processes in aging brain and disease-associated cognitive impairments. These agents influence on acetylcholine-, glutamate-, GABA-, 5-HT-, dopamine-, histamine-, adenosine-, phosphodiesterase-, neurotrophic- systems, and neurohormones. Neuropeptides and their analogs, blood flow enhancers, calcium-channel blockers, antioxidants and vitamins and herbal preparations, and some other agents improving cerebral metabolism and influencing the neurodegeneracy involved in Alzheimer's disease are considered. An original classification of cognition enhancers, based on mechanisms of their action, includes more than 200 drugs in current use and those currently under development.

  3. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J.; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2016-07-01

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones.

  4. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K; Setter, Nava

    2016-07-11

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones.

  5. Enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Liang, S.; Wang, H.C.; Beuhler, M.D. )

    1994-09-01

    The possible use of enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal was examined at the facilities of a California utility in 1992 and 1993. The tests were conducted at bench, pilot, and demonstration scales, with two source waters. Alum and ferric chloride, with cationic polymer, were investigated at various influence arsenic concentrations. The investigators concluded that for the source waters tested, enhanced coagulation could be effective for arsenic removal and that less ferric chloride than alum, on a weight basis, is needed to achieve the same removal.

  6. Power enhanced frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system includes at least one source providing a first near-IR wavelength output including a gain medium for providing high power amplification, such as double clad fiber amplifier, a double clad fiber laser or a semiconductor tapered amplifier to enhance the power output level of the near-IR wavelength output. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Ra-man/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device.

  7. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Yuika Kawata, Satoshi; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-10

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO{sub 2} film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260–340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO{sub 2} substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  8. Does justice require genetic enhancements?

    PubMed

    Holtug, N

    1999-04-01

    It is argued that justice in some cases provides a pro tanto reason genetically to enhance victims of the genetic lottery. Various arguments--both to the effect that justice provides no such reason and to the effect that while there may be such reasons, they are overridden by certain moral constraints--are considered and rejected. Finally, it is argued that justice provides stronger reasons to perform more traditional medical tasks (treatments), and that therefore genetic enhancements should not play an important role in a public health care system.

  9. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atsushi; Saito, Yuika; Kawata, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO2) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO2 film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260-340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO2 substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  10. Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Brigmon, Robin L [North Augusta, SC; Berry, Christopher J [Aiken, SC

    2009-01-06

    A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

  11. Enhanced insulin absorption from sublingual microemulsions: effect of permeation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilam H; Devarajan, Padma V

    2014-12-01

    Microemulsions of insulin (50 IU/mL) comprising permeation enhancers were formulated for sublingual delivery. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated conformational stability, while chemical stability was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). CD spectra of insulin in combination with permeation enhancers revealed attenuation of molar ellipticity at 274 nm in the order TCTP > TC-AOT > TC > TC-NMT > Sol P > insulin solution. The molar ellipticity ratios at 208/222 nm confirmed dissociation of insulin in the microemulsions with the same rank order. Matrix-assisted laser diffraction ionization mass spectra (MALDI) revealed a significant shift in intensity signals towards monomer and dimers with a substantially high ratio of monomers, especially in the presence of the TCTP and TC-AOT. Permeation through porcine sublingual mucosa correlated with the dissociation data. A high correlation between the ratio of molar ellipticity at 208/222 nm and serum glucose levels (r (2) > 0.958) and serum insulin levels (r (2) > 0.952) strongly suggests the role of dissociation of insulin on enhanced absorption. While all microemulsions revealed a reduction in serum glucose levels and increase in serum insulin levels, significant differences were observed with the TCTP and TC-AOT microemulsions. High pharmacological availability >60 % and bioavailability >55 % compared to subcutaneous insulin at a low dose of 2 IU/kg appears highly promising. The data clearly suggests the additional role of the permeation enhancers on dissociation of insulin on enhanced sublingual absorption from the microemulsions.

  12. Enhancing Biology Lectures with Videodisc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.; Kramer, David W., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Authors describe how to use videodisks and computer software in biology instruction. HyperCard Videodisc Toolkit for the Macintosh computer and the BioSci videodisc are used to explain basic principles in the preparation of multimedia presentations. Authors assert that the use of this technology enhances student learning by inserting excellent…

  13. CPS Science Laboratory Enhancement Project

    SciTech Connect

    James, Chandra

    2011-11-30

    The lab enhancement initiative was designed to support early implementation efforts of new policy to promote safe learning environments and school labs called the Chemical Safety and Hygiene Plan (CSHP). These efforts included comprehensive inventories and chemical removals at all Chicago Public High Schools, conducted by environmental health and safety consultants, and the development of professional development resources for teachers.

  14. Enhancing What Students Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2007-01-01

    The Human Function Model, as described in the University of Kentucky Assistive Technology Project, places assistive technology in its proper perspective, as an external support that can enhance an individual's ability to function within the environment. The National Assistive Technology Research Institute groups assistive technology and related…

  15. Running Ahead. Enhancing Teacher Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kathy C.

    1996-01-01

    Workplace factors that affect teacher commitment include teacher autonomy and efficacy, participation, feedback, collaboration, learning opportunities, and resources. The paper details five strategies to help teachers enhance their personal level of commitment (being responsive, getting involved, seeking feedback, developing a plan to maximize…

  16. Forensics: Enhancing Civic Literacy & Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Shawn F.

    2009-01-01

    Forensics--interpretation, speech, and debate--can and should be a meaningful part of every school's curriculum. To put it simply, the course of study, alongside cocurricular competition, promotes civic education and enhances the standard curriculum by helping students explore myriad topics from multiple angles and find the truth in each,…

  17. Enhancements to PVM's BEOLIN architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    .4.3 of PVM had previously been enhanced by the addition of a new architecture, BEOLIN, which allowed a PVM user to abstract a Beowulf class computer with a private network to appear as a single system, visible to the outside world, which could spawn tasks on different internal nodes.

  18. Enhancing Author's Voice through Scripting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase J.; Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2011-01-01

    The authors suggest using scripting as a strategy to mentor and enhance author's voice in writing. Through gradual release, students use authentic literature as a model for writing with voice. The authors also propose possible extensions for independent practice, integration across content areas, and tips for evaluation.

  19. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual report is a summary of research accomplishments for 2006 in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. RWA is a serious pest of barley in the intermountain regions of the weste...

  20. Enhancing Preservice Mathematics Teachers' TPCK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the X-Tech project was to enhance preservice teachers' perceptions of their preparedness to teach with technology. Results indicated that practically-oriented methods that meet a variety of technology related needs are viable for attaining such a goal. Further, it is particularly beneficial to have teachers use a variety of resources…

  1. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual report is a summary of research accomplishments for 2008 in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS Wheat, Peanuts and other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. RWA is a serious pest of barley in the intermountain regions of the west...

  2. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual report is a summary of research accomplishments for 2010 in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS, Wheat, Peanuts and other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. RWA is a serious pest of barley in the intermountain regions of the wes...

  3. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual report is a summary of research accomplishments for 2007 in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS Wheat, Peanuts and other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. RWA is a serious pest of barley in the intermountain regions of the west...

  4. Forensics: Enhancing Civic Literacy & Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Shawn F.

    2009-01-01

    Forensics--interpretation, speech, and debate--can and should be a meaningful part of every school's curriculum. To put it simply, the course of study, alongside cocurricular competition, promotes civic education and enhances the standard curriculum by helping students explore myriad topics from multiple angles and find the truth in each,…

  5. Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a process for recovering liquid hydrocarbons. It comprises: injecting into a fractured subterranean formation a polymer enhanced foam comprising a polymer selected from a synthetic polymer or a biopolymer, a surfactant, an aqueous solvent and a gas, recovering liquid hydrocarbons from the formation.

  6. Innovative Solution to Video Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Through a licensing agreement, Intergraph Government Solutions adapted a technology originally developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for enhanced video imaging by developing its Video Analyst(TM) System. Marshall's scientists developed the Video Image Stabilization and Registration (VISAR) technology to help FBI agents analyze video footage of the deadly 1996 Olympic Summer Games bombing in Atlanta, Georgia. VISAR technology enhanced nighttime videotapes made with hand-held camcorders, revealing important details about the explosion. Intergraph's Video Analyst System is a simple, effective, and affordable tool for video enhancement and analysis. The benefits associated with the Video Analyst System include support of full-resolution digital video, frame-by-frame analysis, and the ability to store analog video in digital format. Up to 12 hours of digital video can be stored and maintained for reliable footage analysis. The system also includes state-of-the-art features such as stabilization, image enhancement, and convolution to help improve the visibility of subjects in the video without altering underlying footage. Adaptable to many uses, Intergraph#s Video Analyst System meets the stringent demands of the law enforcement industry in the areas of surveillance, crime scene footage, sting operations, and dash-mounted video cameras.

  7. Portfolio Development: Enhancing Professional Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Thomas J.; Tillman, Beverly

    This paper provides examples of how portfolios are used at the University of Dayton (Ohio) in an introductory course titled "The Profession of Teaching" to enhance the interpersonal, intrapersonal, musical, linguistic, and spatial intelligence of preservice teachers. For example, students can include audiotapes of their experiences,…

  8. Biosurfactant and enhanced oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    McInerney, Michael J.; Jenneman, Gary E.; Knapp, Roy M.; Menzie, Donald E.

    1985-06-11

    A pure culture of Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 (ATCC No. 39307) and a process for using said culture and the surfactant lichenysin produced thereby for the enhancement of oil recovery from subterranean formations. Lichenysin is an effective surfactant over a wide range of temperatures, pH's, salt and calcium concentrations.

  9. Communication Enhancement: Principles and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Howard

    1988-01-01

    A physician discusses the work of the Communications Enhancement Clinic at Children's Hospital-Boston in providing assistance to children with severe speech problems. He describes the process of evaluating and matching a child's strengths and weaknesses to available technology, including educational software, speech or print output devices, and…

  10. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2)…

  11. Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Leiser, Dan; Goldstein, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, fibrous ceramic tile material called "alumina-enhanced thermal barrier" (AETB) extends temperature capability of insulating materials. Material has obvious potential for terrestrial use in kilns, furnaces, heat engines, and other applications in which light weight and high operating temperature are specified. Three kinds of ceramic fibers are blended, molded, and sintered to make refractory tiles.

  12. The Net-Enhanced University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sederburg, William A.

    2002-01-01

    Using the example of Ferris State University, discusses how a "net-enhanced" university functions and offers guiding principles: serve the core activity, recognize the limits to technology, create a policy structure, provide technical infrastructure, provide personnel infrastructure, build communities, digitize, and don't duplicate. (EV)

  13. Commercialization of vein contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Deshmukh, Harshal; Vrancken, Carlos; Zhang, Yong; Zeman, Herbert D.; Weinberg, Devin

    2003-07-01

    An ongoing clinical study of an experimental infrared (IR) device, the Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) that visualizes surface veins for medical access, indicates that a commercial device with the performance of the existing VCE would have significant clinical utility for even a very skilled phlebotomist. A proof-of-principle prototype VCE device has now been designed and constructed that captures IR images of surface veins with a commercial CCD camera, transfers the images to a PC for real-time software image processing to enhance the vein contrast, and projects the enhanced images back onto the skin with a modified commercial LCD projector. The camera and projector are mounted on precision slides allowing for precise mechanical alignment of the two optical axes and for measuring the effects of axes misalignment. Precision alignment of the captured and projected images over the entire field-of-view is accomplished electronically by software adjustments of the translation, scaling, and rotation of the enhanced images before they are projected back onto the skin. This proof-of-principle prototype will be clinically tested and the experience gained will lead to the development of a commercial device, OnTarget!, that is compact, easy to use, and will visualize accessible veins in almost all subjects needing venipuncture.

  14. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  15. Refractive Index Enhancement in Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    experimentally demonstrated the key ingredients of this approach in Rubidium vapor where we have observe enhanced refractive index with vanishing absorption...beam, Ep. We have recently experimentally demonstrated this effect in a 1-mm-long Rubidium (Rb) vapor cell at high vapor densities. Here, we utilize

  16. Enhancements to PVM's BEOLIN architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    .4.3 of PVM had previously been enhanced by the addition of a new architecture, BEOLIN, which allowed a PVM user to abstract a Beowulf class computer with a private network to appear as a single system, visible to the outside world, which could spawn tasks on different internal nodes.

  17. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2)…

  18. Creating a Visually Enhanced Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Joseph H.

    1998-01-01

    Maintains that visually enhanced musical performances provide an exciting and creative aspect of musical production. Explains that the conductor should choose a musical selection that offers concrete visual opportunities, focus on visual images, choose video excerpts, and use dance if possible. Finds that many visual techniques used by marching…

  19. Laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lednev, Vasily N; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Filippov, Mikhail N; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N; Pershin, Sergey M

    2017-02-01

    Raman signal enhancement by multiple scattering inside laser crater cones was observed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy (LCERS) yielded a 14-fold increase in the Raman spectra bands due to efficient multiple scattering of laser irradiation within the laser crater walls. The same pulsed Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns) was used for both laser crater formation and Raman scattering experiments by varying the output pulse energy. First, powerful pulses are used to produce the laser crater; then low-energy pulses are used to perform Raman scattering measurements. The laser crater profile and its alignment with the laser beam waist were found to be the key parameters for the optimization of the Raman spectrum intensity enhancement. Raman intensity enhancement resulted from increased surface scattering area at the crater walls, rather than spatially offset Raman scattering. The increased signal-to-noise ratio resulted in limits of detection improvement for quantitative analysis using LCERS.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  1. Who Benefits from Pension Enhancements?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Ni, Shawn; Podgursky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s public pension funds across the United States accrued large actuarial surpluses. The seemingly flush conditions of the pension funds led legislators in most states to substantially improve retirement benefits for public workers, including teachers. In this study we examine the benefit enhancements to the teacher pension…

  2. Enhancing Instruction through Software Infusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sia, Archie P.

    The presence of the computer in the classroom is no longer considered an oddity; it has become an ordinary resource for teachers to use for the enhancement of instruction. This paper presents an examination of software infusion, i.e., the use of computer software to enrich instruction in an academic curriculum. The process occurs when a chosen…

  3. Who Benefits from Pension Enhancements?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Ni, Shawn; Podgursky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s public pension funds across the United States accrued large actuarial surpluses. The seemingly flush conditions of the pension funds led legislators in most states to substantially improve retirement benefits for public workers, including teachers. In this study we examine the benefit enhancements to the teacher pension…

  4. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  5. Enhancing Access to Journal Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Raymond H. Fogler Library.

    The libraries of the University of Maine System, Bates, Bowdoin, and Colby Colleges have installed integrated systems which are being linked electronically and are designed to promote the maximum sharing of library resources, thereby significantly enhancing the teaching and research capabilities of each institution. The institutions propose to…

  6. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual newsletter is a summary of research accomplishments in the past year in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS, Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. RWA is a serious pest of barley in the intermountain regions...

  7. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual newsletter is a summary of research accomplishments in the past year in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. Russian wheat aphid (RWA) is a serious pest of barley in the ...

  8. Germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our contribution to this annual newsletter is a summary of research accomplishments in the past year in germplasm enhancement for RWA resistance in barley at the USDA-ARS Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit, Stillwater, OK. RWA is a serious pest of barley in the intermountain regions ...

  9. Managing to enhance soil health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Healthy soils are critical for meeting current and future societal demands. Management strategies that protect the soil against erosion, build soil organic matter and promote nutrient cycling are ways to enhance soil health. Keeping soils covered and judicious use of agrochemicals are akin to us “hu...

  10. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwel; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  11. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  12. Increased glucose metabolism and alpha-glucosidase inhibition in Cordyceps militaris water extract-treated HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kang, Yun Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Kim, Tae Woo; Park, Jae Bong

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Recent living condition improvements, changes in dietary habits, and reductions in physical activity are contributing to an increase in metabolic syndrome symptoms including diabetes and obesity. Through such societal developments, humankind is continuously exposed to metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and the number of the victims is increasing. This study investigated Cordyceps militaris water extract (CMW)-induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells and the effect of CMW treatment on glucose metabolism. MATERIALS/METHODS Colorimetric assay kits were used to determine the glucokinase (GK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, glucose uptake, and glycogen content. Either RT-PCR or western blot analysis was performed for quantitation of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1α), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B (Akt), phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, GK, PDH, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) expression levels. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of acarbose and CMW were evaluated by absorbance measurement. RESULTS CMW induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells by increasing GLUT2 through HNF-1α expression stimulation. Glucose in the cells increased the CMW-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. In turn, glycolysis was stimulated, and glyconeogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, by studying the mechanism of action of PI3k, Akt, and GSK-3β, and measuring glycogen content, the study confirmed that the glucose was stored in the liver as glycogen. Finally, CMW resulted in a higher level of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than that from acarbose. CONCLUSION CMW induced the uptake of glucose into HepG2 cells, as well, it induced metabolism of the absorbed glucose. It is concluded that CMW is a candidate or potential use in diabetes prevention and treatment. PMID:28584574

  13. Increased glucose metabolism and alpha-glucosidase inhibition in Cordyceps militaris water extract-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kang, Yun Hwan; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Kim, Tae Woo; Park, Jae Bong; Choe, Myeon

    2017-06-01

    Recent living condition improvements, changes in dietary habits, and reductions in physical activity are contributing to an increase in metabolic syndrome symptoms including diabetes and obesity. Through such societal developments, humankind is continuously exposed to metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and the number of the victims is increasing. This study investigated Cordyceps militaris water extract (CMW)-induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells and the effect of CMW treatment on glucose metabolism. Colorimetric assay kits were used to determine the glucokinase (GK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, glucose uptake, and glycogen content. Either RT-PCR or western blot analysis was performed for quantitation of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1α), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B (Akt), phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, GK, PDH, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) expression levels. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of acarbose and CMW were evaluated by absorbance measurement. CMW induced glucose uptake in HepG2 cells by increasing GLUT2 through HNF-1α expression stimulation. Glucose in the cells increased the CMW-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. In turn, glycolysis was stimulated, and glyconeogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, by studying the mechanism of action of PI3k, Akt, and GSK-3β, and measuring glycogen content, the study confirmed that the glucose was stored in the liver as glycogen. Finally, CMW resulted in a higher level of α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than that from acarbose. CMW induced the uptake of glucose into HepG2 cells, as well, it induced metabolism of the absorbed glucose. It is concluded that CMW is a candidate or potential use in diabetes prevention and treatment.

  14. [STUDY RELATIVE EXPRESSION OF GENES THAT CONTROL GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN THE LIVER IN MICE WITH DEVELOPMENT OF MELANOCORTIN OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Baklanov, A V; Bazhan, N M

    2015-06-01

    The relative gene expressions of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), phosphoenolpyruvate carbo- xykinase (PEPCK)--markers of gluconeogenesis, glucokinase (GK)--a marker of glycolysis, glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2)--a marker of input and output of glucose in the liver were measured during the development of melanocortin (MC) obesity in male mice of C57BL/6J strain with mutation yellow in the Agouti locus (Ay/a mice). The mutation decreases MC receptor activity and induces hyperphagia and MC obesity. The males of the same line with mutation nonagouti were used as control. Tissue samples were taken at age 10 (before obesity), 15 (moderate obesity) and 30 (developed obesity) weeks. It has been shown that Ay/a mice had decreased glucose tolerance since 10-week age. There were age-related changes in mRNA levels in the liver of Ay/a mice, unlike a/a mice. In Ay/a mice the mRNA GLUT2 levels at the age of 10 weeks, mRNA GK levels at the age of 15 weeks, and mRNA G6P levels at the age of 3O weeks were higher than those in Ada mice of other ages. InAYfa mice the mRNA GK levels at the age of 15 weeks and mRNA G6F levels at the age of 30 weeks were increased relatively to those in a/a mice. Thus, Ay/a mice before the development of MK obesity had changes in the mRNA levels genes of proteins that regulate hepatic glucose metabolism, which may contribute to the compensation of glucose metabolism disorders caused by a hereditary decrease of MK system activity

  15. Computerized enhancement of retinal nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Peli, E; Hedges, T R; Schwartz, B

    1986-04-01

    We investigated a number of image processing techniques for enhancing the retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) in fundus photographs taken with red-free light. Wedge-type defects within the NFL were enhanced best by contrast enhancement algorithms such as histogram modification and extremum sharpening. Narrow, slitlike NFL defects can be enhanced by directional enhancement techniques. Normal NFL features were enhanced best by high-pass filtering techniques such as homomorphic filtering and adaptive enhancement. The enhanced normal NFL may be useful in the analysis of diffuse NFL loss. All of these successful enhancements of normal and defective features indicate that enhancing fundus photographs with digital image processing techniques should facilitate early detection of optic nerve damage from glaucoma and other diseases.

  16. Enhancing who? Enhancing what? Ethics, bioethics, and transhumanism.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tom

    2010-12-01

    Transhumanists advance a "posthuman" condition in which technological and genetic enhancements will transform humankind. They are joined in this goal by bioethicists arguing for genetic selection as a means of "enhancing evolution," improving if not also the species then at least the potential lives of future individuals. The argument of both, this paper argues, is a new riff on the old eugenics tune. As ever, it is done in the name of science and its presumed knowledge base. As ever, the result is destructive rather than instructive, bad faith promoted as high ideal. The paper concludes with the argument that species advancement is possible but in a manner thoroughly distinct from that advanced by either of these groups.

  17. Recruitment of Transcription Complexes to Enhancers and the Role of Enhancer Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Stees, Jared S.; Varn, Fred; Huang, Suming; Strouboulis, John; Bungert, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Enhancer elements regulate the tissue- and developmental-stage-specific expression of genes. Recent estimates suggest that there are more than 50,000 enhancers in mammalian cells. At least a subset of enhancers has been shown to recruit RNA polymerase II transcription complexes and to generate enhancer transcripts. Here, we provide an overview of enhancer function and discuss how transcription of enhancers or enhancer-generated transcripts could contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development and differentiation. PMID:23919179

  18. Enhancement and the ethics of development.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2008-03-01

    Much of the debate about the ethics of enhancement has proceeded according to two framing assumptions. The first is that although enhancement carries large social risks, the chief benefits of enhancement are to those who are enhanced (or their parents, in the case of enhancing the traits of children). The second is that, because we now understand the wrongs of state-driven eugenics, enhancements, at least in liberal societies, will be personal goods, chosen or not chosen in a market for enhancement services. This article argues that both framing assumptions must be rejected, once it is understood that some enhancements--especially those that are most likely to garner resources and become widespread--will increase human productivity. Once one appreciates the productivity-increasing potential of enhancements, one can begin to see that enhancement need not be primarily a zero sum affair, that the social costs of forgoing enhancements may be great, and that the state may well take an interest in facilitating biomedical enhancements, just as it does in facilitating education and other productivity-increasing traditional enhancements. Appreciating the productivity-increasing potential of enhancements also makes it possible to view the enhancement debate in a new light, through the lens of the ethics of development.

  19. Deep Ultrasound Enhancements Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M; Thomas, G; Ward, W; Gardner, D

    2006-05-01

    This study involves collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to enhance and optimize LANL's ultrasonic inspection capabilities for production. Deep-penetrating ultrasonic testing enhancement studies will extend the current capabilities, which only look for disbonds. Current ultrasonic methods in production use 15-20 MHz to inspect for disbonds. The enhanced capabilities use 5 MHz to penetrate to the back surface and image the back surface for any flaws. The enhanced capabilities for back surface inspection use transducers and squirter modifications that can be incorporated into the existing production system. In a production setup the current 15-20 MHz transducer and squirter would perform a bond inspection, followed by a deep inspection that would be performed by simply swapping out the 5 MHz transducer and squirter. Surrogate samples were manufactured of beryllium and bismuth to perform the ultrasonic enhancement studies. The samples were used to simulate flaws on the back surface and study ultrasound's ability to image them. The ultrasonic technique was optimized by performing experiments with these samples and analyzing transducer performance in detecting flaws in the surrogate. Beam patterns were also studied experimentally using a steel ball reflector to measure beam patterns, focal points, and sensitivities to better understand the relationship between design and performance. Many transducers were evaluated including transducers from LANL's production system, LLNL, and other commercially available transducers. Squirter design was also analyzed while performing experiments Flat-bottom holes and ball-mill defects of various sizes were introduced into the samples for experimentation. Flaws depths were varied from .020'' to 0.060'', and diameters varied from 0.0625'' to 0.187''. The smallest defect, .020'' depth and 0.0625'', was detected. Ultrasonic amplitude features produced better images than time

  20. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    PubMed

    Brown, Lewis R

    2010-06-01

    Two-thirds of the oil ever found is still in the ground even after primary and secondary production. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is one of the tertiary methods purported to increase oil recovery. Since 1946 more than 400 patents on MEOR have been issued, but none has gained acceptance by the oil industry. Most of the literature on MEOR is from laboratory experiments or from field trials of insufficient duration or that lack convincing proof of the process. Several authors have made recommendations required to establish MEOR as a viable method to enhance oil recovery, and until these tests are performed, MEOR will remain an unproven concept rather than a highly desirable reality. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Three Fresh Exposures, Enhanced Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This enhanced-color panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features three holes created by the rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004) inside 'Endurance Crater.' The enhanced image makes the red colors a little redder and blue colors a little bluer, allowing viewers to see differences too subtle to be seen without the exaggeration. When compared with an approximately true color image, the tailings from the rock abrasion tool and the interior of the abraded holes are more prominent in this view. Being able to discriminate color variations helps scientists determine rocks' compositional differences and texture variations. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  2. Superhydrophobicity enhancement through substrate flexibility.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Gerber, Julia; Prautzsch, Jana; Schutzius, Thomas M; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-11-22

    Inspired by manifestations in nature, microengineering and nanoengineering of synthetic materials to achieve superhydrophobicity has been the focus of much work. Generally, hydrophobicity is enhanced through the combined effects of surface texturing and chemistry; being durable, rigid materials are the norm. However, many natural and technical surfaces are flexible, and the resulting effect on hydrophobicity has been largely ignored. Here, we show that the rational tuning of flexibility can work synergistically with the surface microtexture or nanotexture to enhance liquid repellency performance, characterized by impalement and breakup resistance, contact time reduction, and restitution coefficient increase. Reduction in substrate areal density and stiffness imparts immediate acceleration and intrinsic responsiveness to impacting droplets (∼350 × g), mitigating the collision and lowering the impalement probability by ∼60% without the need for active actuation. Furthermore, we exemplify the above discoveries with materials ranging from man-made (thin steel or polymer sheets) to nature-made (butterfly wings).

  3. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  4. Three Fresh Exposures, Enhanced Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This enhanced-color panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features three holes created by the rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004) inside 'Endurance Crater.' The enhanced image makes the red colors a little redder and blue colors a little bluer, allowing viewers to see differences too subtle to be seen without the exaggeration. When compared with an approximately true color image, the tailings from the rock abrasion tool and the interior of the abraded holes are more prominent in this view. Being able to discriminate color variations helps scientists determine rocks' compositional differences and texture variations. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  5. Expressing fear enhances sensory acquisition.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Joshua M; Lee, Daniel H; Cusi, Andrée; Feiman, Roman; Grabski, Wojtek; Anderson, Adam K

    2008-07-01

    It has been proposed that facial expression production originates in sensory regulation. Here we demonstrate that facial expressions of fear are configured to enhance sensory acquisition. A statistical model of expression appearance revealed that fear and disgust expressions have opposite shape and surface reflectance features. We hypothesized that this reflects a fundamental antagonism serving to augment versus diminish sensory exposure. In keeping with this hypothesis, when subjects posed expressions of fear, they had a subjectively larger visual field, faster eye movements during target localization and an increase in nasal volume and air velocity during inspiration. The opposite pattern was found for disgust. Fear may therefore work to enhance perception, whereas disgust dampens it. These convergent results provide support for the Darwinian hypothesis that facial expressions are not arbitrary configurations for social communication, but rather, expressions may have originated in altering the sensory interface with the physical world.

  6. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  7. Mixing enhancement using axial flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for enhancing fluid mixing. The method comprises the following: (a) configuring a duct to have an effective outer wall, an effective inner wall, a cross-sectional shape, a first cross-sectional area and an exit area, the first cross-sectional area and the exit area being different in size; (b) generating a first flow at the first cross-sectional area, the first flow having a total pressure and a speed equal to or greater than a local speed of sound; and (c) generating a positive streamwise pressure gradient in a second flow in proximity of the exit area. The second flow results from the first flow. Fluid mixing is enhanced downstream from the duct exit area.

  8. Nonhereditary enhancement of progeny growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Amir S.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Hill, Leigh-Anne; Malone, P. Brandon; Cummings, Kathleen K.; Parghi, Deena; Schwartz, Robert J.; Smith, Roy G.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2002-01-01

    The im electroporated injection of a protease-resistant GH-releasing hormone cDNA into rat dams at 16 d gestation resulted in enhanced long-term growth of the F(1) offspring. The offspring were significantly heavier by 2 wk of age, and the difference was sustained to 10 wk of age. Consistent with their augmented growth, the plasma IGF-I concentration of the F(1) progeny was increased significantly. The pituitary gland of the offspring was significantly heavier and contained an increased number of somatotrophs and PRL-secreting cells, which is indicative of modification of cell lineage differentiation. These unique findings demonstrate that enhanced GH-releasing hormone expression in pregnant dams can result in intergenerational growth promotion by altering development of the pituitary gland in the offspring.

  9. Temporal predictability enhances auditory detection

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Emma L. A.; Harper, Nicol S.; Cooke, James E.; Schnupp, Jan W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Periodic stimuli are common in natural environments and are ecologically relevant, for example, footsteps and vocalizations. This study reports a detectability enhancement for temporally cued, periodic sequences. Target noise bursts (embedded in background noise) arriving at the time points which followed on from an introductory, periodic “cue” sequence were more easily detected (by ~1.5 dB SNR) than identical noise bursts which randomly deviated from the cued temporal pattern. Temporal predictability and corresponding neuronal “entrainment” have been widely theorized to underlie important processes in auditory scene analysis and to confer perceptual advantage. This is the first study in the auditory domain to clearly demonstrate a perceptual enhancement of temporally predictable, near-threshold stimuli. PMID:24907846

  10. Temporal predictability enhances auditory detection.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Emma L A; Harper, Nicol S; Cooke, James E; Schnupp, Jan W H

    2014-06-01

    Periodic stimuli are common in natural environments and are ecologically relevant, for example, footsteps and vocalizations. This study reports a detectability enhancement for temporally cued, periodic sequences. Target noise bursts (embedded in background noise) arriving at the time points which followed on from an introductory, periodic "cue" sequence were more easily detected (by ∼1.5 dB SNR) than identical noise bursts which randomly deviated from the cued temporal pattern. Temporal predictability and corresponding neuronal "entrainment" have been widely theorized to underlie important processes in auditory scene analysis and to confer perceptual advantage. This is the first study in the auditory domain to clearly demonstrate a perceptual enhancement of temporally predictable, near-threshold stimuli.

  11. Quantum-Enhanced Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Dunjko, Vedran; Taylor, Jacob M; Briegel, Hans J

    2016-09-23

    The emerging field of quantum machine learning has the potential to substantially aid in the problems and scope of artificial intelligence. This is only enhanced by recent successes in the field of classical machine learning. In this work we propose an approach for the systematic treatment of machine learning, from the perspective of quantum information. Our approach is general and covers all three main branches of machine learning: supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning. While quantum improvements in supervised and unsupervised learning have been reported, reinforcement learning has received much less attention. Within our approach, we tackle the problem of quantum enhancements in reinforcement learning as well, and propose a systematic scheme for providing improvements. As an example, we show that quadratic improvements in learning efficiency, and exponential improvements in performance over limited time periods, can be obtained for a broad class of learning problems.

  12. Method for enhanced oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Comberiati, Joseph R.; Locke, Charles D.; Kamath, Krishna I.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for enhanced recovery of oil from relatively "cold" reservoirs by carbon dioxide flooding. In oil reservoirs at a temperature less than the critical temperature of 87.7.degree. F. and at a pore pressure greater than the saturation pressure of carbon dioxide at the temperature of the reservoir, the carbon dioxide remains in the liquid state which does not satisfactorily mix with the oil. However, applicants have found that carbon dioxide can be vaporized in situ in the reservoir by selectively reducing the pore pressure in the reservoir to a value less than the particular saturated vapor pressure so as to greatly enhance the mixing of the carbon dioxide with the oil.

  13. Biosurfactant-enhanced soil bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaric, N.; Lu, G.; Velikonja, J.

    1995-12-01

    Bioremediation of soil contaminated with organic chemicals is a viable alternative method for clean-up and remedy of hazardous waste sites. The final objective in this approach is to convert the parent toxicant into a readily biodegradable product which is harmless to human health and/or the environment. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil can also efficiently be enhanced by addition or in-situ production of biosufactants. It was generally observed that the degradation time was shortened and particularly the adaptation time for the microbes. More data from our laboratories showed that chlorinated aromatic compounds, such as 2,4-dichlorophenol, a herbicide Metolachlor, as well as naphthalene are degraded faster and more completely when selected biosurfactants are added to the soil. More recent data demonstrated an enhanced biodegradation of heavy hydrocarbons in petrochemical sludges, and in contaminated oil when biosurfactants were present or were added prior to the biodegradation process.

  14. Nonhereditary enhancement of progeny growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Amir S.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Hill, Leigh-Anne; Malone, P. Brandon; Cummings, Kathleen K.; Parghi, Deena; Schwartz, Robert J.; Smith, Roy G.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2002-01-01

    The im electroporated injection of a protease-resistant GH-releasing hormone cDNA into rat dams at 16 d gestation resulted in enhanced long-term growth of the F(1) offspring. The offspring were significantly heavier by 2 wk of age, and the difference was sustained to 10 wk of age. Consistent with their augmented growth, the plasma IGF-I concentration of the F(1) progeny was increased significantly. The pituitary gland of the offspring was significantly heavier and contained an increased number of somatotrophs and PRL-secreting cells, which is indicative of modification of cell lineage differentiation. These unique findings demonstrate that enhanced GH-releasing hormone expression in pregnant dams can result in intergenerational growth promotion by altering development of the pituitary gland in the offspring.

  15. Enhancing Research Papers in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroffe, Kerry; McCann, G.

    2013-01-01

    XML-based production of journal articles, combined with real-time transformations, now make it possible to develop new enhancements to the reading experience and to the content of the article itself. Papers from AAS journals are now available in ‘Article Evolution’ HTML format, providing both familiar and new functionality that improves the reading experience. This poster will outline the roadmap for the development of ‘Article Evolution’ functionality and ask for input to help shape future enhancements that meet the needs of the astronomy community. Two of the ongoing developments described are ’semantic enrichment’ of articles and adoption of ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID). Both of these have exciting possibilities at an article level within ‘Article Evolution’ but will also impact widely on third party services, such as linking and discovery of research papers.

  16. Resolution enhanced sound detecting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is described for enhancing the resolution of a sound detector of the type which includes an acoustic mirror for focusing sound from an object onto a microphone to enable the determination of the location from which the sound arises. The enhancement apparatus includes an enclosure which surrounds the space between the mirror and microphone, and contains a gas heavier than air, such as Freon, through which sound moves slower and therefore with a shorter wavelength than in air, so that a mirror of given size has greater resolving power. An acoustically transparent front wall of the enclosure which lies forward of the mirror, can include a pair of thin sheets with pressured air between them, to form an end of the region of heavy gas into a concave shape.

  17. Quantum-Enhanced Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Taylor, Jacob M.; Briegel, Hans J.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of quantum machine learning has the potential to substantially aid in the problems and scope of artificial intelligence. This is only enhanced by recent successes in the field of classical machine learning. In this work we propose an approach for the systematic treatment of machine learning, from the perspective of quantum information. Our approach is general and covers all three main branches of machine learning: supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning. While quantum improvements in supervised and unsupervised learning have been reported, reinforcement learning has received much less attention. Within our approach, we tackle the problem of quantum enhancements in reinforcement learning as well, and propose a systematic scheme for providing improvements. As an example, we show that quadratic improvements in learning efficiency, and exponential improvements in performance over limited time periods, can be obtained for a broad class of learning problems.

  18. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  19. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  20. Photodetector with enhanced light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Kane, James

    1985-01-01

    A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the absorption of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.

  1. Technology Education Professional Enhancement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The two goals of this project are: the use of integrative field of aerospace technology to enhance the content and instruction delivered by math, science, and technology teachers through the development of a new publication entitled NASA Technology Today, and to develop a rationale and structure for the study of technology, which establishes the foundation for developing technology education standards and programs of the future.

  2. Preactivated thiomers: Permeation enhancing properties

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqing; Iqbal, Javed; Rahmat, Deni; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed to prepare a series of poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine-2-mercaptonicotinic acid conjugates (preactivated thiomers) and to evaluate the influence of molecular mass or degree of preactivation with 2-mercaptonicotinic acid (2MNA) on their permeation enhancing properties. Preactivated thiomers with different molecular mass and different degree of preactivation were synthesized and categorized on the basis of their molecular mass and degree of preactivation as PAA100-Cys-2MNA (h), PAA250-Cys-2MNA (h), PAA450-Cys-2MNA (h), PAA450-Cys-2MNA (m) and PAA450-Cys-2MNA (l). In vitro permeation studies, the permeation enhancement ability for preactivated thiomers was ranked as PAA450-Cys-2MNA (h) > PAA250-Cys-2MNA (h) > PAA100-Cys-2MNA (h) on both Caco-2 cell monolayers and rat intestinal mucosa. Comparing the influence of degree of preactivation with 2MNA on permeation enhancement, the following order PAA450-Cys-2MNA (h) > PAA450-Cys-2MNA (m) ≈ PAA450-Cys-2MNA (l) on Caco-2 cell monolayers and PAA450-Cys-2MNA (m) > PAA450-Cys-2MNA (h) > PAA450-Cys-2MNA (l) on intestinal mucosa was observed. The Papp of sodium fluorescein was 5.08-fold improved on Caco-2 cell monolayers for PAA450-Cys-2MNA (h) and 2.46-fold improved on intestinal mucosa for PAA450-Cys-2MNA (m), respectively, in comparison to sodium fluorescein in buffer only. These results indicated that preactivated thiomers could be considered as a promising macromolecular permeation enhancing polymer for non-invasive drug administration. PMID:22960503

  3. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  4. Enhancing Soundtracks From Old Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed system enhances soundtracks of old movies. Signal on optical soundtrack of film digitized and processed to reduce noise and improve quality; timing signals added, and signal recorded on compact disk. Digital comparator and voltage-controlled oscillator synchronizes speed of film-drive motor and compact disk motor. Frame-coded detector reads binary frame-identifying marks on film. Digital comparator generates error signal if marks on film do not match those on compact disk.

  5. Decision Rules for Enhanced Breakout.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-20

    347AD-A18 2753 DECISION RULES FOR ENHANCED GRERICOUT(U) MODERN TECNOLOGIES CORP DAYTON 0ON T MI MCCANN 20 MAR 87 MTC-TR-8883-02 BRMC-85-564-i F33615... information to develop a priori estimates of the cost to break-out specific spare parts. In addition, some recommendations were to be developed...implementing directives. Applicable AF and AFLC Regulations and Pamphlets were also reviewed to obtain information on costs and their estimated

  6. The Likelihood of Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Gary; Palmer, Linda C.; Gall, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Whether drugs that enhance cognition in healthy individuals will appear in the near future has become a topic of considerable interest. We address this possibility using a three variable system (psychological effect, neurobiological mechanism, efficiency vs. capabilities) for classifying candidates. Ritalin and modafinil, two currently available compounds, operate on primary psychological states that in turn affect cognitive operations (attention, memory), but there is little evidence that these effects translate into improvements in complex cognitive processing. A second category of potential enhancers includes agents that improve memory encoding, generally without large changes in primary psychological states. Unfortunately, there is little information on how these compounds affect cognitive performance in standard psychological tests. Recent experiments have identified a number of sites at which memory drugs could, in principle, manipulate the cell biological systems underlying the learning-related long-term potentiation (LTP) effect; this may explain the remarkable diversity of memory promoting compounds. Indeed, many of these agents are known to have positive effects on LTP. A possible third category of enhancement drugs directed specifically at integrated cognitive operations is nearly empty. From a neurobiological perspective, two plausible candidate classes have emerged that both target the fast excitatory transmission responsible for communication within cortical networks. One acts on nicotinic receptors (alpha7, alpha4) that regulate release of the neurotransmitter glutamate while the other (‘ampakines’) allosterically modulates the glutamate receptors mediating the post-synaptic response (EPSCs). Brain imaging in primates has shown that ampakines expand cortical networks engaged by a complex task; coupled with behavioral data, these findings provide evidence for the possibility of generating new cognitive capabilities. Finally, we suggest that

  7. The likelihood of cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Gary; Palmer, Linda C; Gall, Christine M

    2011-08-01

    Whether drugs that enhance cognition in healthy individuals will appear in the near future has become a topic of considerable interest. We address this possibility using a three variable system (psychological effect, neurobiological mechanism, and efficiency vs. capabilities) for classifying candidates. Ritalin and modafinil, two currently available compounds, operate on primary psychological states that in turn affect cognitive operations (attention and memory), but there is little evidence that these effects translate into improvements in complex cognitive processing. A second category of potential enhancers includes agents that improve memory encoding, generally without large changes in primary psychological states. Unfortunately, there is little information on how these compounds affect cognitive performance in standard psychological tests. Recent experiments have identified a number of sites at which memory drugs could, in principle, manipulate the cell biological systems underlying the learning-related long-term potentiation (LTP) effect; this may explain the remarkable diversity of memory promoting compounds. Indeed, many of these agents are known to have positive effects on LTP. A possible third category of enhancement drugs directed specifically at integrated cognitive operations is nearly empty. From a neurobiological perspective, two plausible candidate classes have emerged that both target the fast excitatory transmission responsible for communication within cortical networks. One acts on nicotinic receptors (alpha7 and alpha4) that regulate release of the neurotransmitter glutamate while the other ('ampakines') allosterically modulates the glutamate receptors mediating the post-synaptic response (EPSCs). Brain imaging in primates has shown that ampakines expand cortical networks engaged by a complex task; coupled with behavioral data, these findings provide evidence for the possibility of generating new cognitive capabilities. Finally, we suggest that

  8. Enhancements to Sperry/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, T.

    1986-01-01

    Reviewed is the enhancement to NASTRAN program performed by NUK (Nippon Univac Kaisha, Ltd.) added to Level 15.5. Features discussed include intermediate checkpoint-restart in triangular decomposition, I/O improvement, multibanked memory and new plate element. The first three improvements provide the capability to solve significantly large size problems, while the new elements release the analyst from the cumbersome work to constrain the singularities caused by the lack of stiffness of inplane rotation of old plate elements.

  9. Enhanced sampling of rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchionna, Simone

    2000-12-01

    We present a method to enhance sampling of a given reaction coordinate by projecting part of the random thermal noise along a preferential direction. The approach is promising to study rough energy landscapes and highly activated barriers that can be overcome by increasing the attempt frequency. Furthermore it allows us to rescale a given reaction coordinate without biasing the configurational properties of the system. A major advantage of the method is its simplicity in the analytical derivation and numerical implementation.

  10. Enhancing Soundtracks From Old Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed system enhances soundtracks of old movies. Signal on optical soundtrack of film digitized and processed to reduce noise and improve quality; timing signals added, and signal recorded on compact disk. Digital comparator and voltage-controlled oscillator synchronizes speed of film-drive motor and compact disk motor. Frame-coded detector reads binary frame-identifying marks on film. Digital comparator generates error signal if marks on film do not match those on compact disk.

  11. Enhanced photothermal cooling of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guccione, G.; Hosseini, M.; Mirzaei, A.; Slatyer, H. J.; Buchler, B. C.; Lam, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the optomechanical interaction between light and metallic nanowires through the action of bolometric forces. We show that the response time of the photothermal forces induced on the nanowire is fast and the strength of the interaction can overcome the radiation pressure force. Furthermore, we suggest the photothermal forces can be enhanced by surface plasmon excitation to cool the sub-megahertz vibrational modes of the nanowires close to its quantum limit.

  12. CARE 3, Version 4 enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, L. A.; Stiffler, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The enhancements and error corrections to CARE III Version 4 are listed. All changes to Version 4 with the exception of the internal redundancy model were implemented in Version 5. Version 4 is the first public release version for execution on the CDC Cyber 170 series computers. Version 5 is the second release version and it is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 for execution on the DEC VAX 11/700 series computers and many others.

  13. Closing thoughts for cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kantak, Kathleen M; Wettstein, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging field of cognition enhancing research along with its ethics as it stands today is summarized. In the forefront are potentially novel drugs and non-pharmacological treatments for cognitive impairment across many different psychiatric and neurologic indications. Today's research will bring new drugs to patients tomorrow, and tomorrow's research will bring new molecular targets to clinical development that should be cognitive domain-specific. There is the likelihood that special populations may be better treated and that personalized medicine for cognitive impairment could become a reality. It is conceivable that with the current research effort, cognition enhancing drugs will become available to wide-ranging populations of people with neuropsychiatric illness and to those that are healthy. In some cultures, there is a push in society to be more intelligent or have more cognitive prowess. Thus, the ethical use of cognitive enhancing drugs should be an area of debate and communication. Neuroethics is a growing field and it intends to bring together key contributors such as physicians, disease experts, regulatory officials, and policy makers to discuss how such medicines can or should be made available. Together with this, one has to consider the possibility that no single medicine or technology will have a great impact on cognition and, therefore, combination therapy of drugs plus other approaches like exercise or transcranial direct-current stimulation may be the path forward. This is another area of scientific inquiry and debate, and the results should be fruitful and helpful to patients. The science of cognition is advancing at a rapid rate, and communication of its progress along with the development of rational and ethical policies for use of cognitive enhancers will be beneficial.

  14. Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-11

    developing methods to optimally functionalize these nanoreinforcements. A coupling agent methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (MPS) was found to be...102 Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity AFOSR bn0)2-1-0414 H. Thomas Hahn Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department University of...nanocomposite. A coupling agent methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (MPS) was found to be effective for the SiC nanocomposite. As for the graphite

  15. Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Stephen U. S.; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

  16. Enhancing and evaluating diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Swets, J A; Getty, D J; Pickett, R M; D'Orsi, C J; Seltzer, S E; McNeil, B J

    1991-01-01

    Techniques that may enhance diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings were tested in the context of mammography. Statistical information about the relevant features among those visible in a mammogram and about their relative importances in the diagnosis of breast cancer was the basis of two decision aids for radiologists: a checklist that guides the radiologist in assigning a scale value to each significant feature of the images of a particular case, and a computer program that merges those scale values optimally to estimate a probability of malignancy. A test set of approximately 150 proven cases (including normals and benign and malignant lesions) was interpreted by six radiologists, first in their usual manner and later with the decision aids. The enhancing effect of these feature-analytic techniques was analyzed across subsets of cases that were restricted progressively to more and more difficult cases, where difficulty was defined in terms of the radiologists' judgements in the standard reading condition. Accuracy in both standard and enhanced conditions decreased regularly and substantially as case difficulty increased, but differentially, such that the enhancement effect grew regularly and substantially. For the most difficult case sets, the observed increases in accuracy translated into an increase of about 0.15 in sensitivity (true-positive proportion) for a selected specificity (true-negative proportion) of 0.85 or a similar increase in specificity for a selected sensitivity of 0.85. That measured accuracy can depend on case-set difficulty to different degrees for two diagnostic approaches has general implications for evaluation in clinical medicine. Comparative, as well as absolute, assessments of diagnostic performances--for example, of alternative imaging techniques--may be distorted by inadequate treatments of this experimental variable. Subset analysis, as defined and illustrated here, can be useful in alleviating the problem.

  17. Enhanced vision meets pilot assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Peter; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich; Suikat, Reiner

    1999-07-01

    As presented in previous contributions within SPIE's Enhanced and Synthetic Vision Conferences, DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance is involved in the design, development and testing of enhanced vision systems for flight guidance applications. The combination of forward looking imaging sensors (such as DaimlerChrysler's HiVision millimeter wave radar), terrain data stored in on-board databases plus information transmitted from ground or on-board other aircraft via data link is used to give the air crew an improved situational awareness. This helps pilots to handle critical tasks, such as landing approaches and taxiing especially under adverse weather conditions. The research and development of this system was mostly funded by a national research program from mid of 1996 to mid of 1999. On one hand this paper will give a general overview about the project and the lessons learned. Results of flight tests carried out recently will be shown as well as brief looks into evaluation tests on-board an Airbus A-340 full flight simulator performed mid of 1998 at the Flight Simulation Center Berlin. On the other hand an outlook will be presented, which shows enhanced vision systems as a major player in the theater of pilot assistance systems as they are under development at DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance in close cooperation with the University of the Federal Armed Forces in Munich, Germany.

  18. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  19. Parametrically enhanced hidden photon search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Zhao, Yue

    2014-10-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model contain hidden photons. A light hidden photon will generically couple to the Standard Model through a kinetic mixing term, giving a powerful avenue for detection using "light-shining-through-a-wall"-type transmission experiments with resonant cavities. We demonstrate a parametric enhancement of the signal in such experiments, resulting from transmission of the longitudinal mode of the hidden photon. While previous literature has focused on the production and detection of transverse modes, the longitudinal mode allows a significant improvement in experimental sensitivity. Although optical experiments such as ALPS are unable to take useful advantage of this enhancement, the reach of existing microwave cavity experiments such as CROWS is significantly enhanced beyond their published results. Future microwave cavity experiments, designed with appropriate geometry to take full advantage of the longitudinal mode, will provide a powerful probe of hidden-photon parameter space extending many orders of magnitude beyond current limits, including significant regions where the hidden photon can be dark matter.

  20. Superparamagnetic enhancement of thermoelectric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Qingjie; Wei, Ping; Mu, Xin; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Cuncheng; Ma, Shifang; He, Danqi; Ji, Pengxia; Zhu, Wanting; Nie, Xiaolei; Su, Xianli; Tang, Xinfeng; Shen, Baogen; Dong, Xiaoli; Yang, Jihui; Liu, Yong; Shi, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The ability to control chemical and physical structuring at the nanometre scale is important for developing high-performance thermoelectric materials. Progress in this area has been achieved mainly by enhancing phonon scattering and consequently decreasing the thermal conductivity of the lattice through the design of either interface structures at nanometre or mesoscopic length scales or multiscale hierarchical architectures. A nanostructuring approach that enables electron transport as well as phonon transport to be manipulated could potentially lead to further enhancements in thermoelectric performance. Here we show that by embedding nanoparticles of a soft magnetic material in a thermoelectric matrix we achieve dual control of phonon- and electron-transport properties. The properties of the nanoparticles—in particular, their superparamagnetic behaviour (in which the nanoparticles can be magnetized similarly to a paramagnet under an external magnetic field)—lead to three kinds of thermoelectromagnetic effect: charge transfer from the magnetic inclusions to the matrix; multiple scattering of electrons by superparamagnetic fluctuations; and enhanced phonon scattering as a result of both the magnetic fluctuations and the nanostructures themselves. We show that together these effects can effectively manipulate electron and phonon transport at nanometre and mesoscopic length scales and thereby improve the thermoelectric performance of the resulting nanocomposites.

  1. Enhancement classification of galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkinson, John

    With the advent of astronomical imaging technology developments, and the increased capacity of digital storage, the production of photographic atlases of the night sky have begun to generate volumes of data which need to be processed autonomously. As part of the Tonantzintla Digital Sky Survey construction, the present work involves software development for the digital image processing of astronomical images, in particular operations that preface feature extraction and classification. Recognition of galaxies in these images is the primary objective of the present work. Many galaxy images have poor resolution or contain faint galaxy features, resulting in the misclassification of galaxies. An enhancement of these images by the method of the Heap transform is proposed, and experimental results are provided which demonstrate the image enhancement to improve the presence of faint galaxy features thereby improving classification accuracy. The feature extraction was performed using morphological features that have been widely used in previous automated galaxy investigations. Principal component analysis was applied to the original and enhanced data sets for a performance comparison between the original and reduced features spaces. Classification was performed by the Support Vector Machine learning algorithm.

  2. The myth of genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rosoff, Philip M

    2012-06-01

    The ongoing revolution in molecular genetics has led many to speculate that one day we will be able to change the expression or phenotype of numerous complex traits to improve ourselves in many different ways. The prospect of genetic enhancements has generated heated controversy, with proponents advocating research and implementation, with caution advised for concerns about justice, and critics tending to see the prospect of genetic enhancements as an assault on human freedom and human nature. Both camps base their arguments on the unquestioned assumption that the science will realize either their dreams or nightmares. In this paper, I show that their beliefs are based upon two fundamental mistakes. First, they are based upon an unwarranted reliance in a genetic determinism that takes for granted that the traits that we might most want to enhance, like intelligence, aggression, shyness, and even athletic ability, can be causally directed by specific genes. In so doing, character descriptions are reified to be concrete and discrete entities, in this case, genes. Second, they have accepted on faith that there is, or will be, a science to translate their hopes or worries into reality when, in fact, that is unlikely to occur because of the irreducible complexity of phenotypic expression.

  3. Enhancing Stent Effectiveness with Nanofeatures

    PubMed Central

    Bassous, Nicole; Cooke, John P.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents are an effective therapy for symptomatic arterial obstructions, substantially reducing the incidence of restenosis by suppressing the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells into the intima. However, current drug-eluting stents also inhibit the growth of endothelial cells, which are required to cover the vascular stent to reduce an excessive inflammatory response. As a result, the endothelial lining of the lumen is not regenerated. Since the loss of this homeostatic monolayer increases the risk of thrombosis, patients with drug-eluting stents require long-term antithrombotic therapy. Thus, there is a need for improved devices with enhanced effectiveness and physiological compatibility towards endothelial cells. Current developments in nanomaterials may enhance the function of commercially available vascular devices. In particular, modified design schemes might incorporate nanopatterns or nanoparticle-eluting features that reduce restenosis and enhance re-endothelialization. The intent of this review is to discuss emerging nanotechnologies that will improve the performance of vascular stents. PMID:27826371

  4. Dispersion-Enhanced Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time-dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two-level and multi-level) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the side-band frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an under-coupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady-state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady-state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  5. Lateral interactions and enhanced adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Deakin, Mark R.

    1991-06-01

    We extend earlier work on the effects of lateral adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in systems with two different adsorbate species to consider in detail enhanced adsorption phenomena. We give a detailed explanation of the enhancement mechanism for a lattice-gas model in thermodynamic equilibrium, and provide explicit quantitative criteria which must be satisfied by the effective lateral interactions in systems exhibiting strong, intermediate, or weak enhancement behavior. It is the examination and understanding of the topological details of the ground-state and phase diagrams of the model that allow the formulation of these criteria. The theoretically obtained criteria are supported by precise numerical calculations (transfer-matrix with strip width six) of adsorption isotherms for a three-state lattice-gas model with nearest-neighbor interactions on a triangular lattice. The applicability of this theoretical framework is illustrated by an analysis of experimental adsorption isotherms for the electrochemical adsorption of naphthalene on copper and n-decylamine on nickel, previously obtained by Bockris et al. As suggested by Damaskin et al. we attribute the potential dependence of the organic coverage to the influence of coadsorbed hydrogen. We find that nonlinear least-squares fits of numerical lattice-gas isotherms to the experimental data produce good agreement between the experimental and numerical adsorption isotherms, as well as effective lattice-gas interaction energies consistent with independent estimates from the literature.

  6. Integrating Diverse Datasets Improves Developmental Enhancer Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Genevieve D.; Oksenberg, Nir; Truty, Rebecca M.; Kostka, Dennis; Murphy, Karl K.; Ahituv, Nadav; Pollard, Katherine S.; Capra, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Gene-regulatory enhancers have been identified using various approaches, including evolutionary conservation, regulatory protein binding, chromatin modifications, and DNA sequence motifs. To integrate these different approaches, we developed EnhancerFinder, a two-step method for distinguishing developmental enhancers from the genomic background and then predicting their tissue specificity. EnhancerFinder uses a multiple kernel learning approach to integrate DNA sequence motifs, evolutionary patterns, and diverse functional genomics datasets from a variety of cell types. In contrast with prediction approaches that define enhancers based on histone marks or p300 sites from a single cell line, we trained EnhancerFinder on hundreds of experimentally verified human developmental enhancers from the VISTA Enhancer Browser. We comprehensively evaluated EnhancerFinder using cross validation and found that our integrative method improves the identification of enhancers over approaches that consider a single type of data, such as sequence motifs, evolutionary conservation, or the binding of enhancer-associated proteins. We find that VISTA enhancers active in embryonic heart are easier to identify than enhancers active in several other embryonic tissues, likely due to their uniquely high GC content. We applied EnhancerFinder to the entire human genome and predicted 84,301 developmental enhancers and their tissue specificity. These predictions provide specific functional annotations for large amounts of human non-coding DNA, and are significantly enriched near genes with annotated roles in their predicted tissues and lead SNPs from genome-wide association studies. We demonstrate the utility of EnhancerFinder predictions through in vivo validation of novel embryonic gene regulatory enhancers from three developmental transcription factor loci. Our genome-wide developmental enhancer predictions are freely available as a UCSC Genome Browser track, which we hope will enable

  7. Integrating diverse datasets improves developmental enhancer prediction.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Genevieve D; Oksenberg, Nir; Truty, Rebecca M; Kostka, Dennis; Murphy, Karl K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pollard, Katherine S; Capra, John A

    2014-06-01

    Gene-regulatory enhancers have been identified using various approaches, including evolutionary conservation, regulatory protein binding, chromatin modifications, and DNA sequence motifs. To integrate these different approaches, we developed EnhancerFinder, a two-step method for distinguishing developmental enhancers from the genomic background and then predicting their tissue specificity. EnhancerFinder uses a multiple kernel learning approach to integrate DNA sequence motifs, evolutionary patterns, and diverse functional genomics datasets from a variety of cell types. In contrast with prediction approaches that define enhancers based on histone marks or p300 sites from a single cell line, we trained EnhancerFinder on hundreds of experimentally verified human developmental enhancers from the VISTA Enhancer Browser. We comprehensively evaluated EnhancerFinder using cross validation and found that our integrative method improves the identification of enhancers over approaches that consider a single type of data, such as sequence motifs, evolutionary conservation, or the binding of enhancer-associated proteins. We find that VISTA enhancers active in embryonic heart are easier to identify than enhancers active in several other embryonic tissues, likely due to their uniquely high GC content. We applied EnhancerFinder to the entire human genome and predicted 84,301 developmental enhancers and their tissue specificity. These predictions provide specific functional annotations for large amounts of human non-coding DNA, and are significantly enriched near genes with annotated roles in their predicted tissues and lead SNPs from genome-wide association studies. We demonstrate the utility of EnhancerFinder predictions through in vivo validation of novel embryonic gene regulatory enhancers from three developmental transcription factor loci. Our genome-wide developmental enhancer predictions are freely available as a UCSC Genome Browser track, which we hope will enable

  8. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives.

  9. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D.; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives. PMID:25265458

  10. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  11. Identification of RO4597014, a Glucokinase Activator Studied in the Clinic for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To resolve the metabolite redox cycling associated with our earlier clinical compound 2, we carried out lead optimization of lead molecule 1. Compound 4 showed improved lipophilic ligand efficiency and demonstrated robust glucose lowering in diet-induced obese mice without a liability in predictive preclinical drug safety studies. Thus, it was selected as a clinical candidate and further studied in type 2 diabetic patients. Clinical data suggests no evidence of metabolite cycling, which is consistent with the preclinical profiling of metabolism. PMID:24900686

  12. In vitro evidence supports the presence of glucokinase-independent glucosensing mechanisms in hypothalamus and hindbrain of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Otero-Rodiño, Cristina; Velasco, Cristina; Álvarez-Otero, Rosa; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Míguez, Jesús M; Soengas, José L

    2016-06-01

    We previously obtained evidence in rainbow trout for the presence and response to changes in circulating levels of glucose (induced by intraperitoneal hypoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic treatments) of glucosensing mechanisms based on liver X receptor (LXR), mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to increased expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), and sweet taste receptor in the hypothalamus, and on sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT-1) in hindbrain. However, these effects of glucose might be indirect. Therefore, we evaluated the response of parameters related to these glucosensing mechanisms in a first experiment using pooled sections of hypothalamus and hindbrain incubated for 6 h at 15°C in modified Hanks' medium containing 2, 4 or 8 mmol l(-1) d-glucose. The responses observed in some cases were consistent with glucosensing capacity. In a second experiment, pooled sections of hypothalamus and hindbrain were incubated for 6 h at 15°C in modified Hanks' medium with 8 mmol l(-1) d-glucose alone (control) or containing 1 mmol l(-1) phloridzin (SGLT-1 antagonist), 20 µmol l(-1) genipin (UCP2 inhibitor), 1 µmol l(-1) trolox (ROS scavenger), 100 µmol l(-1) bezafibrate (T1R3 inhibitor) and 50 µmol l(-1) geranyl-geranyl pyrophosphate (LXR inhibitor). The response observed in the presence of these specific inhibitors/antagonists further supports the proposal that critical components of the different glucosensing mechanisms are functioning in rainbow trout hypothalamus and hindbrain. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Polycarboxylates Enhance Beetle Antifreeze Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Summary Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) lower the noncolligative freezing point of water in the presence of ice below the ice melting point. The temperature difference between the melting point and the noncolligative freezing point is termed thermal hysteresis (TH). The magnitude of the TH depends on the specific activity and the concentration of AFP, and the concentration of enhancers in the solution. Known enhancers are certain low molecular mass molecules and proteins. Here, we investigated a series of polycarboxylates that enhance the TH activity of an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Triethylenetetramine-N,N,N′,N″,N‴,N‴-hexaacetate, the most efficient enhancer identified in this work, can increase the TH of DAFP by nearly 1.5 fold over than that of the published best enhancer, citrate. The Zn2+ coordinated carboxylate results in loss of the enhancement ability of the carboxylate on antifreeze activity. There is not an additional increase in TH when a weaker enhancer is added to a stronger enhancer solution. These observations suggest that the more carboxylate groups per enhancer molecule the better the efficiency of the enhancer and that the freedom of motion of these molecules is necessary for them to serve as enhancers for AFP. The hydroxyl groups in the enhancer molecules can also positively affect their TH enhancement efficiency, though not as strongly as carboxylate groups. Mechanisms are discussed. PMID:18620083

  14. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  15. Gasdynamic enhancement of nonpremixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, F.E.

    1994-12-31

    To promote efficient performance of very high speed air-breathing propulsion systems, the combustor Mach number must be of the order of six for a flight Mach number of 18. Because of this high gas speed through the combustor, mixing rates of hydrogen fuel with air must be very rapid in order to allow a combustor of reasonable length. It is proposed to enhance the rate of mixing and combustion of hydrogen and air, and thereby reduce combustor length, through the introduction of streamwise vorticity generated by the interaction of a weak oblique shock wave with the density gradient between air and a cylindrical jet of hydrogen. Because of the high Mach number flow in the combustor, the oblique shock traverses the jet at a small angle with respect to the free stream direction, and the principle of slender body theory allows one conceptually to replace the three-dimensional steady flow with a two-dimensional unsteady flow. As a consequence, two-dimensional time-dependent computational studies and an extensive experimental shock tube investigation were employed to assess mixing rates for the steady flow in the combustor. The results indicated that under realistic conditions, adequate mixing could be accomplished within 1 ms, a rate that was technologically interesting. Encouraged by these experiments, a ``practical`` injector, utilizing shock-enhanced mixing, was designed for a combustor having a free stream Mach number of 6.0. A detailed aerodynamic and mixing investigation was carried out in the Mach 6 High Reynolds Number Tunnel at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The results confirmed both the details and the overall effectiveness of the shock-enhanced mixing concept.

  16. Countermeasures to Enhance Sensorimotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. C.; Miller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We have conducted a series of studies that have shown: Training using a combination of modified visual flow and support surface motion during treadmill walking enhances locomotor adaptability to a novel sensorimotor environment. Trained individuals become more proficient at performing multiple competing tasks while walking during adaptation to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. Trained subjects can retain their increased level of adaptability over a six months period. SA training is effective in producing increased adaptability in a more complex over-ground ambulatory task on an obstacle course. This confirms that for a complex task like walking, treadmill training contains enough of the critical features of overground walking to be an effective training modality. The structure of individual training sessions can be optimized to promote fast/strategic motor learning. Training sessions that each contain short-duration exposures to multiple perturbation stimuli allows subjects to acquire a greater ability to rapidly reorganize appropriate response strategies when encountering a novel sensory environment. Individual sensory biases (i.e. increased visual dependency) can predict adaptive responses to novel sensory environments suggesting that customized training prescriptions can be developed to enhance

  17. Helium and Enhanced Image of the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video blinks between an image in Helium and an enhanced image. The original image is from AIA on SDO and the enhanced image was created at the LM Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL) by D...

  18. ATAMM enhancement and multiprocessor performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoughton, John W.; Mielke, Roland R.; Som, Sukhamoy; Obando, Rodrigo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Jones, Robert L., III; Mandala, Brij Mohan V.

    1991-01-01

    ATAMM (Algorithm To Architecture Mapping Model) enhancement and multiprocessor performance evaluation is discussed. The following topics are included: the ATAMM model; ATAMM enhancement; ADM (Advanced Development Model) implementation of ATAMM; and ATAMM support tools.

  19. Freeze Enhanced Halate Halide Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Weaver, K.; Broderick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Relatively little is known about halate ion species (XO3-; X = I, Br, Cl) in atmospheric condensed phases. It was initial thought that iodate was a terminal stable species upon iodide oxidation. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that reactions involving iodate can lead to reactive iodine, and this chemistry is accelerated under acidic conditions. The environmental concentrations and chemistry of bromate and chlorate are largely unexplored in environmental ices. We present results from a series of aqueous phase halate ion reactions with halides under acidic conditions, showing that the kinetics are strongly enhanced upon freezing. The products of these reactions are reactive halogens, which have important implications to marine boundary layer chemistry.

  20. Photographic image enhancement and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scientists using aerial imagery frequently desire image processing or enhancement of that imagery to aid them in data analysis. Sophisticated digital image processing techniques are currently employed in many applications where the data is recorded in digital format, where processing hardware and programs are available. Aerial photographic imagery poses a problem in the magnitude of the digitization processing. Photographic image processing analogous to many available digital techniques is being employed by scientific investigators. Those techniques which may be applied in a cost effective manner to processing of aerial photographic imagery are described here.

  1. Surfactant-Enhanced DNAPL Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-24

    DNAPL SOURCE REMEDIATION AT SITE 88, MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE vii AATDF AFCEE AFB AFP4 AQT B bgs CERCLA CITT em cmc cp cu d de DE&S DNAPL DoD...liquid meter(s) medium, middle Marine Corps Base maximum contaminant level millidarcies micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration unit minute(s) multi-level...present in the subsurface adjacent to a dry-cleaning facility operated by the Marine Corps Base (MCB) Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The contaminant was

  2. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  3. Computer Program Helps Enhance Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, Daniel F., IV

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is Macintosh application program for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. Works with color images digitized to 8 bits. Reads image files in JPL's two primary image formats VICAR and PDS as well as in Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles array of image-processing capabilities used for variety of applications, including processing of biomedical images, cartography, imaging of Earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher also imports color lookup tables in VICAR format for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). Written in Symantec's Think C.

  4. Privacy-enhanced electronic mail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-06-01

    The security of electronic mail sent through the Internet may be described in exactly three words: there is none. The Privacy and Security Research Group has recommended implementing mechanisms designed to provide security enhancements. The first set of mechanisms provides a protocol to provide privacy, integrity, and authentication for electronic mail; the second provides a certificate-based key management infrastructure to support key distribution throughout the internet, to support the first set of mechanisms. These mechanisms are described, as well as the reasons behind their selection and how these mechanisms can be used to provide some measure of security in the exchange of electronic mail.

  5. Plasmonic Backscattering Enhanced Inverted Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Roberts, B.; Ku, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    A plasmonic nanoparticle incorporated inverted organic photovoltaic structure was demonstrated where a monolayer of Ag nanoparticles acted as a wavelength selective reflector. Enhanced light harvesting via plasmonic backscattering into the photovoltaic absorber was observed, resulting in a two-fold improvement in the photocurrent and increased open-circuit voltage. Further, utilizing an optical spacer, the plasmonic backscattering was spectrally controlled, thereby modulating the external quantum efficiency and the photocurrent. Unlike a regular thin-film metallic back reflector, excellent off-resonance optical transmission in excess of 80% was observed from the Ag nanoparticles, making this structure highly suitable for semi-transparent and multi-junction photovoltaic applications.

  6. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  7. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  8. Enhanced variants of IDE algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujok, Petr

    2017-07-01

    The performance of a new mechanism applied on a differential evolution algorithm with an individual-dependent mechanism (IDE) is studied experimentally. Three new IDE variants are proposed and compared with the original IDE variant. The performance of all studied algorithms was compared on each problem of CEC 2015 test suite. The newly proposed IDE variants mostly outperformed the original IDE variant significantly. The results show that the best results are for the newly proposed IDE variant with an enhanced mutation scheme and IDE with the control of the population diversity.

  9. Enhancement of polyisoprene latex production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Albert J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Production of high molecular weight polyisoprene latex is enhanced by administering to plants, particularly Guayule Plants, an amine containing at least one two-carbon chain substituent and preferably substituted trialkylamine of the general structure: ##STR1## where R.sub.4, R.sub.5 and R.sub.6 are alkyl, preferably ethyl and at least one of R.sub.4, R.sub.5 and R.sub.6 is preferably an electron withdrawing group substituted aryloxy or arylthio ethyl group.

  10. Resolution-enhanced entanglement detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Manuel; Pezzè, Luca; Smerzi, Augusto

    2017-03-01

    We formulate a general family of entanglement criteria for multipartite states on arbitrary Hilbert spaces. Fisher information criteria compare the sensitivity to unitary rotations with the variances of suitable local observables. Generalized squeezing-type criteria provide lower bounds that are less stringent but require only measurements of second moments. The enhancement due to local access to the individual subsystems is studied in detail for the case of N spin-1 /2 particles. The discussed techniques can be readily implemented in current experiments with trapped ions in Paul traps and neutral atoms in optical lattices.

  11. Jupiter From Below (Enhanced Color)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-08

    This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's south pole and its swirling atmosphere was created by citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft. Juno acquired the image, looking directly at the Jovian south pole, on February 2, 2017, at 6:06 a.m. PST (9:06 a.m. EST) from an altitude of about 63,400 miles (102,100 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops. Cyclones swirl around the south pole, and white oval storms can be seen near the limb -- the apparent edge of the planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21381

  12. Nutritional Supplements to Enhance Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegenfuss, Tim N.; Landis, Jamie; Greenwood, Mike

    The ability to recover from intense exercise often separates good athletes from great ones. In the past, "recovery" often simply included rest, physical modalities (e.g., massage, hydration therapy) and meeting basic nutritional needs for fluid and energy intake. Today, athletes have a number of additional options to help them recover from high intensity training, one of which includes the judicious use of dietary supplements. This chapter briefly reviews nutritional strategies that have a strong theoretical background for enhancing rehydration/electrolyte balance, replenishing energy reserves, minimizing oxidative damage, and stimulating muscle repair.

  13. Enhancing chaoticity of spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowen; Zhang, Heqiao; Xue, Yu; Hu, Gang

    2005-01-01

    In some practical situations strong chaos is needed. This introduces the task of chaos control with enhancing chaoticity rather than suppressing chaoticity. In this paper a simple method of linear amplifications incorporating modulo operations is suggested to make spatiotemporal systems, which may be originally chaotic or nonchaotic, strongly chaotic. Specifically, this control can eliminate periodic windows, increase the values and the number of positive Lyapunov exponents, make the probability distributions of the output chaotic sequences more homogeneous, and reduce the correlations of chaotic outputs for different times and different space units. The applicability of the method to practical tasks, in particular to random number generators and secure communications, is briefly discussed.

  14. Microbial enhanced oil recovery research

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.M.; Georgiou, G.

    1990-03-01

    In the previous quarterly report we described the criteria for selecting a microorganism for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery studies. After careful consideration we chose Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 because of its ability to withstand reservoir conditions and the production of a surface active lipopeptide. Detailed experiments were conducted in stirred tank fermenters equipped with pH control and constant sparging of air or, in the case of anaerobic experiments, O{sub 2}-free nitrogen. The effect of temperature and pH on biomass production, glucose consumption and interfacial tension against decane were determined for both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Enhancing professionalism at GPU Nuclear

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Late in 1988, GPU Nuclear embarked on a major program aimed at enhancing professionalism at its Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island nuclear generating stations. The program was also to include its corporate headquarters in Parsippany, New Jersey. The overall program was to take several directions, including on-site degree programs, a sabbatical leave-type program for personnel to finish college degrees, advanced technical training for licensed staff, career progression for senior reactor operators, and expanded teamwork and leadership training for control room crew. The largest portion of this initiative was the development and delivery of professionalism training to the nearly 2,000 people at both nuclear generating sites.

  16. Computer Program Helps Enhance Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, Daniel F., IV

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is Macintosh application program for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. Works with color images digitized to 8 bits. Reads image files in JPL's two primary image formats VICAR and PDS as well as in Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles array of image-processing capabilities used for variety of applications, including processing of biomedical images, cartography, imaging of Earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher also imports color lookup tables in VICAR format for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). Written in Symantec's Think C.

  17. Conservation enhancement programs add up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    A new partnership between the U.S. federal government and the State of Delaware will provide 10 million to improve the water quality of the watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, and other water bodies.The agreement, which establishes the Delaware Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), marks the eighth such partnership established since 1997 and brings the total U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) investment in CREP programs to 1.45 billion for improving water quality and restoring wildlife habitat. USDA is expected to pay up to $8 million to enroll up to 6,000 acres in the Delaware CREP program.

  18. Conservation enhancement programs add up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    A new partnership between the U.S. federal government and the State of Delaware will provide $10 million to improve the water quality of the watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, and other water bodies.The agreement, which establishes the Delaware Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), marks the eighth such partnership established since 1997 and brings the total U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) investment in CREP programs to $1.45 billion for improving water quality and restoring wildlife habitat. USDA is expected to pay up to $8 million to enroll up to 6,000 acres in the Delaware CREP program.

  19. Diagnostic enhancements for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Henins, I.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Funds obtained under this project were used to enhance the diagnostic capabilities of the plasma-processing program in the Physics Division at LANL and include successful development and implementation of in-situ Raman spectroscopy and infrared emission spectroscopy. These methods were used to detect the presence and nature of ground-state and electronically excited molecular oxygen formed in an atmospheric-pressure, nonthermal plasma source used for environmental, industrial and decontamination applications.

  20. Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Patricia; Johnson, Yvette; Johnson, Brian; Williams, Philip; Burton, Geoffrey; McCoy, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester (EMUT) software is a tool for development and testing of software for a master controller (MC) flight computer. The primary function of the EMUT software is to simulate interfaces between the MC computer and external analog and digital circuitry (including other computers) in a rack of equipment to be used in scientific experiments. The simulations span the range of nominal, off-nominal, and erroneous operational conditions, enabling the testing of MC software before all the equipment becomes available.