Science.gov

Sample records for enhancing nuclear transparency

  1. Integration of the advanced transparency framework to advanced nuclear systems : enhancing Safety, Operations, Security and Safeguards (SOSS).

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Carmen Margarita; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Cleary, Virginia D.

    2008-08-01

    The advent of the nuclear renaissance gives rise to a concern for the effective design of nuclear fuel cycle systems that are safe, secure, nonproliferating and cost-effective. We propose to integrate the monitoring of the four major factors of nuclear facilities by focusing on the interactions between Safeguards, Operations, Security, and Safety (SOSS). We proposed to develop a framework that monitors process information continuously and can demonstrate the ability to enhance safety, operations, security, and safeguards by measuring and reducing relevant SOSS risks, thus ensuring the safe and legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle facility. A real-time comparison between expected and observed operations provides the foundation for the calculation of SOSS risk. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring SOSS risk. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to enhance the safety, operations, security and safeguards associated with the functioning of the nuclear fuel cycle facility. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a risk algorithm for safeguards and is in the process of demonstrating the ability to monitor operational signals in real-time though a cooperative research project with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The risk algorithms for safety, operations and security are under development. The next stage of this work will be to integrate the four algorithms into a single framework.

  2. Contrast enhancement of transparencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.; Lee, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    System can enhance or reduce contrast of photographic transparency for printing or projection by using constructive and destructive interference of collimated laser beam. System is potentially less expensive than electronic CRT methods and is more accurate than trial-and-error manual techniques.

  3. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/12: ENTNEA: A Concept for Enhancing Nuclear Transparency for Confidence Building in Northeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Man-Kwon; Shin, Sung-Tack

    1999-06-01

    Nuclear energy continues to be a strong and growing component of economic development in Northeast Asia. A broad range of nuclear energy systems already exists across the region and vigorous growth is projected. Associated with these capabilities and plans are various concerns about operational safety, environmental protection, and accumulation of spent fuel and other nuclear materials. We consider cooperative measures that might address these concerns. The confidence building measures suggested here center on the sharing of information to lessen concerns about nuclear activities or to solve technical problems. These activities are encompassed by an Enhanced Nuclear Transparency in Northeast Asia (ENTNEA) concept that would be composed of near-term, information-sharing activities and an eventual regional institution. The near-term activities would address specific concerns and build a tradition of cooperation; examples include radiation measurements for public safety and emergency response, demonstration of safe operations at facilities and in transportation, and material security in the back end of the fuel cycle. Linkages to existing efforts and organizations would be sought to maximize the benefits of cooperation. In the longer term, the new cooperative tradition might evolve into an ENTNEA institution. In institutional form, ENTNEA could combine the near-term activities and new cooperative activities, which might require an institutional basis, for the mutual benefit and security of regional parties.

  4. Nuclear Weapons Sustainment: Improvements Made to Budget Estimates Report, but Opportunities Remain to Further Enhance Transparency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    heavy bombers, air-launched cruise missiles, and ballistic -missile submarines. bDOE provides budget estimates for the nuclear weapons stockpile...Security Program ICBM Intercontinental Ballistic Missile NC3 Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications NNSA National Nuclear Security...Administration SLBM Submarine-launched Ballistic Missile SSBN Ship Submersible Ballistic Nuclear ( ballistic missile submarine) This is a work

  5. Nuclear Weapons Sustainment: Improvements Made to Budget Estimates, but Opportunities Exist to Further Enhance Transparency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    is responsible for the management and security of DOE’s nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. 3Department of...0.8 billion in NNSA funding for nuclear reactor design for the Navy’s Ohio-replacement submarine. Page 11 GAO-15-536 Nuclear Weapons... nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. 28We have ongoing work examining these modernization efforts in more detail as part of our

  6. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) offers a unique opportunity to serve as an international cooperative test bed for developing and demonstrating technologies and processes in a fully operational repository system setting. To address the substantial national security implications for the US resulting from the lack of integrated, transparent management and disposition of nuclear materials at the back-end of the nuclear fuel and weapons cycles, it is proposed that WIPP be used as a test bed to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable the transparent and proliferation-resistant geologic isolation of nuclear materials. The objectives of this initiative are to: (1) enhance public confidence in safe, secure geologic isolation of nuclear materials; (2) develop, test, and demonstrate transparency measures and technologies for the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle; and (3) foster international collaborations leading to workable, effective, globally-accepted standards for the transparent monitoring of geological repositories for nuclear materials. Test-bed activities include: development and testing of monitoring measures and technologies; international demonstration experiments; transparency workshops; visiting scientist exchanges; and educational outreach. These activities are proposed to be managed by the Department of Energy/Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO) as part of The Center for Applied Repository and Underground Studies (CARUS).

  7. Nuclear transparencies from photoinduced pion production

    SciTech Connect

    W. Cosyn; M.C. Martinez; J. Ryckebusch; B. Van Overmeire

    2006-12-01

    We present a relativistic and cross-section factorized framework for computing nuclear transparencies extracted from A({gamma}, {pi} N) reactions at intermediate energies. The proposed quantum mechanical model adopts a relativistic extension to the multiple-scattering Glauber approximation to account for the final state interactions of the ejected nucleon and pion. The theoretical predictions are compared against the experimental {sup 4}He({gamma},p {pi}{sup -}) data from Jefferson Lab. For those data, our results show no conclusive evidence for the onset of mechanisms related to color transparency.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ({sup 31}P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the {sup 31}P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. {sup 1}H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2}, consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T{sub 1} relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine {gamma}-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T{sub 1} with increasing magnetic field.

  9. Nuclear Transparency in Large Momentum Transfer Quasielastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardor, I.; Durrant, S.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Barton, D.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A.; Christensen, N.; Courant, H.; Gushue, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Kosonovsky, E.; Mardor, Y.; Marshak, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Minor, E. D.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Piasetzky, E.; Roser, T.; Russell, J.; Sutton, C. S.; Tanaka, M.; White, C.; Wu, J.-Y.

    1998-12-01

    We measured simultaneously pp elastic and quasielastic \\(p,2p\\) scattering in hydrogen, deuterium, and carbon for momentum transfers of 4.8 to 6.2 \\(GeV/c\\)2 at incoming momenta of 5.9 and 7.5 GeV/c and center-of-mass scattering angles in the range θc.m. = 83.7°-90°. The nuclear transparency is defined as the ratio of the quasielastic cross section to the free pp cross section. At incoming momentum of 5.9 GeV/c, the transparency of carbon decreases by a factor of 2 from θc.m.~=85° to θc.m.~=89°. At the largest angle the transparency of carbon increases from 5.9 to 7.5 GeV/c by more than 50%. The transparency in deuterium does not depend on incoming momentum nor on θc.m..

  10. A framework and methodology for nuclear fuel cycle transparency.

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, Yvonne; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko; Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2006-02-01

    A key objective to the global deployment of nuclear technology is maintaining transparency among nation-states and international communities. By providing an environment in which to exchange scientific and technological information regarding nuclear technology, the safe and legitimate use of nuclear material and technology can be assured. Many nations are considering closed or multiple-application nuclear fuel cycles and are subsequently developing advanced reactors in an effort to obtain some degree of energy self-sufficiency. Proliferation resistance features that prevent theft or diversion of nuclear material and reduce the likelihood of diversion from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. IAEA Safeguards have been effective in minimizing opportunities for diversion; however, recent changes in the global political climate suggest implementation of additional technology and methods to ensure the prompt detection of proliferation. For a variety of reasons, nuclear facilities are becoming increasingly automated and will require minimum manual operation. This trend provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring proliferation risk, especially in future facilities. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation associated with these activities. Additionally, a framework designed to monitor processes will ensure the legitimate use of nuclear material. This report describes recent efforts to develop a methodology capable of assessing proliferation risk in support of overall plant transparency. The framework may be tested at the candidate site located in Japan: the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

  11. Enhanced nonlinear susceptibility via double-double electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Hessa M. M.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear optical susceptibility of an alkali-metal atom with tripod electronic configuration responsible for generating cross-phase modulation and self-phase modulation under the condition of double-double electromagnetically induced transparency. Our investigation demonstrates an enhancement in the nonlinear optical susceptibility of an alkali-metal atom by a factor of 1000 in the region of the second transparency window. This enhancement is in comparison with the atom's susceptibility in the first transparency window for the same parameters under the same conditions. Nonlinear-absorption enhancement arises by canceling Raman-gain generation, which arises when the probe and signal fields have equal intensities. At the center of the second transparency window, we obtain the condition required to attain a nonvanishing nonlinear optical susceptibility. In the bare-state picture, the coupling field must be off resonant from a bare-to-bare-state transition, while working in the semiclassical dressed picture required the signal field to be tuned off resonantly with a bare-to-dressed-state transition. The relation that governs the values of coupling- and signal-field detuning are also obtained. Our scheme exhibits the fact that the second transparency window has advantages over the first transparency window with respect to obtaining an enhanced Kerr effect, and our calculation includes simulation of both low-temperature and Doppler-broadened regimes.

  12. Joint DOE-PNC research on the use of transparency in support of nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Mochiji, Toshiro; Keeney, R.; Tazaki, Makiko; Nakhleh, C.; Puckett, J.; Stanbro, W.

    1999-01-01

    PNC and LANL collaborated in research on the concept of transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The research was based on the Action Sheet No. 21, which was signed in February 1996, ``The Joint Research on Transparency in Nuclear Nonproliferation`` under the ``Agreement between the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) for Cooperation in Research and Development Concerning Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Measures for Safeguards and Nonproliferation``. The purpose of Action Sheet 21 is to provide a fundamental study on Transparency to clarify the means to improve worldwide acceptability for the nuclear energy from the nuclear nonproliferation point of view. This project consists of independent research and then joint discussion at workshops that address a series of topics and issues in transparency. The activities covered in Action Sheet 21 took place over a period of 18 months. Three workshops were held; the first and the third hosted by PNC in Tokyo, Japan and the second hosted by LANL in Los Alamos, New Mexico, US. The following is a summary of the three workshops. The first workshop addressed the policy environment of transparency. Each side presented its perspective on the following issues: (1) a definition of transparency, (2) reasons for transparency, (3) detailed goals of transparency and (4) obstacles to transparency. The topic of the second workshop was ``Development of Transparency Options.`` The activities accomplished were (1) identify type of facilities where transparency might be applied, (2) define criteria for applying transparency, and (3) delineate applicable transparency options. The goal of the third workshop, ``Technical Options for Transparency,`` was to (1) identify conceptual options for transparency system design; (2) identify instrumentation, measurement, data collection and data processing options; (3) identify data display options; and (4) identify technical

  13. Hot-electron refluxing enhanced relativistic transparency of overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Li, Xiao-Ya; Chen, Zi-Yu; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Shen, Bai-Fei; Zhu, Wen-Jun

    2017-03-01

    A new phenomenon of an enhanced relativistic transparency of overdense plasmas by the influence of hot-electron refluxing has been discovered via particle-in-cell simulations. When a p-polarized laser pulse, with intensity below the self-induced-transparency (SIT) threshold, obliquely irradiates a thin overdense plasma, the initially opaque plasma becomes transparent after a time interval that is linearly dependent on the thickness of the plasma. This phenomenon can be interpreted as a consequence of hot-electron refluxing, which reduces the effective electron density by longitudinal heating. When the laser intensity is higher than the SIT threshold, the penetration velocity of the laser in the plasma is enhanced when the refluxing is present.

  14. Nuclear transparency in 90 °c.m. quasielastic A(p,2p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averiche, Y.; Barton, D. S.; Baturin, V.; Buktoyarova, N.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A. S.; Christensen, N.; Courant, H.; Durrant, S.; Fang, G.; Gabriel, K.; Gushue, S.; Heller, K. J.; Heppelmann, S.; Kosonovsky, I.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malki, A.; Mardor, I.; Mardor, Y.; Marshak, M. L.; Martel, D.; Minina, E.; Minor, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Y.; Piasetzky, E.; Roser, T.; Russell, J. J.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Shupe, M. A.; Sutton, S.; Tanaka, M.; Tang, A.; Tsetkov, I.; Watson, J.; White, C.; Wu, J.-Y.; Zhalov, D.

    2004-07-01

    We summarize the results of two experimental programs at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of BNL to measure the nuclear transparency of nuclei measured in the A(p,2p) quasielastic scattering process near 90° in the pp center of mass. The incident momenta varied from 5.9 to 14.4 GeV/c , corresponding to 4.8< Q2 <12.7 (GeV/c)2 . Taking into account the motion of the target proton in the nucleus, the effective incident momenta extended from 5.0 to 15.8 GeV/c . First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which had more complete kinematic definition of quasielastic events. E850 covered a larger range of incident momenta, and thus provided more information regarding the nature of the energy dependence of the nuclear transparency. In E850 the angular dependence of the nuclear transparency near 90° and the nuclear transparency deuterons were studied. Second, we review the techniques used in an earlier experiment, E834, and show that the two experiments are consistent for the carbon data. E834 also determines the nuclear transparencies for lithium, aluminum, copper, and lead nuclei as well as for carbon. A determination of the ( π+ , π+ p) transparencies is also reported. We find for both E850 and E834 that the A(p,2p) nuclear transparency, unlike that for A(e, e' p) nuclear transparency, is incompatible with a constant value versus energy as predicted by Glauber calculations. The A(p,2p) nuclear transparency for carbon and aluminum increases by a factor of two between 5.9 and 9.5 GeV/c incident proton momentum. At its peak the A(p,2p) nuclear transparency is ˜80% of the constant A(e, e' p) nuclear transparency. Then the nuclear transparency falls back to a value at least as small as that at 5.9 GeV/c , and is compatible with the Glauber level again. This oscillating behavior is generally interpreted as an interplay between two components of the pN scattering amplitude; one short ranged and perturbative, and the other long ranged and

  15. Terahertz diffraction enhanced transparency probed in the near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpin, Alexei; van Hoof, Niels; Bhattacharya, Arkabrata; Mennes, Christiaan; Gomez Rivas, Jaime

    2017-08-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency in metamaterials allows to engineer structures which transmit narrow spectral ranges of radiation while exhibiting a large group index. Implementation of this phenomenon frequently calls for strong near-field coupling of bright (dipolar) resonances to dark (multipolar) resonances in the metamolecules comprising the metamaterials. The sharpness and contrast of the resulting transparency windows thus depends strongly on how closely these metamolecules can be placed to one another, placing constraints on fabrication capabilities. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that the reliance on near-field interaction strength can be relaxed, and the magnitude of the electromagnetic-induced transparency enhanced, by exploiting the long-range coupling between metamolecules in periodic lattices. By placing dolmen structures resonant at THz frequencies in a periodic lattice, we show a significant increase of the transparency window when the in-plane diffraction is tuned to the resonant frequency of the metamolecules, as confirmed by direct mapping of the THz near-field amplitude across a lattice of dolmens. Through the direct interrogation of the dark resonance in the near field, we show the interplay of near- and far-field couplings in optimizing the response of planar dolmen arrays via diffraction-enhanced transparency.

  16. 77 FR 69781 - Enhanced Natural Gas Market Transparency

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 152 Enhanced Natural Gas Market... regulations under the natural gas market transparency provisions of section 23 of the Natural Gas Act (NGA... month (i.e., next month gas) would provide useful information for improving natural gas market...

  17. Surface-Plasmon Enhanced Transparent Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly III, T. H.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Tenent, R. C.; Morfa, A. J.; Rowlen, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Random silver nanohole films were created through colloidal lithography techniques and metal vapor deposition. The transparent electrodes were characterized by uv-visible spectroscopy and incorporated into an organic solar cell. The test cells were evaluated for solar power-conversion efficiency and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency spectra displayed evidence that a nanohole film with 92 nm diameter holes induces surface-plasmon-enhanced photoconversion. The nanohole silver films demonstrate a promising route to removing the indium tin oxide transparent electrode that is ubiquitous in organic optoelectronics.

  18. Nanoantennas for enhanced light trapping in transparent organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, P. M.; Simovski, C. R.; Belov, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a light-trapping structure offering a significant enhancement of photovoltaic absorption in transparent organic solar cells operating at infrared, while the visible light transmission keeps sufficiently high. The main mechanism of light trapping is related with the excitation of collective oscillations of the metal nanoantenna arrays, characterized by advantageous field distribution in the volume of the solar cell. It allows more than triple increase in infrared photovoltaic absorption.

  19. Measurement of Nuclear Transparency from A(e,e',π+) Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Clasie, Benjamin

    2006-08-01

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the A(e, e' π+) process in 2H,12C, 27Al, 63Cu and 197Au targets. These measurements were performed at the Jefferson Laboratory over a four momen- tum transfer squared range Q2 = 1.1 to 4.7 (GeV/c)2. The nuclear transparency was extracted as the super-ratio of ( σA/ σH) from data to a model of pion-electroproduction from nuclei without N final state interactions. The Q2 and atomic number dependence of the nuclear transparency both show deviations from traditional nuclear physics expectations, and are consistent with calculations that include the quantum chromodynamical phenomenon of color transparency.

  20. Measuring nuclear transparency from exclusive vector meson production in lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, G.Y.

    1994-04-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson production from E665 at Fermilab are reported. The data were collected on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead targets with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production channels as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. Ideas of systematic studies of color transparency in exclusive vector meson production at CEBAF are discussed.

  1. TRANSPARENCY, VERIFICATION AND THE FUTURE OF NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION AND ARMS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    J. PILAT

    2000-11-01

    In the future, if the nuclear nonproliferation and arms control agendas are to advance, they will likely become increasingly seen as parallel undertakings with the objective of cradle-to-grave controls over nuclear warheads and/or materials. The pursuit of such an agenda was difficult enough at the outset of the nuclear age; it will be more difficult in the future with relatively wide-spread military and civil nuclear programs. This agenda will require both verification and transparency. To address emerging nuclear dangers, we may expect hybrid verification-transparency regimes to be seen as acceptable. Such regimes would have intrusive but much more limited verification provisions than Cold War accords, and have extensive transparency provisions designed in part to augment the verification measures, to fill in the ''gaps'' of the verification regime, and the like.

  2. Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Citizens now expect access to information, particularly from public institutions like local school districts. They demand input and accountability. Cultural and technological changes, such as the Internet, make it possible for districts to comply. Yet transparency--the easily seen and understood actions of a school district and the thinking behind…

  3. Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Citizens now expect access to information, particularly from public institutions like local school districts. They demand input and accountability. Cultural and technological changes, such as the Internet, make it possible for districts to comply. Yet transparency--the easily seen and understood actions of a school district and the thinking behind…

  4. Enhancing professionalism at GPU Nuclear

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Late in 1988, GPU Nuclear embarked on a major program aimed at enhancing professionalism at its Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island nuclear generating stations. The program was also to include its corporate headquarters in Parsippany, New Jersey. The overall program was to take several directions, including on-site degree programs, a sabbatical leave-type program for personnel to finish college degrees, advanced technical training for licensed staff, career progression for senior reactor operators, and expanded teamwork and leadership training for control room crew. The largest portion of this initiative was the development and delivery of professionalism training to the nearly 2,000 people at both nuclear generating sites.

  5. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  6. Proposal for broader United States-Russian transparency of nuclear arms reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Percival, C.M.; Ingle, T.H.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1995-07-01

    During the January 1994 Summit Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin agreed on the goal of ensuring the ``transparency and irreversibility`` of the nuclear arms reduction process. As a result, negotiations are presently underway between the United States Government and the Russian Federation to confirm the stockpiles of plutonium and highly enriched uranium removed from nuclear weapons. In December 1994 the United States presented a paper to the Russian Federation proposing additional measures to provide broader transparency of nuclear arms reduction. The US Department of Energy is studying the implementation of these broader transparency measures at appropriate DOE facilities. The results of the studies include draft protocols for implementation, assessments of the implementation procedures and the impacts on the facilities and estimates of the cost to implement these measures at various facilities.

  7. Transparent film with inverted conical microholes array for reflection enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Biao; Liu, Hongzhong; Jiang, Weitao; Chen, Bangdao; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Liu, Xiaokang

    2016-04-01

    PDMS has been widely utilized for microfluidic chips and microchannel detections, as its good optical properties are the prerequisite to achieve accurate and efficient detection. However, it is difficult to obtain effective information for opaque liquids. With the development of microchannel detection for wider fields, it is imperative to obtain more comprehensive information of the observed objects by integrating high transmission with enhanced reflection. This article investigates reflection enhancement by Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film with inverted conical microholes array. PDMS film with inverted conical microholes array is fabricated by replication from the silicon mold with inverted microcones array which is prepared by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etch tool. The monolayer PDMS film with inverted conical microholes array shows a two-fold effectively increase in reflection, approximately up to 15%, at a broad wavelength range of 637-1131 nm and 1214-1350 nm, compared with bare PDMS film. In addition, the reflection can be further enhanced by multilayered lamination of PDMS film with inverted conical microholes array, and the enhancement is also dependent on the lamination way, i.e., for bilayer laminations, the maximum reflection enhancement occurs when with face-to-back lamination, and 32.79% larger than that with back-to-face lamination. From the experiments, the maximum reflectivity of 8-layered PDMS films can obtain 64.4% while the maximum reflectivity of monolayer PDMS film barely has 17.5%. The transparent film with inverted conical microholes array for reflection enhancement may find a variety of applications in optical devices, microchips, and energy conservation technologies etc.

  8. Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research: ENTREQ

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The syntheses of multiple qualitative studies can pull together data across different contexts, generate new theoretical or conceptual models, identify research gaps, and provide evidence for the development, implementation and evaluation of health interventions. This study aims to develop a framework for reporting the synthesis of qualitative health research. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search for guidance and reviews relevant to the synthesis of qualitative research, methodology papers, and published syntheses of qualitative health research in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and relevant organisational websites to May 2011. Initial items were generated inductively from guides to synthesizing qualitative health research. The preliminary checklist was piloted against forty published syntheses of qualitative research, purposively selected to capture a range of year of publication, methods and methodologies, and health topics. We removed items that were duplicated, impractical to assess, and rephrased items for clarity. Results The Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research (ENTREQ) statement consists of 21 items grouped into five main domains: introduction, methods and methodology, literature search and selection, appraisal, and synthesis of findings. Conclusions The ENTREQ statement can help researchers to report the stages most commonly associated with the synthesis of qualitative health research: searching and selecting qualitative research, quality appraisal, and methods for synthesising qualitative findings. The synthesis of qualitative research is an expanding and evolving methodological area and we would value feedback from all stakeholders for the continued development and extension of the ENTREQ statement. PMID:23185978

  9. Incorporation of a risk analysis approach for the nuclear fuel cycle advanced transparency framework.

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Carmen Margarita; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko; Kitabata, Takuya; Vugrin, Eric D.; Vugrin, Kay White; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Cleary, Virginia D.

    2007-05-01

    Proliferation resistance features that reduce the likelihood of diversion of nuclear materials from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. A framework that monitors process information continuously can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation by measuring and reducing diversion risk, thus ensuring the legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation makes this possible by generating instantaneous system state data that can be used to track and measure the status of the process and material at any given time. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are working in cooperation to develop an advanced transparency framework capable of assessing diversion risk in support of overall plant transparency. The ''diversion risk'' quantifies the probability and consequence of a host nation diverting nuclear materials from a civilian fuel cycle facility. This document introduces the details of the diversion risk quantification approach to be demonstrated in the fuel handling training model of the MONJU Fast Reactor.

  10. The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification

    SciTech Connect

    Pabian, Frank Vincent

    2010-09-16

    This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

  11. Transparency in nuclear warhead dismantlement -- Limited chain of custody and warhead signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kiernan, G.; Percival, M.; Bratcher, L.

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Safeguards, Transparency, and Irreversibility (STI) initiative is the development of a series of transparency measures that provide confidence that nuclear warheads are actually being dismantled and that the fissile material being removed from these dismantled weapons is not recycled into new production. A limited chain of custody (LCC) would follow a warhead from the time it is declared excess until it is actually dismantled and the fissile materials are stored. Measurement of warhead signatures is an option in LCC using radiation detection techniques to confirm that a warhead has been dismantled, without intrusive inspections within the dismantlement facility. This paper discusses LCC and warhead signatures as well as indicate first results of laboratory measurements related to warhead signatures.

  12. Enhanced tunability of plasmon induced transparency in graphene strips

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xi; Su, Xiaopeng; Yang, Yaping

    2015-04-14

    The approach of slow-light efficiency manipulation is theoretically investigated in graphene analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system, which cannot be realized in conventional quantum regime. In this system, two graphene strips with different Fermi energies placed side by side as radiative elements have been discussed, and the coupling strength between radiative elements and dark elements is tuned by these radiative elements. Our proposed scheme exploits the tuning of coupling strength between the radiative elements and dark elements in contrast with the existing approaches that rely on tuning the damping rates of radiative or dark elements. The transparent window and group delays can be tuned by different coupling strength without changing the geometry of structure. This manipulation can be explained using a temporal coupled-mode theory. Furthermore, the hybridized states in this EIT-like system can be manipulated by tuning the Fermi energy of radiative elements. This kind of controllable electromagnetically induced transparency has many significant potential applications in optoelectronic, photodetectors, tunable sensors, and storage of optical data regimes.

  13. Enhancing laboratory activities in nuclear medicine education.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Vesper; Martin, Chris; Schmitz, Casey

    2009-12-01

    Hands-on or active learning is important in nuclear medicine education. As more curricula start to require greater standards and as distance education expands, the effective use of laboratories in nuclear medicine education remains important in physics, instrumentation, and imaging but is often overlooked or underutilized. Laboratory exercises are a unique opportunity for nuclear medicine educators to facilitate students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a manner that often cannot occur in lectures or during online education. Given the lack of current laboratory tools and publications, there exists a requirement for nuclear medicine educators to develop, enhance, and monitor educational tools for laboratory exercises. Expanding technologies, variations in imaging and measurement systems, and the need to ensure that the taught technology is relevant to nuclear medicine students are issues faced by nuclear medicine educators. This article, based on principles of instructional design, focuses on the components and development of effective and enhanced nuclear medicine laboratories in our current educational environment.

  14. Enhancing the conductivity of transparent graphene films via doping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Kang; Reina, Alfonso; Shi, Yumeng; Park, Hyesung; Li, Lain-Jong; Lee, Young Hee; Kong, Jing

    2010-07-16

    We report chemical doping (p-type) to reduce the sheet resistance of graphene films for the application of high-performance transparent conducting films. The graphene film synthesized by chemical vapor deposition was transferred to silicon oxide and quartz substrates using poly(methyl methacrylate). AuCl(3) in nitromethane was used to dope the graphene films and the sheet resistance was reduced by up to 77% depending on the doping concentration. The p-type doping behavior was confirmed by characterizing the Raman G-band of the doped graphene film. Atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope images reveal the deposition of Au particles on the film. The sizes of the Au particles are 10-100 nm. The effect of doping was also investigated by transferring the graphene films onto quartz and poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates. The sheet resistance reached 150 Omega/sq at 87% transmittance, which is comparable to those of indium tin oxide conducting film. The doping effect was manifested only with 1-2 layer graphene but not with multi-layer graphene. This approach advances the numerous applications of graphene films as transparent conducting electrodes.

  15. Enhancing medicine price transparency through price information mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hinsch, Michael; Kaddar, Miloud; Schmitt, Sarah

    2014-05-08

    Medicine price information mechanisms provide an essential tool to countries that seek a better understanding of product availability, market prices and price compositions of individual medicines. To be effective and contribute to cost savings, these mechanisms need to consider prices in their particular contexts when comparing between countries. This article discusses in what ways medicine price information mechanisms can contribute to increased price transparency and how this may affect access to medicines for developing countries. We used data collected during the course of a WHO project focusing on the development of a vaccine price and procurement information mechanism. The project collected information from six medicine price information mechanisms and interviewed data managers and technical experts on key aspects as well as observed market effects of these mechanisms.The reviewed mechanisms were broken down into categories including objective and target audience, as well as the sources, types and volumes of data included. Information provided by the mechanisms was reviewed according to data available on medicine prices, product characteristics, and procurement modalities. We found indications of positive effects on access to medicines resulting from the utilization of the reviewed mechanisms. These include the uptake of higher quality medicines, more favorable results from contract negotiations, changes in national pricing policies, and the decrease of prices in certain segments for countries participating in or deriving data from the various mechanisms. The reviewed mechanisms avoid the methodological challenges observed for medicine price comparisons that only use national price databases. They work with high quality data and display prices in the appropriate context of procurement modalities as well as the peculiarities of purchasing countries. Medicine price information mechanisms respond to the need for increased medicine price transparency and have the

  16. Enhancing medicine price transparency through price information mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medicine price information mechanisms provide an essential tool to countries that seek a better understanding of product availability, market prices and price compositions of individual medicines. To be effective and contribute to cost savings, these mechanisms need to consider prices in their particular contexts when comparing between countries. This article discusses in what ways medicine price information mechanisms can contribute to increased price transparency and how this may affect access to medicines for developing countries. Methods We used data collected during the course of a WHO project focusing on the development of a vaccine price and procurement information mechanism. The project collected information from six medicine price information mechanisms and interviewed data managers and technical experts on key aspects as well as observed market effects of these mechanisms. The reviewed mechanisms were broken down into categories including objective and target audience, as well as the sources, types and volumes of data included. Information provided by the mechanisms was reviewed according to data available on medicine prices, product characteristics, and procurement modalities. Results We found indications of positive effects on access to medicines resulting from the utilization of the reviewed mechanisms. These include the uptake of higher quality medicines, more favorable results from contract negotiations, changes in national pricing policies, and the decrease of prices in certain segments for countries participating in or deriving data from the various mechanisms. Conclusion The reviewed mechanisms avoid the methodological challenges observed for medicine price comparisons that only use national price databases. They work with high quality data and display prices in the appropriate context of procurement modalities as well as the peculiarities of purchasing countries. Medicine price information mechanisms respond to the need for increased

  17. Enhanced adaptive focusing through semi-transparent media

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Diego; Zacharakis, Giannis; Leonetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics can focus light through opaque media by compensating the random phase delay acquired while crossing a scattering curtain. The technique is commonly exploited in many fields, including astrophysics, microscopy, biomedicine and biology. A turbid lens has the capability of producing foci with a resolution higher than conventional optics, however it has a fundamental limit: to obtain a sharp focus one has to introduce a strongly scattering medium in the optical path. Indeed a tight focusing needs strong scattering and, as a consequence, high resolution focusing is obtained only for weakly transmitting samples. Here we describe a novel method allowing to obtain highly concentrated optical spots even by introducing a minimum amount of scattering in the beam path with semi-transparent materials. By filtering the pseudo-ballistic components of the transmitted beam we are able to experimentally overcome the limits of the adaptive focus resolution, gathering light on a spot with a diameter which is one third of the original speckle correlation function. PMID:26620906

  18. Nuclear transparency from quasielastic A(e,e'p) reactions up to Q{sup 2}=8.1 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Garrow, K; et. al.,

    2001-08-01

    The quasielastic (e,e'p) reaction was studied on targets of deuterium, carbon, and iron up to a value of momentum transfer Q{sup 2} of 8.1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. A nuclear transparency was determined by comparing the data to calculations in the Plane-Wave Impulse Approximation. The dependence of the nuclear transparency on Q{sup 2} and the mass number A was investigated in a search for the onset of the Color Transparency within our range of Q{sup 2}. A fit to the world's nuclear transparency data reflects the energy dependence of the free proton-nucleon cross section.

  19. Efficiency enhancement of organic solar cells using transparent plasmonic Ag nanowire electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Gyu; Xu, Ting; Park, Hui Joon; Luo, Xiangang; Guo, L Jay

    2010-10-15

    Surface plasmon enhanced photo-current and power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells using periodic Ag nanowires as transparent electrodes are reported, as compared to the device with conventional ITO electrodes. External quantum efficiencies are enhanced about 2.5 fold around the peak solar spectrum wavelength of 560 nm, resulting in 35% overall increase in power conversion efficiency than the ITO control device under normal unpolarized light.

  20. Efficiency Enhancement of Organic Solar Cells Using Transparent Plasmonic Ag Nanowire Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Myung-Gyu; Xu, Ting; Park, Hui Joon; Luo, Xiangang G; Guo, L. Jay

    2010-08-23

    Surface plasmon enhanced photo-current and power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells using periodic Ag nanowires as transparent electrodes are reported, as compared to the device with conventional ITO electrodes. External quantum efficiencies are enhanced about 2.5 fold around the peak solar spectrum wavelength of 560 nm, resulting in 35% overall increase in power conversion efficiency than the ITO control device under normal unpolarized light.

  1. Enhanced ion acceleration in the transition regime from opaque to transparent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2016-10-01

    Using Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations, we investigate ion acceleration in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions in for targets that become laser transparent to the laser during the interaction process. A theoretical model is developed to derive an optimal target electron areal density `n.L' as a function of laser normalized intensity and the pulse duration in the laser transparent regime. A large schematic parametric scan for a wide range of target electron density (n) and thickness (L) is performed and shown to be consistent with analytical prediction. Our simulations show that iIon acceleration in optimal conditions relies on the re-heating of the expanding sheath electrons by the laser and enhancing enhancement of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) electric field after the plasma becomes transparent to the laser light. This enhanced TNSA field decays slower compared to conventional TNSA resulting in significantly higher proton energies. Our results open the way to the exploration of optimized ion acceleration in the transparency regime, not only with nm-scale foils but also with recently developed micron-scale hydrogen jets. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  2. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability.

  3. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability. PMID:26764164

  4. Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, James E; Meek, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms and fissile material reductions.

  5. [Tools to enhance the quality and transparency of health research reports: reporting guidelines].

    PubMed

    Galvão, Taís Freire; Silva, Marcus Tolentino; Garcia, Leila Posenato

    2016-01-01

    Scientific writing is the cornestone for publishing the results of research. Reporting guidelines are important tools for all those involved in the process of research production and report writing. These guidelines detail what is expected to be found in each section of a report for a given study design. The EQUATOR Network (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) is an international initiative that seeks to improve the reliability and the value of health research literature by promoting transparent and accurate reporting and wider use of robust reporting guidelines. The use of reporting guidelines has contributed to improved reports as well as increased quality of research methods. Reporting guidelines need to be publicized in order to increase knowledge about these essential tools among health researchers. Encouraging their use by journals is key to enhancing the quality of scientific publications.

  6. Photonic crystal slabs for surface contrast enhancement in microscopy of transparent objects.

    PubMed

    Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Becker, Tim; Reverey, Julia; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Rapoport, Daniel H; Lemmer, Uli; Gerken, Martina

    2012-06-18

    In optical microscopy the contrast of transparent objects achieved with conventional methods is often not satisfactory, for example for the automated recognition of cells. In this paper we present a nano-optical label-free approach for contrast enhancement based on photonic crystal slabs (PCS) as the specimen holder. Quasi-guided modes inside these structures cause an intrinsic color of the PCS, which strongly depends on the wavelength and the quality factor of the optical mode. Objects on the surface of the PCS experience a significant color and intensity contrast enhancement, as they change properties of the optical modes.

  7. Broadband light absorption enhancement in polymer photovoltaics using metal nanowall gratings as transparent electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhuo; Chaudhary, Sumit; Kuang, Ping; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-15

    The authors investigate light absorption in organic solar cells in which indium tin oxide (ITO) is replaced by a new metallic architecture (grating) as a transparent electrode. Different from typical metal nanowire gratings, our gratings consist of metal nanowalls with nanoscale footprint and (sub)microscale height [Adv. Mater. 23, 2469 (2011)], thus ensuring high optical transmittance and electrical conductivity. Simulations reveal that a broadband and polarization-insensitive light absorption enhancement is achieved via two mechanisms, when such silver nanowall gratings are employed in P3HT:PCBM based solar cells. Overall absorption enhanced by ~23% compared to a reference cell with ITO electrode.

  8. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Chen, Baohong; Xiang, Feng; Zhou, Jinxiong; Wang, Hong; Suo, Zhigang

    2014-10-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  9. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  10. Understanding of anesthesia machine function is enhanced with a transparent reality simulation.

    PubMed

    Fischler, Ira S; Kaschub, Cynthia E; Lizdas, David E; Lampotang, Samsun

    2008-01-01

    Photorealistic simulations may provide efficient transfer of certain skills to the real system, but by being opaque may fail to encourage deeper learning of the structure and function of the system. Schematic simulations that are more abstract, with less visual fidelity but make system structure and function transparent, may enhance deeper learning and optimize retention and transfer of learning. We compared learning effectiveness of these 2 modes of externalizing the output of a common simulation engine (the Virtual Anesthesia Machine, VAM) that models machine function and dynamics and responds in real time to user interventions such as changes in gas flow or ventilation. Undergraduate students (n = 39) and medical students (n = 35) were given a single, 1-hour guided learning session with either a Transparent or an Opaque version of the VAM simulation. The following day, the learners' knowledge of machine components, function, and dynamics was tested. The Transparent-VAM groups scored higher than the Opaque-VAM groups on a set of multiple-choice questions concerning conceptual knowledge about anesthesia machines (P = 0.009), provided better and more complete explanations of component function (P = 0.003), and were more accurate in remembering and inferring cause-and-effect dynamics of the machine and relations among components (P = 0.003). Although the medical students outperformed undergraduates on all measures, a similar pattern of benefits for the Transparent VAM was observed for these 2 groups. Schematic simulations that transparently allow learners to visualize, and explore, underlying system dynamics and relations among components may provide a more effective mental model for certain systems. This may lead to a deeper understanding of how the system works, and therefore, we believe, how to detect and respond to potentially adverse situations.

  11. Polarization sensitivity in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii enhances the detection of moving transparent objects.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, John C; Johnsen, Sönke

    2006-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that polarization sensitivity enhances the detection of moving, transparent objects by examining the escape response of the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii Girard) from a visual threat. A transparent, birefringent target trans-illuminated by either partially linear polarized or unpolarized light was advanced toward individual crayfish. The optical axis of the target was aligned such that it would be conspicuous to a viewer with polarization sensitivity when trans-illuminated by polarized light. Under polarized light, significantly more crayfish retreated from the target than under unpolarized light of identical intensity (P<0.00005, Fisher's exact test). Whereas the potential for polarization sensitivity has been shown in neurophysiological and structural studies of the visual system of P. clarkii and the signal crayfish Pasifastacus leniusculus (Dana), our results provide the first behavioral evidence for polarization sensitivity among crayfish. The ecological function of this ability is unclear, but it may enhance the detection of fish with silvered scales, transparent zooplankton or macroinvertebrates. Because escape responses are generally more reliably induced than other behaviors, the method employed in this study may prove useful for examining sensory capabilities in other species.

  12. Optical design of transparent metal grids for plasmonic absorption enhancement in ultrathin organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inho; Lee, Taek Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2013-07-01

    Transparent metal grid combining with plasmonic absorption enhancement is a promising replacement to indium tin oxide thin films. We numerically demonstrate metal grids in one or two dimension lead to plasmonic absorption enhancements in ultrathin organic solar cells. In this paper, we study optical design of metal grids for plasmonic light trapping and identify different plasmonic modes of the surface plasmon polaritons excited at the interfaces of glass/metal grids, metal grids/active layers, and the localized surface plasmon resonance of the metal grids using numerical calculations. One dimension metal grids with the optimal design of a width and a period lead to the absorption enhancement in the ultrathin active layers of 20 nm thickness by a factor of 2.6 under transverse electric polarized light compared to the case without the metal grids. Similarly, two dimensional metal grids provide the absorption enhancement by a factor of 1.8 under randomly polarized light.

  13. Enhanced performance of photonic crystal GaN light-emitting diodes with graphene transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hai-Liang; Xu, Chen; Xu, Kun; Xun, Meng; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jie

    2015-03-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) triangle lattice air hole photonic crystal (PC) GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LED) with double-layer graphene transparent electrodes (DGTE) have been produced. The current spreading effect of the double-layer graphene (GR) on the surface of the PC structure of the LED has been researched. Specially, we found that the part of the graphene suspending over the air hole of the PC structure was of much higher conductivity, which reduced the average sheet resistance of the graphene transparent conducting electrode and improved the current spreading of the PC LED. Therefore, the work voltage of the DGTE-PC LED was obviously decreased, and the output power was greatly enhanced. The COMSOL software was used to simulate the current density distribution of the samples. The results show that the etching of PC structure results in the degradation of the current spreading and that the graphene transparent conducting electrode can offer an uniform current spreading in the DGTE-PC LED. PACS: 85.60.Jb; 68.65.Pq; 42.70.Qs

  14. Photon drag enhancement by a slow-light moving medium via electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Azmat; Khan, Naveed; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Rahman, Amin Ur; Ahmad, Afaq

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a considerable enhancement has been observed in the celebrated Fresnel-Fizeau light drag by innovative experimental and theoretical approaches because of its fundamental and practical interest in the emerging technology of quantum optics and photonics. We present a semiclassical density matrix approach on the demonstration of light drag in a slow-light moving medium comprising five-level single tripod atomic configuration. To accomplish this, we introduce Kerr-type nonlinearity that leads to electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification under resonance conditions. By switching ON Kerr-type nonlinearity effect, we observe a prominent transparency window in probe field's absorption spectrum whose width and amplitude can be controlled further by the intensity of Kerr field and control field. The incorporation of Kerr field also switches light propagation from superluminal to subluminal domain. We predict a significant enhancement both in the lateral and the rotary photon drag owing to drag of light linear polarization state subjected to translation and rotation of the host medium, respectively. Consistent with earlier results, light drag considerably depends on both transverse and angular velocity of the host medium. In regime of subluminal propagation, light polarization state drags along the medium motion while in the superluminal propagation region it drags opposite to the medium motion.

  15. Bandwidth and gain enhancement of optically transparent 60-GHz CPW-fed antenna by using BSIS-UC-EBG structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Tian, Huiping; Guo, Zheng; Yang, Daquan; Zhou, Jian; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-06-01

    A method in terms of bandwidth and gain enhancement is presented for optically transparent coplanar waveguide fed (CPW-Fed) antenna, which supports unlicensed 60 GHz band (57-66 GHz) applications. The original antenna and mesh antenna in [8] were designed on a transparent material that is made of a 0.2-mm-thick fused silica 7980 Corning substrate (ɛr: 3.8 and tan δ: 0.0001). However, the peak gains of -5.3 and -5.4 dBi at 60 GHz of those antennas can be further improved. Thus, in this paper, a novel bidirectional symmetric I-shaped slot uniplanar compact electromagnetic band-gap (BSIS-UC-EBG) structure with a reflection phase band of 58.0-62.1 GHz is proposed to improve antenna performance. Based on this BSIS-UC-EBG structure, both transparent BSIS-UC-EBG antenna and transparent mesh BSIS-UC-EBG antenna with enhanced properties are presented and discussed. The analysis results show that the impedance bandwidth (the peak gain) of transparent BSIS-UC-EBG antenna and transparent mesh BSIS-UC-EBG antenna are enhanced to 36.6% (4.7 dBi) and 44.7% (5.8 dBi), respectively. In addition, we also discuss the comparison of radiation patterns at 60 GHz, and the results illustrate that the radiation patterns are basically identical.

  16. Concepts and Strategies for Transparency Monitoring of Nuclear Materials at the Back End of the Fuel/Weapons Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    COSTIN, LAURENCE; DAVIES, PETER; PREGENZER, ARIAN L.

    1999-10-01

    Representatives of the Department of Energy, the national laboratories, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and others gathered to initiate the development of broad-based concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle, including both geologic disposal and monitored retrievable storage. The workshop focused on two key questions: ''Why should we monitor?'' and ''What should we monitor?'' These questions were addressed by identifying the range of potential stakeholders, concerns that stakeholders may have, and the information needed to address those concerns. The group constructed a strategic framework for repository transparency implementation, organized around the issues of safety (both operational and environmental), diversion (assuring legitimate use and security), and viability (both political and economic). Potential concerns of the international community were recognized as the possibility of material diversion, the multinational impacts of potential radionuclide releases, and public and political perceptions of unsafe repositories. The workshop participants also identified potential roles that the WIPP may play as a monitoring technology development and demonstration test-bed facility. Concepts for WIPP'S potential test-bed role include serving as (1) an international monitoring technology and development testing facility, (2) an international demonstration facility, and (3) an education and technology exchange center on repository transparency technologies.

  17. All-fiber transparent piezoelectric harvester with a cooperatively enhanced structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun; Wang, Bo-Sheng; Li, Shan-Chien

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a highly-flexible all-fiber based transparent piezoelectric harvester (ATPH) by using the direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) technique and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Here, we comprehensively show that transferred high performance transparent electrodes with Au-coated nanowire (NW) electrodes can be obtained using a facile and scalable combined fabrication route of both electrospinning and sputtering processes. Au-coated MNFs of a.c. 110 nm thick can significantly reduce junction resistance, which results in high transmittance (90%) at low sheet resistance (175 Ω sq-1). The Au-coated MNFs electrodes also show great flexibility and stretchability, which easily surpass the brittleness of indium tin oxide (ITO) films. Further improvement in ATPH performance was realized by rolling the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in an increase in power output due to the cooperatively enhanced effect. The rolled ATPH with 0.34 cm diameter produces a high output voltage of ˜4.1 V, current ˜295 nA at a strain of 0.5% and 5 hz. This can efficiently run commercially available electronic components in a self-powered mode without any external electrical supply.

  18. Enhancing the reporting and transparency of rheumatology research: a guide to reporting guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Manuscripts and abstracts from biomedical journals frequently do not contain proper information for meeting required standards and serving the multiple needs of their end users. Reporting guidelines and checklists help researchers to meet those standards by providing rules or principles for specific research areas. Rheumatology research includes a broad range of heterogeneous research areas, each with its own requirements, producing several distinct categories of articles. Our objectives with this article are to raise awareness of the existence and importance of reporting guidelines, to present a structured overview of reporting guidelines that rheumatology journals could apply, and to encourage their use by journal authors, editors, and reviewers, including those of Arthritis Research & Therapy. Internationally recognized reporting guidelines exist for a diversity of research areas. We encourage colleagues to consult the 'Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research' (EQUATOR) network when writing scientific papers. EQUATOR is an international initiative that seeks to improve the reliability and value of biomedical research literature by promoting transparent and accurate reporting of studies. We propose specific reporting guidelines for a number of study designs: animal research, randomized trials, reliability and agreement studies, systematic reviews with and without meta-analyses, diagnostic test accuracy studies, and also observational research including cross-sectional, cohort, and case-control studies. We encourage authors, editors, and reviewers to adhere to and enforce the use of the appropriate guidelines when writing, reading, and reviewing scientific papers. PMID:23448311

  19. All-fiber transparent piezoelectric harvester with a cooperatively enhanced structure.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun; Wang, Bo-Sheng; Li, Shan-Chien

    2016-10-28

    In this paper, we demonstrated a highly-flexible all-fiber based transparent piezoelectric harvester (ATPH) by using the direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) technique and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Here, we comprehensively show that transferred high performance transparent electrodes with Au-coated nanowire (NW) electrodes can be obtained using a facile and scalable combined fabrication route of both electrospinning and sputtering processes. Au-coated MNFs of a.c. 110 nm thick can significantly reduce junction resistance, which results in high transmittance (90%) at low sheet resistance (175 Ω sq(-1)). The Au-coated MNFs electrodes also show great flexibility and stretchability, which easily surpass the brittleness of indium tin oxide (ITO) films. Further improvement in ATPH performance was realized by rolling the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in an increase in power output due to the cooperatively enhanced effect. The rolled ATPH with 0.34 cm diameter produces a high output voltage of ∼4.1 V, current ∼295 nA at a strain of 0.5% and 5 hz. This can efficiently run commercially available electronic components in a self-powered mode without any external electrical supply.

  20. Use of carbon dots to enhance UV-blocking of transparent nanocellulose films.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Zhao, Yafei; Jiang, Yaoquan; Miao, Miao; Cao, Shaomei; Fang, Jianhui

    2017-04-01

    High-efficient transparent UV-blocking nanocellulose (NC) films were successfully assembled by pressured-extrusion of the composites of carbon dots (CDs), 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) radical mediated oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) and ZnO nanostructures. ONC nanofibrils were firstly extracted from bamboo fibers and subsequently prepared by applying TEMPO oxidation. The as-obtained CDs-ONC-ZnO films exhibited high visible light transparency, excellent thermal stability and enhanced UV-blocking properties. Compared to the previously designed NC-ZnO films, CDs-ONC-ZnO films presented significant increase of UV-blocking ratio (UVR) with the same amounts of ZnO. Moreover, the UVR of CDs-ONC-s-ZnO film with 4wt% sheet-like ZnO (s-ZnO) at 300nm and 225nm is 92.74% and 98.99%, better than the same condition of CDs-ONC-b-ZnO film added with belt-like ZnO (b-ZnO) and CDs-ONC-p-ZnO film added with commercial particulate ZnO (p-ZnO). An interesting discovery is that when adding 4wt% p-ZnO, the UVR of CDs-ONC-p-ZnO film is very close to the value of NC-s-ZnO film with the same amount of s-ZnO.

  1. Nano-honeycomb structured transparent electrode for enhanced light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Min; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    A universal nano-sphere lithography method has been developed to fabricate nano-structured transparent electrode, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), for light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Perforated SiO2 film made from a monolayer colloidal crystal of polystyrene spheres and tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel is used as a template. Ordered nano-honeycomb pits on the ITO electrode surface are obtained by chemical etching. The proposed method can be utilized to form large-area nano-structured ITO electrode. More than two folds' enhancement in both current efficiency and power efficiency has been achieved in a red phosphorescent OLED which was fabricated on the nano-structured ITO substrate.

  2. Enhancing the reading fluency and comprehension of children with reading disabilities in an orthographically transparent language.

    PubMed

    Snellings, Patrick; van der Leij, Aryan; de Jong, Peter F; Blok, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Breznitz (2006) demonstrated that Hebrew-speaking adults with reading disabilities benefited from a training in which reading rate was experimentally manipulated. In the present study, the authors examine whether silent reading training enhances the sentence reading rate and comprehension of children with reading disabilities and whether results found in Hebrew equally apply to an orthographically transparent language. Training results of 59 Dutch children with reading disabilities and normally achieving children show that children with reading disabilities are able to increase their sentence reading rate with high comprehension levels when pushed to do so with accelerated reading training. Posttest results show that transfer to routine reading is less strong for both accelerated and unaccelerated reading. Only accelerated training allows children with reading disabilities to read at high speed while maintaining high comprehension levels.

  3. Nano-honeycomb structured transparent electrode for enhanced light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Min; Wang, Zhao-Kui E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    A universal nano-sphere lithography method has been developed to fabricate nano-structured transparent electrode, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), for light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Perforated SiO{sub 2} film made from a monolayer colloidal crystal of polystyrene spheres and tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel is used as a template. Ordered nano-honeycomb pits on the ITO electrode surface are obtained by chemical etching. The proposed method can be utilized to form large-area nano-structured ITO electrode. More than two folds' enhancement in both current efficiency and power efficiency has been achieved in a red phosphorescent OLED which was fabricated on the nano-structured ITO substrate.

  4. Enhancement of graphene visibility on transparent substrates by refractive index optimization.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hugo; Alves, Luís; Moura, Cacilda; Belsley, Michael; Stauber, Tobias; Schellenberg, Peter

    2013-05-20

    Optical reflection microscopy is one of the main imaging tools to visualize graphene microstructures. Here is reported a novel method that employs refractive index optimization in an optical reflection microscope, which greatly improves the visibility of graphene flakes. To this end, an immersion liquid with a refractive index that is close to that of the glass support is used in-between the microscope lens and the support improving the contrast and resolution of the sample image. Results show that the contrast of single and few layer graphene crystals and structures can be enhanced by a factor of 4 compared to values commonly achieved with transparent substrates using optical reflection microscopy lacking refractive index optimization.

  5. High-refractive-index transparent coatings enhance the optical fiber cladding modes refractometric sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Renoirt, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Chao; Debliquy, Marc; Olivier, Marie-Georges; Mégret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2013-11-18

    The high order cladding modes of standard single mode optical fiber appear in quasi-degenerate pairs corresponding to mostly radially or mostly azimuthally polarized light. In this work, we demonstrate that, in the presence of a high-refractive-index coating surrounding the fiber outer surface, the wavelength spacing between the orthogonally polarized cladding modes families can be drastically enhanced. This behavior can be advantageously exploited for refractometric sensing purposes. For this, we make use of tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) as spectral combs to excite the orthogonally polarized cladding modes families separately. TFBGs were coated with a nanometer-scale transparent thin film characterized by a refractive index value close to 1.9, well higher than the one of pure silica. This coating brings two important assets: an ~8-fold increase in refractometric sensitivity is obtained in comparison to bare TFBGs while the sensitivity is extended to surrounding refractive index (SRI) values above 1.45.

  6. Enhanced broadband near-infrared luminescence from transparent Yb3+/Ni2+ codoped silicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Botao; Zhou, Shifeng; Ruan, Jian; Qiao, Yanbo; Chen, Danping; Zhu, Congshan; Qiu, Jianrong

    2008-02-04

    The near-infrared emission intensity of Ni(2+) in Yb(3+)/Ni(2+) codoped transparent MgO-Al(2)O(3)-Ga(2)O(3)-SiO(2)-TiO(2) glass ceramics could be enhanced up to 4.4 times via energy transfer from Yb(3+) to Ni(2+) in nanocrystals. The best Yb(2)O(3) concentration was about 1.00 mol%. For the Yb(3+)/Ni(2+) codoped glass ceramic with 1.00 mol% Yb(2)O(3), a broadband near-infrared emission centered at 1265 nm with full width at half maximum of about 300 nm and lifetime of about 220 mus was observed. The energy transfer mechanism was also discussed.

  7. Novel transparent conductor with enhanced conductivity: hybrid of silver nanowires and dual-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hiesang; Woo, Yun Sung; Shin, Weonho; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Taek; Kim, Felix Sunjoo; Hwang, Jinyoung

    2017-10-01

    We present hybrid transparent conducting films based on silver nanowires (Ag NWs) and doped graphene through novel dual co-doping method by applying various dopants (HNO3 or Au for p-doping and N2H4 for n-doping) on top and bottom sides of graphene. We systematically investigated the effect of dual-doping on their surface as well as electrical and optical properties of graphene and Ag NW/graphene hybrid films through the combination study with various dopant types (p/p, p/n, n/p, and n/n). We found that the p/p-type dual-doped (p-type dopant: HNO3) graphene and its hybrid formation with Ag NWs appeared to be the most effective in enhancing the electrical properties of conductor (doped graphene with ΔR/R0 = 84% and Ag NW/doped graphene hybrid with ΔR/R0 = 62%), demonstrating doped monolayer graphene with high optical transmittance (TT = 97.4%), and sheet resistance (Rs = 188 Ω/sq.). We also note that dual-doping improved such electrical properties without any significant debilitation of optical transparency of conductors (doped graphene with ΔTT = 0.1% and Ag NW/doped graphene hybrid with ΔTT = 0.4%). In addition, the enhanced conductivity of p-type dual-doped graphene allows a hybrid system to form co-percolating network in which Ag NWs can form a secondary conductive path at grain boundaries of polycrystalline graphene.

  8. Ultra-fast laser enhanced printing of nanomaterial for high quality transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nian, Qiong

    Direct printing of nanomaterials, which integrate nanomaterials into a film via low cost mean, is designed to fabricate transparent conductive electrode (TCE) film. Following laser processing is utilized as the post treatment to enhance the film performance. The laser processing is proposed in order to weld nanomaterials in nanoscale and enhance the electrical conductance of the nanomaterials film after direct printing. Rigid glass substrate was chosen as the substrate to load nanomaterials printing; however, this laser processing also can be utilized to nanomaterials printed on flexible substrate like polymer and bendable glass. Aluminum doped zinc oxide nanoparticles and silver nanowires were chosen as the printable nanomaterials. The laser -- nanomaterial interaction and temperature evolution was studied by Comsol Multiphysics software. The nature intrinsic of laser induced localized nanowelding was simulated by Molecular Dynamic simulation. The SEM, TEM and XRD results show that microstructure of nanomaterials film was improved significantly after laser induced nanowelding. The performance evaluation confirms the improved optoelectronic property of nanomaterials printing film. The theoretical study of the electrical conductance enhancement is presented in the thesis. The direct printing techniques and ultra-fast laser processing have the potential to boost the efficiency when used in commercial mass -- production.

  9. The Exact Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Parker J; Born, Alexandra; Henen, Morkos A; Strotz, Dean; Orts, Julien; Olsson, Simon; Güntert, Peter; Chi, Celestine N; Vögeli, Beat

    2017-07-14

    Although often depicted as rigid structures, proteins are highly dynamic systems, whose motions are essential to their functions. Despite this, it is difficult to investigate protein dynamics due to the rapid timescale at which they sample their conformational space, leading most NMR-determined structures to represent only an averaged snapshot of the dynamic picture. While NMR relaxation measurements can help to determine local dynamics, it is difficult to detect translational or concerted motion, and only recently have significant advances been made to make it possible to acquire a more holistic representation of the dynamics and structural landscapes of proteins. Here, we briefly revisit our most recent progress in the theory and use of exact nuclear Overhauser enhancements (eNOEs) for the calculation of structural ensembles that describe their conformational space. New developments are primarily targeted at increasing the number and improving the quality of extracted eNOE distance restraints, such that the multi-state structure calculation can be applied to proteins of higher molecular weights. We then review the implications of the exact NOE to the protein dynamics and function of cyclophilin A and the WW domain of Pin1, and finally discuss our current research and future directions.

  10. Nuclear spin coherence properties of 151Eu3+ and 153Eu3+ in a Y2O3 transparent ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, J.; Kunkel, N.; Ikesue, A.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, P.

    2017-03-01

    We have measured inhomogeneous linewidths and coherence times (T 2) of nuclear spin transitions in a Eu3+ :Y2O3 transparent ceramic by an all-optical spin echo technique. The nuclear spin echo decay curves showed a strong modulation which was attributed to interaction with Y nuclei in the host. The coherence time of the 29 MHz spin transition in 151Eu3+ was 16 ms in a small applied magnetic field. Temperature dependent measurements showed that the coherence time was constant up to 18 K and was limited by spin-lattice relaxation for higher temperatures. Nuclear spin echoes in 153Eu3+ gave much weaker signals than for the case of 151Eu3+ . The spin coherence time for the 73 MHz spin transition in 153Eu3+ was estimated to 14 ms in a small magnetic field. The study shows that the spin transitions of ceramic Eu3+ :Y2O3 have coherence properties comparable to the best rare-earth-doped materials available.

  11. Engineered absorption enhancement and induced transparency in coupled molecular and plasmonic resonator systems.

    PubMed

    Adato, Ronen; Artar, Alp; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Altug, Hatice

    2013-06-12

    Coupled plasmonic resonators have become the subject of significant research interest in recent years as they provide a route to dramatically enhanced light-matter interactions. Often, the design of these coupled mode systems draws intuition and inspiration from analogies to atomic and molecular physics systems. In particular, they have been shown to mimic quantum interference effects, such as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Fano resonances. This analogy also been used to describe the surface-enhanced absorption effect where a plasmonic resonance is coupled to a weak molecular resonance. These important phenomena are typically described using simple driven harmonic (or linear) oscillators (i.e., mass-on-a-spring) coupled to each other. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of an essential interdependence between the rate at which the system can be driven by an external field and its damping rate through radiative loss. This link is required in systems exhibiting time-reversal symmetry and energy conservation. Not only does it ensure an accurate and physically consistent description of resonant systems but leads directly to interesting new effects. Significantly, we demonstrate this dependence to predict a transition between EIT and electromagnetically induced absorption that is solely a function of the ratio of the radiative to intrinsic loss rates in coupled resonator systems. Leveraging the temporal coupled mode theory, we introduce a unique and intuitive picture that accurately describes these effects in coupled plasmonic/molecular and fully plasmonic systems. We demonstrate our approach's key features and advantages analytically as well as experimentally through surface-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and plasmonic metamaterial applications.

  12. ITO/ATO bilayer transparent electrodes with enhanced light scattering, thermal stability and electrical conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén, C.; Montero, J.; Herrero, J.

    2016-10-01

    Transparent electrodes based on In2O3:Sn (ITO) and SnO2:Sb (ATO) thin films have been deposited by sputtering at room temperature on soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. The preparation conditions were adjusted to obtain 250 nm-thick ITO layers with high conductivity and textured ATO coatings with various thicknesses from 80 to 200 nm. These ITO and ATO films have been combined to enhance the optical scattering and the electrical conductivity of the bilayer electrodes. Besides, a suitable ATO coating can prevent the oxidation of the ITO underlayer, thus increasing the stability of the overall electrical performance. With this purpose the structure, morphology, optical and electrical properties have been analysed comparatively for SLG/ITO, SLG/ATO and SLG/ITO/ATO samples after heating in air at 500 °C, studying the influence of the ATO layer thickness on the light scattering and thermal stability of the electrodes. In this way, a minimum sheet resistance of 8 Ω/sq has been achieved with a 120 nm-thick ATO film deposited on the 250 nm-thick ITO layer; such stacked electrode has visible transmittance near 80% and average haze HT = 10%, showing superior stability, light scattering and electrical performance than the isolated ITO and ATO films.

  13. Enhanced Photocurrent Generation from Bacteriorhodopsin Photocells Using Grating-Structured Transparent Conductive Oxide Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Takahiro; Kasai, Katsuyuki; Haruyama, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Toshiki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Tominari, Yukihiro; Ueda, Rieko; Terui, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Shukichi; Otomo, Akira

    2016-04-01

    We fabricated a grating-structured electrode made of indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) with a high refractive index (approximately 2) for a bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocell. We investigated the photocurrent characteristics of the bR photocell and demonstrated that the photocurrent values from the bR/IZO electrode with the grating structure with a grating period of 340 nm were more than 3.5-4 times larger than those without the grating structure. The photocurrent enhancement was attributed to the resonance effect due to light coupling to the grating structure as well as the scattering effect based on the experimental results and analysis using the photonic band structure determined using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The refractive index of the bR film in electrolyte solution (1.40) used in the FDTD simulations was estimated by analyzing the extinction peak wavelength of 20-nm gold colloids in the bR film. Our results indicate that the grating- or photonic-crystal-structured transparent conductive oxide (TCO) electrodes can increase the light use efficiency of various bR devices such as artificial photosynthetic devices, solar cells, and light-sensing devices.

  14. Transparent free-standing metamaterials and their applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xinglin; Li, Guangyuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Peng, Bo; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shijie; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-01-07

    Integration of metamaterials onto a flexible substrate can provide many advantages such as transparency, deformability, light weight and biocompatibility. Here we demonstrate a simple and convenient nickel sacrificial layer-assisted transfer method to fabricate visible-near infrared (IR) metamaterials embedded into a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. Both the structures and the optical properties are maintained after transferring into the PDMS film from a rigid substrate. This PDMS-based metamaterial can behave as a high performance surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) device with tunable plasmonic bands, which decouple the preparation of SERS structure and the linkage of targeted molecules to the plasmonic structures. By simply covering the PDMS metamaterials device on the surface with molecules of interest, we demonstrate the application of 2-naphthalenethiol molecules self-assembled on a Au film, highlighting the considerable potential of these PDMS metamaterials as a SERS stamp onto any other substrate. What's more, the PDMS-based nanostructures offer a representative model to investigate the interaction between the plasmonic nanostructure and the substrate consisting of different materials by placing PDMS on the surface of the substrate.

  15. Optically transparent superhydrophobic surfaces with enhanced mechanical abrasion resistance enabled by mesh structure.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Naoyuki; Manabe, Kengo; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Shiratori, Seimei

    2015-03-04

    Inspired by naturally occurring superhydrophobic surfaces such as "lotus leaves", a number of approaches have been attempted to create specific surfaces having nano/microscale rough structures and a low surface free energy. Most importantly, much attention has been paid in recent years to the improvement of the durability of highly transparent superhydrophobic surfaces. In this report, superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated using three steps. First, chemical and morphological changes are generated in the polyester mesh by alkaline treatment of NaOH. Second, alkaline treatment causes hydrophobic molecules of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane to react with the hydroxyl groups on the fiber surfaces forming covalent bonds by using the chemical vapor deposition method. Third, hydrophobicity is enhanced by treating the mesh with SiO2 nanoparticles modified with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane using a spray method. The transmittance of the fabricated superhydrophobic mesh is approximately 80% in the spectral range of 400-1000 nm. The water contact angle and the water sliding angle remain greater than 150° and lower than 25°, respectively, and the transmittance remains approximately 79% after 100 cycles of abrasion under approximately 10 kPa of pressure. The mesh surface exhibits a good resistance to acidic and basic solutions over a wide range of pH values (pH 2-14), and the surface can also be used as an oil/water separation material because of its mesh structure.

  16. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international cooperation.

    PubMed

    Ugletveit, Finn; Aaltonen, Hannele

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear and radiological emergencies may easily become severe international emergencies requiring substantial resources in several or many states for an adequate response, which in some cases may require resources exceeding national capabilities. Through the development of a consistent, coherent and sustainable joint programme for improved and more efficient international responses to nuclear and radiological emergencies, it is believed that we could achieve a better and more cost-effective response capability for nuclear and radiological emergencies. This requires, however, that we be willing and able to establish mechanisms of assistance where information and resources are globally shared and that standardised/harmonised procedures be developed and implemented. If we are willing to make this investment, we believe that, in the long term, there will be a significant benefit for all of us.

  17. Enhanced visible fluorescence in highly transparent Al-doped ZnO film by surface plasmon coupling of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishnoi, Swati; Das, Rupali; Phadke, Parikshit; Kotnala, R. K.; Chawla, Santa

    2014-10-01

    ZnO:Al (AZO) film has been deposited on quartz substrate by Pulsed laser deposition and showed monophasic hexagonal structure of c-axis oriented nanorods upto 80 nm in height. AZO film was optimally conjugated with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in a hybrid nanostructure to achieve significant enhancement in the visible fluorescence emission. Augmented near field and extinction spectra of shape tailored Ag NPs and their dimers are simulated through FDTD method, and a direct association with fluorescence enhancement is established. Such plasmon- enhanced visible emission from a transparent conducting oxide could be very important for solar cell applications.

  18. Evidence of a slight nuclear transparency in the alpha-nucleus systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chamon, L. C.; Gasques, L. R.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Rossi, Jr., E. S.; deBoer, R. J.; Seymour, C.; Wiescher, M.; Kiss, G. G.

    2015-02-19

    In earlier works, we proposed a model for the nuclear potential of the α + α and α + ¹²C systems. In addition, this theoretical model successfully described data related to the elastic and inelastic scattering processes as well as resonances that correspond to the capture reaction channel. In the present work, we extend the same model to obtain bare nuclear potentials for several α-nucleus systems. We adopt this parameter-free interaction to analyze fusion, elastic, and inelastic scattering data within the context of the coupled-channel formalism. Our results indicate that, for these systems, the absorption of flux of the elastic channel at internal distances of interaction is not complete. In addition, we present new experimental angular distributions for the 2⁺ inelastic target excitation of α on ¹²⁰,¹³⁰Te.

  19. Evidence of a slight nuclear transparency in the alpha-nucleus systems

    DOE PAGES

    Chamon, L. C.; Gasques, L. R.; Nobre, G. P. A.; ...

    2015-02-19

    In earlier works, we proposed a model for the nuclear potential of the α + α and α + ¹²C systems. In addition, this theoretical model successfully described data related to the elastic and inelastic scattering processes as well as resonances that correspond to the capture reaction channel. In the present work, we extend the same model to obtain bare nuclear potentials for several α-nucleus systems. We adopt this parameter-free interaction to analyze fusion, elastic, and inelastic scattering data within the context of the coupled-channel formalism. Our results indicate that, for these systems, the absorption of flux of the elasticmore » channel at internal distances of interaction is not complete. In addition, we present new experimental angular distributions for the 2⁺ inelastic target excitation of α on ¹²⁰,¹³⁰Te.« less

  20. Performance enhancement of metal nanowire transparent conducting electrodes by mesoscale metal wires.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Wang, Shuang; Wu, Hui; Narasimhan, Vijay K; Kong, Desheng; Ryoung Lee, Hye; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    For transparent conducting electrodes in optoelectronic devices, electrical sheet resistance and optical transmittance are two of the main criteria. Recently, metal nanowires have been demonstrated to be a promising type of transparent conducting electrode because of low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Here we incorporate a mesoscale metal wire (1-5 μm in diameter) into metal nanowire transparent conducting electrodes and demonstrate at least a one order of magnitude reduction in sheet resistance at a given transmittance. We realize experimentally a hybrid of mesoscale and nanoscale metal nanowires with high performance, including a sheet resistance of 0.36 Ω sq(-1) and transmittance of 92%. In addition, the mesoscale metal wires are applied to a wide range of transparent conducting electrodes including conducting polymers and oxides with improvement up to several orders of magnitude. The metal mesowires can be synthesized by electrospinning methods and their general applicability opens up opportunities for many transparent conducting electrode applications.

  1. Nuclear-enhanced geothermal heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.H. II

    1995-12-31

    This report proposes the testing of an abandoned drill well for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel rods. The well need not be in a geothermal field, since the downhole assembly takes advantage of only the natural thermal gradient. The water in the immediate vicinity of the fuel will be chemically treated for corrosion resistance. Above this will be a long column of viscous fluid insoluble in water, to act as a fluid barrier. The remainder of the well bore, up to the surface, will be the working fluid for the power turbine at the surface. There will be a low-pressure region in the immediate vicinity of the fuel, encouraging the flashing of steam. Due to the low level of heat emitted by the fuel rods, the radioactive material will be surrounded by a secondary casing that will reduce the water it contacts directly, thus causing it to heat up quickly and to maximize the steam-generating process, and the formation of air nuclides. These will percolate upward through the viscous column where steadily decreasing pressure causes expansion. The nuclear fuel`s thermal energy will have been transferred through the high radioactive zone as pressure, then it will flash to steam and heat the water in the top of the wellbore. The drill well, a minimum of 10,000 ft. in depth, will naturally heat any circulating fluid. The fuel is not used as a thermal source, but only to produce a few spontaneous bubbles, sufficient to increase the fluid pressure by expansion as it rises in the wellbore. The additional thermal energy from the nuclear source will superheat the water for use in the power-generation apparatus at the surface. This equipment, operating on very-low radioactive fluid, will be protected by a secondary containment. The typical drill well is ideally suited for the insertion of spent fuel rods, which are smaller than downhole tools and instrumentation regularly installed in production wells.

  2. Integrating Nuclear Information to Enhance Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, N; Dubrin, J; Scarbrough, J

    2001-10-01

    Implementation of the Strengthened Safeguards System provides many new opportunities and challenges for collecting; analyzing and archiving nuclear materials safeguards information. For the first time in the history of safeguards, the International Atomic Energy Agency will be required not only to verify the accuracy of declarations, but also the completeness. To successfully implement the new safeguards regime, new and innovative ways of collecting, analyzing and archiving large amounts of safeguards information will be required. A conceptual system design that utilizes a geographical information system for the integration and analysis of this safeguards information will be described and demonstrated.

  3. Enhancing the credibility of decisions based on scientific conclusions: transparency is imperative.

    PubMed

    Schreider, Jay; Barrow, Craig; Birchfield, Norman; Dearfield, Kerry; Devlin, Dennis; Henry, Sara; Kramer, Melissa; Schappelle, Seema; Solomon, Keith; Weed, Douglas L; Embry, Michelle R

    2010-07-01

    Transparency and documentation of the decision process are at the core of a credible risk assessment and, in addition, are essential in the presentation of a weight of evidence (WoE)-based approach. Lack of confidence in the risk assessment process (as the basis for a risk management decision), beginning with evaluation of raw data and continuing through the risk decision process, is largely because of issues surrounding transparency. There is a critical need to implement greater transparency throughout the risk assessment process, and although doing so will not guarantee the correctness of the risk assessment or that all risk assessors come up with the same conclusions, it will provide essential information on how a particular conclusion or decision was made, thereby increasing confidence in the conclusions. Recognizing this issue, the International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute convened a multisector committee tasked with discussing this issue and examining existing guidance and recommendations related to transparency in risk assessment. The committee concluded that transparency is inextricably linked to credibility: credibility of the data, credibility of the risk assessment process, and credibility of the resulting decision making. To increase this credibility, existing guidance concerning criteria elements of transparency related to the risk assessment process must be more widely disseminated and applied, and raw data for studies used in human health and environmental risk assessment must be more widely available. Finally, the decision-making process in risk management must be better documented and a guidance framework established for both the process itself and its communication to the public.

  4. Enhanced transparent conducting networks on plastic substrates modified with highly oxidized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong Seok; Sin, Dong Hun; Kim, Haena; Jang, Jeong In; Kim, Ho Young; Lee, Geon-Woong; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Soo-Young; Han, Joong Tark

    2016-03-01

    Atomically thin and two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO) is a very fascinating material because of its functional groups, high transparency, and solution processability. Here we show that highly oxidized GO (HOGO) nanosheets serve as an effective interfacial modifier of transparent conducting films with one-dimensional (1D) silver nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Optically transparent and small-sized GO nanosheets, with minimal sp2 domains, were successfully fabricated by step-wise oxidation and exfoliation of graphite. We demonstrated that under-coated HOGO further decreases the sheet resistance of the SWCNT film top-coated with HOGO by increasing the contact area between the SWCNTs and HOGO nanosheets by generating hole carriers in the SWCNT as a result of charge transfer. Moreover, HOGO nanosheets with AgNWs contribute to the efficient thermal joining of AgNW networks on plastic substrates by limiting the thermal embedding of AgNWs into the plastic surface, resulting in efficient decrease of the sheet resistance. Furthermore, flexible organic photovoltaic cells with GO-modified AgNW anodes on a flexible substrate were successfully demonstrated.Atomically thin and two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO) is a very fascinating material because of its functional groups, high transparency, and solution processability. Here we show that highly oxidized GO (HOGO) nanosheets serve as an effective interfacial modifier of transparent conducting films with one-dimensional (1D) silver nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Optically transparent and small-sized GO nanosheets, with minimal sp2 domains, were successfully fabricated by step-wise oxidation and exfoliation of graphite. We demonstrated that under-coated HOGO further decreases the sheet resistance of the SWCNT film top-coated with HOGO by increasing the contact area between the SWCNTs and HOGO nanosheets by generating hole carriers in the SWCNT as a result of charge

  5. Enhancement of measurement sensitivity in the formation of shear interferograms of transparent plates with small residual wedging

    SciTech Connect

    But', A I; Lyalikov, A M

    2011-10-31

    We have proposed a method for increasing the sensitivity of measurements of the wedge angle in transparent plates. The method is based on formation of the holographic shear interferograms using a combination of 180 Degree-Sign rotation of the plate with byturn adjustment of interferograms in its images to an infinitely wide fringe. The sensitivity enhancement is due to the increased number of interference fringes in the observed images of the wedged plate, which favours the reduction of the measurement error during optical processing of the obtained interferograms. Data on the experimental validation of the proposed method are presented.

  6. Enhanced transparent conducting networks on plastic substrates modified with highly oxidized graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Seok; Sin, Dong Hun; Kim, Haena; Jang, Jeong In; Kim, Ho Young; Lee, Geon-Woong; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Soo-Young; Han, Joong Tark

    2016-03-28

    Atomically thin and two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO) is a very fascinating material because of its functional groups, high transparency, and solution processability. Here we show that highly oxidized GO (HOGO) nanosheets serve as an effective interfacial modifier of transparent conducting films with one-dimensional (1D) silver nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Optically transparent and small-sized GO nanosheets, with minimal sp(2) domains, were successfully fabricated by step-wise oxidation and exfoliation of graphite. We demonstrated that under-coated HOGO further decreases the sheet resistance of the SWCNT film top-coated with HOGO by increasing the contact area between the SWCNTs and HOGO nanosheets by generating hole carriers in the SWCNT as a result of charge transfer. Moreover, HOGO nanosheets with AgNWs contribute to the efficient thermal joining of AgNW networks on plastic substrates by limiting the thermal embedding of AgNWs into the plastic surface, resulting in efficient decrease of the sheet resistance. Furthermore, flexible organic photovoltaic cells with GO-modified AgNW anodes on a flexible substrate were successfully demonstrated.

  7. Enhanced Photocurrent of Transparent CuFeO2 Photocathodes by Self-Light-Harvesting Architecture.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yunjung; Yang, Wooseok; Kim, Jimin; Jeong, Sunho; Moon, Jooho

    2017-04-13

    Efficient sunlight-driven water-splitting devices can be achieved by using an optically and energetically well-matched pair of photoelectrodes in a tandem configuration. The key for maximizing the photoelectrochemical efficiency is the use of a highly transparent front photoelectrode with a band gap below 2.0 eV. Herein, we propose two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) structures consisting of a CuFeO2-decorated microsphere monolayer, which serve as self-light-harvesting architectures allowing for amplified light absorption and high transparency. The photocurrent densities are evaluated for three CuFeO2 2D PC-based photoelectrodes with microspheres of different sizes. The optical analysis confirmed the presence of a photonic stop band that generates slow light and at the same time amplifies the absorption of light. The 410 nm sized CuFeO2-decorated microsphere 2D PC photocathode shows an exceptionally high visible light transmittance of 76.4% and a relatively high photocurrent of 0.2 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V vs a reversible hydrogen electrode. The effect of the microsphere size on the carrier collection efficiency was analyzed by in situ conductive atomic force microscopy observation under illumination. Our novel synthetic method to produce self-light-harvesting nanostructures provides a promising approach for the effective use of solar energy by highly transparent photocathodes.

  8. Enhancing Transparency and Control When Drawing Data-Driven Inferences About Individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daizhuo; Fraiberger, Samuel P; Moakler, Robert; Provost, Foster

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies show the remarkable power of fine-grained information disclosed by users on social network sites to infer users' personal characteristics via predictive modeling. Similar fine-grained data are being used successfully in other commercial applications. In response, attention is turning increasingly to the transparency that organizations provide to users as to what inferences are drawn and why, as well as to what sort of control users can be given over inferences that are drawn about them. In this article, we focus on inferences about personal characteristics based on information disclosed by users' online actions. As a use case, we explore personal inferences that are made possible from "Likes" on Facebook. We first present a means for providing transparency into the information responsible for inferences drawn by data-driven models. We then introduce the "cloaking device"-a mechanism for users to inhibit the use of particular pieces of information in inference. Using these analytical tools we ask two main questions: (1) How much information must users cloak to significantly affect inferences about their personal traits? We find that usually users must cloak only a small portion of their actions to inhibit inference. We also find that, encouragingly, false-positive inferences are significantly easier to cloak than true-positive inferences. (2) Can firms change their modeling behavior to make cloaking more difficult? The answer is a definitive yes. We demonstrate a simple modeling change that requires users to cloak substantially more information to affect the inferences drawn. The upshot is that organizations can provide transparency and control even into complicated, predictive model-driven inferences, but they also can make control easier or harder for their users.

  9. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2)/ SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  10. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2) / SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  11. Is it possible to enhance the nuclear Schiff moment by nuclear collective modes?

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, N. Dmitriev, V. F. Flambaum, V. V. Lisetskiy, A. Sen'kov, R. A. Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2007-09-15

    The nuclear Schiff moment is predicted to be enhanced in nuclei with static quadrupole and octupole deformation. The analogous suggestion of the enhanced contribution to the Schiff moment from the soft collective quadrupole and octupole vibrations in spherical nuclei is tested in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation with separable quadrupole and octupole forces applied to the odd {sup 217-221}Ra and {sup 217-221}Rn isotopes. In this framework, we confirm the existence of the enhancement effect due to the soft modes, but only in the limit when the frequencies of quadrupole and octupole vibrations are close to zero.

  12. Radiation enhanced dissociation of hydrogen in nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Yoichi

    1992-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced dissociation of hydrogen gas in nuclear rockets is studied. The dissociation degree is obtained by solving rate equations, which include the fast-ion induced dissociation and ionization of atomic and molecular hydrogens. Analytical formulas are used to estimate a change in the viscosity and the specific impulse. It was found that the fast-ion induced dissociation plays an important role in enhancing the specific impulse for nuclear rocket concepts using hydrogen gas at low pressures (less than 0.1 MPa) and low temperatures (less than 3000 K). It is also shown that the specific impulse is enhanced by mixing helium-3, lithium-6, boron-10, or uranium-235 with hydrogen.

  13. Magnetically Induced Optical Transparency on a Forbidden Transition in Strontium for Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Matthew N.; Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-06-01

    In this Letter we realize a narrow spectroscopic feature using a technique that we refer to as magnetically induced optical transparency. A cold ensemble of 88Sr atoms interacts with a single mode of a high-finesse optical cavity via the 7.5 kHz linewidth, spin forbidden 1S0 to 3P1 transition. By applying a magnetic field that shifts two excited state Zeeman levels, we open a transmission window through the cavity where the collective vacuum Rabi splitting due to a single level would create destructive interference for probe transmission. The spectroscopic feature approaches the atomic transition linewidth, which is much narrower than the cavity linewidth, and is highly immune to the reference cavity length fluctuations that limit current state-of-the-art laser frequency stability.

  14. Ultraviolet laser crystallized ZnO:Al films on sapphire with high Hall mobility for simultaneous enhancement of conductivity and transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, Qiong; Zhang, Martin Y.; Schwartz, Bradley D.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-05-19

    One of the most challenging issues in transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) is to improve their conductivity without compromising transparency. High conductivity in TCO films often comes from a high carrier concentration, which is detrimental to transparency due to free carrier absorption. Here we show that UV laser crystallization (UVLC) of aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on sapphire results in much higher Hall mobility, allowing relaxation of the constraints of the conductivity/transparency trade-off. X-ray diffraction patterns and morphological characterizations show grain growth and crystallinity enhancement during UVLC, resulting in less film internal imperfections. Optoelectronic measurements show that UVLC dramatically improves the electron mobility, while the carrier concentration decreases which in turn simultaneously increases conductivity and transparency. AZO films under optimized UVLC achieve the highest electron mobility of 79 cm{sup 2}/V s at a low carrier concentration of 7.9 × 10{sup +19} cm{sup −3}. This is realized by a laser crystallization induced decrease of both grain boundary density and electron trap density at grain boundaries. The infrared (IR) to mid-IR range transmittance spectrum shows UVLC significantly enhances the AZO film transparency without compromising conductivity.

  15. Optically enhanced nuclear cross polarization in acridine-doped fluorene

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, C.M.

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this work has been to create large polarizations of the dilute /sup 13/C nuclei in the solid state. The idea was to create /sup 1/H polarizations larger than Boltzmann and to use the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy cross polarization technique to then transfer this large polarization to the /sup 13/C spin system. Optical Nuclear Polarization (ONP) of acridine-doped fluorene single crystals was studied. In addition, ONP of powdered samples of the acridine-doped fluorene was studied. In general, many compounds do not crystallize easily or do not form large crystals suitable for NMR experiments. Powdered, amorphous and randomly dispersed samples are generally far more readily available than single crystals. One objective of this work has been to (first) create large /sup 1/H polarizations. Although large optical proton polarizations in single crystals have been reported previously, optically generated polarizations in powdered samples have not been reported. For these reasons, ONP studies of powdered samples of the acridine-doped fluorene were also undertaken. Using ONP in combination with the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy experiment, large /sup 13/C polarizations have been created in fluorene single crystals. These large /sup 13/C polarizations have permitted the determination of the seven incongruent chemical shielding tensors of the fluorene molecule. Part 2 of this thesis describes the proton enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy experiment. Part 3 describes the ONP experiment. Part 4 is a description of the experimental set-up. Part 5 describes the data analysis for the determination of the chemical shielding tensors. Part 6 presents the results of the ONP experiments performed in this work and the chemical shielding tensors determined.

  16. Enhancement of the electrical properties of silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes by atomic layer deposition coating with zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Quang; Tran, Duc-Huy; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Nguyen, Duy-Cuong

    2016-08-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes for applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes are important components and require low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Herein, we report an enhancement of the electrical properties of silver (Ag) nanowire networks by coating with zinc oxide using the atomic layer deposition technique. A strong decrease in the sheet resistance of Ag nanowires, namely from 20-40 Ω/□ to 7-15 Ω/□, was observed after coating with ZnO. Ag nanowire electrodes coated with 200-cycle ZnO by atomic layer deposition show the best quality, with a sheet resistance of 11 Ω/□ and transmittance of 75%.

  17. Enhancement of the electrical properties of silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes by atomic layer deposition coating with zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Quang; Tran, Duc-Huy; Ngoc Phan, Vu; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Nguyen, Duy-Cuong

    2016-08-19

    Transparent conductive electrodes for applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes are important components and require low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Herein, we report an enhancement of the electrical properties of silver (Ag) nanowire networks by coating with zinc oxide using the atomic layer deposition technique. A strong decrease in the sheet resistance of Ag nanowires, namely from 20-40 Ω/□ to 7-15 Ω/□, was observed after coating with ZnO. Ag nanowire electrodes coated with 200-cycle ZnO by atomic layer deposition show the best quality, with a sheet resistance of 11 Ω/□ and transmittance of 75%.

  18. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to

  19. Enhanced ion beam energy by relativistic transparency in laser-driven shock ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the effects of relativistic transparency (RT) on electrostatic shock ion acceleration. Penetrating portion of the laser pulse directly heats up the electrons to a very high temperature in backside of the target, resulting in a condition of high shock velocity. The reflected portion of the pulse can yield a fast hole boring and density compression in near-critical density plasma to satisfy the electrostatic shock condition; 1.5

  20. Enhancement of polar crystalline phase formation in transparent PVDF-CaF2 composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Goo; Ha, Jong-Wook; Sohn, Eun-Ho; Park, In Jun; Lee, Soo-Bok

    2016-12-01

    We consider the influence of calcium fluoride (CaF2) nanoparticles on the crystalline phase formation of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) for the first time. The transparent PVDF-CaF2 composite films were prepared by casting on PET substrates using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) as a solvent. It was found that CaF2 promoted the formation of polar crystalline phase of PVDF in composites, whereas nonpolar α-phase was dominant in the neat PVDF film prepared at the same condition. The portion of polar crystalline phase increased in proportional to the weight fraction of CaF2 in the composite films up to 10 wt%. Further addition of CaF2 suppressed completely the α-phase formation. Polar crystalline phase observed in as-cast composite films was a mixture of β- and γ-polymorph structures. It was also shown that much ordered γ-phase could be obtained through thermal treatment of as-cast PVDF-CaF2 composite film at the temperatures above the melting temperature of the composite films, but below that of γ-phase.

  1. Multifold fluorescence enhancement in nanoscopic fluorophore-clay hybrids in transparent aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Felbeck, Tom; Mundinger, Simon; Lezhnina, Marina M; Staniford, Mark; Resch-Genger, Ute; Kynast, Ulrich H

    2015-05-11

    Valuable emissive properties of organic fluorophores have become indispensable analytical tools in biophotonics, but frequently suffer from low solubilities and radiationless deactivation in aqueous media, that is, in biological ambience as well. In this report, nanoscaled dye-clay hybrids based on laponite, Na0.7 {(Li0.3 Mg5.5 )[Si8 O20 (OH)4 ]}, are taken advantage of to solubilize neutral dyes, which are natively not encountered in water. Previously reported efficiency and solubility bottlenecks of such hybrids can to a large extent be overcome by comparably simple chemical measures, as demonstrated here for two prominent examples, the fluorescent dyes Nile Red and Coumarin 153. On controlled co-adsorption of small bifunctional quaternary ammonium ions (Me3 N(+) C2 H5 OH and Me3 N(+) C2 H5 NH2 ) we observed an outright efficiency boost by an order of magnitude, and a 30-fold brightness gain. Even at higher concentrations, transparency and stability of the hybrid dispersions are retained, rendering them useful for employment as optically functional nanoparticles in bioassays and beyond. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Enhanced Performance in Al-Doped ZnO Based Transparent Flexible Transparent Thin-Film Transistors Due to Oxygen Vacancy in ZnO Film with Zn-Al-O Interfaces Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Yao, Rui; Wang, Huanhuan; Wu, Xiaoming; Wu, Jinzhu; Wu, Xiaohong; Qin, Wei

    2017-04-05

    Highly conductive and optical transparent Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin film composed of ZnO with a Zn-Al-O interface was fabricated by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. The as-prepared AZO thin film exhibits excellent electrical and optical properties with high stability and compatibility with temperature-sensitive flexible photoelectronic devices; film resistivity is as low as 5.7 × 10(-4) Ω·cm, the carrier concentration is high up to 2.2 × 10(21) cm(-3). optical transparency is greater than 80% in a visible range, and the growth temperature is below 150 °C on the PEN substrate. Compared with the conventional AZO film containing by a ZnO-Al2O3 interface, we propose that the underlying mechanism of the enhanced electrical conductivity for the current AZO thin film is attributed to the oxygen vacancies deficiency derived from the free competitive growth mode of Zn-O and Al-O bonds in the Zn-Al-O interface. The flexible transparent transistor based on this AZO electrode exhibits a favorable threshold voltage and Ion/Ioff ratio, showing promising for use in high-resolution, fully transparent, and flexible display applications.

  3. Enhancing leadership at a nuclear power plant - a systematic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jupiter, P.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced technology, greater regulatory oversight, and critical public scrutiny create numerous pressures for leaders within nuclear power plant systems (NPPSs). These large, complex industrial installations have unusually high expectations imposed for safety and efficiency of operation - without the luxury of trial-and-error learning. Industry leaders assert that enhanced leadership and management can substantially improve the operating performance of a nuclear power plant. The need has been voiced within the nuclear industry for systematic and effective methods to address leadership and management issues. This paper presents a step-by-step model for enhancing leadership achievement within NPPS, which is defined as the combined structural, equipment, and human elements involved in a plant's operation. Within the model, key areas for which the leader is responsible build upon each other in sequential order to form a solid strategic structure; teachable actions and skills form an ongoing cycle for leadership achievement. Through the model's continued and appropriate functioning, a NPPS is likely to maintain its viability, productivity, and effectiveness for the full licensed term of a plant.

  4. Bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells: a strategy to enhance overall efficiency based on transparent polyaniline electrode.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jihuai; Li, Yan; Tang, Qunwei; Yue, Gentian; Lin, Jianming; Huang, Miaoliang; Meng, Lijian

    2014-02-07

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a promising solution to global energy and environmental problems because of its clean, low-cost, high efficiency, good durability, and easy fabrication. However, enhancing the efficiency of the DSSC still is an important issue. Here we devise a bifacial DSSC based on a transparent polyaniline (PANI) counter electrode (CE). Owing to the sunlight irradiation simultaneously from the front and the rear sides, more dye molecules are excited and more carriers are generated, which results in the enhancement of short-circuit current density and therefore overall conversion efficiency. The photoelectric properties of PANI can be improved by modifying with 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP). The bifacial DSSC with 4-ATP/PANI CE achieves a light-to-electric energy conversion efficiency of 8.35%, which is increased by ~24.6% compared to the DSSC irradiated from the front only. This new concept along with promising results provides a new approach for enhancing the photovoltaic performances of solar cells.

  5. Bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells: A strategy to enhance overall efficiency based on transparent polyaniline electrode

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jihuai; Li, Yan; Tang, Qunwei; Yue, Gentian; Lin, Jianming; Huang, Miaoliang; Meng, Lijian

    2014-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a promising solution to global energy and environmental problems because of its clean, low-cost, high efficiency, good durability, and easy fabrication. However, enhancing the efficiency of the DSSC still is an important issue. Here we devise a bifacial DSSC based on a transparent polyaniline (PANI) counter electrode (CE). Owing to the sunlight irradiation simultaneously from the front and the rear sides, more dye molecules are excited and more carriers are generated, which results in the enhancement of short-circuit current density and therefore overall conversion efficiency. The photoelectric properties of PANI can be improved by modifying with 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP). The bifacial DSSC with 4-ATP/PANI CE achieves a light-to-electric energy conversion efficiency of 8.35%, which is increased by ~24.6% compared to the DSSC irradiated from the front only. This new concept along with promising results provides a new approach for enhancing the photovoltaic performances of solar cells. PMID:24504117

  6. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford,C.; de Boer,G.; De Castro, K; Landers, Ph.D., J; Rogers, E

    2009-10-19

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has become a global concern. Many countries continue to make efforts to strengthen nuclear security by enhancing systems of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A). Though MPC&A systems can significantly upgrade nuclear security, they do not eliminate the "human factor." This paper will describe some of the key elements of a comprehensive, sustainable nuclear security culture enhancement program and how implementation can mitigate the insider threat.

  7. Nuclear Transparency and Single Particle Spectral Functions from Quasielastic A(e,e'p) Reactions up to Q2=8.1 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, David Wayne

    2003-05-01

    High statistics elastic and quasielastic scattering measurements were performed on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and iron at squared momentum transfers up to 8.1 GeV2. Both the nuclear transparency and the single particle spectral functions were extracted by means of comparison with a Plane- Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. Our data provide no evidence of the onset of color transparency within our kinematic range.

  8. Study of natural diamonds by dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Li, L; Hu, H; Yang, B; Dan, Z; Qiu, J; Guo, J; Chen, F; Ye, C

    1994-11-01

    The results of a study of two types of natural-diamond crystals by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are reported. The home-built DNP magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectrometer operates at 54 GHz for electrons and 20.2 MHz for carbons. The power of the microwave source was about 30 W and the highest DNP enhancement factor came near to 10(3). It was shown that in the MAS spectra the 13C NMR linewidths of the Ib-type diamond were broader than those of IaB3-type diamond. From the hyperfine structure of the DNP enhancement as a function of frequency, four kinds of nitrogen-centred and one kind of carbon-centred free radicals could be identified in the Ib-type diamond. The hyperfine structures of the DNP enhancement curve that originated from the anisotropic hyperfine interaction between electron and nuclei could be partially averaged out by MAS. The 13C polarization time of DNP was rather long, i.e. 1500 s, and the spin-lattice relaxation time (without microwave irradiation) was about 300 s, which was somewhat shorter than anticipated. Discussions on these experimental results have been made in this report.

  9. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances. PMID:22308442

  10. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Christopher R; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-02-07

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances.

  11. Enhancing the Reading Fluency and Comprehension of Children with Reading Disabilities in an Orthographically Transparent Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snellings, Patrick; van der Leij, Aryan; de Jong, Peter F.; Blok, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Breznitz (2006) demonstrated that Hebrew-speaking adults with reading disabilities benefited from a training in which reading rate was experimentally manipulated. In the present study, the authors examine whether silent reading training enhances the sentence reading rate and comprehension of children with reading disabilities and whether results…

  12. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  13. Aluminum thin film enhanced IR nanosecond laser-induced frontside etching of transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Daniel; Cambronero, Ferran; Flores-Arias, María Teresa; Farid, Nazar; O'Connor, Gerard M.

    2017-01-01

    Laser processing of glass is of significant commercial interest for microfabrication of precision optical engineering devices. In this work, a laser ablation enhancement mechanism for microstructuring of glass materials is presented. The method consists of depositing a thin film of aluminum on the front surface of the glass material to be etched. The laser beam modifies the glass material by being incident on this front-side. The influence of ablation fluence in the nanosecond regime, in combination with the deposition of the aluminum layer of various thicknesses, is investigated by determining the ablation threshold for different glass materials including soda-lime, borosilicate, fused silica and sapphire. Experiments are performed using single laser pulse per shot in an air environment. The best enhancement in terms of threshold fluence reduction is obtained for a 16 nm thick aluminum layer where a reduction of two orders of magnitude in the ablation threshold fluence is observed for all the glass samples investigated in this work.

  14. Enhanced transparency, mechanical durability, and antibacterial activity of zinc nanoparticles on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Jin-Seok; Park, Byeong-Ju; Eom, Ji-Ho; Heo, So-Young; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2014-09-01

    Homogeneously distributed zinc nanoparticles (NPs) on the glass substrate were investigated for the transmittance, mechanical durability, and antibacterial effect. The buffered Ti NPs between Zn NPs and glass substrate were studied for an enhancement of the transmittance and mechanical endurance. The Ti NPs buffered Zn NPs showed a high transmittance of approximately 91.5% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a strong antibacterial activity for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria. The buffered Ti NPs are attractive for an excellent mechanical endurance of the Zn NPs. The Zn NPs did not require the protection layer to prevent the degradation of the performance for both the antibacterial effect and the transmittance.

  15. Paramagnetic Enhancement of Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Peter John; Rouf, Syed Awais; Vaara, Juha

    2017-03-14

    We present a derivation and computations of the paramagnetic enhancement of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling, which may be expressed in terms of the hyperfine coupling (HFC) and (for systems with multiple unpaired electrons) zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensors. This enhancement is formally analogous to the hyperfine contributions to the NMR shielding tensor as formulated by Kurland and McGarvey. The significance of the spin-spin coupling enhancement is demonstrated by using a combination of density-functional theory and correlated ab initio calculations, to determine the HFC and ZFS tensors, respectively, for two paramagnetic 3d metallocenes, a Cr(II)(acac)2 complex, a Co(II) pyrazolylborate complex, and a lanthanide system, Gd-DOTA. Particular attention is paid to relativistic effects in HFC tensors, which are calculated using two methods: a nonrelativistic method supplemented by perturbational spin-orbit coupling corrections, and a fully relativistic, four-component matrix-Dirac-Kohn-Sham approach. The paramagnetic enhancement lacks a direct dependence on the distance between the coupled nuclei, and represents more the strength and orientation of the individual hyperfine couplings of the two nuclei to the spin density distribution. Therefore, the enhancement gains relative importance as compared to conventional coupling as the distance between the nuclei increases, or generally in the cases where the conventional coupling mechanisms result in a small value. With the development of the experimental techniques of paramagnetic NMR, the more significant enhancements, e.g., of the (13)C(13)C couplings in the Gd-DOTA complex (as large as 9.4 Hz), may eventually become important.

  16. Enhanced transparency, mechanical durability, and antibacterial activity of zinc nanoparticles on glass substrate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Jin-Seok; Park, Byeong-Ju; Eom, Ji-Ho; Heo, So-Young; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneously distributed zinc nanoparticles (NPs) on the glass substrate were investigated for the transmittance, mechanical durability, and antibacterial effect. The buffered Ti NPs between Zn NPs and glass substrate were studied for an enhancement of the transmittance and mechanical endurance. The Ti NPs buffered Zn NPs showed a high transmittance of approximately 91.5% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a strong antibacterial activity for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria. The buffered Ti NPs are attractive for an excellent mechanical endurance of the Zn NPs. The Zn NPs did not require the protection layer to prevent the degradation of the performance for both the antibacterial effect and the transmittance. PMID:25183360

  17. From screening to synthesis: using nvivo to enhance transparency in qualitative evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Catherine; Murphy, Kathy; Meehan, Ben; Thomas, James; Brooker, Dawn; Casey, Dympna

    2017-03-01

    To explore the experiences and perceptions of healthcare staff caring for people with dementia in the acute setting. This article focuses on the methodological process of conducting framework synthesis using nvivo for each stage of the review: screening, data extraction, synthesis and critical appraisal. Qualitative evidence synthesis brings together many research findings in a meaningful way that can be used to guide practice and policy development. For this purpose, synthesis must be conducted in a comprehensive and rigorous way. There has been previous discussion on how using nvivo can assist in enhancing and illustrate the rigorous processes involved. Qualitative framework synthesis. Twelve documents, or research reports, based on nine studies, were included for synthesis. The benefits of using nvivo are outlined in terms of facilitating teams of researchers to systematically and rigorously synthesise findings. nvivo functions were used to conduct a sensitivity analysis. Some valuable lessons were learned, and these are presented to assist and guide researchers who wish to use similar methods in future. Ultimately, good qualitative evidence synthesis will provide practitioners and policymakers with significant information that will guide decision-making on many aspects of clinical practice. The example provided explored how people with dementia are cared for acute settings. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Transparent and conductive electrodes combining AZO and ATO thin films for enhanced light scattering and electrical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén, C.; Montero, J.; Herrero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Al:ZnO (AZO) and Sb:SnO2 (ATO) thin films have been deposited by DC sputtering on soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. The preparation conditions were adjusted to obtain transparent films with high conductivity for AZO and high texture for ATO. Then, the combination of AZO and ATO thin films has been tested to enhance the optical scattering and the electrical performance. The structure, morphology, optical, and electrical properties have been analyzed for SLG/AZO, SLG/ATO and SLG/ATO/AZO samples. The surface texture has been characterized optically by the haze parameters for transmittance and reflectance (HT and HR), which have been related to the root mean square roughness for each sample. Some increase of the electrical resistance is obtained for the AZO films deposited on rough ATO underlayers as compared with analogous AZO grown directly on the smooth SLG substrate. Nevertheless, ATO/AZO bilayers have allowed to achieve better electrical conductivity than ATO and greater optical scattering than isolated ATO or AZO films. In this way, average haze values of HT = 30% and HR = 72%, together with sheet resistance of 20 Ω/sq. have been obtained by combining 150 nm-thick ATO and 800 nm-thick AZO films.

  19. Titanate nanotube thin films with enhanced thermal stability and high-transparency prepared from additive-free sols

    SciTech Connect

    Koroesi, Laszlo; Papp, Szilvia; Hornok, Viktoria; Oszko, Albert; Petrik, Peter; Patko, Daniel; Horvath, Robert; Dekany, Imre

    2012-08-15

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized from TiO{sub 2} in alkaline medium by a conventional hydrothermal method (150 Degree-Sign C, 4.7 bar). To obtain hydrogen titanates, the as-prepared sodium titanates were treated with either HCl or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} aqueous solutions. A simple synthesis procedure was devised for stable titanate nanotube sols without using any additives. These highly stable ethanolic sols can readily be used to prepare transparent titanate nanotube thin films of high quality. The resulting samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2}-sorption measurements, Raman spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The comparative results of using two kinds of acids shed light on the superior thermal stability of the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated titanate nanotubes (P-TNTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that P-TNTs contains P in the near-surface region and the thermal stability was enhanced even at a low ({approx}0.5 at%) concentration of P. After calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C, the specific surface areas of the HCl- and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated samples were 153 and 244 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. The effects of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment on the structure, morphology and porosity of titanate nanotubes are discussed. - Graphical Abstract: TEM picture (left) shows P-TNTs with diameters about 5-6 nm. Inset shows a stable titanate nanotube sol illuminated by a 532 nm laser beam. Due to the presence of the nanoparticles the way of the light is visible in the sol. Cross sectional SEM picture (right) as well as ellipsometry revealed the formation of optical quality P-TNT films with thicknesses below 50 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment led to TNTs with high surface area even after calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated TNTs preserved their nanotube morphology up to 500

  20. Transparent bionanocomposite films based on chitosan and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Soni, Bhawna; Hassan, El Barbary; Schilling, M Wes; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2016-10-20

    The development of biobased active films for use in food packaging is increasing due to low cost, environmental appeal, renewability and availability. The objective of this research was to develop an effective and complete green approach for the production of bionanocomposite films with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties. This was accomplished by incorporating TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) into a chitosan matrix. An aqueous suspension of chitosan (100-75wt%), sorbitol (25wt%) and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TEMPO-CNFs, 0-25wt%) were cast in an oven at 40°C for 2-4days. Films were preconditioned at 25°C and 50% RH for characterization. The surface morphology of the films was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thermal properties and crystal structure of the films were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA-DTG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Incorporation of TEMPO-CNFs enhanced the mechanical strength of the films due to the high aspect ratio (3-20nm width, and 10-100nm length) of TEMPO-CNFs and strong interactions with the chitosan matrix. Oxygen and water vapor transmission rates for films that are prepared with chitosan and TEMPO-CNFs (15-25wt%) were significantly reduced. Furthermore, these bionanocomposite films had good thermal stability. Use of TEMPO-CNFs in this method makes it possible to produce bionanocomposite films that are flexible, transparent, and thus have potential in food packaging applications.

  1. Enhancement of minority involvement in DOE nuclear physics programs

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of continuing efforts to interact with a large number of minority students, the Minority Program in the ANL Physics Division has succeeded in attracting many highly qualified students to apply for participation in the programs of the Physics Division and other ANL divisions. The program is directed toward the identification of institutions with relatively strong physics programs and with faculty interested in stimulating their students to pursue research activities, particularly summer programs. During visits to colleges, lectures are presented and are followed by discussion of activities in physics, at Argonne and other national laboratories, and the possibilities for graduate study, employment, etc. Additional activities included attending meetings of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science and of the Society of Black Physics Students. As a result of these efforts, 42 applications were received for the summer program in 1994. A total of 24 offers were made for the Summer Research Participation program in conjunction with Argonne`s Department of Educational Programs. A number of former participants are currently enrolled in graduate programs in physics; one student is working on his Ph.D. thesis in Nuclear Physics in the Physics Division. Various institutions will be visited during this year and several meetings of minority groups will be attended. These ongoing interactions are generating institutional relationships that will enrich the physics programs in minority institutions and substantially enhance minority involvement not only in nuclear physics, but in other branches of physics and science.

  2. UV Enhancement of CR-39 Nuclear Track Detector Etch Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traynor, Nathan; McLauchlin, Christopher; Dodge, Kenneth; McLean, James; Padalino, Stephen; Burke, Michelle; Sangster, Craig

    2014-03-01

    CR-39 plastic is an effective and commonly used solid state nuclear track detector. High-energy charged particles leave tracks of chemical damage. When CR-39 is chemically etched with NaOH at elevated temperatures, pits are produced at the track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. We have shown that by exposing the CR-39 to high intensity UV light between nuclear irradiation and chemical etching, the rate at which the pits grow during etching is increased. The effect has been observed for wavelengths shorter than 350 nm, to at least 250 nm. Heating of samples during UV exposure dramatically increases the etch rates, although heating alone does not produce the effect. The pit enhancement is the result of an increase in both the bulk and track etch rates, while the ratio of these rates (which determines sensitivity to particles) remains roughly constant. By determining the best processing parameters, this effect promises to significantly reduce the time required to process CR-39 track detectors. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  3. Enhanced hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes mutated by nuclear irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Min; Song, Wenlu; Ding, Lingkan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Li; Cen, Kefa

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear irradiation was used for the first time to generate efficient mutants of hydrogen-producing bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes, which were screened with larger colour circles of more fermentative acid by-products. E. aerogenes cells were mutated by nuclear irradiation of (60)Co γ-rays. The screened E. aerogenes ZJU1 mutant with larger colour circles enhanced the hydrogenase activity from 89.8 of the wild strain to 157.4mLH2/(gDWh). The hereditary stability of the E. aerogenes ZJU1 mutant was certified after over ten generations of cultivation. The hydrogen yield of 301mLH2/gglucose with the mutant was higher by 81.8% than that of 166mL/gglucose with the wild strain. The peak hydrogen production rate of 27.2mL/(L·h) with the mutant was higher by 40.9% compared with that of 19.3mL/(L·h) with the wild strain. The mutant produced more acetate and butyrate but less ethanol compared with the wild strain during hydrogen fermentation.

  4. Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced NMR Relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2013-09-15

    We present a new methodological basis for selectively illuminating a dilute population of fluid within a porous medium. Specifically, transport in porous materials can be analyzed by now-standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and NMR pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusometry methods in combination with with the prominent NMR signal amplification tool, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The key components of the approach introduced here are (1) to selectively place intrinsic or extrinsic paramagnetic probes at the site or local volume of interest within the sample, (2) to amplify the signal from the local solvent around the paramagnetic probes with Overhauser DNP, which is performed in situ and under ambient conditions, and (3) to observe the ODNP-enhanced solvent signal with 1D or 2D NMR relaxometry methods, thus selectively amplifying only the relaxation dynamics of the fluid that resides in or percolates through the local porous volume that contains the paramagnetic probe. Here, we demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach by selectively amplifying the NMR signal of only one solvent population, which is in contact with a paramagnetic probe and occluded from a second solvent population. An apparent one-component T2 relaxation decay is shown to actually contain two distinct solvent populations. The approach outlined here should be universally applicable to a wide range of other 1D and 2D relaxometry and PFG diffusometry measurements, including T1-T2 or T1-D correlation maps, where the occluded population containing the paramagnetic probes can be selectively amplified for its enhanced characterization.

  5. Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced NMR Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    We present a new methodological basis for selectively illuminating a dilute population of fluid within a porous medium. Specifically, transport in porous materials can be analyzed by now-standard nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and NMR pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusometry methods in combination with with the prominent NMR signal amplification tool, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The key components of the approach introduced here are (1) to selectively place intrinsic or extrinsic paramagnetic probes at the site or local volume of interest within the sample, (2) to amplify the signal from the local solvent around the paramagnetic probes with Overhauser DNP, which is performed in situ and under ambient conditions, and (3) to observe the ODNP-enhanced solvent signal with 1D or 2D NMR relaxometry methods, thus selectively amplifying only the relaxation dynamics of the fluid that resides in or percolates through the local porous volume that contains the paramagnetic probe. Here, we demonstrate the proof of principle of this approach by selectively amplifying the NMR signal of only one solvent population, which is in contact with a paramagnetic probe and occluded from a second solvent population. An apparent one-component T2 relaxation decay is shown to actually contain two distinct solvent populations. The approach outlined here should be universally applicable to a wide range of other 1D and 2D relaxometry and PFG diffusometry measurements, including T1–T2 or T1-D correlation maps, where the occluded population containing the paramagnetic probes can be selectively amplified for its enhanced characterization. PMID:23837010

  6. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers,E.; deBoer,G.; Crawford, C.; De Castro, K.; Landers, J.

    2009-10-19

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has become a global concern. Many countries continue to make efforts to strengthen nuclear security by enhancing systems of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A). Though MPC&A systems can significantly upgrade nuclear security, they do not eliminate the "human factor." Gen. Eugene Habiger, a former "Assistant Secretary for Safeguards and Security" at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear-weapons complex and a former commander of U.S. strategic nuclear forces, has observed that "good security is 20% equipment and 80% people." Although eliminating the "human factor" is not possible, accounting for and mitigating the risk of the insider threat is an essential element in establishing an effective nuclear security culture. This paper will consider the organizational role in mitigating the risk associated with the malicious insider through monitoring and enhancing human reliability and motivation as well as enhancing the nuclear security culture.

  7. Hyperfine-enhanced gyromagnetic ratio of a nuclear spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangtawesin, S.; McLellan, C. A.; Myers, B. A.; Bleszynski Jayich, A. C.; Awschalom, D. D.; Petta, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear spin gyromagnetic ratio can be enhanced by hyperfine coupling to the electronic spin. Here we show wide tunability of this enhancement on a 15N nuclear spin intrinsic to a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. We perform control of the nuclear spin near the ground state level anti-crossing (GSLAC), where the enhancement of the gyromagnetic ratio from the ground state hyperfine coupling is maximized. We demonstrate a two order of magnitude enhancement of the effective nuclear gyromagnetic ratio compared to the value obtained at 500 G, a typical operating field that is suitable for nuclear spin polarization. Finally, we show that with strong enhancements, the nuclear spin ultimately suffers dephasing from the inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR transition frequency at the GSLAC.

  8. Enhanced optical, electrical, and mechanical characteristics of ZnO/Ag grids/ZnO flexible transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Tao; Ting, Chu-Chi; Kao, Po-Ching; Li, Shan-Rong; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    This study demonstrates well-designed tri-layer flexible transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs), whose structure is ZnO (20 nm)/Ag grids (4, 6, 8, 10 nm)/ZnO (20 nm) (ZAZ), fabricated via thermal deposition. The optical, electrical, and mechanical characteristics of the proposed structure are improved compared to those of MoO3/Ag grids/MoO3 (MAM) electrodes. The transmittance at 550 nm, sheet resistance, and figure of merit of the proposed ZAZ electrodes with 6-nm silver grids are 78.58%, 9.3 Ω/square, and 9.6 × 10-3, respectively, which are better than those of MAM electrodes (66.25%, 9.7 Ω/square, and 1.6 × 10-3, respectively). It is found that the enhancement of the electrical characteristics of ZAZ can be ascribed to the improved crystallization of ZnO films. ZnO films with improved crystallization and a larger grain size can inhibit carriers from scattering at inter-grain boundaries. Based on a bending test, the strains of ZAZ electrodes under tension and compression were 0.616%, 0.633%, and those of MAM electrodes were 0.62% and 0.65%, respectively. The sheet resistance of the ZAZ structure increases significantly after 800 bending cycles, while that of the MAM structure increases significantly after only 200 bending cycles. These data indicate that ZAZ electrodes have significantly improved mechanical properties and durability compared to those of MAM electrodes in the bending test under both tensile and compressive stress. The proposed TCEs show good optical, electrical, and mechanical characteristics and have potential for application in optoelectronics.

  9. Oxamflatin Treatment Enhances Cloned Porcine Embryo Development and Nuclear Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Spate, Lee D.; Walters, Eric M.; O'Gorman, Chad; Lee, Kiho; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Wells, Kevin; Rivera, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faulty epigenetic reprogramming of somatic nuclei is thought to be the main reason for low cloning efficiency by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), such as Scriptaid, improve developmental competence of SCNT embryos in several species. Another HDACi, Oxamflatin, is about 100 times more potent than Scriptaid in the ability to inhibit nuclear-specific HDACs. The present study determined the effects of Oxamflatin treatment on embryo development, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Oxamflatin treatment enhanced blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos in vitro. Embryo transfer produced more pigs born and fewer mummies from the Oxamflatin-treated group compared to the Scriptaid-treated positive control. Oxamflatin also decreased DNA methylation of POU5F1 regulatory elements and centromeric repeat elements in day-7 blastocysts. When compared to in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos, the methylation status of POU5F1, NANOG, and centromeric repeat was similar in the cloned embryos, indicating these genes were successfully reprogrammed. However, compared to the lack of methylation of XIST in day-7 IVF embryos, a higher methylation level in day-7 cloned embryos was observed, implying that X chromosomes were activated in day-7 IVF blastocysts, but were not fully activated in cloned embryos, i.e., reprogramming of XIST was delayed. A time-course analysis of XIST DNA methylation on day-13, -15, -17, and -19 in vivo embryos revealed that XIST methylation initiated at about day 13 and was not completed by day 19. The methylation of the XIST gene in day-19 control cloned embryos was delayed again when compared to in vivo embryos. However, methylation of XIST in Oxamflatin-treated embryos was comparable with in vivo embryos, which further demonstrated that Oxamflatin could accelerate the delayed reprogramming of XIST gene and thus might improve cloning efficiency. PMID:25548976

  10. Enhancement of Characteristics of Transparent Conductive Electrode on Flexible Substrate by Combination of Solution-Based Oxide and Metallic Layers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cha, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates solution-processed transparent conductors with hybrid structure consisting of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) layers fabricated on polymeric flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The transparent conductors had stacked structures of AgNWs/ITO-NPs on 125-μm-thick PET and ITO-NPs/AgNWs/ITO-NPs on 125-μm-thick PET, 188-μm-thick PET, or 700-μm-thick glass substrate, respectively. Successful integrations were possible on the substrates without any deformation or distortion. Sheet resistance of the triple-layered transparent conductor samples exhibits low values ranging from 22.41 Ω/square to 22.99 Ω/squarer. Also, their optical transmittance exhibits high values ranging from 83.78 to 87.29% at 550 nm. The triple-layered transparent conductor showed a good thermal stability in terms of sheet resistance and optical transmittance against the high-temperature environment up to 250 °C. All the double and triple-layered transparent conductors fabricated on PET and glass substrates are so stable against the accelerated thermal aging from 110 °C to 130 °C, that ΔR/R0 and ΔT(550)/T0(550) values exhibit less than 0.068 and 0.049, respectively. Furthermore, the layers are so flexible that ΔR/R0 of the layers on PET substrates is lower than 0.1 even at 4.0-mm bending. Especially, triple-layered transparent conductor on 125-μm-thick PET substrates exhibits ΔR/R0 value of 0.042 even at 4.0 mm bending. Thus, it can be concluded that the hybrid structures have the advantage of both thermal stability and flexibility for electrical and optical properties of transparent conductive electrode; which makes them highly applicable in flexible electronics.

  11. Silicon-Induced UV Transparency in Phosphate Glasses and Its Application to the Enhancement of the UV Type B Emission of Gd(3).

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José A

    2017-05-10

    The silicon route to improve the ultraviolet (UV) transparency in phosphate glasses is investigated and further exploited to enhance the UV type B (280-320 nm) emission of gadolinium(III) relevant for biomedical applications. The glasses were synthesized with a barium phosphate composition by melt-quenching in ambient atmosphere and the optical properties investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy including emission decay kinetics. An improvement in the UV transparency was gradually developed for the glasses melted merely with increasing amounts of Si powder. A particular PL in the visible was also exhibited for such glasses under excitation at 275 nm, consistent with the presence of Si-induced defects. For Si-Gd codoped glasses, the UV transparency was likewise manifested, while the UV emission from Gd(3+) around 312 nm was enhanced with the increase in Si concentration (up to ∼6.7 times). Moreover, along with the Gd(3+) PL intensity enhancement, a linear correlation was revealed between the increase in decay times for the Gd(3+6)P7/2-emitting state and the amount of silicon. It is then suggested that the improved PL properties of gadolinium(III) originate from the increased UV transparency of the host and the consequent precluding of a nonradiative energy transfer from Gd(3+) to the matrix. Accordingly, a role of Si as PL quenching inhibitor is supported. The demonstrated efficacy of the Si-Gd codoping concept realized by a facile glass synthesis procedure may appeal to the application of the UV-emitting glasses for phototherapy lamps.

  12. The role of graphene in enhancing electrical heating and mechanical performances of graphene-aligned silver nanowire hybrid transparent heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Ma, J. G.; Xu, H. Y.; Zhu, H. C.; Liu, Y. C.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, flexible and energy-efficient transparent heaters based on graphene and aligned silver nanowire (G-ASNW) hybrid structures are fabricated by thermal evaporation of silver on the aligned electrospun nanofiber templates and subsequent transfer of monolayer graphene onto the ASNWs. The G-ASNW films exhibit few wire-wire junctions and low resistance along the aligned direction, which are favorable for low-voltage transparent heater applications. Coating the ASNW network with monolayer graphene increases the saturated temperature of the hybrid heater due to the high thermal conductivity and low convective heat-transfer coefficient of graphene. Meanwhile, G-ASNW films show excellent electromechanical stability under cyclic bending because the graphene anchoring on the top surface of ASNWs could share tensile stress and serve as local conducting pathways at break-points even if small cracks were generated. The G-ASNW hybrid structures present a perspective on wearable transparent heaters.

  13. On the graphite-induced UV transparency in phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, José A.

    2016-12-01

    In this Communication, the origin of the graphite-induced UV transparency in phosphate glasses is scrutinized beyond the commonly accepted reduction of metal impurities. A systematic study was carried out by melting phosphate glasses with increasing amounts of graphite powder. Subsequent characterizations were performed by UV/Vis transmission, photoluminescence, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The data points to a structural modification accompanying the enhanced UV transparency. A model accounting for Psbnd Osbnd C bond formation and the generation of reactive oxygen species is proposed in line with the new structural view suggested.

  14. Airborne Transparencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Lois Thommason

    1984-01-01

    Starting from a science project on flight, art students discussed and investigated various means of moving in space. Then they made acetate illustrations which could be used as transparencies. The projection phenomenon made the illustrations look airborne. (CS)

  15. Enhancement in second harmonic generation efficiency, laser damage threshold and optical transparency of Mn 2+ doped L-alanine crystals: A correlation with crystalline perfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, S. K.; Rathee, S. P.; Maurya, K. K.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2011-08-01

    Effect on crystalline perfection, second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency, laser damage threshold (LDT) and optical transparency due to Mn 2+ doping in L-alanine crystals has been investigated. The crystalline perfection of pure and doped crystals was evaluated by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry, which revealed the improvement in the crystalline perfection at low and moderate doping concentrations. At moderate and high concentrations, the Mn 2+ ions were found to be incorporated predominantly at the interstitial sites of the crystalline matrix. The actual incorporated amount of dopants in the crystals was analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The optical transparency, SHG efficiency, and laser damage threshold of the grown crystals with different concentrations of Mn 2+ were investigated. From these studies it is revealed that Mn 2+ doping lead to a considerable enhancement in the measured nonlinear optical properties with a correlation on crystalline perfection.

  16. What Happens to Deterrence as Nuclear Weapons Decrease Toward Zero?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drell, Sidney

    2011-04-01

    Steps reducing reliance on deployed nuclear weapons en route to zero will be discussed. They include broadly enhancing cooperation and transparency agreements beyond the provisions for verifying limits on deployed strategic nuclear warheads and delivery systems in the New START treaty. Two questions that will be addressed are: What conditions would have to be established in order to maintain strategic stability among nations as nuclear weapons recede in importance? What would nuclear deterrence be like in a world without nuclear weapons?

  17. New mechanism of the enhancement of the Goos-Hanchen effect at an interface between transparent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A. S.; Tarasenko, A. S.; Tarasenko, S. V.; Shavrov, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    It has been shown that an increase in the longitudinal displacement of a beam of TB (TE) waves even in the case of a single interface between transparent media is possible owing to the resonance excitation of an evanescent wave with the corresponding polarization if the energy flux through the interface is identically zero.

  18. Solid-state nitrogen-14 nuclear magnetic resonance enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization using a gyrotron.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum, Veronika; Caporini, Marc A; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-07-01

    By combining indirect detection of 14N with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using a gyrotron, the signal-to-noise ratio can be dramatically improved and the recovery delay between subsequent experiments can be shortened. Spectra of glassy samples of the amino acid proline doped with the stable bi-radical TOTAPOL rotating at 15.625 kHz at 110K were obtained in a 400 MHz solid-state NMR spectrometer equipped with a gyrotron for microwave irradiation at 263 GHz. DNP enhancement factors on the order of epsilon approximately 40 were achieved. The recovery delays can be reduced from 60 s without radicals at 300 K to 6 s with radicals at 110 K. In the absence of radicals at room temperature, the proton relaxation in proline is inefficient due to the absence of rotating methyl groups and other heat sinks, thus making long recovery delays mandatory. DNP allows one to reduce the acquisition times of 13C-detected 14N spectra from several days to a few hours. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancing light out-coupling of organic light-emitting devices using indium tin oxide-free low-index transparent electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Lu, Chun-Yang; Tsai, Shang-Ta; Tsai, Yu-Tang; Chen, Chien-Yu; Tsai, Wei-Lung; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Hong-Wei; Lee, Wei-Kai; Jiao, Min; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2014-05-05

    With its increasing and sufficient conductivity, the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been capable of replacing the widely used but less cost-effective indium tin oxides (ITOs) as alternative transparent electrodes for organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). Intriguingly, PEDOT:PSS also possesses an optical refractive index significantly lower than those of ITO and typical organic layers in OLEDs and well matching those of typical OLED substrates. Optical simulation reveals that by replacing ITO with such a low-index transparent electrode, the guided modes trapped within the organic/ITO layers in conventional OLEDs can be substantially suppressed, leading to more light coupled into the substrate than the conventional ITO device. By applying light out-coupling structures onto outer surfaces of substrates to effectively extract radiation into substrates, OLEDs using such low-index transparent electrodes achieve enhanced optical out-coupling and external quantum efficiencies in comparison with conventional OLEDs using ITO.

  20. Synergistically enhanced stability of highly flexible silver nanowire/carbon nanotube hybrid transparent electrodes by plasmonic welding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsoo; Woo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Ju Tae; Lee, Byung Yang; Han, Chang-Soo

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report highly transparent and flexible AgNW/SWCNT hybrid networks on PET substrates combined with plasmonic welding for securing ultrahigh stability in mechanical and electrical properties under severe bending. Plasmonic welding produces local heating and welding at the junction of AgNWs and leads strong adhesion between AgNW and SWCNT as well as between hybrid structure and substrate. The initial sheet resistance of plasmon treated AgNW/SWCNT hybrid film was 26 Ω sq(-1), with >90% optical transmittance over the wavelength range 400-2700 nm. Following 200 cycles of convex/concave bending with a bending radius of 5 mm, the sheet resistance changed from 26 to 29 Ω sq(-1). This hybrid structure combined with the plasmonic welding process provided excellent stability, low resistance, and high transparency, and is suitable for highly flexible electronics applications, including touch panels, solar cells, and OLEDs.

  1. Color transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, B.K.; Miller, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The anomously large transmission of nucleons through a nucleus following a hard collision is explored. This effect, known as color transparency, is believed to be a prediction of QCD. The necessary conditions for its occurrence and the effects that must be included a realistic calculation are discussed.

  2. Thermoacoustic sensor for nuclear fuel temperaturemonitoring and heat transfer enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Alli; Steven L. Garrett

    2013-05-01

    A new acoustical sensing system for the nuclear power industry has been developed at The Pennsylvania State University in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratories. This sensor uses the high temperatures of nuclear fuel to convert a nuclear fuel rod into a standing-wave thermoacoustic engine. When a standing wave is generated, the sound wave within the fuel rod will be propagated, by acoustic radiation, through the cooling fluid within the reactor or spent fuel pool and can be monitored a remote location external to the reactor. The frequency of the sound can be correlated to an effective temperature of either the fuel or the surrounding coolant. We will present results for a thermoacoustic resonator built into a Nitonic-60 (stainless steel) fuel rod that requires only one passive component and no heat exchangers.

  3. A quantum spectrum analyzer enhanced by a nuclear spin memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosskopf, Tobias; Zopes, Jonathan; Boss, Jens M.; Degen, Christian L.

    2017-08-01

    We realize a two-qubit sensor designed for achieving high-spectral resolution in quantum sensing experiments. Our sensor consists of an active "sensing qubit" and a long-lived "memory qubit", implemented by the electronic and the nitrogen-15 nuclear spins of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, respectively. Using state storage times of up to 45 ms, we demonstrate spectroscopy of external ac signals with a line width of 19 Hz (˜2.9 ppm) and of carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance signals with a line width of 190 Hz (˜74 ppm). This represents an up to 100-fold improvement in spectral resolution compared to measurements without nuclear memory.

  4. Enhancing nonlinear energy deposition into transparent solids with an elliptically polarized and mid-IR heating laser pulse under two-color femtosecond impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.; Bezsudnova, Yu I.; Platonenko, V. T.; Bravy, B. G.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    We report on an enhancement of deposited energy density of up to 10 kJ cm-3 inside transparent solids (fused silica and quartz) from using two-color µJ energy level tightly focused (NA  =  0.5) co-propagating linearly polarized seeding (visible, 0.62 µm) and elliptically polarized heating (near-IR, 1.24 µm) femtosecond laser pulses. The rise in temperature under constant volume causes pressure of up to 12 GPa. It has been shown experimentally and theoretically that the production of seeding electrons through multiphoton ionization by visible laser pulse paves the way for controllability of the energy deposition and laser-induced micromodification via carrier heating by delayed infrared laser pulses inside the material. The developed theoretical approach predicts that the deposited energy density will be enhanced by up to 14 kJ cm-3 when using longer (up to 5 µm) wavelengths for heating laser pulses inside transparent solids.

  5. Enhanced efficiencies in thin and semi-transparent dye-sensitized solar cells under low photon flux conditions using TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Keyu; Guo, Min; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Haitao

    2015-10-01

    The photovoltaic output of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are greatly dependent on the amount of absorbed photons, which is limited by the thickness of active layer of DSSCs and the illumination conditions. To improve the cell performance under low irradiance condition, a photoanode was designed by attaching a TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal (NTPC) onto the thin TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) layer for applications in thin and semi-transparent DSSCs. It is found that the introduction of the TiO2 NTPC significantly increases the light harvesting and hence the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the respective DSSCs. The TiO2 NTPC provides multi-functionalities, such as Bragg reflection, light scatting and additional light harvesting from its nanotube structure, leading to more significant light harvesting enhancement in these thin and semi-transparent DSSCs. Compared with the single-layer TiO2 NP based reference DSSCs, the above-mentioned synergic effects in a cell incoporated with a ∼2.3-μm-thick TiO2 NTPC yield PCE enhancements up to 99.1% and 130%, under 1 and 0.5 Sun conditions, respectively. Meanwhile, an obvious compensation effect of TiO2 NTPC to reduce the output power drop of these cells under tilted incient light is also demonstrated. The work will boost the practical applications of PC in irradiance sensitive devices.

  6. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-07

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability.

  7. Performance enhancement of metal nanowire-based transparent electrodes by electrically driven nanoscale nucleation of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Yu-Jeng; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-07-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus low energy consumption, are required for ZnO nucleation. This made the use of substrates with very low operating temperatures, such as PET and PEN, feasible. The optimized AgNW transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) fabricated using this promising linking method exhibited a low sheet resistance (13 Ω sq-1), a high transmission (92% at 550 nm), a high figure of merit (FOM; up to σDC/σOp = 340) and can be applied to wide range of next-generation flexible optoelectronic devices.Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) electrodes have been considered to be promising materials for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. Despite the fact that a single AgNW has extremely high conductivities, the high junction resistance between nanowires limits the performance of the AgNW matrix. Therefore, post-treatments are usually required to approach better NW-NW contact. Herein, we report a novel linking method that uses joule heating to accumulate sol-gel ZnO near nanowire junctions. The nanoscale ZnO nucleation successfully restrained the thermal instability of the AgNW under current injection and acted as an efficient tightening medium to realize good NW-NW contacts. A low process temperature (<50 °C), and thus

  8. ASME Nuclear Crane Standards for Enhanced Crane Safety and Increased Profit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, Stephen N.

    2000-01-01

    The ASME NOG-1 standard, 'Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes', covers top running cranes for nuclear facilities; with the ASME NUM-1 standard, 'Rules for Construction of Cranes, Monorails, and Hoists', covering the single girder, underhung, wall and jib cranes, as well as the monorails and hoists. These two ASME nuclear crane standards provide criteria for designing, inspecting and testing overhead handling equipment with enhanced safety to meet the 'defense-in-depth' approach of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents NUREG 0554 and NUREG 0612. In addition to providing designs for enhanced safety, the ASME nuclear crane standards provide a basis for purchasing overhead handling equipment with standard safety features, based upon accepted engineering principles, and including performance and environmental parameters specific to nuclear facilities. The ASME NOG-1 and ASME NUM-1 standards not only provide enhanced safety for handling a critical load, but also increase profit by minimizing the possibility of load drops, by reducing cumbersome operating restrictions, and by providing the foundation for a sound licensing position. The ASME nuclear crane standards can also increase profit by providing the designs and information to help ensure that the right standard equipment is purchased. Additionally, the ASME nuclear crane standards can increase profit by providing designs and information to help address current issues, such as the qualification of nuclear plant cranes for making 'planned engineered lifts' for steam generator replacement and decommissioning.

  9. Self-Reliability and Motivation in a Nuclear Security Culture Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Cary E.; de Boer, Gloria; De Castro, Kara; Landers, John; Rogers, Erin

    2010-10-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has become a global concern. Many countries continue to make efforts to strengthen nuclear security by enhancing systems of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A). Though MPC&A systems can significantly upgrade nuclear security, they do not eliminate the “human factor.” Gen. Eugene Habiger, a former “Assistant Secretary for Safeguards and Security” at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear-weapons complex and a former commander of U.S. strategic nuclear forces, has observed that “good security is 20% equipment and 80% people.”1 Although eliminating the “human factor” is not possible, accounting for and mitigating the risk of the insider threat is an essential element in establishing an effective nuclear security culture. This paper will consider the organizational role in mitigating the risk associated with the malicious insider through monitoring and enhancing human reliability and motivation as well as enhancing the nuclear security culture.

  10. Transparent, flexible surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates based on Ag-coated structured PET (polyethylene terephthalate) for in-situ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zewen; Zhu, Kai; Gu, Chuan; Wen, Yibing; Cui, Guanglei; Qu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Transparent, flexible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were fabricated by metalization of structured polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets. The resultant Ag-coated structured PET SERS substrates were revealed to be highly sensitive with good reproducibility and stability, an enhancement factor of 3 × 106 was acquired, which can be attributed mainly to the presence of plentiful multiple-type hot spots within the quasi-three-dimensional surface of the structured PET obtained by oxygen plasma etching. In addition, detections of model molecules on fruit skin were also carried out, demonstrating the great potential of the Ag-coated structured PET in in-situ detection of analyte on irregular objects. Importantly, the technique used for the preparation of such substrate is completely compatible with well-established silicon device technologies, and large-area fabrication with low cost can be readily realized.

  11. Radio frequency sputtered Al:ZnO-Ag transparent conductor: A plasmonic nanostructure with enhanced optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytchkova, Anna; Luisa Grilli, Maria; Rinaldi, Antonio; Vedraine, Sylvain; Torchio, Philippe; Piegari, Angela; Flory, François

    2013-09-01

    Optimization of metal-based transparent conductors (MTCs) made of silver and aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) prepared by radio-frequency (r.f.) sputtering has been carried out through tuning of metal film properties. The influence of morphology and related plasmonic features of AZO/Ag/AZO MTCs on their optical and electrical performance is demonstrated and it is shown that the nominal thickness of the silver layer itself is not the most crucial value determining the MTC performance. The MTC performance has been optimized by a search of deposition conditions ensuring fractal-type metal layer formation up to a certain coalescence state that enables full gaining from silver optical properties, including its plasmonic features. For 150 W- and 200 W-deposited silver, MTCs with maximum transmittance as high as 83.6% have been obtained. These coatings have a figure of merit as good as 0.01 Ω-1 and a remarkably wide spectral transparency region: transmittance higher than 70% down to 1200 nm for 200W-samples. Modelling of the MTC coatings is proposed additionally, based on variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements, which takes into account the variation of the optical properties of silver when deposited in various conditions and embedded in a semiconductor stack.

  12. Understanding the mechanisms leading to failure in metallic nanowire-based transparent heaters, and solution for stability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, M; Sannicolo, T; Muñoz-Rojas, D; Lohan, B Guillo; Khan, A; Anikin, M; Jiménez, C; Bruckert, F; Bréchet, Y; Bellet, D

    2017-02-03

    Silver nanowire (AgNW) networks are emerging as one of the most promising alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for transparent electrodes in flexible electronic devices. They can be used in a variety of optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, touch panels and organic light-emitting diodes. Recently they have also proven to be very efficient when used as transparent heaters (THs). In addition to the study of AgNW networks acting as THs in regular use, i.e. at low voltage and moderate temperature, their stability and physical behavior at higher voltages and for longer durations should be studied in view of their integration into real devices. The properties of AgNW networks deposited by spray coating on glass or flexible transparent substrates are thoroughly studied via in situ measurements. The AgNW networks' behavior at different voltages for different durations and under different atmospheric conditions, both in air and under vacuum, has been examined. At low voltage, a reversible electrical response is observed while irreversibility and even failure are observed at higher voltages. In order to gain a deeper insight into the behavior of AgNW networks used as THs, simple but realistic physical models are proposed and are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental data. Finally, as the stability of AgNW networks is a key issue, we demonstrate that coating AgNW networks with a very thin layer of TiO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD) improves the material's resistance against electrical and thermal instabilities without altering optical transmittance. We show that the critical annealing temperature associated to network breakdown increases from 270 °C for the as-deposited AgNW networks to 420 °C for AgNW networks coated with TiO2. Similarly, the electrical failure which occurs at 7 V for the as-deposited networks increases to 13 V for TiO2-coated networks. TiO2 is also proved to stabilize AgNW networks during long duration operation and at

  13. Understanding the mechanisms leading to failure in metallic nanowire-based transparent heaters, and solution for stability enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrange, M.; Sannicolo, T.; Muñoz-Rojas, D.; Guillo Lohan, B.; Khan, A.; Anikin, M.; Jiménez, C.; Bruckert, F.; Bréchet, Y.; Bellet, D.

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanowire (AgNW) networks are emerging as one of the most promising alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO) for transparent electrodes in flexible electronic devices. They can be used in a variety of optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, touch panels and organic light-emitting diodes. Recently they have also proven to be very efficient when used as transparent heaters (THs). In addition to the study of AgNW networks acting as THs in regular use, i.e. at low voltage and moderate temperature, their stability and physical behavior at higher voltages and for longer durations should be studied in view of their integration into real devices. The properties of AgNW networks deposited by spray coating on glass or flexible transparent substrates are thoroughly studied via in situ measurements. The AgNW networks’ behavior at different voltages for different durations and under different atmospheric conditions, both in air and under vacuum, has been examined. At low voltage, a reversible electrical response is observed while irreversibility and even failure are observed at higher voltages. In order to gain a deeper insight into the behavior of AgNW networks used as THs, simple but realistic physical models are proposed and are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental data. Finally, as the stability of AgNW networks is a key issue, we demonstrate that coating AgNW networks with a very thin layer of TiO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD) improves the material’s resistance against electrical and thermal instabilities without altering optical transmittance. We show that the critical annealing temperature associated to network breakdown increases from 270 °C for the as-deposited AgNW networks to 420 °C for AgNW networks coated with TiO2. Similarly, the electrical failure which occurs at 7 V for the as-deposited networks increases to 13 V for TiO2-coated networks. TiO2 is also proved to stabilize AgNW networks during long duration operation and at

  14. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Thomas L.; Bersell, Bridget M.; Booker, Paul M.; Anderson, Gerald E.; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Meagher, John B.; Siefken, Rob R.; Spracklen, James L.

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  15. Amphiphilic Block Copolymers Enhance Cellular Uptake and Nuclear Entry of Polyplex-Delivered DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihui; Sahay, Gaurav; Sriadibhatla, Srikanth; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    This work for the first time demonstrates that synthetic polymers enhance uptake and nuclear import of plasmid DNA (pDNA) through the activation of cellular trafficking machinery. Nonionic block copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), Pluronics, are widely used as excipients in pharmaceutics. We previously demonstrated that Pluronics increase the phosphorylation of IκB and subsequent NFκB nuclear localization as well as upregulate numerous NFκB-related genes. In this study, we show that Pluronics enhance gene transfer by pDNA/polycation complexes (“polyplexes”) in a promoter-dependent fashion. Addition of Pluronic P123 or P85 to polyethyleneimine-based polyplexes had little effect on polyplex particle size but significantly enhanced pDNA cellular uptake, nuclear translocation and gene expression in several cell lines. When added to polyplex-transfected cells after transfection, Pluronics enhanced nuclear import of pDNA containing NFκB–binding sites, but have no effect on import of pDNA without these sites. All together, our studies suggest that Pluronics rapidly activate NFκB, which binds cytosolic pDNA that possesses promoters containing NFκB binding sites and consequently increases nuclear import of pDNA through NFκB nuclear translocation. PMID:18729495

  16. Enhancing the electrical properties of a flexible transparent graphene-based field-effect transistor using electropolished copper foil for graphene growth.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Lei-Wei; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2014-07-09

    Flexible transparent graphene-based field-effect transistors (Gr-FETs) were fabricated using large-area single-layer graphene synthesized through low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on a pretreated copper (Cu) foil, followed by transfer of the graphene from the Cu foil to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate. The electropolishing method was adopted to smooth the surface of the Cu foil, which is a crucial factor because it affects the defect density of graphene films on the PET substrate after transfer and the electronic transport property of the graphene-based devices. The influence of the electropolishing process on the graphene properties was examined using a Raman spectroscope, a scanning electron microscope, and an optical microscope. When the electropolishing process was adopted to improve the graphene quality, the carrier mobility of the flexible transparent Gr-FETs was enhanced from 90 to 340 cm(2)/(V s). Furthermore, variation of the carrier mobility was lower than 10% when the bending radius of the flexible device was decreased from 6.0 to 1.0 cm.

  17. Oxygen-17 dynamic nuclear polarisation enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy at 18.8 T.

    PubMed

    Brownbill, Nick J; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Blanc, Frédéric

    2017-02-23

    We report (17)O dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR experiments at 18.8 T. Several formulations were investigated on the Mg(OH)2 compound. A signal enhancement factor of 17 could be obtained when the solid particles were incorporated into a glassy o-terphenyl matrix doped with BDPA using the Overhauser polarisation transfer scheme whilst the cross effect mechanism enabled by TEKPol yielded a slightly lower enhancement but more time efficient data acquisition.

  18. Phenomenological Transparency.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Morgan; Mara, Michael

    2017-01-20

    Translucent objects such as fog, clouds, smoke, glass, ice, and liquids are pervasive in cinematic environments because they frame scenes in depth and create visually-compelling shots. Unfortunately, they are hard to render in real-time and have thus previously been rendered poorly compared to opaque surfaces. This paper introduces the first model for a real-time rasterization algorithm that can simultaneously approximate the following transparency phenomena: wavelength-varying ("colored") transmission, translucent colored shadows, caustics, volumetric light and shadowing, partial coverage, diffusion, and refraction. All render efficiently with order-independent draw calls and low bandwidth. We include source code.

  19. Mars mission performance enhancement with hybrid nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagle, J. E.; Noffsinger, K. E.; Segna, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  20. Advanced hybrid nuclear propulsion Mars mission performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagle, J. E.; Noffsinger, K. E.; Segna, D. R.

    1992-02-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  1. Mars mission performance enhancement with hybrid nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.; Noffsinger, Kent E.; Segna, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  2. Mars mission performance enhancement with hybrid nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Noffsinger, K.E.; Segna, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  3. Advanced hybrid nuclear propulsion Mars mission performance enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Noffsinger, K.E.; Segna, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  4. Potential opportunities for nano materials to help enable enhanced nuclear fuel performance

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, Kenneth J.

    2012-06-06

    This presentation is an overview of the technical challenges for development of nuclear fuels with enhanced performance and accident tolerance. Key specific aspects of improved fuel performance are noted. Examples of existing nanonuclear projects and concepts are presented and areas of potential focus are suggested. The audience for this presentation includes representatives from: DOE-NE, other national laboratories, industry and academia. This audience is a mixture of nanotechnology experts and nuclear energy researchers and managers.

  5. Enhancing the interaction between nuclear experiment and theory through information and statistics

    DOE PAGES

    Ireland, D. G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-02-05

    This Focus Issue draws from a range of topics within nuclear physics, from studies of individual nucleons to the heaviest of nuclei. The unifying theme, however, is to illustrate the extent to which uncertainty is a key quantity, and to showcase applications of the latest computational methodologies. It is our assertion that a paradigm shift is needed in nuclear physics to enhance the coupling between theory and experiment, and we hope that this collection of articles is a good start.

  6. A suitable for large scale production, flexible and transparent surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for in situ ultrasensitive analysis of chemistry reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. X.; Shang, S. B.; Hu, L. T.; Liu, X. Y.; Qiu, H. W.; Li, C. H.; Huo, Y. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Yang, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high cost-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) flexible substrate is demonstrated, which endowed with excellent optical transparency, high SERS activity and large scale. This SERS flexible substrate of Ag/Cu/Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) was prepared by replacing Cu atoms with Ag atoms in situ on Cu nano-film. The Ag/Cu/PET flexible substrate shows high sensitivity in SERS detection and the minimum detected concentration of R6G can reach 10-10 M. In addition, the residual methylene blue (MB) on a fish surface was selected as the analyte, the results no doubt shows the potential of SERS technology application in food detection.

  7. Enhancing the optical properties of silver nanowire transparent conducting electrodes by the modification of nanowire cross-section using ultra-violet illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Lee, H.; Woo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Improvement in the haze and transmittance of the silver nanowire (Ag NW) based transparent conducting electrodes is achieved by illuminating UV light after the Ag NW network formation. The evidences from the experimental analyses and numerical calculations indicate that the enhancement of the optical properties is derived from the modification of the Ag NW cross-section from a pentagonal to a circular shape, as well as the removal of the polyvinylpyrrolidone capping layer on the Ag NW surface. The deformation of the Ag NW cross-section occurs due to heat generation induced by the UV light absorption in the Ag NW, and it provides thermal energy for recrystallization to the Ag atoms on the NW surface, specifically near the corners of the pentagon, resulting in an increase in the radius of the rounded corners.

  8. Highly transparent low capacitance plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-HfO{sub 2} tunnel junction engineering

    SciTech Connect

    El Hajjam, Khalil; Baboux, Nicolas; Calmon, Francis; Souifi, Abdelkader; Poncelet, Olivier; Francis, Laurent A.; Ecoffey, Serge; Drouin, Dominique

    2014-01-15

    The development of metallic single electron transistor (SET) depends on the downscaling and the electrical properties of its tunnel junctions. These tunnel junctions should insure high tunnel current levels, low thermionic current, and low capacitance. The authors use atomic layer deposition to fabricate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} thin layers. Tunnel barrier engineering allows the achievement of low capacitance Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} tunnel junctions using optimized annealing and plasma exposure conditions. Different stacks were designed and fabricated to increase the transparency of the tunnel junction while minimizing thermionic current. This tunnel junction is meant to be integrated in SET to enhance its electrical properties (e.g., operating temperature, I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio)

  9. In situ synthesis of poly(methyl methacrylate)/MgAl layered double hydroxide nanocomposite with high transparency and enhanced thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Li; Qu, Baojun

    2004-04-01

    A novel poly(methyl methacrylate)/MgAl layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanocomposite (PMMA-MgAl NC) with high transparency and enhanced thermal properties was synthesized in situ by adding sodium hydroxide aqueous solution to an emulsion consisting of metal ion aqueous solution, sodium dodecyl sulfate, methyl methacrylate, and benzoyl peroxide, then followed by the thermal initiation polymerization. The basal spacing of PMMA-MgAl NC was 2.72 nm determined by X-ray diffraction measurement. The intercalated MgAl LDH particles of 60-120 nm width and 25-40 nm thickness were well dispersed at molecular level in the PMMA matrix. When the 50% weight loss was selected as a comparison point, the decomposition temperature of PMMA-MgAl NC sample with 30 wt% MgAl LDH (including dodecyl sulfate) was ca. 45 °C higher than that of pure PMMA.

  10. Decreased activity and enhanced nuclear export of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein beta during inhibition of adipogenesis by ceramide.

    PubMed Central

    Sprott, Kam M; Chumley, Michael J; Hanson, Janean M; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2002-01-01

    To identify novel molecular mechanisms by which ceramide regulates cell differentiation, we examined its effect on adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Hormonal stimulation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes induced formation of triacylglycerol-laden adipocytes over 7 days; in part, via the co-ordinated action of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins alpha, beta and delta (C/EBP-alpha, -beta and -delta) and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). The addition of exogenous N-acetylsphingosine (C2-ceramide) or increasing endogenous ceramide levels inhibited the expression of C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma, and blocked adipocyte development. C2-ceramide did not decrease the cellular expression of C/EBPbeta, which is required for expression of C/EBPalpha and PPARgamma, but significantly blocked its transcriptional activity from a promoter construct after 24 h. The ceramide-induced decrease in the transcriptional activity of C/EBPbeta correlated with a strong decrease in its phosphorylation, DNA-binding ability and nuclear localization at 24 h. However, ceramide did not change the nuclear level of C/EBPbeta after a period of 4 or 16 h, suggesting that it was not affecting nuclear import. CRM1 (more recently named 'exportin-1') is a nuclear membrane protein that regulates protein export from the nucleus by binding to a specific nuclear export sequence. Leptomycin B is an inhibitor of CRM1/exportin-1, and reversed the ceramide-induced decrease in nuclear C/EBPbeta at 24 h. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that ceramide may inhibit adipogenesis, at least in part, by enhancing dephosphorylation and premature nuclear export of C/EBPbeta at a time when its maximal transcriptional activity is required to drive adipogenesis. PMID:12071851

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  12. Selectively Transparent and Conducting Photonic Crystals and their Potential to Enhance the Performance of Thin-Film Silicon-Based Photovoltaics and Other Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul G.

    2011-12-01

    The byproducts of human engineered energy production are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations well above their natural levels and accompanied continual decline in the natural reserves of fossil fuels necessitates the development of green energy alternatives. Solar energy is attractive because it is abundant, can be produced in remote locations and consumed on site. Specifically, thin-film silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) solar cells have numerous inherent advantages including their availability, non-toxicity, and they are relatively inexpensive. However, their low-cost and electrical performance depends on reducing their thickness to as great an extent as possible. This is problematic because their thickness is much less than their absorption length. Consequently, enhanced light trapping schemes must be incorporated into these devices. Herein, a transparent and conducting photonic crystal (PC) intermediate reflector (IR), integrated into the rear side of the cell and serving the dual function as a back-reflector and a spectral splitter, is identified as a promising method of boosting the performance of thin-film silicon-based PV. To this end a novel class of PCs, namely selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystals (STCPC), is invented. These STCPCs are a significant advance over existing 1D PCs because they combine intense wavelength selective broadband reflectance with the transmissive and conductive properties of sputtered ITO. For example, STCPCs are made to exhibit Bragg-reflectance peaks in the visible spectrum of 95% reflectivity and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 200nm. At the same time, the average transmittance of these STCPCs is greater than 80% over the visible spectrum that is outside their stop-gap. Using wave-optics analysis, it is shown that STCPC intermediate reflectors increase the current generated in micromorph cells by 18%. In comparison, the more conventional IR comprised of a single homogeneous

  13. Nuclear redistribution of tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein requires proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, S K; Maouyo, D; Handler, J S; Kwon, H M

    2000-02-01

    Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity-responsive expression of the genes for the sodium-myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT) and the sodium-chloride-betaine cotransporter (BGT1). Hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP due to a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear distribution (proportion of TonEBP that is in the nucleus). We found that inhibitors of proteasome activity markedly reduce the induction of SMIT and BGT1 mRNA in response to hypertonicity. These inhibitors also reduce hypertonicity-induced stimulation of expression of a reporter gene controlled by the tonicity-responsive enhancer. Western and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the proteasome inhibitors reduce the hypertonicity-induced increase of TonEBP in the nucleus by inhibiting its nuclear redistribution without affecting its abundance. Although the nuclear distribution of TonEBP is sensitive to inhibition of proteasome activity as is that of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, the signaling pathways appear to be different in that hypertonicity does not affect the nuclear distribution of NF-kappaB. Conversely, treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases the nuclear distribution of NF-kappaB but not TonEBP.

  14. NR4A nuclear receptors support memory enhancement by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, Joshua D.; Bookout, Angie L.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Bridi, Morgan; Rao, Allison J.; Sulewski, Michael E.; Kroener, Brian T.; Manglesdorf, David J.; Abel, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a long-lasting memory requires a transcription-dependent consolidation period that converts a short-term memory into a long-term memory. Nuclear receptors compose a class of transcription factors that regulate diverse biological processes, and several nuclear receptors have been implicated in memory formation. Here, we examined the potential contribution of nuclear receptors to memory consolidation by measuring the expression of all 49 murine nuclear receptors after learning. We identified 13 nuclear receptors with increased expression after learning, including all 3 members of the Nr4a subfamily. These CREB-regulated Nr4a genes encode ligand-independent “orphan” nuclear receptors. We found that blocking NR4A activity in memory-supporting brain regions impaired long-term memory but did not impact short-term memory in mice. Further, expression of Nr4a genes increased following the memory-enhancing effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Blocking NR4A signaling interfered with the ability of HDAC inhibitors to enhance memory. These results demonstrate that the Nr4a gene family contributes to memory formation and is a promising target for improving cognitive function. PMID:22996661

  15. Conditions for observation of fade out of collective enhancement of the nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, S. M.

    2008-11-15

    The results of two recent papers searching for the disappearance of collective enhancements with energy in nuclear level densities are examined. It is found that the effects of such enhancements are less than has been assumed. The reduction in the size of the effect only partially resolves the disagreement between theory and experiment. This effect also plays a role in explaining the results of an earlier experiment.

  16. Oboe Transparency Results - Oboes 1-9

    SciTech Connect

    Heinle, R A

    2002-10-15

    The motivation for the ''Transparency'' experiment is that DOE/DP would like to have data available to show to interested parties, such as the JASONs. The U1a subcritical experiments are consistent with U.S. policy on nuclear testing. This would be done in a spirit of ''Transparency'' if doubts should arise. Thus, the objective of the ''Transparency'' measurements on the Oboe series is to place an upper bound on the nuclear energy released in the subcritical experiments. Two separate experimental packages cover the transparency measurement issue thoroughly. These are: (1) Neutron Track-Etch Dosimetry. (2) Scintillator Fission Neutron/Gamma Rate Measurement. Because the containment barrier is only 1-inch steel, plus 6-inch shotcrete, it is quite transparent to fission neutrons and, thus, both experiments can be mounted outside the containment barrier and can be recovered post shot. An additional group of dosimeters was placed on the lid of the vessel for greater sensitivity.

  17. Transparent bionanocomposite films based on chitosan and tempo-oxidized cellulose nanofibers with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of biobased active films for use in food packaging is increasing due to low cost, environmental appeal, renewability and availability. The objective of this research was to develop an effective and complete green approach for the production of bionanocomposite films with enhanced mec...

  18. Importin-4 Regulates Gene Delivery by Enhancing Nuclear Retention and Chromatin Deposition by Polyplexes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Nikki L; Sullivan, Millicent O

    2015-12-07

    For successful gene delivery, plasmid DNA must be able to access the nucleus in order to be transcribed. Numerous studies have shown that gene delivery occurs more readily in dividing cells, which is attributed to increased nuclear access when the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis; however, nonviral carriers continue to have low transfection efficiencies and require large quantities of DNA per cell to achieve reasonable gene transfer, even in dividing cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that using histone-derived nuclear localization sequences (NLS)s to target polyplexes might enhance nuclear delivery by facilitating interactions with histone effectors that mediate nuclear partitioning and retention during mitosis. We discovered a novel interaction between polyplexes linked to histone 3 (H3) N-terminal tail peptides and the histone nuclear import protein importin-4, as evidenced by strong spatial colocalization as well as significantly decreased transfection when importin-4 expression was reduced. A fraction of the histone-targeted polyplexes was also found to colocalize with the retrotranslocon of the endoplasmic reticulum, Sec61. Super resolution microscopy demonstrated a high level of polyplex binding to chromatin postmitosis, and there also was a significant decrease in the amount of chromatin binding following importin-4 knockdown. These results provide evidence that natural histone effectors mediate both nuclear entry and deposition on chromatin by histone-targeted polyplexes, and a translocation event from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol may occur before mitosis to enable the polyplexes to interact with these essential cytoplasmic proteins.

  19. Importin-4 Regulates Gene Delivery by Enhancing Nuclear Retention and Chromatin Deposition by Polyplexes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nikki L.; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2016-01-01

    For successful gene delivery, plasmid DNA must be able to access the nucleus in order to be transcribed. Numerous studies have shown that gene delivery occurs more readily in dividing cells, which is attributed to increased nuclear access when the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis; however, nonviral carriers continue to have low transfection efficiencies and require large quantities of DNA per cell to achieve reasonable gene transfer, even in dividing cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that using histone-derived nuclear localization sequences (NLS)s to target polyplexes might enhance nuclear delivery by facilitating interactions with histone effectors that mediate nuclear partitioning and retention during mitosis. We discovered a novel interaction between polyplexes linked to histone 3 (H3) N-terminal tail peptides and the histone nuclear import protein importin-4, as evidenced by strong spatial colocalization as well as significantly decreased transfection when importin-4 expression was reduced. A fraction of the histone-targeted polyplexes was also found to colocalize with the retrotranslocon of the endoplasmic reticulum, Sec61. Super resolution microscopy demonstrated a high level of polyplex binding to chromatin post-mitosis, and there also was a significant decrease in the amount of chromatin binding following importin-4 knockdown. These results provide evidence that natural histone effectors mediate both nuclear entry and deposition on chromatin by histone-targeted polyplexes, and a translocation event from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol may occur before mitosis to enable the polyplexes to interact with these essential cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:26465823

  20. Analysis of a Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket for Earth to Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian; Brown, Norman (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed engine concept is the Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket (NEAR). The NEAR concept uses a fission reactor to thermally heat a propellant in a rocket plenum. The rocket is shrouded, thus the exhaust mixes with ingested air to provide additional thermal energy through combustion. The combusted flow is then expanded through a nozzle to provide thrust.

  1. Observation and theoretical simulation of electromagnetically induced transparency and enhanced velocity selective optical pumping in cesium vapour in a micrometric thickness optical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Ray, B.; Slavov, D.; Todorov, P.; Ghosh, P. N.; Mitra, S.; Cartaleva, S.

    2014-09-01

    Observation of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and enhanced velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) signals in a micrometric cell with cesium is reported. The line shape and non-linear features observed in the case of fluorescence in the direction parallel to the cell windows and the transmission spectra observed along the propagation direction of the probe beam show considerable differences in the spectral profile. A theoretical model based on five level optical Bloch equations is used to simulate the spectra. The Doppler convolution includes all possible orientations of atomic velocities with respect to the laser beam direction. Atoms moving nearly parallel to the windows and perpendicular to the collinear pump and probe beams have much lower Doppler shift and hence produce considerable narrowing of the Doppler background in the fluorescence spectra. The coherence decay rate is also low for such atoms as they do not meet with the cell walls. The simulated curves reproduce the observed sharp EIT peaks and enhanced broad VSOP signals for the closed probe transition in the fluorescence and absorption spectra. The observed effect of detuning of the pump frequency on the non-linear features is also reproduced by the simulation.

  2. Omnidirectional and broadband optical absorption enhancement in small molecule organic solar cells by a patterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 transparent anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ximin; Hao, Yuying; Zhang, Ye; Cui, Yanxia; Ji, Ting; Wang, Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We designed and calculated a novel organic solar cell (OSC) with MoO3/Ag/MoO3 (MAM) grating as transparent anode and the patterned copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerence (C60) as active layer. The numerical results indicate that a broadband, omnidirectional light absorption enhancement is realized by utilizing such a one-dimensional (1D) grating with core-shell structure. The total absorption efficiency of the active layer over the wavelength range from 400 to 900 nm is enhanced by 178.88%, 19.44% and 99.16% relative to the equivalent planar cell considering the weight of air-mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) solar spectrum at normally incident transverse magnetic (TM), transverse electric (TE) and TM/TE hybrid polarized light, respectively. The improved light trapping is attributed to the multiple modes hybridization of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and the strong coupling of SPP waves at TM polarization along with the Floquet modes at TE polarization. Furthermore, the proposed optimized architecture also exhibits an expected short-circuit current density (Jsc) with the value of 11.11 mA/cm2 in theory, which is increased by 116.6% compared with that of the planar control device.

  3. SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

    2012-09-25

    Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle

  4. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent; James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D.; Glenn, Chance M.

    2015-07-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  5. Transparent electronics and prospects for transparent displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wager, John F.; Valencia, Melinda M.; Bender, Jeffrey P.; Norris, Benjamin J.; Chiang, Hai Q.; Hong, David; Norris, Luke N.; Harman, Taran V.; Park, Sangmoon; Anderson, Jeremy T.; Park, Cheol-Hee; Keszler, Douglas A.; Tate, Janet; Yanagi, Hiroshi; Price, Matthew F.; Hoffman, R. L.

    2003-09-01

    Transparent electronics is a nascent technology whose objective is the realization of invisible electronic circuits. Part of the impetus for the development of transparent electronics is the recent availability of p-type transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). With the emergence of p-type TCOs, in addition to conventional n-type TCOs such as indium-tin oxide, tin oxide, and zinc oxide, fabrication of transparent bipolar electronic devices becomes feasible. The first part of this paper reviews TCOs and discusses our work in the development of p-TCOs and alternative TC materials (e.g. sulfides). We have recently invented a novel, n-channel, accumulation-mode transparent thin-film transistor (TTFT). This TTFT is highly transparent, has very little light sensitivity, and exhibits electrical characteristics that appear to be suitable for implementation as a transparent select-transistor in each pixel of an active-matrix liquid-crystal display (AMLCD). Moreover, the processing technology used to fabricate this device is relatively simple and appears to be compatible with inexpensive glass substrate technology. The second part of this paper focuses on TTFTs. If transparent electronics is employed to realize transparent back-plane electronic drivers on transparent substrates, fabrication of a transparent display becomes feasible. The third part of this paper offers an approach for realization of a transparent display.

  6. Transparent switchboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A tin oxide coating is formed on a plate of glass and the coating is then etched away from the glass in thin lines to form separate electrical conductors which extend to one end of the plate and connect to either a vertical (column) or horizontal (row) position sensing SCR circuit. A thin transparent insulating coating is formed over the oxide layer except at selected touch points which are positioned in a matrix pattern of vertical columns and horizontal rows. Touching one of these points with a finger bridges the thin line between adjacent conductors to activate trigger circuits in the particular row and column sensing circuits associated with the point touched. The row and column sensing circuits are similar and are powered with a low frequency, ac voltage source. The source for the row circuits is 180 out of phase with the source for the column circuits so that one circuit acts as ground for the other during half of the supply voltage cycle. The signals from the sensing circuits are input to a logic circuit which determines the presence of a valid touch, stores a binary matrix number associated with the touched point, signals a computer of the presence of a stored number and prevents storage of a new number before receiving an enable signal from the computer.

  7. Transparent screens.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, R J

    1988-01-01

    There is a kind of transitional phenomenon found among certain borderline patients which is quite distinct from Winnicott's transitional object. These are patients who are preoccupied with maintaining proper physical distance from their objects, in order to regulate anxieties about isolation on the one hand, and identity-annihilating closeness on the other. Since they believe the activity of looking to be intrusive and devouring, hence dangerous, transparent screens are interposed between self and other, and serve as protective barriers. These screens function intrapsychically as well, to split off or hide those aspects of the self felt to be unacceptable. The analyst may witness the failure of the screen in several ways: it may create too great a distance, isolating the individual and keeping him from life; it may become contaminated by projections and turn into a persecutor, or trap the individual, a state of intolerable claustrophobia; most dramatically, it may suddenly shatter. The latter is associated with psychosis and death, and its appearance may be a harbinger of suicide.

  8. Metazoan Nuclear Pores Provide a Scaffold for Poised Genes and Mediate Induced Enhancer-Promoter Contacts.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Debo, Brian; Aleman, Jennifer R; Talamas, Jessica A; Lan, Yemin; Nguyen, Nha H; Won, Kyoung J; Capelson, Maya

    2017-04-06

    Nuclear pore complex components (Nups) have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, yet what regulatory steps are controlled by metazoan Nups remains unclear. We identified the presence of multiple Nups at promoters, enhancers, and insulators in the Drosophila genome. In line with this binding, we uncovered a functional role for Nup98 in mediating enhancer-promoter looping at ecdysone-inducible genes. These genes were found to be stably associated with nuclear pores before and after activation. Although changing levels of Nup98 disrupted enhancer-promoter contacts, it did not affect ongoing transcription but instead compromised subsequent transcriptional activation or transcriptional memory. In support of the enhancer-looping role, we found Nup98 to gain and retain physical interactions with architectural proteins upon stimulation with ecdysone. Together, our data identify Nups as a class of architectural proteins for enhancers and supports a model in which animal genomes use the nuclear pore as an organizing scaffold for inducible poised genes.

  9. Ray-tracing method to analyze and quantify the light enhancement around subsurface defects in transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rong; Zhao, Dongfeng; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Ping; Hua, Neng; Lin, Zunqi

    2014-11-01

    Laser-induced damage (LID) to optical glass has become a growing problem in high-power laser systems. It is well known that the main reason of glass being damaged is due to defects and impurities in the material. Damage caused by subsurface defects (SSDs) is especially common in actual system running. Accordingly, in the presence of SSDs, a simple and alternative calculation method is developed to evaluate the enhancement of light field around the incident and exit surface. This ray tracing approach, based on the classical optics theory, is very direct and clear to show the optical phenomena of light intensity enhancement. Some basic SSD shapes have been studied and investigated here, which reveals the importance and boundary condition of controlling the size and density of SSDs in grinding and polishing process. Finally, to achieve optimal breadth depth ratio, the least etching amounts by hydrofluoric (HF) acid is investigated. The theoretical analysis and simulation results provide an appropriate range of removal amounts, which is very important in the HF etching process.

  10. Transparency microplates under impact.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chun Yat; Roslan, Zulhanif; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Chua, Wei Seong; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-07-15

    Transparency microplates enable biochemical analysis in resource-limited laboratories. During the process of transfer, the analytes tittered into the wells may undergo spillage from one well to another due to lateral impact. Sidelong impact tests conducted found the absence of non-linear effects (e.g., viscoelastic behavior) but high energy loss. Finite element simulations conducted showed that the rectangular plate holding the transparencies could undergo z-axis deflections when a normal component of the force was present despite constraints being used. High speed camera sequences confirmed this and also showed the asymmetrical z-axis deflection to cause the contact line closer to impact to displace first when the advancing condition was exceeded. Capillary waves were found to travel toward the contact line at the opposite end, where if the advancing contact angle condition was exceeded, also resulted in spreading. The presence of surface scribing was found to limit contact line movement better. With water drops dispensed on scribed transparencies, immunity from momentum change of up to 9.07 kgm/s on impact was possible for volumes of 40 μL. In the case of glycerol drops immunity from momentum change of up to 9.07 kgm/s on impact extended to volumes of 90 μL. The improved immunity of glycerol was attributed to its heightened dampening characteristics and its higher attenuation of capillary waves. Overall, scribed transparency microplates were able to better withstand spillage from accidental impact. Accidental impact was also found not to cause any detrimental effects on the fluorescence properties of enhanced green fluorescent protein samples tested.

  11. Enhancing the effectiveness of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer by inducing Filamin A nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Mooso, Benjamin A.; Vinall, Ruth L.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Savoy, Rosalinda M.; Cheung, Jean P.; Singh, Sheetal; Siddiqui, Salma; Wang, Yu; Bedolla, Roble G.; Martinez, Anthony; Mudryj, Maria; Kung, Hsing-Jien; deVere White, Ralph W.; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2013-01-01

    Since prostate cancer (CaP) is regulated by androgen receptor (AR) activity, metastatic CaP is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Despite initial response, patients on ADT eventually progress to castration-resistant CaP (CRPC), which is currently incurable. We previously showed that cleavage of the 280kDa structural protein Filamin A (FlnA) to a 90kDa fragment, and nuclear localization of the cleaved product, sensitized CRPC cells to ADT. Hence, treatment promoting FlnA nuclear localization would enhance androgen responsiveness. Here, we show that FlnA nuclear localization induced apoptosis in CRPC cells during ADT, identifying it as a treatment tool in advanced CaP. Significantly, the natural product genistein-combined-polysaccharide (GCP) had a similar effect. Investigation of the mechanism of GCP-induced apoptosis showed that GCP induced FlnA cleavage and nuclear localization, and that apoptosis resulting from GCP treatment was mediated by FlnA nuclear localization. Two main components of GCP are genistein and daidzein: the ability of GCP to induce G2 arrest was due to genistein whereas sensitivity to ADT stemmed from daidzein; hence both were needed to mediate GCP's effects. FlnA cleavage is regulated by its phosphorylation; we show that ADT enhanced FlnA phosphorylation, which prevented its cleavage, whereas GCP inhibited FlnA phosphorylation, thereby sensitizing CaP cells to ADT. In a mouse model of CaP recurrence, GCP, but not vehicle, impeded relapse following castration; indicating that GCP, when administered with ADT, interrupted the development of CRPC. These results demonstrate the efficacy of GCP in promoting FlnA nuclear localization and enhancing androgen responsiveness in CaP. PMID:22993077

  12. Enhancing the effectiveness of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer by inducing Filamin A nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Mooso, Benjamin A; Vinall, Ruth L; Tepper, Clifford G; Savoy, Rosalinda M; Cheung, Jean P; Singh, Sheetal; Siddiqui, Salma; Wang, Yu; Bedolla, Roble G; Martinez, Anthony; Mudryj, Maria; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Devere White, Ralph W; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2012-12-01

    As prostate cancer (CaP) is regulated by androgen receptor (AR) activity, metastatic CaP is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Despite initial response, patients on ADT eventually progress to castration-resistant CaP (CRPC), which is currently incurable. We previously showed that cleavage of the 280 kDa structural protein Filamin A (FlnA) to a 90 kDa fragment, and nuclear localization of the cleaved product, sensitized CRPC cells to ADT. Hence, treatment promoting FlnA nuclear localization would enhance androgen responsiveness. Here, we show that FlnA nuclear localization induced apoptosis in CRPC cells during ADT, identifying it as a treatment tool in advanced CaP. Significantly, the natural product genistein combined polysaccharide (GCP) had a similar effect. Investigation of the mechanism of GCP-induced apoptosis showed that GCP induced FlnA cleavage and nuclear localization and that apoptosis resulting from GCP treatment was mediated by FlnA nuclear localization. Two main components of GCP are genistein and daidzein: the ability of GCP to induce G2 arrest was due to genistein whereas sensitivity to ADT stemmed from daidzein; hence, both were needed to mediate GCP's effects. FlnA cleavage is regulated by its phosphorylation; we show that ADT enhanced FlnA phosphorylation, which prevented its cleavage, whereas GCP inhibited FlnA phosphorylation, thereby sensitizing CaP cells to ADT. In a mouse model of CaP recurrence, GCP, but not vehicle, impeded relapse following castration, indicating that GCP, when administered with ADT, interrupted the development of CRPC. These results demonstrate the efficacy of GCP in promoting FlnA nuclear localization and enhancing androgen responsiveness in CaP.

  13. A Strategy to enhance Eu3+ emission from LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors and green-to-orange multicolor tunable, transparent nanophosphor-polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Yu-Ho; Jang, Ho Seong

    2015-01-01

    LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors with a single tetragonal phase are synthesized, and various strategies to enhance the Eu3+ emission from the nanophosphors are investigated. The optimized Eu3+ concentration is 35 mol%, and the red emission peaks due to the 5D0 →7FJ (J = 1 and 2) transitions of Eu3+ ions are further enhanced by energy transfer from a sensitizer pair of Ce3+ and Tb3+. The triple doping of Ce, Tb, and Eu into the LiYF4 host more effectively enhances the Eu3+ emission than the core/shell strategies of LiYF4:Eu(35%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%) and LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%)/LiYF4:Eu(35%) architectures. Efficient energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu3+ through Tb3+ results in three times higher Eu3+ emission intensity from LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%), Eu(1%) nanophosphors compared with LiYF4:Eu(35%), which contains the optimized Eu3+ concentration. Owing to the energy transfer of Ce3+ → Tb3+ and Ce3+ → Tb3+ → Eu3+, intense green and red emission peaks are observed from LiYF4:Ce(13%), Tb(14%), Eu(1-5%) (LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu) nanophosphors, and the intensity ratio of green to red emission is controlled by adjusting the Eu3+ concentration. With increasing Eu3+ concentration, the LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors exhibit multicolor emission from green to orange. In addition, the successful incorporation of LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) facilitates the preparation of highly transparent nanophosphor-PDMS composites that present excellent multicolor tunability. PMID:25597900

  14. A Strategy to enhance Eu3+ emission from LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors and green-to-orange multicolor tunable, transparent nanophosphor-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Yu-Ho; Jang, Ho Seong

    2015-01-19

    LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors with a single tetragonal phase are synthesized, and various strategies to enhance the Eu(3+) emission from the nanophosphors are investigated. The optimized Eu(3+) concentration is 35 mol%, and the red emission peaks due to the (5)D0 →(7)FJ (J = 1 and 2) transitions of Eu(3+) ions are further enhanced by energy transfer from a sensitizer pair of Ce(3+) and Tb(3+). The triple doping of Ce, Tb, and Eu into the LiYF4 host more effectively enhances the Eu(3+) emission than the core/shell strategies of LiYF4:Eu(35%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%) and LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%)/LiYF4:Eu(35%) architectures. Efficient energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Eu(3+) through Tb(3+) results in three times higher Eu(3+) emission intensity from LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%), Eu(1%) nanophosphors compared with LiYF4:Eu(35%), which contains the optimized Eu(3+) concentration. Owing to the energy transfer of Ce(3+) → Tb(3+) and Ce(3+) → Tb(3+) → Eu(3+), intense green and red emission peaks are observed from LiYF4:Ce(13%), Tb(14%), Eu(1-5%) (LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu) nanophosphors, and the intensity ratio of green to red emission is controlled by adjusting the Eu(3+) concentration. With increasing Eu(3+) concentration, the LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors exhibit multicolor emission from green to orange. In addition, the successful incorporation of LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) facilitates the preparation of highly transparent nanophosphor-PDMS composites that present excellent multicolor tunability.

  15. A Strategy to enhance Eu3+ emission from LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors and green-to-orange multicolor tunable, transparent nanophosphor-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Won, Yu-Ho; Jang, Ho Seong

    2015-01-01

    LiYF4:Eu nanophosphors with a single tetragonal phase are synthesized, and various strategies to enhance the Eu3+ emission from the nanophosphors are investigated. The optimized Eu3+ concentration is 35 mol%, and the red emission peaks due to the 5D0 -->7FJ (J = 1 and 2) transitions of Eu3+ ions are further enhanced by energy transfer from a sensitizer pair of Ce3+ and Tb3+. The triple doping of Ce, Tb, and Eu into the LiYF4 host more effectively enhances the Eu3+ emission than the core/shell strategies of LiYF4:Eu(35%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%) and LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%)/LiYF4:Eu(35%) architectures. Efficient energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu3+ through Tb3+ results in three times higher Eu3+ emission intensity from LiYF4:Ce(15%), Tb(15%), Eu(1%) nanophosphors compared with LiYF4:Eu(35%), which contains the optimized Eu3+ concentration. Owing to the energy transfer of Ce3+ --> Tb3+ and Ce3+ --> Tb3+ --> Eu3+, intense green and red emission peaks are observed from LiYF4:Ce(13%), Tb(14%), Eu(1-5%) (LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu) nanophosphors, and the intensity ratio of green to red emission is controlled by adjusting the Eu3+ concentration. With increasing Eu3+ concentration, the LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors exhibit multicolor emission from green to orange. In addition, the successful incorporation of LiYF4:Ce, Tb, Eu nanophosphors into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) facilitates the preparation of highly transparent nanophosphor-PDMS composites that present excellent multicolor tunability.

  16. Ca(2+) Enhanced Nacre-Inspired Montmorillonite-Alginate Film with Superior Mechanical, Transparent, Fire Retardancy, and Shape Memory Properties.

    PubMed

    Liang, Benliang; Zhao, Hewei; Zhang, Qi; Fan, Yuzun; Yue, Yonghai; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2016-10-11

    Inspired by nacre, this is the first time that using the cross-linking of alginate with Ca ions to fabricate organic-inorganic nacre-inspired films we have successfully prepared a new class of Ca(2+) ion enhanced montmorillonite (MMT)-alginate (ALG) composites, realizing an optimum combination of high strength (∼280 MPa) and high toughness (∼7.2 MJ m(-3)) compared with other MMT based artificial nacre. Furthermore, high temperature performance of the composites (with a maximum strength of ∼170 MPa at 100 °C) along with excellent transmittance, fire retardancy, and unique shape memory response to alcohols could greatly expand the application of the mutilfunctional composites, which are believed to show competitive advantages in transportion, construction, and insulations, protection of a flammable biological material, etc.

  17. Enhanced light extraction of GaN-based light-emitting diodes with periodic textured SiO2 on Al-doped ZnO transparent conductive layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhao; Bingfeng, Fan; Yiting, Chen; Yi, Zhuo; Zhoujun, Pang; Zhen, Liu; Gang, Wang

    2016-07-01

    We report an effective enhancement in light extraction of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an Al-doped ZnO (AZO) transparent conductive layer by incorporating a top regular textured SiO2 layer. The 2 inch transparent through-pore anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane was fabricated and used as the etching mask. The periodic pore with a pitch of about 410 nm was successfully transferred to the surface of the SiO2 layer without any etching damages to the AZO layer and the electrodes. The light output power was enhanced by 19% at 20 mA and 56% at 100 mA compared to that of the planar LEDs without a patterned surface. This approach offers a technique to fabricate a low-cost and large-area regular pattern on the LED chip for achieving enhanced light extraction without an obvious increase of the forward voltage. ).

  18. Price transparency: building community trust.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    With the push from policymakers, payers, and consumers for hospitals to make their prices public, healthcare executives need to recognize two central issues related to price transparency: 1) meaningful price transparency involves helping patients and consumers understand their financial obligation for an episode of care, and 2) price transparency is key to the most critical success strategy for healthcare providers: building trust. This article reviews the history of pricing and billing practices and explores why price transparency is not easily achieved in today's environment. Pricing is a mystery even to those of us who work in the field, yet despite its complexity, the call for price transparency is not going to go away. For transparency, the goal should be to establish a rational pricing system that is easily explainable and justified to all stakeholders. Healthcare executives must make pricing a priority, understand cost, develop a pricing philosophy, understand the overall revenue requirements, examine market conditions and prices, and set up systems for review. A rational process of price setting should enhance community trust. In this matter there is nothing less at stake than the hearts of our community members.

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates the Cytosolic/Nuclear Partitioning of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase by Enhancing its Nuclear Localization.

    PubMed

    Aroca, Angeles; Schneider, Markus; Scheibe, Renate; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule comparable with nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide in plants. The underlying mechanism of its action is unknown, although it has been proposed to be S-sulfhydration. This post-translational modification converts the thiol groups of cysteines within proteins to persulfides, resulting in functional changes of the proteins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, S-sulfhydrated proteins have been identified, including the cytosolic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase GapC1 and GapC2. In this work, we studied the regulation of sulfide on the subcellular localization of these proteins using two different approaches. We generated GapC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GapC2-GFP transgenic plants in both the wild type and the des1 mutant defective in the l-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1, responsible for the generation of sulfide in the cytosol. The GFP signal was detected in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of epidermal cells, although with reduced nuclear localization in des1 compared with the wild type, and exogenous sulfide treatment resulted in similar signals in nuclei in both backgrounds. The second approach consisted of the immunoblot analysis of the GapC endogenous proteins in enriched nuclear and cytosolic protein extracts, and similar results were obtained. A significant reduction in the total amount of GapC in des1 in comparison with the wild type was determined and exogenous sulfide significantly increased the protein levels in the nuclei in both plants, with a stronger response in the wild type. Moreover, the presence of an S-sulfhydrated cysteine residue on GapC1 was demonstrated by mass spectrometry. We conclude that sulfide enhances the nuclear localization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Effect of enhanced pCO2 levels on the production of dissolved organic carbon and transparent exopolymer particles in short-term bioassay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Shi, T.; Tyrrell, T.; Richier, S.; Moore, C. M.; Dumousseaud, C.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2014-07-01

    It has been proposed that increasing levels of pCO2 in the surface ocean will lead to more partitioning of the organic carbon fixed by marine primary production into the dissolved rather than the particulate fraction. This process may result in enhanced accumulation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface ocean and/or concurrent accumulation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEPs), with important implications for the functioning of the marine carbon cycle. We investigated this in shipboard bioassay experiments that considered the effect of four different pCO2 scenarios (ambient, 550, 750 and 1000 μatm) on unamended natural phytoplankton communities from a range of locations in the northwest European shelf seas. The environmental settings, in terms of nutrient availability, phytoplankton community structure and growth conditions, varied considerably between locations. We did not observe any strong or consistent effect of pCO2 on DOC production. There was a significant but highly variable effect of pCO2 on the production of TEPs. In three of the five experiments, variation of TEP production between pCO2 treatments was caused by the effect of pCO2 on phytoplankton growth rather than a direct effect on TEP production. In one of the five experiments, there was evidence of enhanced TEP production at high pCO2 (twice as much production over the 96 h incubation period in the 750 μatm treatment compared with the ambient treatment) independent of indirect effects, as hypothesised by previous studies. Our results suggest that the environmental setting of experiments (community structure, nutrient availability and occurrence of phytoplankton growth) is a key factor determining the TEP response to pCO2 perturbations.

  1. NMR-based structural biology enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Koers, Eline J; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Rosay, Melanie; Weingarth, Markus; Prokofyev, Alexander; Sauvée, Claire; Ouari, Olivier; van der Zwan, Johan; Pongs, Olaf; Tordo, Paul; Maas, Werner E; Baldus, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has become a powerful method to enhance spectroscopic sensitivity in the context of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We show that, compared to DNP at lower field (400 MHz/263 GHz), high field DNP (800 MHz/527 GHz) can significantly enhance spectral resolution and allows exploitation of the paramagnetic relaxation properties of DNP polarizing agents as direct structural probes under magic angle spinning conditions. Applied to a membrane-embedded K(+) channel, this approach allowed us to refine the membrane-embedded channel structure and revealed conformational substates that are present during two different stages of the channel gating cycle. High-field DNP thus offers atomic insight into the role of molecular plasticity during the course of biomolecular function in a complex cellular environment.

  2. Enhancing nuclear power plant performance through the use of artifical intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Maren, A.; Miller, L.; Uhrig, R.; Upadhyaya, B.

    1989-06-15

    In the summer of 1988, the Department of Nuclear Engineering (NE) at the University of Tennessee (UT) in Knoxville was selected to carry out a research program in Enhancing the Operation of Nuclear Power plants through the use of Artificial Intelligence, This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research under 10CFR605 for Nuclear Engineering Research. The objective of the research is to advance the state-of-the-art of nuclear power plant control, safety, management, and instrumentation systems through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, including both expert systems and neural networks. The emphasis will be placed on methods that can be implemented on a rapid or real-time basis. A second, but equally important, objective is to build a broadly based critical mass of expertise in the artificial intelligence, field that can be brought to bear on the technology of nuclear power plants. Both of these goals are being met. This overview and the attached technical reports describe the work that is being carried out. Although in some cases, the scope of the work differs somewhat from the specific tasks described in the original proposal, all activities are clearly within the overall scope of the contract.

  3. Enhancing nuclear power plant performance through the use of artifical intelligence. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Maren, A.; Miller, L.; Uhrig, R.; Upadhyaya, B.

    1989-06-15

    In the summer of 1988, the Department of Nuclear Engineering (NE) at the University of Tennessee (UT) in Knoxville was selected to carry out a research program in ``Enhancing the Operation of Nuclear Power plants through the use of Artificial Intelligence, This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research under 10CFR605 for Nuclear Engineering Research. The objective of the research is to advance the state-of-the-art of nuclear power plant control, safety, management, and instrumentation systems through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, including both expert systems and neural networks. The emphasis will be placed on methods that can be implemented on a rapid or real-time basis. A second, but equally important, objective is to build a broadly based critical mass of expertise in the artificial intelligence, field that can be brought to bear on the technology of nuclear power plants. Both of these goals are being met. This overview and the attached technical reports describe the work that is being carried out. Although in some cases, the scope of the work differs somewhat from the specific tasks described in the original proposal, all activities are clearly within the overall scope of the contract.

  4. A new approach to nuclear fuel safeguard enhancement through radionuclide profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Aaron Dawon

    The United States has led the effort to promote peaceful use of nuclear power amongst states actively utilizing it as well as those looking to deploy the technology in the near future. With the attraction being demonstrated by various countries towards nuclear power comes the concern that a nation may have military aspirations for the use of nuclear energy. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established nuclear safeguard protocols and procedures to mitigate nuclear proliferation. The work herein proposed a strategy to further enhance existing safeguard protocols by considering safeguard in nuclear fuel design. The strategy involved the use of radionuclides to profile nuclear fuels. Six radionuclides were selected as identifier materials. The decay and transmutation of these radionuclides were analyzed in reactor operation environment. MCNPX was used to simulate a reactor core. The perturbation in reactivity of the core due to the loading of the radionuclides was insignificant. The maximum positive and negative reactivity change induced was at day 1900 with a value of 0.00185 +/- 0.00256 and at day 2000 with -0.00441 +/- 0.00249, respectively. The mass of the radionuclides were practically unaffected by transmutation in the core; the change in radionuclide inventory was dominated by natural decay. The maximum material lost due to transmutation was 1.17% in Eu154. Extraneous signals from fission products identical to the radionuclide compromised the identifier signals. Eu154 saw a maximum intensity change at EOC and 30 days post-irradiation of 1260% and 4545%, respectively. Cs137 saw a minimum change of 12% and 89%, respectively. Mitigation of the extraneous signals is cardinal to the success of the proposed strategy. The predictability of natural decay provides a basis for the characterization of the signals from the radionuclide.

  5. Direct evidence of fadeout of collective enhancement in nuclear level density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, K.; Roy, Pratap; Pandit, Deepak; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T. K.; Kundu, S.; Sen, A.; Rana, T. K.; Manna, S.; Pandey, R.; Roy, T.; Dhal, A.; Asgar, Md. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2017-09-01

    The phenomenon of collective enhancement in nuclear level density and its fadeout has been probed using neutron evaporation study of two strongly deformed (173Lu, 185Re), and one spherical (201Tl) compound nuclei over the excitation energy (E*) range of ∼ 22- 56 MeV. Clear signature of the fadeout of collective enhancement in nuclear level density was observed for the first time in both the deformed evaporation residues 172Lu and 184Re at an excitation energy range ∼ 14- 21 MeV. Calculations based on finite temperature density functional theory, as well as macroscopic-microscopic shape transition model, have strongly established a close correlation between the observed fadeout of collective enhancement and a deformed to spherical nuclear shape transition in these nuclei occurring in the same excitation energy zone. Interestingly, a weak signature of fadeout has also been observed for the spherical residue 200Tl. This is due to a similar shape transition of the deformed excited state configuration of 200Tl.

  6. Plasmonic graphene transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guowei; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Qian; Hui, Rongqing; Chen, Zhijun; Maroni, Victor A; Wu, Judy

    2012-03-08

    Plasmonic graphene is fabricated using thermally assisted self-assembly of silver nanoparticles on graphene. The localized surface-plasmonic effect is demonstrated with the resonance frequency shifting from 446 to 495 nm when the lateral dimension of the Ag nanoparticles increases from about 50 to 150 nm. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are employed to confirm the experimentally observed light-scattering enhancement in the solar spectrum in plasmonic graphene and the decrease of both the plasmonic resonance frequency and amplitude with increasing graphene thickness. In addition, plasmonic graphene shows much-improved electrical conductance by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the original graphene, making the plasmonic graphene a promising advanced transparent conductor with enhanced light scattering for thin-film optoelectronic devices.

  7. A new model for Overhauser enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance using nitroxide radicals.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brandon D; Han, Songi

    2007-09-14

    Nitroxide free radicals are the most commonly used source for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and are also exclusively employed as spin labels for electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy of diamagnetic molecules and materials. Nitroxide free radicals have been shown to have strong dipolar coupling to (1)H in water, and thus result in large DNP enhancement of (1)H NMR signal via the well known Overhauser effect. The fundamental parameter in a DNP experiment is the coupling factor, since it ultimately determines the maximum NMR signal enhancements which can be achieved. Despite their widespread use, measurements of the coupling factor of nitroxide free radicals have been inconsistent, and current models have failed to successfully explain our experimental data. We found that the inconsistency in determining the coupling factor arises from not taking into account the characteristics of the ESR transitions, which are split into three (or two) lines due to the hyperfine coupling of the electron to the (14)N nuclei (or (15)N) of the nitric oxide radical. Both intermolecular Heisenberg spin exchange interactions as well as intramolecular nitrogen nuclear spin relaxation mix the three (or two) ESR transitions. However, neither effect has been taken into account in any experimental studies on utilizing or quantifying the Overhauser driven DNP effects. The expected effect of Heisenberg spin exchange on Overhauser enhancements has already been theoretically predicted and observed by Bates and Drozdoski [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4038 (1977)]. Here, we present a new model for quantifying Overhauser enhancements through nitroxide free radicals that includes both effects on mixing the ESR hyperfine states. This model predicts the maximum saturation factor to be considerably higher by the effect of nitrogen nuclear spin relaxation. Because intramolecular nitrogen spin relaxation is independent of the nitroxide concentration

  8. U.S./Russian cooperative efforts to enhance nuclear MPC&A at VNIITF, (Chelyabinsk-70)

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, B; Apt, K; Blasy, J; Bukin, D; Churikov, Y; Eras, A; Magda, E; Neymotin, L; Schultz, F; Slankas, T; Tsygankov, G; Zuev, V

    1998-09-01

    The All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as assembly, disassembly, and testing of prototypes (pilot samples) of nuclear weapons. VNIITF also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. The objective of the U.S./Russian Materials Protection Control and Accounting (MPC&A) cooperative program between the US Department of Energy and Russia's Ministry of Atomic Eneryy, at VNIITF is to improve the protection and accountability of nuclear material at VNIITF. Enhanced safeguards systems have been implemented at a reactor test area called the Pulse Research Reactor Facility (PRR) in Area 20. The area contains three pulse reactors with associated storage areas. The integrated MPC&A system at the PRR was demonstrated to US and Russian audiences in May, 1998. Expansion of work into several new facilities is underway both in Area 20 and at other locations. These include processing and production facilities some of which are considered sensitive facilities, by the Russian side. Methods have been developed to assure that work is done as agreed without actually having access to the buildings. C-70 has developed an extensive computerized system which integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the MPC&A program, the existing systems have been augmented with Russian and US technologies. This paper will describe the work completed at the PRR, and the on-going activities and cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF.

  9. Absorption enhancement of GaInP nanowires by tailoring transparent shell thicknesses and its application in III-V nanowire/Si film two-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Tongfei; Liu, Guangqiang; Wen, Long; Zhou, BuKang; Wang, Yuqi

    2015-09-21

    A non-absorbing transparent shell is proposed to be coated on the outer surface of the core photoactive GaInP nanowire array (NWA) of the III-V nanowire (NW)/Si film two-junction solar cell. Interestingly, the diluted (at the filling ratio of 0.25) GaInP NWA with core / transparent shell structure can absorb more light than that in bare denser (at the filling ratio of 0.5) NWA. This allows for less source material consumption during the fabrication of III-V NWA/Si film two-junction cell. Meanwhile, the condition of current matching between the top III-V NWA and Si film sub cell can be easily fulfilled by tailoring the coating thickness of the transparent coating. Beyond the advantages on light absorption, the surface passivation effects introduced by the addition of some transparent dielectric coatings can reduce the surface recombination rate at the top NWA sub cell surface. This facilitates the effective extraction of photo-generated carriers and enhances output stability of the top NWA sub cell. From electrical simulation, a power conversion efficiency of 29.9% can be obtained at the optimized coating geometry.

  10. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  11. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Polarization enhancement in &vec{d}(\\vec{p},\\vec{n})^{2};He reaction: nuclear teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, S.

    2004-02-01

    I show that an experimental technique used in nuclear physics may be successfully applied to quantum teleportation (QT) of spin states of massive matter. A new non-local physical effect, the 'quantum-teleportation effect', is discovered for the nuclear polarization measurement. Enhancement of the neutron polarization is expected in the proposed experiment for QT that discriminates only one of the Bell states.

  12. Hydration status affects nuclear distribution of transcription factor tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Cha, J H; Woo, S K; Han, K H; Kim, Y H; Handler, J S; Kim, J; Kwon, H M

    2001-11-01

    Tonicity responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity responsive expression of proteins that catalyze cellular accumulation of compatible osmolytes. In cultured MDCK cells, hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP via a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear localization. For investigating regulation of TonEBP in the kidney, rats were subjected to water loading or dehydration. Water loading lowered urine osmolality and mRNA expression of sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT), a target gene of TonEBP, in the renal medulla; dehydration doubled the urine osmolality and increased SMIT mRNA expression. In contrast, overall abundance of TonEBP and its mRNA measured by immunoblot and ribonuclease protection assay, respectively, was not affected. Immunohistochemical analysis, however, revealed that nuclear distribution of TonEBP is generally increased throughout the medulla in dehydrated animals compared with water loaded animals. Increased nuclear localization was particularly dramatic in thin limbs. Notable exceptions were the middle to terminal portions of the inner medullary collecting ducts and blood vessels, where a change in TonEBP distribution was not evident. Immunohistochemical detection of SMIT mRNA revealed that the changes in nuclear distribution of TonEBP correlate with expression of SMIT. It is concluded that under physiologic conditions, nucleocytoplasmic distribution is the dominant mode of regulation of TonEBP in the renal medulla.

  13. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneoka, Hidenori; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  14. Nanocrystalline diamond protects Zr cladding surface against oxygen and hydrogen uptake: Nuclear fuel durability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Škarohlíd, Jan; Ashcheulov, Petr; Škoda, Radek; Taylor, Andrew; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Tomáštík, Jan; Fendrych, František; Kopeček, Jaromír; Cháb, Vladimír; Cichoň, Stanislav; Sajdl, Petr; Macák, Jan; Xu, Peng; Partezana, Jonna M; Lorinčík, Jan; Prehradná, Jana; Steinbrück, Martin; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2017-07-25

    In this work, we demonstrate and describe an effective method of protecting zirconium fuel cladding against oxygen and hydrogen uptake at both accident and working temperatures in water-cooled nuclear reactor environments. Zr alloy samples were coated with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers of different thicknesses, grown in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition apparatus. In addition to showing that such an NCD layer prevents the Zr alloy from directly interacting with water, we show that carbon released from the NCD film enters the underlying Zr material and changes its properties, such that uptake of oxygen and hydrogen is significantly decreased. After 100-170 days of exposure to hot water at 360 °C, the oxidation of the NCD-coated Zr plates was typically decreased by 40%. Protective NCD layers may prolong the lifetime of nuclear cladding and consequently enhance nuclear fuel burnup. NCD may also serve as a passive element for nuclear safety. NCD-coated ZIRLO claddings have been selected as a candidate for Accident Tolerant Fuel in commercially operated reactors in 2020.

  15. UC Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Curriculum and Research Enhancement. Final report, February 14, 1993--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K.; Peterson, P.F.

    1995-05-11

    This is a report for the 2/14/93 to 2/14/95 period of the five-year program proposed and initiated in 1992, for curriculum and research enhancement for the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. The program is designed to strengthen the departmental academic infrastructure and improve the education breadth of nuclear engineering students. The DOE funds have supported scholarships and a novel educational program which includes summer coursework at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. The summer course provides an important introduction to reactor safety and operations to students who will in the future be responsible for running many of our existing nuclear power plants. The work was funded under DOE contract DE-FG0393ER75856, with a matching gift to the Department from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). The program described in the original grant proposal has been successful implemented with an enthusiastic response from our students and faculty. The program consisted of two parts, one for innovative additions to our curriculum funded by the DOE, and the other for distinguished lectureships and support for basic research funded by gifts from PG&E.

  16. An electronically enhanced security system using plastic scintillators for special nuclear material detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, P.P. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    The Electronically Enhanced Security System at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), operated by Rockwell International, in Golden, Colorado, includes a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring system. It was designed by RFP to operate in areas where there is variable radiation background and high volumes of pedestrian traffic. The SNM monitors, or radiometric scanners, using plastic scintillator detectors and microprocessor-based electronics, are placed at entrance/exit doors of SNM processing areas within production buildings. The Enhanced Security System has numerous areas or posts that are each monitored by the following equipment for alarm detection: plastic scintillators, solid-state color cameras, microwave occupancy detectors, and audio and visual alarmed condition indicators. At centralized guard posts, assessment of an alarm is accomplished by using time-lapse color video cassette recorders, alarm annunciators, an intercom system, dedicated color monitors, and an alarm color monitor. As a pilot program, the Enhanced Security System accomplished a considerable yearly cost savings.

  17. An electronically enhanced security system using plastic scintillators for special nuclear material detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, P.P. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Electronically Enhanced Security System at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), operated by Rockwell International, in Golden, Colorado includes a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring system. It was designed by RFP to operate in areas where there is variable radiation background and high volumes of pedestrian traffic. The SNM monitors, or radiometric scanners, using plastic scintillator detectors and microprocessor-based electronics, are placed at the entrance/exit doors of SNM processing areas within production buildings. The Enhanced Security System has numerous areas or posts that are each monitored by the following equipment for alarm detection: plastic scintillators, solid-state color cameras, microwave occupancy detectors, and audio and visual alarmed condition indicators. At centralized guard posts, assessment of an alarm is accomplished by using time-lapse color video cassette recorders, alarm annunciators, an intercom system, dedicated color monitors, and an alarm color monitor. As a pilot program, the Enhanced Security System accomplished a considerable yearly cost savings.

  18. Enhancement of Nuclear Reactions due to Screening Effects of Core Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, N.; Shrestha, P. J.; Miley, G. H.; Violante, V.

    2005-12-01

    Recent progress in understanding the screening effects of core level atomic electrons is summarized in this paper. Some preliminary results on core electron screening were reported before.1 The studies focus on two types of nuclear reactions in some metal lattices: fusion between deuterons and also proton capture by medium and heavy lattice nuclei. In both reactions the energy of the light nuclear species, proton or deuteron, is on the keV (1000 eV) scale, while that of heavy nuclei is essentially zero. A standard atomic code is used to obtain the core electron charge density and the potential profile in the metal atom. This Hartree-Fock-Slater type code was originally written by Herman and Skillman2 and later modified by others and available online.3 For the D-D reaction, the charge density obtained then gives an estimate on the screening length. The corresponding enhancement in Coulomb barrier tunneling can be obtained from this data. For the proton capture reaction, an ion dynamic code4 written to simulate the motion of keV protons in Pd/Ni lattice, CLAIRE, was modified to take into account the realistic atomic potential, including core electron contributions. In both cases, our result shows a significant nuclear reaction enhancement. The reaction rate calculated roughly matches the scale of excess heat observed in some metal hydride/deuteride5 experiments.

  19. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of (13)C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of (13)C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  20. Oxidized LDL enhances stretch-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation through alterations in nuclear protein import.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Mirna N; Dibrov, Elena; Blackwood, David P; Pierce, Grant N

    2012-12-01

    Mechanical stress contributes to hypertension and atherosclerosis partly through the stimulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is another important atherogenic factor that can increase VSMC proliferation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether oxLDL could further enhance the proliferative action of mechanical stretch on VSMC, and to determine the mechanism responsible for this interaction. Because nuclear protein import is critical in regulating gene expression, transcription, and cell proliferation, its involvement in the mitogenic effects of oxLDL and mechanical stress was studied. OxLDL enhanced the proliferative effects of mechanical stretch on its own in rabbit aortic VSMC, and induced increases in the expression of HSP60 in an additive manner. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of HSP60 induced increases in cell proliferation compared with uninfected VSMC. Mechanical stretch and oxLDL stimulated the rate of nuclear protein import in VSMC and increased the expression of nucleoporins. These effects were sensitive to inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We conclude that oxLDL and mechanical stretch have a synergistic effect on VSMC proliferation. This synergistic effect is induced through a stimulation of nuclear protein import via HSP60 and an activation of the MAPK pathway.

  1. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of 13C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of 13C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  2. In Situ Characterization of Pharmaceutical Formulations by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Yang, Fengyuan; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan V; D'Addio, Suzanne M; Jawla, Sudheer K; Li, Yongjun; Lipert, Maya P; Xu, Wei; Williamson, R Thomas; Leone, Anthony; Griffin, Robert G; Su, Yongchao

    2017-08-31

    A principal advantage of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy lies in its ability to determine molecular structure in a noninvasive and quantitative manner. Accordingly, MAS should be widely applicable to studies of the structure of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and formulations. However, the low sensitivity encountered in spectroscopy of natural abundance APIs present at low concentration has limited the success of MAS experiments. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhances NMR sensitivity and can be used to circumvent this problem provided that suitable paramagnetic polarizing agent can be incorporated into the system without altering the integrity of solid dosages. Here, we demonstrate that DNP polarizing agents can be added in situ during the preparation of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) via spray drying and hot-melt extrusion so that ASDs can be examined during drug development. Specifically, the dependence of DNP enhancement on sample composition, radical concentration, relaxation properties of the API and excipients, types of polarizing agents and proton density, has been thoroughly investigated. Optimal enhancement values are obtained from ASDs containing 1% w/w radical concentration. Both polarizing agents TOTAPOL and AMUPol provided reasonable enhancements. Partial deuteration of the excipient produced 3× higher enhancement values. With these parameters, an ASD containing posaconazole and vinyl acetate yields a 32-fold enhancement which presumably results in a reduction of NMR measurement time by ∼1000. This boost in signal intensity enables the full assignment of the natural abundance pharmaceutical formulation through multidimensional correlation experiments.

  3. Nuclear AURKA acquires kinase-independent transactivating function to enhance breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feimeng; Yue, Caifeng; Li, Guohui; He, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Xi; Yan, Min; Long, Zijie; Qiu, Wanshou; Yuan, Zhongyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome-localized mitotic Aurora kinase A (AURKA) facilitates G2/M events. Here we show that AURKA translocates to the nucleus and causes distinct oncogenic properties in malignant cells by enhancing breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. Unexpectedly, this function is independent of its kinase activity. Instead, AURKA preferentially interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in the nucleus and acts as a transcription factor in a complex that induces a shift in MYC promoter usage and activates the MYC promoter. Blocking AURKA nuclear localization inhibits this newly discovered transactivating function of AURKA, sensitizing resistant BCSC to kinase inhibition. These findings identify a previously unknown oncogenic property of the spatially deregulated AURKA in tumorigenesis and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity to overcome kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:26782714

  4. THz-waves channeling in a monolithic saddle-coil for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR.

    PubMed

    Macor, A; de Rijk, E; Annino, G; Alberti, S; Ansermet, J-Ph

    2011-10-01

    A saddle coil manufactured by electric discharge machining (EDM) from a solid piece of copper has recently been realized at EPFL for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments (DNP-NMR) at 9.4 T. The corresponding electromagnetic behavior of radio-frequency (400 MHz) and THz (263 GHz) waves were studied by numerical simulation in various measurement configurations. Moreover, we present an experimental method by which the results of the THz-wave numerical modeling are validated. On the basis of the good agreement between numerical and experimental results, we conducted by numerical simulation a systematic analysis on the influence of the coil geometry and of the sample properties on the THz-wave field, which is crucial in view of the optimization of DNP-NMR in solids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. THz-waves channeling in a monolithic saddle-coil for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macor, A.; de Rijk, E.; Annino, G.; Alberti, S.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2011-10-01

    A saddle coil manufactured by electric discharge machining (EDM) from a solid piece of copper has recently been realized at EPFL for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments (DNP-NMR) at 9.4 T. The corresponding electromagnetic behavior of radio-frequency (400 MHz) and THz (263 GHz) waves were studied by numerical simulation in various measurement configurations. Moreover, we present an experimental method by which the results of the THz-wave numerical modeling are validated. On the basis of the good agreement between numerical and experimental results, we conducted by numerical simulation a systematic analysis on the influence of the coil geometry and of the sample properties on the THz-wave field, which is crucial in view of the optimization of DNP-NMR in solids.

  6. Soils. Transparency Masters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This document is a collection of 43 overhead transparency masters to be used as teaching aids in a course of study involving soils such as geology, agronomy, hydrology, earth science, or land use study. Some transparencies are in color. Selected titles of transparencies may give the reader a better understanding of the graphic content. Titles are:…

  7. Soils. Transparency Masters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This document is a collection of 43 overhead transparency masters to be used as teaching aids in a course of study involving soils such as geology, agronomy, hydrology, earth science, or land use study. Some transparencies are in color. Selected titles of transparencies may give the reader a better understanding of the graphic content. Titles are:…

  8. Nuclear Filtering of Intrinsic Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-11-12

    Nuclei are transparent for a heavy intrinsic charm (IC) component of the beam hadrons, what leads to an enhanced nuclear dependence of open charm production at large Feynman x{sub F}. Indeed, such an effect is supported by data from the SELEX experiment published recently [1]. Our calculations reproduce well the data, providing strong support for the presence of IC in hadrons in amount less than 1%. Moreover, we performed an analysis of nuclear effects in J/{Psi} production and found at large x{sub F} a similar, albeit weaker effect, which does not contradict data.

  9. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Thomas F.; Dannatt, Hugh R. W.; Barrow, Nathan S.; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P.; Newton, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to 1H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90 K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90 K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement.

  10. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Thomas F; Dannatt, Hugh R W; Barrow, Nathan S; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P; Newton, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to (1)H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Hotelling Trace Criterion Used for System Optimization and Feature Enhancement in Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiete, Robert Dean

    The Hotelling trace criterion (HTC) is a measure of class separability used in pattern recognition to find a set of linear features that optimally separate two classes of objects. In this dissertation we use the HTC not as a figure of merit for features, but as a figure of merit for characterizing imaging systems and designing filters for feature enhancement in nuclear medicine. If the HTC is to be used to optimize systems, then it must correlate with human observer performance. In our first study, a set of images, created by overlapping ellipses, was used to simulate images of livers. Two classes were created, livers with and without tumors, with noise and blur added to each image to simulate nine different imaging systems. Using the ROC parameter d_ {rm a} as our measure, we found that the HTC has a correlation of 0.988 with the ability of humans to separate these two classes of objects. A second study was performed to demonstrate the use of the HTC for system optimization in a realistic task. For this study we used a mathematical model of normal and diseased livers and of the imaging system to generate a realistic set of liver images from nuclear medicine. A method of adaptive, nonlinear filtering which enhances the features that separate two sets of images has also been developed. The method uses the HTC to find the optimal linear feature operator for the Fourier moduli of the images, and uses this operator as a filter so that the features that separate the two classes of objects are enhanced. We demonstrate the use of this filtering method to enhance texture features in simulated liver images from nuclear medicine, after using a training set of images to obtain the filter. We also demonstrate how this method of filtering can be used to reconstruct an object from a single photon-starved image of it, when the object contains a repetitive feature. When power spectrums for real liver scans from nuclear medicine are calculated, we find that the three

  12. The art of transparency

    PubMed Central

    Sayim, Bilge; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Artists throughout the ages have discovered a number of techniques to depict transparency. With only a few exceptions, these techniques follow closely the properties of physical transparency. The two best known properties are X-junctions and the luminance relations described by Metelli. X-junctions are seen where the contours of a transparent material cross contours of the surface behind; Metelli's constraints on the luminance relations between the direct and filtered portions of the surface specify a range of luminance values that are consistent with transparency. These principles have been used by artists since the time of ancient Egypt. However, artists also discovered that stimuli can be seen as transparent even when these physical constraints are not met. Ancient Greek artists, for example, were able to depict transparent materials in simple black-and-white line drawings. Artists also learned how to represent transparency in cases where neither X-junctions nor Metelli's constraints could apply: for example, where no portions of the objects behind the transparent material extend beyond it. Many painters convincingly portrayed transparency in these cases by depicting the effects the transparent medium would have on material or object properties. Here, we show how artists employed these and other techniques revealing their anticipation of current formalizations of perceived transparency, and we suggest new, as-yet-untested principles. PMID:23145252

  13. The art of transparency.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Artists throughout the ages have discovered a number of techniques to depict transparency. With only a few exceptions, these techniques follow closely the properties of physical transparency. The two best known properties are X-junctions and the luminance relations described by Metelli. X-junctions are seen where the contours of a transparent material cross contours of the surface behind; Metelli's constraints on the luminance relations between the direct and filtered portions of the surface specify a range of luminance values that are consistent with transparency. These principles have been used by artists since the time of ancient Egypt. However, artists also discovered that stimuli can be seen as transparent even when these physical constraints are not met. Ancient Greek artists, for example, were able to depict transparent materials in simple black-and-white line drawings. Artists also learned how to represent transparency in cases where neither X-junctions nor Metelli's constraints could apply: for example, where no portions of the objects behind the transparent material extend beyond it. Many painters convincingly portrayed transparency in these cases by depicting the effects the transparent medium would have on material or object properties. Here, we show how artists employed these and other techniques revealing their anticipation of current formalizations of perceived transparency, and we suggest new, as-yet-untested principles.

  14. Nuclear lamin-A scales with tissue stiffness and enhances matrix-directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena L; Buxboim, Amnon; Harada, Takamasa; Dingal, P C Dave P; Pinter, Joel; Pajerowski, J David; Spinler, Kyle R; Shin, Jae-Won; Tewari, Manorama; Rehfeldt, Florian; Speicher, David W; Discher, Dennis E

    2013-08-30

    Tissues can be soft like fat, which bears little stress, or stiff like bone, which sustains high stress, but whether there is a systematic relationship between tissue mechanics and differentiation is unknown. Here, proteomics analyses revealed that levels of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A scaled with tissue elasticity, E, as did levels of collagens in the extracellular matrix that determine E. Stem cell differentiation into fat on soft matrix was enhanced by low lamin-A levels, whereas differentiation into bone on stiff matrix was enhanced by high lamin-A levels. Matrix stiffness directly influenced lamin-A protein levels, and, although lamin-A transcription was regulated by the vitamin A/retinoic acid (RA) pathway with broad roles in development, nuclear entry of RA receptors was modulated by lamin-A protein. Tissue stiffness and stress thus increase lamin-A levels, which stabilize the nucleus while also contributing to lineage determination.

  15. Nuclear Lamin-A Scales with Tissue Stiffness and Enhances Matrix-Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Buxboim, Amnon; Harada, Takamasa; Dingal, P. C. Dave P.; Pinter, Joel; Pajerowski, J. David; Spinler, Kyle R.; Shin, Jae-Won; Tewari, Manorama; Rehfeldt, Florian; Speicher, David W.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissues can be soft like fat, which bears little stress, or stiff like bone, which sustains high stress, but whether there is a systematic relationship between tissue mechanics and differentiation is unknown. Here, proteomics analyses revealed that levels of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A scaled with tissue elasticity, E, as did levels of collagens in the extracellular matrix that determine E. Stem cell differentiation into fat on soft matrix was enhanced by low lamin-A levels, whereas differentiation into bone on stiff matrix was enhanced by high lamin-A levels. Matrix stiffness directly influenced lamin-A protein levels, and, although lamin-A transcription was regulated by the vitamin A/retinoic acid (RA) pathway with broad roles in development, nuclear entry of RA receptors was modulated by lamin-A protein. Tissue stiffness and stress thus increase lamin-A levels, which stabilize the nucleus while also contributing to lineage determination. PMID:23990565

  16. Reduced Noise UV Enhancement of Etch Rates for Nuclear Tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Rebecca; Clarkson, David; Ume, Rubab; Regan, Sean; Sangster, Craig; Padalino, Stephen; McLean, James

    2016-10-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is an effective technique for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched in NaOH at 80°C for 6 hours, producing micron-scale signal pits at the nuclear track sites. Using CR-39 irradiated with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 1.0 MeV protons, we show that exposing the CR-39 to high intensity UV light before etching, with wavelengths between 240 nm and 350 nm, speeds the etch process. Elevated temperatures during UV exposure amplifies this effect, with etch rates up to 50% greater than unprocessed conditions. CR-39 pieces exposed to UV light and heat can also exhibit heightened levels of etch-induced noise (surface features not caused by nuclear particles). By illuminating the CR-39 from the side opposite to the tracks, a similar level of etch enhancement was obtained with little to no noise. The effective wavelength range is reduced, due to strong attenuation of shorter wavelengths. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  17. A set of enhanced green fluorescent protein concatemers for quantitative determination of nuclear localization signal strength.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Jennifer; Thavaraja, Ramya; Giehler, Susanne; Nalaskowski, Marcus M

    2017-09-15

    Regulated transport of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm is an important process in the eukaryotic cell. In most cases, active nucleo-cytoplasmic protein transport is mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS) and/or nuclear export signal (NES) motifs. In this study, we developed a set of vectors expressing enhanced GFP (EGFP) concatemers ranging from 2 to 12 subunits (2xEGFP to 12xEGFP) for analysis of NLS strength. As shown by in gel GFP fluorescence analysis and αGFP Western blotting, EGFP concatemers are expressed as fluorescent full-length proteins in eukaryotic cells. As expected, nuclear localization of concatemeric EGFPs decreases with increasing molecular weight. By oligonucleotide ligation this set of EGFP concatemers can be easily fused to NLS motifs. After determination of intracellular localization of EGFP concatemers alone and fused to different NLS motifs we calculated the size of a hypothetic EGFP concatemer showing a defined distribution of EGFP fluorescence between nucleus and cytoplasm (n/c ratio = 2). Clear differences of the size of the hypothetic EGFP concatemer depending on the fused NLS motif were observed. Therefore, we propose to use the size of this hypothetic concatemer as quantitative indicator for comparing strength of different NLS motifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Resonant Enhancement of Nuclear Reactions as a Possible Solution to the Cosmological Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyburt, Richard H.; Pospelov, Maxim

    There is a significant discrepancy between the current theoretical prediction of the cosmological lithium abundance, mostly produced as 7Be during the Big Bang, and its observationally inferred value. We investigate whether the resonant enhancement of 7 Be burning reactions may alleviate this discrepancy. We identify one narrow nuclear level in 9B, E5/2+ ≃ 16.7 MeV that is not sufficiently studied experimentally, and being just ~ 200 keV above the 7Be+d threshold, may lead to the resonant enhancement of 7Be(d, γ)9B and 7Be(d, p)αα reactions. We determine the relationship between the domain of resonant energies Er and the deuterium separation width Γd that results in the significant depletion of the cosmological lithium abundance and find that (Er, Γd)≃(170-220, 10-40) keV can eliminate the current discrepancy. Such a large width at this resonant energy can be only achieved if the interaction radius for the deuterium entrance channel is very large, a27 ≥ 10 fm. New nuclear experimental and theoretical work is needed to clarify the role this resonance plays on the BBN prediction of the lithium abundance. Alternatively, the most liberal interpretation of the allowed parameters of 16.7 MeV resonance can significantly increase the errors in predicted lithium abundance: [7Li/H]BBN = (2.5-6) × 10-10.

  19. Prompt gamma ray diagnostics and enhanced hadron-therapy using neutron-free nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Picciotto, A.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a series of simulations about the potential use of Boron isotopes to trigger neutron-free (aneutronic) nuclear reactions in cancer cells through the interaction with an incoming energetic proton beam, thus resulting in the emission of characteristic prompt gamma radiation (429 keV, 718 keV and 1435 keV). Furthermore assuming that the Boron isotopes are absorbed in cancer cells, the three alpha-particles produced in each p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions can potentially result in the enhancement of the biological dose absorbed in the tumor region since these multi-MeV alpha-particles are stopped inside the single cancer cell, thus allowing to spare the surrounding tissues. Although a similar approach based on the use of 11B nuclei has been proposed in [Yoon et al. Applied Physics Letters 105, 223507 (2014)], our work demonstrate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the crucial importance of the use of 10B nuclei (in a solution containing also 11B) for the generation of prompt gamma-rays, which can be applied to medical imaging. In fact, we demonstrate that the use of 10B nuclei can enhance the intensity of the 718 keV gamma-ray peak more than 30 times compared to the solution containing only 11B nuclei. A detailed explanation of the origin of the different prompt gamma-rays, as well as of their application as real-time diagnostics during a potential cancer treatment, is here discussed.

  20. Thermal and thermomechanical calculations of deep-rock nuclear waste disposal with the enhanced SANGRE code

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1983-03-01

    An attempt to model the complex thermal and mechanical phenomena occurring in the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in rock at high power loading is described. Such processes include melting of the rock, convection of the molten material, and very high stressing of the rock mass, leading to new fracturing. Because of the phase changes and the wide temperature ranges considered, realistic models must provide for coupling of the thermal and mechanical calculations, for large deformations, and for steady-state temperature-depenent creep of the rock mass. Explicit representation of convection would be desirable, as would the ability to show fracture development and migration of fluids in cracks. Enhancements to SNAGRE consisted of: array modifications to accommodate complex variations of thermal and mechanical properties with temperature; introduction of the ability of calculate thermally induced stresses; improved management of the minimum time step and minimum temperature step to increase code efficiency; introduction of a variable heat-generation algorithm to accommodate heat decay of the nuclear materials; streamlining of the code by general editing and extensive deletion of coding used in mesh generation; and updating of the program users' manual. The enhanced LLNL version of the code was renamed LSANGRE. Phase changes were handled by introducing sharp variations in the specific heat of the rock in a narrow range about the melting point. The accuracy of this procedure was tested successfully on a melting slab problem. LSANGRE replicated the results of both the analytical solution and calculations with the finite difference TRUMP code. Following enhancement and verification, a purely thermal calculation was carried to 105 years. It went beyond the extent of maximum melt and into the beginning of the cooling phase.

  1. Microcavity-Free Broadband Light Outcoupling Enhancement in Flexible Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Nanostructured Transparent Metal-Dielectric Composite Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Hai; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Yi-Bo; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Xiang, Heng-Yang; Chen, Jing-De; Zhou, Lei; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-26

    Flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) hold great promise for future bendable display and curved lighting applications. One key challenge of high-performance flexible OLEDs is to develop new flexible transparent conductive electrodes with superior mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Herein, an effective nanostructured metal/dielectric composite electrode on a plastic substrate is reported by combining a quasi-random outcoupling structure for broadband and angle-independent light outcoupling of white emission with an ultrathin metal alloy film for optimum optical transparency, electrical conduction, and mechanical flexibility. The microcavity effect and surface plasmonic loss can be remarkably reduced in white flexible OLEDs, resulting in a substantial increase in the external quantum efficiency and power efficiency to 47.2% and 112.4 lm W(-1).

  2. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  3. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  4. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  5. Acetylation is essential for nuclear heme oxygenase-1-enhanced tumor growth and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F-F; Chiang, M-T; Li, F-A; Yeh, C-T; Lee, W-H; Chau, L-Y

    2017-08-28

    Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endoplasmic reticulum-anchored enzyme, is observed in many cancers. HO-1 nuclear translocation has been shown to correlate with progression of several cancers. We recently reported that HO-1 is susceptible to intramembrane proteolysis and translocates to the nucleus to promote cancer growth and invasiveness without depending on its enzymatic activity. In the present study, we show that the HO-1 lacking C-terminal transmembrane segment (t-HO-1) was susceptible to acetylation by p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) histone acetyltransferase in the nucleus. Mass spectrometry analysis of HO-1 isolated from human embryonic kidney cells 293T (HEK293T) cells overexpressing CBP and t-HO-1 revealed two acetylation sites located at K243 and K256. Mutation of both lysine residues to arginine (R) abolished t-HO-1-enhanced tumor cell growth, migration and invasion. However, mutation of the lysine residues to glutamine (Q), a mimic of acetylated lysine, had no significant effect on t-HO-1-mediated tumorigenicity. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that transcriptional factor JunD interacted with wild-type (WT) t-HO-1 and mutant carrying K243/256Q but not K243/256 R mutation. Moreover, JunD-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity was significantly enhanced by coexpression with WT and acetylation-mimic but not acetylation-defective t-HO-1. Consistent with the in vitro observations, the implication of K243/256 acetylation in t-HO-1-enhanced tumorigenicity was also demonstrated in xenograft models. Immunohistochemistry performed with a specific antibody against acetyl-HO-1 showed the positive acetyl-HO-1 nuclear staining in human lung cancer tissues but not in the corresponding non-tumor tissues, supporting its clinical significance. Collectively, our findings highlight the importance of nuclear HO-1 post-translational modification in the induction of cancer progression.Oncogene advance online publication, 28 August 2017; doi:10.1038/onc

  6. Nuclear transcription factors: a new approach to enhancing cellular responses to ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Moore, Brian; Mack, Judith; Gasbarre, Christopher; Keevey, Samantha; Ortel, Bernhard; Sinha, Alok; Khachemoune, Amor

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) relies upon the uptake of ALA into cancer cells, where it is converted into a porphyrin intermediate, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that is highly photosensitizing. For large or resistant tumors, however, ALA/PDT is often not completely effective due to inadequate PpIX levels. Therefore, new approaches to enhance the intracellular production of PpIX are sought. Here, we describe a general approach to improve intracellular PpIX accumulation via manipulations that increase the expression of an enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), that is rate-determining for PpIX production. We show that nuclear hormones that promote terminal differentiation, e.g. vitamin D or androgens, can also increase the accumulation of PpIX and the amount of killing of the target cells upon exposure to light. These hormones bind to intracellular hormone receptors that translocate to the nucleus, where they act as transcription factors to increase the expression of target genes. We have found that several other transcription factors associated with terminal differentiation, including members of the CCAAT enhancer binding (C/EBP) family, and a homeobox protein named Hoxb13, are also capable of enhancing PpIX accumulation. These latter transcription factors appear to interact directly with the CPO gene promoter, resulting in enhanced CPO transcriptional activity. Our data in several different cell systems, including epithelial cells of the skin and prostate cancer cells, indicate that enhancement of CPO expression and PpIX accumulation represents a viable new approach toward improving the efficacy of ALA/PDT.

  7. Formation of Tap/NXT1 Heterodimers Activates Tap-Dependent Nuclear mRNA Export by Enhancing Recruitment to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Heather L.; Coburn, Glen A.; Zeng, Yan; Kang, Yibin; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2002-01-01

    The Tap protein has been shown to activate the nuclear export of mRNA species bearing retroviral constitutive transport elements and is also believed to play an essential role in the sequence nonspecific export of cellular mRNAs. However, it has remained unclear how Tap activity is regulated in vivo. Here, we report that the small NXT1/p15-1 protein functions as a critical cofactor for Tap-mediated mRNA export in both human and invertebrate cells. In the absence of NXT1 binding, the Tap protein is unable to effectively interact with components of the nuclear pore complex and both Tap nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and the nuclear export of mRNA molecules tethered to Tap are therefore severely attenuated. Formation of a Tap/NXT1 heterodimer enhances nucleoporin binding both in vitro and in vivo and induces the formation of a Tap/NXT1/nucleoporin ternary complex that is likely to be a key intermediate in the process of nuclear mRNA export. The critical importance of NXT1 for the nuclear export of poly(A)+ RNA is emphasized by the finding that specific inhibition of the expression of the Drosophila homolog of human NXT1, by using RNA interference, results in the nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA in cultured insect cells. These data suggest that NXT1 may act as a molecular switch that regulates the ability of Tap to mediate nuclear mRNA export by controlling the interaction of Tap with components of the nuclear pore. PMID:11739738

  8. Six distinct nuclear factors interact with the 75-base-pair repeat of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Baltimore, D

    1987-01-01

    Binding sites for six distinct nuclear factors on the 75-base-pair repeat of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer have been identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay combined with methylation interference. Three of these factors, found in WEHI 231 nuclear extracts, which we have named LVa, LVb, and LVc (for leukemia virus factors a, b, and c) have not been previously identified. Nuclear factors that bind to the conserved simian virus 40 corelike motif, the NF-1 motif, and the glucocorticoid response element were also detected. Testing of multiple cell lines showed that most factors appeared ubiquitous, except that the NF-1 binding factor was found neither in nuclear extracts from MEL cells nor in the embryonal carcinoma cell lines PCC4 and F9, and core-binding factor was relatively depleted from MEL and F9 nuclear extracts. Images PMID:3561410

  9. A complex of nuclear proteins mediates SR protein binding to a purine-rich splicing enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yeakley, J M; Morfin, J P; Rosenfeld, M G; Fu, X D

    1996-01-01

    A purine-rich splicing enhancer from a constitutive exon has been shown to shift the alternative splicing of calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the native repetitive GAA sequence comprises the optimal enhancer element and specifically binds a saturable complex of proteins required for general splicing in vitro. This complex contains a 37-kDa protein that directly binds the repetitive GAA sequence and SRp40, a member of the SR family of non-snRNP splicing factors. While purified SR proteins do not stably bind the repetitive GAA element, exogenous SR proteins become associated with the GAA element in the presence of nuclear extracts and stimulate GAA-dependent splicing. These results suggest that repetitive GAA sequences enhance splicing by binding a protein complex containing a sequence-specific RNA binding protein and a general splicing activator that, in turn, recruit additional SR proteins. This type of mechanism resembles the tra/tra-2-dependent recruitment of SR proteins to the Drosophila doublesex alternative splicing regulatory element. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755518

  10. Structure of Colloidal Quantum Dots from Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piveteau, Laura; Ong, Ta-Chung; Rossini, Aaron J; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-11-04

    Understanding the chemistry of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) is primarily hampered by the lack of analytical methods to selectively and discriminately probe the QD core, QD surface and capping ligands. Here, we present a general concept for studying a broad range of QDs such as CdSe, CdTe, InP, PbSe, PbTe, CsPbBr3, etc., capped with both organic and inorganic surface capping ligands, through dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy. DNP can enhance NMR signals by factors of 10-100, thereby reducing the measurement times by 2-4 orders of magnitude. 1D DNP enhanced spectra acquired in this way are shown to clearly distinguish QD surface atoms from those of the QD core, and environmental effects such as oxidation. Furthermore, 2D NMR correlation experiments, which were previously inconceivable for QD surfaces, are demonstrated to be readily performed with DNP and provide the bonding motifs between the QD surfaces and the capping ligands.

  11. Absorption Transparencies for Efficient Nonlinear Optical Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kenneth Kang-Hee

    The work presented in this thesis describes methods by which nonlinear optical generation of radiation can be enhanced with the use of absorption transparencies. Two experiments are discussed: (i) the use of a naturally occurring absorption transparency in zinc vapor for efficient generation of 104.8 nm radiation, and (ii) the creation of an induced transparency on a collisionally broadened resonance transition of lead, with which large enhancements in nonlinear optical processes may be possible. In both cases, the linear susceptibility is cancelled by a quantum interference. Since the nonlinear susceptibility does not cancel, large enhancements in nonlinear generation efficiency are possible. There is a naturally existing transparency in zinc, where two broad autoionizing levels are separated within a decay width. Because they decay predominantly to the same final continuum state, there is a sharp cancellation in both the absorption and the refractive index from the ground state. A correct choice of intermediate levels for the sum-frequency mixing process prevents a similar cancellation in the nonlinear susceptibility. We were able to generate 0.25 muJ per pulse of 104.8 nm radiation at 10 Hz using UV pump lasers with energies of about a mJ and pulse lengths of 5 ns. Unfortunately, such naturally existing transparencies are rare. However, electromagnetically induced transparencies can be created in a general manner and present the possibility of doing enhanced nonlinear optics in many systems. Especially of interest is the creation of induced transparencies on a resonance line at high densities, as such a transparency would be most useful for nonlinear optical applications. The effects of collisions need to be carefully considered, since collisional broadening is larger than lifetime broadening in such transitions. We create an induced transparency in the presence of collisions by using a strong field to couple the resonantly broadened state of lead to another

  12. Effect of Lanthanide Ions on Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhancement and Liquid State T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy; Fain, Sean B.; Rowland, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    In the dynamic nuclear polarization process, microwave irradiation facilitates exchange of polarization from a radical’s unpaired electron to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperatures, increasing polarization by >10000. Doping samples with Gd3+ ions further increases the achievable solid-state polarization. However, upon dissolution, paramagnetic lanthanide metals can be potent relaxation agents, decreasing liquid-state polarization. Here, the effects of lanthanide metals on the solid and liquid-state magnetic properties of [1-13C]pyruvate are studied. The results show that in addition to gadolinium, holmium not only increases the achievable polarization but also the rate of polarization. Liquid-state relaxation studies found that unlike gadolinium, holmium minimally affects T1. Additionally, results reveal that linear contrast agents dissociate in pyruvic acid, greatly reducing liquid-state T1. While macrocyclic agents do not readily dissociate, they yield lower solid-state polarization. Results indicate that polarization with free lanthanides and subsequent chelation during dissolution produces the highest polarization enhancement while minimizing liquid-state relaxation. PMID:22367680

  13. Development of bubble chambers with enhanced stability and sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Bolte, W.J.; Collar, Juan I.; Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; Nakazawa, D.; Odom, B.; O'Sullivan, K.; Plunkett, R.; Ramberg, E.; Raskin, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Vieira, J.D.; /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    The viability of using a Bubble Chamber for rare event searches and in particular for the detection of dark matter particle candidates is considered. Techniques leading to the deactivation of inhomogeneous nucleation centers and subsequent enhanced stability in such a detector are described. Results from prototype trials indicate that sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils like those expected from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles can be obtained in conditions of near total insensitivity to minimum ionizing backgrounds. An understanding of the response of superheated heavy refrigerants to these recoils is demonstrated within the context of existing theoretical models. We comment on the prospects for the detection of supersymmetric dark matter particles with a large CF{sub 3}I chamber.

  14. A Photo-Degradable Gene Delivery System for Enhanced Nuclear Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoyoung, Lee; Yeji, Kim; Patrick G., Schweickert; Stephen F., Konieczny; You-Yeon, Won

    2013-01-01

    There currently exists a significant gap in our understanding of how the detailed chemical characteristics of polycation gene carriers influence their delivery performances in overcoming an important cellular-level transport barrier, i.e., intranuclear gene transcription. In this study, a UV-degradable gene carrier material (ENE4-1) was synthesized by crosslinking low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI-2k) molecules using UV-cleavable o-nitrobenzyl urethane (NBU) as the linker molecule. NBU degrades upon exposure to mild UV irradiation. Therefore, this UV-degradable carrier allows us to control the chemical characteristics of the polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) particles at desired locations within the intracellular environment. By using this photolytic DNA carrier, we found that the exact timing of the UV degradation significantly influences the gene transfection efficiencies of ENE4-1/DNA(pGL2) polyplexes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, even if the polyplexes were UV-degraded at different intracellular locations/times, their nuclear entry efficiency was not influenced by the location/timing of UV degradation. The UV treatment did not influence the size or binding strength of the polyplexes. However, we confirmed that the degradation of the carrier molecules impacts the chemical characteristics of the polyplexes (it produces carbamic acid and nitrosobenzyl aldehyde groups on ENE4-1). We believe that these anionic acid groups enhance the interaction of the polyplexes with nuclear transcription proteins and thus the final gene expression levels; this effect was found to occur, even though UV irradiation itself has a general effect of reducing transfection efficiencies. Excess (uncomplexed) ENE4-1 polymers appear to not play any role in the UV-enhanced gene transcription phenomenon. PMID:24172855

  15. Transparencies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of perspective, or showing things as the human eye sees them, when creating reflections and transparencies in works of art. Provides examples of artwork using transparency, reflection, and refraction by M. C. Escher, Richard Estes, and Janet Fish to give students an opportunity to learn about these three art techniques. (CMK)

  16. Talking about Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Rae

    2009-01-01

    In his inaugural address, U.S. President Barack Obama linked the need to demonstrate accountability and transparency to the earning of trust. His connection of these dots is not surprising, since taxpayers often expect accountability and transparency from their governments, just as governments, donors, alumni, and students expect accountability…

  17. Transparencies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of perspective, or showing things as the human eye sees them, when creating reflections and transparencies in works of art. Provides examples of artwork using transparency, reflection, and refraction by M. C. Escher, Richard Estes, and Janet Fish to give students an opportunity to learn about these three art techniques. (CMK)

  18. Enhanced electrical transparency by ultra-thin LaAlO3 insertion at oxide metal/semiconductor heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Takeaki; Minohara, Makoto; Bell, Christopher; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masaharu; Hwang, Harold Y.; Hikita, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-05

    We demonstrate that the electrical conductivity of metal/semiconductor oxide heterojunctions can be increased over 7 orders of magnitude by inserting an ultrathin layer of LaAlO3. This counterintuitive result, that an interfacial barrier can be driven transparent by inserting a wide-gap insulator, arises from the large internal electric field between the two polar LaAlO3 surfaces. In conclusion, this field modifies the effective band offset in the device, highlighting the ability to design the electrostatic boundary conditions with atomic precision.

  19. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement-Mediated Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Glioma with Different Progression at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiangyong; Dai, Zhuozhi; Xiao, Gang; Yan, Gen; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Guishan; Zhuang, Zerui; Shen, Yuanyu; Zhang, Zhiyan; Hu, Wei; Wu, Renhua

    2017-01-18

    Glioma is a malignant neoplasm affecting the central nervous system. The conventional approaches to diagnosis, such as T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and contrast-enhanced T1WI, give an oversimplified representation of anatomic structures. Nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) imaging is a special form of magnetization transfer (MT) that provides a new way to detect small solute pools through indirect measurement of attenuated water signals, and makes it possible to probe semisolid macromolecular protons. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the effect of NOE-mediated imaging and progression of glioma in a rat tumor model. We found that the NOE signal decreased in tumor region, and signal of tumor center and peritumoral normal tissue markedly decreased with growth of the glioma. At the same time, NOE signal in contralateral normal tissue dropped relatively late (at about day 16-20 after implanting the glioma cells). NOE imaging is a new contrast method that may provide helpful insights into the pathophysiology of glioma with regard to mobile proteins, lipids, and other metabolites. Further, NOE images differentiate normal brain tissue from glioma tissue at a molecular level. Our study indicates that NOE-mediated imaging is a new and promising approach for estimation of tumor progression.

  20. Imaging human teeth by phosphorus magnetic resonance with nuclear Overhauser enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Brauckmann, Ole; Nixdorf, Donald R; Kentgens, Arno; Garwood, Michael; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-08-08

    Three-dimensional phosphorus MR images ((31)P MRI) of teeth are obtained at a nominal resolution of 0.5 mm in less than 15 minutes using acquisition pulse sequences sensitive to ultra-short transversal relaxation times. The images directly reflect the spatially resolved phosphorus content of mineral tissue in dentin and enamel; they show a lack of signal from pulp tissue and reduced signal from de-mineralized carious lesions. We demonstrate for the first time that the signal in (31)P MR images of mineralized tissue is enhanced by a (1)H-(31)P nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). Using teeth as a model for imaging mineralized human tissue, graded differences in signal enhancement are observed that correlate well with known mineral content. From solid-state NMR experiments we conclude that the NOE is facilitated by spin diffusion and that the NOE difference can be assigned to a higher water content and a different micro-structure of dentin. Thus, a novel method for imaging mineral content without ionizing radiation is proposed. This method has potential use in the assessment of de-mineralization states in humans, such as caries of teeth and osteoporosis of bones.

  1. Imaging human teeth by phosphorus magnetic resonance with nuclear Overhauser enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Brauckmann, Ole; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Kentgens, Arno; Garwood, Michael; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional phosphorus MR images (31P MRI) of teeth are obtained at a nominal resolution of 0.5 mm in less than 15 minutes using acquisition pulse sequences sensitive to ultra-short transversal relaxation times. The images directly reflect the spatially resolved phosphorus content of mineral tissue in dentin and enamel; they show a lack of signal from pulp tissue and reduced signal from de-mineralized carious lesions. We demonstrate for the first time that the signal in 31P MR images of mineralized tissue is enhanced by a 1H-31P nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). Using teeth as a model for imaging mineralized human tissue, graded differences in signal enhancement are observed that correlate well with known mineral content. From solid-state NMR experiments we conclude that the NOE is facilitated by spin diffusion and that the NOE difference can be assigned to a higher water content and a different micro-structure of dentin. Thus, a novel method for imaging mineral content without ionizing radiation is proposed. This method has potential use in the assessment of de-mineralization states in humans, such as caries of teeth and osteoporosis of bones. PMID:27498919

  2. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-11-26

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

  3. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-01-01

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells. PMID:26607742

  4. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-11-01

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

  5. Vitamin C enhances in vitro and in vivo development of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Yuan, Ting; Lai, Liangxue; Pang, Daxin; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Report for the first time that vitamin C has a beneficial effect on the development of porcine SCNT embryos. {yields} The level of acH4K5 and Oct4 expression at blastocyst-stage was up-regulated after treatment. {yields} A higher rate of gestation and increased number of piglets born were harvested in the treated group. -- Abstract: The reprogramming of differentiated cells into a totipotent embryonic state through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still an inefficient process. Previous studies revealed that the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts could be significantly enhanced with vitamin C treatment. Here, we investigated the effects of vitamin C, to our knowledge for the first time, on the in vitro and in vivo development of porcine SCNT embryos. The rate of blastocyst development in SCNT embryos treated with 50 {mu}g/mL vitamin C 15 h after activation (36.0%) was significantly higher than that of untreated SCNT embryos (11.5%). The enhanced in vitro development rate of vitamin C-treated embryos was associated with an increased acetylation level of histone H4 lysine 5 and higher Oct4, Sox2 and Klf4 expression levels in blastocysts, as determined by real-time PCR. In addition, treatment with vitamin C resulted in an increased pregnancy rate in pigs. These findings suggest that treatment with vitamin C is beneficial for enhancement of the in vitro and in vivo development of porcine SCNT embryos.

  6. Hazy Transparent Cellulose Nanopaper

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Nogi, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify light scattering mechanism of hazy transparent cellulose nanopaper. Clear optical transparent nanopaper consists of 3–15 nm wide cellulose nanofibers, which are obtained by the full nanofibrillation of pulp fibers. At the clear transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance are 89.3–91.5% and haze values are 4.9–11.7%. When the pulp fibers are subjected to weak nanofibrillation, hazy transparent nanopapers are obtained. The hazy transparent nanopaper consists of cellulose nanofibers and some microsized cellulose fibers. At the hazy transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance were constant at 88.6–92.1% but their haze value were 27.3–86.7%. Cellulose nanofibers are solid cylinders, whereas the pulp fibers are hollow cylinders. The hollow shape is retained in the microsized cellulose fibers, but they are compressed flat inside the nanopaper. This compressed cavity causes light scattering by the refractive index difference between air and cellulose. As a result, the nanopaper shows a hazy transparent appearance and exhibits a high thermal durability (295–305 °C), and low thermal expansion (8.5–10.6 ppm/K) because of their high density (1.29–1.55 g/cm3) and crystallinity (73–80%). PMID:28128326

  7. Hazy Transparent Cellulose Nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Nogi, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify light scattering mechanism of hazy transparent cellulose nanopaper. Clear optical transparent nanopaper consists of 3-15 nm wide cellulose nanofibers, which are obtained by the full nanofibrillation of pulp fibers. At the clear transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance are 89.3-91.5% and haze values are 4.9-11.7%. When the pulp fibers are subjected to weak nanofibrillation, hazy transparent nanopapers are obtained. The hazy transparent nanopaper consists of cellulose nanofibers and some microsized cellulose fibers. At the hazy transparent nanopaper with 40 μm thickness, their total transmittance were constant at 88.6-92.1% but their haze value were 27.3-86.7%. Cellulose nanofibers are solid cylinders, whereas the pulp fibers are hollow cylinders. The hollow shape is retained in the microsized cellulose fibers, but they are compressed flat inside the nanopaper. This compressed cavity causes light scattering by the refractive index difference between air and cellulose. As a result, the nanopaper shows a hazy transparent appearance and exhibits a high thermal durability (295-305 °C), and low thermal expansion (8.5-10.6 ppm/K) because of their high density (1.29-1.55 g/cm3) and crystallinity (73-80%).

  8. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  9. Investigation of Wavelet-Based Enhancements to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Explosives Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Dress, William B.; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is effective for the detection and identification of certain types of explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. In explosive detection, the NQR response of certain 14N nuclei present in the crystalline material is probed. The 14N nuclei possess a nuclear quadrupole moment which in the presence of an electric field gradient produces an energy level splitting which may be excited by radio-frequency magnetic fields. Pulsing on the sample with a radio signal of the appropriate frequency produces a transient NQR response which may then be detected. Since the resonant frequency is dependent upon both the quadrupole moment of the 14N nucleus and the nature of the local electric field gradients, it is very compound specific. Under DARPA sponsorship, the authors are using multiresolution methods to investigate the enhancement of operation of NQR explosives detectors used for land mine detection. For this application, NQR processing time must be reduced to less than one second. False alarm responses due to acoustic and piezoelectric ringing must be suppressed. Also, as TNT is the most prevalent explosive found in land mines, NQR detection of TNT must be made practical despite unfavorable relaxation tunes. All three issues require improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and all would benefit from improved feature extraction. This paper reports some of the insights provided by multiresolution methods that can be used to obtain these improvements. It includes results of multiresolution analysis of experimentally observed NQR signatures for RDX responses and various false alarm signatures in the absence of explosive compounds.

  10. Deciphering the Regulatory Logic of an Ancient, Ultraconserved Nuclear Receptor Enhancer Module

    PubMed Central

    Bagamasbad, Pia D.; Bonett, Ronald M.; Sachs, Laurent; Buisine, Nicolas; Raj, Samhitha; Knoedler, Joseph R.; Kyono, Yasuhiro; Ruan, Yijun; Ruan, Xiaoan

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative, synergistic gene regulation by nuclear hormone receptors can increase sensitivity and amplify cellular responses to hormones. We investigated thyroid hormone (TH) and glucocorticoid (GC) synergy on the Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9) gene, which codes for a zinc finger transcription factor involved in development and homeostasis of diverse tissues. We identified regions of the Xenopus and mouse Klf9 genes 5–6 kb upstream of the transcription start sites that supported synergistic transactivation by TH plus GC. Within these regions, we found an orthologous sequence of approximately 180 bp that is highly conserved among tetrapods, but absent in other chordates, and possesses chromatin marks characteristic of an enhancer element. The Xenopus and mouse approximately 180-bp DNA element conferred synergistic transactivation by hormones in transient transfection assays, so we designate this the Klf9 synergy module (KSM). We identified binding sites within the mouse KSM for TH receptor, GC receptor, and nuclear factor κB. TH strongly increased recruitment of liganded GC receptor and serine 5 phosphorylated (initiating) RNA polymerase II to chromatin at the KSM, suggesting a mechanism for transcriptional synergy. The KSM is transcribed to generate long noncoding RNAs, which are also synergistically induced by combined hormone treatment, and the KSM interacts with the Klf9 promoter and a far upstream region through chromosomal looping. Our findings support that the KSM plays a central role in hormone regulation of vertebrate Klf9 genes, it evolved in the tetrapod lineage, and has been maintained by strong stabilizing selection. PMID:25866873

  11. Toward transparent clinical policies.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Richard N; Marcuse, Edgar K; Moyer, Virginia A; Neuspiel, Daniel R; Hodgson, Elizabeth Susan; Glade, Gordon; Harbaugh, Norman; Miller, Marlene R; Sevilla, Xavier; Simpson, Lisa; Takata, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    Clinical policies of professional societies such as the American Academy of Pediatrics are valued highly, not only by clinicians who provide direct health care to children but also by many others who rely on the professional expertise of these organizations, including parents, employers, insurers, and legislators. The utility of a policy depends, in large part, on the degree to which its purpose and basis are clear to policy users, an attribute known as the policy's transparency. This statement describes the critical importance and special value of transparency in clinical policies, guidelines, and recommendations; helps identify obstacles to achieving transparency; and suggests several approaches to overcome these obstacles.

  12. Enhanced optical properties of heterostructured ZnO/CeO2 nanocomposite fabricated by one-pot hydrothermal method: Fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption and visible light transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Geping; Fan, Huiqing; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-12-01

    Many researchers investigated the properties of either discrete metal oxide CeO2 or ZnO materials. However, less attention has been paid to the various nanostructure and performances of CeO2 and ZnO nanocomposite up to now. In this paper, a facile and low cost one-pot hydrothermal synthesis method has been adopted to obtained directly precursors of CeCO3OH and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 with different Ce atom molar ratios to Zn, which are transformed into their corresponding metal oxide to form the ZnO/CeO2 heterostructure nanocomposites (HSNCs) by pyrolysis. The heterostructure is composed of ZnO and CeO2 monocrystals, simultaneously, CeO2 monocrystals are well dispersed on the surface of ZnO monocrystal for cosmetics. Bing dependent on the analysis results of XRD and TEM for the obtained precursors before and after pyrolysis, the formation mechanism of HSNCs was proposed. To the best of our knowledge, the paper first reported heterostructured ZnO/CeO2 nanocomposite grown in one-pot mixed aqueous solution of cerium nitrate, zinc acetate and urea without other extra surfactant. Additionally, the influence of various Ce/Zn molar ratios on the heterostructure, fluorescence emission and UV-visible absorption properties of HSNCs was investigated in detail. ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs display higher fluorescence emission with the increasing Ce/Zn molar ratio. Meanwhile, the larger Ce/Zn molar ratio of ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs, the stronger transparency in the visible light region and the weaker UV absorption. The results are due to the fact that the band gap of ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs will decrease from 3.25 to 3.08 eV when Ce/Zn atom molar ratio is increased from 0 to 0.08. By the comprehensive analysis on the optical performances of HSNCs with the different Ce/Zn atom molar ratios, ZnO/CeO2-0.04 HSNCs could become UV absorber materials and transparent material in the visible region. ZnO/CeO2-0.04 HSNCs with the UV-filtering and Vis-transparent properties is appropriate for personal-care cosmetics.

  13. Enhanced Light Output of AlGaInP Light Emitting Diodes Using an Indium-Zinc Oxide Transparent Conduction Layer and Electroplated Metal Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Der-Ming; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Uang, Kai-Ming; Chen, Tron-Min; Lee, Wei-Chi; Wang, Pei-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The use of indium-zinc oxide (IZO) as a transparent conduction layer (TCL) for electroplated nickel metal substrate AlGaInP light-emitting diodes with a 300×300 µm2 chip size was investigated with regard to both fabrication and effectiveness in improving light extraction efficiency. A metal system consisting of AuGe/Au was deposited to form ohmic contact dots for the n+-GaAs layer, and then an IZO film was deposited to serve as a TCL. Compared with conventional light emitting diodes (LEDs) with GaAs substrates, the proposed LEDs show an increase in light output power (i.e., ΔLop/Lop) by 116.7% at 20 mA and 168.9% at 100 mA.

  14. Grayscale transparent metasurface holograms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Kruk, Sergey; Tang, Hanzhi; Li, Tao; Kravchenko, Ivan; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-12-16

    In this paper, we demonstrate transparent metaholograms based on silicon metasurfaces that allow high-resolution grayscale images to be encoded. Finally, the holograms feature the highest diffraction and transmission efficiencies, and operate over a broad spectral range.

  15. Stretchable, transparent, ionic conductors.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Christoph; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Foo, Choon Chiang; Rothemund, Philipp; Whitesides, George M; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-08-30

    Existing stretchable, transparent conductors are mostly electronic conductors. They limit the performance of interconnects, sensors, and actuators as components of stretchable electronics and soft machines. We describe a class of devices enabled by ionic conductors that are highly stretchable, fully transparent to light of all colors, and capable of operation at frequencies beyond 10 kilohertz and voltages above 10 kilovolts. We demonstrate a transparent actuator that can generate large strains and a transparent loudspeaker that produces sound over the entire audible range. The electromechanical transduction is achieved without electrochemical reaction. The ionic conductors have higher resistivity than many electronic conductors; however, when large stretchability and high transmittance are required, the ionic conductors have lower sheet resistance than all existing electronic conductors.

  16. A Dictionary for Transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2001-11-15

    There are many terms that are used in association with the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Transparency Project associated with the Mayak Fissile Materials Storage Facility. This is a collection of proposed definitions of these terms.

  17. Fast characterization of functionalized silica materials by silicon-29 surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Moreno; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Caporini, Marc A; Vitzthum, Veronika; Miéville, Pascal; Héroguel, Florent; Rascón, Fernando; Roussey, Arthur; Thieuleux, Chloé; Boualleg, Malika; Veyre, Laurent; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Copéret, Christophe; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-02-23

    We demonstrate fast characterization of the distribution of surface bonding modes and interactions in a series of functionalized materials via surface-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Surface-enhanced silicon-29 DNP NMR spectra were obtained by using incipient wetness impregnation of the sample with a solution containing a polarizing radical (TOTAPOL). We identify and compare the bonding topology of functional groups in materials obtained via a sol-gel process and in materials prepared by post-grafting reactions. Furthermore, the remarkable gain in time provided by surface-enhanced silicon-29 DNP NMR spectroscopy (typically on the order of a factor 400) allows the facile acquisition of two-dimensional correlation spectra.

  18. Transparency Durability Test Criteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    includes laboratory coupon durability testing and field service data acquisition. These areas were used to advance the development, measurement, and...comparison of coupon testing to in-service aircraft transparency durability, where durability is defined as the continued ability of the transparency to...meet specified performance requirements. Summaries of coupon tests and field service data acquisition and analysis are reported. New coupon tests

  19. Multistability and spin diffusion enhanced lifetimes in dynamic nuclear polarization in a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Mühlbacher, M.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Giedke, G.; Ludwig, S.

    2015-12-01

    The control of nuclear spins in quantum dots is essential to explore their many-body dynamics and exploit their prospects for quantum information processing. We present a unique combination of dynamic nuclear spin polarization and electric-dipole-induced spin resonance in an electrostatically defined double quantum dot (DQD) exposed to the strongly inhomogeneous field of two on-chip nanomagnets. Our experiments provide direct and unrivaled access to the nuclear spin polarization distribution and allow us to establish and characterize multiple fixed points. Further, we demonstrate polarization of the DQD environment by nuclear spin diffusion which significantly stabilizes the nuclear spins inside the DQD.

  20. Thermoacoustic enhancements for nuclear fuel rods and other high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    2017-05-09

    A nuclear thermoacoustic device includes a housing defining an interior chamber and a portion of nuclear fuel disposed in the interior chamber. A stack is disposed in the interior chamber and has a hot end and a cold end. The stack is spaced from the portion of nuclear fuel with the hot end directed toward the portion of nuclear fuel. The stack and portion of nuclear fuel are positioned such that an acoustic standing wave is produced in the interior chamber. A frequency of the acoustic standing wave depends on a temperature in the interior chamber.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  2. Operational safety enhancement of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors via development of nuclear power plant simulators and transfer of related technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohut, P.; Epel, L.G.; Tutu, N.K.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under the US government`s International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper.

  3. Imaging of nuclear Overhauser enhancement at 7 and 3 T.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuanyu; Xiao, Gang; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tang, Xiangyong; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyan; Guan, Jitian; Wu, Renhua

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) is a type of magnetization transfer using cross-relaxation. It originates from mobile macromolecules, which may have relevance to the evaluation of tumor features. We studied the value of NOE imaging at 7 and 3 T and suggest a utility for diagnosing human brain tumors. Two types of protein solution at different concentrations and pH values, and six normal Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, were used to detect NOE signal with a 7 T scanner. Then, six healthy volunteers and 11 patients with brain tumors (six gliomas and five meningiomas) were included at 3 T. Z-spectra were measured and NOE weighted (NOE*) images were acquired with a three-offset measurement. Wide spectral separation was shown at both 7 T and 3 T delineating the NOE peak in the Z-spectrum. The concentration dependence and pH independence of NOE were confirmed in phantom experiments, and NOE values were greater in white matter than in gray matter in vivo. At 3 T, data indicated that NOE* maps were slightly hypointense in gliomas and were not obviously different from meningiomas. Thus, NOE imaging may help distinguish benign from malignant tumors, and as such may contribute to diagnosing brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Imaging amide proton transfer and nuclear overhauser enhancement using chemical exchange rotation transfer (CERT).

    PubMed

    Zu, Zhongliang; Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Quarles, C Chad; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2014-08-01

    This study investigates amide proton transfer (APT) and nuclear overhauser enhancement (NOE) in phantoms and 9L tumors in rat brains at 9.4 Tesla, using a recently developed method that can isolate different contributions to exchange. Chemical exchange rotation transfer (CERT) was used to quantify APT and NOEs through subtraction of signals acquired at two irradiation flip angles, but with the same average irradiation power. CERT separates and quantifies specific APT and NOE signals without contamination from other proton pools, and thus overcomes a key shortcoming of conventional CEST asymmetry approaches. CERT thus has increased specificity, though at the cost of decreased signal strength. In vivo experiments show that the APT effect acquired with CERT in 9L rat tumors (3.1%) is relatively greater than that in normal tissue (2.5%), which is consistent with previous CEST asymmetry analysis. The NOE effect centered at -1.6 ppm shows substantial image contrast within the tumor and between the tumor and the surrounding tissue, while the NOE effect centered at -3.5 ppm shows little contrast. CERT provides an image contrast that is more specific to chemical exchange than conventional APT by means of asymmetric CEST Z-spectra analysis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Imaging Amide Proton Transfer and Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Using Chemical Exchange Rotation Transfer (CERT)

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Zhongliang; Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Quarles, C. Chad; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.; Gochberg, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates amide proton transfer (APT) and nuclear overhauser enhancement (NOE) in phantoms and 9L tumors in rat brains at 9.4 Tesla, using a recently developed method that can isolate different contributions to exchange. Methods Chemical exchange rotation transfer (CERT) was used to quantify APT and NOEs through subtraction of signals acquired at two irradiation flip angles, but with the same average irradiation power. Results CERT separates and quantifies specific APT and NOE signals without contamination from other proton pools, and thus overcomes a key shortcoming of conventional CEST asymmetry approaches. CERT thus has increased specificity, though at the cost of decreased signal strength. In vivo experiments show that the APT effect acquired with CERT in 9L rat tumors (3.1%) is relatively greater than that in normal tissue (2.5%), which is consistent with previous CEST asymmetry analysis. The NOE effect centered at −1.6 ppm shows substantial image contrast within the tumor and between the tumor and the surrounding tissue, while the NOE effect centered at −3.5 ppm shows little contrast. Conclusion CERT provides an image contrast that is more specific to chemical exchange than conventional APT by means of asymmetric CEST Z-spectra analysis. PMID:24302497

  6. Infrared transparent conductive oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Linda F.; Moran, Mark B.

    2001-09-01

    A novel class of complex metal oxides that have potential as transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) for the electromagnetic-interference (EMI) shielding on IR-seeker windows and missile domes has been identified. These complex metal oxides exhibit the rhombohedral (R3m) crystalline structure of naturally occurring delafossite, CuFeO2. The general chemical formula is ABO2 where A is a monovalent metal (Me+1 such as Cu, Ag, Au, Pt or Pd, and B is a trivalent metal (Me3+) such as Al,Ti,Cr,Co,Fe,Ni,Cs,Rh,Ga,Sn,In,Y,La,Pr,Nd,Sm or Eu. By adjusting the oxygen content, the conductivity can be varied over a wide range so that the delafossites behave as insulators, semiconductors or metals. This paper presents results for films of p-type CuxAlyOz and n-type CuxCryOz deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering from high-purity-metal targets. Films have been deposited using conventional RF- and DC-power supplies, and a new asymmetric-bipolar-pulsed- DC-power supply. Similar to the high-temperature-copper- oxide superconductors, the presence of Cu-O bonds is critical for the unique properties. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) are used to understand the relationship between the optoelectornic properties and the molecular structure of the films. For example, FTIR absorption bands at 1470 and 1395cm-1 are present only in CuxAlyOz films that exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity. When these bands are absent, the CuxAlyOz films have high values of resistivity. In addition to the 1470 and 1395cm-1 bands observed in CuxAlyOz films, another pair of bands at 1040 and 970cm-1 is present in CuxCryOz films.

  7. Transparency benchmarking on audio watermarks and steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraetzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana; Lang, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The evaluation of transparency plays an important role in the context of watermarking and steganography algorithms. This paper introduces a general definition of the term transparency in the context of steganography, digital watermarking and attack based evaluation of digital watermarking algorithms. For this purpose the term transparency is first considered individually for each of the three application fields (steganography, digital watermarking and watermarking algorithm evaluation). From the three results a general definition for the overall context is derived in a second step. The relevance and applicability of the definition given is evaluated in practise using existing audio watermarking and steganography algorithms (which work in time, frequency and wavelet domain) as well as an attack based evaluation suite for audio watermarking benchmarking - StirMark for Audio (SMBA). For this purpose selected attacks from the SMBA suite are modified by adding transparency enhancing measures using a psychoacoustic model. The transparency and robustness of the evaluated audio watermarking algorithms by using the original and modifid attacks are compared. The results of this paper show hat transparency benchmarking will lead to new information regarding the algorithms under observation and their usage. This information can result in concrete recommendations for modification, like the ones resulting from the tests performed here.

  8. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameri, Saeed A.

    Nuclear power plants usually provide base-load electric power and operate most economically at a constant power level. In an energy grid with a high fraction of renewable energy sources, future nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling the reactor to a large Thermal Energy Storage (TES) block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this thesis, a Prismatic-core Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PAHTR) operates at constant power with heat provided to a TES block that supplies power as needed to a secondary energy conversion system. The PAHTR is designed to have a power rating of 300 MW th, with 19.75 wt% enriched Tri-Structural-Isotropic UO 2 fuel and a five year operating cycle. The passive molten salt TES system will operate in the latent heat region with an energy storage capacity of 150 MWd. Multiple smaller TES blocks are used instead of one large block to enhance the efficiency and maintenance complexity of the system. A transient model of the coupled reactor/TES system is developed to study the behavior of the system in response to varying load demands. The model uses six-delayed group point kinetics and decay heat models coupled to thermal-hydraulic and heat transfer models of the reactor and TES system. Based on the transient results, the preferred TES design consists of 1000 blocks, each containing 11000 LiCl phase change material tubes. A safety assessment of major reactor events demonstrates the inherent safety of the coupled system. The loss of forced circulation study determined the minimum required air convection heat removal rate from the reactor core and the lowest possible reduced primary flow rate that can maintain the reactor in a safe condition. The loss of ultimate heat sink study demonstrated the ability of the TES

  9. Force Enhancement Packages for Countering Nuclear Threats in the 2022-2027 Time Frame: Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    3 2. Threats, a Notional Scenario, and a Vision of a System A. Threats The threat of nuclear terrorism in the near future (2022–2027...over the next decade or two. Two relevant, recent unclassified analyses from U.S. Government agencies have commented on nuclear terrorism . The...in assisting nations to counter nuclear terrorism threats. 4. DOD will participate in planning and exercises with the selected countries. This planning

  10. Electromagnetically induced transparency with quantum interferometry.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anindita; Dastidar, Krishna Rai

    2012-02-28

    We have shown that electromagnetically induced transparency can be achieved by control-probe interferometry using two delayed phase-locked ultrashort pulses. Two vibrational wavepackets on the excited state, excited by two delayed phase-locked ultrashort pulses, interfere constructively or destructively leading to enhancement or suppression of absorption to a selective set of vibrational levels. Depending on the phase difference and the delay between the pulses with same carrier frequency, one can design different transparency windows between absorption peaks at consecutive even(odd) vibrational levels by eliminating absorption at odd(even) vibrational levels. We have shown that by switching the phase difference of two delayed femtosecond pulses, one can switch to complete elimination of absorption from enhanced absorption to a particular set of vibrational levels in the excited state. Thus, switching of transparency through window between odd vibrational levels to that between even vibrational levels is possible. By properly choosing the temporal width and the carrier frequency of the pulses, lossless transmission of complete or bands of frequencies of the pulses can be achieved through these transparency windows. Hence, designing of single- or multi-mode transparency windows in NaH molecule is feasible by control-probe quantum interferometry.

  11. Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

    1993-10-01

    We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

  12. Enhanced 2.0 μm emission in Tm/Ho codoped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing β-PbF nano-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jiajia; Xu, Rongrong; Wang, Meng; Gao, Guojun; Chen, Jimeng; Hu, Lili; Zhang, Junjie

    2010-01-01

    Oxyfluoride glasses, 30.9SiO 2-15.5AlO 1.5-30.9PbF 2-22.7CdF 2-1.5TmF 3- xHoF 3 ( x=0.1,1,1.5) (mol %), were prepared by traditional melt-quenching method. By appropriate heat treatment of the precursor glasses as described above, transparent glass ceramics were obtained with β- PbF 2 nano-crystals embedded in glassy matrix as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Optical absorption and 2.0 μm emission properties of the precursor glass and glass ceramic samples have been studied. Rare-earth ions were confirmed to enter into nano-crystals, by absorption spectra. The emission intensity in 2.0 μm region increased several times after crystallization, due to shortened distance between codopants and low phonon energy of the β- PbF 2 nano-crystals. Of the investigated samples, glass ceramic sample containing 1.5 mol% TmF 3 and 0.1 mol% HoF 3 has the broadest and the most efficient emission in 2.0 μm region. The Tm 3+/Ho 3+codoped oxyfluoride glass ceramics show potential applications in 2.0 μm laser devices.

  13. [Twenty-year History and Future Challenges in Transparency Enhancement of Review Process for Approval: Focus on Public Release of Review Reports regarding New Drugs and Medical Devices].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kazushige; Kawasaki, Satoko; Yoshida, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW, formerly Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW)) has been trying to increase transparency of the review process for approving reports in order to promote the rational use of newly approved drugs and medical devices. The first Summary Basis of Approval (SBA) was published by MHW in 1994. In 1999, evaluation reports were prepared by MHW and the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Evaluation Center to make them available to the public. In 2005, a notice from the Chief Executive of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) made procedures for public release of information on reviewing applications for new drugs. In 2006, 90 review reports of newly approved drugs and eight medical devices were revealed on PMDA websites. The dissemination of information by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and that of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) were studied and compared with that of the MHLW and PMDA. While common technical documents (CTD) for new drugs and summary technical documents (STED) for new medical devices have been released by PMDA, such documents are not released by the FDA and EMA. The European Public Assessment Report (EAPR) summary for the public is an interesting questionnaire approach that uses the "What," "How" and "Why" format. Finally, future proposals for the next decade are also outlined.

  14. Nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) imaging in the human brain at 7T.

    PubMed

    Jones, Craig K; Huang, Alan; Xu, Jiadi; Edden, Richard A E; Schär, Michael; Hua, Jun; Oskolkov, Nikita; Zacà, Domenico; Zhou, Jinyuan; McMahon, Michael T; Pillai, Jay J; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-08-15

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a magnetization transfer (MT) technique to indirectly detect pools of exchangeable protons through the water signal. CEST MRI has focused predominantly on signals from exchangeable protons downfield (higher frequency) from water in the CEST spectrum. Low power radiofrequency (RF) pulses can slowly saturate protons with minimal interference of conventional semi-solid based MT contrast (MTC). When doing so, saturation-transfer signals are revealed upfield from water, which is the frequency range of non-exchangeable aliphatic and olefinic protons. The visibility of such signals indicates the presence of a relayed transfer mechanism to the water signal, while their finite width reflects that these signals are likely due to mobile solutes. It is shown here in protein phantoms and the human brain that these signals build up slower than conventional CEST, at a rate typical for intramolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) effects in mobile macromolecules such as proteins/peptides and lipids. These NOE-based saturation transfer signals show a pH dependence, suggesting that this process is the inverse of the well-known exchange-relayed NOEs in high resolution NMR protein studies, thus a relayed-NOE CEST process. When studying 6 normal volunteers with a low-power pulsed CEST approach, the relayed-NOE CEST effect was about twice as large as the CEST effects downfield and larger in white matter than gray matter. This NOE contrast upfield from water provides a way to study mobile macromolecules in tissue. First data on a tumor patient show reduction in both relayed NOE and CEST amide proton signals leading to an increase in magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry, providing insight into previously reported amide proton transfer (APT) effects in tumors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Craig K; Huang, Alan; Xu, Jiadi; Edden, Richard AE; Schär, Michael; Hua, Jun; Oskolkov, Nikita; Zacà, Domenico; Zhou, Jinyuan; McMahon, Michael T; Pillai, Jay J; van Zijl, Peter CM

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a magnetization transfer (MT) technique to indirectly detect pools of exchangeable protons through the water signal. CEST MRI has focused predominantly on signals from exchangeable protons downfield (higher frequency) from water in the CEST spectrum. Low power radiofrequency (RF) pulses can slowly saturate protons with minimal interference of conventional semi-solid based MT contrast (MTC). When doing so, saturation-transfer signals are revealed upfield from water, which is the frequency range of non-exchangeable aliphatic and olefinic protons. The visibility of such signals indicates the presence of a relayed transfer mechanism to the water signal, while their finite width reflects that these signals are likely due to mobile solutes. It is shown here in protein phantoms and the human brain that these signals build up slower than conventional CEST, at a rate typical for intramolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) effects in mobile macromolecules such as proteins/peptides and lipids. These NOE-based saturation transfer signals show a pH dependence, suggesting that this process is the inverse of the well-known exchange-relayed NOEs in high resolution NMR protein studies, thus an relayed-NOE CEST process. When studying 6 normal volunteers with a low-power pulsed CEST approach, the relayed-NOE CEST effect was about twice as large as the CEST effects downfield and larger in white matter than gray matter. This NOE contrast upfield from water provides a way to study mobile macromolecules in tissue. First data on a tumor patient show reduction in both relayed NOE and CEST amide proton signals leading to an increase in magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry, providing insight into previously reported amide proton transfer (APT) effects in tumors. PMID:23567889

  16. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  17. The Role of Nuclear Star Clusters in Enhancing Supermassive Black Hole Feeding Rates During Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, J. P.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Debuhr, J.; Ma, C.-P.

    2015-04-01

    During galaxy mergers the gas falls to the center, triggers star formation, and feeds the rapid growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). SMBHs respond to this fueling by supplying energy back to the ambient gas. Numerical studies suggest that this feedback is necessary to explain why the properties of SMBHs and the formation of bulges are closely related. This intimate link between the SMBH’s mass and the large scale dynamics and luminosity of the host has proven to be a difficult issue to tackle with simulations due to the inability to resolve all the relevant length scales simultaneously. In this paper we simulate SMBH growth at high-resolution with FLASH, accounting for the gravitational focusing effects of nuclear star clusters (NSCs), which appear to be ubiquitous in galactic nuclei. In the simulations, the NSC core is resolved by a minimum cell size of about 0.001 pc or approximately 10-3 of the cluster’s radius. We discuss the conditions required for effective gas funneling to occur, which are mainly dominated by a relationship between NSC velocity dispersion and the local sound speed, and provide a sub-grid prescription for the augmentation of central SMBH accretion rates in the presence of NSCs. For the conditions expected to persist in the centers of merging galaxies, the resultant large central gas densities in NSCs should produce drastically enhanced embedded SMBH accretion rates—up to an order of magnitude increase can be achieved for gas properties resembling those in large-scale galaxy merger simulations. This will naturally result in faster black hole growth rates and higher luminosities than predicted by the commonly used Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion formalism.

  18. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preventing Radiobleaching of Cyanine Fluorophores Enhances Stability of Nuclear/NIRF Multimodality Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Reinier; Heskamp, Sandra; Rijpkema, Mark; Bos, Desirée L.; Goldenberg, David M.; McBride, William J.; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Cai, Weibo; Boerman, Otto C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the large interest in nuclear/optical multimodality imaging, the effect of radiation on the fluorescence of fluorophores remains largely unexplored. Herein, we report on the radiobleaching of cyanine fluorophores and describe conditions to provide robust radioprotection under practical (pre)clinical settings. We determined the radiosensitivity of several cyanine fluorescent compounds, including IRDye 800CW (800CW) and a dual modality imaging tetrapeptide containing DOTA as chelator and Dylight 800 as fluorophore, exposed to increasing activities of 111In, 68Ga, or 213Bi (γ, EC/β, and α emitter, respectively). An activity and type of radiation-dependent radiation-induced loss of fluorescence, radiobleaching, of 800CW was observed upon incubation with escalating activities of 111In, 68Ga, or 213Bi. 68Ga showed the largest radiolytic effect, followed by 111In and 213Bi. The addition of oxygen radical scavengers including ethanol, gentisic acid, and ascorbic acid (AA), provided a concentration dependent radioprotective effect. These results supported the hypothesis of a free radical-mediated radiobleaching mechanism. AA provided the most robust radioprotection over a wide range of concentrations and preserved fluorescence at much higher radioactivity levels. Overall, both near-infrared fluorescent compounds displayed similar sensitivity, except for 213Bi-irradiated solutions, where the dual modality construct exhibited enhanced radiolysis, presumably due to direct radiation damage from α particles. Concurrently, AA was not able to preserve fluorescence of the dual-modality molecule labeled with 213Bi. Our findings have important consequences for several research areas including ROS sensing, radiation-mediated drug release (uncaging), fluorescent dosimetry, and in the preparation of dual-modality radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:28042311

  20. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-01

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R1 of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R1 vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S-I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole 14N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of 27Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  1. THE ROLE OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS IN ENHANCING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FEEDING RATES DURING GALAXY MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Naiman, J. P.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Debuhr, J.; Ma, C.-P.

    2015-04-20

    During galaxy mergers the gas falls to the center, triggers star formation, and feeds the rapid growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). SMBHs respond to this fueling by supplying energy back to the ambient gas. Numerical studies suggest that this feedback is necessary to explain why the properties of SMBHs and the formation of bulges are closely related. This intimate link between the SMBH’s mass and the large scale dynamics and luminosity of the host has proven to be a difficult issue to tackle with simulations due to the inability to resolve all the relevant length scales simultaneously. In this paper we simulate SMBH growth at high-resolution with FLASH, accounting for the gravitational focusing effects of nuclear star clusters (NSCs), which appear to be ubiquitous in galactic nuclei. In the simulations, the NSC core is resolved by a minimum cell size of about 0.001 pc or approximately 10{sup −3} of the cluster’s radius. We discuss the conditions required for effective gas funneling to occur, which are mainly dominated by a relationship between NSC velocity dispersion and the local sound speed, and provide a sub-grid prescription for the augmentation of central SMBH accretion rates in the presence of NSCs. For the conditions expected to persist in the centers of merging galaxies, the resultant large central gas densities in NSCs should produce drastically enhanced embedded SMBH accretion rates—up to an order of magnitude increase can be achieved for gas properties resembling those in large-scale galaxy merger simulations. This will naturally result in faster black hole growth rates and higher luminosities than predicted by the commonly used Bondi–Hoyle–Lyttleton accretion formalism.

  2. Activation of the glutaredoxin-1 gene by Nuclear Factor kappa B enhances signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aesif, Scott W.; Kuipers, Ine; van der Velden, Jos; Tully, Jane E.; Guala, Amy S.; Anathy, Vikas; Sheely, Juliana I.; Reynaert, Niki L.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; van der Vliet, Albert; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M. W.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor, Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical regulator of inflammation and immunity, and is negatively regulated via S-glutathionylation. The inhibitory effect of S-glutathionylation is overcome by glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1), which under physiological conditions catalyses deglutathionylation and enhances NF-κB activation. The mechanisms whereby expression of the Glrx1 gene is regulated remain unknown. Here we examined the role of NF-κB in regulating activation of Glrx1. Transgenic mice which express a doxycyclin-inducible constitutively active version of inhibitory kappa B kinase-beta (CA-IKKβ) demonstrate elevated expression of Grx1. Transient transfection of CA-IKKβ also resulted in significant induction of Grx1. A 2kb region Glrx1 promoter that contains two putative NF-κB binding sites was activated by CA-IKKβ, RelA/p50, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed binding of RelA to the promoter of Glrx1 in response to LPS. Stimulation of C10 lung epithelial cells with LPS caused transient increases in Grx1 mRNA expression, and time-dependent increases in S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. Overexpression of Grx1 decreased S-glutathionylation of IKKβ, prolonged NF-κB activation, and increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Collectively, this study demonstrates that the Glrx1 gene is positively regulated by NF-κB, and suggests a feed forward mechanism to promote NF-κB signaling by decreasing S-glutathionylation. PMID:21762778

  3. Greatly Enhanced Merger Rates of Compact-object Binaries in Non-spherical Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Antonini, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The Milky Way and a significant fraction of galaxies are observed to host a central massive black hole (MBH) embedded in a non-spherical nuclear star cluster. We study the secular orbital evolution of compact-object binaries in these environments and characterize the excitation of extremely large eccentricities that can lead to mergers by gravitational radiation. We find that the eccentricity excitation occurs most efficiently when the nodal precession timescale of the binary’s orbit around the MBH due to the non-spherical cluster becomes comparable (within a factor of ∼10) to the timescale on which the binary is torqued by the MBH due to the Lidov–Kozai (LK) mechanism. We show that in this regime the perturbations due to the cluster increase the fraction of systems that reach extreme eccentricities (1{--}e∼ {10}-4{--}{10}-6) by a factor of ∼10–100 compared to the idealized case of a spherical cluster, increasing the merger rates of compact objects by a similar factor. We identify two main channels that lead to this extreme eccentricity excitation: (i) chaotic diffusion of the eccentricities due to resonance overlap; (ii) cluster-driven variations of the mutual inclinations between the binary orbit and its center-of-mass orbit around the MBH, which can intensify the LK oscillations. We estimate that our mechanism can produce BH–BH and BH–neutron star binary merger rates of up to ≈ 15 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1 and ≈ 0.4 {{Gpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, respectively. Thus, we propose the cluster-enhanced LK mechanism as a new channel for the merger of compact-object binaries, competing with scenarios that invoke isolated binary evolution or dynamical formation in globular clusters.

  4. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography and nuclear imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay; Rasmussen, John C.; Zhu, Banghe; Azhdarinia, Ali; Yan, Shikui; Smith, Anne M.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is an alternative modality for molecular imaging that has been demonstrated in animals and recently in humans. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) using continuous wave or frequency domain photon migration techniques could be used to provide quantitative molecular imaging in vivo if it could be validated against "gold-standard," nuclear imaging modalities, using dual-labeled imaging agents. Unfortunately, developed FEOT systems are not suitable for incorporation with CT/PET/SPECT scanners because they utilize benchtop devices and require a large footprint. In this work, we developed a miniaturized fluorescence imaging system installed in the gantry of the Siemens Inveon PET/CT scanner to enable NIR transillumination measurements. The system consists of a CCD camera equipped with NIR sensitive intensifier, a diode laser controlled by a single board compact controller, a 2-axis galvanometer, and RF circuit modules for homodyne detection of the phase and amplitude of fluorescence signals. The performance of the FEOT system was tested and characterized. A mouse-shaped solid phantom of uniform optical properties with a fluorescent inclusion was scanned using CT, and NIR fluorescence images at several projections were collected. The method of high-order approximation to the radioactive transfer equation was then used to reconstruct the optical images. Dual-labeled agents were also used on a tumor bearing mouse to validate the results of the FEOT against PET/CT image. The results showed that the location of the fluorophore obtained from the FEOT matches the location of tumor obtained from the PET/CT images. Besides validation of FEOT, this hybrid system could allow multimodal molecular imaging (FEOT/PET/CT) for small animal imaging.

  5. Plutonium partitioning in uranium and plutonium co-recovery system for fast reactor fuel recycling with enhanced nuclear proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Masaumi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2013-07-01

    For enhancement of nuclear proliferation resistance, a 'co-processing' method for U and Pu co-recovery was studied. Two concepts, no U scrubbing and no Pu reduction partitioning, were employed to formulate two types of flow sheets by using a calculation code. Their process performance was demonstrated using radioactive solutions derived from an irradiated fast reactor fuel. These experimental results indicated that U and Pu were co-recovered in the U/Pu product, and the Pu content in the U/Pu product increased approximately 2.3 times regardless of using reductant. The proposed no U scrubbing and no Pu reductant flow sheet is applicable to fast reactor fuel reprocessing and enhances its resistance to nuclear proliferation. (authors)

  6. Nuclear overhauser enhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging at 7 Tesla in glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Paech, Daniel; Zaiss, Moritz; Meissner, Jan-Eric; Windschuh, Johannes; Wiestler, Benedikt; Bachert, Peter; Neumann, Jan Oliver; Kickingereder, Philipp; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Wick, Wolfgang; Nagel, Armin Michael; Heiland, Sabine; Ladd, Mark Edward; Bendszus, Martin; Radbruch, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T) and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee-approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3 ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT) to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR(asym)). Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1) and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTR(asym) values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001) in CE-T1 tumor (-1.99 ± 1.22%), tumor necrosis (-1.36 ± 1.30%) and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH) within T2 edema margins (-3.56 ± 1.24%) compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (-8.38 ± 1.19%). In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015) and tumor necrosis (p<0.001) mean MTR(asym) values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40 ± 2.21%) displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7 T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. Further research is needed to determine the origin of NOE

  7. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Mediated Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Imaging at 7 Tesla in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Paech, Daniel; Zaiss, Moritz; Meissner, Jan-Eric; Windschuh, Johannes; Wiestler, Benedikt; Bachert, Peter; Neumann, Jan Oliver; Kickingereder, Philipp; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Wick, Wolfgang; Nagel, Armin Michael; Heiland, Sabine; Ladd, Mark Edward; Bendszus, Martin; Radbruch, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T) and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. Patients and Methods Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee–approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT) to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTRasym). Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1) and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. Results Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTRasym values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001) in CE-T1 tumor (−1.99±1.22%), tumor necrosis (−1.36±1.30%) and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH) within T2 edema margins (−3.56±1.24%) compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (−8.38±1.19%). In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015) and tumor necrosis (p<0.001) mean MTRasym values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40±2.21%) displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. Conclusion NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2-weighted

  8. Enhancement of the Two-Dimensional Conduction Electron Zeeman Energy Near v=1 by Optical Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.R.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Vitkalov, S.A.

    1998-11-06

    Enhancement of the Zeeman energy of 2D conduction electrons near v = 1 by optical dynamic nuclear polarization (lINP), as observed by the Overhauser shift of the transport detected electron spin resonance, is measured quantitatively for the first time in GaAs/AIGaAs mukiquantum wells. The NMR signal enhancement is obtained under similar conditions in the same sample, allowing the hyperke coupling constant of 3.7T between between the nuclei and 2D conduction electrons to be measured for the first time. The potential to suppress the Zeeman energy by optical DNP is discussed in the context of its potential influence on Skyrmion formation.

  9. Solid-state NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ayala, Isabel; Bardet, Michel; De Paëpe, Gaël; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Hediger, Sabine

    2013-04-03

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool.

  10. Large-area surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging of brain ischemia by gold nanoparticles grown on random nanoarrays of transparent boehmite.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Shogo; Naya, Masayuki; Shiota, Megumi; Morikawa, Takayuki; Kubo, Akiko; Tani, Takeharu; Hishiki, Takako; Horiuchi, Tadashi; Suematsu, Makoto; Kajimura, Mayumi

    2014-06-24

    Although SERS spectroscopy, which is sensitive to molecular vibration states, offers label-free visualization of molecules, identification of molecules and their reliable large-area imaging remains to be developed. Limitation comes from difficulties in fabricating a SERS-active substrate with homogeneity over a large area. Here, we overcome this hurdle by utilizing a self-assembled nanostructure of boehmite that is easily achieved by a hydrothermal preparation of aluminum as a template for subsequent gold (Au) deposition. This approach brought about random arrays of Au-nanostructures with a diameter of ∼125 nm and a spacing of <10 nm, ideal for the hot-spots formation. The substrate, which we named "gold nanocoral" (GNC) after its coral reef-like shape, exhibited a small variability of signal intensities (coefficient value <11.2%) in detecting rhodamine 6G molecule when 121 spots were measured over an area of 10 × 10 mm(2), confirming high uniformity. The transparent nature of boehmite enabled us to conduct the measurement from the back-side of the substrate as efficiently as that from the front-side. We then conducted tissue imaging using the mouse ischemic brain adhered on the GNC substrate. Through nontargeted construction of two-dimensional-Raman-intensity map using differential bands from two metabolically distinct regions, that is, ischemic core and contralateral-control areas, we found that mapping using the adenine ring vibration band at 736 cm(-1) clearly demarcated ischemic core where high-energy adenine phosphonucleotides were degraded as judged by imaging mass spectrometry. Such a detection capability makes the GNC-based SERS technology especially promising for revealing acute energy derangement of tissues.

  11. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  12. [Transparency in public health decision-making].

    PubMed

    García-Altés, Anna; Argimon, Josep M

    2016-11-01

    Improving the quality and transparency of governmental healthcare decision-making has an impact on the health of the population through policies, organisational management and clinical practice. Moreover, the comparison between healthcare centres and the transparent feedback of results to professionals and to the wider public contribute directly to improved results. The "Results Centre" of the Catalan healthcare system measures and disseminates the results achieved by the different healthcare centres in order to facilitate a shared decision-making process, thereby enhancing the quality of healthcare provided to the population of Catalonia (Spain). This is a pioneering initiative in Spain and is aligned with the most advanced countries in terms of policies of transparency and accountability. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Transparent conductive coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashok, S.

    1983-01-01

    Thin film transparent conductors are discussed. Materials with electrical conductivity and optical transparency are highly desirable in many optoelectronic applications including photovoltaics. Certain binary oxide semiconductors such as tin oxide (SnO2) and indium oxide (In2O3) offer much better performance tradeoff in optoelectronics as well as better mechanical and chemical stability than thin semitransparent films. These thin-film transparent conductors (TC) are essentially wide-bandgap degenerate semiconductors - invariably n-type - and hence are transparent to sub-bandgap (visible) radiation while affording high electrical conductivity due to the large free electron concentration. The principal performance characteristics of TC's are, of course, electrical conductivity and optical transmission. The TC's have a refractive index of around 2.0 and hence act as very efficient antireflection coatings. For using TC's in surface barrier solar cells, the photovoltaic barrier is of utmost importance and so the work function or electron affinity of the TC is also a very important material parameter. Fabrication processes are discussed.

  14. Transparency for international trade

    Treesearch

    K. R. Lakin; G. A. Fowler; W. D. Bailey; J. Cavey; P. Lehtonen

    2003-01-01

    U.S. Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine (USDA-APHIS-PPQ) has developed a Regulated Plant Pest List (RPPL). This provides trading partners with an official list of plant pests of concern to the U.S., along with providing greater transparency of Agency actions.

  15. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  16. Nuclear energy and security

    SciTech Connect

    BLEJWAS,THOMAS E.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; EAGAN,ROBERT J.; BAKER,ARNOLD B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity.

  17. Integrated Process Monitoring based on Systems of Sensors for Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Sensitivity and Robustness

    SciTech Connect

    Humberto E. Garcia

    2014-07-01

    This paper illustrates safeguards benefits that process monitoring (PM) can have as a diversion deterrent and as a complementary safeguards measure to nuclear material accountancy (NMA). In order to infer the possible existence of proliferation-driven activities, the objective of NMA-based methods is often to statistically evaluate materials unaccounted for (MUF) computed by solving a given mass balance equation related to a material balance area (MBA) at every material balance period (MBP), a particular objective for a PM-based approach may be to statistically infer and evaluate anomalies unaccounted for (AUF) that may have occurred within a MBP. Although possibly being indicative of proliferation-driven activities, the detection and tracking of anomaly patterns is not trivial because some executed events may be unobservable or unreliably observed as others. The proposed similarity between NMA- and PM-based approaches is important as performance metrics utilized for evaluating NMA-based methods, such as detection probability (DP) and false alarm probability (FAP), can also be applied for assessing PM-based safeguards solutions. To this end, AUF count estimates can be translated into significant quantity (SQ) equivalents that may have been diverted within a given MBP. A diversion alarm is reported if this mass estimate is greater than or equal to the selected value for alarm level (AL), appropriately chosen to optimize DP and FAP based on the particular characteristics of the monitored MBA, the sensors utilized, and the data processing method employed for integrating and analyzing collected measurements. To illustrate the application of the proposed PM approach, a protracted diversion of Pu in a waste stream was selected based on incomplete fuel dissolution in a dissolver unit operation, as this diversion scenario is considered to be problematic for detection using NMA-based methods alone. Results demonstrate benefits of conducting PM under a system

  18. Sorting Nexin 6 Enhances Lamin A Synthesis and Incorporation into the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, Jose M.; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Molina-Sanchez, Pedro; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Viana, Rosa; de Mora, Jaime Font; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear lamins are important structural and functional proteins in mammalian cells, but little is known about the mechanisms and cofactors that regulate their traffic into the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that trafficking of lamin A, but not lamin B1, and its assembly into the nuclear envelope are regulated by sorting nexin 6 (SNX6), a major component of the retromer that targets proteins and other molecules to specific subcellular locations. SNX6 interacts with lamin A in vitro and in vivo and links it to the outer surface of the endoplasmic reticulum in human and mouse cells. SNX6 transports its lamin A cargo to the nuclear envelope in a process that takes several hours. Lamin A protein levels in the nucleus augment or decrease, respectively, upon gain or loss of SNX6 function. We further show that SNX6-dependent lamin A nuclear import occurs across the nuclear pore complex via a RAN-GTP-dependent mechanism. These results identify SNX6 as a key regulator of lamin A synthesis and incorporation into the nuclear envelope. PMID:25535984

  19. Nuclear p16INK4a expression predicts enhanced radiation response in head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dok, Rüveyda; Asbagh, Layka Abbasi; Van Limbergen, Evert Jan; Sablina, Anna; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry analysis of p16INK4a in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) tumor samples revealed that 28% of tumors showed nuclear/cytoplasmic p16INK4a localization, while 37% of tumors had cytoplasmic p16INK4a. Our previous study showed that p16INK4a inhibits the DNA repair response independently of its function in the cell cycle, suggesting that p16INK4a subcellular localization should be considered during stratification of HNSCC patients. Using p16INK4a mutants with different localization signals, we found that expression of nuclear p16INK4a, but not cytoplasmic p16INK4a impaired RAD51 foci formation, indicating that nuclear localization of p16INK4a is crucial for its function in DNA repair. We next investigated the role of p16INK4a subcellular localization in radiation response in a retrospective cohort of 261 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. We found that only HNSCC patients expressing nuclear p16INK4a expression showed better outcome, locoregional control and disease free survival, after chemoradiation. In concordance with the patient data, only expression of nuclear p16INK4a increased radiosensitivity of HNSCC cells. These results implicate nuclear p16INK4a expression as a potent marker to predict radiation response of HNSCC patients and should be taken into account in intensification or de-escalation studies. PMID:27246975

  20. Transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Liu, Zhe; Liang, Bo; Wang, Xianfu; Shen, Guozhen

    2012-05-01

    With the features of high mobility, a high electric on/off ratio and excellent transparency, metal oxide nanowires are excellent candidates for transparent thin-film transistors, which is one of the key technologies to realize transparent electronics. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors. It begins with the brief introduction to the synthetic methods for high quality metal oxide nanowires, and the typical nanowire transfer and printing techniques with emphasis on the simple contact printing methodology. High performance transparent transistors built on both single nanowires and nanowire thin films are then highlighted. The final section deals with the applications of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors in the field of transparent displays and concludes with an outlook on the current perspectives and future directions of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors.

  1. Transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Liu, Zhe; Liang, Bo; Wang, Xianfu; Shen, Guozhen

    2012-05-21

    With the features of high mobility, a high electric on/off ratio and excellent transparency, metal oxide nanowires are excellent candidates for transparent thin-film transistors, which is one of the key technologies to realize transparent electronics. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors. It begins with the brief introduction to the synthetic methods for high quality metal oxide nanowires, and the typical nanowire transfer and printing techniques with emphasis on the simple contact printing methodology. High performance transparent transistors built on both single nanowires and nanowire thin films are then highlighted. The final section deals with the applications of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors in the field of transparent displays and concludes with an outlook on the current perspectives and future directions of transparent metal oxide nanowire transistors.

  2. Rhodamine 6G and 800 J-heteroaggregates with enhanced acceptor luminescence (HEAL) adsorbed in transparent SiO2 GLAD thin films.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valencia, Juan R; Aparicio, Francisco J; Espinós, Juan P; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustín R; Barranco, Angel

    2011-04-21

    An enhanced fluorescent emission in the near infrared is observed when the Rhodamine 800 (Rh800) and 6G (Rh6G) dyes are coadsorbed in porous SiO(2) optical thin films prepared by glancing angle deposition (GLAD). This unusual behavior is not observed in solution and it has been ascribed to the formation of a new type of J-heteroaggregates with enhanced acceptor luminescence (HEAL). This article describes in detail and explains the main features of this new phenomenology previously referred in a short communication [J. R. Sánchez-Valencia, J. Toudert, L. González-García, A. R. González-Elipe and A. Barranco, Chem. Commun., 2010, 46, 4372-4374]. It is found that the efficiency and characteristics of the energy transfer process are dependent on the Rh6G/Rh800 concentration ratio which can be easily controlled by varying the pH of the solutions used for the infiltration of the molecules or by thermal treatments. A simple model has been proposed to account for the observed enhanced acceptor luminescence in which the heteroaggregates order themselves according to a "head to tail" configuration due to the geometrical constrains imposed by the SiO(2) porous matrix thin film. The thermal stability of the dye molecules within the films and basic optical (absorption and fluorescence) principles of the HEAL process are also described.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization studies of nitroxyl spin probes in agarose gel using Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Meenakumari, V; Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A; Milton Franklin Benial, A

    2017-11-01

    Agarose is a tissue-equivalent material and its imaging characteristics similar to those of real tissues. Hence, the dynamic nuclear polarization studies of 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (carboxy-PROXYL) in agarose gel were carried out. The dynamic nuclear polarization parameters such as spin lattice relaxation time, longitudinal relaxivity, leakage factor, saturation parameter and coupling parameter were estimated for 2 mM carboxy-PROXYL in phosphate-buffered saline solution and water/agarose mixture (99 : 1). From these results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2 mM, and the reduction in enhancement was observed for carboxy-PROXYL in water/agarose mixture (99 : 1) compared with phosphate-buffered saline solution. Phantom imaging was also performed with 2 mM concentration of carboxy-PROXYL in various concentrations of agarose gel at various radio frequency power levels. The results from the dynamic nuclear polarization measurements agree well with the phantom imaging results. These results pave the way for designing model system for human tissues suited to the biological applications of electron spin resonance/Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Flexible Transparent Supercapacitors Based on Hierarchical Nanocomposite Films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fanhong; Wan, Pengbo; Xu, Haijun; Sun, Xiaoming

    2017-05-31

    Flexible transparent electronic devices have recently gained immense popularity in smart wearable electronics and touch screen devices, which accelerates the development of the portable power sources with reliable flexibility, robust transparency and integration to couple these electronic devices. For potentially coupled as energy storage modules in various flexible, transparent and portable electronics, the flexible transparent supercapacitors are developed and assembled from hierarchical nanocomposite films of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and aligned polyaniline (PANI) nanoarrays upon their synergistic advantages. The nanocomposite films are fabricated from in situ PANI nanoarrays preparation in a blended solution of aniline monomers and rGO onto the flexible, transparent, and stably conducting film (FTCF) substrate, which is obtained by coating silver nanowires (Ag NWs) layer with Meyer rod and then coating of rGO layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Optimization of the transparency, the specific capacitance, and the flexibility resulted in the obtained all-solid state nanocomposite supercapacitors exhibiting enhanced capacitance performance, good cycling stability, excellent flexibility, and superior transparency. It provides promising application prospects for exploiting flexible, low-cost, transparent, and high-performance energy storage devices to be coupled into various flexible, transparent, and wearable electronic devices.

  5. Chinese perspectives on nuclear arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.N.; Glaser, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    China`s nuclear weapons and Beijing`s arms control policies have become increasingly important factors in the post-Cold War era of U.S.-Russian strategic arms reductions and growing concern about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Unlike Russia and the United States, China is not constrained by any international arms control regime from modernizing and expanding its nuclear forces. In addition, the Chinese nuclear arsenal, the quality of which is likely to be significantly enhanced over the coming decade, will be an increasingly important strategic factor in regional and global security as China`s nuclear weapons more closely match the capabilities of U.S. and Russian nuclear forces. Concern about Beijing`s nuclear capability has also been heightened by China`s rapid emergence as a major power with a huge economy, able to underwrite an extensive nuclear arms buildup in the next century should Chinese leaders choose to do so. Uncertainty about China`s nuclear weapons capabilities, it strategic intentions, and the long-run goals of its nuclear modernization program is exacerbated by China`s lack of transparency in the military sphere. In addition, unofficial contacts between scientists, arms and control experts, and foreign policy institute researchers can be encouraged. The concrete impact on Chinese thinking of past arms control discussions between Chinese and Americans is evidenced by Beijing`s decision to join the NPT and by Beijing`s support for permanent extension of the NPT. The strengthening of a Western-influenced arms control community in China could affect thinking in Beijing on a broad range of international arms control issues, from non-proliferation to confidence-building measures and greater military transparency in Asia, and foster movement in China toward taking more responsibility for maintaining international peace and stability. 43 refs.

  6. Transparent conductive oxide-free perovskite solar cells with PEDOT:PSS as transparent electrode.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kuan; Li, Pengcheng; Xia, Yijie; Chang, Jingjing; Ouyang, Jianyong

    2015-07-22

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have been attracting considerable attention because of their low fabrication cost and impressive energy conversion efficiency. Most PSCs are built on transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) such as fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) or indium tin oxide (ITO), which are costly and rigid. Therefore, it is significant to explore alternative materials as the transparent electrode of PSCs. In this study, highly conductive and highly transparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate ( PSS) films were investigated as the transparent electrode of both rigid and flexible PSCs. The conductivity of PSS films on rigid glass or flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate is significantly enhanced through a treatment with methanesulfonic acid (MSA). The optimal power conversion efficiency (PCE) is close to 11% for the rigid PSCs with an MSA-treated PSS film as the transparent electrode on glass, and it is more than 8% for the flexible PSCs with a MSA-treated PSS film as the transparent electrode on PET. The flexible PSCs exhibit excellent mechanical flexibility in the bending test.

  7. Structural studies of. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin. 2. /sub 1/H NMR assignments via an improved relayed coherence transfer nuclear Overhauser enhancement experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Basus, V.J.; Scheek, R.M.

    1988-04-19

    Complete sequence-specific assignments of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of bungarotoxin were reported in a previous paper. The assignment was significantly aided by the use of the homonuclear Hartman-Hahn relayed coherence transfer nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiment (HRNOESY) which we present here, as a modification of relayed coherence transfer nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (relayed NOESY). As shown here, HRNOESY resolves problems of proton resonance overlap especially in extended chain conformations as found in ..beta..-sheets.

  8. Lattice-induced transparency in planar metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Lattice modes are intrinsic to periodic structures and they can be easily tuned and controlled by changing the lattice constant of the structural array. Previous studies have revealed the excitation of sharp absorption resonances due to lattice mode coupling with the plasmonic resonances. Here, we report an experimental observation of a lattice-induced transparency (LIT) by coupling the first-order lattice mode (FOLM) to the structural resonance of a terahertz asymmetric split ring resonator. The observed sharp transparency is a result of the destructive interference between the bright mode and the FOLM assisted dark mode. As the FOLM is swept across the metamaterial resonance, the transparency band undergoes a large change in its bandwidth and resonance position. We propose a three-oscillator model to explain the underlying coupling mechanism in LIT system that shows good agreement with the observed results. Besides controlling the transparency behavior, LIT also shows a huge enhancement in its Q factor and exhibits a high group delay of 28 ps with an enhanced group index of 4.5 ×104 , which could be pivotal in ultrasensitive sensing and slow-light device applications.

  9. Narrowing of the Overhauser field distribution by feedback-enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenberg, S.; McNeil, R. P. G.; Rubbert, S.; Bluhm, H.

    2015-11-01

    In many electron spin qubit systems coherent control is impaired by the fluctuating nuclear spin bath of the host material. Previous experiments have shown dynamic nuclear polarization with feedback to significantly prolong the inhomogeneous dephasing time T2* by narrowing the distribution of nuclear Overhauser field fluctuations. We present a model relating the achievable narrowing of the Overhauser field to both the pump rate and the noise magnitude and find reasonable agreement with experimental data. It shows that former experiments on gated GaAs quantum dots were limited by the pump rate of the pumping mechanism used. Here we propose an alternative feedback scheme using electron dipole spin resonance. Sequentially applying two ac electric fields with frequencies slightly detuned from the desired Larmor frequency results in a pump curve with a stable fixed point. Our model predicts that T2* values on the order of microseconds can be achieved.

  10. U.S./Russian cooperative efforts to enhance nuclear MPC&A at VNIITF, (Chelyabinsk-70)

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, B; Apt, K; Blasy, J; Bukin, D; Churikov, Y; Curtis, D; Eras, A; Magda, E; Neymotin, L; Shultz, F; Slankas, T; Tittemore, G; Tsygankov, G; Zuev, V

    1999-04-20

    The work described here is part of an effort called the Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Program, a cooperative program between the US Department of Eenrgy (DOE) and Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy (MinAtom). The objective of the program is to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation by strengthening MPC&A systems at Russian nuclear Facilities. This paper describes that portion of the MPC&A program that is directed specifically to the needs of the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF), also called Chelyabinsk-70. A major MPC&A milestone was met at VNIITF when the MPC&A improvements were commissioned at the Pulse Research Reactor Facility in May of this year.

  11. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-05

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed.

  12. The enhancement of nuclear receptor transcriptional activation by a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Huang, C J; Wang, W M; Kang, J C; Hsu, W C

    2004-04-01

    The p160 coactivators, steroid receptor coactivator 1, glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) and the activator of thyroid and retinoic acid receptor, have two activation domains, AD1 and AD2, which transmit the activation signal from the DNA-bound nuclear receptor to the chromatin and/or transcription machinery. In screening for mammalian proteins that bind the AD2 of GRIP1, we identified a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2 (mACTN2). mACTN2 was expressed in the heart, skeletal muscle, lung, brain and testis, but there was no expression in the spleen, liver or kidney. Interestingly, the expression level of mACTN2 in the developing embryo depended on the embryonic stage. We further demonstrated that mACTN2 could enhance two transactivation activities of GRIP1, which in turn could enhance the homodimerization of mACTN2. Importantly, mACTN2 not only served as a primary coactivator for androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and thyroid receptor activities, but also acted synergistically with GRIP1 to enhance these nuclear receptor (NR) functions. However, the NR binding motif, LXXLL, conserved in mACTN2 and other actinin family proteins, might be a dispensable domain for its coactivator roles in NRs. These findings suggested that mACTN2 might play an important role in GRIP1-induced NR coactivator functions.

  13. Plasmonic Graphene Transparent Conductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    www.MaterialsViews.com www.advopticalmat.de FU LL P A P ER Guowei Xu,* Jianwei Liu, Qian Wang , Rongqing Hui, Zhijun Chen, Victor A. Maroni, and Judy Wu Plasmonic...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UU...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS surface plasmon, graphene, transparent conductors Guowei Xu, Jianwei Liu, Qian

  14. Transparent Spinel Ceramic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 NRL REVIEW 215 OPTICAL SCIENCES Transparent Spinel Ceramic J.S. Sanghera, G. Villalobos , W. Kim, S. Bayya, and I.D. Aggarwal Optical Sciences...Sponsored by NRL and ONR] Reference 1 G. Villalobos , J.S. Sanghera, S.B. Bayya, and I.D. Aggarwal, “Fluoride Salt Coated Magnesium Aluminate,” U.S. Patent 7,211,325, May 1, 2007.

  15. Enhanced 2-5 μm emission in Ho³⁺/Yb³⁺ codoped halide modified transparent tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Lin, Jian; Jia, Yujie; Zhang, Shuo; Zhao, Junhong; Sun, Guangyao; Ye, Song; Ren, Junjiang; Rong, Liang

    2015-01-05

    Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped TeO₂-WO₃-ZnO-ZnX₂(X=F, Cl) glasses were prepared by melt-quenching method. The absorption spectra, transmittance spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) curves, Raman spectra and mid-infrared fluorescence spectra were measured, along with the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, stimulated emission and absorption cross-sections were calculated to evaluate the effects of halide amount of the spectroscopic properties. It is shown that the introduction of an appropriate amount of halide can further improve the mid-infrared fluorescence intensity through an enhanced phonon-assisted energy transfer between Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) ions and the energy transfer mechanisms are investigated quantitatively in detail by calculating energy transfer microparameters and phonon contribution ratios. The results indicate that this kind of glasses is a promising material for mid-infrared optical fiber. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An enhancement of NASTRAN for the seismic analysis of structures. [nuclear power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burroughs, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    New modules, bulk data cards and DMAP sequence were added to NASTRAN to aid in the seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures. These allow input consisting of acceleration time histories and result in the generation of acceleration floor response spectra. The resulting system contains numerous user convenience features, as well as being reasonably efficient.

  17. Enhancement of Teaching and Learning of the Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering Using Multimedia Courseware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyvan, Shahla A.; Pickard, Rodney; Song, Xiaolong

    1997-01-01

    Computer-aided instruction incorporating interactive multimedia and network technologies can boost teaching effectiveness and student learning. This article describes the development and implementation of network server-based interactive multimedia courseware for a fundamental course in nuclear engineering. A student survey determined that 80% of…

  18. Quantitative rate determination by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Lee, Youngbok; Hilty, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Emerging techniques for hyperpolarization of nuclear spins, foremost dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), lend unprecedented sensitivity to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sufficient signal can be obtained from a single scan, and reactions even far from equilibrium can be studied in real-time. When following the progress of a reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, however, spin relaxation occurs concomitantly with the reaction to alter resonance line intensities. Here, we present a model for accounting for spin-relaxation in such reactions studied by hyperpolarized NMR. The model takes into account auto- and cross-relaxation in dipole-dipole coupled spin systems and is therefore applicable to NMR of hyperpolarized protons, the most abundant NMR-active nuclei. Applied to the Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4-dipheneylbutadiene (DPBD) with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione (PTD), reaction rates could be obtained accurately and reproducibly. Additional parameters available from the same experiment include relaxation rates of the reaction product, which may yield further information about the molecular properties of the product. The method presented is also compatible with an experiment where a single spin in the reactant is labeled in its spin-state by a selective radio frequency pulse for subsequent tracking through the reaction, allowing the unambiguous identification of its position in the product molecule. In this case, the chemical shift specificity of high-resolution NMR can allow for the simultaneous determination of reaction rates and mechanistic information in one experiment.

  19. Transparency of Computational Intelligence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owotoki, Peter; Mayer-Lindenberg, Friedrich

    This paper introduces the behaviour of transparency of computational intelligence (CI) models. Transparency reveals to end users the underlying reasoning process of the agent embodying CI models. This is of great benefit in applications (e.g. data mining, entertainment and personal robotics) with humans as end users because it increases their trust in the decisions of the agent and their acceptance of its results. Our integrated approach, wherein rules are just one of other transparency factors (TF), differs from previous related efforts which have focused mostly on generation of comprehensible rules as explanations. Other TF include degree of confidence measure and visualization of principal features. The transparency quotient is introduced as a measure of the transparency of models based on these factors. The transparency enabled generalized exemplar model has been developed to demonstrate the TF and transparency concepts introduced in this paper.

  20. The most transparent research.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Melinda

    2009-10-01

    Biomedicine would be a breeze if organisms were transparent. With the ability to see through tissues, scientists could spot the development of tumors more easily in study animals. And biologists could study exactly how an animal's organs develop by observing them as they grow. In effect, the secrets of the body would be out there for everyone to see.The thought of peering into our tissues may sound like science fiction, but one day it could be science. Using ideas from genetics, electrical engineering, chemistry and solid-state physics, a handful of researchers are working on ways to render biological tissues transparent.Some have already succeeded: in 2007, Richard White, a biologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, used careful breeding techniques to create a transparent adult zebrafish named casper, evoking a reference to the famous cartoon ghost by the same name. Now, more than 100 labs around the world are using these transparent fish to study cancer pathology and development in real time. "The field of in vivo imaging-looking at things that are happening inside an actual organism-is growing rapidly," White says.Researchers are even making strides toward turning human tissue transparent. The primary reason we can't see what's inside of us is that light scatters when it passes through tissue. The body is densely packed with many types of substances, such as bone and fat, and light travels through them at different speeds because they have what physicists refer to as different refractive indices. The result is that light can't pass through biological tissues in a straight line, much as car headlights don't pass through dense fog. To fix this problem, scientists are working on developing ways to stop tissues from scattering light. Indeed, "if you take away the scattering properties of human tissues, we would look more or less like jellyfish," explains Changhuei Yang, an electrical engineer and bioengineer at the California Institute of Technology

  1. A survey of nuclear-related agreements and possibilities for nuclear cooperation in South Asia: Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/15

    SciTech Connect

    RAJEN,GAURAV

    2000-04-01

    Several existing nuclear-related agreements already require India and Pakistan, as members, to share information. The agreements are bilateral, regional, and international. Greater nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan could be promoted by first understanding the information flows required by existing agreements. This understanding is an essential step for developing projects that can incrementally advance the sensitivity of the information being shared. This paper provides a survey of existing nuclear-related agreements involving India and Pakistan, and suggests future confidence-building projects using the frameworks provided by these agreements. The Bilateral Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Facilities is discussed as a basis for creating further agreements on restricting the use and deployment of nuclear weapons. The author suggests options for enhancing the value of the list of nuclear facilities exchanged annually as a part of this agreement. The International Atomic Energy Agency's regional cooperation agreement among countries in the Asia-Pacific region is an opportunity for greater subregional nuclear cooperation in South Asia. Linking the regional agreement with South Asian environmental cooperation and marine pollution protection efforts could provide a framework for projects involving Indian and Pakistani coastal nuclear facilities. Programs of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations that use nuclear techniques to increase food and crop production and optimize water management in arid areas also provide similar opportunities for nuclear cooperation. Other frameworks for nuclear cooperation originate from international conventions related to nuclear safety, transportation of nuclear wastes, worker protection against ionizing radiation, and the nondeployment of nuclear weapons in certain areas. The information shared by existing frameworks includes: laws and regulations (including

  2. Enhancing Scientific Collaboration, Transparency, and Public Access: Utilizing the Second Life Platform to Convene a Scientific Conference in 3-D Virtual Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies reveal a general mistrust of science as well as a distorted perception of the scientific method by the public at-large. Concurrently, the number of science undergraduate and graduate students is in decline. By taking advantage of emergent technologies not only for direct public outreach but also to enhance public accessibility to the science process, it may be possible to both begin a reversal of popular scientific misconceptions and to engage a new generation of scientists. The Second Life platform is a 3-D virtual world produced and operated by Linden Research, Inc., a privately owned company instituted to develop new forms of immersive entertainment. Free and downloadable to the public, Second Life offers an imbedded physics engine, streaming audio and video capability, and unlike other "multiplayer" software, the objects and inhabitants of Second Life are entirely designed and created by its users, providing an open-ended experience without the structure of a traditional video game. Already, educational institutions, virtual museums, and real-world businesses are utilizing Second Life for teleconferencing, pre-visualization, and distance education, as well as to conduct traditional business. However, the untapped potential of Second Life lies in its versatility, where the limitations of traditional scientific meeting venues do not exist, and attendees need not be restricted by prohibitive travel costs. It will be shown that the Second Life system enables scientific authors and presenters at a "virtual conference" to display figures and images at full resolution, employ audio-visual content typically not available to conference organizers, and to perform demonstrations or premier three-dimensional renderings of objects, processes, or information. An enhanced presentation like those possible with Second Life would be more engaging to non- scientists, and such an event would be accessible to the general users of Second Life, who could have an

  3. AN APPROACH FOR ENHANCING NUCLEAR MATERIALS TRACKING AND REPORTING IN WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    V. L. LONGMIRE; S. L. SEITZ; B. J. SINKULE

    2001-06-01

    Recent policy from the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has identified the need to report nuclear materials in waste in a manner that is consistent with the Department of Energy's Nuclear Materials Information System (NMIS), which uses Form 471 as its official record. NMIS is used to track nuclear material inventories while they are subject to safeguards. This requirement necessitates the reevaluation of existing business practices that are used to track and report these nuclear materials. This paper provides a methodology for applying a systems approach to the evaluation of the flow of nuclear waste materials from a generating facility through to permanent disposal. This methodology can be used to integrate existing systems and leverage data already gathered that support both the waste reporting requirements and the NMIS requirements. In order to consider an active waste reporting system that covers waste management through to final disposal, the requirements for characterization, certification, and transportation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are used as an example. These requirements are found in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP/WAC) and associated requirement documents. This approach will prevent inconsistencies in reported data and address current and future needs. For example, spent fuel (which the U.S. intends to dispose of as high-level waste) has not been viewed as particularly attractive in terms of proliferation in comparison to materials associated with other parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. However, collecting high-level waste (or some types of defense waste) in one location where it will be left for hundreds or thousands of years presents proliferation and safeguards issues that need to be considered as part of a systems evaluation. This paper brings together information on domestic and international safeguards practices and considers the current system of documentation used by the U

  4. Transparent conducting materials: overview and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Deelen, Joop; Illiberi, Andrea; Hovestad, Arjan; Barbu, Ionut; Klerk, Lennaert; Buskens, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    An overview of different transparent conductors is given. In addition, atmospheric pressure CVD of ZnO resulted in conductivities below 1 mΩ cm for a temperature of 480°C, whereas at a process temperature of 200°C a value of 2 mΩ cm was obtained. Also atmospheric pressure spatial ALD was used to make conductive ZnO. Furthermore, the properties of transparent conductive oxides (TCO) can be enhanced by application of metallic grids. This way, sheet resistances of below 0.1 Ω/sq and transmittances above 85 % can be achieved. Modeling indicates that the performance of thin film cells can be enhanced by18% using a grid/TCO combination. Light scattering is a vital element of thin film solar cells and both texturization and multimaterial approaches for advanced light management such as plasmonics are discussed.

  5. An improved ARS2-derived nuclear reporter enhances the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Hoang, Kevin T D; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to pioneer genetic engineering techniques for high-value protein and biofuel production from algae. To date, most studies of transgenic Chlamydomonas have utilized the chloroplast genome due to its ease of engineering, with a sizeable suite of reporters and well-characterized expression constructs. The advanced manipulation of algal nuclear genomes has been hampered by limited strong expression cassettes, and a lack of high-throughput reporters. We have improved upon an endogenous reporter gene - the ARS2 gene encoding an arylsulfatase enzyme - that was first cloned and characterized decades ago but has not been used extensively. The new construct, derived from ARS2 cDNA, expresses significantly higher levels of reporter protein and transforms more efficiently, allowing qualitative and quantitative screening using a rapid, inexpensive 96-well assay. The improved arylsulfatase expression cassette was used to screen a new transgene promoter from the ARG7 gene, and found that the ARG7 promoter can express the ARS2 reporter as strongly as the HSP70-RBCS2 chimeric promoter that currently ranks as the best available promoter, thus adding to the list of useful nuclear promoters. This enhanced arylsulfatase reporter construct improves the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering within the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, with potential application to other algal strains.

  6. Cinnamaldehyde enhances Nrf2 nuclear translocation to upregulate phase II detoxifying enzyme expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Yu-Ling; Wu, Mei-Li; Chuang, Show-Mei

    2011-05-11

    Cinnamaldehyde has been demonstrated to stimulate glutathione production and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes in HepG2 cells. The mechanism underlying this cinnamaldehyde-mediated gene expression relies on Nrf2 transcriptional activity. Therefore, the molecular signaling events in cinnamaldehyde-mediated detoxifying enzyme expression were further investigated in this study. Cinnamaldehyde activated ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK signaling pathways, but not the p38 MAP kinase pathway, subsequently leading to Nrf2 nuclear translocation and eventually increasing phase II enzyme expression. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, or JNK pathways attenuated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and phase II enzyme expression. Depletion of Nrf2 by small RNA interference (si-RNA) showed that the protein levels of phase II enzymes were no longer induced by cinnamaldehyde. A luciferase reporter assay and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) also demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde-activated signaling resulted in the increased transcriptional activity of Nrf2 through binding to the ARE4 enhancer sequence. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK pathways activated by cinnamaldehyde collectively control Nrf2 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, leading to the increase of phase II enzyme expression. Application of an appropriate chemopreventive agent such as cinnamaldehyde could potentially be an alternative strategy for cancer chemoprevention.

  7. Enhancer of rudimentary homologue interacts with scaffold attachment factor B at the nuclear matrix to regulate SR protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Drakouli, Sotiria; Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Papathanassiou, Maria; Mylonis, Ilias; Georgatsou, Eleni

    2017-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor B1 (SAFB1) is an integral component of the nuclear matrix of vertebrate cells. It binds to DNA on scaffold/matrix attachment region elements, as well as to RNA and a multitude of different proteins, affecting basic cellular activities such as transcription, splicing and DNA damage repair. In the present study, we show that enhancer of rudimentary homologue (ERH) is a new molecular partner of SAFB1 and its 70% homologous paralogue, scaffold attachment factor B2 (SAFB2). ERH interacts directly in the nucleus with the C-terminal Arg-Gly-rich region of SAFB1/2 and co-localizes with it in the insoluble nuclear fraction. ERH, a small ubiquitous protein with striking homology among species and a unique structure, has also been implicated in fundamental cellular mechanisms. Our functional analyses suggest that the SAFB/ERH interaction does not affect SAFB1/2 function in transcription (e.g. as oestrogen receptor α co-repressors), although it reverses the inhibition exerted by SAFB1/2 on the splicing kinase SR protein kinase 1 (SRPK1), which also binds on the C-terminus of SAFB1/2. Accordingly, ERH silencing decreases lamin B receptor and SR protein phosphorylation, which are major SRPK1 substrates, further substantiating the role of SAFB1 and SAFB2 in the co-ordination of nuclear function. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Use of artificial intelligence to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    In the operation of a nuclear power plant, the sheer magnitude of the number of process parameters and systems interactions poses difficulties for the operators, particularly during abnormal or emergency situations. Recovery from an upset situation depends upon the facility with which the available raw data can be converted into and assimilated as meaningful knowledge. Plant personnel are sometimes affected by stress and emotion, which may have varying degrees of influence on their performance. Expert systems can take some of the uncertainty and guesswork out of their decisions by providing expert advice and rapid access to a large information base. Application of artificial intelligence technologies, particularly expert systems, to control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and improve power plant safety and reliability. 12 refs.

  9. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    PubMed

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  10. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-03-23

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

  11. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1997-12-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr-Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu-Zr-Hf or a combination of both.

  12. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1999-01-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both.

  13. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-03-23

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

  14. Perceptual transparency from image deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin’ya

    2015-01-01

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid’s surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of “invisible” transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation. PMID:26240313

  15. Perceptual transparency from image deformation.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-08-18

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid's surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of "invisible" transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation.

  16. Twist1 Enhances Hypoxia Induced Radioresistance in Cervical Cancer Cells by Promoting Nuclear EGFR Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hua; Nie, Xin; Zou, Yanmei; Gong, Chen; Li, Yang; Wu, Hua; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Lin; Zhuang, Liang; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yihua; Xiong, Huihua

    2017-01-01

    Twist1 is a crucial transcription factor that regulates epithelial mesenchymal transition and involves in metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that Twist1 plays important role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we investigated the change of Twist1 expression in human cervical squamous cancer cell line SiHa after hypoxia treatment. We also explored the role of Twist1 in radioresistance by manipulating the expression level of Twist1. We observed that hypoxia treatment elevated the expression of Twist1 in SiHa cells. Knockdown of Twist1 with siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of SiHa cells under hypoxia condition, accompanied by reduced levels of nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Conversely, overexpression of Twist1 led to increased radioresistance of SiHa cells, which in turn increased nuclear EGFR localization and expression levels of nuclear DNA-PK. Moreover, concomitant high expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and Twist1 in primary tumors of cervical cancer patients correlated with the worse prognosis after irradiation treatment. Taken together, these data provide new insights into molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced radioresistance in cervical cancer cells, and suggest that Twist1 is a promising molecular target to improve the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy. PMID:28261334

  17. Determination of the temperature dependence of the dynamic nuclear polarisation enhancement of water protons at 3.4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Eugeny V; Pike, Kevin J; Tam, Thomas K Y; Newton, Mark E; Smith, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2011-03-14

    It is shown that the temperature dependence of the DNP enhancement of the NMR signal from water protons at 3.4 T using TEMPOL as a polarising agent can be obtained provided that the nuclear relaxation, T(1I), is sufficiently fast and the resolution sufficient to measure the (1)H NMR shift. For high radical concentrations (∼100 mM) the leakage factor is approximately 1 and, provided sufficient microwave power is available, the saturation factor is also approximately 1. In this situation the DNP enhancement is solely a product of the ratio of the electron and nuclear gyromagnetic ratios and the coupling factor enabling the latter to be directly determined. Although the use of high microwave power levels needed to ensure saturation causes rapid heating of the sample, this does not prevent maximum DNP enhancements, ε(0), being obtained since T(1I) is very much less than the characteristic heating time at these concentrations. It is necessary, however, to know the temperature variation of T(1I) to allow accurate modelling of the behaviour. The DNP enhancement is found to vary linearly with temperature with ε(0)(T) = -2 ± 2 - (1.35 ± 0.02)T for 6 °C ≤ T ≤ 100 °C. The value determined for the coupling factor, 0.055 ± 0.003 at 25 °C, agrees very well with the molecular dynamics simulations of Sezer et al. (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009, 11, 6626) who calculated 0.0534, however the experimental values increase much more rapidly with increasing temperature than predicted by these simulations. Large DNP enhancements (|ε(0)| > 100) are reported at high temperatures but it is also shown that significant enhancements (e.g.∼40) can be achieved whilst maintaining the sample temperature at 40 °C by adjusting the microwave power and irradiation time. In addition, short polarisation times enable rapid data acquisition which permits further enhancement of the signal, such that useful liquid state DNP-NMR experiments could be carried out on very small samples.

  18. Effects of motion and configural complexity on color transparency perception.

    PubMed

    Gerardin, Peggy; Roud, Philippe; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    We tested whether motion and configural complexity affect perceived transparency. A series of five coherent chromatic transformations in color space was applied across a figure: translation, convergence, shear, divergence and rotation. The stimuli consisted of a bipartite or a checkerboard configuration (10 x 10 degrees), with a central static or moving overlay (5 x 5 degrees). Three different luminance conditions (the plane of chromatic transformation oriented toward higher, lower, or equal luminances) were also tested for each of three modulation depths. For each stimulus, the observer judged whether the overlay appeared transparent or not. The main results indicated an interaction between the type of chromatic transformation and stimulus motion and complexity. For example, convergences are judged to appear transparent significantly more often when motion is added for bipartite configurations, or when they are generated in a checkerboard configuration. Surprisingly, shears that have been reported to appear opaque, are more frequently reported to appear transparent with short vector lengths and when combined with motion. Other transformations are also affected by motion, although the effectiveness of figural complexity on transparency seems to depend on both the type of color shifts and the presence of motion. The results indicate that adding motion and stimulus complexity are not necessarily neutral with respect to the chromatic shifts evoking transparency. Thus, studies that have used motion to enhance transparency may yield different results about the color shifts supporting transparency perception from those that did not. The same might be supposed for stimulus complexity under some conditions.

  19. Variable delay multi-pulse train for fast chemical exchange saturation transfer and relayed-nuclear overhauser enhancement MRI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Jones, Craig K; Chan, Kannie W Y; Zhang, Jiangyang; Walczak, P; McMahon, Michael T; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is a new MRI technology allowing the detection of low concentration endogenous cellular proteins and metabolites indirectly through their exchangeable protons. A new technique, variable delay multi-pulse CEST (VDMP-CEST), is proposed to eliminate the need for recording full Z-spectra and performing asymmetry analysis to obtain CEST contrast. The VDMP-CEST scheme involves acquiring images with two (or more) delays between radiofrequency saturation pulses in pulsed CEST, producing a series of CEST images sensitive to the speed of saturation transfer. Subtracting two images or fitting a time series produces CEST and relayed-nuclear Overhauser enhancement CEST maps without effects of direct water saturation and, when using low radiofrequency power, minimal magnetization transfer contrast interference. When applied to several model systems (bovine serum albumin, crosslinked bovine serum albumin, l-glutamic acid) and in vivo on healthy rat brain, VDMP-CEST showed sensitivity to slow to intermediate range magnetization transfer processes (rate < 100-150 Hz), such as amide proton transfer and relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement-CEST. Images for these contrasts could be acquired in short scan times by using a single radiofrequency frequency. VDMP-CEST provides an approach to detect CEST effect by sensitizing saturation experiments to slower exchange processes without interference of direct water saturation and without need to acquire Z-spectra and perform asymmetry analysis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Variable Delay Multi-Pulse Train for Fast Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer and Relayed-Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Jones, Craig K.; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Zhang, Jiangyang; Walczak, P.; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is a new MRI technology allowing the detection of low concentration endogenous cellular proteins and metabolites indirectly through their exchangeable protons. A new technique, variable delay multi-pulse CEST (VDMP-CEST), is proposed to eliminate the need for recording full Z-spectra and performing asymmetry analysis to obtain CEST contrast. Methods The VDMP-CEST scheme involves acquiring images with two (or more) delays between radiofrequency saturation pulses in pulsed CEST, producing a series of CEST images sensitive to the speed of saturation transfer. Subtracting two images or fitting a time series produces CEST and relayed-nuclear Overhauser enhancement CEST maps without effects of direct water saturation and, when using low radiofrequency power, minimal magnetization transfer contrast interference. Results When applied to several model systems (bovine serum albumin, crosslinked bovine serum albumin, l-glutamic acid) and in vivo on healthy rat brain, VDMP-CEST showed sensitivity to slow to intermediate range magnetization transfer processes (rate < 100–150 Hz), such as amide proton transfer and relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement-CEST. Images for these contrasts could be acquired in short scan times by using a single radiofrequency frequency. Conclusions VDMP-CEST provides an approach to detect CEST effect by sensitizing saturation experiments to slower exchange processes without interference of direct water saturation and without need to acquire Z-spectra and perform asymmetry analysis. PMID:23813483

  1. Grading of corneal transparency.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Clare; Wolffsohn, James S

    2004-12-01

    To examine the academic literature on the grading of corneal transparency and to assess the potential use of objective image analysis. Reference databases of academic literature were searched and relevant manuscripts reviewed. Annunziato, Efron (Millennium Edition) and Vistakon-Synoptik corneal oedema grading scale images were analysed objectively for relative intensity, edges detected, variation in intensity and maximum intensity. In addition, corneal oedema was induced in one subject using a low oxygen transmissibility (Dk/t) hydrogel contact lens worn for 3h under a light eye patch. Recovery from oedema was monitored over time using ultrasound pachymetry, high and low contrast visual acuity measures, bulbar hyperaemia grading and transparency image analysis of the test and control eyes. Several methods for assessing corneal transparency are described in the academic literature, but none have gained widespread use in clinical practice. The change in objective image analysis with printed scale grade was best described by quadratic parametric or sigmoid 3-parameter functions. 'Pupil image scales' (Annunziato and Vistakon-Synoptik) were best correlated to average intensity; however, the corneal section scale (Efron) was strongly correlated to variations in intensity. As expected, patching an eye wearing a low Dk/t hydrogel contact lens caused a significant (F = 119.2, p < 0.001) 14.3% increase in corneal thickness, which gradually recovered under open eye conditions. Corneal section image analysis was the most affected parameter and intensity variation across the slit width, in isolation, was the strongest correlate, accounting for 85.8% of the variance with time following patching, and 88.7% of the variance with corneal thickness. Corneal oedema is best determined objectively by the intensity variation across the width of a corneal section. This can be easily measured using a slit-lamp camera connected to a computer. Oedema due to soft contact lens wear is not

  2. Minimizing human error in radiopharmaceutical preparation and administration via a bar code-enhanced nuclear pharmacy management system.

    PubMed

    Hakala, John L; Hung, Joseph C; Mosman, Elton A

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this project was to ensure correct radiopharmaceutical administration through the use of a bar code system that links patient and drug profiles with on-site information management systems. This new combined system would minimize the amount of manual human manipulation, which has proven to be a primary source of error. The most common reason for dosing errors is improper patient identification when a dose is obtained from the nuclear pharmacy or when a dose is administered. A standardized electronic transfer of information from radiopharmaceutical preparation to injection will further reduce the risk of misadministration. Value stream maps showing the flow of the patient dose information, as well as potential points of human error, were developed. Next, a future-state map was created that included proposed corrections for the most common critical sites of error. Transitioning the current process to the future state will require solutions that address these sites. To optimize the future-state process, a bar code system that links the on-site radiology management system with the nuclear pharmacy management system was proposed. A bar-coded wristband connects the patient directly to the electronic information systems. The bar code-enhanced process linking the patient dose with the electronic information reduces the number of crucial points for human error and provides a framework to ensure that the prepared dose reaches the correct patient. Although the proposed flowchart is designed for a site with an in-house central nuclear pharmacy, much of the framework could be applied by nuclear medicine facilities using unit doses. An electronic connection between information management systems to allow the tracking of a radiopharmaceutical from preparation to administration can be a useful tool in preventing the mistakes that are an unfortunate reality for any facility.

  3. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells.

  4. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  5. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  6. HEU Transparency Implementation Program and its Radiation Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2002-01-31

    In February 1993, the Governments of the United States (U.S.) and the Russian Federation (R.F.) signed a bilateral Agreement for the U.S. purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from 500 metric tons (MT) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of Russian nuclear weapons. The HEU Purchase Agreement serves important national security and nonproliferation policy imperatives for both countries since its implementation reduces the quantity of surplus Russian HEU that could be stolen and diverted for weapons use. In return, Russia receives much needed U.S. dollars over a 20-year delivery period. In 2001, Russia received over half a billion US dollars from the purchase of the LEU blended from 30 MT HEU. As part of this Agreement, transparency rights were agreed upon that provide confidence to both governments that the nonproliferation objectives of the Agreement are being fulfilled. While the U.S. Department of State, in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is responsible negotiating transparency rights associated with this nuclear material, the NNSA is responsible for implementing those rights. These rights allow U.S. and R.F., personnel (called ''monitors'') to visit the processing facilities and observe the steps for processing the HEU into fuel for nuclear reactors. In this fashion, the processing of HEU to LEU is made ''transparent.'' For DOE, there are three transparency objectives: (1) that the HEU is extracted from nuclear weapons, (2) that this same HEU is oxidized, and (3) that the HEU is blended into LEU. For MINATOM, the transparency objective is: (1) that the LEU is fabricated into fuel for commercial nuclear power reactors: The transparency is based on visits by designated transparency monitors (100 preapproved U.S. and Russian monitors) with specific rights to monitor and to access storage and processing areas to provide confidence that the nonproliferation goals

  7. Low-energy enhancement of nuclear γ strength and its impact on astrophysical reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, A. C.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Bürger, A.; Camera, F.; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goriely, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Harissopulos, S.; Koehler, P. E.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T. T.; Rose, S.; Ruud, I. E.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A. V.; Wiedeking, M.

    2014-03-01

    An unexpected enhancement in the low-energy part of the γ-strength function for light and medium-mass nuclei has been discovered at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. This enhancement could lead to an increase in the neutron-capture rates up to two orders of magnitude for very exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. However, it is still an open question whether this structure persists when approaching the neutron drip line.

  8. NMR signal enhancement of >50 000 times in fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Pinto, L F; Marín-Montesinos, I; Lloveras, V; Muñoz-Gómez, J L; Pons, M; Veciana, J; Vidal-Gancedo, J

    2017-03-17

    Herein, we report the synthesis and the study of a novel mixed biradical with BDPA and TEMPO radical units that are covalently bound by an ester group (BDPAesterTEMPO) as a polarizing agent for fast dissolution DNP. The biradical exhibits an extremely high DNP NMR enhancement of >50 000 times, which constitutes one of the largest signal enhancements observed so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  9. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine enhances apoptosis through inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB in hypoxic murine embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qanungo, Suparna; Wang, Mi; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2004-11-26

    In this study, we investigated the role of reduced glutathione (GSH) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB) in hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Hypoxia caused p53-dependent apoptosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts transfected with Ras and E1A. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) but not other antioxidants, such as the vitamin E analog trolox and epigallocatechin-3-gallate, enhanced hypoxia-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. NAC also enhanced hypoxia-induced apoptosis in two human cancer cell lines, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells and A549 lung carcinoma cells. In murine embryonic fibroblasts, all three antioxidants blocked hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species formation. NAC did not enhance hypoxia-induced cytochrome c release but did enhance poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage, indicating that NAC acted at a post-mitochondrial level. NAC-mediated enhancement of apoptosis was mimicked by incubating cells with GSH monoester, which increased intracellular GSH similarly to NAC. Hypoxia promoted degradation of an inhibitor of kappaB(IkappaBalpha), NFkappaB-p65 translocation into the nucleus, NFkappaB binding to DNA, and subsequent transactivation of NFkappaB, which increased X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein levels. NAC failed to block degradation by IkappaBalpha and sequestration of the p65 subunit of NFkappaB to the nucleus. However, NAC did abrogate hypoxia-induced NFkappaB binding to DNA, NFkappaB-dependent gene expression, and induction of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein. In conclusion, NAC enhanced hypoxic apoptosis by a mechanism apparently involving GSH-dependent suppression of NFkappaB transactivation.

  10. The transparency trap.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Ethan

    2014-10-01

    To promote accountability, productivity, and shared learning, many organizations create open work environments and gather reams of data on how individuals spend their time. A few years ago, HBS professor Ethan Bernstein set out to find empirical evidence that such approaches improve organizational performance. What he discovered is that this kind of transparency often has an unintended consequence: It can leave employees feeling vulnerable and exposed. When that happens, they conceal any conduct that deviates from the norm so that they won't have to explain it. Unrehearsed, experimental behaviors sometimes stop altogether. But Bernstein also discovered organizations that had established zones of privacy within open environments by setting four types of boundaries: around teams, between feedback and evaluation, between decision rights and improvement rights, and around periods of experimentation. Moreover, across several studies, the companies that had done all this were the ones that consistently got the most creative, efficient, and thoughtful work from their employees. Bernstein's conclusion? By balancing transparency and privacy, organizations can capture the benefits of both, and encourage just the right amount of "positive deviance" needed to increase innovation and productivity.

  11. Wetting transparency of graphene.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Javad; Mi, Xi; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Thomas, Abhay V; Yavari, Fazel; Shi, Yunfeng; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Koratkar, Nikhil A

    2012-01-22

    We report that graphene coatings do not significantly disrupt the intrinsic wetting behaviour of surfaces for which surface-water interactions are dominated by van der Waals forces. Our contact angle measurements indicate that a graphene monolayer is wetting-transparent to copper, gold or silicon, but not glass, for which the wettability is dominated by short-range chemical bonding. With increasing number of graphene layers, the contact angle of water on copper gradually transitions towards the bulk graphite value, which is reached for ~6 graphene layers. Molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical predictions confirm our measurements and indicate that graphene's wetting transparency is related to its extreme thinness. We also show a 30-40% increase in condensation heat transfer on copper, as a result of the ability of the graphene coating to suppress copper oxidation without disrupting the intrinsic wettability of the surface. Such an ability to independently tune the properties of surfaces without disrupting their wetting response could have important implications in the design of conducting, conformal and impermeable surface coatings.

  12. Corneal structure and transparency

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Keith M.; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. PMID:26145225

  13. Lattice Transparency of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sieun; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Kim, Youn Sang; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-03-08

    Here, we demonstrated the transparency of graphene to the atomic arrangement of a substrate surface, i.e., the "lattice transparency" of graphene, by using hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods as a model system. The growth behaviors of ZnO nanocrystals on graphene-coated and uncoated substrates with various crystal structures were investigated. The atomic arrangements of the nucleating ZnO nanocrystals exhibited a close match with those of the respective substrates despite the substrates being bound to the other side of the graphene. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we confirmed the energetic favorability of the nucleating phase following the atomic arrangement of the substrate even with the graphene layer present in between. In addition to transmitting information about the atomic lattice of the substrate, graphene also protected its surface. This dual role enabled the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods on a Cu substrate, which otherwise dissolved in the reaction conditions when graphene was absent.

  14. Corneal structure and transparency.

    PubMed

    Meek, Keith M; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Gap-bridging enhancement of modified Urca processes in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Pangeni, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear matter at neutron-star densities and temperatures, Cooper pairing leads to the formation of a gap in the nucleon excitation spectra resulting in exponentially strong Boltzmann suppression of many transport coefficients. Previous calculations have shown evidence that density oscillations of sufficiently large amplitude can overcome this suppression for flavor-changing β processes, via the mechanism of "gap bridging." We address the simplifications made in that initial work, and show that gap bridging can counteract Boltzmann suppression of neutrino emissivity for the realistic case of modified Urca processes in matter with P32 neutron pairing.

  16. Monocular transparency generates quantitative depth.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ian P; Duke, Philip A

    2003-11-01

    Monocular zones adjacent to depth steps can create an impression of depth in the absence of binocular disparity. However, the magnitude of depth is not specified. We designed a stereogram that provides information about depth magnitude but which has no disparity. The effect depends on transparency rather than occlusion. For most subjects, depth magnitude produced by monocular transparency was similar to that created by a disparity-defined depth probe. Addition of disparity to monocular transparency did not improve the accuracy of depth settings. The magnitude of depth created by monocular occlusion fell short of that created by monocular transparency.

  17. Colorless, Transparent, Aromatic Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, K. S.; Ely, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    New process yields aromatic condensation polyimide films essentially colorless. Films between 90- and 100-percent transparent at visible wavelength of 500 nm. Optically transparent polyimide films made from variety of aromatic condensation polyimides. Range from very pale in color to colorless, compared to bright yellow color of conventional/ commercial aromatic polyimide film. Increased transparency achieved at no sacrifice in thermal stability, flexibility, toughness, or mechanical properties. These features extremely attractive as films or coating materials for aerospace applications or for any other applications where high optical transparency or thermal stability is required.

  18. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  19. Transparent lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan; Jeong, Sangmoo; Hu, Liangbing; Wu, Hui; Lee, Seok Woo; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Transparent devices have recently attracted substantial attention. Various applications have been demonstrated, including displays, touch screens, and solar cells; however, transparent batteries, a key component in fully integrated transparent devices, have not yet been reported. As battery electrode materials are not transparent and have to be thick enough to store energy, the traditional approach of using thin films for transparent devices is not suitable. Here we demonstrate a grid-structured electrode to solve this dilemma, which is fabricated by a microfluidics-assisted method. The feature dimension in the electrode is below the resolution limit of human eyes, and, thus, the electrode appears transparent. Moreover, by aligning multiple electrodes together, the amount of energy stored increases readily without sacrificing the transparency. This results in a battery with energy density of 10 Wh/L at a transparency of 60%. The device is also flexible, further broadening their potential applications. The transparent device configuration also allows in situ Raman study of fundamental electrochemical reactions in batteries. PMID:21788483

  20. Nuclear CaMKII enhances histone H3 phosphorylation and remodels chromatin during cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Awad, Salma; Kunhi, Muhammad; Little, Gillian H; Bai, Yan; An, Woojin; Bers, Donald; Kedes, Larry; Poizat, Coralie

    2013-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a central role in pathological cardiac hypertrophy, but the mechanisms by which it modulates gene activity in the nucleus to mediate hypertrophic signaling remain unclear. Here, we report that nuclear CaMKII activates cardiac transcription by directly binding to chromatin and regulating the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine-10. These specific activities are demonstrated both in vitro and in primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Activation of CaMKII signaling by hypertrophic agonists increases H3 phosphorylation in primary cardiac cells and is accompanied by concomitant cellular hypertrophy. Conversely, specific silencing of nuclear CaMKII using RNA interference reduces both H3 phosphorylation and cellular hypertrophy. The hyper-phosphorylation of H3 associated with increased chromatin binding of CaMKII occurs at specific gene loci reactivated during cardiac hypertrophy. Importantly, H3 Ser-10 phosphorylation and CaMKII recruitment are associated with increased chromatin accessibility and are required for chromatin-mediated transcription of the Mef2 transcription factor. Unlike phosphorylation of H3 by other kinases, which regulates cellular proliferation and immediate early gene activation, CaMKII-mediated signaling to H3 is associated with hypertrophic growth. These observations reveal a previously unrecognized function of CaMKII as a kinase signaling to histone H3 and remodeling chromatin. They suggest a new epigenetic mechanism controlling cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. Nuclear Fusion Within Extremely Dense Plasma Enhanced by Quantum Particle Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan

    2015-05-01

    Quantum effects play an enhancement role in p-p chain reactions occurring within stars. Such an enhancement is quantified by a wave penetration factor that is proportional to the density of the participating fuel particles. This leads to an innovative theory for dense plasma, and its result shows good agreement with independent data derived from the solar energy output. An analysis of the first Z-pinch machine in mankind's history exhibiting neutron emission leads to a derived deuterium plasma beam density greater than that of water, with plasma velocities exceeding 10000 km/s. Fusion power could be achieved by the intersection of four such pinched plasma beams with powerful head-on collisions in their common focal region due to the beam and target enhanced reaction. supported by the Fund for the Construction of Graduate Degree of China (No. 2014XWD-S0805)

  2. Effects of Li+ ions on the enhancement of up-conversion emission in Ho3+-Yb3+ co-doped transparent glass-ceramics containing Ba2LaF7 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhencai; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Ren, Peng; Qiu, Jianbei

    2016-10-01

    The up-conversion (UC) emission of Ho3+-Yb3+ and Li+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics 45SiO2-15Al2O3-12Na2CO3-21BaF2-7LaF3-0.2HoF3-1YbF3-xLi2CO3 (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 mol%) containing Ba2LaF7 nanocrystals were investigated. These glass ceramics samples were prepared using the conventional quenching techniques. The Ba2LaF7 nanocrystals precipitated from the glass matrix was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared with the glass ceramics sample without Li+, the UC emission intensity of glass ceramics samples with Li+ were enhanced. It can be proved that the Li+ can affect the enhancement up-conversion (UC) emission. Particularly, the green UC emission intensity band centered at 546 nm was strongly increased twice with the concentration of Li+ increasing up to 4 mol%. Through the comparison and analysis of the energy graph, it was shown that the 5F4/5S2→5I8 transition of Ho3+ ion obtained the green (546 nm) light. There are two weak fluorescences in the red (657 nm) region and near infrared (753 nm) region of spectrum, which is the 5F4/5S2→5I7 and 5F5→5I8 transition of Ho3+. Therefore, the emission results showed that the incorporation of Li+ ions into the Ba2LaF7:Eu3+ lattice could induce a remarkable change of the emission intensity in red region (R = IED/IMD) with 393 nm excitation wavelength. It was indicated that the symmetry of the lattice was destroyed by Li+ in glass ceramics. The possible mechanism responsible for the enhancement of UC emission in Ho-Yb co-doped was discussed.

  3. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Glatkowski, P. J.; Landis, D. A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  4. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  5. Enhanced air dispersion modelling at a typical Chinese nuclear power plant site: Coupling RIMPUFF with two advanced diagnostic wind models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Li, Hong; Sun, Sida; Fang, Sheng

    2017-09-01

    An enhanced air dispersion modelling scheme is proposed to cope with the building layout and complex terrain of a typical Chinese nuclear power plant (NPP) site. In this modelling, the California Meteorological Model (CALMET) and the Stationary Wind Fit and Turbulence (SWIFT) are coupled with the Risø Mesoscale PUFF model (RIMPUFF) for refined wind field calculation. The near-field diffusion coefficient correction scheme of the Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in the Building Wakes Computer Code (ARCON96) is adopted to characterize dispersion in building arrays. The proposed method is evaluated by a wind tunnel experiment that replicates the typical Chinese NPP site. For both wind speed/direction and air concentration, the enhanced modelling predictions agree well with the observations. The fraction of the predictions within a factor of 2 and 5 of observations exceeds 55% and 82% respectively in the building area and the complex terrain area. This demonstrates the feasibility of the new enhanced modelling for typical Chinese NPP sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization–enhanced solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Belenky, Marina; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) and cryogenic temperatures to perform high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments that enhance sensitivity in magic-angle spinning NMR spectra of cryo-trapped photocycle intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by a factor of ≈90. Multidimensional spectroscopy of U-13C,15N-labeled samples resolved coexisting states and allowed chemical shift assignments in the retinylidene chromophore for several intermediates not observed previously. The correlation spectra reveal unexpected heterogeneity in dark-adapted bR, distortion in the K state, and, most importantly, 4 discrete L substates. Thermal relaxation of the mixture of L's showed that 3 of these substates revert to bR568 and that only the 1 substate with both the strongest counterion and a fully relaxed 13-cis bond is functional. These definitive observations of functional and shunt states in the bR photocycle provide a preview of the mechanistic insights that will be accessible in membrane proteins via sensitivity-enhanced DNP NMR. These observations would have not been possible absent the signal enhancement available from DNP. PMID:19474298

  7. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Vikram S; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Belenky, Marina; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-09

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) and cryogenic temperatures to perform high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments that enhance sensitivity in magic-angle spinning NMR spectra of cryo-trapped photocycle intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by a factor of approximately 90. Multidimensional spectroscopy of U-(13)C,(15)N-labeled samples resolved coexisting states and allowed chemical shift assignments in the retinylidene chromophore for several intermediates not observed previously. The correlation spectra reveal unexpected heterogeneity in dark-adapted bR, distortion in the K state, and, most importantly, 4 discrete L substates. Thermal relaxation of the mixture of L's showed that 3 of these substates revert to bR(568) and that only the 1 substate with both the strongest counterion and a fully relaxed 13-cis bond is functional. These definitive observations of functional and shunt states in the bR photocycle provide a preview of the mechanistic insights that will be accessible in membrane proteins via sensitivity-enhanced DNP NMR. These observations would have not been possible absent the signal enhancement available from DNP.

  8. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade and Improvement of Surface Diagnostic Capabilities at STAR Facility for Enhancing Tritium and Nuclear PMI Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, M.; Taylor, C. N.; Pawelko, R. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Merrill, B. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials with tritium [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. The plasma-material-interaction (PMI) determines a boundary condition for diffusing tritium into bulk PFCs, and the tritium PMI is crucial for enhancing fundamental sciences that dictate tritium fuel cycles and safety and are high importance to an FNSF and DEMO. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  9. Analysis of sensitivity enhancement by dynamic nuclear polarization in solid-state NMR: a case study of functionalized mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Lafon, Olivier; Thankamony, Aany S Lilly; Slowing, Igor I; Kandel, Kapil; Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Vezin, Hervé; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pruski, Marek

    2013-04-21

    We systematically studied the enhancement factor (per scan) and the sensitivity enhancement (per unit time) in (13)C and (29)Si cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR boosted by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). Specifically, we separated contributions due to: (i) microwave irradiation, (ii) quenching by paramagnetic effects, (iii) the presence of frozen solvent, (iv) the temperature, as well as changes in (v) relaxation and (vi) cross-polarization behaviour. No line-broadening effects were observed for MSNs when lowering the temperature from 300 to 100 K. Notwithstanding a significant signal reduction due to quenching by TOTAPOL radicals, DNP-CP-MAS at 100 K provided global sensitivity enhancements of 23 and 45 for (13)C and (29)Si, respectively, relative to standard CP-MAS measurements at room temperature. The effects of DNP were also ascertained by comparing with state-of-the-art two-dimensional heteronuclear (1)H{(13)C} and (29)Si{(1)H} correlation spectra, using, respectively, indirect detection or Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) refocusing to boost signal acquisition. This study highlights opportunities for further improvements through the development of high-field DNP, better polarizing agents, and improved capabilities for low-temperature MAS.

  10. Development of analytical Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for sensitivity enhancement and mixture analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Steven Tung-Kuen.

    1989-01-01

    FT-NMR has been explored with regard to its ability to analyze mixtures. The recycled-flow NMR method, which permits premagnetized nuclei to flow into the detector before acquisition, allows substantial sensitivity enhancement, especially for those nuclei with inefficient relaxation mechanisms. The enhancement factor of flow NMR over static NMR is between 3.5-5 for the slowly relaxing carbon nuclei. Similar enhancements have been observed in 1D spin-echo and 2D J-resolved experiments. A mathematical discussion of the potential enhancement in recycled-flow NMR indicates that this enhancement could be as large as 20. In addition, flow NMR also provides accurate quantitative {sup 13}C data in substantially less time. These dual advantages of recycled-flow NMR have been applied to analyze two mixtures and to determine the MW{sub n} of several polyethylene glycols. An on-line continuous-flow high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/{sup 1}H NMR system has been developed on a 400 MHz FT-NMR spectrometer. The detection limit of this system is estimated to be 30 {mu}g, using alanine and caffeine as test samples. For practical HPLC/NMR analyses, a 200 {mu}g quantity of material may be required. The eluent used in reversed-phase (RP)-HPLC, which interfaces with the proton signals of the eluates, is suppressed by the binomial and WATR (Water Attenuation by T{sub 2} Relaxation) pulse methods. RP-HPLC/{sup 1}H NMR is applied to the separation and identification of antimycin A, a class of antibiotics used in fishery management, and its degradation products, antimycin lactones. A method based on the long range J-resolved (LRJR) NMR experiment is developed to analyze mixtures. LRJR is used to select those carbons that are modulated due to the long range {sub 1}H-{sup 13}C coupling to a specific proton(s).

  11. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  12. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team indicates

  13. Enhanced effect of C P -violating nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment in a HfF+ molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Titov, A. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The HfF+ cation is a very promising system to use in the search for the electron electric dipole moment (EDM), and a corresponding experiment is carried out by JILA group [H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, and E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013), 10.1126/science.1243683; K.-K. Ni, H. Loh, M. Grau, K. C. Cossel, J. Ye, and E. A. Cornell, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 300, 12 (2014), 10.1016/j.jms.2014.02.001. Here we theoretically investigate the cation to search for another effect which violates time-reversal (T ) and spatial parity (P ) symmetries—the nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM) interaction with electrons. We report an accurate ab initio relativistic electronic structure calculations of the molecular parameter WM=0.494 10/33Hz e cm2 that is required to interpret the experimental data in terms of the MQM of the Hf nucleus. For this we have implemented and applied the combined Dirac-Coulomb(-Gaunt) and relativistic effective core potential approaches to treat electron correlation effects from all of the electrons and to take into account high-order correlation effects using the coupled cluster method with single, double, triple and noniterative quadruple cluster amplitudes. We discuss interpretation of the MQM effect in terms of the strength constants of T ,P -odd nuclear forces, proton and neutron EDMs, the QCD parameter θ , and quark chromo-EDMs.

  14. Transparency in psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Helen M

    2012-09-01

    Transparency in medical care is emerging as a new standard. In the United States, patients have always been able to access to their chart in accordance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), established in 1996. Such access, nevertheless, can be time consuming and burdensome. Among the many provisions afforded by HIPAA are the security and privacy of health data. Physicians are recently coming to realize the benefits enjoyed by patients and the healthcare system when the information in a patient's chart is made available in real-time. Psychiatrists often find the concept of revealing their progress notes, however, quite provocative and controversial. In these evolving times, it is important for psychiatrists to recognize the potential consequences and advantages of sharing their progress notes with patients. This review provides guidelines for psychiatrists to follow regarding proper documentation of progress notes and how to successfully share that information with patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stakeholder Transportation Scorecard: Reviewing Nevada's Recommendations for Enhancing the Safety and Security of Nuclear Waste Shipments - 13518

    SciTech Connect

    Dilger, Fred C.; Ballard, James D.; Halstead, Robert J.

    2013-07-01

    As a primary stakeholder in the Yucca Mountain program, the state of Nevada has spent three decades examining and considering national policy regarding spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation. During this time, Nevada has identified 10 issues it believes are critical to ensuring the safety and security of any spent nuclear fuel transportation program, and achieving public acceptance. These recommendations are: 1) Ship the oldest fuel first; 2) Ship mostly by rail; 3) Use dual-purpose (transportable storage) casks; 4) Use dedicated trains for rail shipments; 5) Implement a full-scale cask testing program; 6) Utilize a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for the selection of a new rail spur to the proposed repository site; 7) Implement the Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB) 'straw man' process for route selection; 8) Implement Section 180C assistance to affected States, Tribes and localities through rulemaking; 9) Adopt safety and security regulatory enhancements proposed states; and 10) Address stakeholder concerns about terrorism and sabotage. This paper describes Nevada's proposals in detail and examines their current status. The paper describes the various forums and methods by which Nevada has presented its arguments and sought to influence national policy. As of 2012, most of Nevada's recommendations have been adopted in one form or another, although not yet implemented. If implemented in a future nuclear waste program, the State of Nevada believes these recommendations would form the basis for a successful national transportation plan for shipments to a geologic repository and/or centralized interim storage facility. (authors)

  16. Cytogenetic biodosimetry for Fukushima travelers after the nuclear power plant accident: no evidence of enhanced yield of dicentrics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Han, Eun-Ae; Lee, Seung-Sook; Ha, Wi-Ho; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Lee, Hyo Rak; Cho, Min Su

    2012-11-01

    Individuals who traveled to contaminated areas after the Fukushima nuclear accident have concerns about the health effects. However, medical follow-up for any adverse health effects will be difficult without personal dose measurements. Cytogenetic biodosimetry is a reasonable method of assessing absorbed doses retrospectively. We analyzed dicentric chromosomes for 265 Fukushima travelers, mostly journalists and rescue workers, who had been dispatched to northeastern Japan during the nuclear emergency. As a control group, 37 healthy volunteers who had not visited Japan since the accident were enrolled. Yields of dicentrics and absorbed doses calculated from a dose-response calibration curve for travelers and the control group were compared. The cut-off level for dicentric chromosomes in the controls was 3.5 per 1000 cells. Of the 265 travelers, 31 had elevated numbers of dicentrics (High-Dics group) while 234 were below the cut-off (Normal-Dics group). All but one of the individuals in the High-Dics group also reported a significantly higher number of medical exposures to radiation within the past three years compared with the Normal-Dics or control groups. The 225 travelers with no history of medical exposure showed no difference of dicentrics yield compared to the control group. Our data indicate that Fukushima travel alone did not enhance the yield of dicentrics.

  17. Enzymatic repair of selected cross-linked homoduplex molecules enhances nuclear gene rescue from Pompeii and Herculaneum remains

    PubMed Central

    Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cammarota, Marcella; Galderisi, Umberto; Cascino, Antonino; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) samples extracted from the bone remains of six equids buried by the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD were investigated to test pre-amplification and enzymatic repair procedures designed to enhance the rescue of nuclear genes. The extracts, which proved all positive for Equidae mtDNA amplification, proved positive only four times out of 18 when tested for single-copy Equidae nuclear genes (ɛ globin, p53 and γ interferon). Pre-amplification did not change the number of retrieved aDNA sequences but 10 times out of 14 enzymatic repair restored the amplifiability of the genes analysed, proving that repair increases the rate of successful rescue from 22 to αλµοστ 80%. These findings support the hypothesis that some of these cross-linked aDNA molecules, which are not completely separated when DNA is extracted under denaturing conditions, become homoduplex substrates for Pol I and/or T4 ligase action upon renaturation. aDNA authenticity is proved by the homology of the nucleotide sequences of loci tested to the corresponding modern Equidae sequences. Data also indicate that cross-linked homoduplex molecules selected by denaturation of the extract are repaired without any chimera formation. The general features of aDNA amplification with and without denaturation and enzymatic repair are discussed. PMID:11842122

  18. Enzymatic repair of selected cross-linked homoduplex molecules enhances nuclear gene rescue from Pompeii and Herculaneum remains.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cammarota, Marcella; Galderisi, Umberto; Cascino, Antonino; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2002-02-15

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) samples extracted from the bone remains of six equids buried by the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD were investigated to test pre-amplification and enzymatic repair procedures designed to enhance the rescue of nuclear genes. The extracts, which proved all positive for Equidae mtDNA amplification, proved positive only four times out of 18 when tested for single-copy Equidae nuclear genes (epsilon globin, p53 and gamma interferon). Pre-amplification did not change the number of retrieved aDNA sequences but 10 times out of 14 enzymatic repair restored the amplifiability of the genes analysed, proving that repair increases the rate of successful rescue from 22 to alpha(lambda)mu(omicron)sigma(tau) 80%. These findings support the hypothesis that some of these cross-linked aDNA molecules, which are not completely separated when DNA is extracted under denaturing conditions, become homoduplex substrates for Pol I and/or T4 ligase action upon renaturation. aDNA authenticity is proved by the homology of the nucleotide sequences of loci tested to the corresponding modern Equidae sequences. Data also indicate that cross-linked homoduplex molecules selected by denaturation of the extract are repaired without any chimera formation. The general features of aDNA amplification with and without denaturation and enzymatic repair are discussed.

  19. Cytogenetic biodosimetry for Fukushima travelers after the nuclear power plant accident: no evidence of enhanced yield of dicentrics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Han, Eun-Ae; Lee, Seung-Sook; Ha, Wi-Ho; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Lee, Hyo Rak; Cho, Min Su

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who traveled to contaminated areas after the Fukushima nuclear accident have concerns about the health effects. However, medical follow-up for any adverse health effects will be difficult without personal dose measurements. Cytogenetic biodosimetry is a reasonable method of assessing absorbed doses retrospectively. We analyzed dicentric chromosomes for 265 Fukushima travelers, mostly journalists and rescue workers, who had been dispatched to northeastern Japan during the nuclear emergency. As a control group, 37 healthy volunteers who had not visited Japan since the accident were enrolled. Yields of dicentrics and absorbed doses calculated from a dose-response calibration curve for travelers and the control group were compared. The cut-off level for dicentric chromosomes in the controls was 3.5 per 1000 cells. Of the 265 travelers, 31 had elevated numbers of dicentrics (High-Dics group) while 234 were below the cut-off (Normal-Dics group). All but one of the individuals in the High-Dics group also reported a significantly higher number of medical exposures to radiation within the past three years compared with the Normal-Dics or control groups. The 225 travelers with no history of medical exposure showed no difference of dicentrics yield compared to the control group. Our data indicate that Fukushima travel alone did not enhance the yield of dicentrics. PMID:22859566

  20. Theory of absorption-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Sergio G.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2013-10-01

    Recent experiments [Hutchison, O’Carroll, Schwartz, Genet, and Ebbesen, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.1433-785110.1002/anie.201006019 50, 2085 (2011)] have demonstrated that optical transmission through an array of subwavelength holes in a metal film can be enhanced by the intentional presence of dyes in the system. As the transmission maximum occurs spectrally close to the absorption resonances of the dyes, this phenomenon was christened “absorption induced transparency”. Here, a theoretical study on absorption induced transparency is presented. The results show that the appearance of transmission maxima requires that the absorbent fills the holes and that it occurs also for single holes. Furthermore, it is shown that the transmission process is nonresonant, being composed by a sequential passage of the electromagnetic field through the hole. Finally, the physical origin of the phenomenon is demonstrated to be nonplasmonic, which implies that absorption induced transparency should also occur at the infrared or terahertz frequency regimes.

  1. Alternatives to Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy Presat and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Presat for NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Le Guennec, Adrien; Tayyari, Fariba; Edison, Arthur S

    2017-09-05

    NMR metabolomics are primarily conducted with 1D nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) presat for water suppression and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) presat as a T2 filter to remove macromolecule signals. Others pulse sequences exist for these two objectives but are not often used in metabolomics studies, because they are less robust or unknown to the NMR metabolomics community. However, recent improvements on alternative pulse sequences provide attractive alternatives to 1D NOESY presat and CPMG presat. We focus this perspective on PURGE, a water suppression technique, and PROJECT presat, a T2 filter. These two pulse sequences, when optimized, performed at least on par with 1D NOESY presat and CPMG presat, if not better. These pulse sequences were tested on common samples for metabolomics, human plasma, and urine.

  2. Use of the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) for enhanced receipt confirmation measurements at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Mattingly; T.E. Valentine; J.T. Mihalczo

    2000-05-30

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) developed by the Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been used at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant to perform enhanced receipts confirmation measurements providing mass estimates on low mass HEU metal pieces in shipping containers. For this application, NMIS was used in its active mode with a small Cf source on one side of the shipping container and detectors on the other side. Second order correlation measurements with calibration standards were utilized to obtain the mass of HEU. This was the first use of NMIS for receipts at the Y-12 Plant. This was a cost-effective method for measuring the mass of receipts with as many as 64 items measured in one day. This paper describes the reasons for using the NMIS for this application. The measurement technique and evaluation of the measurement data for this application are also described.

  3. Development of a magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe with a cryogenic detection system for sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takashi; Hioka, Katsuya; Fujioka, Koji; Takegoshi, K

    2008-04-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe for high-resolution solid-state NMR has been developed. In this probe, temperature of the detection coil is kept at cryogenic temperature (approximately 12 K) for sensitivity enhancement, which is achieved not only by suppression of thermal noise but also by increment of a Q factor of the coil. A marked feature of this probe is that a sample rotating at magic angle is thermally isolated from the cryogenic system in order to realize high-resolution solid-state NMR measurement at various sample temperatures. We call this system as cryocoil magic-angle spinning (cryocoil MAS). (1)H MAS NMR with the coil temperature of approximately 20 K was successfully observed for solid adamantane rotating at room temperature, and signal-to-noise increment due to this cryocoil approach was confirmed.

  4. Nanocellulose reinforcement of Transparent Composites

    Treesearch

    Joshua Steele; Hong Dong; James F. Snyder; Josh A. Orlicki; Richard S. Reiner; Alan W. Rudie

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the impact of nanocellulose reinforcement on transparent composite properties. Due to the small diameter, high modulus, and high strength of cellulose nanocrystals, transparent composites that utilize these materials should show improvement in bulk mechanical performances without a corresponding reduction in optical properties. In this study...

  5. Student Perceptions of Teaching Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alecia D.; Hunt, Andrea N.; Powell, Rachel E.; Dollar, Cindy Brooks

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss the relationship between teaching transparency and active learning through the perspectives of their students. Active learning directly engages students in the learning process while transparency involves the instructor's divulgence of logic regarding course organization and activity choices. After utilizing these teaching…

  6. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Franks, W Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-21

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

  7. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Franks, W. Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids comprised of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20 – 64 fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4 – 18.8 T) and temperature (109 – 180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine sidechain conformers, unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules, and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR as an excellent tool for characterization of HIV-1 assemblies. PMID:26709853

  8. A novel Chk1-binding peptide that enhances genotoxic sensitivity through the cellular redistribution of nuclear Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Seok; Choi, Kyu Jin; Bae, Sangwoo

    2016-01-01

    Since checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is an essential factor for cell viability following DNA damage, the inhibition of Chk1 has been a major focus of pharmaceutical development to enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy that damage DNA. However, due to the off-target effects of conventional Chk1-targeting strategies and the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors, alternative strategies are required to target Chk1. To facilitate such efforts, in this study, we identified a specific Chk1-binding 12-mer peptide from the screening of a phage display library and characterized the peptide in terms of cellular cytotoxicity, and in terms of its effect on Chk1 activity and sensitivity to genotoxic agents. This peptide, named N-terminal Chk1-binding peptide (Chk1-NP), bound the kinase domain of Chk1. Simulation of the binding revealed that the very N-terminus of the Chk1 kinase domain is the potential peptide binding site. Of note, the polyarginine-mediated internalization of Chk1-NP redistributed nuclear Chk1 with a prominent decrease in the nucleus in the absence of DNA damage. Treatment with Chk1-NP peptide alone decreased the viability of p53-defective HeLa cells, but not that of p53-functional NCI-H460 cells under normal conditions. The treatment of HeLa or NCI-H460 cells with the peptide significantly enhanced radiation sensitivity following ionizing radiation (IR) with a greater enhancement observed in HeLa cells. Moreover, the IR-induced destabilization of Chk1 was aggravated by treatment with Chk1-NP. Therefore, the decreased nuclear localization and protein levels of Chk1 seem to be responsible for the enhanced cancer cell killing following combined treatment with IR and Chk1-NP. The approach using the specific Chk1-binding peptide may facilitate the mechanistic understanding and potential modulation of Chk1 activities and may provide a novel rationale for the development of specific Chk1-targeting agents. PMID:28025997

  9. Local Water Dynamics in Coacervated Polyelectrolytes Monitored Through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced 1H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kausik, Ravinath; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Korevaar, Peter A.; Stucky, Galen; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    We present the first study of quantifying the diffusion coefficient of interfacial water on polyelectrolyte surfaces of systems fully dispersed in bulk water under ambient conditions. Such measurements were made possible through the implementation of a recently introduced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) technique to selectively amplify the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of hydration water that is interacting with specifically located spin labels on polyelectrolyte surfaces. The merit of this novel capability is demonstrated in this report through the measurement of solvent microvisosity on the surface of two types of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, when freely dissolved versus when complexed to form a liquid-liquid colloidal phase called complex coacervates. These complex coacervates were formed through electrostatic complexation between the imidazole-based cationic homopolymer poly(N-vinylimidazole) (PVIm), and anionic polypeptide polyaspartate (PAsp) in the pH range of 4.5 – 6.0, under which conditions the coacervate droplets are highly fluidic yet densely packed with polyelectrolytes. We also investigated the rotational diffusion coefficients of the spin labels covalently bound to the polyelectrolyte chains for both PVIm and PAsp, showing a 5 fold change in the rotational correlation time as well as anisotropy parameter upon coacervation, which represents a surprisingly small decrease given the high polymer concentration inside the dense microdroplets. For both DNP and ESR experiments, the polymers were covalently tagged with stable nitroxide radical spin labels (∼1 wt %) to probe the local solvent and polymer segment dynamics. We found that the surface water diffusion coefficients near uncomplexed PVIm and PAsp at pH 8 differ, and are around D∼1.3×10−9 m2 / s. In contrast, inside the complex coacervate phase, the water diffusion coefficient in the immediate vicinity of either polyelectrolyte was D∼ 0.25×10−9 m2 / s, which is about

  10. Purification of a mouse nuclear factor that binds to both the A and B cores of the polyomavirus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kamachi, Y; Ogawa, E; Asano, M; Ishida, S; Murakami, Y; Satake, M; Ito, Y; Shigesada, K

    1990-01-01

    We have previously identified a protein factor, PEBP2 (polyomavirus enhancer-binding protein), in the nuclear extract from mouse NIH 3T3 cells which binds to the sequence motif, PEA2, located within the polyomavirus enhancer A element. Upon cellular transformation with activated oncogene c-Ha-ras, this factor frequently undergoes drastic molecular modifications into an altered form having a considerably reduced molecular size. In this study, the altered form, PEBP3, was purified to near homogeneity. The purified PEBP3 comprised two sets of families of polypeptides, alpha-1 to alpha-4 and beta-1 to beta-2, which were 30 to 35 kilodaltons and 20 to 25 kilodaltons in size, respectively. Both kinds of polypeptides possessed DNA-binding activities with exactly the same sequence specificity. Individual alpha or beta polypeptides complexed with DNA showed faster gel mobilities than did PEBP3. However, the original gel retardation pattern was restored when alpha and beta polypeptides were mixed together in any arbitrary pair. These observation along with the results of UV- and chemical-cross-linking studies led us to conclude that PEBP3 is a heterodimer of alpha and beta subunits, potentially having a divalent DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, PEBP3 was found to bind a second, hitherto-unnoticed site of the polyomavirus enhancer that is located within the B element and coincides with the sequence previously known as the simian virus 40 enhancer core homology. From comparison of this and the original binding sites, the consensus sequence for PEBP3 was defined to be PuACCPuCA. These findings provided new insights into the biological significance of PEBP3 and PEBP2. Images PMID:2168969

  11. Growth of semiconductor nanostructures by MBE for the study of electron and nuclear spin enhancement and other physical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is an extremely versatile thin film technique, which can produce single-crystal layers with atomic dimensional controls and thus permit the preparation of novel structures and devices tailored to meet specific needs. Spin relaxation time ts is one of the key features in spin-related phenomena and thus of great importance for spintronics. In this work, we prepare high quality samples, mainly of CdTe epilayers, by MBE, characterize their spin relaxation dynamics, and discuss the results theoretically. First, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms of electron relaxation dynamics and nuclear spin enhancement, we focus on the growth and characterization of CdTe epilayers. By changing the shutter sequences and inserting ZnSe buffer layer, we have reproducibly grown (111) and (100) CdTe epilayers of high crystalline qualities by MBE, despite the large lattice mismatch between CdTe and GaAs substrate. Then we investigate ts for the (111) and (100) CdTe epilayers. It is found that for the (111) CdTe, spin relaxation rate t-1s is significantly enhanced and shows no temperature dependence through 130K to 300K, while t-1s for the (100) CdTe is strongly affected by the temperature. It is also found that t-1s is dependent on material quality for both (111) and (100) CdTe. We theoretically discuss the effect of strain and defect on spin relaxation time of CdTe. It is the first experimental observation of the effect of strain on t-1s in a II-VI semiconductor material. Second, the growth and characterization of ZnTe/ZnSe related type II quantum structures, or quantum dots (QDs), are also presented in this work. The PL of Zn-Se-Te related type II quantum structures show blue shifts with higher intensities of exciting laser, an indication of type II QDs. Besides being an attractive method to p-type dope wide bandgap materials, the resulting material may be a promising structure for spin enhancement properties. Third, we present the study of the

  12. Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Yang, Yong Austin

    2013-10-28

    The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

  13. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-06-15

    Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

  14. Introducing modern technology to promote transparency in health services.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Shafiqul

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative indicators show that Bangladeshi maternal and child healthcare is progressing satisfactorily. However, healthcare quality is still inadequate. It is hypothesised that modern technology enhances healthcare quality. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how modern technology such as electronic record keeping and the internet can contribute to enhancing Bangladeshi healthcare quality. This study also explores how socio-economic and political factors affect the healthcare quality. This paper is based on a qualitative case study involving 68 in-depth interviews with healthcare professionals, elected representatives, local informants and five focus group discussions with healthcare service users to understand technology's effect on health service quality. The study has been conducted in one rural and one urban service organisations to understand how various factors contribute differently to healthcare quality. The findings show that modern technology, such as the internet and electronic devices for record keeping, contribute significantly to enhancing health service transparency, which in turn leads to quality health and family planning services. The findings also show that information and communication technology (ICT) is an effective mechanism for reducing corruption and promoting transparency. However, resource constraints impact adversely on the introduction of technology, which leads to less transparent healthcare. Progress in education and general socio-economic conditions makes it suitable to enhance ICT usage, which could lead to healthcare transparency, but political and bureaucratic factors pose a major challenge to ensure transparency. This paper can be a useful guide for promoting governance and healthcare quality in developing countries including Bangladesh. It analyses the ICT challenges that healthcare staff face when promoting transparent healthcare. This paper provides a deeper understanding of transparency and healthcare

  15. Energy and nuclear charge dependence of abundance enhancements of solar cosmic ray heavy ions in three large solar events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Durgaprasad, N.; Vahia, M. N.

    1983-11-01

    The differential flux and energy spectra of solar cosmic ray heavy ions of He, C, 0, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe were determined in the energy interval E = 3-30 MeV amu-1 for two large solar events of January 24, 1971 and September 1, 1971 in rocket flights made from Ft. Churchill. From these data the relative abundances and the abundance enhancement factors, c, relative to photospheric abundances were obtained for these elements. Similar results were obtained for a third event on August 4, 1972 from the available published data. Characteristic features of c vs nuclear charge dependences were deduced for five energy intervals. The energy dependence of c for He shows a moderate change by a factor of about 3, whereas for Fe, c shows a very dramatic decrease by a factor of 10-20 with increasing energy. It is inferred that these abundance enhancements of solar cosmic ray heavy ions at low energies seem to be related to their ionization states (Z*) and hence studies of Z* can give information on the important parameters such as temperature and density in the accelerating region in the Sun.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  17. TM6, a novel nuclear matrix attachment region, enhances its flanking gene expression through influencing their chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lusha; Xu, Rui; Lu, Longtao; Zhang, Jiedao; Yang, Guodong; Huang, Jinguang; Wu, Changai; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) regulate the higher-order organization of chromatin and affect the expression of their flanking genes. In this study, a tobacco MAR, TM6, was isolated and demonstrated to remarkably increase the expression of four different promoters that drive gusA gene and adjacent nptII gene. In turn, this expression enhanced the transformation frequency of transgenic tobacco. Deletion analysis of topoisomerase II-binding site, AT-rich element, and MAR recognition signature (MRS) showed that MRS has the highest contribution (61.7%) to the TM6 sequence-mediated transcription activation. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility assay showed that 35S and NOS promoter regions with TM6 are more sensitive than those without TM6. The analysis also revealed that TM6 reduces promoter DNA methylation which can affect the gusA expression. In addition, two tobacco chromatin-associated proteins, NtMBP1 and NtHMGB, isolated using a yeast one-hybrid system, specifically bound to the TM6II-1 region (761 bp to 870 bp) and to the MRS element in the TM6II-2 (934 bp to 1,021 bp) region, respectively. We thus suggested that TM6 mediated its chromatin opening and chromatin accessibility of its flanking promoters with consequent enhancement of transcription.

  18. ATHB17 enhances stress tolerance by coordinating photosynthesis associated nuclear gene and ATSIG5 expression in response to abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Cui, Rong; Xu, Ping; Wu, Jie; Mao, Jie-Li; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Yu, Lin-Hui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis is sensitive to environmental stress and must be efficiently modulated in response to abiotic stress. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report that ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 17 (ATHB17), an Arabidopsis HD-Zip transcription factor, regulated the expression of a number of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) involved in the light reaction and ATSIG5 in response to abiotic stress. ATHB17 was responsive to ABA and multiple stress treatments. ATHB17-overexpressing plants displayed enhanced stress tolerance, whereas its knockout mutant was more sensitive compared to the wild type. Through RNA-seq and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, we found that ATHB17 did not affect the expression of many known stress-responsive marker genes. Interestingly, we found that ATHB17 down-regulated many PhANGs and could directly modulate the expression of several PhANGs by binding to their promoters. Moreover, we identified ATSIG5, encoding a plastid sigma factor, as one of the target genes of ATHB17. Loss of ATSIG5 reduced salt tolerance while overexpression of ATSIG5 enhanced salt tolerance, similar to that of ATHB17. ATHB17 can positively modulate the expression of many plastid encoded genes (PEGs) through regulation of ATSIG5. Taken together, our results suggest that ATHB17 may play an important role in protecting plants by adjusting expression of PhANGs and PEGs in response to abiotic stresses. PMID:28358040

  19. Feasibility Study of Compton Scattering Enhanced Multiple Pinhole Imager for Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L. J.; Rogers, W. L.; Clinthorne, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of a Compton scattering enhanced (CSE) multiple pinhole imaging system for gamma rays with energy of 140keV or higher. This system consists of a multiple-pinhole collimator, a position sensitive scintillation detector as used in standard Gamma camera, and a Silicon pad detector array, inserted between the collimator and the scintillation detector. The problem of multiplexing, normally associated with multiple pinhole system, is reduced by using the extra information from the detected Compton scattering events. In order to compensate for the sensitivity loss, due to the low probability of detecting Compton scattered events, the proposed detector is designed to collect both Compton scattering and Non-Compton events. It has been shown that with properly selected pinhole spacing, the proposed detector design leads to an improved image quality.

  20. Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR): dramatic sensitivity enhancement by large and fast temperature lowering.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Maude; Retournard, Alain; Canet, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    We have observed that, when going rapidly from ambient temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature, the nitrogen-14 NQR signal (for transitions involving the m=0 spin state, nitrogen-14 being a quadrupolar nucleus of spin I=1) is increased by a factor of ca. 10(2). While Boltzmann statistics cannot explain this enhancement, the strong temperature dependence of the quadrupolar interaction is very likely to be at the origin of this phenomenon. Indeed, the quadrupolar Hamiltonian becomes time dependent and is prone to induce transitions toward the spin state associated with m=0. Its binding and slow relaxing properties result in a durable increased population and consequently in an increased intensity of NQR lines originating from the state m=0.

  1. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  2. Air transparent soundproof window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-01

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  3. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  4. Electromagnetically induced transparency in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Li, Bei-Bei; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a quantum interference effect arising from different transition pathways of optical fields. Within the transparency window, both absorption and dispersion properties strongly change, which results in extensive applications such as slow light and optical storage. Due to the ultrahigh quality factors, massive production on a chip and convenient all-optical control, optical microcavities provide an ideal platform for realizing EIT. Here we review the principle and recent development of EIT in optical microcavities. We focus on the following three situations. First, for a coupled-cavity system, all-optical EIT appears when the optical modes in different cavities couple to each other. Second, in a single microcavity, all-optical EIT is created when interference happens between two optical modes. Moreover, the mechanical oscillation of the microcavity leads to optomechanically induced transparency. Then the applications of EIT effect in microcavity systems are discussed, including light delay and storage, sensing, and field enhancement. A summary is then given in the final part of the paper.

  5. Nuclear domain 'knock-in' screen for the evaluation and identification of small molecule enhancers of CRISPR-based genome editing.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham

    2015-10-30

    CRISPR is a genome-editing platform that makes use of the bacterially-derived endonuclease Cas9 to introduce DNA double-strand breaks at precise locations in the genome using complementary guide RNAs. We developed a nuclear domain knock-in screen, whereby the insertion of a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein variant Clover is inserted by Cas9-mediated homology directed repair (HDR) within the first exon of genes that are required for the structural integrity of subnuclear domains such as the nuclear lamina and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs). Using this approach, we compared strategies for enhancing CRISPR-mediated HDR, focusing on known genes and small molecules that impact non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, we identified the small molecule RS-1 as a potent enhancer of CRISPR-based genome editing, enhancing HDR 3- to 6-fold depending on the locus and transfection method. We also characterized U2OS human osteosarcoma cells expressing Clover-tagged PML and demonstrate that this strategy generates cell lines with PML NBs that are structurally and functionally similar to bodies in the parental cell line. Thus, the nuclear domain knock-in screen that we describe provides a simple means of rapidly evaluating methods and small molecules that have the potential to enhance Cas9-mediated HDR.

  6. Nuclear domain ‘knock-in’ screen for the evaluation and identification of small molecule enhancers of CRISPR-based genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR is a genome-editing platform that makes use of the bacterially-derived endonuclease Cas9 to introduce DNA double-strand breaks at precise locations in the genome using complementary guide RNAs. We developed a nuclear domain knock-in screen, whereby the insertion of a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein variant Clover is inserted by Cas9-mediated homology directed repair (HDR) within the first exon of genes that are required for the structural integrity of subnuclear domains such as the nuclear lamina and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs). Using this approach, we compared strategies for enhancing CRISPR-mediated HDR, focusing on known genes and small molecules that impact non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, we identified the small molecule RS-1 as a potent enhancer of CRISPR-based genome editing, enhancing HDR 3- to 6-fold depending on the locus and transfection method. We also characterized U2OS human osteosarcoma cells expressing Clover-tagged PML and demonstrate that this strategy generates cell lines with PML NBs that are structurally and functionally similar to bodies in the parental cell line. Thus, the nuclear domain knock-in screen that we describe provides a simple means of rapidly evaluating methods and small molecules that have the potential to enhance Cas9-mediated HDR. PMID:26429972

  7. DOE, 2013. A Report to the Secretary of Energy: Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-02-01

    In the six months after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took several actions to review the safety of its nuclear facilities and identify situations where near-term improvements could be made. These actions and recommendations were addressed in an August 2011 report to the Secretary of Energy, Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events. Based on recommendations in the August 2011 report, DOE embarked on a project to develop and refine guidance that supports improvements in DOE’s processes for analyzing and mitigating beyond design basis events (BDBEs), i.e., events such as earthquakes that are more severe than the events that formed the basis of the design for DOE’s nuclear facilities. The results of this BDBE project and recommendations for further DOE actions are provided in this follow-on report. The main activity of the BDBE project was the pilot application of guidance for evaluation of BDBE analysis and mitigation features at four DOE nuclear facilities representing a range of DOE sites, nuclear facility types/activities, and responsible program offices. The pilot evaluations focused on: (1) BDBE evaluations as documented in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA); (2) potential BDBE vulnerabilities and margins to failure for facility safety features as obtained from general area and specific system walkdowns and design document reviews; and, (3) preparations made in facility and site emergency management programs to respond to severe accidents. The BDBE project also evaluated whether draft BDBE guidance on safety analysis and emergency management could be used to improve the analysis of, and preparations for, mitigating severe accidents and BDBEs. The pilot evaluation team paid close attention to related actions being pursued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. commercial nuclear industry, and the

  8. Transparency and accountability

    PubMed Central

    Pulverer, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    EMBO Molecular Medicine is enriched by a number of innovative policies designed to enhance the editorial process: peer review process files, de-emphasis of confidential referee comments and cross-refereeing. PMID:20734350

  9. Prostaglandin A2 Enhances Cellular Insulin Sensitivity via a Mechanism that Involves the Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A3

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X.; Walton, R. G.; Tian, L.; Luo, N.; Ho, S-R.; Fu, Y.; Garvey, W. T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that members of the NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors can augment insulin’s ability to stimulate glucose transport in adipocytes. In the current study, we endeavored to test for an insulin-sensitizing effect in muscle cells and to identify a potential transactivator. Lentiviral constructs were used to engineer both hyperexpression and shRNA silencing of NR4A3 in C2C12 myocytes. The NR4A3 hyper-expression construct led to a significant increase in glucose transport rates in the presence of maximal insulin while the NR4A3 knock-down exhibited a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates. Consistently, insulin-mediated AKT phosphorylation was increased by NR4A3 hyperexpression and decreased following shRNA NR4A3 suppression. Then, we examined effects of prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) on insulin action and NR4A3 transactivation. PGA2 augmented insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in C2C12 myocytes and AKT phosphorylation after 12-h treatment, without significant effects on basal transport or basal AKT phosphorylation. More importantly, we demonstrated that PGA2 led to a greater improvement in insulin-stimulated glucose rates in NR4A3 overexpressing C2C12 myocytes, when compared with Lac-Z controls stimulated with insulin and PGA2. Moreover, the sensitizing effect of PGA2 was significantly diminished in NR4A3 knockdown myocytes compared to scramble controls. These results show for the first time that: (i) PGA2 augments insulin action in myocytes as manifested by enhanced stimulation of glucose transport and AKT phosphorylation; and (ii) the insulin sensitizing effect is dependent upon the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3. PMID:23104421

  10. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  11. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  12. A synthetic snRNA m3G-CAP enhances nuclear delivery of exogenous proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pedro M D; Wenska, Malgorzata; Lundin, Karin E; Wrange, Orjan; Strömberg, Roger; Smith, C I Edvard

    2009-04-01

    Accessing the nucleus through the surrounding membrane poses one of the major obstacles for therapeutic molecules large enough to be excluded due to nuclear pore size limits. In some therapeutic applications the large size of some nucleic acids, like plasmid DNA, hampers their access to the nuclear compartment. However, also for small oligonucleotides, achieving higher nuclear concentrations could be of great benefit. We report on the synthesis and possible applications of a natural RNA 5'-end nuclear localization signal composed of a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap (m(3)G-CAP). The cap is found in the small nuclear RNAs that are constitutive part of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in nuclear splicing. We demonstrate the use of the m(3)G signal as an adaptor that can be attached to different oligonucleotides, thereby conferring nuclear targeting capabilities with capacity to transport large-size cargo molecules. The synthetic capping of oligos interfering with splicing may have immediate clinical applications.

  13. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-05-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn.

  14. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, Julius; Henesian, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A low pressure gas electrode utilizing ionized gas in a glow discharge regime forms a transparent electrode for electro-optical switches. The transparent electrode comprises a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the electrode is a transparent electrode. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. The plasma can be created either by the main high voltage pulser used to charge up the crystal or by auxiliary discharges or external sources of ionization. A typical configuration utilizes 10 torr argon in the discharge region adjacent to each crystal face.

  15. Transparent conductive graphene textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    Neves, A. I. S.; Bointon, T. H.; Melo, L. V.; Russo, S.; de Schrijver, I.; Craciun, M. F.; Alves, H.

    2015-01-01

    Transparent and flexible electrodes are widely used on a variety of substrates such as plastics and glass. Yet, to date, transparent electrodes on a textile substrate have not been explored. The exceptional electrical, mechanical and optical properties of monolayer graphene make it highly attractive as a transparent electrode for applications in wearable electronics. Here, we report the transfer of monolayer graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil, to fibers commonly used by the textile industry. The graphene-coated fibers have a sheet resistance as low as ~1 kΩ per square, an equivalent value to the one obtained by the same transfer process onto a Si substrate, with a reduction of only 2.3 per cent in optical transparency while keeping high stability under mechanical stress. With this approach, we successfully achieved the first example of a textile electrode, flexible and truly embedded in a yarn. PMID:25952133

  16. Flexible Transparent Electronic Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Yunlong; Wan, Pengbo; Zhang, Han; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors capable of real-time, sensitive, and selective analysis at room-temperature, have gained immense popularity in recent years for their potential to be integrated into various smart wearable electronics and display devices. Here, recent advances in flexible transparent sensors constructed from semiconducting oxides, carbon materials, conducting polymers, and their nanocomposites are presented. The sensing material selection, sensor device construction, and sensing mechanism of flexible transparent sensors are discussed in detail. The critical challenges and future development associated with flexible and transparent electronic gas sensors are presented. Smart wearable gas sensors are believed to have great potential in environmental monitoring and noninvasive health monitoring based on disease biomarkers in exhaled gas.

  17. Directional performance in motion transparency.

    PubMed

    Braddick, Oliver J; Wishart, Keith A; Curran, William

    2002-05-01

    Motion transparency provides a challenging test case for our understanding of how visual motion, and other attributes, are computed and represented in the brain. However, previous studies of visual transparency have used subjective criteria which do not confirm the existence of independent representations of the superimposed motions. We have developed measures of performance in motion transparency that require observers to extract information about two motions jointly, and therefore test the information that is simultaneously represented for each motion. Observers judged whether two motions were at 90 degrees to one another; the base direction was randomized so that neither motion taken alone was informative. The precision of performance was determined by the standard deviations (S.D.s) of probit functions fitted to the data. Observers also made judgments of orthogonal directions between a single motion stream and a line, for one of two transparent motions against a line and for two spatially segregated motions. The data show that direction judgments with transparency can be made with comparable accuracy to segregated (non-transparent) conditions, supporting the idea that transparency involves the equivalent representation of two global motions in the same region. The precision of this joint direction judgment is, however, 2-3 times poorer than that for a single motion stream. The precision in directional judgment for a single stream is reduced only by a factor of about 1.5 by superimposing a second stream. The major effect in performance, therefore, appears to be associated with the need to compute and compare two global representations of motion, rather than with interference between the dot streams per se. Experiment 2 tested the transparency of motions separated by a range of angles from 5 degrees to 180 degrees by requiring subjects to set a line matching the perceived direction of each motion. The S.D.s of these settings demonstrated that directions of

  18. Additive and subtractive transparent depth displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Frank L.; Toet, Alexander

    2003-09-01

    Image fusion is the generally preferred method to combine two or more images for visual display on a single screen. We demonstrate that perceptual image separation may be preferable over perceptual image fusion for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. In this context image separation refers to the simultaneous presentation of images on different depth planes of a single display. Image separation allows the user to recognize the source of the information that is displayed. This can be important because synthetic images are more liable to flaws. We have examined methods to optimize perceptual image separation. A true depth difference between enhanced and synthetic imagery works quite well. A standard stereoscopic display based on convergence is less suitable since the two images tend to interfere: the image behind is masked (occluded) by the image in front, which results in poor viewing comfort. This effect places 3D systems based on 3D glasses, as well as most autostereoscopic displays, at a serious disadvantage. A 3D display based on additive or subtractive transparency is acceptable: both the perceptual separation and the viewing comfort are good, but the color of objects depends on the color in the other depth layer(s). A combined additive and subtractive transparent display eliminates this disadvantage and is most suitable for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. We suggest that the development of such a display system is of a greater practical value than increasing the number of depth planes in autostereoscopic displays.

  19. Lines that induce phenomenal transparency.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Alba; Roncato, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Three neighbouring opaque surfaces may appear split into two layers, one transparent and one opaque beneath, if an outline contour is drawn that encompasses two of them. The phenomenon was originally observed by Kanizsa [1955 Rivista di Psicologia 69 3-19; 1979 Organization in Vision: Essays on Gestalt Psychology (New York: Praeger)], for the case where an outline contour is drawn to encompass one of the two parts of a bicoloured figure and a portion of a background of lightest (or darkest) luminance. Preliminary observations revealed that the outline contour yields different effects: in addition to the stratification into layers described by Kanizsa, a second split, opposite in depth order, may occur when the outline contour is close in luminance to one of the three surfaces. An initial experiment was designed to investigate what conditions give rise to the two phenomenal transparencies: this led to the conclusion that an outline contour superimposed on an opaque surface causes this surface to emerge as a transparent layer when the luminances of the contour and the surface differ, in absolute value, by no more than 13.2 cd m(-2). We have named this phenomenon 'transparency of the intercepted surface', to distinguish it from the phenomenal transparency arising when the contour and surface are very different in luminance. When such a difference exists, the contour acts as a factor of surface definition and grouping: the portion of the homogeneous surface it bounds emerges as a fourth surface and groups with a nearby surface if there is one close in luminance. The transparency phenomena ('transparency of the contoured surface') perceived in this context conform to the constraints of Metelli's model, as demonstrated by a second experiment, designed to gather 'opacity' ratings of stimuli. The observer judgments conformed to the values predicted by Metelli's formula for perceived degree of transparency, alpha. The role of the outline contour in conveying figural and

  20. Transparency in Distributed File Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    and may be accessed and updated even if the primary is unavailable. I IBIS provides complete location transparency . Because of this, the IBIS...lack of actual location information in names allows his to be done transparently . Updates to replicated information are propagated using the mail system...isn’t possible to update the directory. In the case of migation by UID, a forwarding address with a reference count equal to i the link count of the

  1. Semi-transparent solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Semi-transparent solar cells are a type of technology that combines the benefits of visible light transparency and light-to-electricity conversion. One of the biggest opportunities for such technologies is in their integration as windows and skylights within energy-sustainable buildings. Currently, such building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are dominated by crystalline silicon based modules; however, the opaque nature of silicon creates a unique opportunity for the adoption of emerging photovoltaic candidates that can be made truly semi-transparent. These include: amorphous silicon-, kesterite-, chalcopyrite-, CdTe-, dye-sensitized-, organic- and perovskite- based systems. For the most part, amorphous silicon has been the workhorse in the semi-transparent solar cell field owing to its established, low-temperature fabrication processes. Excitement around alternative classes, particularly perovskites and the inorganic candidates, has recently arisen because of the major efficiency gains exhibited by these technologies. Importantly, each of these presents unique opportunities and challenges within the context of BIPV. This topic review provides an overview into the broader benefits of semi-transparent solar cells as building-integrated features, as well as providing the current development status into all of the major types of semi-transparent solar cells technologies.

  2. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK(-1) , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m(-3) (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. Multifunctional non-viral gene vectors with enhanced stability, improved cellular and nuclear uptake capability, and increased transfection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhe; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Di; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell for nanoparticle stabilization, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) and mTAT (a cell-penetrating peptide) for accelerated cellular uptake, and a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS) for enhanced intracellular transport of DNA to the nucleus. In vitro study showed that coating of the binary PPMS/DNA polyplex with γ-PGA promotes cellular uptake of the polyplex particles, particularly by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive cells through the GGT-mediated endocytosis pathway. Conjugating PEG to the γ-PGA led to the formation of a ternary PPMS/DNA/PGA-g-PEG polyplex with decreased positive charges on the surface of the polyplex particles and substantially higher stability in serum-containing aqueous medium. The cellular uptake rate was further improved by incorporating mTAT into the ternary polyplex system. Addition of the NLS peptide was designed to facilitate intracellular delivery of the plasmid to the nucleus--a rate-limiting step in the gene transfection process. As a result, compared with the binary PPMS/LucDNA polyplex, the new mTAT-quaternary PPMS/LucDNA/NLS/PGA-g-PEG-mTAT system exhibited reduced cytotoxicity, remarkably faster cellular uptake rate, and enhanced transport of DNA to the nucleus. All these advantageous functionalities contribute to the remarkable gene transfection efficiency of the mTAT-quaternary polyplex both in vitro and in vivo, which exceeds that of the binary polyplex and commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000/DNA lipoplex. The multifunctional mTAT-quaternary polyplex system with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity represents a new type of promising non-viral vectors for the delivery of therapeutic genes to treat tumors.We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell

  4. Tunable phonon-induced transparency in bilayer graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hugen; Low, Tony; Guinea, Francisco; Xia, Fengnian; Avouris, Phaedon

    2014-08-13

    In the phenomenon of plasmon-induced transparency, which is a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic gases, the coherent interference between two plasmon modes results in an optical transparency window in a broad absorption spectrum. With the requirement of contrasting lifetimes, typically one of the plasmon modes involved is a dark mode that has limited coupling to the electromagnetic radiation and possesses relatively longer lifetime. Plasmon-induced transparency not only leads to light transmission at otherwise opaque frequency regions but also results in the slowing of light group velocity and enhanced optical nonlinearity. In this article, we report an analogous behavior, denoted as phonon-induced transparency (PIT), in AB-stacked bilayer graphene nanoribbons. Here, light absorption due to the plasmon excitation is suppressed in a narrow window due to the coupling with the infrared active Γ-point optical phonon, whose function here is similar to that of the dark plasmon mode in the plasmon-induced transparency. We further show that PIT in bilayer graphene is actively tunable by electrostatic gating and estimate a maximum slow light factor of around 500 at the phonon frequency of 1580 cm(-1), based on the measured spectra. Our demonstration opens an avenue for the exploration of few-photon nonlinear optics and slow light in this novel two-dimensional material.

  5. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhanced MR imaging of (31)P-containing metabolites: multipoint-Dixon vs. frequency-selective excitation.

    PubMed

    Rink, Kristian; Berger, Moritz C; Korzowski, Andreas; Breithaupt, Mathies; Biller, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Nagel, Armin M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop nuclear-Overhauser-enhanced (NOE) [(1)H]-(31)P magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on 3D fully-balanced steady-state free precession (fbSSFP). Therefore, two implementations of a 3D fbSSFP sequence are compared using frequency-selective excitation (FreqSel) and multipoint-Dixon (MP-Dixon). (31)P-containing model solutions and four healthy volunteers were examined at field strengths of B0=3T and 7T. Maps of the distribution of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), and adenosine 5´-triphosphate (ATP) in the human calf were obtained with an isotropic resolution of 1.5cm (1.0cm) in an acquisition time of 5min (10min). NOE-pulses had the highest impact on the PCr acquisitions enhancing the signal up to (82 ± 13) % at 3T and up to (37 ± 9) % at 7T. An estimation of the level of PCr in muscle tissue from [(1)H]-(31)P MRI data yielded a mean value of (33 ± 8) mM. In conclusion, direct [(1)H]-(31)P imaging using FreqSel as well as MP-Dixon is possible in clinically feasible acquisition times. FreqSel should be preferred for measurements where only a single metabolite resonance is considered. MP-Dixon performs better in terms of SNR if a larger spectral width is of interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator enhances cisplatin resistance by upregulating MDR1 expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Yi; Kalpana, Sriram; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Ben-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The identification of molecular pathways in cancer cells is important for understanding the cells' underlying biology and for designing effective cancer therapies. We demonstrate that the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is critical during the development of cisplatin resistance. The reduced expression of ARNT was correlated with cisplatin-induced cell death in drug-sensitive cells. In addition, suppression of ARNT reversed the characteristics of cisplatin-resistant cells, making these cells cisplatin-sensitive, and significantly enhanced caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. The inhibition of colony formation, regulated by cisplatin, was more significant in ARNT-knockdown cells than in parental cells. In a xenograft analysis of severe combined immunodeficiency mice, cisplatin also efficiently inhibited ARNT-deficient c4 tumors but not ARNT-containing vT2 tumor formation. Furthermore, the downregulation of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) expression and retention of drugs in cells caused by suppression of ARNT, resulting in the resensitization of drug-resistant cells to cisplatin, was observed. When overexpressed, ARNT interacted with Sp1 to enhance the expression of MDR1 through Sp1-binding sites on the MDR1 promoter, resulting in a reversal of the effect of cisplatin on cell death. In addition, ARNT-induced MDR1 expression was inhibited in Sp1-knockdown cells. These results reveal previously unrecognized, multifaceted functions of ARNT in establishing the drug-resistant properties of cancer cells by the upregulation of MDR1, highlighting ARNT's potential as a therapeutic target in an important subset of cancers.

  7. Nuclear receptor Nurr1 agonists enhance its dual functions and improve behavioral deficits in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chun-Hyung; Han, Baek-Soo; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Deog-Joong; Shin, Joon; Rajan, Sreekanth; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Sohn, Mijin; Kim, Won-Gon; Han, Minjoon; Jeong, Inhye; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tu, Yupeng; Naffin-Olivos, Jacqueline L; Park, Chang-Hwan; Ringe, Dagmar; Yoon, Ho Sup; Petsko, Gregory A; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2015-07-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD), primarily caused by selective degeneration of midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons, is the most prevalent movement disorder, affecting 1-2% of the global population over the age of 65. Currently available pharmacological treatments are largely symptomatic and lose their efficacy over time with accompanying severe side effects such as dyskinesia. Thus, there is an unmet clinical need to develop mechanism-based and/or disease-modifying treatments. Based on the unique dual role of the nuclear orphan receptor Nurr1 for development and maintenance of mDA neurons and their protection from inflammation-induced death, we hypothesize that Nurr1 can be a molecular target for neuroprotective therapeutic development for PD. Here we show successful identification of Nurr1 agonists sharing an identical chemical scaffold, 4-amino-7-chloroquinoline, suggesting a critical structure-activity relationship. In particular, we found that two antimalarial drugs, amodiaquine and chloroquine stimulate the transcriptional function of Nurr1 through physical interaction with its ligand binding domain (LBD). Remarkably, these compounds were able to enhance the contrasting dual functions of Nurr1 by further increasing transcriptional activation of mDA-specific genes and further enhancing transrepression of neurotoxic proinflammatory gene expression in microglia. Importantly, these compounds significantly improved behavioral deficits in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat model of PD without any detectable signs of dyskinesia-like behavior. These findings offer proof of principle that small molecules targeting the Nurr1 LBD can be used as a mechanism-based and neuroprotective strategy for PD.

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced ¹H-¹³C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional ¹H-¹³C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both ¹H-¹³C cross-polarization and ¹H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for ¹H-¹³C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T₂ relaxation of ¹³C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on ¹³C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional ¹³C-¹³C exchange spectrum of selectively ¹³C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensitive Detection of Transcription Factor in Nuclear Extracts by Target-Actuated Isothermal Amplification-Mediated Fluorescence Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiang, Dongxue; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2017-10-03

    Transcription factors (TFs) modulate the process of gene transcription by binding to specific DNA sequences, and their alteration may cause a variety of diseases. Here, we develop a simple and sensitive method to directly detect TF in crude nuclear extracts using target-actuated isothermal amplification-mediated fluorescence enhancement with fluorescent base 2-aminopurine (2-AP) as the fluorophore. In the presence of TF, its specific binding to the probe prevents the digestion of the probe by exonuclease III (Exo III), initiating the extension reaction to produce DNA duplexes which may be subsequently digested by λ exonuclease to release single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) and free 2-AP molecules. Although some excess probes may be partially digested by Exo III, the phosphorothioate modification between two binding sites of the probe may generate a hindrance to preserve the rest of TF-binding probes which may hybridize with the released ssDNAs to initiate new cycles of nicking-digestion-hybridization, generating abundant free 2-AP molecules for significant fluorescence enhancement. Different from the reported amplification strategies, all the TF-binding probes take part in the amplification reaction no matter if they bind with TF or not, greatly improving the detection signal. This method can be used for sensitive detection of NF-κBp50 with a detection limit of 4.11 × 10(-4) mg/mL and the screening of potential TF inhibitors as well. Importantly, this method is very simple without the involvement of any external quenchers, extra primers, and templates, and it may be extended to selectively detect various DNA-binding proteins by simply changing the binding-site sequences of the probes.

  10. 78 FR 14149 - 2012 Fiscal Transparency Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Fiscal Transparency Report AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of State hereby presents the findings from the 2012 Fiscal Transparency review process in its first annual Fiscal Transparency Report. This report describes the minimum standards of fiscal transparency developed by the...

  11. THE FISSILE MATERIAL TRANSPARENCY TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION (FMTTD)

    SciTech Connect

    L. R. AVENS; J. E. DOYLE; M. F. MULLEN

    2001-06-01

    The United States Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency Cooperative Threat Reduction program is supporting the construction of a fissile material storage facility at Mayak in the Russian Federation. Up to 34 tons of weapon-grade plutonium will be stored in the facility to await disposition. In order to meet arms control and nonproliferation objectives, the U.S. Congress has requested assurances that the nuclear material stored at the Mayak facility is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons. The usual approach to identify the origin or state of radioactive materials is to measure the intensity and energy of neutron and gamma radiation emitted. However, the Russian Federation considers such details as isotopic composition and mass to be classified. The solution arrived at by a DOE multilaboratory team is to place the radioactive specimen, the gamma and neutron counters, and all the computational equipment behind an information barrier. In the Fissile Materials Transparency Technology Demonstration (FMTD), this equipment was configured and programmed to measure the following six attributes: isotopic ratio, threshold mass, absence of oxide, presence of plutonium, age, and symmetry. On August 16, 2000, at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a delegation of Russian officials observed the successful demonstration of this new technology (called an Attribute Measurement System with Information Barrier, or AMS/IB). The scientists were able to demonstrate without releasing classified information that the nuclear material sample being tested (a nuclear weapon pit) had the declared weapon-grade plutonium characteristics. Once fully developed, AMS/IB technology will protect sensitive information while providing the United States increased confidence that the mandated Russian fissile materials have been stored. Attribute measurement systems can play a role in a number of U.S.-Russian nuclear security regimes such as the Trilateral Initiative, the Plutonium

  12. Quantitative characterization of nuclear overhauser enhancement and amide proton transfer effects in the human brain at 7 tesla.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dapeng; Zhou, Jinyuan; Xue, Rong; Zuo, Zhentao; An, Jing; Wang, Danny J J

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively investigate two main magnetization transfer effects at low B1: the nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) and amide proton transfer in the human brain at 7 T. The magnetization transfer effects in the human brain were characterized using a four-pool proton model, which consisted of bulk water, macromolecules, an amide group of mobile proteins and peptides, and NOE-related protons resonating upfield. The pool sizes, exchange rates, and relaxation times of these proton pools were investigated quantitatively by fitting, and the net signals of amide proton transfer and NOE were simulated based on the fitted parameters. The results showed that the four-pool model fitted the experimental data quite well, and the NOE effects in human brain at 7 T had a broad spectrum distribution. The NOE effects peaked at a B1 of ∼ 1-1.4 μT and were significantly stronger in the white matter than in the gray matter, corresponding to a pool-size ratio ∼ 2:1. As the amide proton transfer effect was relatively small compared with the NOE effects, magnetization transfer asymmetry analysis yielded an NOE-dominated contrast in the healthy human brain in this range of B1. These findings are important to identify the source of NOE effects and to quantify amide proton transfer effects in human brain at 7 T. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Imaging of amide proton transfer and nuclear Overhauser enhancement in ischemic stroke with corrections for competing effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zu, Zhongliang; Zaiss, Moritz; Khan, Imad S; Singer, Robert J; Gochberg, Daniel F; Bachert, Peter; Gore, John C; Xu, Junzhong

    2015-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) potentially provides the ability to detect small solute pools through indirect measurements of attenuated water signals. However, CEST effects may be diluted by various competing effects, such as non-specific magnetization transfer (MT) and asymmetric MT effects, water longitudinal relaxation (T1 ) and direct water saturation (radiofrequency spillover). In the current study, CEST images were acquired in rats following ischemic stroke and analyzed by comparing the reciprocals of the CEST signals at three different saturation offsets. This combined approach corrects the above competing effects and provides a more robust signal metric sensitive specifically to the proton exchange rate constant. The corrected amide proton transfer (APT) data show greater differences between the ischemic and contralateral (non-ischemic) hemispheres. By contrast, corrected nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) around -3.5 ppm from water change over time in both hemispheres, indicating whole-brain changes that have not been reported previously. This study may help us to better understand the contrast mechanisms of APT and NOE imaging in ischemic stroke, and may also establish a framework for future stroke measurements using CEST imaging with spillover, MT and T1 corrections. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Imaging of Amide Proton Transfer and Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement in Ischemic Stroke with Corrections for Competing Effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Zu, Zhongliang; Zaiss, Moritz; Khan, Imad S.; Singer, Robert; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Bachert, Peter; Gore, John C.; Xu, Junzhong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) potentially provides the ability to detect small solute pools through indirect measurements of attenuated water signals. However, CEST effects may be diluted by various competing effects such as non-specific magnetization transfer (MT) and asymmetric MT effects, water longitudinal relaxation (T1), and direct water saturation (RF spillover). In the current study, CEST images were acquired in rats following ischemic stroke and analyzed by comparing the reciprocals of the CEST signals at three different saturation offsets. This combined approach corrects the above competing effects and provides a more robust signal metric sensitive specifically to proton exchange rate constant. The corrected amide proton transfer (APT) data show greater differences between the ischemic and the contralateral (non-ischemic) hemispheres. By contrast, corrected nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) around −3.5 ppm from water change over time in both hemispheres, indicating whole-brain changes that have not been reported before. This study may help better understand the contrast mechanisms of APT and NOE imaging in ischemic stroke, and also establishes a framework for future stroke measurements using CEST imaging with spillover-, MT- and T1-corrections. PMID:25483870

  15. Cut and paste RNA for nuclear magnetic resonance, paramagnetic resonance enhancement, and electron paramagnetic resonance structural studies.

    PubMed

    Duss, Olivier; Diarra Dit Konté, Nana; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2015-01-01

    RNA is a crucial regulator involved in most molecular processes of life. Understanding its function at the molecular level requires high-resolution structural information. However, the dynamic nature of RNA complicates structure determination because crystallization is often not possible or can result in crystal-packing artifacts resulting in nonnative structures. To study RNA and its complexes in solution, we described an approach in which large multi-domain RNA or protein-RNA complex structures can be determined at high resolution from isolated domains determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and then constructing the entire macromolecular structure using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) long-range distance constraints. Every step in this structure determination approach requires different types of isotope or spin-labeled RNAs. Here, we present a simple modular RNA cut and paste approach including protocols to generate (1) small isotopically labeled RNAs (<10 nucleotides) for NMR structural studies, which cannot be obtained by standard protocols, (2) large segmentally isotope and/or spin-labeled RNAs for diamagnetic NMR and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR, and (3) large spin-labeled RNAs for pulse EPR spectroscopy.

  16. Analysis of Molecular Orientation in Organic Semiconducting Thin Films Using Static Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kubo, Shosei; Aussenac, Fabien; Engelke, Frank; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Kaji, Hironori

    2017-10-09

    Molecular orientation in amorphous organic semiconducting thin film devices is an important issue affecting device performances. However, to date it has not been possible to analyze the "distribution" of the orientations. Although solid-state NMR (ssNMR) can provide information on the distribution of molecular orientations, the technique is limited because of the small amounts of sample in the devices and the low sensitivity of ssNMR. Here, we report the first application of dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced ssNMR (DNP-ssNMR) to orientational analysis of amorphous phenyldi(pyren-1-yl)phosphine oxide (POPy2). The 31P DNP-ssNMR spectra exhibited a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to quantify the distribution of molecular orientations in amorphous films: the P=O axis of the vacuum-deposited and drop-cast POPy2 shows anisotropic and isotropic distribution, respectively. The different molecular orientations reflect the molecular origin of the different charge transport behaviors. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Melatonin enhances the developmental competence of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos by preventing DNA damage induced by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Jin, Yong-Xun; Yuan, Bao; Zhang, Jia-Bao; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2017-09-11

    Melatonin has antioxidant and scavenger effects in the cellular antioxidant system. This research investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of melatonin action in porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. The results suggested that the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos was considerably enhanced after melatonin treatment. In addition, melatonin attenuated the increase in reactive oxygen species levels induced by oxidative stress, the decrease in glutathione levels, and the mitochondrial dysfunction. Importantly, melatonin inhibited phospho-histone H2A.X (γH2A.X) expression and comet tail formation, suggesting that γH2A.X prevents oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. The expression of genes involved in homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining pathways for the repair of double-stranded breaks (DSB) was reduced upon melatonin treatment in porcine SCNT embryos at day 5 of development under oxidative stress condition. These results indicated that melatonin promoted porcine SCNT embryo development by preventing oxidative stress-induced DNA damage via quenching of free radical formation. Our results revealed a previously unrecognized regulatory effect of melatonin in response to oxidative stress and DNA damage. This evidence provides a novel mechanism for the improvement in SCNT embryo development associated with exposure to melatonin.

  18. FBI-1 enhances transcription of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-responsive E-selectin gene by nuclear localization of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Kang, Jae-Eun; Park, Hye-Jin; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Yim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Jung-Min; Heo, Min-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Yeun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2005-07-29

    The POZ domain is a highly conserved protein-protein interaction motif found in many regulatory proteins. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) plays a key role in the expression of a variety of genes in response to infection, inflammation, and stressful conditions. We found that the POZ domain of FBI-1 (factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of human immunodeficiency virus-1) interacted with the Rel homology domain of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB in both in vivo and in vitro protein-protein interaction assays. FBI-1 enhanced NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of E-selectin genes in HeLa cells upon phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulation and overcame gene repression by IkappaB alpha or IkappaB beta. In contrast, the POZ domain of FBI-1, which is a dominant-negative form of FBI-1, repressed NF-kappaB-mediated transcription, and the repression was cooperative with IkappaB alpha or IkappaB beta. In contrast, the POZ domain tagged with a nuclear localization sequence polypeptide of FBI-1 enhanced NF-kappaB-responsive gene transcription, suggesting that the molecular interaction between the POZ domain and the Rel homology domain of p65 and the nuclear localization by the nuclear localization sequence are important in the transcription enhancement mediated by FBI-1. Confocal microscopy showed that FBI-1 increased NF-kappaB movement into the nucleus and increased the stability of NF-kappaB in the nucleus, which enhanced NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of the E-selectin gene. FBI-1 also interacted with IkappaB alpha and IkappaB beta.

  19. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (˜15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes.

  20. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (∼15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes. PMID:27911774

  1. Making metals transparent: a circuit model approach.

    PubMed

    Molero, Carlos; Medina, Francisco; Rodríguez-Berral, Rauĺ; Mesa, Francisco

    2016-05-16

    Solid metal films are well known to be opaque to electromagnetic waves over a wide frequency range, from low frequency to optics. High values of the conductivity at relatively low frequencies or negative values of the permittivity at the optical regime provide the macroscopic explanation for such opacity. In the microwave range, even extremely thin metal layers (much smaller than the skin depth at the operation frequency) reflect most of the impinging electromagnetic energy, thus precluding significant transmission. However, a drastic resonant narrow-band enhancement of the transparency has recently been reported. The quasi-transparent window is opened by placing the metal film between two symmetrically arranged and closely spaced copper strip gratings. This letter proposes an analytical circuit model that yields a simple explanation to this unexpected phenomenon. The proposed approach avoids the use of lengthy numerical calculations and suggests how the transmissivity can be controlled and enhanced by manipulating the values of the electrical parameters of the associated circuit model.

  2. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  3. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-17

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  4. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  5. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; ...

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore » color transparency effects.« less

  6. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kheterpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Laget, J. M.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. D. J.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moutarde, H.; Muneva, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatie, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included the color transparency effects.

  7. Transparent Memory For Harsh Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. H.; Retamal, J. R. Durán; Yang, P. K.; Lee, C. P.; Tsai, M. L.; Kang, C. F.; He-Hau, Jr.

    2017-03-01

    As a new class of non-volatile memory, resistive random access memory (RRAM) offers not only superior electronic characteristics, but also advanced functionalities, such as transparency and radiation hardness. However, the environmental tolerance of RRAM is material-dependent, and therefore the materials used must be chosen carefully in order to avoid instabilities and performance degradation caused by the detrimental effects arising from environmental gases and ionizing radiation. In this work, we demonstrate that AlN-based RRAM displays excellent performance and environmental stability, with no significant degradation to the resistance ratio over a 100-cycle endurance test. Moreover, transparent RRAM (TRRAM) based on AlN also performs reliably under four different harsh environmental conditions and 2 MeV proton irradiation fluences, ranging from 1011 to 1015 cm‑2. These findings not only provide a guideline for TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of AlN TRRAM for future transparent harsh electronics.

  8. The effects of mechanical transparency on adjustment to a complex visuomotor transformation at early and late working age.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Herbert; Hegele, Mathias

    2010-12-01

    Mechanical tools are transparent in the sense that their input-output relations can be derived from their perceptible characteristics. Modern technology creates more and more tools that lack mechanical transparency, such as in the control of the position of a cursor by means of a computer mouse or some other input device. We inquired whether an enhancement of transparency by means of presenting the shaft of a virtual sliding lever, which governed the transformation of hand position into cursor position, supports performance of aimed cursor movement and the acquisition of an internal model of the transformation in both younger and older adults. Enhanced transparency resulted in an improvement of visual closed-loop control in terms of movement time and curvature of cursor paths. The movement-time improvement was more pronounced at older working age than at younger working age, so that the enhancement of transparency can serve as a means to mitigate age-related declines in performance. Benefits for the acquisition of an internal model of the transformation and of explicit knowledge were absent. Thus, open-loop control in this task did not profit from enhanced mechanical transparency. These findings strongly suggest that environmental support of transparency of the effects of input devices on controlled systems might be a powerful tool to support older users. Enhanced transparency may also improve simulator-based training by increasing motivation, even if training benefits do not transfer to situations without enhanced transparency. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Perturbation on hyperfine-enhanced 141Pr nuclear spin dynamics associated with antiferroquadrupolar order in PrV2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T. U.; Higemoto, W.; Sakai, A.; Tsujimoto, M.; Nakatsuji, S.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of multipolar order and hyperfine-enhanced (HE) 141Pr nuclear spin dynamics in PrV2Al20 was investigated using the muon spin relaxation technique. No explicit sign of time-reversal symmetry breaking was found below the multipolar order temperature TQ˜0.6 K in a zero applied field as anticipated on the basis of the antiferroquadrupolar (AFQ) order picture proposed by Sakai and Nakatsuji [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 063701 (2011), 10.1143/JPSJ.80.063701]. Further evidence of the nonmagnetic ground state was obtained from the observation of HE 141Pr nuclear spin fluctuations in the MHz scale. A marked increase in the muon spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ,μ) was observed below 1 K with decreasing temperature, which was attributed to the perturbation on the HE 141Pr nuclear spin dynamics associated with the development of AFQ correlations. The longitudinal field dependence of 1 /T1 ,μ revealed that the enhanced 141Pr nuclear spin accidentally has an effective gyromagnetic ratio close to that of the muon.

  10. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  11. Flower-enhanced expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial respiratory protein is associated with changes in mitochondrion number.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Struck, F; Matzinger, D F; Levings, C S

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein is an obligatory component of the respiratory electron transport chain that is encoded by a single-copy gene in mammals and fungi. In contrast, this protein is encoded by a small gene family in dicotyledonous tobacco and monocotyledonous maize. We cloned four cDNAs from tobacco that encode the mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein. These clones, along with a previously isolated cDNA, represent five independent members of the gene family that can be divided into three subfamilies. All of these genes were derived from the two progenitor species and were expressed in amphidiploid tobacco. The proteins encoded by these five genes are probably functional because they all contain the universally conserved hexyl peptides necessary for the 2Fe-2S cluster formation. The expression of the Rieske protein gene family is differentially regulated; a 6- to 11-fold higher level of steady state transcripts was found in flowers than in leaves, stems, and roots. Members of at least two subfamilies were preferentially expressed in flowers, indicating that they share a common cis-regulatory element(s), which can respond to a flower-specific signal(s). Although approximately 10 times more transcripts occurred in flowers than in leaves, flower and leaf mitochondria contained a similar amount of the Rieske protein. Flowers, however, contained seven times more Rieske proteins than leaves. These results indicated an increase in mitochondrion number in flowers. High-energy demands during anther development might bring about an increase in mitochondrion numbers in flowers and the flower-enhanced expression of the Rieske protein gene family. Our results suggested that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory proteins could sense and respond to changes in energy metabolism and/or changes in mitochondrion numbers. PMID:8180500

  12. Enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels by co-sintering with BeO: II. Fuel performance and neutronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Kevin; Mays, Claude

    2008-04-01

    The fuel rod performance and neutronics of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide (ECO) nuclear fuel with BeO have been compared to those of standard UO 2 fuel. The standards of comparison were that the ECO fuel should have the same infinite neutron-multiplication factor kinf at end of life and provide the same energy extraction per fuel assembly over its lifetime. The BeO displaces some uranium, so equivalence with standard UO 2 fuel was obtained by increasing the burnup and slightly increasing the enrichment. The COPERNIC fuel rod performance code was adapted to account for the effect of BeO on thermal properties. The materials considered were standard UO 2, UO 2 with 4.0 vol.% BeO, and UO 2 with 9.6 vol.% BeO. The smaller amount of BeO was assumed to provide increases in thermal conductivity of 0, 5, or 10%, whereas the larger amount was assumed to provide an increase of 50%. A significant improvement in performance was seen, as evidenced by reduced temperatures, internal rod pressures, and fission gas release, even with modest (5-10%) increases in thermal conductivity. The benefits increased monotonically with increasing thermal conductivity. Improvements in LOCA initialization performance were also seen. A neutronic calculation considered a transition from standard UO 2 fuel to ECO fuel. The calculation indicated that only a small increase in enrichment is required to maintain the kinf at end of life. The smallness of the change was attributed to the neutron-multiplication reaction of Be with fast neutrons and the moderating effect of BeO. Adoption of ECO fuel was predicted to provide a net reduction in uranium cost. Requirements for industrial hygiene were found to be comparable to those for processing of UO 2.

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3C Interacts with and Enhances the Stability of the c-Myc Oncoprotein▿

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bharat G.; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Verma, Subhash C.; Lan, Ke; Robertson, Erle S.

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first human DNA virus to be associated with cancer. Its oncogenic potential was further demonstrated by its ability to transform primary B lymphocytes in vitro. EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is one of a small subset of latent antigens critical for the transformation of human primary B lymphocytes. Although EBNA3C has been shown to modulate several cellular functions, additional targets involved in cellular transformation remain to be explored. EBNA3C can recruit key components of the SCFSkp2 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this report, we show that EBNA3C residues 130 to 190, previously shown to bind to the SCFSkp2 complex, also can strongly associate with the c-Myc oncoprotein. Additionally, the interaction of EBNA3C with c-Myc was mapped to the region of c-Myc that includes the highly conserved Skp2 binding domain. Skp2 has been shown to regulate c-Myc stability and also has been shown to function as a coactivator of transcription for c-Myc target genes. We now show that the EBV latent oncoprotein EBNA3C can stabilize c-Myc and that the recruitment of both c-Myc and its cofactor Skp2 to c-Myc-dependent promoters can enhance c-Myc-dependent transcription. This same region of EBNA3C also recruits and modulates the activity of retinoblastoma and p27, both major regulators of the mammalian cell cycle. The inclusion of c-Myc in the group of cellular targets modulated by this domain further accentuates the importance of these critical residues of EBNA3C in bypassing the cell cycle checkpoints. PMID:18256156

  14. Rapid determination of biosynthetic pathways using fractional isotope enrichment and high-resolution dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sean; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Carbon-13 NMR has traditionally been a method of choice for the determination of metabolic pathways. Through fractional labeling, (13)C spectra allow the identification of fragments incorporated as a unit into a biosynthesized molecule. The low sensitivity of (13)C spectroscopy is an impediment to such studies, especially if compounded with an often limited availability of biosynthesized molecules. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can increase the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance by several orders of magnitude, and in combination with high-resolution spectroscopy has the potential to increase the reach of this technique for metabolic profiling. Here, we present an application of high-resolution DNP enhanced NMR to the study of the biosynthetic pathways for membrane lipids. We show that fatty acid methyl esters are readily hyperpolarized in organic solvent. The resulting spectra resolve the various structural features of the chains, including atoms near the termini, as well as unsaturated and cyclopropyl groups. Peak patterns observed in fractionally labeled samples are explained by the way feed molecules are incorporated into fatty acid chains during synthesis. Differences in multiplet intensity between samples made from glucose and acetate feedstock mixtures further reveal metabolic preferences for these precursors in the biosynthesis of the product. In addition to the present study of lipid biosynthesis, high-resolution DNP-NMR of fractionally (13)C-labeled metabolites may present itself for the rapid determination of biosynthetic pathways in various biomedical applications, especially in cases of limited availability of the products of interest. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Partial transparency of compressed wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed novel wood composite with optical transparency at arbitrary region. Pores in wood cells have a great variation in size. These pores expand the light path in the sample, because the refractive indexes differ between constituents of cell and air in lumen. In this study, wood compressed to close to lumen had optical transparency. Because the condition of the compression of wood needs the plastic deformation, wood was impregnated phenolic resin. The optimal condition for high transmission is compression ratio above 0.7.

  16. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement imaging of glioblastoma at 7 Tesla: region specific correlation with apparent diffusion coefficient and histology.

    PubMed

    Paech, Daniel; Burth, Sina; Windschuh, Johannes; Meissner, Jan-Eric; Zaiss, Moritz; Eidel, Oliver; Kickingereder, Philipp; Nowosielski, Martha; Wiestler, Benedikt; Sahm, Felix; Floca, Ralf Omar; Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Wick, Wolfgang; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Ladd, Mark Edward; Bachert, Peter; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    To explore the correlation between Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE)-mediated signals and tumor cellularity in glioblastoma utilizing the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and cell density from histologic specimens. NOE is one type of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) that originates from mobile macromolecules such as proteins and might be associated with tumor cellularity via altered protein synthesis in proliferating cells. For 15 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, NOE-mediated CEST-contrast was acquired at 7 Tesla (asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.3ppm, B1 = 0.7 μT). Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1), T2 and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) were acquired at 3 Tesla and coregistered. The T2 edema and the CE-T1 tumor were segmented. ADC and MTRasym values within both regions of interest were correlated voxelwise yielding the correlation coefficient rSpearman (rSp). In three patients who underwent stereotactic biopsy, cell density of 12 specimens per patient was correlated with corresponding MTRasym and ADC values of the biopsy site. Eight of 15 patients showed a weak or moderate positive correlation of MTRasym and ADC within the T2 edema (0.16≤rSp≤0.53, p<0.05). Seven correlations were statistically insignificant (p>0.05, n = 4) or yielded rSp≈0 (p<0.05, n = 3). No trend towards a correlation between MTRasym and ADC was found in CE-T1 tumor (-0.310.05, n = 6). The biopsy-analysis within CE-T1 tumor revealed a strong positive correlation between tumor cellularity and MTRasym values in two of the three patients (rSppatient3 = 0.69 and rSppatient15 = 0.87, p<0.05), while the correlation of ADC and cellularity was heterogeneous (rSppatient3 = 0.545 (p = 0.067), rSppatient4 = -0.021 (p = 0.948), rSppatient15 = -0.755 (p = 0.005)). NOE-imaging is a new contrast promising insight into pathophysiologic processes in glioblastoma regarding cell density and protein content, setting itself apart from

  17. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Imaging of Glioblastoma at 7 Tesla: Region Specific Correlation with Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Windschuh, Johannes; Meissner, Jan-Eric; Zaiss, Moritz; Eidel, Oliver; Kickingereder, Philipp; Nowosielski, Martha; Wiestler, Benedikt; Sahm, Felix; Floca, Ralf Omar; Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Wick, Wolfgang; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Ladd, Mark Edward; Bachert, Peter; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE)-mediated signals and tumor cellularity in glioblastoma utilizing the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and cell density from histologic specimens. NOE is one type of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) that originates from mobile macromolecules such as proteins and might be associated with tumor cellularity via altered protein synthesis in proliferating cells. Patients and Methods For 15 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, NOE-mediated CEST-contrast was acquired at 7 Tesla (asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.3ppm, B1 = 0.7 μT). Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1), T2 and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) were acquired at 3 Tesla and coregistered. The T2 edema and the CE-T1 tumor were segmented. ADC and MTRasym values within both regions of interest were correlated voxelwise yielding the correlation coefficient rSpearman (rSp). In three patients who underwent stereotactic biopsy, cell density of 12 specimens per patient was correlated with corresponding MTRasym and ADC values of the biopsy site. Results Eight of 15 patients showed a weak or moderate positive correlation of MTRasym and ADC within the T2 edema (0.16≤rSp≤0.53, p<0.05). Seven correlations were statistically insignificant (p>0.05, n = 4) or yielded rSp≈0 (p<0.05, n = 3). No trend towards a correlation between MTRasym and ADC was found in CE-T1 tumor (-0.310.05, n = 6). The biopsy-analysis within CE-T1 tumor revealed a strong positive correlation between tumor cellularity and MTRasym values in two of the three patients (rSppatient3 = 0.69 and rSppatient15 = 0.87, p<0.05), while the correlation of ADC and cellularity was heterogeneous (rSppatient3 = 0.545 (p = 0.067), rSppatient4 = -0.021 (p = 0.948), rSppatient15 = -0.755 (p = 0.005)). Discussion NOE-imaging is a new contrast promising insight into pathophysiologic processes in glioblastoma regarding cell density

  18. A synthetic snRNA m3G-CAP enhances nuclear delivery of exogenous proteins and nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Wenska, Malgorzata; Lundin, Karin E.; Wrange, Örjan; Strömberg, Roger; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2009-01-01

    Accessing the nucleus through the surrounding membrane poses one of the major obstacles for therapeutic molecules large enough to be excluded due to nuclear pore size limits. In some therapeutic applications the large size of some nucleic acids, like plasmid DNA, hampers their access to the nuclear compartment. However, also for small oligonucleotides, achieving higher nuclear concentrations could be of great benefit. We report on the synthesis and possible applications of a natural RNA 5′-end nuclear localization signal composed of a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap (m3G-CAP). The cap is found in the small nuclear RNAs that are constitutive part of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in nuclear splicing. We demonstrate the use of the m3G signal as an adaptor that can be attached to different oligonucleotides, thereby conferring nuclear targeting capabilities with capacity to transport large-size cargo molecules. The synthetic capping of oligos interfering with splicing may have immediate clinical applications. PMID:19208638

  19. VRK3-mediated nuclear localization of HSP70 prevents glutamate excitotoxicity-induced apoptosis and Aβ accumulation via enhancement of ERK phosphatase VHR activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haengjin; Kim, Wanil; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Most of neurodegenerative disorders are associated with protein aggregation. Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and persistent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation are also implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we found that vaccinia-related kinase 3 (VRK3) facilitates nuclear localization of glutamate-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Nuclear HSP70 leads to enhancement of vaccinia H1-related phosphatase (VHR) activity via protein-protein interaction rather than its molecular chaperone activity, thereby suppressing excessive ERK activation. Moreover, glutamate-induced ERK activation stimulates the expression of HSP70 and VRK3 at the transcriptional level. Downregulation of either VRK3 or HSP70 rendered cells vulnerable to glutamate-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of HSP70 fused to a nuclear localization signal attenuated apoptosis more than HSP70 alone. The importance of nuclear localization of HSP70 in the negative regulation of glutamate-induced ERK activation was further confirmed in VRK3-deficient neurons. Importantly, we showed a positive correlation between levels of VRK3 and HSP70 in the progression of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases in humans, and neurons with HSP70 nuclear localization exhibited less Aβ accumulation in brains from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, HSP70 and VRK3 could potentially serve as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27941812

  20. Estrogen promotes fat mass and obesity-associated protein nuclear localization and enhances endometrial cancer cell proliferation via the mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaping; Shen, Jiaqi; Gao, Liyan; Feng, Youji

    2016-04-01

    Extensive exposure to estrogen is generally acknowledged as a risk factor for endometrial cancer. Given that the accumulation of adipocytes also contributes to the increased production of estrogen, in the present study, we evaluated the expression of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene in endometrial tumor tissues and further explored the mechanism of how estrogen facilitates FTO nuclear localization and promotes endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assay was used to detect the FTO expression in endometrial tumor samples. Western blotting was performed to investigate the mechanism of estrogen-induced FTO nuclear localization. siRNA was used to knock down ERα and further explore its role in FTO nuclear localization. MTT assay was carried out to determine cell proliferation. We found that FTO was overexpressed in endometrial carcinoma tissues and served as a poor prognostic marker. Additionally, estrogen induced FTO nuclear accumulation via the mTOR signaling pathway and the nuclear localization was ERα-dependent, which contributed to enhanced proliferative activity. Therefore, the present study provides new insight into the mechanisms of estrogen-induced proliferation, implying the possibility of using FTO as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  1. ICP27-dependent resistance of herpes simplex virus type 1 to leptomycin B is associated with enhanced nuclear localization of ICP4 and ICP0

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, Joy; Strain, Anna K.; Perkins, Keith D.; Rice, Stephen A. . E-mail: ricex019@umn.edu

    2006-09-01

    It was previously shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is sensitive to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of nuclear export factor CRM1, and that a single methionine to threonine change at residue 50 (M50T) of viral immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 can confer LMB resistance. In this work, we show that deletion of residues 21-63 from ICP27 can also confer LMB resistance. We further show that neither the M50T mutation nor the presence of LMB affects the nuclear shuttling activity of ICP27, suggesting that another function of ICP27 determines LMB resistance. A possible clue to this function emerged when it was discovered that LMB treatment of HSV-1-infected cells dramatically enhances the cytoplasmic accumulation of two other IE proteins, ICP0 and ICP4. This effect is completely dependent on ICP27 and is reversed in cells infected with LMB-resistant mutants. Moreover, LMB-resistant mutations in ICP27 enhance the nuclear localization of ICP0 and ICP4 even in the absence of LMB, and this effect can be discerned in transfected cells. Thus, the same amino (N)-terminal region of ICP27 that determines sensitivity to LMB also enhances ICP27's previously documented ability to promote the cytoplasmic accumulation of ICP4 and ICP0. We speculate that ICP27's effects on ICP4 and ICP0 may contribute to HSV-1 LMB sensitivity.

  2. All-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Höfle, Stefan; Czolk, Jens; Mertens, Adrian; Colsmann, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we report on indium tin oxide-free, all-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with inverted device architecture. Conductive polymer layers are employed as both transparent cathodes and transparent anodes, with the top anodes having enhanced conductivities from a supporting stochastic silver nanowire mesh. Both electrodes exhibit transmittances of 80-90% in the visible spectral regime. Upon the incorporation of either yellow- or blue-light emitting fluorescent polymers, the OLEDs show low onset voltages, demonstrating excellent charge carrier injection from the polymer electrodes into the emission layers. Overall luminances and current efficiencies equal the performance of opaque reference OLEDs with indium tin oxide and aluminium electrodes, proving excellent charge carrier-to-light conversion within the device.

  3. Making Diamondlike Films More Transparent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Kussmaul, Michael T.; Sovey, James S.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon films highly transparent to visible light made by dual-ion-beam deposition process. Hard, resistant to scratching, and hermetic. Used as protective coatings on eyeglasses, magnetic recording heads, computer hard disks, and windows in bar-code scanners. Amorphous diamondlike carbon films preferable to polycrystalline diamond films in these and other applications. Smooth and adherent and deposited at room temperature.

  4. Monocular transparency and unpaired stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Grove, Philip M; Brooks, Kevin R; Anderson, Barton L; Gillam, Barbara J

    2006-09-01

    Howard and Duke [Howard, I. P. & Duke, P. A. (2003). Monocular transparency generates quantitative depth. Vision Research, 43, 2615-2621] recently proposed a new source of binocular information they claim is used to recover depth in stereoscopic displays. They argued that these displays lack conventional disparity and that the metrical depth experienced results from transparency rather than occlusion relations. Using a variety of modified versions of their stimuli, we show here that the conditions for transparency are not required to elicit the depth experienced in their stereograms. We demonstrate that quantitative and precise depth depended not on the presence of transparency but horizontal contours of the same contrast polarity. Depth was attenuated, particularly at larger target offsets, when horizontal contours had opposite contrast polarity for at least a portion of their length. We also show that a demonstration they used to control for the role of horizontal contours can be understood with previously identified mechanisms involved in the computations associated with stereoscopic occlusion. These results imply that the findings reported by Howard and Duke can be understood with mechanisms responsible for the computation of binocular disparity and stereoscopic occlusion.

  5. Monocular transparency and unpaired stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Grove, Philip M; Brooks, Kevin R; Anderson, Barton L; Gillam, Barbara J

    2006-05-01

    Howard and Duke [Howard, I. P. & Duke, P. A. (2003). Monocular transparency generates quantitative depth. Vision Research, 43, 2615-2621] recently proposed a new source of binocular information they claim is used to recover depth in stereoscopic displays. They argued that these displays lack conventional disparity and that the metrical depth experienced results from transparency rather than occlusion relations. Using a variety of modified versions of their stimuli, we show here that the conditions for transparency are not required to elicit the depth experienced in their stereograms. We demonstrate that quantitative and precise depth depended not on the presence of transparency but horizontal contours of the same contrast polarity. Depth was attenuated, particularly at larger target offsets, when horizontal contours had opposite contrast polarity for at least a portion of their length. We also show that a demonstration they used to control for the role of horizontal contours can be understood with previously identified mechanisms involved in the computations associated with stereoscopic occlusion. These results imply that the findings reported by Howard and Duke can be understood with mechanisms responsible for the computation of binocular disparity and stereoscopic occlusion.

  6. Could Transparency Bring Economic Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The Spellings Commission report calls for greater access to higher education for low- and moderate-income students, greater transparency in the way higher education works and greater accountability for producing results. These recommendations are all significant in their own right, but the three concepts also converge to provide powerful support…

  7. Projection transparencies from printed material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunewald, L. S.; Nickerson, T. B.

    1968-01-01

    Method for preparing project transparencies, or view graphs, permits the use of almost any expendable printed material, pictures, charts, or text, in unlimited color or black and white. The method can be accomplished by either of two techniques, with a slight difference in materials.

  8. Transparency in Cooperative Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Paulsen, Morten Flate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the following question: What is the potential of social networking within cooperative online education? Social networking does not necessarily involve communication, dialogue, or collaboration. Instead, the authors argue that "transparency" is a unique feature of social networking services.…

  9. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 knockdown enhances glucose uptake and alters glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Huang, Huijing; Huang, Yi; Wang, Jinli; Yan, Jinhua; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Cuntai; Zhang, Le

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to induce the expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxification genes. Recently, increasing evidence has revealed roles for Nrf2 in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism; however, the exact functions of Nrf2 in hepatocyte biology are largely unclear. In the current study, the transient knockdown of Nrf2 via siRNA transfection enhanced the glucose uptake of fasting AML12 hepatocytes to 325.3 ± 11.1% ( P < 0.05) of that of untransfected control cells. The impacts of Nrf2 knockdown (NK) on the antioxidant system, inflammatory response, and glucose metabolism were then examined in AML12 cells under both high-glucose (33 mmol/L) and low-glucose (4.5 mmol/L) conditions. NK lowered the gene and protein expression of the anti-oxidases heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 and increased p-eukaryotic initiation factor-2α(S51), p-nuclear factor-κB p65(S276), and its downstream proinflammatory factors, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, at the protein level. NK also altered the protein expression of fibroblast growth factor 21, glucose transporter type 4, insulin-like growth factor 1, forkhead box protein O1, p-AKT(S473), and p-GSK3α/β(Y279/Y216), which are involved in glucose uptake, glycogenesis, and gluconeogenesis in AML12 cells. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the central role of Nrf2 in the regulation of glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes, in addition to its classical roles in the regulation of redox signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proinflammatory responses, and support the potential of Nrf2 as a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and other associated metabolic syndromes. Impact statement Increasing evidence supports the complexity of Nrf2 functions beyond the antioxidant and detoxification response. Previous in

  10. Optically transparent multi-suction electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Nagarah, John M.; Stowasser, Annette; Parker, Rell L.; Asari, Hiroki; Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Multielectrode arrays (MEAs) allow for acquisition of multisite electrophysiological activity with submillisecond temporal resolution from neural preparations. The signal to noise ratio from such arrays has recently been improved by substrate perforations that allow negative pressure to be applied to the tissue; however, such arrays are not optically transparent, limiting their potential to be combined with optical-based technologies. We present here multi-suction electrode arrays (MSEAs) in quartz that yield a substantial increase in the detected number of units and in signal to noise ratio from mouse cortico-hippocampal slices and mouse retina explants. This enables the visualization of stronger cross correlations between the firing rates of the various sources. Additionally, the MSEA's transparency allows us to record voltage sensitive dye activity from a leech ganglion with single neuron resolution using widefield microscopy simultaneously with the electrode array recordings. The combination of enhanced electrical signals and compatibility with optical-based technologies should make the MSEA a valuable tool for investigating neuronal circuits. PMID:26539078

  11. Accelerating Biomedical Discoveries through Rigor and Transparency.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Judith A; Brown, Liliana L; Murphy, Stephanie J; Grieder, Franziska; Silberberg, Shai D

    2017-07-01

    Difficulties in reproducing published research findings have garnered a lot of press in recent years. As a funder of biomedical research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has taken measures to address underlying causes of low reproducibility. Extensive deliberations resulted in a policy, released in 2015, to enhance reproducibility through rigor and transparency. We briefly explain what led to the policy, describe its elements, provide examples and resources for the biomedical research community, and discuss the potential impact of the policy on translatability with a focus on research using animal models. Importantly, while increased attention to rigor and transparency may lead to an increase in the number of laboratory animals used in the near term, it will lead to more efficient and productive use of such resources in the long run. The translational value of animal studies will be improved through more rigorous assessment of experimental variables and data, leading to better assessments of the translational potential of animal models, for the benefit of the research community and society. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. PIASy Represses CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein δ (C/EBPδ) Transcriptional Activity by Sequestering C/EBPδ to the Nuclear Periphery*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shanggen; Si, Junling; Liu, Tong; DeWille, James W.

    2008-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding proteinδ (C/EBPδ) plays a key role in mammary epithelial cell G0 growth arrest, and “loss of function” alterations in C/EBPδ have been reported in breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. C/EBPδ is regulated at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels, suggesting tight control of C/EBPδ content and function. Protein inhibitors of activated STATs (PIASs) regulate a growing number of transcription factors, including C/EBPs. HC11 nontransformed mammary epithelial cells express PIAS3, PIASxβ, and PIASy, and all three PIAS family members repress C/EBPδ transcriptional activity. PIASy is the most potent, however, repressing C/EBPδ transcriptional activity by >80%. PIASy repression of C/EBPδ transcriptional activity is dependent upon interaction between the highly conserved PIASy N-terminal nuclear matrix binding domain (SAPD) and the C/EBPδ transactivation domain (TAD). PIASy repression of C/EBPδ transcriptional activity is independent of histone deacetylase activity, PIASy E3 SUMO ligase activity, and C/EBPδ sumoylation status. PIASy expression is associated with C/EBPδ translocation from nuclear foci, where C/EBPδ co-localizes with p300, to the nuclear periphery. PIASy-mediated translocation of C/EBPδ is dependent upon the PIASy SAPD and C/EBPδ TAD. PIASy reduces the expression of C/EBPδ adhesion-related target genes and enhances repopulation of open areas within a cell monolayer in the in vitro “scratch” assay. These results demonstrate that PIASy represses C/EBPδ by a mechanism that requires interaction between the PIASy SAPD and C/EBPδ TAD and does not require PIASy SUMO ligase activity or C/EBPδ sumoylation. PIASy alters C/EBPδ nuclear localization, reduces C/EBPδ transcriptional activity, and enhances cell proliferation/migration. PMID:18477566

  13. Black perception in a transparent OLED display.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosun; Seo, Young-Jun; Yang, Byungchoon; Chu, Hye Yong

    2017-02-20

    Black perception (perceived blackness of gray 0) of transparent OLED displays was studied in this paper. In pre-test, maximum luminances of acceptable black level under various surround conditions were found in a non-transparent display. In the first experiment, the luminance of a transparent patch was compared with that of an opaque one in order to find the effect of transparency on black perception. As a result, participants perceived the transparent patch darker than the opaque one even when the two were in similar luminance levels, which we termed as the "Transparency Effect." In the second experiment, the perceived brightness of gray 0 with various background brightness conditions was investigated to observe the effect of induced black perception. Most participants per