Science.gov

Sample records for eniwetok

  1. Clean soil at Eniwetok and Johnston Atolls

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlitt, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency has managed two large-scale soil cleanups (landmass decontaminations) of plutonium contamination. Both are at Pacific Ocean atolls formerly used for nuclear weapons tests. The Eniwetok Atoll (EA) cleanup between 1977 and 1980 evaluated 390 ha of contaminated land and cleaned 50 ha by removing 80,000 m[sup 3] of contaminated soil. The Johnston Atoll (JA) cleanup is in process. It has checked 270 ha, will clean 15 ha, and plans for removal of 80,000 m[sup 3] of soil. The cleanups are similar in other respects including carbonate-based soil, in situ radiation surveys, contamination characteristics, soil excavation methods, safety, and weather. The two cleanups are in contrast relative to planning time, agencies involved, funding, documentation, environmental considerations, cleanup workforce, site beneficiaries, waste characterization, regulatory permits, management, and project duration. The most noteworthy differences are the rationale for cleanup, the cleanup process, the definition of clean, and the cost.

  2. Oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of limestones and dolomites, bikini and eniwetok atolls.

    PubMed

    Gross, M G; Tracey, J I

    1966-03-01

    Aragonitic, unconsolidated sediments from the borings on the Eniwetok and Bikini atolls are isotopically identical with unaltered skeletal fragments, whereas the recrystallized limestones exhibit isotopic variations resulting from alteration in meteoric waters during periods of emergence. Dolomites and associated calcites are enriched in O(18), perhaps because of interaction with hypersaline brines.

  3. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 9. Air-drop instrumentation. Part 2. Teller-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, H.E.

    1985-09-01

    It was the purpose of the Teller-Alpha experiment to measure the coefficient alpha by means of detectors placed a long distance from the bomb. The detectors are photoelectric devices that respond to visible light produced in the air surrounding the bomb by the absorbed gamma rays. A measurement of this sort was proposed by Edward Teller prior to the Sandstone Operation. The main components of the Teller-Alpha equipment were the photohead, the 200-Mc timing oscillator, and the high-speed-sensitivity recoding oscilloscope. A complete discussion of the experiment is provided.

  4. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6, blast measurements. Part 3. Pressure near ground level. Section 4. Blast asymmetry from aerial photographs. Section 5. Ball-crusher-gauge measurements of peak pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    Aerial motion pictures from manned aircraft were taken of the Dog, Easy, and George Shots and from a drone aircraft on Dog Shot to determine whether asymmetries in the blast waves could be detected and measured. Only one film, that taken of Dog Shot from a drone, was considered good enough to warrant detailed analysis, but this failed to yield any positive information on asymmetries. The analysis showed that failure to obtain good arrival-time data arose from a number of cases, but primarily from uncertainities in magnification and timing. Results could only be matched with reliable data from blast-velocity switches by use of large corrections. Asymnetries, if present, were judged to have been too small or to have occurred too early to be detected with the slow-frame speed used. Recommendations for better results include locating the aircraft directly overhead at the time of burst and using a camera having greater frame speed and provided with timing marks.

  5. Technical papers presented at a DOE meeting on criteria for cleanup of transuranium elements in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    Transuranium element soil contamination cleanup experience gained from nuclear weapons accidents and cleanup at Eniwetok Atoll was reviewed. Presentations have been individually abstracted for inclusion in the data base. (ACR)

  6. 32 CFR 761.7 - Basic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... military jurisdiction where entry is controlled by the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll). (e) Military areas. Entries authorized under this Instruction...

  7. 32 CFR 761.7 - Basic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... military jurisdiction where entry is controlled by the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll). (e) Military areas. Entries authorized under this Instruction...

  8. 32 CFR 761.7 - Basic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... military jurisdiction where entry is controlled by the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll). (e) Military areas. Entries authorized under this Instruction...

  9. 32 CFR 761.7 - Basic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... military jurisdiction where entry is controlled by the Department of the Army (Kwajalein Atoll) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (Eniwetok Atoll). (e) Military areas. Entries authorized under this Instruction...

  10. 32 CFR 761.4 - Special provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... entries into Eniwetok Atoll should be directed to: Commander, Field Command, Defense Nuclear Agency, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM 87115. (c) Entry into Johnston Atoll is controlled by the Defense...

  11. 32 CFR 761.4 - Special provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Kwajalein Atoll under military jurisdiction is controlled by the Department of the Army. Inquiries concerning entries into islands under military control in the Kwajalein Atoll should be directed to: National.... (b) Entry into Eniwetok Atoll is controlled by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Inquiries...

  12. 32 CFR 761.4 - Special provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Kwajalein Atoll under military jurisdiction is controlled by the Department of the Army. Inquiries concerning entries into islands under military control in the Kwajalein Atoll should be directed to: National.... (b) Entry into Eniwetok Atoll is controlled by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Inquiries...

  13. 32 CFR 761.4 - Special provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Kwajalein Atoll under military jurisdiction is controlled by the Department of the Army. Inquiries concerning entries into islands under military control in the Kwajalein Atoll should be directed to: National.... (b) Entry into Eniwetok Atoll is controlled by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Inquiries...

  14. 32 CFR 761.4 - Special provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Kwajalein Atoll under military jurisdiction is controlled by the Department of the Army. Inquiries concerning entries into islands under military control in the Kwajalein Atoll should be directed to: National.... (b) Entry into Eniwetok Atoll is controlled by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Inquiries...

  15. Operation Castle. Project 7. 1. Electromagnetic radiation calibration, Pacific )roving ground. Report for March-May 1954

    SciTech Connect

    Olseon, M.H.

    1984-08-31

    A total of 17 stations, one close-in (320 km from Bikini and 23 km from Eniwetok) and the balance at distances, were operated for the electromagnetic experimental effort. Seventy-four sets of data were obtained from a possible total of 102. Of the remaining 28 sets, no data were obtained because equipment was not in operation, records were not readable, the alert notifications were not received, signals were not discernible, or equipment malfunctioned.

  16. Coral chronometers: seasonal growth bands in reef corals.

    PubMed

    Knutson, D W; Buddemeier, R W; Smith, S V

    1972-07-21

    Autoradiagraphs and x-radiographs have been made of vertical sections through the centers of reef corals from Eniwetok. Radioactivity bands in the coral structure are caused by strontium-90 and are related to specific series of nuclear tests, thus making possible calculation of long-term growth rates. These data indicate that the cyclic variations in radial density revealed by x-radiography are annual. PMID:17815626

  17. Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-29

    Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

  18. Dolomitization of the Mid-Pacific Atolls.

    PubMed

    Berner, R A

    1965-03-12

    The origin of the dolomite which occurs beneath the atolls of Funafuti, Kita-daitō-jima, and Eniwetok in the Pacific Ocean can be explained by the reaction of hypersaline brines with transported or buried reef skeletal material. Dolomitization could have taken place at the sediment surface in shallow restricted back-reef lagoons and tidal flats or below the surface by reflux action. Measurements of oxygen isotopes in samples of dolomite can be interpreted as indicating an origin from evaporated, isotopically-heavy sea water.

  19. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  20. Shock-induced effects in calcite from Cactus Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizgirda, J.; Ahrens, T. J.; Tsay, F.-D.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses shock metamorphism of calcite from coralline limestone samples retrieved from a borehole drilled into rocks beneath Cactus Crater, a nuclear explosion crater at Eniwetok Atoll. The metamorphism was detected and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR); the ESR spectra of Mn(+) present as a trace constituent in the coral samples, show a consistent decrease in hyperfine peak splitting with decreasing depth of sample. It is suggested that the decrease in hyperfine peak splitting reflects a decrease in crystal field splitting, and therefore, small increases on cation-anion distances produced by mechanical energy input during the shock process. Two alternative crater models suggested by the ESR results are a depiction of a steady decay of the shock wave, and a delineation of a breccia lens with a breccia-bedrock interface at 20 plus or minus 5 m.

  1. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Julie Langham Grilly, February 3, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Julie Langham Grilly was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) being the widow of Dr. Wright Langham, an investigator of principal interest of the committee. Her extensive experience with research at LANL was also of interest to the committee. Following a brief biographical sketch, Ms. Grilly relates her early postwar experience and her knowledge of Wright Langham`s involvement in animal research at Los Alamos, radiolanthanum tests on monkeys, Eniwetok tissue examinations, research on tritium uptake in humans, plutonium injections, tritium injections, EDTA, and etc. In addition to illuminating her former husband as a researcher and as an individual, she also relates her remembrances of Louis Hempelman, Enrico Fermi, Oppenheimer, Edward Teller, and many others.

  2. Operation Hardtack. Project 1. 9. Loading on buried simulated structures in high-overpressure regions. Report for April-October 1958

    SciTech Connect

    Bultmann, E.H.; McDonough, G.F.; Sinnamon, G.K.

    1984-10-31

    The objective of this project was to study some of the factors affecting the transmission of air-blast-induced pressure through soil and the loading produced on buried structures by such pressures in the high-pressure region (approximately 250 psi). Factors studied were: (1) the attenuation of pressure in a sand deposit when the water table is a few feet below the ground surface; (2) the effect of duration of positive phase of blast on the pressure transmitted through such a soil; (3) the effect of structure flexibility on the pressure acting on structures buried in such a soil; and (4) the relationship between horizontal and vertical pressures in such a soil. The project employed 43 devices, each a rigid cylinder having one rigid end and one deformable-diaphragm end. The devices were buried at depths ranging from 0 to 20 feet at each of two locations at the Eniwetok Proving Ground. The locations were chosen to give a predicted ground surface overpressure of about 250 psi from each of two shots, Cactus and Koa.

  3. Einsteinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haire, Richard G.

    The discovery of einsteinium, element 99, came about during the analyses of nuclear products produced in and then recovered from test debris following a thermonuclear explosion (weapon test device, ‘Mike', November 1952) at Eniwetok Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. The uranium present in this device was subjected to a very intense neutron flux (integrated fluence of about 1024neutrons) in an extremely short time frame (few nanoseconds), which allowed a large number of multiple neutron captures with a minimal degree of decay of the products formed. Nuclei were formed with usually high neutron/proton ratios (very ‘heavy' uranium isotopes), which then rapidly beta-decayed into new, transuranium isotopes through element 100. Scientists from several U.S. Government laboratories separated and analyzed extensively the debris samplings in the following weeks. From these investigations came the discovery and identification of einsteinium and fermium. The first element was named in honor of Albert Einstein, and assigned the symbol, E (later changed to the current symbol, Es). Additional details and discussions about the discovery of this element and the scientists involved are given in several references (Thompson et al., 1954; Ghiorso et al., 1955; Fields et al., 1956; Hyde et al., 1964; Seaborg and Loveland, 1990).

  4. John von Neumann and Klaus Fuchs: an Unlikely Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    2010-03-01

    I discuss the origin of the idea of making a fusion (hydrogen) bomb and the physics involved in it, and then turn to the design proposed for one by the unlikely collaborators John von Neumann and Klaus Fuchs in a patent application they filed at Los Alamos in May 1946, which Fuchs passed on to the Russians in March 1948, and which with substantial modifications was tested on the island of Eberiru on the Eniwetok atoll in the South Pacific on May 8, 1951. This test showed that the fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei could be ignited, but that the ignition would not propagate because the heat produced was rapidly radiated away. Meanwhile, Stanislaw Ulam and C.J. Everett had shown that Edward Teller’s Classical Super could not work, and at the end of December 1950, Ulam had conceived the idea of super compression, using the energy of a fission bomb to compress the fusion fuel to such a high density that it would be opaque to the radiation produced. Once Teller understood this, he invented a greatly improved, new method of compression using radiation, which then became the heart of the Ulam-Teller bomb design, which was tested, also in the South Pacific, on November 1, 1952. The Russians have freely acknowledged that Fuchs gave them the fission bomb, but they have insisted that no one gave them the fusion bomb, which grew out of design involving a fission bomb surrounded by alternating layers of fusion and fission fuels, and which they tested on November 22, 1955. Part of the irony of this story is that neither the American nor the Russian hydrogen-bomb programs made any use of the brilliant design that von Neumann and Fuchs had conceived as early as 1946, which could have changed the entire course of development of both programs.

  5. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2010-11-05

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a potential Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed low-level, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area (TA)-54. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to seven sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. The top site choice is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. The seven sites are as follows. TA-18/36 (62 acres) is located on Potrillo Drive that intersects Pajarito Road at the bottom of a steep grade. It has some blast zone issues on its southwest side and some important archeological sites on the southeast section. TA-60 (50 acres) is located at the end of Eniwetok Road off Diamond Drive, east of TA-3. Most of the site is within a fifty foot-deep ravine (that may have contamination in the drainage), with a small section on the mesa above. TA-63/52/46 (110 acres) lies to the north of Pajarito Road along Puye Road. It is centrally located in a brown field industrial area, with good access to generators on a controlled road. TA-46 (22 acres) is a narrow site on the south side of Pajarito Road across from TA-46 office buildings. TA-48 (14 acres) is also narrow, and is located on the north side of Pajarito Road near the west vehicle access portal (VAP). TA-51 (19 acres) is located on the south side of Pajarito Road at the top of the hill above TA-18 near the current entrance to the TA-54. TA-54 West (16 acres) is just north of the entrance to TA-54 at Pajarito Road and is close to Zone 4. Although it is near the San Ildefonso Pueblo property line, there may be adequate set-back for sight screening.