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Sample records for enoyl acyl carrier

  1. Trapping of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase–Acyl Carrier Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tallorin, Lorillee; Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Quynh G.; Beld, Joris; La Clair, James J.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An ideal target for metabolic engineering, fatty acid biosynthesis remains poorly understood on a molecular level. These carrier protein-dependent pathways require fundamental protein–protein interactions to guide reactivity and processivity, and their control has become one of the major hurdles in successfully adapting these biological machines. Our laboratory has developed methods to prepare acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) loaded with substrate mimetics and cross-linkers to visualize and trap interactions with partner enzymes, and we continue to expand the tools for studying these pathways. We now describe application of the slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor triclosan to explore the interactions between the type II fatty acid ACP from Escherichia coli, AcpP, and its corresponding enoyl-ACP reductase, FabI. We show that the AcpP–triclosan complex demonstrates nM binding, inhibits in vitro activity, and can be used to isolate FabI in complex proteomes. PMID:26938266

  2. A rational approach to identify inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase.

    PubMed

    Chhabria, Mahesh T; Parmar, Kailash B; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik S

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterial enoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase is an attractive target for focused design of novel antitubercular agents. Structural information available on enoyl-ACP reductase in complex with different ligands was used to generate receptor-based pharmacophore model in Discovery Studio (DS). In parallel, pharmacophore models were also generated using ligand-based approach (HypoGen module in DS). Statistically significant models were generated (r(2) = 0.85) which were found to be predictive as indicated from internal and external cross-validations. The model was used as a query tool to search Zinc and Maybridge databases to identify lead compounds and predict their activity in silico. Database searching retrieved many potential lead compounds having better estimated IC50 values than the training set compounds. These compounds were then evaluated for their drug-likeliness and pharmacokinetic properties using DS. Few selected compounds were then docked into the crystal structure of enoyl-ACP reductase using Dock 6.5. Most compounds were found to have high score values, which was found to be consistent with the results from pharmacophore mapping. Additionally, molecular docking provided useful insights into the nature of binding of the identified hit molecules. In summary, we show a useful strategy employing ligand- and structure-based approaches (pharmacophore modeling coupled with molecular docking) to identify new enoyl- ACP reductase inhibitors for antimycobacterial chemotherapy.

  3. Inhibition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA by arylamides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the key enzymes involved in the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of M. tuberculosis. We report here the discovery, through high-throughput screening, of a series of arylamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. These direct InhA inhibitors require no mycobacterial enzymatic activation and thus circumvent the resistance mechanism to antitubercular prodrugs such as INH and ETA that is most commonly observed in drug-resistant clinical isolates. The crystal structure of InhA complexed with one representative inhibitor reveals the binding mode of the inhibitor within the InhA active site. Further optimization through a microtiter synthesis strategy followed by in situ activity screening led to the discovery of a potent InhA inhibitor with in vitro IC50 = 90 nM, representing a 34-fold potency improvement over the lead compound. PMID:17723305

  4. Inhibition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA by arylamides.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2007-11-01

    InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the key enzymes involved in the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of M. tuberculosis. We report here the discovery, through high-throughput screening, of a series of arylamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. These direct InhA inhibitors require no mycobacterial enzymatic activation and thus circumvent the resistance mechanism to antitubercular prodrugs such as INH and ETA that is most commonly observed in drug-resistant clinical isolates. The crystal structure of InhA complexed with one representative inhibitor reveals the binding mode of the inhibitor within the InhA active site. Further optimization through a microtiter synthesis strategy followed by in situ activity screening led to the discovery of a potent InhA inhibitor with in vitro IC(50)=90 nM, representing a 34-fold potency improvement over the lead compound.

  5. 3D-QSAR studies on triclosan derivatives as Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shah, P; Siddiqi, M I

    2010-07-01

    3D-QSAR studies were carried out on a training set of 53 structurally highly diverse analogues of triclosan to investigate the correlation of the structural properties of triclosan derivatives with the inhibition of the activity of enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase in Plasmodium falciparum (PfENR) by employing Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA). The crystal structure bound conformation of triclosan, was used as a template for aligning molecules. The probable binding mode conformations of other inhibitors were explored according to molecular docking and molecular mechanics poisson-boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) solvation free energy estimation methods using grid based linear Poisson-Boltzmann calculations. Predictive 3D-QSAR models, established using routine database alignment rule based on crystallographic-bound conformation of template molecule, produced statistically significant results with cross-validated r2 cv values of 0.64 and 0.54 and non-cross-validated r2 ncv values of 0.96 and 0.97 for CoMFA and CoMSIA models, respectively. The statistically significant models were validated by a test set of nine compounds with predictive r(2) values of 0.534 and 0.765 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. Our QSAR model is able to successfully explain the geometric and electrostatic complementarities between ligands and receptor and provides useful guidelines to design novel triclosan derivatives as Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier reductase inhibitors.

  6. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductase genes.

    PubMed

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductases from sunflower. A major factor contributing to the amount of fatty acids in plant oils are the first steps of their synthesis. The intraplastidic fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in plants is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS). The last step in each elongation cycle is carried out by the enoyl-[ACP]-reductase, which reduces the dehydrated product of β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydrase using NADPH or NADH. To determine the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two enoyl-[ACP]-reductase genes have been identified and cloned from developing seeds with 75 % identity: HaENR1 (GenBank HM021137) and HaENR2 (HM021138). The two genes belong to the ENRA and ENRB families in dicotyledons, respectively. The genetic duplication most likely originated after the separation of di- and monocotyledons. RT-qPCR revealed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Highest expression of HaENR1 was in roots, stems and developing cotyledons whereas that of H a ENR2 was in leaves and early stages of seed development. Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single-copy genes. In vivo activity of the ENR enzymes was tested by complementation experiments with the JP1111 fabI(ts) E. coli strain. Both enzymes were functional demonstrating that they interacted with the bacterial FAS components. That different fatty acid profiles resulted infers that the two Helianthus proteins have different structures, substrate specificities and/or reaction rates. The latter possibility was confirmed by in vitro analysis with affinity-purified heterologous-expressed enzymes that reduced the crotonyl-CoA substrate using NADH with different V max.

  7. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase I (FabI) Is Essential for the Intracellular Growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Ericson, Megan E; Frank, Matthew W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-12-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is a key regulatory protein in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Genes of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode two functional enoyl-acyl carrier protein isoforms based on their ability to complement the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of Escherichia coli strain JP1111 [fabI(Ts)]. The FabI isoform was inactivated by the FabI selective inhibitor AFN-1252, but the FabK isoform was not affected by the drug, as expected. Inhibition of FabI by AFN-1252 decreased endogenous fatty acid synthesis by 80% and lowered the growth rate of L. monocytogenes in laboratory medium. Robust exogenous fatty acid incorporation was not detected in L. monocytogenes unless the pathway was partially inactivated by AFN-1252 treatment. However, supplementation with exogenous fatty acids did not restore normal growth in the presence of AFN-1252. FabI inactivation prevented the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes, showing that neither FabK nor the incorporation of host cellular fatty acids was sufficient to support the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes Our results show that FabI is the primary enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is essential for the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase I (FabI) Is Essential for the Intracellular Growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Megan E.; Frank, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is a key regulatory protein in bacterial fatty acid synthesis. Genes of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode two functional enoyl-acyl carrier protein isoforms based on their ability to complement the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of Escherichia coli strain JP1111 [fabI(Ts)]. The FabI isoform was inactivated by the FabI selective inhibitor AFN-1252, but the FabK isoform was not affected by the drug, as expected. Inhibition of FabI by AFN-1252 decreased endogenous fatty acid synthesis by 80% and lowered the growth rate of L. monocytogenes in laboratory medium. Robust exogenous fatty acid incorporation was not detected in L. monocytogenes unless the pathway was partially inactivated by AFN-1252 treatment. However, supplementation with exogenous fatty acids did not restore normal growth in the presence of AFN-1252. FabI inactivation prevented the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes, showing that neither FabK nor the incorporation of host cellular fatty acids was sufficient to support the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. Our results show that FabI is the primary enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of type II bacterial fatty acid synthesis and is essential for the intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:27736774

  9. The Two Functional Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases of Enterococcus faecalis Do Not Mediate Triclosan Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Bi, Hongkai; Ma, Jincheng; Hu, Zhe; Zhang, Wenbin; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase catalyzes the last step of the elongation cycle in the synthesis of bacterial fatty acids. The Enterococcus faecalis genome contains two genes annotated as enoyl-ACP reductases, a FabI-type enoyl-ACP reductase and a FabK-type enoyl-ACP reductase. We report that expression of either of the two proteins restores growth of an Escherichia coli fabI temperature-sensitive mutant strain under nonpermissive conditions. In vitro assays demonstrated that both proteins support fatty acid synthesis and are active with substrates of all fatty acid chain lengths. Although expression of E. faecalis fabK confers to E. coli high levels of resistance to the antimicrobial triclosan, deletion of fabK from the E. faecalis genome showed that FabK does not play a detectable role in the inherent triclosan resistance of E. faecalis. Indeed, FabK seems to play only a minor role in modulating fatty acid composition. Strains carrying a deletion of fabK grow normally without fatty acid supplementation, whereas fabI deletion mutants make only traces of fatty acids and are unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs. PMID:24085780

  10. Enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase inhibitors: an updated patent review (2011 - 2015).

    PubMed

    Zitko, Jan; Doležal, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Enoyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase (ENR) is a limiting step enzyme in the Fatty Acid Synthase II system. In mammals, there is no homologue to ENR, which makes it an optimal candidate target for selective anti-infective drugs. Up-to-date, only two ENR inhibitors are used in clinical practice. This review is a survey on important patents on low molecular weight compounds with ENR inhibiting activity published in 2011-2015. Common patent databases (SciFinder, esp@cenet, WIPO) were used to locate patent applications on the proposed topic and in the timespan of 2011-2015. In 2011-2015, we have observed patents in previously known structural groups of diphenyl ethers and acrylamides as well as new structural classes, often identified by high-throughput screening campaigns. The spectrum of activity of applied derivatives covers significant bacteria, mycobacteria, and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodia and Toxoplasma). Good news from research of ENR inhibitors: a) four selective anti-staphylococcal compounds applied in 2011-2015 or earlier were pushed to Phase I or Phase II clinical trials and some of them proved safety and tolerability after peroral and/or intravenous administration; b) big pharma companies have renewed their interest in the development of new anti-infective compounds against resistant strains of clinical relevance.

  11. A pathogenic fungi diphenyl ether phytotoxin targets plant enoyl (acyl carrier protein) reductase.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Ferreira, Daneel; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A; McInroy, John A; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2008-07-01

    Cyperin is a natural diphenyl ether phytotoxin produced by several fungal plant pathogens. At high concentrations, this metabolite inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase, a key enzyme in porphyrin synthesis. However, unlike its herbicide structural analogs, the mode of action of cyperin is not light dependent, causing loss of membrane integrity in the dark. We report that this natural diphenyl ether inhibits Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enoyl (acyl carrier protein) reductase (ENR). This enzyme is also sensitive to triclosan, a synthetic antimicrobial diphenyl ether. Whereas cyperin was much less potent than triclosan on this target site, their ability to cause light-independent disruption of membrane integrity and inhibition of ENR is similar at their respective phytotoxic concentrations. The sequence of ENR is highly conserved within higher plants and a homology model of Arabidopsis ENR was derived from the crystal structure of the protein from Brassica napus. Cyperin mimicked the binding of triclosan in the binding pocket of ENR. Both molecules were stabilized by the pi-pi stacking interaction between one of their phenyl rings and the nicotinamide ring of the NAD(+). Furthermore, the side chain of tyrosine is involved in hydrogen bonding with a phenolic hydroxy group of cyperin. Therefore, cyperin may contribute to the virulence of the pathogens by inhibiting ENR and destabilizing the membrane integrity of the cells surrounding the point of infection.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Jun Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2006-06-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are responsible for bacterial type II fatty-acid biosynthesis and are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. The S. pneumoniae enoyl-ACP reductase (FabK) was crystallized and selenomethionine MAD data were collected to 2 Å resolution. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (FabK; EC 1.3.1.9) is responsible for catalyzing the final step in each elongation cycle of fatty-acid biosynthesis. Selenomethionine-substituted FabK was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.26, b = 126.70, c = 53.63 Å, β = 112.46°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution using synchrotron beamline BL32B2 at SPring-8. Two molecules were estimated to be present in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45.1%.

  13. Inefficient translation renders the Enterococcus faecalis fabK enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase phenotypically cryptic.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Haihong; Cronan, John E

    2014-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase catalyzes the last step of the bacterial fatty acid elongation cycle. Enterococcus faecalis is unusual in that it encodes two unrelated enoyl-ACP reductases, FabI and FabK. We recently reported that deletion of the gene encoding FabI results in an unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) auxotroph despite the presence of fabK, a gene encoding a second fully functional enoyl-ACP reductase. By process of elimination, our prior report argued that poor expression was the reason that fabK failed to functionally replace FabI. We now report that FabK is indeed poorly expressed and that the expression defect is at the level of translation rather than transcription. We isolated four spontaneous mutants that allowed growth of the E. faecalis ΔfabI strain on fatty acid-free medium. Each mutational lesion (single base substitution or deletion) extended the fabK ribosome binding site. Inactivation of fabK blocked growth, indicating that the mutations acted only on fabK rather than a downstream gene. The mutations activated fabK translation to levels that supported fatty acid synthesis and hence cell growth. Furthermore, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments showed that point mutations that resulted in increased complementarity to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA increased FabK translation to levels sufficient to support growth, whereas mutations that decreased complementarity blocked fabK translation.

  14. Resistance Mechanisms and the Future of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations leading to clinical antibiotic resistance are a liability of single-target inhibitors. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitors have one intracellular protein target and drug resistance is increased by the acquisition of single base pair mutations that alter drug binding. The spectrum of resistance mechanisms to FabI inhibitors suggests criteria that should be considered during the development of single-target antibiotics that would minimize the impact of missense mutations on their clinical usefulness. These criteria include high-affinity, fast on/off kinetics, few drug contacts with residue side chains, and no toxicity. These stringent criteria are achievable by structure-guided design, but this approach will only yield pathogen-specific drugs. Single-step acquisition of resistance may limit the clinical application of broad-spectrum, single-target antibiotics, but appropriately designed, pathogen-specific antibiotics have the potential to overcome this liability. PMID:26931811

  15. Pyrrolidine carboxamides as a novel class of inhibitors of enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Stroud, Robert; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-10-19

    In view of the worldwide spread of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, there is an urgent need to discover antituberculosis agent with novel structures. InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from M. tuberculosis, is one of the key enzymes involved in the mycobacterial fatty acid elongation cycle and has been validated as an effective antimicrobial target. We report here the discovery, through high-throughput screening, of a series of pyrrolidine carboxamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. Crystal structures of InhA complexed with three inhibitors have been used to elucidate the inhibitor binding mode. The potency of the lead compound was improved over 160-fold by subsequent optimization through iterative microtiter library synthesis followed by in situ activity screening without purification. Resolution of racemic mixtures of several inhibitors indicate that only one enantiomer is active as an inhibitor of InhA.

  16. Pyrrolidine Carboxamides as a Novel Class of Inhibitors of Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (InhA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Stroud, Robert; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    In view of the worldwide spread of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, there is an urgent need to discover antituberculosis agent with novel structures. InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the key enzymes involved in the mycobacterial fatty acid elongation cycle and has been validated as an effective antimicrobial target. We report here discovery through high throughput screening of a series of pyrrolidine carboxamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. Crystal structures of InhA complexed with three inhibitors have been used to elucidate the inhibitor binding mode. The potency of the lead compound was improved over 160-fold by subsequent optimization through iterative microtiter library synthesis followed by in situ activity screening without purification. Resolution of racemic mixtures of several inhibitors indicate that only one enantiomer is active as an inhibitor of InhA. PMID:17034137

  17. Virtually Designed Triclosan-Based Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Owono Owono, Luc C; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Keita, Melalie; Megnassan, Eugene; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2015-05-01

    We report here new chemical structures of predicted nanomolar triclosan-based inhibitors (TCLs) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) virtually proposed by computer-assisted molecular design. 3D models of InhA-TCL complexes were prepared by in situ modifications of the reference crystal structure (PDB entry 1P45) for a training set of 15 TCLs with known InhA inhibitory activities. A QSAR model was built leading to linear correlation between the calculated free energies of complexation (ΔΔGcom ) and experimental values IC50 (exp) : pIC50 =-0.0657×ΔΔGcom +3.0502, R(2) =0.96. In addition, ligand-based quantitative pharmacophore model (PH4) was built from bound conformations of the training set compounds and confirmed the correlation between molecular models and observed activities: pIC50 (exp=) 0.8929×pIC50 (pre) -0.441, R(2) =0.95. Structural information from both models helped us to propose new TCL analogues. A virtual library of TCLs with known predicted activities against enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of Plasmodium falciparum (PfENR) was evaluated, revealing dual target TCLs. Moreover, analysis of binding site interactions suggested enriching substitutions, which led to more potent TCLs with predicted pIC50 (pre) as low as 7 nM. The computational approach, which used both free energy estimated from molecular modeling and 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model, was helpful in virtually proposing the dual-targeted drugs and provided valuable information for the design of novel potential antituberculotic agents.

  18. Structural basis for cyclopropanation by a unique enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Dheeraj; Hale, Wendi A.; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Gu, Liangcai; Sherman, David H.; Gerwick, William H.; Håkansson, Kristina; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    The natural product curacin A, a potent anticancer agent, contains a rare cyclopropane group. The five enzymes for cyclopropane biosynthesis are highly similar to enzymes that generate a vinyl chloride moiety in the jamaicamide natural product. The structural biology of this remarkable catalytic adaptability is probed with high-resolution crystal structures of the curacin cyclopropanase (CurF ER), an in vitro enoyl reductase (JamJ ER), and a canonical curacin enoyl reductase (CurK ER). The JamJ and CurK ERs catalyze NADPH-dependent double bond reductions typical of enoyl reductases (ERs) of the medium chain dehydrogenase reductase (MDR) superfamily. Cyclopropane formation by CurF ER is specified by a short loop which, when transplanted to JamJ ER, confers cyclopropanase activity on the chimeric enzyme. Detection of an adduct of NADPH with the model substrate crotonyl-CoA provides indirect support for a recent proposal of a C2-ene intermediate on the reaction pathway of MDR enoyl-thioester reductases. PMID:26526850

  19. Escherichia coli Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Supports Efficient Operation of a Functional Reversal of the β-Oxidation Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Jacob E.; Clomburg, James M.; Blankschien, Matthew D.; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung

    2014-01-01

    We recently used a synthetic/bottom-up approach to establish the identity of the four enzymes composing an engineered functional reversal of the β-oxidation cycle for fuel and chemical production in Escherichia coli (J. M. Clomburg, J. E. Vick, M. D. Blankschien, M. Rodriguez-Moya, and R. Gonzalez, ACS Synth Biol 1:541–554, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sb3000782). While native enzymes that catalyze the first three steps of the pathway were identified, the identity of the native enzyme(s) acting as the trans-enoyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase(s) remained unknown, limiting the amount of product that could be synthesized (e.g., 0.34 g/liter butyrate) and requiring the overexpression of a foreign enzyme (the Euglena gracilis trans-enoyl-CoA reductase [EgTER]) to achieve high titers (e.g., 3.4 g/liter butyrate). Here, we examine several native E. coli enzymes hypothesized to catalyze the reduction of enoyl-CoAs to acyl-CoAs. Our results indicate that FabI, the native enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase (ENR) from type II fatty acid biosynthesis, possesses sufficient NADH-dependent TER activity to support the efficient operation of a β-oxidation reversal. Overexpression of FabI proved as effective as EgTER for the production of butyrate and longer-chain carboxylic acids. Given the essential nature of fabI, we investigated whether bacterial ENRs from other families were able to complement a fabI deletion without promiscuous reduction of crotonyl-CoA. These characteristics from Bacillus subtilis FabL enabled ΔfabI complementation experiments that conclusively established that FabI encodes a native enoyl-CoA reductase activity that supports the β-oxidation reversal in E. coli. PMID:25527535

  20. Resistance Mechanisms and the Future of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-01

    Missense mutations leading to clinical antibiotic resistance are a liability of single-target inhibitors. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitors have one intracellular protein target and drug resistance is increased by the acquisition of single-base-pair mutations that alter drug binding. The spectrum of resistance mechanisms to FabI inhibitors suggests criteria that should be considered during the development of single-target antibiotics that would minimize the impact of missense mutations on their clinical usefulness. These criteria include high-affinity, fast on/off kinetics, few drug contacts with residue side chains, and no toxicity. These stringent criteria are achievable by structure-guided design, but this approach will only yield pathogen-specific drugs. Single-step acquisition of resistance may limit the clinical application of broad-spectrum, single-target antibiotics, but appropriately designed pathogen-specific antibiotics have the potential to overcome this liability. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Modification of Triclosan Scaffold in Search of Improved Inhibitors for Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Reductase in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Jozef; Fomovska, Alina; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Muench, Stephen P.; Zhou, Ying; Lai, Bo-Shiun; Bissati, Kamal El; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Sommervile, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W.; Rice, David; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2013-01-01

    Through our focused effort to discover new and effective agents against toxoplasmosis, a structure-based drug design approach was utilized to develop a series of potent inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) enzyme in Toxoplasma gondii (TgENR). Modifications to positions 5 and 4′ of the well-known ENR inhibitor triclosan afforded a series of 29 new analogs. Among the resulting compounds, many showed high potency and improved physicochemical properties in comparison with the lead. The most potent compounds 16a and 16c have IC50 values of 250 nM against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites without apparent toxicity to the host cells. Their IC50 values against the recombinant TgENR were 43 and 26 nM, respectively. Additionally, 11 other analogs in this series had IC50 values ranging from 17 to 130 nM in the enzyme-based assay. With respect to their excellent in vitro activity as well as improved drug-like properties, the lead compounds 16a and 16c are deemed to be an excellent starting point for the development of new medicines to effectively treat Toxoplasma gondii infections. PMID:23776166

  2. Modification of triclosan scaffold in search of improved inhibitors for enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Stec, Jozef; Fomovska, Alina; Afanador, Gustavo A; Muench, Stephen P; Zhou, Ying; Lai, Bo-Shiun; El Bissati, Kamal; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patty J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Sommervile, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W; Rice, David; Prigge, Sean T; McLeod, Rima; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2013-07-01

    Through our focused effort to discover new and effective agents against toxoplasmosis, a structure-based drug design approach was used to develop a series of potent inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) enzyme in Toxoplasma gondii (TgENR). Modifications to positions 5 and 4' of the well-known ENR inhibitor triclosan afforded a series of 29 new analogues. Among the resulting compounds, many showed high potency and improved physicochemical properties in comparison with the lead. The most potent compounds 16 a and 16 c have IC50 values of 250 nM against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites without apparent toxicity to the host cells. Their IC50 values against recombinant TgENR were found to be 43 and 26 nM, respectively. Additionally, 11 other analogues in this series had IC50 values ranging from 17 to 130 nM in the enzyme-based assay. With respect to their excellent in vitro activity as well as improved drug-like properties, the lead compounds 16 a and 16 c are deemed to be excellent starting points for the development of new medicines to effectively treat Toxoplasma gondii infections.

  3. Triclosan Resistome from Metagenome Reveals Diverse Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases and Selective Enrichment of Triclosan Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Raees; Kong, Hyun Gi; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Choi, Jinhee; Baek, Kwang-Yeol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent and TCS resistance is considered to have evolved in diverse organisms with extensive use of TCS, but distribution of TCS resistance has not been well characterized. Functional screening of the soil metagenome in this study has revealed that a variety of target enoyl acyl carrier protein reductases (ENR) homologues are responsible for the majority of TCS resistance. Diverse ENRs similar to 7-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7-α-HSDH), FabG, or the unusual YX7K-type ENR conferred extreme tolerance to TCS. The TCS-refractory 7-α HSDH-like ENR and the TCS-resistant YX7K-type ENR seem to be prevalent in human pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that a selective enrichment occurred in pathogenic bacteria in soil. Additionally, resistance to multiple antibiotics was found to be mediated by antibiotic resistance genes that co-localize with TCS resistance determinants. Further comparative analysis of ENRs from 13 different environments has revealed a huge diversity of both prototypic and metagenomic TCS-resistant ENRs, in addition to a selective enrichment of TCS-resistant specific ENRs in presumably TCS-contaminated environments with reduced ENR diversity. Our results suggest that long-term extensive use of TCS can lead to the selective emergence of TCS-resistant bacterial pathogens, possibly with additional resistance to multiple antibiotics, in natural environments. PMID:27577999

  4. Rational Design of Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Activity Based on a Clinically Relevant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Reductase Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Shah, Sonam; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Pan, Pan; Hirschbeck, Maria W.; Tareilus, Mona; Eltschkner, Sandra; Yu, Weixuan; Cummings, Jason E.; Knudson, Susan E.; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Walker, Stephen G.; Slayden, Richard A.; Sotriffer, Christoph A.; Tonge, Peter J.; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Determining the molecular basis for target selectivity is of particular importance in drug discovery. The ideal antibiotic should be active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms with a minimal effect on human targets. CG400549, a Staphylococcus-specific 2-pyridone compound that inhibits the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), has recently been shown to possess human efficacy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, which constitute a serious threat to human health. In this study, we solved the structures of three different FabI homologues in complex with several pyridone inhibitors, including CG400549. Based on these structures, we rationalize the 65-fold reduced affinity of CG400549 toward Escherichia coli versus S. aureus FabI and implement concepts to improve the spectrum of antibacterial activity. The identification of different conformational states along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic hydride transfer provides an elegant visual depiction of the relationship between catalysis and inhibition, which facilitates rational inhibitor design. Ultimately, we developed the novel 4-pyridone-based FabI inhibitor PT166 that retained favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacy in a mouse model of S. aureus infection with extended activity against Gram-negative and mycobacterial organisms. PMID:24739388

  5. Rational design of broad spectrum antibacterial activity based on a clinically relevant enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Shah, Sonam; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Pan, Pan; Hirschbeck, Maria W; Tareilus, Mona; Eltschkner, Sandra; Yu, Weixuan; Cummings, Jason E; Knudson, Susan E; Bommineni, Gopal R; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-06-06

    Determining the molecular basis for target selectivity is of particular importance in drug discovery. The ideal antibiotic should be active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms with a minimal effect on human targets. CG400549, a Staphylococcus-specific 2-pyridone compound that inhibits the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), has recently been shown to possess human efficacy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, which constitute a serious threat to human health. In this study, we solved the structures of three different FabI homologues in complex with several pyridone inhibitors, including CG400549. Based on these structures, we rationalize the 65-fold reduced affinity of CG400549 toward Escherichia coli versus S. aureus FabI and implement concepts to improve the spectrum of antibacterial activity. The identification of different conformational states along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic hydride transfer provides an elegant visual depiction of the relationship between catalysis and inhibition, which facilitates rational inhibitor design. Ultimately, we developed the novel 4-pyridone-based FabI inhibitor PT166 that retained favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacy in a mouse model of S. aureus infection with extended activity against Gram-negative and mycobacterial organisms. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Functional Characterization of Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-acyl-carrier Protein Reductase (FabV) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Lin, Jin-Shui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR), FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholerae fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore the fabV mutant strain to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity. PMID:27965638

  7. Resistance to AFN-1252 Arises from Missense Mutations in Staphylococcus aureus Enoyl-acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI)*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Maxwell, John B.; Rock, Charles O.

    2013-01-01

    AFN-1252 is a potent antibiotic against Staphylococcus aureus that targets the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI). A thorough screen for AFN-1252-resistant strains was undertaken to identify the spectrum of mechanisms for acquired resistance. A missense mutation in fabI predicted to encode FabI(M99T) was isolated 49 times, and a single isolate was predicted to encode FabI(Y147H). AFN-1252 only bound to the NADPH form of FabI, and the close interactions between the drug and Met-99 and Tyr-147 explained how the mutations would result in resistant enzymes. The clone expressing FabI(Y147H) had a pronounced growth defect that was rescued by exogenous fatty acid supplementation, and the purified protein had less than 5% of the enzymatic activity of FabI. FabI(Y147F) was also catalytically defective but retained its sensitivity to AFN-1252, illustrating the importance of the conserved Tyr-147 hydroxyl group in FabI function. The strains expressing FabI(M99T) exhibited normal growth, and the biochemical properties of the purified protein were indistinguishable from those of FabI. The AFN-1252 Kiapp increased from 4 nm in FabI to 69 nm in FabI(M99T), accounting for the increased resistance of the corresponding mutant strain. The low activity of FabI(Y147H) precluded an accurate Ki measurement. The strain expressing FabI(Y147H) was also resistant to triclosan; however, the strain expressing FabI(M99T) was more susceptible. Strains with higher levels of AFN-1252 resistance were not obtained. The AFN-1252-resistant strains remained sensitive to submicromolar concentrations of AFN-1252, which blocked growth through inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis at the FabI step. PMID:24189061

  8. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Muench, Stephen P.; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Rafferty, John B.; Kirisits, Michael J.; Roberts, Craig W.; Mui, Ernest J.; Rice, David W.

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  9. Discrimination of Potent Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by Thermal Shift Assay

    PubMed Central

    Afanador, Gustavo A.; Muench, Stephen P.; McPhillie, Martin; Fomovska, Alina; Schön, Arne; Zhou, Ying; Cheng, Gang; Stec, Jozef; Freundlich, Joel S.; Shieh, Hong-Ming; Anderson, John W.; Jacobus, David P.; Fidock, David A.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Fishwick, Colin W.; Rice, David W.; Freire, Ernesto; McLeod, Rima; Prigge, Sean T.

    2014-01-01

    Many microbial pathogens rely on a type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway which is distinct from the type I pathway found in humans. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (ENR) is an essential FASII pathway enzyme and the target of a number of antimicrobial drug discovery efforts. The biocide triclosan is established as a potent inhibitor of ENR and has been the starting point for medicinal chemistry studies. We evaluated a series of triclosan analogs for their ability to inhibit the growth of Toxoplasma gondii, a pervasive human pathogen, and its ENR enzyme (TgENR). Several compounds were identified that inhibited TgENR at low nanomolar concentrations, but could not be further differentiated due to the limited dynamic range of the TgENR activity assay. Thus, we adapted a thermal shift assay (TSA) to directly measure the dissociation constant (Kd) of the most potent inhibitors identified in this study as well as inhibitors from previous studies. Furthermore, the TSA allowed us to determine the mode of action of these compounds in the presence of NADH or NAD+ cofactors. We found that all of the inhibitors bind to a TgENR/NAD+ complex, but that they differed in their dependence on NAD+ concentration. Ultimately, we were able to identify compounds which bind to the TgENR/NAD+ complex in the low femtomolar range. This shows how TSA data combined with enzyme inhibition, parasite growth inhibition data and ADMET predictions allow for better discrimination between potent ENR inhibitors for future medicine development. PMID:24295325

  10. Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus NADPH-dependent enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase by triclosan and hexachlorophene.

    PubMed

    Heath, R J; Li, J; Roland, G E; Rock, C O

    2000-02-18

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) plays a determinant role in completing cycles of elongation in type II fatty acid synthase systems and is an important target for antibacterial drugs. The FabI component of Staphylococcus aureus (saFabI) was identified, and its properties were compared with Escherichia coli FabI (ecFabI). ecFabI and saFabI had similar specific activities, and saFabI expression complemented the E. coli fabI(Ts) mutant, illustrating that the Gram-positive FabI was interchangeable with the Gram-negative FabI enzyme. However, ecFabI was specific for NADH, whereas saFabI exhibited specific and positive cooperative binding of NADPH. Triclosan and hexachlorophene inhibited both ecFabI and saFabI. The triclosan-resistant ecFabI(G93V) protein was also refractory to hexachlorophene inhibition, illustrating that both drugs bind at the FabI active site. Both the introduction of a plasmid expressing the safabI gene or a missense mutation in the chromosomal safabI gene led to triclosan resistance in S. aureus; however, these strains did not exhibit cross-resistance to hexachlorophene. The replacement of the ether linkage in triclosan by a carbon bridge in hexachlorophene prevented the formation of a stable FabI-NAD(P)(+)-drug ternary complex. Thus, the formation of this ternary complex is a key determinant of the antibacterial activity of FabI inhibitors.

  11. Isolation and characterization of an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase gene from microalga Isochrysis galbana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Minggang; Liang, Kepeng; Wang, Bo; Sun, Xiuqin; Yue, Yanyan; Wan, Wenwen; Zheng, Li

    2013-03-01

    In most bacteria, plants and algae, fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a group of freely dissociable proteins known as the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) system. In the FAS II system, enoylacyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) acts as a determinant for completing the cycles of fatty acid elongation. In this study, the cDNA sequence of ENR, designated as IgENR, was isolated from the microalga Isochrysis galbana CCMM5001. RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) was used to isolate the full-length cDNA of IgENR (1 503 bp), which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 044 bp and encodes a protein of 347 amino acids. The genomic DNA sequence of IgENR is interrupted by four introns. The putative amino acid sequence is homologous to the ENRs of seed plants and algae, and they contain common coenzymebinding sites and active site motifs. Under different stress conditions, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed the expression of IgENR was upregulated by high temperature (35°C), and downregulated by depleted nitrogen (0 mol/L). To clarify the mechanism of lipids accumulating lipids, other genes involved in lipids accumulation should be studied.

  12. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR. PMID:21603269

  13. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR.

  14. Prioritization of active antimalarials using structural interaction profile of Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (PfENR)-triclosan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S P; George, L B; Jasrai, Y T; Pandya, H A

    2015-01-01

    An empirical relationship between the experimental inhibitory activities of triclosan derivatives and its computationally predicted Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (PfENR) dock poses was developed to model activities of known antimalarials. A statistical model was developed using 57 triclosan derivatives with significant measures (r = 0.849, q(2) = 0.619, s = 0.481) and applied on structurally related and structurally diverse external datasets. A substructure-based search on ChEMBL malaria dataset (280 compounds) yielded only two molecules with significant docking energy, whereas eight active antimalarials (EC(50) < 100 nM, tested on 3D7 strain) with better predicted activities (pIC(50) ~ 7) from Open Access Malaria Box (400 compounds) were prioritized. Further, calculations on the structurally diverse rhodanine molecules (known PfENR inhibitors) distinguished actives (experimental IC(50) = 0.035 μM; predicted pIC(50) = 6.568) and inactives (experimental IC(50) = 50 μM; predicted pIC50 = -4.078), which showed that antimalarials possessing dock poses similar to experimental interaction profiles can be used as leads to test experimentally on enzyme assays.

  15. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  16. Crystal structures and kinetic properties of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase I from Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ling; Gao, Zengqiang; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Shennan; Dong, Yuhui

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive citrus disease. The leading cause of HLB is Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. Enoyl−acyl carrier protein reductase (also called ENR or FabI and a product of the fabI gene) is an enzyme required in a critical step of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and has attracted attention as a target of novel antimicrobial agents. We determined the crystal structures of FabI from Ca. L. asiaticus in its apoform as well as in complex with b-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) at 1.7 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively, to facilitate the design and screening of small molecule inhibitors of FabI. The monomeric ClFabI is highly similar to other known FabI structures as expected; however, unlike the typical tetramer, ClFabI exists as a hexamer in crystal, whereas as dimer in solution, on the other hand, the substrate binding loop which always disordered in apoform FabI structures is ordered in apo-ClFabI. Interestingly, the structure of ClFabI undergoes remarkable conformational change in the substrate-binding loop in the presence of NAD. We conclude that the signature sequence motif of FabI can be considered as Gly-(Xaa)5-Ser-(Xaa)n-Val-Tyr-(Xaa)6-Lys-(Xaa)n-Thr instead of Tyr-(Xaa)6-Lys. We have further identified isoniazid as a competitive inhibitor with NADH. PMID:24407918

  17. High-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in the apo form, in complex with NAD+ and in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Otero, José M.; Noël, Ann-Josée; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Wende, Wolfgang; Schierling, Benno; Pingoud, Alfred; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR; the product of the fabI gene) is an important enzyme that is involved in the type II fatty-acid-synthesis pathway of bacteria, plants, apicomplexan protozoa and mitochondria. Harmful pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum use the type II fatty-acid-synthesis system, but not mammals or fungi, which contain a type I fatty-acid-synthesis pathway consisting of one or two multifunctional enzymes. For this reason, specific inhibitors of ENR are attractive antibiotic candidates. Triclosan, a broad-range antibacterial agent, binds to ENR, inhibiting fatty-acid synthesis. As humans do not have an ENR enzyme, they are not affected. Here, high-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) ENR in the apo form, bound to NAD+ and bound to NAD+ plus triclosan are reported. Differences from and similarities to other known ENR structures are reported; in general, the structures are very similar. The cofactor-binding site is also very similar to those of other ENRs and, as reported for other species, triclosan leads to greater ordering of the loop that covers the cofactor-binding site, which, together with the presence of triclosan itself, presumably provides tight binding of the dinucleotide, preventing cycling of the cofactor. Differences between the structures of Tth ENR and other ENRs are the presence of an additional β-sheet at the N-terminus and a larger number of salt bridges and side-chain hydrogen bonds. These features may be related to the high thermal stability of Tth ENR. PMID:23027736

  18. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kouassi, Affiba Florance; Kone, Mawa; Keita, Melalie; Esmel, Akori; Megnassan, Eugene; N'Guessan, Yao Thomas; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2015-12-12

    We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs) inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). Three-dimensional (3D) models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry code: 4U0J), the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50(exp)). First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50(exp). Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom) of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50(exp) (pIC50(exp) = -0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R² = 0.94), which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4). Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL) of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50(pre) reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  19. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Affiba Florance; Kone, Mawa; Keita, Melalie; Esmel, Akori; Megnassan, Eugene; N’Guessan, Yao Thomas; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs) inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). Three-dimensional (3D) models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry code: 4U0J), the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp). First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom) of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94), which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4). Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL) of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. PMID:26703572

  20. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase FabI1 Is Essential for In Vivo Growth and Is the Target of a Novel Chemotherapeutic with Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jason E.; Kingry, Luke C.; Rholl, Drew A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis pathway is a validated target for the development of novel chemotherapeutics. However, since Burkholderia pseudomallei carries genes that encode both FabI and FabV enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase homologues, the enoyl-ACP reductase that is essential for in vivo growth needs to be defined so that the correct drug target can be chosen for development. Accordingly, ΔfabI1, ΔfabI2, and ΔfabV knockout strains were constructed and tested in a mouse model of infection. Mice infected with a ΔfabI1 strain did not show signs of morbidity, mortality, or dissemination after 30 days of infection compared to the wild-type and ΔfabI2 and ΔfabV mutant strains that had times to mortality of 60 to 84 h. Although signs of morbidity and mortality of ΔfabI2 and ΔfabV strains were not significantly different from those of the wild-type strain, a slight delay was observed. A FabI1-specific inhibitor was used to confirm that inhibition of FabI1 results in reduced bacterial burden and efficacy in an acute B. pseudomallei murine model of infection. This work establishes that FabI1 is required for growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei in vivo and is a potential molecular target for drug development. PMID:24277048

  1. Biological evaluation of potent triclosan-derived inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase InhA in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Stec, Jozef; Vilchèze, Catherine; Lun, Shichun; Perryman, Alexander L; Wang, Xin; Freundlich, Joel S; Bishai, William; Jacobs, William R; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2014-11-01

    New triclosan (TRC) analogues were evaluated for their activity against the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase InhA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). TRC is a well-known inhibitor of InhA, and specific modifications to its positions 5 and 4' afforded 27 derivatives; of these compounds, seven derivatives showed improved potency over that of TRC. These analogues were active against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Mtb strains. The most active compound in this series, 4-(n-butyl)-1,2,3-triazolyl TRC derivative 3, had an MIC value of 0.6 μg mL(-1) (1.5 μM) against wild-type Mtb. At a concentration equal to its MIC, this compound inhibited purified InhA by 98 %, and showed an IC50 value of 90 nM. Compound 3 and the 5-methylisoxazole-modified TRC 14 were able to inhibit the biosynthesis of mycolic acids. Furthermore, mc(2) 4914, an Mtb strain overexpressing inhA, was found to be less susceptible to compounds 3 and 14, supporting the notion that InhA is the likely molecular target of the TRC derivatives presented herein.

  2. Biological Evaluation of Potent Triclosan-Derived Inhibitors of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase InhA in Drug-sensitive and Drug-resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Lun, Shichun; Perryman, Alexander L.; Wang, Xin; Freundlich, Joel S.; Bishai, William; Jacobs, William R.

    2014-01-01

    New triclosan (TRC) analogs were evaluated for their activity against the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase InhA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). TRC is a well-known inhibitor of InhA and specific modifications to its positions 5 and 4′ afforded twenty-seven derivatives; of these compounds seven derivatives showed an improved potency in comparison to TRC. These analogs were active against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Mtb strains. The most active compound in this series, 3, had an MIC value of 0.6 μg/mL (1.5 μM) against wild-type Mtb. At a concentration equal to its MIC, this molecule inhibited the purified InhA enzyme to the extent of 98%, and it showed an IC50 value of 90 nM. Compounds 3 and 14 were able to inhibit the biosynthesis of mycolic acids. Furthermore, mc24914, an Mtb strain overexpressing inhA, was resistant to the compounds 3 and 14, supporting the notion that InhA is the likely molecular target of the TRC derivatives presented herein. PMID:25165007

  3. Versatility of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases

    DOE PAGES

    Beld, Joris; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-10-09

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) requires posttranslational modification with a 4'-phosphopantetheine arm for activity, and this thiol-terminated modification carries cargo between enzymes in ACP-dependent metabolic pathways. In this paper, we show that acyl-ACP synthetases (AasSs) from different organisms are able to load even, odd, and unnatural fatty acids onto E. coli ACP in vitro. Vibrio harveyi AasS not only shows promiscuity for the acid substrate, but also is active upon various alternate carrier proteins. AasS activity also extends to functional activation in living organisms. We show that exogenously supplied carboxylic acids are loaded onto ACP and extended by the E.more » coli fatty acid synthase, including unnatural fatty acid analogs. These analogs are further integrated into cellular lipids. Finally, in vitro characterization of four different adenylate-forming enzymes allowed us to disambiguate CoA-ligases and AasSs, and further in vivo studies show the potential for functional application in other organisms.« less

  4. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  5. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  6. Structural insights into the mechanism and inhibition of the β-hydroxydecanoyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Moynié, Lucile; Leckie, Stuart M; McMahon, Stephen A; Duthie, Fraser G; Koehnke, Alessa; Taylor, James W; Alphey, Magnus S; Brenk, Ruth; Smith, Andrew D; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-23

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is an essential component of metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The fatty acid biosynthetic pathway of Gram-negative bacteria is an established therapeutic target. Two homologous enzymes FabA and FabZ catalyze a key step in fatty acid biosynthesis; both dehydrate hydroxyacyl fatty acids that are coupled via a phosphopantetheine to an acyl carrier protein (ACP). The resulting trans-2-enoyl-ACP is further polymerized in a processive manner. FabA, however, carries out a second reaction involving isomerization of trans-2-enoyl fatty acid to cis-3-enoyl fatty acid. We have solved the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FabA with a substrate allowing detailed molecular insight into the interactions of the active site. This has allowed a detailed examination of the factors governing the second catalytic step. We have also determined the structure of FabA in complex with small molecules (so-called fragments). These small molecules occupy distinct regions of the active site and form the basis for a rational inhibitor design program. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Acylation of the Type 3 Secretion System Translocon Using a Dedicated Acyl Carrier Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agrebi, Rym; Canestrari, Mickaël J.; Mignot, Tâm; Lebrun, Régine; Bouveret, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens often deliver effectors into host cells using type 3 secretion systems (T3SS), the extremity of which forms a translocon that perforates the host plasma membrane. The T3SS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) is genetically associated with an acyl carrier protein, IacP, whose role has remained enigmatic. In this study, using tandem affinity purification, we identify a direct protein-protein interaction between IacP and the translocon protein SipB. We show, by mass spectrometry and radiolabelling, that SipB is acylated, which provides evidence for a modification of the translocon that has not been described before. A unique and conserved cysteine residue of SipB is identified as crucial for this modification. Although acylation of SipB was not essential to virulence, we show that this posttranslational modification promoted SipB insertion into host-cell membranes and pore-forming activity linked to the SPI-1 T3SS. Cooccurrence of acyl carrier and translocon proteins in several γ- and β-proteobacteria suggests that acylation of the translocon is conserved in these other pathogenic bacteria. These results also indicate that acyl carrier proteins, known for their involvement in metabolic pathways, have also evolved as cofactors of new bacterial protein lipidation pathways. PMID:28085879

  9. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: β-hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein] dehydratase genes.

    PubMed

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Sánchez, Rosario; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    Two sunflower hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein] dehydratases evolved into two different isoenzymes showing distinctive expression levels and kinetics' efficiencies. β-Hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein (ACP)]-dehydratase (HAD) is a component of the type II fatty acid synthase complex involved in 'de novo' fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. This complex, formed by four intraplastidial proteins, is responsible for the sequential condensation of two-carbon units, leading to 16- and 18-C acyl-ACP. HAD dehydrates 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP generating trans-2-enoyl-ACP. With the aim of a further understanding of fatty acid biosynthesis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydratase genes have been cloned from developing seeds, HaHAD1 (GenBank HM044767) and HaHAD2 (GenBank GU595454). Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single copy genes. Differences in their expression patterns across plant tissues were detected. Higher levels of HaHAD2 in the initial stages of seed development inferred its key role in seed storage fatty acid synthesis. That HaHAD1 expression levels remained constant across most tissues suggest a housekeeping function. Heterologous expression of these genes in E. coli confirmed both proteins were functional and able to interact with the bacterial complex 'in vivo'. The large increase of saturated fatty acids in cells expressing HaHAD1 and HaHAD2 supports the idea that these HAD genes are closely related to the E. coli FabZ gene. The proposed three-dimensional models of HaHAD1 and HaHAD2 revealed differences at the entrance to the catalytic tunnel attributable to Phe166/Val1159, respectively. HaHAD1 F166V was generated to study the function of this residue. The 'in vitro' enzymatic characterization of the three HAD proteins demonstrated all were active, with the mutant having intermediate K m and V max values to the wild-type proteins.

  10. A Cerulenin Insensitive Short Chain 3-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase in Spinacia oleracea Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jan G.; Clough, Richard C.; Barnum, Susan R.

    1989-01-01

    A cerulenin insensitive 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase has been assayed in extracts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. The enzyme was active in the 40 to 80% ammonium sulfate precipitate of whole leaf homogenates and catalyzed the synthesis of acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein. This condensation reaction was five-fold faster than acetyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase, and the initial rates of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthesis were independent of the presence of cerulenin. In the presence of fatty acid synthase cofactors and 100 micromolar cerulenin, the principal fatty acid product of de novo synthesis was butyric and hexanoic acids. Using conformationally sensitive native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for separation, malonyl-, acetyl-, butyryl-, hexanoyl, and long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins could be detected by immunoblotting and autoradiography. In the presence of 100 micromolar cerulenin, the accumulation of butyryl- and hexanoyl-acyl carrier protein was observed, with no detectable long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins or fatty acids being produced. In the absence of cerulenin, the long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins also accumulated. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16666765

  11. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  12. Characterization of a structurally and functionally diverged acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from milkweed seed.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, E B; Coughlan, S J; Shanklin, J

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA for a structurally variant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase was isolated from milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) seed, a tissue enriched in palmitoleic (16:1delta9)* and cis-vaccenic (18:1delta11) acids. Extracts of Escherichia coli that express the milkweed cDNA catalyzed delta9 desaturation of acyl-ACP substrates, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited seven- to ten-fold greater specificity for palmitoyl (16:0)-ACP and 30-fold greater specificity for myristoyl (14:0)-ACP than did known delta9-stearoyl (18:0)-ACP desaturases. Like other variant acyl-ACP desaturases reported to date, the milkweed enzyme contains fewer amino acids near its N-terminus compared to previously characterized delta9-18:0-ACP desaturases. Based on the activity of an N-terminal deletion mutant of a delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase, this structural feature likely does not account for differences in substrate specificities.

  13. Complete amino acid sequence of chicken liver acyl carrier protein derived from the fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Huang, W Y; Stoops, J K; Wakil, S J

    1989-04-01

    The acyl carrier protein domain of the chicken liver fatty acid synthase has been isolated after tryptic treatment of the synthase. The isolated domain functions as an acceptor of acetyl and malonyl moieties in the synthase-catalyzed transfer of these groups from their coenzyme A esters and therefore indicates that the acyl carrier protein domain exists in the complex as a discrete entity. The amino acid sequence of the acyl carrier protein was derived from analyses of peptide fragments produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage and trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestions of the molecule. The isolated acyl carrier protein domain consists of 89 amino acid residues and has a calculated molecular weight of 10,127. The protein contains the phosphopantetheine group attached to the serine residue at position 38. The isolated acyl carrier protein peptide shows some sequence homology with the acyl carrier protein of Escherichia coli, particularly in the vicinity of the site of phosphopantetheine attachment, and shows extensive sequence homology with the acyl carrier protein from the uropygial gland of goose.

  14. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jodie E.; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-01-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  15. Decarboxylation of malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) by 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases in plant fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Brummel, M; Schuch, R; Spener, F

    1997-01-01

    In order to identify regulatory steps in fatty acid biosynthesis, the influence of intermediate 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier proteins) (3-oxoacyl-ACPs) and end-product acyl-ACPs of the fatty acid synthase reaction on the condensation reaction was investigated in vitro, using total fatty acid synthase preparations and purified 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthases (KASs; EC 2.3.1.41) from Cuphea lanceolata seeds. KAS I and II in the fatty acid synthase preparations were assayed for the elongation of octanoyl- and hexadecanoyl-ACP respectively, and the accumulation of the corresponding condensation product 3-oxoacyl-ACP was studied by modulating the content of the reducing equivalentS NADH and NADPH. Complete omission of reducing equivalents resulted with either KAS in the abnormal synthesis of acetyl-ACP from malonyl-ACP by a decarboxylation reaction. Supplementation with NADPH or NADH, separately or in combination with recombinant 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase (EC 1.1.1.100), led to a decrease in the amount of acetyl-ACP and a simultaneous increase in elongation products. This demonstrates that the accumulation of 3-oxoacyl-ACP inhibits the condensation reaction on the one hand, and induces the decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP on the other. By carrying out similar experiments with purified enzymes, this decarboxylation was attributed to the action of KAS. Our data point to a regulatory mechanism for the degradation of malonyl-ACP in plants which is activated by the accumulation of the fatty acid synthase intermediate 3-oxoacyl-ACP. PMID:9020860

  16. The solution structure of acyl carrier protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hing C; Liu, Gaohua; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Zheng, Jie

    2002-05-03

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) performs the essential function of shuttling the intermediates between the enzymes that constitute the type II fatty acid synthase system. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is unique in producing extremely long mycolic acids, and tubercular ACP, AcpM, is also unique in possessing a longer carboxyl terminus than other ACPs. We determined the solution structure of AcpM using protein NMR spectroscopy to define the similarities and differences between AcpM and the typical structures. The amino-terminal region of the structure is well defined and consists of four helices arranged in a right-handed bundle held together by interhelical hydrophobic interactions similar to the structures of other bacterial ACPs. The unique carboxyl-terminal extension from helix IV has a "melted down" feature, and the end of the molecule is a random coil. A comparison of the apo- and holo-forms of AcpM revealed that the 4'-phosphopantetheine group oscillates between two states; in one it is bound to a hydrophobic groove on the surface of AcpM, and in another it is solvent-exposed. The similarity between AcpM and other ACPs reveals the conserved structural motif that is recognized by all type II enzymes. However, the function of the coil domain extending from helix IV to the carboxyl terminus remains enigmatic, but its structural characteristics suggest that it may interact with the very long chain intermediates in mycolic acid biosynthesis or control specific protein-protein interactions.

  17. Fat Metabolism in Higher Plants: LXII. Stearl-acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase from Spinach Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, B S; Jaworski, J G; Stumpf, P K

    1974-10-01

    Stearyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6), present in the stroma fraction of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts, rapidly desaturated enzymatically prepared stearyl-acyl carrier protein to oleic acid. No other substrates were desaturated. In addition to stearyl-acyl carrier protein, reduced ferredoxin was an essential component of the system. The electron donor systems were either ascorbate, dichlorophenolindophenol, photosystem I and light, or NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP reductase. The desaturase was more active in extracts prepared from chloroplasts obtained from immature spinach leaves than from mature leaves. Stearyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase also occurs in soluble extracts of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) mesocarp and of developing safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) seeds.

  18. Acyl hydrolases from trans-AT polyketide synthases target acetyl units on acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Matthew; Afonso, Jose P; Kohlhaas, Christoph; Karbaum, Petra; Frank, Sarah; Piel, Jörn; Oldham, Neil J

    2016-04-18

    Acyl hydrolase (AH) domains are a common feature of trans-AT PKSs. They have been hypothesised to perform a proofreading function by removing acyl chains from stalled sites. This study determines the substrate tolerance of the AH PedC for a range of acyl-ACPs. Clear preference towards short, linear acyl-ACPs is shown, with acetyl-ACP the best substrate. These results imply a more targeted housekeeping role for PedC: namely the removal of unwanted acetyl groups from ACP domains caused by erroneous transfer of acetyl-CoA, or possibly by decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP.

  19. Bacillus subtilis acyl carrier protein is encoded in a cluster of lipid biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed Central

    Morbidoni, H R; de Mendoza, D; Cronan, J E

    1996-01-01

    A cluster of Bacillus subtilis fatty acid synthetic genes was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli fabD mutant encoding a thermosensitive malonyl coenzyme A-acyl carrier protein transacylase. The B. subtilis genomic segment contains genes that encode three fatty acid synthetic proteins, malonyl coenzyme A-acyl carrier protein transacylase (fabD), 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (fabG), and the N-terminal 14 amino acid residues of acyl carrier protein (acpP). Also present is a sequence that encodes a homolog of E. coli plsX, a gene that plays a poorly understood role in phospholipid synthesis. The B. subtilis plsX gene weakly complemented an E. coli plsX mutant. The order of genes in the cluster is plsX fabD fabG acpP, the same order found in E. coli, except that in E. coli the fabH gene lies between plsX and fabD. The absence of fabH in the B. subtilis cluster is consistent with the different fatty acid compositions of the two organisms. The amino acid sequence of B. subtilis acyl carrier protein was obtained by sequencing the purified protein, and the sequence obtained strongly resembled that of E. coli acyl carrier protein, except that most of the protein retained the initiating methionine residue. The B. subtilis fab cluster was mapped to the 135 to 145 degrees region of the chromosome. PMID:8759840

  20. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F.; Frank, Matthew W.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V. Joshua; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  2. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  3. Fatty Acid Activation in Cyanobacteria Mediated by Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase Enables Fatty Acid Recycling1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarzyk, Danuta; Fulda, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In cyanobacteria fatty acids destined for lipid synthesis can be synthesized de novo, but also exogenous free fatty acids from the culture medium can be directly incorporated into lipids. Activation of exogenous fatty acids is likely required prior to their utilization. To identify the enzymatic activity responsible for activation we cloned candidate genes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and identified the encoded proteins as acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases (Aas). The enzymes catalyze the ATP-dependent esterification of fatty acids to the thiol of acyl carrier protein. The two protein sequences are only distantly related to known prokaryotic Aas proteins but they display strong similarity to sequences that can be found in almost all organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis. To investigate the biological role of Aas activity in cyanobacteria, aas knockout mutants were generated in the background of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and S. elongatus PCC 7942. The mutant strains showed two phenotypes characterized by the inability to utilize exogenous fatty acids and by the secretion of endogenous fatty acids into the culture medium. The analyses of extracellular and intracellular fatty acid profiles of aas mutant strains as well as labeling experiments indicated that the detected free fatty acids are released from membrane lipids. The data suggest a considerable turnover of lipid molecules and a role for Aas activity in recycling the released fatty acids. In this model, lipid degradation represents a third supply of fatty acids for lipid synthesis in cyanobacteria. PMID:20061450

  4. A determinant of substrate specificity predicted from the acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase of developing cat's claw seed.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, E B; Shah, S; Shanklin, J; Browse, J

    1998-06-01

    Cat's claw (Doxantha unguis-cati L.) vine accumulates nearly 80% palmitoleic acid (16:1Delta9) plus cis-vaccenic acid (18:1Delta11) in its seed oil. To characterize the biosynthetic origin of these unusual fatty acids, cDNAs for acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) desaturases were isolated from developing cat's claw seeds. The predominant acyl-ACP desaturase cDNA identified encoded a polypeptide that is closely related to the stearoyl (Delta9-18:0)-ACP desaturase from castor (Ricinis communis L.) and other species. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, the cat's claw polypeptide functioned as a Delta9 acyl-ACP desaturase but displayed a distinct substrate specificity for palmitate (16:0)-ACP rather than stearate (18:0)-ACP. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the cat's claw enzyme with that of the castor Delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase suggested that a single amino acid substitution (L118W) might account in large part for the differences in substrate specificity between the two desaturases. Consistent with this prediction, conversion of leucine-118 to tryptophan in the mature castor Delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase resulted in an 80-fold increase in the relative specificity of this enzyme for 16:0-ACP. The alteration in substrate specificity observed in the L118W mutant is in agreement with a crystallographic model of the proposed substrate-binding pocket of the castor Delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase.

  5. A Determinant of Substrate Specificity Predicted from the Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase of Developing Cat's Claw Seed1

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shah, Salehuzzaman; Shanklin, John; Browse, John

    1998-01-01

    Cat's claw (Doxantha unguis-cati L.) vine accumulates nearly 80% palmitoleic acid (16:1Δ9) plus cis-vaccenic acid (18:1Δ11) in its seed oil. To characterize the biosynthetic origin of these unusual fatty acids, cDNAs for acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) desaturases were isolated from developing cat's claw seeds. The predominant acyl-ACP desaturase cDNA identified encoded a polypeptide that is closely related to the stearoyl (Δ9–18:0)-ACP desaturase from castor (Ricinis communis L.) and other species. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, the cat's claw polypeptide functioned as a Δ9 acyl-ACP desaturase but displayed a distinct substrate specificity for palmitate (16:0)-ACP rather than stearate (18:0)-ACP. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the cat's claw enzyme with that of the castor Δ9–18:0-ACP desaturase suggested that a single amino acid substitution (L118W) might account in large part for the differences in substrate specificity between the two desaturases. Consistent with this prediction, conversion of leucine-118 to tryptophan in the mature castor Δ9–18:0-ACP desaturase resulted in an 80-fold increase in the relative specificity of this enzyme for 16:0-ACP. The alteration in substrate specificity observed in the L118W mutant is in agreement with a crystallographic model of the proposed substrate-binding pocket of the castor Δ9–18:0-ACP desaturase. PMID:9625712

  6. Function of genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase for host-selective act-toxin biosynthesis in the tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y; Ishii, Y; Honda, A; Masunaka, A; Tsuge, T; Yamamoto, M; Ohtani, K; Fukumoto, T; Gomi, K; Peever, T L; Akimitsu, K

    2009-04-01

    The tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata produces host-selective ACT-toxin and causes Alternaria brown spot disease. Sequence analysis of a genomic cosmid clone identified a part of the ACTT gene cluster and implicated two genes, ACTT5 encoding an acyl-CoA synthetase and ACTT6 encoding an enoyl-CoA hydratase, in the biosynthesis of ACT-toxin. Genomic Southern blots demonstrated that both genes were present in tangerine pathotype isolates producing ACT-toxin and also in Japanese pear pathotype isolates producing AK-toxin and strawberry pathotype isolates producing AF-toxin. ACT-, AK-, and AF-toxins from these three pathotypes share a common 9,10-epoxy-8-hydroxy-9-methyl-decatrienoic acid moiety. Targeted gene disruption of two copies of ACTT5 significantly reduced ACT-toxin production and virulence. Targeted gene disruption of two copies of ACTT6 led to complete loss of ACT-toxin production and pathogenicity and a putative decatrienoic acid intermediate in ACT-toxin biosynthesis accumulated in mycelial mats. These results indicate that ACTT5 and ACTT6 are essential genes in ACT-toxin biosynthesis in the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata and both are required for full virulence of this fungus.

  7. Perturbation of Staphylococcus aureus Gene Expression by the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitor AFN-1252

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Joshua B.; Kukula, Maciej; Jackson, Pamela; Pulse, Mark; Simecka, Jerry W.; Valtierra, David; Weiss, William J.; Kaplan, Nachum

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the alteration in Staphylococcus aureus gene expression following treatment with the type 2 fatty acid synthesis inhibitor AFN-1252. An Affymetrix array study showed that AFN-1252 rapidly increased the expression of fatty acid synthetic genes and repressed the expression of virulence genes controlled by the SaeRS 2-component regulator in exponentially growing cells. AFN-1252 did not alter virulence mRNA levels in a saeR deletion strain or in strain Newman expressing a constitutively active SaeS kinase. AFN-1252 caused a more pronounced increase in fabH mRNA levels in cells entering stationary phase, whereas the depression of virulence factor transcription was attenuated. The effect of AFN-1252 on gene expression in vivo was determined using a mouse subcutaneous granuloma infection model. AFN-1252 was therapeutically effective, and the exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 h [AUC0–48]) of AFN-1252 in the pouch fluid was comparable to the plasma levels in orally dosed animals. The inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis by AFN-1252 in the infected pouches was signified by the substantial and sustained increase in fabH mRNA levels in pouch-associated bacteria, whereas depression of virulence factor mRNA levels in the AFN-1252-treated pouch bacteria was not as evident as it was in exponentially growing cells in vitro. The trends in fabH and virulence factor gene expression in the animal were similar to those in slower-growing bacteria in vitro. These data indicate that the effects of AFN-1252 on virulence factor gene expression depend on the physiological state of the bacteria. PMID:23459481

  8. A special acyl carrier protein for transferring long hydroxylated fatty acids to lipid A in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Brozek, K A; Carlson, R W; Raetz, C R

    1996-12-13

    Lipid A, the hydrophobic anchor of lipopolysaccharides in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, varies in structure among different Rhizobiaceae. The Rhizobium meliloti lipid A backbone, like that of Escherichia coli, is a beta1'-6-linked glucosamine disaccharide that is phosphorylated at positions 1 and 4'. Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A lacks both phosphates, but contains aminogluconate in place of the proximal glucosamine 1-phosphate, and galacturonic acid instead of the 4'-phosphate. A peculiar feature of the lipid As of all Rhizobiaceae is acylation with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, a long hydroxylated fatty acid not found in E. coli. We now describe an in vitro system, consisting of a membrane enzyme and a cytosolic acyl donor from R. leguminosarum, that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to (Kdo)2-lipid IVA, a key lipid A precursor common to both E. coli and R. leguminosarum. The 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid moiety was detected in the lipid product by mass spectrometry. The membrane enzyme required the presence of Kdo residues in the acceptor substrate for activity. The cytosolic acyl donor was purified from wild-type R. leguminosarum using the acylation of (Kdo)2-[4'-32P]-lipid IVA as the assay. Amino-terminal sequencing of the purified acyl donor revealed an exact 19-amino acid match with a partially sequenced gene (orf*) of R. leguminosarum. Orf* contains the consensus sequence, DSLD, for attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine. When the entire orf* gene was sequenced, it was found to encode a protein of 92 amino acids. Orf* is a new kind of acyl carrier protein because it is only approximately 25% identical both to the constitutive acyl carrier protein (AcpP) and to the inducible acyl carrier protein (NodF) of R. leguminosarum. Mass spectrometry of purified active Orf* confirmed the presence of 4'-phosphopantetheine and 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in the major species. Smaller mass peaks indicative of Orf* acylation with hydroxylated 20, 22, 24

  9. N-Activated β-Lactams as Versatile Reagents for Acyl Carrier Protein Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gitanjeli; Amoroso, Jon W.; Borketey, Lawrence S.; Schnarr, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Acyl carrier proteins are critical components of fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. Their primary function is to shuttle intermediates between active sites via a covalently bound phosphopantetheine arm. Small molecules capable of acylating this prosthetic group will provide a simple and reversible means of introducing novel functionality onto carrier protein domains. A series of N-activated β-lactams are prepared to examine site-specific acylation of the phosphopantetheine-thiol. In general, β-lactams are found to be significantly more reactive than our previously studied β-lactones. Selectivity for the holo over apo-form of acyl carrier proteins is demonstrated indicating that only the phosphopantetheine-thiol is modified. Incorporation of an N-propargyloxycarbonyl group provides an alkyne handle for conjugation to fluorophores and affinity labels. The utility of these groups for mechanistic interrogation of a critical step in polyketide biosynthesis is examined through comparison to traditional probes. In all, we expect the probes described in this study to serve as valuable and versatile tools for mechanistic interrogation of fatty acid, polyketide, and nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis. PMID:22293823

  10. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4’-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17828.001 PMID:27540631

  11. A simple method for isolation and construction of markerless cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kouji; Keta, Sumie; Uesaka, Kazuma; Kato, Akihiro; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Ihara, Kunio; Omata, Tatsuo; Aichi, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas) secrete free fatty acids (FFAs) into the external medium and hence have been used for the studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels. While the wild-type strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is highly sensitive to exogenously added linolenic acid, mutants defective in the aas gene are known to be resistant to the externally provided fatty acid. In this study, the wild-type Synechocystis cells were shown to be sensitive to lauric, oleic, and linoleic acids as well, and the resistance to these fatty acids was shown to be enhanced by inactivation of the aas gene. On the basis of these observations, we developed an efficient method to isolate aas-deficient mutants from cultures of Synechocystis cells by counter selection using linoleic acid or linolenic acid as the selective agent. A variety of aas mutations were found in about 70 % of the FFA-resistant mutants thus selected. Various aas mutants were isolated also from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, using lauric acid as a selective agent. Selection using FFAs was useful also for construction of markerless aas knockout mutants from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Thus, genetic engineering of FFA-producing cyanobacterial strains would be greatly facilitated by the use of the FFAs for counter selection.

  12. Expression, purification and characterization of the acyl carrier protein phosphodiesterase from Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Elavazhagan; Kong, Rong; Sun, Huihua; Rao, Feng; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2010-06-01

    Acyl carrier protein phosphodiesterases (AcpH) are the only enzymes known to remove the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl moiety from holo acyl carrier proteins (ACP), which are a large family of proteins essential for the biosynthesis of lipid and other cellular metabolites. Here we report that the AcpH (paAcpH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble and stable protein after optimization of the expression and purification conditions. This marks an improvement from the aggregation-prone E. coli AcpH that could only be obtained by refolding the polypeptide obtained from the inclusion body. With the soluble recombinant protein, we found that PaAcpH exhibits preferred substrate specificity towards the ACPs from the fatty acid synthesis pathway among eight carrier proteins. We further showed that PaAcpH hydrolyzes and releases the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl group-linked products from a multidomain polyketide synthase, demonstrating that the enzyme is fully capable of hydrolyzing acylated ACP substrates.

  13. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  14. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-04-15

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4'-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, (15)N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  16. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-22

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3-17), helix II (residues 39-53), helix III (residues 60-64), and helix IV (residues 68-78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe(45) in helix II and Phe(18) in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser(15) in helix I and Ile(20) in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe(45)-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser(58) in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains.

  17. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3–17), helix II (residues 39–53), helix III (residues 60–64), and helix IV (residues 68–78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe45 in helix II and Phe18 in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser15 in helix I and Ile20 in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe45-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser58 in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains. PMID:26631734

  18. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  19. In silico screening for Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindert, Steffen; Tallorin, Lorillee; Nguyen, Quynh G.; Burkart, Michael D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The need for novel therapeutics against Plasmodium falciparum is urgent due to recent emergence of multi-drug resistant malaria parasites. Since fatty acids are essential for both the liver and blood stages of the malarial parasite, targeting fatty acid biosynthesis is a promising strategy for combatting P. falciparum. We present a combined computational and experimental study to identify novel inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase ( PfENR) in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. A small-molecule database from ChemBridge was docked into three distinct PfENR crystal structures that provide multiple receptor conformations. Two different docking algorithms were used to generate a consensus score in order to rank possible small molecule hits. Our studies led to the identification of five low-micromolar pyrimidine dione inhibitors of PfENR.

  20. Acyl carrier proteins from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds and their influence on FatA and FatB acyl-ACP thioesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of acyl-ACP thioesterases from sunflower importantly changed when endogenous ACPs were used. Sunflower FatB was much more specific towards saturated acyl-ACPs when assayed with them. Acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) are small (~9 kDa), soluble, acidic proteins involved in fatty acid synthesis in plants and bacteria. ACPs bind to fatty acids through a thioester bond, generating the acyl-ACP lipoproteins that are substrates for fatty acid synthase (FAS) complexes, and that are required for fatty acid chain elongation, acting as important intermediates in de novo fatty acid synthesis in plants. Plants, usually express several ACP isoforms with distinct functionalities. We report here the cloning of three ACPs from developing sunflower seeds: HaACP1, HaACP2, and HaACP3. These proteins were plastidial ACPs expressed strongly in seeds, and as such they are probably involved in the synthesis of sunflower oil. The recombinant sunflower ACPs were expressed in bacteria but they were lethal to the prokaryote host. Thus, they were finally produced using the GST gene fusion system, which allowed the apo-enzyme to be produced and later activated to the holo form. Radiolabelled acyl-ACPs from the newly cloned holo-ACP forms were also synthesized and used to characterize the activity of recombinant sunflower FatA and FatB thioesterases, important enzymes in plant fatty acids synthesis. The activity of these enzymes changed significantly when the endogenous ACPs were used. Thus, FatA importantly increased its activity levels, whereas FatB displayed a different specificity profile, with much high activity levels towards saturated acyl-CoA derivatives. All these data pointed to an important influence of the ACP moieties on the activity of enzymes involved in lipid synthesis.

  1. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  2. Expression, purification and characterization of enoyl-ACP reductase II, FabK, from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Hevener, Kirk E.; Mehboob, Shahila; Boci, Teuta; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2012-10-25

    The rapid rise in bacterial drug resistance coupled with the low number of novel antimicrobial compounds in the discovery pipeline has led to a critical situation requiring the expedient discovery and characterization of new antimicrobial drug targets. Enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis pathway, FAS-II, are distinct from their mammalian counterparts, FAS-I, in terms of both structure and mechanism. As such, they represent attractive targets for the design of novel antimicrobial compounds. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase II, FabK, is a key, rate-limiting enzyme in the FAS-II pathway for several bacterial pathogens. The organism, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is a causative agent of chronic periodontitis that affects up to 25% of the US population and incurs a high national burden in terms of cost of treatment. P. gingivalis expresses FabK as the sole enoyl reductase enzyme in its FAS-II cycle, which makes this a particularly appealing target with potential for selective antimicrobial therapy. Herein we report the molecular cloning, expression, purification and characterization of the FabK enzyme from P. gingivalis, only the second organism from which this enzyme has been isolated. Characterization studies have shown that the enzyme is a flavoprotein, the reaction dependent upon FMN and NADPH and proceeding via a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism to reduce the enoyl substrate. A sensitive assay measuring the fluorescence decrease of NADPH as it is converted to NADP{sup +} during the reaction has been optimized for high-throughput screening. Finally, protein crystallization conditions have been identified which led to protein crystals that diffract x-rays to high resolution.

  3. Recognition of Acyl Carrier Proteins by Ketoreductases in Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Matthew P.; Cane, David E.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-01-01

    Ketoreductases (KRs) are the most widespread tailoring domains found in individual modules of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs), and are responsible for controlling the configurations of both the α-methyl and β-hydroxyl stereogenic centers in the growing polyketide chain. Because they recognize substrates that are covalently bound to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) within the same PKS module, we sought to quantify the extent to which protein-protein recognition contributes to the turnover of these oxidoreductive enzymes using stand-alone domains from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Reduced 2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP substrates derived from two enantiomeric acyl chains and four distinct ACP domains were synthesized and presented to four distinct KR domains. Two KRs, from DEBS modules 2 and 5, displayed little preference for oxidation of substrates tethered to their cognate ACP domains over those attached to the other ACP domains tested. In contrast, the KR from DEBS module 1 showed a ca. 10-50-fold preference for substrate attached to its native ACP domain, whereas the KR from DEBS module 6 actually displayed a ca. 10-fold preference for the ACP from DEBS module 5. Our findings suggest that recognition of the ACP by a KR domain is unlikely to affect the rate of native assembly line polyketide biosynthesis. In some cases, however, unfavorable KR-ACP interactions may suppress the rate of substrate processing when KR domains are swapped to construct hybrid PKS modules. PMID:27118242

  4. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  5. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The beta-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (beta-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 A resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 A, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known alpha-beta-alpha-beta-alpha thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ;open' conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  6. Probing the Phosphopantetheine Arm Conformations of Acyl Carrier Proteins Using Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) are universal and highly conserved domains central to both fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. These proteins tether reactive acyl intermediates with a swinging 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) arm and interact with a suite of catalytic partners during chain transport and elongation while stabilizing the growing chain throughout the biosynthetic pathway. The flexible nature of the Ppant arm and the transient nature of ACP–enzyme interactions impose a major obstacle to obtaining structural information relevant to understanding polyketide and fatty acid biosynthesis. To overcome this challenge, we installed a thiocyanate vibrational spectroscopic probe on the terminal thiol of the ACP Ppant arm. This site-specific probe successfully reported on the local environment of the Ppant arm of two ACPs previously characterized by solution NMR, and was used to determine the solution exposure of the Ppant arm of an ACP from 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Given the sensitivity of the probe’s CN stretching band to conformational distributions resolved on the picosecond time scale, this work lays a foundation for observing the dynamic action-related structural changes of ACPs using vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:25080832

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Two Safflower Oleoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Thioesterase cDNA Clones

    PubMed Central

    Knutzon, Deborah S.; Bleibaum, Janice L.; Nelsen, Janet; Kridl, Jean C.; Thompson, Gregory A.

    1992-01-01

    Oleoyl-acyl carrier protein (18:1-ACP) thioesterase has been partially purified from developing safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) seeds. Protein species with molecular masses of 34 and 40 kD associated with thioesterase activity were identified and partially sequenced. Analysis of amino-terminal and internal cyanogen bromide peptide sequences revealed no differences in the primary structure of the two species. Amino acid sequence was used to design degenerate oligonucleotides for primers in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using safflower embryo cDNA as a template. A 380-base pair PCR product was used to isolate two classes of cDNA clones, designated 2-1 and 5-2, from the embryo cDNA library. Clone 2-1 encodes a 389-amino acid protein including a 60-amino acid transit peptide, and contains all of the protein sequence determined from the 34- and 40-kD proteins. Clone 5-2 encodes a 385-amino acid protein with 80% identity to that encoded by 2-1. Expression of the two safflower cDNA clones in Escherichia coli resulted in a 50- to 100-fold increase in the level of 18:1-ACP thioesterase activity. Both thioesterases are most active on 18:1-ACP; however, the enzyme encoded by 5-2 shows less discrimination against saturated 16- and 18-carbon acyl-ACP substrates. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:16653193

  8. Control of Lipid Synthesis during Soybean Seed Development: Enzymic and Immunochemical Assay of Acyl Carrier Protein.

    PubMed

    Ohlrogge, J B; Kuo, T M

    1984-03-01

    During soybean seed (Glycine max, var Am Soy 71) development, the rate of lipid biosynthesis per seed increases greatly. As the seed reaches maturity, lipid synthesis declines. To study the controls over the oil synthesis and storage process, we have chosen acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a representative marker for the fatty acid synthetase pathway. We have quantitated soybean ACP levels by both enzymic and immunochemical methods. Escherichia coli acyl-ACP synthetase was used as an assay for enzymically active ACP. Total ACP protein was determined by immunoassay using antibodies prepared in rabbits against spinach ACP. These antibody preparations also bind ACP isolated from soybeans, allowing development of a radioimmunoassay based on competition with [(3)H]palmitoyl-ACP. The enzymic and immunochemical measurement of ACP at various stages of seed development have indicated that ACP activity and ACP antigen increase markedly in correlation with the in vivo increase in lipid synthesis. These results indicate that a major control over the increase in lipid synthesis arises through regulation of the levels of the fatty acid biosynthetic proteins. However, as the seed reaches maturity and lipid biosynthesis declines, ACP per seed remains relatively high. In the mature seed, we found that more than 95% of the ACP is localized in the cotyledons, less than 5% is in the axis, and less than 1% is in the seed coat.

  9. Structure of apo acyl carrier protein and a proposal to engineer protein crystallization through metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Janson, Cheryl A.

    2010-11-16

    A topic of current interest is engineering surface mutations in order to improve the success rate of protein crystallization. This report explores the possibility of using metal-ion-mediated crystal-packing interactions to facilitate rational design. Escherichia coli apo acyl carrier protein was chosen as a test case because of its high content of negatively charged carboxylates suitable for metal binding with moderate affinity. The protein was successfully crystallized in the presence of zinc ions. The crystal structure was determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution with MAD phasing using anomalous signals from the co-crystallized Zn{sup 2+} ions. The case study suggested an integrated strategy for crystallization and structure solution of proteins via engineering surface Asp and Glu mutants, crystallizing them in the presence of metal ions such as Zn{sup 2+} and solving the structures using anomalous signals.

  10. Evolutionary, environmental and tissue controls on the occurrence of multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein

    SciTech Connect

    Battey, J.F.; Ohlrogge, J.B. )

    1989-04-01

    Previous research has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP). We have examined the development of this trait in evolutionarily diverse species. Isoforms were resolved by Western blotting and native PAGE of {sup 3}H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed in primitive vascular plants including gymnosperms, ferns and Psilotum and the nonvascular liverworts and mosses. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, unicellular algae and bacteria such as Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single electrophoretic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants. We have also examined light and tissue control over the expression of ACP isoforms. The expression of multiple forms of ACP in leaf of Spinacia and Avena is altered very little by light. Rather, the different patterns of ACP isoforms are primarily dependant on tissue source.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein synthase plays an essential role in the synthesis of fatty acids, nonribosomal peptides and polyketides. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, AcpS or group I phosphopentatheine transferase exhibits two different structural conformations depending upon the pH. The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS–ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the α2 helix and in the conformation of the α3–α4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4–6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS–ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS–ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  12. Cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)-thioesterase B from seeds of Chinese Spicehush (Lindera communis).

    PubMed

    Dong, Shubin; Huang, Jiacong; Li, Yannan; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Shanzhi; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-05-25

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TE EC 3.1.2.14) are fatty acid biosynthesis key enzymes that determine fatty acid carbon chain length in most plant tissues. A full-length cDNA corresponding to one of the fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (Fat) genes, designated LcFatB, was isolated from developing Lindera communis seeds using PCR and RACE with degenerate primers based on conserved sequences of multiple TE gene sequences obtained from GenBank. The 1788 bp cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 1260 bp encoding a protein of 419 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 61-73% identity to proteins in the FatB class of plant thioesterases. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that LcFatB was expressed in all tissues of L. communis, with the highest expression in the developing seeds 75days after flowering. Recombinant pET-MLcFatB was constructed using the pET-30 a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)△FadE, a strain that deleted the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (FadE). SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins isolated from pET-MLcFatB E. coli cells after induction with IPTG revealed a protein band at ~40.5kDa, corresponding to the predicted size of LcFatB mature protein. The decanoic acid and lauric acid contents of the pET-MLcFatB transformant were increased significantly. These findings suggest that an LcFatB gene from a non-traditional oil-seed tree could be used to function as a saturated acyl-ACP thioesterase and could potentially be used to modify the fatty acid composition of seed oil from L. communis or other species through transgenic approaches.

  13. The Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Mediates Fatty Acid Import1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    von Berlepsch, Simon; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Brodesser, Susanne; Fink, Patrick; Marin, Kay; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Gierth, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of fatty acids across biological membranes is a largely uncharacterized process, although it is essential at membranes of several higher plant organelles like chloroplasts, peroxisomes, or the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we analyzed loss-of-function mutants of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a model system to circumvent redundancy problems encountered in eukaryotic organisms. Cells deficient in the only cytoplasmic Synechocystis acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (SynAas) were highly resistant to externally provided α-linolenic acid, whereas wild-type cells bleached upon this treatment. Bleaching of wild-type cells was accompanied by a continuous increase of α-linolenic acid in total lipids, whereas no such accumulation could be observed in SynAas-deficient cells (Δsynaas). When SynAas was disrupted in the tocopherol-deficient, α-linolenic acid-hypersensitive Synechocystis mutant Δslr1736, double mutant cells displayed the same resistance phenotype as Δsynaas. Moreover, heterologous expression of SynAas in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutants lacking the major yeast fatty acid import protein Fat1p (Δfat1) led to the restoration of wild-type sensitivity against exogenous α-linolenic acid of the otherwise resistant Δfat1 mutant, indicating that SynAas is functionally equivalent to Fat1p. In addition, liposome assays provided direct evidence for the ability of purified SynAas protein to mediate α-[14C]linolenic acid retrieval from preloaded liposome membranes via the synthesis of [14C]linolenoyl-acyl carrier protein. Taken together, our data show that an acyl-activating enzyme like SynAas is necessary and sufficient to mediate the transfer of fatty acids across a biological membrane. PMID:22535424

  14. Use of structure-based drug design approaches to obtain novel anthranilic acid acyl carrier protein synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Parris, Kevin; Huang, Adrian; Failli, Amedeo; Quagliato, Dominick; Dushin, Elizabeth Glasfeld; Novikova, Elena; Severina, Elena; Tuckman, Margareta; Petersen, Peter J; Dean, Charles; Fritz, Christian C; Meshulam, Tova; DeCenzo, Maureen; Dick, Larry; McFadyen, Iain J; Somers, William S; Lovering, Frank; Gilbert, Adam M

    2005-12-15

    Acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the transfer of the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl group from the coenzyme A to a serine residue in acyl carrier protein (ACP), thereby activating ACP, an important step in cell wall biosynthesis. The structure-based design of novel anthranilic acid inhibitors of AcpS, a potential antibacterial target, is presented. An initial high-throughput screening lead and numerous analogues were modeled into the available AcpS X-ray structure, opportunities for synthetic modification were identified, and an iterative process of synthetic modification, X-ray complex structure determination with AcpS, biological testing, and further modeling ultimately led to potent inhibitors of the enzyme. Four X-ray complex structures of representative anthranilic acid ligands bound to AcpS are described in detail.

  15. A conserved motif flags Acyl Carrier Proteins for β-branching in polyketide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhongshu; Farmer, Rohit; Williams, Christopher; Hothersall, Joanne; Płoskoń, Eliza; Wattana-amorn, Pakorn; Stephens, Elton R.; Yamada, Erika; Gurney, Rachel; Takebayashi, Yuiko; Masschelein, Joleen; Cox, Russell J.; Lavigne, Rob; Willis, Christine L.; Simpson, Thomas J.; Crosby, John; Winn, Peter J.; Thomas, Christopher M.; Crump, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Type I PKSs often utilise programmed β-branching, via enzymes of an “HMG-CoA synthase (HCS) cassette”, to incorporate various side chains at the second carbon from the terminal carboxylic acid of growing polyketide backbones. We identified a strong sequence motif in Acyl Carrier Proteins (ACPs) where β-branching is known. Substituting ACPs confirmed a correlation of ACP type with β-branching specificity. While these ACPs often occur in tandem, NMR analysis of tandem β-branching ACPs indicated no ACP-ACP synergistic effects and revealed that the conserved sequence motif forms an internal core rather than an exposed patch. Modelling and mutagenesis identified ACP Helix III as a probable anchor point of the ACP-HCS complex whose position is determined by the core. Mutating the core affects ACP functionality while ACP-HCS interface substitutions modulate system specificity. Our method for predicting β-carbon branching expands the potential for engineering novel polyketides and lays a basis for determining specificity rules. PMID:24056399

  16. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Philipp M; Xu, Shuqing; Gagliardini, Valeria; Whittle, Edward; Shanklin, John; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P

    2011-04-05

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators' sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP Δ(9) and a 16:0-ACP Δ(4) desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection.

  17. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Philipp M.; Xu, Shuqing; Gagliardini, Valeria; Whittle, Edward; Shanklin, John; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P.

    2011-01-01

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators’ sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP Δ9 and a 16:0-ACP Δ4 desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection. PMID:21436056

  18. Subcellular localization of acyl carrier protein in leaf protoplasts of Spinacia oleracea.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlrogge, J B; Kuhn, D N; Stumpf, P K

    1979-01-01

    This communication demonstrates that all de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in spinach leaf cells requires acyl carrier protein (ACP) and occurs specifically in the chloroplasts. Antibodies raised to purified spinach ACP inhibited at least 98% of malonyl CoA-dependent fatty acid synthesis by spinach leaf homogenates. Therefore, the presence of ACP in a compartment of the spinach leaf cell would serve as a marker for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis. A radioimmunoassay capable of detecting 10(15) mol (10(-11) g) of spinach ACP was developed to measure the levels of ACP in leaf cell components isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation of a gentle lysate of spinach leaf protoplasts. All of the ACP of the leaf cell could be attributed to the chloroplast. Less than 1% of the ACP associated with chloroplasts resulted from binding of free ACP to chloroplasts. Of interest, ACP from Escherichia coli, soybean, and sunflower showed only partial crossreactivity with spinach ACP by the radioimmunoassay. These results strongly suggest that, in the leaf cell, chloroplasts are the sole site for the de novo synthesis of C16 and C18 fatty acids. These fatty acids are then transported into the cytoplasm for further modification and are either inserted into extrachloroplastic membrane lipids or returned to the chloroplast for insertion into lamellar membrane lipids. PMID:286305

  19. 3-Oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) reductase from avocado (Persea americana) fruit mesocarp.

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Sidebottom, C; Smith, C G; Slabas, A R

    1990-01-01

    The NADPH-linked 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) (ACP) reductase (EC 1.1.1.100), also known as 'beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase', has been purified from the mesocarp of mature avocado pears (Persea americana). The enzyme is inactivated by low ionic strength and low temperature. On SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, purified 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase migrated as a single polypeptide giving a molecular mass of 28 kDa. Gel-filtration chromatography gave an apparent native molecular mass of 130 kDa, suggesting that the enzyme is tetrameric. The enzyme is inactivated by dilution, but some protection is afforded by the presence of NADPH. Kinetic constants have been determined using synthetic analogues as well as the natural ACP substrate. It exhibits a broad pH optimum around neutrality. Phenylglyoxal inactivates the enzyme, and partial protection is given by 1 mM-NADPH. Antibodies have been raised against the protein, which were used to localize it using immunogold electron microscopy. It is localized in plastids. N-Terminal amino-acid-sequence analysis was performed on the enzyme, and it shows close structural similarity with cytochrome f. Internal amino-acid-sequence data, derived from tryptic peptides, shows similarity with the putative gene products encoded by the nodG gene from the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium meliloti and the gra III act III genes from Streptomyces spp. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2244875

  20. Enhanced production of polyunsaturated fatty acids by enzyme engineering of tandem acyl carrier proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shohei; Satoh, Yasuharu; Ujihara, Tetsuro; Takata, Yusuke; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    In some microorganisms, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are biosynthesized by PUFA synthases characterized by tandem acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) in subunit A. These ACPs were previously shown to be important for PUFA productivity. In this study, we examined their function in more detail. PUFA productivities increased depending on the number of ACPs without profile changes in each subunit A of eukaryotic and prokaryotic PUFA synthases. We also constructed derivative enzymes from subunit A with 5 × ACPs. Enzymes possessing one inactive ACP at any position produced ~30% PUFAs compared with the parental enzyme but unexpectedly had ~250% productivity compared with subunit A with 4 × ACPs. Enzymes constructed by replacing the 3rd ACP with an inactive ACP from another subunit A or ACP-unrelated sequences produced ~100% and ~3% PUFAs compared with the parental 3rd ACP-inactive enzyme, respectively. These results suggest that both the structure and number of ACP domains are important for PUFA productivity. PMID:27752094

  1. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    SciTech Connect

    Schluter, P.M.; Shanklin, J.; Xu, S.; Gagliardini, V.; Whittle, E.; Grossniklaus, U.; Schiestl, F. P.

    2011-04-05

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 9} and a 16:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 4} desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection.

  2. Structural analysis and interaction studies of acyl-carrier protein (acpP) of Staphylococcus aureus, an extraordinarily thermally stable protein.

    PubMed

    Volk, Kathrin; Breunig, Sven D; Rid, Raphaela; Herzog, Julia; Bräuer, Maria; Hundsberger, Harald; Klein, Christian; Müller, Norbert; Önder, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Acyl-carrier-protein (acpP) is an essential protein in fatty acid biosynthesis of Staphylococcus aureus [Cronan, J.E. and Thomas, J. (2009). Complex enzymes in microbial natural product biosynthesis, part B: polyketides, aminocoumarins and carbohydrates.

  3. The nodulation protein NodG shows the enzymatic activity of an 3-oxoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase.

    PubMed

    López-Lara, I M; Geiger, O

    2001-03-01

    The acyl carrier protein NodF is required for the synthesis of unusual polyunsaturated fatty acids that confer specificity to lipochitin oligosaccharide nodulation (Nod) factors of Rhizobium leguminosarum. In this study, homogeneous NodF protein was used as a ligand to identify proteins of R. leguminosarum that specifically interact with NodF and presumably are involved in the biosynthesis or transfer of the unusual fatty acids. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of a 29-kDa protein that interacts strongly with NodF revealed high similarity to NodG of Rhizobium sp. N33 and to NodG of Sinorhizobium meliloti We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the NodG-like protein of R. leguminosarum and found it to be the product of the constitutively expressed gene fabG. FabG is the 3-oxoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase that catalyzes the first reduction step in each cycle of fatty acid elongation. FabG of R. leguminosarum and NodG of Rhizobium sp. N33 were expressed in Escherichia coli. In both cases, the purified protein showed 3-oxoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase activity in vitro. Therefore, NodG has the same biochemical function as FabG, and the high degree of similarity at the protein and DNA level suggest that nodG is a duplication of the housekeeping genefabG.

  4. Genomic structures and characterization of the 5'-flanking regions of acyl carrier protein and Delta4-palmitoyl-ACP desaturase genes from Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jung; Shin, Jeong Sheop; Kim, Jeong-Kook; Suh, Mi Chung

    2005-09-25

    The seed-specific or seed-predominant promoters of acyl carrier protein (Cs-ACP1) and Delta4-palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (Cs-4PAD) genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of petroselinic acid, were isolated from coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and analyzed in coriander endosperms and transgenic Arabidopsis. The expression of Cs-ACP1 and Cs-4PAD genes was coordinately regulated during seed development.

  5. The benzimidazole based drugs show good activity against T. gondii but poor activity against its proposed enoyl reductase enzyme target.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Craig; McPhillie, Martin J; Zhou, Ying; Woods, Stuart; Afanador, Gustavo A; Rawson, Shaun; Khaliq, Farzana; Prigge, Sean T; Roberts, Craig W; Rice, David W; McLeod, Rima; Fishwick, Colin W; Muench, Stephen P

    2014-02-01

    The enoyl acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR) enzyme of the apicomplexan parasite family has been intensely studied for antiparasitic drug design for over a decade, with the most potent inhibitors targeting the NAD(+) bound form of the enzyme. However, the higher affinity for the NADH co-factor over NAD(+) and its availability in the natural environment makes the NADH complex form of ENR an attractive target. Herein, we have examined a benzimidazole family of inhibitors which target the NADH form of Francisella ENR, but despite good efficacy against Toxoplasma gondii, the IC50 for T. gondii ENR is poor, with no inhibitory activity at 1 μM. Moreover similar benzimidazole scaffolds are potent against fungi which lack the ENR enzyme and as such we believe that there may be significant off target effects for this family of inhibitors.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of enoyl-ACP reductase III (FabL) from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook-Han; Park, Joon Kyu; Ha, Byung Hak; Moon, Jin Ho; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong

    2007-03-01

    Enoyl-ACP reductase III (FabL) from B. subtilis has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 139.56, c = 62.75 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Enoyl-[acyl-carrier protein] reductase (enoyl-ACP reductase; ENR) is a key enzyme in type II fatty-acid synthase that catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle. It has been considered as an antibiotic target since it is an essential enzyme in bacteria. However, recent studies indicate that some pathogens have more than one ENR. Bacillus subtilis is reported to have two ENRs, namely BsFabI and BsFabL. While BsFabI is similar to other FabIs, BsFabL shows very little sequence similarity and is NADPH-dependent instead of NADH-dependent as in the case of FabI. In order to understand these differences on a structural basis, BsFabL has been cloned, expressed and and crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 139.56, c = 62.75 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120° and one molecule of FabL in the asymmetric unit. Data were collected using synchrotron radiation (beamline 4A at the Pohang Light Source, Korea). The crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  7. The Conserved Modular Elements of the Acyl Carrier Proteins of Lipid Synthesis Are Only Partially Interchangeable*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Cronan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work showed that expression of acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) of a diverse set of bacteria replaced the function of Escherichia coli ACP in lipid biosynthesis. However, the AcpAs of Lactococcus lactis and Enterococcus faecalis were inactive. Both failed to support growth of an E. coli acpP mutant strain. This defect seemed likely because of the helix II sequences of the two AcpAs, which differed markedly from those of the proteins that supported growth. To test this premise, chimeric ACPs were constructed in which L. lactis helix II replaced helix II of E. coli AcpP and vice versa. Expression of the AcpP protein L. lactis AcpA helix II allowed weak growth, whereas the L. lactis AcpA-derived protein that contained E. coli AcpP helix II failed to support growth of the E. coli mutant strain. Replacement of the L. lactis AcpA helix II residues in this protein showed that substitution of valine for the phenylalanine residue four residues downstream of the phosphopanthetheine-modified serine gave robust growth and allowed modification by the endogenous AcpS phosphopantetheinyl transferase (rather than the promiscuous Sfp transferase required to modify the L. lactis AcpA and the chimera of L. lactis AcpA helix II in AcpP). Further chimera constructs showed that the lack of function of the L. lactis AcpA-derived protein containing E. coli AcpP helix II was due to incompatibility of L. lactis AcpA helix I with the downstream elements of AcpP. Therefore, the origins of ACP incompatibility can reside in either helix I or in helix II. PMID:25861991

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-20

    The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS-ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the {alpha}2 helix and in the conformation of the {alpha}3-{alpha}4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4-6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS-ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS-ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  9. Conserved Function of ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE 5 on Seed Oil and Oleic Acid Biosynthesis between Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Changyu; Li, Dong; Gao, Chenhao; Liu, Kaige; Qi, Shuanghui; Duan, Shaowei; Li, Zixiong; Gong, Jingyun; Wang, Jianjun; Hai, Jiangbo; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that several ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE (AtAAD) members in Arabidopsis thaliana are responsible for oleic acid (C18:1) biosynthesis. Limited research has been conducted on another member, AtAAD5, and its paralog BnAAD5 in the closely related and commercially important plant, Brassica napus. Here, we found that AtAAD5 was predominantly and exclusively expressed in developing embryos at the whole seed developmental stages. The aad5 mutation caused a significant decrease in the amounts of oil and C18:1, and a considerable increase in the content of stearic acid (C18:0) in mature seeds, suggesting that AtAAD5 functioned as an important facilitator of seed oil biosynthesis. We also cloned the full-length coding sequence of BnAAD5-1 from the A3 subgenome of the B. napus inbred line L111. We showed that ectopic expression of BnAAD5-1 in the A. thaliana aad5-2 mutant fully complemented the phenotypes of the mutant, such as lower oil content and altered contents of C18:0 and C18:1. These results help us to better understand the functions of AAD members in A. thaliana and B. napus and provide a promising target for genetic manipulation of B. napus.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase III (mtFabH) assay: principles and method.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sarbjot; Reynolds, Kevin A

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is one of the relatively newer targets in antibacterial drug discovery. The presence of distinct fatty acid synthases (FAS) in mammals and bacteria and the fact that most bacterial FAS enzymes are essential for viability make this a very attractive antimicrobial drug target. The enzyme beta-ketoacyl ACP synthase (KASIII or FabH) is the key enzyme that initiates fatty acid biosynthesis in a type II dissociated FAS. This enzyme catalyzes the condensation of acyl CoA and malonyl ACP (acyl carrier protein) to form a beta-ketoacyl ACP product, which is further processed to form mature fatty acids that are involved in various essential cellular processes and structures like phospholipid biosynthesis, cell wall formation, etc. Herein we describe a new assay for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis FabH (mtFabH) enzyme involved in a key initiation step in the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are an integral component of the cell wall. The assay eliminates the need for the cumbersome washing steps or specialty scintillation proximity assay beads and the preparation of acyl carrier proteins required in other assay formats. This discontinuous assay involves the reduction of radiolabled long-chain beta-ketoacyl CoA product to its dihydroxy derivative, which partitions into a nonpolar phase for quantitation, while the reduced radiolabeled substrate derivative remains in the aqueous phase.

  11. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  12. ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE2 and 3 Are Responsible for Making Omega-7 Fatty Acids in the Arabidopsis Aleurone1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Fiona M.; Munoz-Azcarate, Olaya; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Omega-7 monounsaturated fatty acids (ω-7s) are specifically enriched in the aleurone of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. We found significant natural variation in seed ω-7 content and used a Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross population to fine-map a major quantitative trait loci to a region containing ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE1 (AAD1) and AAD3. We found that AAD3 expression is localized to the aleurone where mutants show an approximately 50% reduction in ω-7 content. By contrast, AAD1 is localized to the embryo where mutants show a small reduction in ω-9 content. Enzymatic analysis has previously shown that AAD family members possess both stearoyl- and palmitoyl-ACP Δ9 desaturase activity, including the predominant isoform SUPPRESSOR OF SALICYLIC ACID INSENSITIVE2. However, aad3 ssi2 aleurone contained the same amount of ω-7s as aad3. Within the AAD family, AAD3 shares the highest degree of sequence similarity with AAD2 and AAD4. Mutant analysis showed that AAD2 also contributes to ω-7 production in the aleurone, and aad3 aad2 exhibits an approximately 85% reduction in ω-7s. Mutant analysis also showed that FATTY ACID ELONGASE1 is required for the production of very long chain ω-7s in the aleurone. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the ω-7 pathway proceeds via Δ9 desaturation of palmitoyl-ACP followed by elongation of the product. Interestingly, significant variation was also identified in the ω-7 content of Brassica napus aleurone, with the highest level detected being approximately 47% of total fatty acids. PMID:27462083

  13. ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE2 and 3 Are Responsible for Making Omega-7 Fatty Acids in the Arabidopsis Aleurone.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Fiona M; Munoz-Azcarate, Olaya; Kelly, Amélie A; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Omega-7 monounsaturated fatty acids (ω-7s) are specifically enriched in the aleurone of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. We found significant natural variation in seed ω-7 content and used a Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross population to fine-map a major quantitative trait loci to a region containing ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE1 (AAD1) and AAD3 We found that AAD3 expression is localized to the aleurone where mutants show an approximately 50% reduction in ω-7 content. By contrast, AAD1 is localized to the embryo where mutants show a small reduction in ω-9 content. Enzymatic analysis has previously shown that AAD family members possess both stearoyl- and palmitoyl-ACP Δ(9) desaturase activity, including the predominant isoform SUPPRESSOR OF SALICYLIC ACID INSENSITIVE2. However, aad3 ssi2 aleurone contained the same amount of ω-7s as aad3 Within the AAD family, AAD3 shares the highest degree of sequence similarity with AAD2 and AAD4. Mutant analysis showed that AAD2 also contributes to ω-7 production in the aleurone, and aad3 aad2 exhibits an approximately 85% reduction in ω-7s Mutant analysis also showed that FATTY ACID ELONGASE1 is required for the production of very long chain ω-7s in the aleurone. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the ω-7 pathway proceeds via Δ(9) desaturation of palmitoyl-ACP followed by elongation of the product. Interestingly, significant variation was also identified in the ω-7 content of Brassica napus aleurone, with the highest level detected being approximately 47% of total fatty acids. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Only One of the Five Ralstonia solanacearum Long-Chain 3-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase Homologues Functions in Fatty Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Juanli; Ma, Jincheng; Lin, Jinshui; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Cronan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a major phytopathogenic bacterium, causes a bacterial wilt disease in diverse plants. Although fatty acid analyses of total membranes of R. solanacearum showed that they contain primarily palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1) and cis-vaccenic (C18:1) acids, little is known regarding R. solanacearum fatty acid synthesis. The R. solanacearum GMI1000 genome is unusual in that it contains four genes (fabF1, fabF2, fabF3, and fabF4) annotated as encoding 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase II homologues and one gene (fabB) annotated as encoding 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I. We have analyzed this puzzling apparent redundancy and found that only one of these genes, fabF1, encoded a long-chain 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase, whereas the other homologues did not play roles in R. solanacearum fatty acid synthesis. Mutant strains lacking fabF1 are nonviable, and thus, FabF1 is essential for R. solanacearum fatty acid biosynthesis. Moreover, R. solanacearum FabF1 has the activities of both 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase II and 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I. PMID:22194290

  15. Fatty acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: cloning and characterization of the fabAB operon encoding beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabA) and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I (FabB).

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, T T; Schweizer, H P

    1997-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fabA and fabB genes, encoding beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I, respectively, were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Northern analysis demonstrated that fabA and fabB are cotranscribed and most probably form a fabAB operon. The FabA and FabB proteins were similar in size and amino acid composition to their counterparts from Escherichia coli and to the putative homologs from Haemophilus influenzae. Chromosomal fabA and fabB mutants were isolated; the mutants were auxotrophic for unsaturated fatty acids. A temperature-sensitive fabA mutant was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of a single base that induced a G101D change; this mutant grew normally at 30 degrees C but not at 42 degrees C, unless the growth medium was supplemented with oleate. By physical and genetic mapping, the fabAB genes were localized between 3.45 and 3.6 Mbp on the 5.9-Mbp chromosome, which corresponds to the 58- to 59.5-min region of the genetic map. PMID:9286984

  16. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis.

  17. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis. PMID:26305336

  18. Structural and dynamic characterization of a freestanding acyl carrier protein involved in the biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subrata; Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-05-01

    Friulimicin is a cyclic lipodecapeptide antibiotic that is produced by Actinoplanes friuliensis. Similar to the related lipopeptide drug daptomycin, the peptide skeleton of friulimicin is synthesized by a large multienzyme nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) system. The LipD protein plays a major role in the acylation reaction of friulimicin. The attachment of the fatty acid group promotes its antibiotic activity. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that LipD is most closely related to other freestanding acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), for which the genes are located near to NRPS gene clusters. Here, we report that the solution NMR structure of apo-LipD is very similar to other four-helix bundle forming ACPs from fatty acid synthase (FAS), polyketide synthase, and NRPS systems. By recording NMR dynamics data, we found that the backbone motions in holo-LipD are more restricted than in apo-LipD due to the attachment of phosphopantetheine moiety. This enhanced stability of holo-LipD was also observed in differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, unlike several other ACPs, the folding of LipD does not depend on the presence of divalent cations, although the presence of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) can increase the protein stability. We propose that small structural rearrangements in the tertiary structure of holo-LipD which lead to the enhanced stability are important for the cognate enzyme recognition for the acylation reaction. Our results also highlight the different surface charges of LipD and FAS-ACP from A. friuliensis that would allow the acyl-CoA ligase to interact preferentially with the LipD instead of binding to the FAS-ACP. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  19. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mtFabD, a malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadbane, Hemza; Brown, Alistair K.; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S. Fütterer, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Binding of Ni{sup 2+} ions to the uncleaved affinity tag facilitated de novo phasing of the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD to 3.0 Å resolution. Mycobacteria display a unique and unusual cell-wall architecture, central to which is the membrane-proximal mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan core (mAGP). The biosynthesis of mycolic acids, which form the outermost layer of the mAGP core, involves malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT). This essential enzyme catalyses the transfer of malonyl from coenzyme A to acyl carrier protein AcpM, thus feeding these two-carbon units into the chain-elongation cycle of the type II fatty-acid synthase. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD, the mycobacterial MCAT, has been determined to 3.0 Å resolution by multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Phasing was facilitated by Ni{sup 2+} ions bound to the 20-residue N-terminal affinity tag, which packed between the two independent copies of mtFabD.

  20. Temporal and tissue-specific regulation of a Brassica napus stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, S P; Piffanelli, P; Fairbairn, D; Bowra, S; Hatzopoulos, P; Tsiantis, M; Murphy, D J

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a Brassica napus stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene (Bn10) is presented. This gene is one member of a family of four closely related genes expressed in oilseed rape. The expression of the promoter of this gene in transgenic tobacco was found to be temporally regulated in the developing seed tissues. However, the promoter was also particularly active in other oleogenic tissues such as the tapetum and pollen grains. This raises the interesting question of whether seed-expressed lipid synthesis genes are regulated by separate tissue-specific determinants or by a single factor common to all oleogenic tissues. Parts of the plants undergoing rapid development such as the components of immature flowers and seedlings also exhibited high levels of promoter activity. These tissues are likely to have an elevated requirement for membrane lipid synthesis. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase transcript levels have previously been shown to be temporally regulated in the B. napus embryo (S.P. Slocombe, I. Cummins, R.P. Jarvis, D.J. Murphy [1992] Plant Mol Biol 20: 151-155). Evidence is presented demonstrating the induction of desaturase mRNA by abscisic acid in the embryo. PMID:8016261

  1. Construction of efficient and effective transformation vectors for palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash Janardhan; Shah, Farida Habib

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil obtained from E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera is known to have about 44% of palmitic acid (C16:0). Palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Thioesterase (PATE) is one of the key enzymes involved in plastidial fatty acid biosynthesis; and it determines the level of the C16:0 assimilation in oilseeds. This enzyme's activity in oil palm is responsible for high (> 44 % in E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera and 25 % in E. oleifera) content of C16:0 in its oil. By post-transcriptional PATE gene silencing, C16:0 content can be minimized for nutritional value improvement of the palm oil. The objective of this study was the construction of novel transformation vectors for PATE gene silencing. Six different transformation vectors targeted against PATE gene were constructed using 619 bp long PATE gene (5' region) fragment (from GenBank AF507115). In one set of three transformation vectors, PATE gene fragment was fused with CaMV 35S promoter in antisense, intron-spliced inverted repeat (ISIR), and inverted repeat (IR) orientations to generate antisense mRNA and hair-pin RNAs (hpRNA). In another set of three transformation vectors with same design, CaMV 35S was replaced with Oil palm mesocarp tissue-specific promoter (MSP). The expression cassette of antisense, ISIR, and IR of PATE gene fragments were constructed in primary cloning vector, pHANNIBAL or its derivative/s. Finally, all 6 expression cassettes were sub-cloned into pCAMBIA 1301 which contains the Hygromycinr and the GUS reporter genes for transformant selection and transformation detection respectively. The results of the RE analyses of the constructs and sequence analyses of PATE and MSP shows and confirms the orientation, size and locations of all the components from constructs. We hypothesize that 4 (pISIRPATE-PC, pIRPATE-PC, pMISIRPATE-PC and pMIRPATE-PC) out of 6 transformation vectors constructed in this study will be efficient and effective in palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm. Abbreviations anti

  2. Construction of efficient and effective transformation vectors for palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm.

    PubMed

    Bhore, Subhash Janardhan; Shah, Farida Habib

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil obtained from E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera is known to have about 44% of palmitic acid (C16:0). Palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Thioesterase (PATE) is one of the key enzymes involved in plastidial fatty acid biosynthesis; and it determines the level of the C16:0 assimilation in oilseeds. This enzyme's activity in oil palm is responsible for high (> 44 % in E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera and 25 % in E. oleifera) content of C16:0 in its oil. By post-transcriptional PATE gene silencing, C16:0 content can be minimized for nutritional value improvement of the palm oil. The objective of this study was the construction of novel transformation vectors for PATE gene silencing. Six different transformation vectors targeted against PATE gene were constructed using 619 bp long PATE gene (5' region) fragment (from GenBank AF507115). In one set of three transformation vectors, PATE gene fragment was fused with CaMV 35S promoter in antisense, intron-spliced inverted repeat (ISIR), and inverted repeat (IR) orientations to generate antisense mRNA and hair-pin RNAs (hpRNA). In another set of three transformation vectors with same design, CaMV 35S was replaced with Oil palm mesocarp tissue-specific promoter (MSP). The expression cassette of antisense, ISIR, and IR of PATE gene fragments were constructed in primary cloning vector, pHANNIBAL or its derivative/s. Finally, all 6 expression cassettes were sub-cloned into pCAMBIA 1301 which contains the Hygromycinr and the GUS reporter genes for transformant selection and transformation detection respectively. The results of the RE analyses of the constructs and sequence analyses of PATE and MSP shows and confirms the orientation, size and locations of all the components from constructs. We hypothesize that 4 (pISIRPATE-PC, pIRPATE-PC, pMISIRPATE-PC and pMIRPATE-PC) out of 6 transformation vectors constructed in this study will be efficient and effective in palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm. antiPATE - Antisense

  3. Defective peroxisomal catabolism of branched fatty acyl coenzyme A in mice lacking the sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x gene function

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Udo; Raabe, Martin; Ellinghaus, Peter; Kannenberg, Frank; Fobker, Manfred; Engel, Thomas; Denis, Simone; Wouters, Fred; Wirtz, Karel W.A.; Wanders, Ronald J.A.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Assmann, Gerd

    1998-01-01

    Gene targeting in mice was used to investigate the unknown function of Scp2, encoding sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2; a peroxisomal lipid carrier) and sterol carrier protein-x (SCPx; a fusion protein between SCP2 and a peroxisomal thiolase). Complete deficiency of SCP2 and SCPx was associated with marked alterations in gene expression, peroxisome proliferation, hypolipidemia, impaired body weight control, and neuropathy. Along with these abnormalities, catabolism of methyl-branched fatty acyl CoAs was impaired. The defect became evident from up to 10-fold accumulation of the tetramethyl-branched fatty acid phytanic acid in Scp2(−/−) mice. Further characterization supported that the gene disruption led to inefficient import of phytanoyl-CoA into peroxisomes and to defective thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketopristanoyl-CoA. These results corresponded to high-affinity binding of phytanoyl-CoA to the recombinant rat SCP2 protein, as well as high 3-ketopristanoyl-CoA thiolase activity of the recombinant rat SCPx protein. PMID:9553048

  4. Toward production of jet fuel functionality in oilseeds: identification of FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases and evaluation of combinatorial expression strategies in Camelina seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E; Vu, Hieu Sy; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Nam, Jeong-Won; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-07-01

    Seeds of members of the genus Cuphea accumulate medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs; 8:0-14:0). MCFA- and palmitic acid- (16:0) rich vegetable oils have received attention for jet fuel production, given their similarity in chain length to Jet A fuel hydrocarbons. Studies were conducted to test genes, including those from Cuphea, for their ability to confer jet fuel-type fatty acid accumulation in seed oil of the emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa. Transcriptomes from Cuphea viscosissima and Cuphea pulcherrima developing seeds that accumulate >90% of C8 and C10 fatty acids revealed three FatB cDNAs (CpuFatB3, CvFatB1, and CpuFatB4) expressed predominantly in seeds and structurally divergent from typical FatB thioesterases that release 16:0 from acyl carrier protein (ACP). Expression of CpuFatB3 and CvFatB1 resulted in Camelina oil with capric acid (10:0), and CpuFatB4 expression conferred myristic acid (14:0) production and increased 16:0. Co-expression of combinations of previously characterized Cuphea and California bay FatBs produced Camelina oils with mixtures of C8-C16 fatty acids, but amounts of each fatty acid were less than obtained by expression of individual FatB cDNAs. Increases in lauric acid (12:0) and 14:0, but not 10:0, in Camelina oil and at the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols resulted from inclusion of a coconut lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase specialized for MCFAs. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of Camelina β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, however, reduced 12:0 in seeds expressing a 12:0-ACP-specific FatB. Camelina lines presented here provide platforms for additional metabolic engineering targeting fatty acid synthase and specialized acyltransferases for achieving oils with high levels of jet fuel-type fatty acids.

  5. Design and synthesis of aryl ether inhibitors of the Bacillus anthracis enoyl-ACP reductase.

    PubMed

    Tipparaju, Suresh K; Mulhearn, Debbie C; Klein, Gary M; Chen, Yufeng; Tapadar, Subhasish; Bishop, Molly H; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Juan; Ghassemi, Mahmood; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Cook, James L; Johlfs, Mary; Mesecar, Andrew D; Johnson, Michael E; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-08-01

    The problem of increasing bacterial resistance to the current generation of antibiotics is well documented. Known resistant pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are becoming more prevalent, while the potential exists for developing drug-resistant pathogens for use as bioweapons, such as Bacillus anthracis. The biphenyl ether antibacterial agent, triclosan, exhibits broad-spectrum activity by targeting the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway through inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) and provides a potential scaffold for the development of new, broad-spectrum antibiotics. We used a structure-based approach to develop novel aryl ether analogues of triclosan that target ENR, the product of the fabI gene, from B. anthracis (BaENR). Structure-based design methods were used for the expansion of the compound series including X-ray crystal structure determination, molecular docking, and QSAR methods. Structural modifications were made to both phenyl rings of the 2-phenoxyphenyl core. A number of compounds exhibited improved potency against BaENR and increased efficacy against both the Sterne strain of B. anthracis and the methicillin-resistant strain of S. aureus. X-ray crystal structures of BaENR in complex with triclosan and two other compounds help explain the improved efficacy of the new compounds and suggest future rounds of optimization that might be used to improve their potency.

  6. Concentrations of long-chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins during fatty acid synthesis by chloroplasts isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), safflower (Carthamus tinctoris), and amaranthus (Amaranthus lividus) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Roughan, G.; Nishida, I. )

    1990-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis from (1-14C)acetate by chloroplasts isolated from peas and amaranthus was linear for at least 15 min, whereas incorporation of the tracer into long-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) did not increase after 2-3 min. When reactions were transferred to the dark after 3-5 min, long-chain acyl-ACPs lost about 90% of their radioactivity and total fatty acids retained all of theirs. Half-lives of the long-chain acyl-ACPs were estimated to be 10-15 s. Concentrations of palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-ACP as indicated by equilibrium labeling during steady-state fatty acid synthesis, ranged from 0.6-1.1, 0.2-0.7, and 0.4-1.6 microM, respectively, for peas and from 1.6-1.9, 1.3-2.6, and 0.6-1.4 microM, respectively, for amaranthus. These values are based on a chloroplast volume of 47 microliters/mg chlorophyll and varied according to the mode of the incubation. A slow increase in activity of the fatty acid synthetase in safflower chloroplasts resulted in long-chain acyl-ACPs continuing to incorporate labeled acetate for 10 min. Upon re-illumination following a dark break, however, both fatty acid synthetase activity and acyl-ACP concentrations increased very rapidly. Palmitoyl-ACP was present at concentrations up to 2.5 microM in safflower chloroplasts, whereas those of stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACPs were in the lower ranges measured for peas. Acyl-ACPs were routinely separated from extracts of chloroplasts that had been synthesising long-chain fatty acids from labeled acetate by a minor modification of the method of Mancha et al. The results compared favorably with those obtained using alternative analytical methods such as adsorption to filter paper and partition chromatography on silicic acid columns.

  7. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  8. A novel approach for over-expression, characterization, and isotopic enrichment of a homogeneous species of acyl carrier protein from Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; Modak, Rahul; Sharma, Shilpi; Sharma, Alok Kumar; Sarma, Siddhartha P.; Surolia, Avadhesha; Surolia, Namita . E-mail: surolia@jncasr.ac.in

    2005-05-20

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) plays a central role in fatty acid biosynthesis by transferring the acyl groups from one enzyme to another for the completion of the fatty acid synthesis cycle. Holo-ACP is the obligatory substrate for the synthesis of acyl-ACPs which act as the carrier and donor for various metabolic reactions. Despite its interactions with numerous proteins in the cell, its mode of interaction is poorly understood. Here, we report the over-expression of PfACP in minimal medium solely in its holo form and in high yield. Expression in minimal media provides a means to isotopically label PfACP for high resolution multi-nuclear and multi-dimensional NMR studies. Indeed, the proton-nitrogen correlated NMR spectrum exhibits very high chemical shift dispersion and resolution. We also show that holo-PfACP thus expressed is amenable to acylation reactions using Escherichia coli acyl-ACP synthetase as well as by standard chemical methods.

  9. A novel approach for over-expression, characterization, and isotopic enrichment of a homogeneous species of acyl carrier protein from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; Modak, Rahul; Sharma, Shilpi; Sharma, Alok Kumar; Sarma, Siddhartha P; Surolia, Avadhesha; Surolia, Namita

    2005-05-20

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) plays a central role in fatty acid biosynthesis by transferring the acyl groups from one enzyme to another for the completion of the fatty acid synthesis cycle. Holo-ACP is the obligatory substrate for the synthesis of acyl-ACPs which act as the carrier and donor for various metabolic reactions. Despite its interactions with numerous proteins in the cell, its mode of interaction is poorly understood. Here, we report the over-expression of PfACP in minimal medium solely in its holo form and in high yield. Expression in minimal media provides a means to isotopically label PfACP for high resolution multi-nuclear and multi-dimensional NMR studies. Indeed, the proton-nitrogen correlated NMR spectrum exhibits very high chemical shift dispersion and resolution. We also show that holo-PfACP thus expressed is amenable to acylation reactions using Escherichia coli acyl-ACP synthetase as well as by standard chemical methods.

  10. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  11. Toward production of jet fuel functionality in oilseeds: Identification of FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases and evaluation of combinatorial expression strategies in Camelina seeds

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E.; Vu, Hieu Sy; ...

    2015-05-11

    Seeds of members of the genus Cuphea accumulate medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs; 8:0–14:0). MCFA- and palmitic acid- (16:0) rich vegetable oils have received attention for jet fuel production, given their similarity in chain length to Jet A fuel hydrocarbons. Studies were conducted to test genes, including those from Cuphea, for their ability to confer jet fuel-type fatty acid accumulation in seed oil of the emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa. Transcriptomes from Cuphea viscosissima and Cuphea pulcherrima developing seeds that accumulate >90% of C8 and C10 fatty acids revealed three FatB cDNAs (CpuFatB3, CvFatB1, and CpuFatB4) expressed predominantly in seeds andmore » structurally divergent from typical FatB thioesterases that release 16:0 from acyl carrier protein (ACP). Expression of CpuFatB3 and CvFatB1 resulted in Camelina oil with capric acid (10:0), and CpuFatB4 expression conferred myristic acid (14:0) production and increased 16:0. Co-expression of combinations of previously characterized Cuphea and California bay FatBs produced Camelina oils with mixtures of C8–C16 fatty acids, but amounts of each fatty acid were less than obtained by expression of individual FatB cDNAs. Increases in lauric acid (12:0) and 14:0, but not 10:0, in Camelina oil and at the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols resulted from inclusion of a coconut lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase specialized for MCFAs. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of Camelina β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, however, reduced 12:0 in seeds expressing a 12:0-ACP-specific FatB. Here, Camelina lines presented here provide platforms for additional metabolic engineering targeting fatty acid synthase and specialized acyltransferases for achieving oils with high levels of jet fuel-type fatty acids.« less

  12. Toward production of jet fuel functionality in oilseeds: identification of FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases and evaluation of combinatorial expression strategies in Camelina seeds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E.; Vu, Hieu Sy; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Nam, Jeong-Won; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2015-01-01

    Seeds of members of the genus Cuphea accumulate medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs; 8:0–14:0). MCFA- and palmitic acid- (16:0) rich vegetable oils have received attention for jet fuel production, given their similarity in chain length to Jet A fuel hydrocarbons. Studies were conducted to test genes, including those from Cuphea, for their ability to confer jet fuel-type fatty acid accumulation in seed oil of the emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa. Transcriptomes from Cuphea viscosissima and Cuphea pulcherrima developing seeds that accumulate >90% of C8 and C10 fatty acids revealed three FatB cDNAs (CpuFatB3, CvFatB1, and CpuFatB4) expressed predominantly in seeds and structurally divergent from typical FatB thioesterases that release 16:0 from acyl carrier protein (ACP). Expression of CpuFatB3 and CvFatB1 resulted in Camelina oil with capric acid (10:0), and CpuFatB4 expression conferred myristic acid (14:0) production and increased 16:0. Co-expression of combinations of previously characterized Cuphea and California bay FatBs produced Camelina oils with mixtures of C8–C16 fatty acids, but amounts of each fatty acid were less than obtained by expression of individual FatB cDNAs. Increases in lauric acid (12:0) and 14:0, but not 10:0, in Camelina oil and at the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols resulted from inclusion of a coconut lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase specialized for MCFAs. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of Camelina β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, however, reduced 12:0 in seeds expressing a 12:0-ACP-specific FatB. Camelina lines presented here provide platforms for additional metabolic engineering targeting fatty acid synthase and specialized acyltransferases for achieving oils with high levels of jet fuel-type fatty acids. PMID:25969557

  13. Functional characterizations of malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT) in Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingfei; Zhu, Guan; Qin, Zonghua; Wu, Caiyan; Lv, Minna; Liao, Shenquan; Qi, Nanshan; Xie, Mingquan; Cai, Jianping

    2012-07-01

    Eimeria tenella, an apicomplexan parasite in chickens, possesses an apicoplast and its associated metabolic pathways including the Type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS II). Malonyl-CoA:acyl-carry protein transacylase (MCAT) encoded by the fabD gene is one of the essential enzymes in the FAS II system. In the present study, the entire E. tenella MCAT gene (EtfabD) was cloned and sequenced. Immunolabeling located this protein in the apicoplast organelle in coccidial sporozoites. Functional replacement of the fabD gene with amber mutation of E. coli temperature-sensitive LA2-89 strain by E. tenella EtMCAT demonstrated that EcFabD and EtMCAT perform the same biochemical function. The recombinant EtMCAT protein was expressed and its general biochemical features were also determined. An alkaloid natural product corytuberine (CAS: 517-56-6) could specifically inhibit the EtMCAT activity (IC(50)=16.47μM), but the inhibition of parasite growth in vitro by corytuberine was very weak (the predicted MIC(50)=0.65mM).

  14. Phosphorylation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase MabA Regulates Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Molle, Virginie; Kremer, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Mycolic acids are key cell wall components for the survival, pathogenicity, and antibiotic resistance of the human tubercle bacillus. Although it was thought that Mycobacterium tuberculosis tightly regulates their production to adapt to prevailing environmental conditions, the molecular mechanisms governing mycolic acid biosynthesis remained extremely obscure. Meromycolic acids, the direct precursors of mycolic acids, are synthesized by a type II fatty acid synthase from acyl carrier protein-bound substrates that are extended iteratively, with a reductive cycle in each round of extension, the second step of which is catalyzed by the essential β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, MabA. In this study, we investigated whether post-translational modifications of MabA might represent a strategy employed by M. tuberculosis to regulate mycolic acid biosynthesis. Indeed, we show here that MabA was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by several M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr protein kinases, including PknB, as well as in vivo in mycobacteria. Mass spectrometric analyses using LC-ESI/MS/MS and site-directed mutagenesis identified three phosphothreonines, with Thr191 being the primary phosphor-acceptor. A MabA_T191D mutant, designed to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, exhibited markedly decreased ketoacyl reductase activity compared with the wild-type protein, as well as impaired binding of the NADPH cofactor, as demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The hypothesis that phosphorylation of Thr191 alters the enzymatic activity of MabA, and subsequently mycolic acid biosynthesis, was further supported by the fact that constitutive overexpression of the mabA_T191D allele in Mycobacterium bovis BCG strongly impaired mycobacterial growth. Importantly, conditional expression of the phosphomimetic MabA_T191D led to a significant inhibition of de novo biosynthesis of mycolic acids. This study provides the first information on the molecular mechanism(s) involved in mycolic acid

  15. Enhanced production of branched-chain fatty acids by replacing β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase III (FabH).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Jiang, Yanfang; Bentley, Gayle J; Liu, Di; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2015-08-01

    Branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are important precursors for the production of advanced biofuels with improved cold-flow properties. Previous efforts in engineering type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) for BCFA production suffered from low titers and/or the co-production of a large amount of straight-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), making it nearly impossible for further conversion of BCFAs to branched biofuels. Synthesis of both SCFAs and BCFAs requires FabH, the only β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the initial condensation reaction between malonyl-ACP and a short-chain acyl-CoA. In this study, we demonstrated that replacement of the acetyl-CoA-specific E. coli FabH with a branched-chain-acyl-CoA-specific FabH directed the flux to the synthesis of BCFAs, resulting in a significant enhancement in BCFA titer compared to a strain containing both acetyl-CoA- and branched-chain-acyl-CoA-specific FabHs. We further demonstrated that the composition of BCFAs can be tuned by engineering the upstream pathway to control the supply of different branched-chain acyl-CoAs, leading to the production either even-chain-iso-, odd-chain-iso-, or odd-chain-anteiso-BCFAs separately. Overall, the top-performing strain from this study produced BCFAs at 126 mg/L, comprising 52% of the total free fatty acids.

  16. The Length of the Bound Fatty Acid Influences the Dynamics of the Acyl Carrier Protein and the Stability of the Thioester Bond†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis have been shown to exhibit a high degree of conformational flexibility, in that they are able to sequester fatty acid intermediates between 4 and 18 carbons in length. This flexibility has been observed in X-ray and NMR structures of acyl carrier proteins attached to different fatty acids. NMR studies comparing decanoyl-ACP and stearoyl-ACP indicated that ACP exhibits more dynamic motions when bound to longer fatty acids. We have used complementary chemical and NMR methods as an approach to improving our understanding of the effect of fatty acid length on the dynamics of acyl carrier protein. A chemical assay of the accessibility of the acyl thioester to solvent revealed a positive correlation between chain length and rate of hydrolysis. Surprisingly, this linear correlation was biphasic, with accelerated hydrolysis observed for fatty acids longer than 15 carbons. To further understand the motions associated with this acceleration, we collected 15N relaxation dispersion data for 14:0-, 15:0-, and 16:0-ACP. The greatest dispersions were exhibited by residues that form the entrance to the fatty acid binding pocket. In addition, these dispersions were observed to increase with the length of the fatty acid. Because the exchange rates derived from fitting the data to a two-state model varied from residue to residue, a more complex motional model appears to be required to adequately explain the dynamics. Thus, acyl-ACP offers an interesting system for future investigations of complex protein motions on the micro- and millisecond time scales. PMID:20014832

  17. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  18. Defective pollen wall is required for anther and microspore development in rice and encodes a fatty acyl carrier protein reductase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Tan, Hexin; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Yuanyun; Liang, Wanqi; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Wang, Yujiong; Kai, Guoying; Shanklin, John; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  19. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  20. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene from the oleaginous microalga Chlorella zofingiensis: cloning, characterization and transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Huang, Junchao; Hu, Qiang; Chen, Feng

    2012-12-01

    The green alga Chlorella zofingiensis can accumulate high level of oleic acid (OA, C18:1△(9)) rich oils in response to stress conditions. To understand the regulation of biosynthesis of fatty acid in particular OA at the molecular level, we cloned and characterized the stearoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) responsible for OA formation through desaturation of stearic acid (C18:0) from C. zofingiensis. Southern blot indicated that the C. zofingiensis genome contained a single copy of SAD, from which the deduced amino acid sequence shared high identity to the corresponding homologs from other microalgae and higher plants. The desaturation activity of SAD was demonstrated in vitro using C18:0-ACP as a substrate. Stress conditions such as high light (HL), nitrogen deficiency (N(-)), or combination of HL and N(-) (HL + N(-)) drastically up-regulated the transcripts of biotin carboxylase (BC, a subunit of ACCase) and SAD, and therefore induced considerably the cellular accumulation of total fatty acids including OA. Glucose (50 mM) gave rise to the similar up-regulation of the two genes and induction of fatty acid accumulation. The accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was found to be associated with the up-regulation of genes. This is the first report of characterization of Chlorella-derived SAD and the results may contribute to understanding of the mechanisms involved in fatty acid/lipid biosynthesis in microalgae.

  1. Structure-based analysis of the molecular interactions between acyltransferase and acyl carrier protein in vicenistatin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Iwasawa, Shohei; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Acyltransferases (ATs) are key determinants of building block specificity in polyketide biosynthesis. Despite the importance of protein–protein interactions between AT and acyl carrier protein (ACP) during the acyltransfer reaction, the mechanism of ACP recognition by AT is not understood in detail. Herein, we report the crystal structure of AT VinK, which transfers a dipeptide group between two ACPs, VinL and VinP1LdACP, in vicenistatin biosynthesis. The isolated VinK structure showed a unique substrate-binding pocket for the dipeptide group linked to ACP. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of ACP recognition, we attempted to crystallize the VinK–ACP complexes. Because transient enzyme–ACP complexes are difficult to crystallize, we developed a covalent cross-linking strategy using a bifunctional maleimide reagent to trap the VinK–ACP complexes, allowing the determination of the crystal structure of the VinK–VinL complex. In the complex structure, Arg-153, Met-206, and Arg-299 of VinK interact with the negatively charged helix II region of VinL. The VinK–VinL complex structure allows, to our knowledge, the first visualization of the interaction between AT and ACP and provides detailed mechanistic insights into ACP recognition by AT. PMID:26831085

  2. Expression Cloning of a Pseudomonas Gene Encoding a Hydroxydecanoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein-Dependent UDP-GlcNAc Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Garry D.; Kaltashov, Igor A.; Cotter, Robert J.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    1998-01-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-3-O-acyltransferase (UDP-GlcNAc acyltransferase) catalyzes the first step of lipid A biosynthesis (M. S. Anderson and C. R. H. Raetz, J. Biol. Chem. 262:5159–5169, 1987). We here report the isolation of the lpxA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a library of Pseudomonas strain PAO1 expressed in Escherichia coli LE392 (J. Lightfoot and J. S. Lam, J. Bacteriol. 173:5624–5630, 1991). Pseudomonas lpxA encodes a 10-carbon-specific UDP-GlcNAc acyltransferase, whereas the E. coli transferase is selective for a 14-carbon acyl chain. Recombinant cosmid 1137 enabled production of a 3-hydroxydecanoyl-specific UDP-GlcNAc acyltransferase in E. coli. It was identified by assaying lysozyme-EDTA lysates of individual members of the library with 3-hydroxydecanoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) as the substrate. Cosmid 1137 contained a 20-kb insert of P. aeruginosa DNA. The lpxA gene region was localized to a 1.3-kb SalI-PstI fragment. Sequencing revealed that it contains one complete open reading frame (777 bp) encoding a new lpxA homolog. The predicted Pseudomonas LpxA is 258 amino acids long and contains 21 complete hexapeptide repeating units, spaced in approximately the same manner as the 24 repeats of E. coli LpxA. The P. aeruginosa UDP-GlcNAc acyltransferase is 54% identical and 67% similar to the E. coli enzyme. A plasmid (pGD3) containing the 1.3-kb SalI-PstI fragment complemented E. coli RO138, a temperature-sensitive mutant harboring lpxA2. LpxA assays of extracts of this construct indicated that it is >1,000-fold more selective for 3-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP than for 3-hydroxymyristoyl-ACP. Mass spectrometry of lipid A isolated from this strain by hydrolysis at pH 4.5 revealed [M-H]− 1,684.5 (versus 1,796.5 for wild-type lipid A), consistent with 3-hydroxydecanoate rather than 3-hydroxymyristate at positions 3 and 3′. PMID:9440522

  3. Feedback regulation of plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by 18:1-acyl carrier protein in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Carl; Haslam, Richard P.; Shanklin, John

    2012-01-01

    Plant seed oil represents a major renewable source of reduced carbon, but little is known about the biochemical regulation of its synthesis. The goal of this research was to identify potential feedback regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in Brassica napus embryo-derived cell cultures and to characterize both the feedback signals and enzymatic targets of the inhibition. Fatty acids delivered via Tween esters rapidly reduced the rate of fatty acid synthesis in a dose-dependent and reversible manner, demonstrating the existence of feedback inhibition in an oil-accumulating tissue. Tween feeding did not affect fatty acid elongation in the cytosol or the incorporation of radiolabeled malonate into nascent fatty acids, which together pinpoint plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) as the enzymatic target of feedback inhibition. To identify the signal responsible for feedback, a variety of Tween esters were tested for their effects on the rate of fatty acid synthesis. Maximum inhibition was achieved upon feeding oleic acid (18:1) Tween esters that resulted in the intracellular accumulation of 18:1 free fatty acid, 18:1-CoA, and 18:1-acyl-carrier protein (ACP). Direct, saturable inhibition of ACCase enzyme activity was observed in culture extracts and in extracts of developing canola seeds supplemented with 18:1-ACP at physiological concentrations. A mechanism for feedback inhibition is proposed in which reduced demand for de novo fatty acids results in the accumulation of 18:1-ACP, which directly inhibits plastidic ACCase, leading to reduced fatty acid synthesis. Defining this mechanism presents an opportunity for mitigating feedback inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in crop plants to increase oil yield. PMID:22665812

  4. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD). The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance.

  5. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD). The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance. PMID:25926841

  6. RhlA converts beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein intermediates in fatty acid synthesis to the beta-hydroxydecanoyl-beta-hydroxydecanoate component of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun; Rock, Charles O

    2008-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes a rhamnolipid (RL) surfactant that functions in hydrophobic nutrient uptake, swarming motility, and pathogenesis. We show that RhlA supplies the acyl moieties for RL biosynthesis by competing with the enzymes of the type II fatty acid synthase (FASII) cycle for the beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) pathway intermediates. Purified RhlA forms one molecule of beta-hydroxydecanoyl-beta-hydroxydecanoate from two molecules of beta-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP and is the only enzyme required to generate the lipid component of RL. The acyl groups in RL are primarily beta-hydroxydecanoyl, and in vitro, RhlA has a greater affinity for 10-carbon substrates, illustrating that RhlA functions as a molecular ruler that selectively extracts 10-carbon intermediates from FASII. Eliminating either FabA or FabI activity in P. aeruginosa increases RL production, illustrating that slowing down FASII allows RhlA to more-effectively compete for beta-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP. In Escherichia coli, the rate of fatty acid synthesis increases 1.3-fold when RhlA is expressed, to ensure the continued formation of fatty acids destined for membrane phospholipid even though 24% of the carbon entering FASII is diverted to RL synthesis. Previous studies have placed a ketoreductase, called RhlG, before RhlA in the RL biosynthetic pathway; however, our experiments show that RhlG has no role in RL biosynthesis. We conclude that RhlA is necessary and sufficient to form the acyl moiety of RL and that the flux of carbon through FASII accelerates to support RL production and maintain a supply of acyl chains for phospholipid synthesis.

  7. RhlA Converts β-Hydroxyacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Intermediates in Fatty Acid Synthesis to the β-Hydroxydecanoyl-β-Hydroxydecanoate Component of Rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kun; Rock, Charles O.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes a rhamnolipid (RL) surfactant that functions in hydrophobic nutrient uptake, swarming motility, and pathogenesis. We show that RhlA supplies the acyl moieties for RL biosynthesis by competing with the enzymes of the type II fatty acid synthase (FASII) cycle for the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) pathway intermediates. Purified RhlA forms one molecule of β-hydroxydecanoyl-β-hydroxydecanoate from two molecules of β-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP and is the only enzyme required to generate the lipid component of RL. The acyl groups in RL are primarily β-hydroxydecanoyl, and in vitro, RhlA has a greater affinity for 10-carbon substrates, illustrating that RhlA functions as a molecular ruler that selectively extracts 10-carbon intermediates from FASII. Eliminating either FabA or FabI activity in P. aeruginosa increases RL production, illustrating that slowing down FASII allows RhlA to more-effectively compete for β-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP. In Escherichia coli, the rate of fatty acid synthesis increases 1.3-fold when RhlA is expressed, to ensure the continued formation of fatty acids destined for membrane phospholipid even though 24% of the carbon entering FASII is diverted to RL synthesis. Previous studies have placed a ketoreductase, called RhlG, before RhlA in the RL biosynthetic pathway; however, our experiments show that RhlG has no role in RL biosynthesis. We conclude that RhlA is necessary and sufficient to form the acyl moiety of RL and that the flux of carbon through FASII accelerates to support RL production and maintain a supply of acyl chains for phospholipid synthesis. PMID:18326581

  8. Dissecting the Structural Elements for the Activation of β-Ketoacyl-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Osinski, Tomasz; Demas, Matt; Grimshaw, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase (FabG) catalyzes the key reductive reaction in the elongation cycle of fatty acid synthesis (FAS), which is a vital metabolic pathway in bacteria and a promising target for new antibiotic development. The activation of the enzyme is usually linked to the formation of a catalytic triad and cofactor binding, and crystal structures of FabG from different organisms have been captured in either the active or inactive conformation. However, the structural elements which enable activation of FabG require further exploration. Here we report the findings of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of the FabG protein found in the causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). vcFabG exists predominantly as a dimer in solution and is able to self-associate to form tetramers, which is the state seen in the crystal structure. The formation of the tetramer may be promoted by the presence of the cofactor NADP(H). The transition between the dimeric and tetrameric states of vcFabG is related to changes in the conformations of the α4/α5 helices on the dimer-dimer interface. Two glycine residues adjacent to the dimer interface (G92 and G141) are identified to be the hinge for the conformational changes, while the catalytic tyrosine (Y155) and a glutamine residue that forms hydrogen bonds to both loop β4-α4 and loop β5-α5 (Q152) stabilize the active conformation. The functions of the aforementioned residues were confirmed by binding and enzymatic assays for the corresponding mutants. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the results of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of FabG from Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). In this work, we dissected the structural elements responsible for the activation of vcFabG. The structural information provided here is essential for the development of antibiotics specifically targeting bacterial FabG, especially for the multidrug-resistant strains of V. cholerae. PMID:26553852

  9. Discovery of a novel and potent class of F. tularensis enoyl-reductase (FabI) inhibitors by molecular shape and electrostatic matching

    PubMed Central

    Hevener, Kirk E.; Mehboob, Shahila; Su, Pin-Chih; Truong, Kent; Boci, Teuta; Deng, Jiangping; Ghassemi, Mahmood; Cook, James L.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase, FabI, is a key enzyme in the bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (FAS II). FabI is an NADH-dependent oxidoreductase that acts to reduce enoyl-ACP substrates in a final step of the pathway. The absence of this enzyme in humans makes it an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. FabI is known to be unresponsive to structure-based design efforts due to a high degree of induced fit and a mobile flexible loop encompassing the active site. Here we discuss the development, validation, and careful application of a ligand-based virtual screen used for the identification of novel inhibitors of the Francisella tularensis FabI target. In this study, four known classes of FabI inhibitors were used as templates for virtual screens that involved molecular shape and electrostatic matching. The program ROCS was used to search a high-throughput screening library for compounds that matched any of the four molecular shape queries. Matching compounds were further refined using the program EON, which compares and scores compounds by matching electrostatic properties. Using these techniques, 50 compounds were selected, ordered, and tested. The tested compounds possessed novel chemical scaffolds when compared to the input query compounds. Several hits with low micromolar activity were identified and follow-up scaffold-based searches resulted in the identification of a lead series with sub-micromolar enzyme inhibition, high ligand efficiency, and a novel scaffold. Additionally, one of the most active compounds showed promising whole-cell antibacterial activity against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative species, including the target pathogen. The results of a preliminary structure-activity relationship analysis are presented. PMID:22098466

  10. Discovery of a novel and potent class of F. tularensis enoyl-reductase (FabI) inhibitors by molecular shape and electrostatic matching.

    PubMed

    Hevener, Kirk E; Mehboob, Shahila; Su, Pin-Chih; Truong, Kent; Boci, Teuta; Deng, Jiangping; Ghassemi, Mahmood; Cook, James L; Johnson, Michael E

    2012-01-12

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase, FabI, is a key enzyme in the bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (FAS II). FabI is an NADH-dependent oxidoreductase that acts to reduce enoyl-ACP substrates in a final step of the pathway. The absence of this enzyme in humans makes it an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. FabI is known to be unresponsive to structure-based design efforts due to a high degree of induced fit and a mobile flexible loop encompassing the active site. Here we discuss the development, validation, and careful application of a ligand-based virtual screen used for the identification of novel inhibitors of the Francisella tularensis FabI target. In this study, four known classes of FabI inhibitors were used as templates for virtual screens that involved molecular shape and electrostatic matching. The program ROCS was used to search a high-throughput screening library for compounds that matched any of the four molecular shape queries. Matching compounds were further refined using the program EON, which compares and scores compounds by matching electrostatic properties. Using these techniques, 50 compounds were selected, ordered, and tested. The tested compounds possessed novel chemical scaffolds when compared to the input query compounds. Several hits with low micromolar activity were identified and follow-up scaffold-based searches resulted in the identification of a lead series with submicromolar enzyme inhibition, high ligand efficiency, and a novel scaffold. Additionally, one of the most active compounds showed promising whole-cell antibacterial activity against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative species, including the target pathogen. The results of a preliminary structure-activity relationship analysis are presented.

  11. Functional expression of an acyl carrier protein (ACP) from Azospirillum brasilense alters fatty acid profiles in Escherichia coli and Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Jha, Jyoti K; Sinha, Saheli; Maiti, Mrinal K; Basu, Asitava; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal K; Sen, Soumitra K

    2007-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a central cofactor for de novo fatty acid synthesis, acyl chain modification and chain-length termination during lipid biosynthesis in living organisms. Although the structural and functional organization of the ACPs in bacteria and plant are highly conserved, the individual ACP is engaged in the generation of sets of signature fatty acids required for specific purpose in bacterial cells and plant tissues. Realizing the fact that the bacterial ACP being originated early in molecular evolution is characteristically different from the plant's counterpart, we explored the property of an ACP from Azospirillum brasilense (Ab), a plant-associative aerobic bacterium, to find its role in changing the fatty acid profile in heterologous systems. Functional expression of Ab-ACP in Escherichia coli, an enteric bacterium, and Brassica juncea, an oil-seed crop plant, altered the fatty acid composition having predominantly 18-carbon acyl pool, reflecting the intrinsic nature of the ACP from A. brasilense which usually has C18:1 rich membrane lipid. In transgenic Brassica the prime increment was found for C18:3 in leaves; and C18:1 and C8:2 in seeds. Interestingly, the seed oil quality of the transgenic Brassica potentially improved for edible purposes, particularly with respect to the enhancement in the ratio of monounsaturated (C18:1)/saturated fatty acids, increment in the ratio of linoleic (C18:2)/linolenic (C18:3) and reduction of erucic acid (C22:1).

  12. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of malonyl-CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase (FabD) from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Wook; Natarajan, Sampath; Kim, Hyesoon; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2008-12-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight in rice, which is one of the most devastating diseases in rice-cultivating countries. The Xoo0880 (fabD) gene coding for a malonyl-CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT) from Xoo was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. MCAT is an essential enzyme that catalyzes a key reaction of fatty-acid synthesis in bacteria and plants: the conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-acyl carrier protein. The FabD enzyme was purified and crystallized in order to elucidate its three-dimensional structure and to determine its enzymatic reaction mechanism and biological importance. The crystal obtained diffracted to 1.9 A resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 41.4, b = 74.6, c = 98.5 A. According to Matthews coefficient calculations, the crystallographic structure contains only one monomeric unit in the asymmetric unit with a V(M) of 2.21 A(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 44.3%.

  13. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Initiated by the FabY Class of β-Ketoacyl Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Sachdeva, Meena; Leeds, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    The prototypical type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway in bacteria utilizes two distinct classes of β-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) domains to assemble long-chain fatty acids, the KASIII domain for initiation and the KASI/II domain for elongation. The central role of FAS in bacterial viability and virulence has stimulated significant effort toward developing KAS inhibitors, particularly against the KASIII domain of the β-acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase FabH. Herein, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not utilize a FabH ortholog but rather a new class of divergent KAS I/II enzymes to initiate the FAS pathway. When a P. aeruginosa cosmid library was used to rescue growth in a fabH downregulated strain of Escherichia coli, a single unannotated open reading frame, PA5174, complemented fabH depletion. While deletion of all four KASIII domain-encoding genes in the same P. aeruginosa strain resulted in a wild-type growth phenotype, deletion of PA5174 alone specifically attenuated growth due to a defect in de novo FAS. Siderophore secretion and quorum-sensing signaling, particularly in the rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems, was significantly muted in the absence of PA5174. The defect could be repaired by intergeneric complementation with E. coli fabH. Characterization of recombinant PA5174 confirmed a preference for short-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates, supporting the identification of PA5174 as the predominant enzyme catalyzing the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A with malonyl-ACP in P. aeruginosa. The identification of the functional role for PA5174 in FAS defines the new FabY class of β-ketoacyl synthase KASI/II domain condensation enzymes. PMID:22753059

  14. Lactococcus lactis fabH, Encoding β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase, Can Be Functionally Replaced by the Plasmodium falciparum Congener▿

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yu; Gisselberg, Jolyn E.; Johnson, Jacob D.; Lee, Patricia J.; Prigge, Sean T.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, in addition to scavenging essential fatty acids from its intra- and intercellular environments, possesses a functional complement of type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) enzymes targeted to the apicoplast organelle. Recent evidence suggests that products of the plasmodial FAS II system may be critical for the parasite's liver-to-blood cycle transition, and it has been speculated that endogenously generated fatty acids may be precursors for essential cofactors, such as lipoate, in the apicoplast. β-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III (pfKASIII or FabH) is one of the key enzymes in the initiating steps of the FAS II pathway, possessing two functions in P. falciparum: the decarboxylative thio-Claisen condensation of malonyl-ACP and various acyl coenzymes A (acyl-CoAs; KAS activity) and the acetyl-CoA:ACP transacylase reaction (ACAT). Here, we report the generation and characterization of a hybrid Lactococcus lactis strain that translates pfKASIII instead of L. lactis fabH to initiate fatty acid biosynthesis. The L. lactis expression vector pMG36e was modified for the efficient overexpression of the plasmodial gene in L. lactis. Transcriptional analysis indicated high-efficiency overexpression, and biochemical KAS and ACAT assays confirm these activities in cell extracts. Phenotypically, the L. lactis strain expressing pfKASIII has a growth rate and fatty acid profiles that are comparable to those of the strain complemented with its endogenous gene, suggesting that pfKASIII can use L. lactis ACP as substrate and perform near-normal function in L. lactis cells. This strain may have potential application as a bacterial model for pfKASIII inhibitor prescreening. PMID:20418430

  15. Solution Structure of 4'-Phosphopantetheine - GmACP3 from Geobacter Metallireducens: A Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein with Atypical Structural Features and a Putative Role in Lipopolysaccharide Biosyntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Smola, Matthew J.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Hamilton, Keith; Acton, Thomas; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2011-03-08

    GmACP3 from Geobacter metallireducens is a specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP) whose gene, gmet_2339, is located near genes encoding many proteins involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, indicating a likely function for GmACP3 in LPS production. By overexpression in Escherichia coli, about 50% holo-GmACP3 and 50% apo-GmACP3 were obtained. Apo-GmACP3 exhibited slow precipitation and non-monomeric behavior by 15NNMRrelaxation measurements. Addition of 4'-phosphopantetheine (4'-PP) via enzymatic conversion by E. coli holo-ACP synthase resulted in stable >95% holo-GmACP3 that was characterized as monomeric by 15N relaxation measurements and had no indication of conformational exchange. We have determined a high-resolution solution structure of holo-GmACP3 by standard NMR methods, including refinement with two sets of NH residual dipolar couplings, allowing for a detailed structural analysis of the interactions between 4'-PP and GmACP3. Whereas the overall four helix bundle topology is similar to previously solved ACP structures, this structure has unique characteristics, including an ordered 4'-PP conformation that places the thiol at the entrance to a central hydrophobic cavity near a conserved hydrogen-bonded Trp-His pair. These residues are part of a conservedWDSLxH/N motif found in GmACP3 and its orthologs. The helix locations and the large hydrophobic cavity are more similar tomediumand long-chain acyl-ACPs than to other apo- and holo-ACP structures. Taken together, structural characterization along with bioinformatic analysis of nearby genes suggests that GmACP3 is involved in lipid A acylation, possibly by atypical long-chain hydroxy fatty acids, and potentially is involved in synthesis of secondary metabolites.

  16. Characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Gene Cluster: Purification of Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) and Malonyl-Coenzyme A:ACP Transacylase (FabD)

    PubMed Central

    Kutchma, Alecksandr J.; Hoang, Tung T.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    1999-01-01

    A DNA fragment containing the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fabD (encoding malonyl-coenzyme A [CoA]:acyl carrier protein [ACP] transacylase), fabG (encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase), acpP (encoding ACP), and fabF (encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II) genes was cloned and sequenced. This fab gene cluster is delimited by the plsX (encoding a poorly understood enzyme of phospholipid metabolism) and pabC (encoding 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase) genes; the fabF and pabC genes seem to be translationally coupled. The fabH gene (encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III), which in most gram-negative bacteria is located between plsX and fabD, is absent from this gene cluster. A chromosomal temperature-sensitive fabD mutant was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis that resulted in a W258Q change. A chromosomal fabF insertion mutant was generated, and the resulting mutant strain contained substantially reduced levels of cis-vaccenic acid. Multiple attempts aimed at disruption of the chromosomal fabG gene were unsuccessful. We purified FabD as a hexahistidine fusion protein (H6-FabD) and ACP in its native form via an ACP-intein-chitin binding domain fusion protein, using a novel expression and purification scheme that should be applicable to ACP from other bacteria. Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization spectroscopy, native polyacrylamide electrophoresis, and amino-terminal sequencing revealed that (i) most of the purified ACP was properly modified with its 4′-phosphopantetheine functional group, (ii) it was not acylated, and (iii) the amino-terminal methionine was removed. In an in vitro system, purified ACP functioned as acyl acceptor and H6-FabD exhibited malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase activity. PMID:10464226

  17. Neutralization of acidic residues in helix II stabilizes the folded conformation of acyl carrier protein and variably alters its function with different enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2007-02-16

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small protein essential for bacterial growth and pathogenesis, interacts with diverse enzymes during the biosynthesis of fatty acids, phospholipids, and other specialized products such as lipid A. NMR and hydrodynamic studies have previously shown that divalent cations stabilize native helical ACP conformation by binding to conserved acidic residues at two sites (A and B) at either end of the "recognition" helix II. To examine the roles of these amino acids in ACP structure and function, site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace individual site A (Asp-30, Asp-35, Asp-38) and site B (Glu-47, Glu-53, Asp-56) residues in recombinant Vibrio harveyi ACP with the corresponding amides, along with combined mutations at each site (SA, SB) or both sites (SA/SB). Like native V. harveyi ACP, all individual mutants were unfolded at neutral pH but adopted a helical conformation in the presence of millimolar Mg(2+) or upon fatty acylation. Mg(2+) binding to sites A or B independently stabilized native ACP conformation, whereas mutant SA/SB was folded in the absence of Mg(2+), suggesting that charge neutralization is largely responsible for ACP stabilization by divalent cations. Asp-35 in site A was critical for holo-ACP synthase activity, while acyl-ACP synthetase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA) activities were more affected by mutations in site B. Both sites were required for fatty acid synthase activity. Overall, our results indicate that divalent cation binding site mutations have predicted effects on ACP conformation but unpredicted and variable consequences on ACP function with different enzymes.

  18. The LYR protein subunit NB4M/NDUFA6 of mitochondrial complex I anchors an acyl carrier protein and is essential for catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Angerer, Heike; Radermacher, Michael; Mańkowska, Michalina; Steger, Mirco; Zwicker, Klaus; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Brandt, Ulrich; Zickermann, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest and most complicated enzyme of the oxidative phosphorylation system. It comprises a number of so-called accessory subunits of largely unknown structure and function. Here we studied subunit NB4M [NDUFA6, LYR motif containing protein 6 (LYRM6)], a member of the LYRM family of proteins. Chromosomal deletion of the corresponding gene in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica caused concomitant loss of the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein subunit ACPM1 from the enzyme complex and paralyzed ubiquinone reductase activity. Exchanging the LYR motif and an associated conserved phenylalanine by alanines in subunit NB4M also abolished the activity and binding of subunit ACPM1. We show, by single-particle electron microscopy and structural modeling, that subunits NB4M and ACPM1 form a subdomain that protrudes from the peripheral arm in the vicinity of central subunit domains known to be involved in controlling the catalytic activity of complex I. PMID:24706851

  19. The BioC O-Methyltransferase Catalyzes Methyl Esterification of Malonyl-Acyl Carrier Protein, an Essential Step in Biotin Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Steven; Cronan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work implicated the Escherichia coli BioC protein as the initiator of the synthetic pathway that forms the pimeloyl moiety of biotin (Lin, S., Hanson, R. E., and Cronan, J. E. (2010) Nat. Chem. Biol. 6, 682–688). BioC was believed to be an O-methyltransferase that methylated the free carboxyl of either malonyl-CoA or malonyl-acyl carrier protein based on the ability of O-methylated (but not unmethylated) precursors to bypass the BioC requirement for biotin synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. However, only indirect proof of the hypothesized enzymatic activity was obtained because the activities of the available BioC preparations were too low for direct enzymatic assay. Because E. coli BioC protein was extremely recalcitrant to purification in an active form, BioC homologues of other bacteria were tested. We report that the native form of Bacillus cereus ATCC10987 BioC functionally replaced E. coli BioC in vivo, and the protein could be expressed in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. In disagreement with prior scenarios that favored malonyl-CoA as the methyl acceptor, malonyl-acyl carrier protein was a far better acceptor of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-l-methionine than was malonyl-CoA. BioC was specific for the malonyl moiety and was inhibited by S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and sinefungin. High level expression of B. cereus BioC in E. coli blocked cell growth and fatty acid synthesis. PMID:22965231

  20. Docking studies of flavonoid compounds as inhibitors of β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase I (Kas I) of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Ghalia; Berakdar, Noura

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of many common bacterial infections, including cholecystitis, bacteremia, cholangitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), traveler's diarrhea and other clinical infections such as neonatal meningitis and pneumonia. The fatty acid biosynthesis is essential for the bacterial viability and growth. There are three types of β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) which are important for overcoming the bacterial resistance problem. β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase I (KAS I) is member of the condensing enzyme family, which is a key catalyst in bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus an attractive target for novel antibioticsis related to the elongation of unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial fatty acid synthesis and can be a good therapeutic target of designing novel antibiotics. In this report, we performed docking study of E. coli (KAS I) and 50 flavonoids. Out of these 50 flavonoids, there are two compounds, genistein and isorhamnetin, that showed the superior binding energy while fully satisfying the conditions of drug likeliness. The predicted binding energy of genistein and isorhamnetin toward KAS I are -135.76kcal/mol and -132.42kcal/mol, respectively. These energies favorably compare to the biding energy of known drugs thiolactomicin and cerulenin that are -90.26kcal/mol and -99.64kcal/mol, respectively. The method used was docking with the selected E. coli (KAS I-PDB ID-1FJ4) using iGemdock. This was also found to obey the Lipinski's guidelines of five and to show the drug likeliness and bioavailability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Triclosan Resistance in a Bacterial Fish Pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, is Mediated by an Enoyl Reductase, FabV.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raees; Lee, Myung Hwan; Joo, Hae-Jin; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Ahmad, Shabir; Choi, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan, the widely used biocide, specifically targets enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis system. Although the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida exhibits triclosan resistance, the nature of this resistance has not been elucidated. Here, we aimed to characterize the triclosan resistance of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida causing furunculosis. The fosmid library of triclosan-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida was constructed to select a fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance. With the fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance, a subsequent secondary library search resulted in the selection of subclone pTSR-1. DNA sequence analysis of pTSR-1 revealed the presence of a chromosomal-borne fabV-encoding ENR homolog. The ENR of A. salmonicida (FabVas) exhibited significant homology with previously known FabV, including the catalytic domain YX(8)K. fabVas introduction into E. coli dramatically increased its resistance to triclosan. Heterologous expression of FabVas might functionally replace the triclosan-sensitive FabI in vivo to confer E. coli with triclosan resistance. A genome-wide search for fabVas homologs revealed the presence of an additional fabV gene (fabVas2) paralog in A. salmonicida strains and the fabVas orthologs from other gram-negative fish pathogens. Both of the potential FabV ENRs expressed similarly with or without triclosan supplement. This is the first report about the presence of two potential FabV ENRs in a single pathogenic bacterium. Our result suggests that triclosan-resistant ENRs are widely distributed in various bacteria in nature, and the wide use of this biocide can spread these triclosan-tolerant ENRs among fish pathogens and other pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Evolution of Acyl-Substrate Recognition by a Family of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Quin H.; Brecht, Ryan M.; Dudekula, Dastagiri; Greenberg, E. Peter; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Members of the LuxI protein family catalyze synthesis of acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing signals from S-adenosyl-L-methionine and an acyl thioester. Some LuxI family members prefer acyl-CoA, and others prefer acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) as the acyl-thioester substrate. We sought to understand the evolutionary history and mechanisms mediating this substrate preference. Our phylogenetic and motif analysis of the LuxI acyl-HSL synthase family indicates that the acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes evolved from an acyl-ACP-utilizing ancestor. To further understand how acyl-ACPs and acyl-CoAs are recognized by acyl-HSL synthases we studied BmaI1, an octanoyl-ACP-dependent LuxI family member from Burkholderia mallei, and BjaI, an isovaleryl-CoA-dependent LuxI family member from Bradyrhizobium japonicum. We synthesized thioether analogs of their thioester acyl-substrates to probe recognition of the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety common to both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA substrates. The kinetics of catalysis and inhibition of these enzymes indicate that they recognize the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety and they recognize non-preferred substrates with this moiety. We find that CoA substrate utilization arose through exaptation of acyl-phosphopantetheine recognition in this enzyme family. PMID:25401334

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Acyl Carrier Protein Crystal Structures in Disulfide-linked and Reduced States and their Prevalence during Blood Stage Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, John R.; Prigge, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) has a single reactive sulfhydryl necessary for function in covalently binding nascent fatty acids during biosynthesis. In Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria, fatty acid biosynthesis occurs in the apicoplast organelle during the liver stage of the parasite life cycle. During the blood stage, fatty acid biosynthesis is inactive and the redox state of the apicoplast has not been determined. We solved the crystal structure of ACP from P. falciparum in reduced and disulfide-linked forms, and observe the surprising result that the disulfide in the PfACP cross-linked dimer is sequestered from bulk solvent in a tight molecular interface. We assessed solvent accessibility of the disulfide with small molecule reducing agents and found that the disulfide is protected from BME but less so for other common reducing agents. We examined cultured P. falciparum parasites to determine which form of PfACP is prevalent during the blood stages. We readily detected monomeric PfACP in parasite lysate, but do not observe the disulfide-linked form, even under conditions of oxidative stress. To demonstrate that PfACP contains a free sulfhydryl and is not acylated or in the apo state, we treated blood stage parasites with the disulfide forming reagent diamide. We found that the effects of diamide are reversed with reducing agent. Together, these results suggest that the apicoplast is a reducing compartment, as suggested by models of P. falciparum metabolism, and that PfACP is maintained in a reduced state during blood stage growth. PMID:19768685

  4. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III Activity Is Inhibited by Phosphorylation on a Single Threonine Residue*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Molle, Virginie; Taylor, Rebecca C.; Brown, Alistair K.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Fütterer, Klaus; Kremer, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Mycolic acids are hallmark features of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. They are synthesized by the condensation of two fatty acids, a C56-64-meromycolyl chain and a C24-26-fatty acyl chain. Meromycolates are produced via the combination of type I and type II fatty acid synthases (FAS-I and FAS-II). The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-ACP. Because mtFabH represents a potential regulatory key point of the mycolic acid pathway, we investigated the hypothesis that phosphorylation of mtFabH controls its activity. Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently emerged as a major physiological mechanism of regulation in prokaryotes. We demonstrate here that mtFabH was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by several mycobacterial STPKs, particularly by PknF and PknA, as well as in vivo in mycobacteria. Analysis of the phosphoamino acid content indicated that mtFabH was phosphorylated exclusively on threonine residues. Mass spectrometry analyses using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry identified Thr45 as the unique phosphoacceptor. This was further supported by complete loss of PknF- or PknA-dependent phosphorylation of a mtFabH mutant. Mapping Thr45 on the crystal structure of mtFabH illustrates that this residue is located at the entrance of the substrate channel, suggesting that the phosphate group may alter accessibility of the substrate and thus affect mtFabH enzymatic activity. A T45D mutant of mtFabH, designed to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, exhibited markedly decreased transacylation, malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation, and condensing activities compared with the wild-type protein or the T45A mutant. Together, these findings not only represent the first demonstration of phosphorylation of a β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III enzyme but also indicate that phosphorylation of mt

  5. Structure of a Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein Essential for Lipid A Biosynthesis with Very Long-chain Fatty Acids in Open and Closed Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rossi, Paolo M.; Forouhar, Farhad; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Yunhuang; Ni, Shuisong; Unser, Sarah; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-09-18

    The solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures and backbone (15)N dynamics of the specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP), RpAcpXL, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in both the apo form and holo form modified by covalent attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine at S37, are virtually identical, monomeric, and correspond to the closed conformation. The structures have an extra α-helix compared to the archetypical ACP from Escherichia coli, which has four helices, resulting in a larger opening to the hydrophobic cavity. Chemical shift differences between apo- and holo-RpAcpXL indicated some differences in the hinge region between α2 and α3 and in the hydrophobic cavity environment, but corresponding changes in nuclear Overhauser effect cross-peak patterns were not detected. In contrast to the NMR structures, apo-RpAcpXL was observed in an open conformation in crystals that diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, which resulted from movement of α3. On the basis of the crystal structure, the predicted biological assembly is a homodimer. Although the possible biological significance of dimerization is unknown, there is potential that the resulting large shared hydrophobic cavity could accommodate the very long-chain fatty acid (28-30 carbons) that this specialized ACP is known to synthesize and transfer to lipid A. These structures are the first representatives of the AcpXL family and the first to indicate that dimerization may be important for the function of these specialized ACPs.

  6. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis : Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies

    DOE PAGES

    McGillick, Brian E.; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; ...

    2016-01-28

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. Coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, this makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. In addition, we havemore » discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Our results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency.« less

  7. Identification of a malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase and its regulatory role in fatty acid biosynthesis in oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Wen; Liu, Wan-Jun; Hu, Dong-Xiong; Wang, Xiang; Balamurugan, Srinivasan; Alimujiang, Adili; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2016-08-30

    Oleaginous microalgae hold great promises for biofuel production. However, commercialization of microalgal biofuels remains impracticable due to lack of suitable industrial strain with high growth rate and lipid productivity. Engineering of metabolic pathways is a potential strategy for the improvement of microalgal strains for the production of lipids and also value-added products in microalgae. Malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT) has been reported to be involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. Here, we identified a putative MCAT in the oleaginous marine microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica. NoMCAT-overexpressing N. oceanica showed higher growth rate and photosynthetic efficiency. The neutral lipid content of engineered lines showed a significant increase by up to 31% compared to wild type. GC-MS analysis revealed that NoMCAT overexpression significantly altered the fatty acid composition. The composition of EPA (C20:5) increased by 8%, which is a polyunsaturated fatty acid necessary for animal nutrition. These results demonstrate the role of MCAT in enhancing fatty acid biosynthesis and growth in microalgae, and also provide an insight into metabolic engineering of microalgae with high industrial potential. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  9. Primary structures of the precursor and mature forms of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from safflower embryos and requirement of ferredoxin for enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, G A; Scherer, D E; Foxall-Van Aken, S; Kenny, J W; Young, H L; Shintani, D K; Kridl, J C; Knauf, V C

    1991-01-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6) catalyzes the principal conversion of saturated fatty acids to unsaturated fatty acids in the synthesis of vegetable oils. Stearoyl-ACP desaturase was purified from developing embryos of safflower seed, and extensive amino acid sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence was used in conjunction with polymerase chain reactions to clone a full-length cDNA. The primary structure of the protein, as deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA, includes a 33-amino-acid transit peptide not found in the purified enzyme. Expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding the mature form of stearoyl-ACP desaturase did not result in an altered fatty acid composition. However, active enzyme was detected when assayed in vitro with added spinach ferredoxin. The lack of significant activity in vitro without added ferredoxin and the lack of observed change in fatty acid composition indicate that ferredoxin is a required cofactor for the enzyme and that E. coli ferredoxin functions poorly, if at all, as an electron donor for the plant enzyme. Images PMID:2006194

  10. Defective Pollen Wall Is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Tan, Hexin; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Yuanyun; Liang, Wanqi; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Wang, Yujiong; Kai, Guoying; Shanklin, John; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-01-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots. PMID:21705642

  11. A missense mutation in the fabB (beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I) gene confers tiolactomycin resistance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Suzanne; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Price, Allen C; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2002-05-01

    Thiolactomycin (TLM) is an antibiotic that inhibits bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis at the condensing enzyme step, and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I (FabB) is the relevant target in Escherichia coli. TLM resistance is associated with the upregulation of efflux pumps. Therefore, a tolC knockout mutant (strain ANS1) was constructed to eliminate the contribution of type I secretion systems to TLM resistance. Six independent TLM-resistant clones of strain ANS1 were isolated, and all possessed the same missense mutation in the fabB gene (T1168G) that directed the expression of a mutant protein, FabB(F390V). FabB(F390V) was resistant to TLM in vitro. Leucine is the only other amino acid found at position 390 in nature, and the Staphylococcus aureus FabF protein, which contains this substitution, was sensitive to TLM. Structural modeling predicted that the CG2 methyl group of the valine side chain interfered with the positioning of the C11 methyl on the isoprenoid side chain of TLM in the binary complex, whereas the absence of a bulky methyl group on the leucine side chain permitted TLM binding. These data illustrate that missense mutations that introduce valine at position 390 confer TLM resistance while maintaining the vital catalytic properties of FabB.

  12. 3-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is not similar to other condensing enzymes of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, H; Jaworski, J G

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding spinach (Spinacia oleracea) 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (KAS III), which catalyzes the initial condensing reaction in fatty acid biosynthesis, was isolated. Based on the amino acid sequence of tryptic digests of purified spinach KAS III, degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed and used to amplify a 612-bp fragment from first-strand cDNA of spinach leaf RNA. A root cDNA library was probed with the PCR fragment, and a 1920-bp clone was isolated. Its deduced amino acid sequence matched the sequences of the tryptic digests obtained from the purified KAS III. Northern analysis confirmed that it was expressed in both leaf and root. The clone contained a 1218-bp open reading frame coding for 405 amino acids. The identity of the clone was confirmed by expression in Escherichia coli BL 21 as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. The deduced amino acid sequence was 48 and 45% identical with the putative KAS III of Porphyra umbilicalis and KAS III of E. coli, respectively. It also had a strong local homology to the plant chalcone synthases but had little homology with other KAS isoforms from plants, bacteria, or animals. PMID:8290632

  13. Toward production of jet fuel functionality in oilseeds: Identification of FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases and evaluation of combinatorial expression strategies in Camelina seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E.; Vu, Hieu Sy; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Nam, Jeong -Won; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2015-05-11

    Seeds of members of the genus Cuphea accumulate medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs; 8:0–14:0). MCFA- and palmitic acid- (16:0) rich vegetable oils have received attention for jet fuel production, given their similarity in chain length to Jet A fuel hydrocarbons. Studies were conducted to test genes, including those from Cuphea, for their ability to confer jet fuel-type fatty acid accumulation in seed oil of the emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa. Transcriptomes from Cuphea viscosissima and Cuphea pulcherrima developing seeds that accumulate >90% of C8 and C10 fatty acids revealed three FatB cDNAs (CpuFatB3, CvFatB1, and CpuFatB4) expressed predominantly in seeds and structurally divergent from typical FatB thioesterases that release 16:0 from acyl carrier protein (ACP). Expression of CpuFatB3 and CvFatB1 resulted in Camelina oil with capric acid (10:0), and CpuFatB4 expression conferred myristic acid (14:0) production and increased 16:0. Co-expression of combinations of previously characterized Cuphea and California bay FatBs produced Camelina oils with mixtures of C8–C16 fatty acids, but amounts of each fatty acid were less than obtained by expression of individual FatB cDNAs. Increases in lauric acid (12:0) and 14:0, but not 10:0, in Camelina oil and at the sn-2 position of triacylglycerols resulted from inclusion of a coconut lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase specialized for MCFAs. RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of Camelina β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, however, reduced 12:0 in seeds expressing a 12:0-ACP-specific FatB. Here, Camelina lines presented here provide platforms for additional metabolic engineering targeting fatty acid synthase and specialized acyltransferases for achieving oils with high levels of jet fuel-type fatty acids.

  14. Modification of Brassica napus seed oil by expression of the Escherichia coli fabH gene, encoding 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III.

    PubMed

    Verwoert, I I; van der Linden, K H; Walsh, M C; Nijkamp, H J; Stuitje, A R

    1995-03-01

    The Escherichia coli fabH gene encoding 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (KAS III) was isolated and the effect of overproduction of bacterial KAS III was compared in both E. coli and Brassica napus. The change in fatty acid profile of E. coli was essentially the same as that reported by Tsay et al. (J Biol Chem 267 (1992) 6807-6814), namely higher C14:0 and lower C18:1 levels. In our study, however, an arrest of cell growth was also observed. This and other evidence suggests that in E. coli the accumulation of C14:0 may not be a direct effect of the KAS III overexpression, but a general metabolic consequence of the arrest of cell division. Bacterial KAS III was expressed in a seed- and developmentally specific manner in B. napus in either cytoplasm or plastid. Significant increases in KAS III activities were observed in both these transformation groups, up to 3.7 times the endogenous KAS III activity in mature seeds. Only the expression of the plastid-targeted KAS III gene, however, affected the fatty acid profile of the storage lipids, such that decreased amounts of C18:1 and increased amounts of C18:2 and C18:3 were observed as compared to control plants. Such changes in fatty acid composition reflect changes in the regulation and control of fatty acid biosynthesis. We propose that fatty acid biosynthesis is not controlled by one rate-limiting enzyme, such as acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but rather is shared by a number of component enzymes of the fatty acid biosynthetic machinery.

  15. The stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase promoter (Des) from oil palm confers fruit-specific GUS expression in transgenic tomato.

    PubMed

    Saed Taha, Rima; Ismail, Ismanizan; Zainal, Zamri; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar

    2012-09-01

    The stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase is a plastid-localized enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyl-ACP and plays an important role in the determination of the properties of the majority of cellular glycerolipids. Functional characterization of the fatty acid desaturase genes and their specific promoters is a prerequisite for altering the composition of unsaturated fatty acids of palm oil by genetic engineering. In this paper, the specificity and strength of the oil palm stearoyl-ACP desaturase gene promoter (Des) was evaluated in transgenic tomato plants. Transcriptional fusions between 5' deletions of the Des promoter (Des1-4) and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were generated and their expression analyzed in different tissues of stably transformed tomato plants. Histochemical analysis of the Des promoter deletion series revealed that GUS gene expression was confined to the tomato fruits. No expression was detected in vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants. The highest levels of GUS activity was observed in different tissues of ripe red fruits (vascular tissue, septa, endocarp, mesocarp and columella) and in seeds, which harbored the promoter region located between -590 and +10. A comparison of the promoter-deletion constructs showed that the Des4 promoter deletion (314bp) produced a markedly low level of GUS expression in fruits and seeds. Fluorometric analysis of the GUS activity revealed a 4-fold increase in the activity of the full-length Des promoter compared to the CaMV35S promoter. RNA-hybridization analyses provided additional evidence of increased GUS expression in fruits driven by a Des fragment. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of the Des promoter as a tool for the genetic engineering of oil palms and other species, including dicots, in improving the quality and nutritional value of the fruits.

  16. Rhizobial acyl carrier proteins and their roles in the formation of bacterial cell-surface components that are required for the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules on legume hosts.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Otto; López-Lara, Isabel M

    2002-03-05

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) of Escherichia coli is a small acidic protein which functions as carrier of growing acyl chains during their biosynthesis and as donor of acyl chains during transfer to target molecules. This unique ACP of E. coli is expressed constitutively. In more complex bacteria, multiple ACPs are present, indicating a channeling of pools of multi-carbon units into different biosynthetic routes. In rhizobia, for example, besides the constitutive ACP (AcpP) involved in the biosynthesis and transfer of common fatty acids, three specialized ACPs have been reported: (1) the flavonoid-inducible nodulation protein NodF, (2) AcpXL that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to a sugar backbone during lipid A biosynthesis, and (3) the RkpF protein which is required for the biosynthesis of rhizobial capsular polysaccharides. All three of those specialized rhizobial ACPs are required for the biosynthesis of cell-surface molecules that play a role in establishing the symbiotic relationship between rhizobia and their legume hosts. Surprisingly, the recently sequenced genomes from Mesorhizobium loti and Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest even more candidates for ACPs in rhizobia.

  17. Enzymes involved in fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis in Streptomyces glaucescens: role of FabH and FabD and their acyl carrier protein specificity.

    PubMed

    Florova, Galina; Kazanina, Galina; Reynolds, Kevin A

    2002-08-20

    Malonyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) is used as an extender unit in each of the elongation steps catalyzed by the type II dissociated fatty acid synthase (FAS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) of Streptomyces glaucescens. Initiation of straight-chain fatty acid biosynthesis by the type II FAS involves a direct condensation of acetyl-CoA with this malonyl-ACP to generate a 3-ketobutyryl-ACP product and is catalyzed by FabH. In vitro experiments with a reconstituted type II PKS system in the absence of FabH have previously shown that the acetyl-ACP (generated by decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP), not acetyl-CoA, is used to initiate tetracenomycin C (TCM C) biosynthesis. We have shown that sgFabH activity is present in S. glaucescens fermentations during TCM C production, suggesting that it could contribute to initiation of TCM C biosynthesis in vivo. Isotope incorporation studies with [CD3]acetate and [13CD3]acetate demonstrated significant intact retention of three deuteriums into the starter unit of palmitate and complete washout of deuterium label into the starter unit of TCM C. These observations provide evidence that acetyl-CoA is not used directly as a starter unit for TCM C biosynthesis in vivo and argue against an involvement of FabH in this process. Consistent with this conclusion, assays of the purified recombinant sgFabH with acetyl-CoA demonstrated activity using malonyl-ACP generated from either FabC (the S. glaucescens FAS ACP) (k(cat) 42.2 min(-1), K(m) 4.5 +/- 0.3 microM) or AcpP (the E. coli FAS ACP) (k(cat) 7.5 min(-1), K(m) 6.3 +/- 0.3 microM) but not TcmM (the S. glaucescens PKS ACP). In contrast, the sgFabD which catalyzes conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-ACP for fatty acid biosynthesis was shown to be active with TcmM (k(cat) 150 min(-1), K(m) 12.2 +/- 1.2 microM), AcpP (k(cat) 141 min(-1), K(m) 13.2 +/- 1.6 microM), and FabC (k(cat) 560 min(-1), K(m) 12.7 +/- 2.6 microM). This enzyme was shown to be present during TCM C production and could play a

  18. Malonyl-coenzyme A:acyl carrier protein acyltransferase of Streptomyces glaucescens: a possible link between fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Summers, R G; Ali, A; Shen, B; Wessel, W A; Hutchinson, C R

    1995-07-25

    Streptomyces glaucescens, a Gram-positive soil bacterium, produces the polyketide antibiotic tetracenomycin (Tcm) C. To study possible biochemical connections between the biosynthesis of bacterial fatty acids and polyketides, the abundant acyl carrier protein (ACP) detected throughout the growth of the tetracenomycin (Tcm) C-producing S. glaucescens was purified to homogeneity and found to behave like many other ACPs from bacteria and plants (apparent M(r) of 20,000 on gel filtration chromatography, apparent M(r) of 3400-4800 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, and pI approximately 3.8). By using an oligodeoxynucleotide synthesized in accordance with the sequence of residues 25-36 of the ACP, the fabC gene encoding this protein was cloned, and expression of this gene in Escherichia coli yielded the ACP entirely as the active holoenzyme. Sequence analysis of 4.3 kilobases (kb) of DNA flanking fabC revealed the presence of three other genes oriented in the same transcriptional direction in the order fabD, fabH, fabC, and fabB. Each of the four genes is predicted to encode proteins with high sequence similarity to the following components of the E. coli fatty acid synthase (FAS): the FabD malonyl-coenzyme A:ACP acyltransferase (MAT), FabH 3-oxoacyl:ACP synthase III, AcpP ACP, and FabB 3-oxoacyl:ACP synthase I. Expression of the S. glaucescens fabD gene in E. coli produced active MAT able to catalyze in vitro the transfer of radioactive malonate from malonyl-coenzyme A to the E. coli AcpP and S. glaucescens FabC ACPs, as well as to the TcmM ACP component of the Tcm type II polyketide synthase [Shen, B., et al. (1992) J. Bacteriol 174, 3818-3821]. Expression of fabD also restored the high-temperature growth of the E. coli fabD89 mutant that bears a temperature-sensitive MAT. The latter finding and the close similarity between the organization of the S. glaucescens fabDHCB and E. coli FAS-encoding genes (fab

  19. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde acylhydrazone with a 1,4-benzodioxan fragment as a novel class of potent β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoda; Yang, Yushun; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Yangjian

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential for bacterial survival. β-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III (FabH), is a particularly attractive antibacterial target, since it is central to the initiation of fatty acid biosynthesis. Three series of 21 cinnamaldehyde acylhydrazone derivatives, A3-9, B3-9, and C3-9, were synthesized and evaluated for FabH-inhibitory activity. Compound B6 showed the most potent biological activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis (minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values: 1.56-3.13 µg/mL) and was comparable with the positive control. Docking simulation by positioning compound B6 in the FabH structure active site was performed to explore the possible binding model.

  20. Expression of lauroyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase in brassica napus seeds induces pathways for both fatty acid oxidation and biosynthesis and implies a set point for triacylglycerol accumulation

    PubMed

    Eccleston; Ohlrogge

    1998-04-01

    Expression of a California bay lauroyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase (MCTE) in developing seeds of transgenic oilseed rape alters the fatty acid composition of the mature seed, resulting in up to 60 mol% of laurate in triacylglycerols. In this study, we examined the metabolism of lauric acid and 14C-acetate in developing seeds of oilseed rape that express high levels of MCTE. Lauroyl-CoA oxidase activity but not palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activity was increased several-fold in developing seeds expressing MCTE. In addition, isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities were six- and 30-fold higher, respectively, in high-laurate developing seeds. Control seeds incorporated 14C-acetate almost entirely into fatty acids, whereas in seeds expressing MCTE, only 50% of the label was recovered in lipids and the remainder was in a range of water-soluble components, including sucrose and malate. Together, these results indicate that the pathways for beta-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle have been induced in seeds expressing high levels of MCTE. Although a substantial portion of the fatty acid produced in these seeds is recycled to acetyl-CoA and sucrose through the beta-oxidation and glyoxylate cycle pathways, total seed oil is not reduced. How is oil content maintained if lauric acid is inefficiently converted to triacylglycerol? The levels of acyl carrier protein and several enzymes of fatty acid synthesis were increased two- to threefold at midstage development in high-laurate seeds. These results indicate that a coordinate induction of the fatty acid synthesis pathway occurs, presumably to compensate for the lauric acid lost through beta-oxidation or for a shortage of long-chain fatty acids.

  1. Plant Acyl-CoA:Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferases (LPCATs) Have Different Specificities in Their Forward and Reverse Reactions*

    PubMed Central

    Lager, Ida; Yilmaz, Jenny Lindberg; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Jasieniecka, Katarzyna; Kazachkov, Michael; Wang, Peng; Zou, Jitao; Weselake, Randall; Smith, Mark A.; Bayon, Shen; Dyer, John M.; Shockey, Jay M.; Heinz, Ernst; Green, Allan; Banas, Antoni; Stymne, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) enzymes have central roles in acyl editing of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Plant LPCAT genes were expressed in yeast and characterized biochemically in microsomal preparations of the cells. Specificities for different acyl-CoAs were similar for seven LPCATs from five different species, including species accumulating hydroxylated acyl groups in their seed oil, with a preference for C18-unsaturated acyl-CoA and low activity with palmitoyl-CoA and ricinoleoyl (12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoyl)-CoA. We showed that Arabidopsis LPCAT1 and LPCAT2 enzymes catalyzed the acylation and de-acylation of both sn positions of PC, with a preference for the sn-2 position. When acyl specificities of the Arabidopsis LPCATs were measured in the reverse reaction, sn-2-bound oleoyl, linoleoyl, and linolenoyl groups from PC were transferred to acyl-CoA to a similar extent. However, a ricinoleoyl group at the sn-2-position of PC was removed 4–6-fold faster than an oleoyl group in the reverse reaction, despite poor utilization in the forward reaction. The data presented, taken together with earlier published reports on in vivo lipid metabolism, support the hypothesis that plant LPCAT enzymes play an important role in regulating the acyl-CoA composition in plant cells by transferring polyunsaturated and hydroxy fatty acids produced on PC directly to the acyl-CoA pool for further metabolism or catabolism. PMID:24189065

  2. Crystallographic studies on the binding of isonicotinyl-NAD adduct to wild-type and isoniazid resistant 2-trans-enoyl-ACP (CoA) reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcio Vinicius Bertacine; Vasconcelos, Igor Bordin; Prado, Adriane Michele Xavier; Fadel, Valmir; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2007-09-01

    The resumption of tuberculosis led to an increased need to understand the molecular mechanisms of drug action and drug resistance, which should provide significant insight into the development of newer compounds. Isoniazid (INH), the most prescribed drug to treat TB, inhibits an NADH-dependent enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) that provides precursors of mycolic acids, which are components of the mycobacterial cell wall. InhA is the major target of the mode of action of isoniazid. INH is a pro-drug that needs activation to form the inhibitory INH-NAD adduct. Missense mutations in the inhA structural gene have been identified in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to INH. To understand the mechanism of resistance to INH, we have solved the structure of two InhA mutants (I21V and S94A), identified in INH-resistant clinical isolates, and compare them to INH-sensitive WT InhA structure in complex with the INH-NAD adduct. We also solved the structure of unliganded INH-resistant S94A protein, which is the first report on apo form of InhA. The salient features of these structures are discussed and should provide structural information to improve our understanding of the mechanism of action of, and resistance to, INH in M. tuberculosis. The unliganded structure of InhA allows identification of conformational changes upon ligand binding and should help structure-based drug design of more potent antimycobacterial agents.

  3. Alteration of chain length substrate specificity of Aeromonas caviae R-enantiomer-specific enoyl-coenzyme A hydratase through site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Hisano, Tamao; Taguchi, Seiichi; Doi, Yoshiharu

    2003-08-01

    Aeromonas caviae R-specific enoyl-coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase (PhaJ(Ac)) is capable of providing (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA with a chain length of four to six carbon atoms from the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis. In this study, amino acid substitutions were introduced into PhaJ(Ac) by site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the feasibility of altering the specificity for the acyl chain length of the substrate. A crystallographic structure analysis of PhaJ(Ac) revealed that Ser-62, Leu-65, and Val-130 define the width and depth of the acyl-chain-binding pocket. Accordingly, we targeted these three residues for amino acid substitution. Nine single-mutation enzymes and two double-mutation enzymes were generated, and their hydratase activities were assayed in vitro by using trans-2-octenoyl-CoA (C(8)) as a substrate. Three of these mutant enzymes, L65A, L65G, and V130G, exhibited significantly high activities toward octenoyl-CoA than the wild-type enzyme exhibited. PHA formation from dodecanoate (C(12)) was examined by using the mutated PhaJ(Ac) as a monomer supplier in recombinant Escherichia coli LS5218 harboring a PHA synthase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain 61-3 (phaC1(Ps)). When L65A, L65G, or V130G was used individually, increased molar fractions of 3-hydroxyoctanoate (C(8)) and 3-hydroxydecanoate (C(10)) units were incorporated into PHA. These results revealed that Leu-65 and Val-130 affect the acyl chain length substrate specificity. Furthermore, comparative kinetic analyses of the wild-type enzyme and the L65A and V130G mutants were performed, and the mechanisms underlying changes in substrate specificity are discussed.

  4. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the [beta]-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2010-07-20

    {beta}-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 {angstrom} resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH.

  5. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis : Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies

    SciTech Connect

    McGillick, Brian E.; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-01-28

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. Coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, this makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. In addition, we have discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Our results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency.

  6. Molecular analysis of 51 unrelated pedigrees with late-onset multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) in southern China confirmed the most common ETFDH mutation and high carrier frequency of c.250G>A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Xue-Jiao; Murong, Shen-Xing; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2011-06-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting amino acid, fatty acid, and choline metabolisms and is a common genetic defect responsible for lipid storage myopathy. Most forms of MADD are caused by a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or ETF dehydrogenase (ETFDH). However, its molecular feature has not been found uniformly in previous reports of Chinese patients. A large cohort of 56 late-onset MADD patients from 51 unrelated pedigrees in southern China was recruited to investigate a clear correlation between clinical phenotype and molecular genetic basis. All exons of ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH, including the intron-exon boundaries, and 5' and 3' untranslated regions were directly sequenced. ETFDH deficiencies affected 94.1% (48/51) of the pedigrees. ETFDH-c.250G>A is the most common mutation, representing a high allelic frequency of 83.3% (80/96). Carrier frequency of c.250G>A is estimated to be 1.35% (7/520) in the normal population. A significant reduced expression of ETFDH was identified in the muscle of ETFDH-deficient patients. ETFDH deficiency is a major cause of riboflavin-responsive MADD in southern China, and c.250G>A is an important mutation that could be employed as a fast and reliable screening method.

  7. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis : Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies

    SciTech Connect

    McGillick, Brian E.; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-02-23

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. This, coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. Additionally, we have discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. These results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency.

  8. Individual S-acylated cysteines differentially contribute to H-Ras endomembrane trafficking and acylation/deacylation cycles

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Maria P.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation/deacylation cycles and vesicular transport are critical for an adequate subcellular distribution of S-acylated Ras proteins. H-Ras is dually acylated on cysteines 181 and 184, but it is unknown how these residues individually contribute to H-Ras trafficking. In this study, we characterized the acylation and deacylation rates and membrane trafficking of monoacylated H-Ras mutants to analyze their contributions to H-Ras plasma membrane and endomembrane distribution. We demonstrated that dually acylated H-Ras interacts with acyl-protein thioesterases (APTs) 1 and 2 at the plasma membrane. Moreover, single-acylation mutants of H-Ras differed not only in their subcellular distribution, where both proteins localized to different extents at both the Golgi complex and plasma membrane, but also in their deacylation rates, which we showed to be due to different sensitivities to APT1 and APT2. Fluorescence photobleaching and photoactivation experiments also revealed that 1) although S-acylated, single-acylation mutants are incorporated with different efficiencies into Golgi complex to plasma membrane vesicular carriers, and 2) the different deacylation rates of single-acylated H-Ras influence differentially its overall exchange between different compartments by nonvesicular transport. Taken together, our results show that individual S-acylation sites provide singular information about H-Ras subcellular distribution that is required for GTPase signaling. PMID:28179458

  9. 3-Methylbutanoyl and 3-methylbut-2-enoyl disaccharides from green coffee beans (Coffea arabica).

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Bernhard; Gáti, Tamás; Tóth, Gábor; Schreier, Peter

    2002-06-01

    Three 3-methylbutanoyl and 3-methylbut-2-enoyl disaccharides isolated from green coffee beans (Coffea arabica) were identified as 3-methylbutanoyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-beta-D-apiofuranoside, 3-methylbutanoyl-6-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-beta-D-fructofuranoside, and 3-methylbut-2-enoyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-beta-D-apiofuranoside. The structures were established by one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectra as well as by ESI MS/MS spectra.

  10. Expression of a delta 9 14:0-acyl carrier protein fatty acid desaturase gene is necessary for the production of omega 5 anacardic acids found in pest-resistant geranium (Pelargonium xhortorum).

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, D J; Cahoon, E B; Shanklin, J; Craig, R; Cox-Foster, D L; Mumma, R O; Medford, J I

    1996-01-01

    Anacardic acids, a class of secondary compounds derived from fatty acids, are found in a variety of dicotyledonous families. Pest resistance (e.g., spider mites and aphids) in Pelargonium xhortorum (geranium) is associated with high levels (approximately 81%) of unsaturated 22:1 omega 5 and 24:1 omega 5 anacardic acids in the glandular trichome exudate. A single dominant locus controls the production of these omega 5 anacardic acids, which arise from novel 16:1 delta 11 and 18:1 delta 13 fatty acids. We describe the isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a unique delta 9 14:0-acyl carrier protein fatty acid desaturase. Several lines of evidence indicated that expression of this desaturase leads to the production of the omega 5 anacardic acids involved in pest resistance. First, its expression was found in pest-resistant, but not suspectible, plants and its expression followed the production of the omega 5 anacardic acids in segregating populations. Second, its expression and the occurrence of the novel 16:1 delta 11 and 18:1 delta 13 fatty acids and the omega 5 anacardic acids were specific to tall glandular trichomes. Third, assays of the recombinant protein demonstrated that this desaturase produced the 14:1 delta 9 fatty acid precursor to the novel 16:1 delta 11 and 18:1 delta 13 fatty acids. Based on our genetic and biochemical studies, we conclude that expression of this delta 9 14:0-ACP desaturase gene is required for the production of omega 5 anacardic acids that have been shown to be necessary for pest resistance in geranium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8710947

  11. Beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III from pea (Pisum sativum L.): properties, inhibition by a novel thiolactomycin analogue and isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jones, A Lesley; Gane, Andy M; Herbert, Derek; Willey, David L; Rutter, Andrew J; Kille, Peter; Dancer, Jane E; Harwood, John L

    2003-03-01

    A beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III (KAS III; short-chain condensing enzyme) has been partly purified from pea leaves. The enzyme, which had acetyl-CoA:ACP acyltransferase (ACAT) activity, was resolved from a second, specific, ACAT protein. The KAS III enzyme had a derived molecular mass of 42 kDa (from its cDNA sequence) and operated as a dimer. Its enzymological characteristics were similar to those of two other plant KAS III enzymes except for its inhibition by thiolactomycin. A derivative of thiolactomycin containing a longer (C8 saturated) hydrophobic side-chain (compound 332) was a more effective inhibitor of pea KAS III and showed competitive inhibition towards malonyl-ACP whereas thiolactomycin showed uncompetitive characteristics at high concentrations. This difference may be due to the better fit of compound 332 into a hydrophobic pocket at the active site. A full-length cDNA for the pea KAS III was isolated. This was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase in order to facilitate subsequent purification. Demonstrated activity in preparations from E. coli confirmed that the cDNA encoded a KAS III enzyme. Furthermore, the expressed KAS III had ACAT activity, showing that the latter was inherent. The derived amino acid sequence of the pea cDNA showed 81-87% similarity to that for other plant dicotyledon KAS IIIs, somewhat less for Allium porrum (leek, 71%) and for Porphyra spp. (62%), Synechocystis spp. (65%) and various bacteria (42-65%). The pea KAS III exhibited four areas of homology, three of which were around the active-site Cys(123), His(323) and Asn(353). In addition, a stretch of 23 amino acids (residues 207-229 in the pea KAS III) was almost completely conserved in the plant KAS IIIs. Modelling this stretch showed they belonged to a peptide fragment that fitted over the active site and contained segments suggested to be involved in substrate binding and in conformational changes during

  12. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  13. Type I and type II fatty acid biosynthesis in Eimeria tenella: enoyl reductase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, J Z; Muench, S P; Allary, M; Campbell, S; Roberts, C W; Mui, E; McLeod, R L; Rice, D W; Prigge, S T

    2007-12-01

    Apicomplexan parasites of the genus Eimeria are the major causative agent of avian coccidiosis, leading to high economic losses in the poultry industry. Recent results show that Eimeria tenella harbours an apicoplast organelle, and that a key biosynthetic enzyme, enoyl reductase, is located in this organelle. In related parasites, enoyl reductase is one component of a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) and has proven to be an attractive target for antimicrobial compounds. We cloned and expressed the mature form of E. tenella enoyl reductase (EtENR) for biochemical and structural studies. Recombinant EtENR exhibits NADH-dependent enoyl reductase activity and is inhibited by triclosan with an IC50 value of 60 nm. The crystal structure of EtENR reveals overall similarity with other ENR enzymes; however, the active site of EtENR is unoccupied, a state rarely observed in other ENR structures. Furthermore, the position of the central beta-sheet appears to block NADH binding and would require significant movement to allow NADH binding, a feature not previously seen in the ENR family. We analysed the E. tenella genomic database for orthologues of well-characterized bacterial and apicomplexan FAS enzymes and identified 6 additional genes, suggesting that E. tenella contains a type II FAS capable of synthesizing saturated, but not unsaturated, fatty acids. Interestingly, we also identified sequences that appear to encode multifunctional type I FAS enzymes, a feature also observed in Toxoplasma gondii, highlighting the similarity between these apicomplexan parasites.

  14. Acyl-CoA binding proteins: multiplicity and function.

    PubMed

    Gossett, R E; Frolov, A A; Roths, J B; Behnke, W D; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA is thought to be primarily in intermediary metabolism of fatty acids. However, recent data show that nM to microM levels of these lipophilic molecules are potent regulators of cell functions in vitro. Although long-chain fatty acyl-CoA are present at several hundred microM concentration in the cell, very little long-chain fatty acyl-CoA actually exists as free or unbound molecules, but rather is bound with high affinity to membrane lipids and/or proteins. Recently, there is growing awareness that cytosol contains nonenzymatic proteins also capable of binding long-chain fatty acyl-CoA with high affinity. Although the identity of the cytosolic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding protein(s) has been the subject of some controversy, there is growing evidence that several diverse nonenzymatic cytosolic proteins will bind long-chain fatty acyl-CoA. Not only does acyl-CoA binding protein specifically bind medium and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA), but ubiquitous proteins with multiple ligand specificities such as the fatty acid binding proteins and sterol carrier protein-2 also bind LCFA-CoA with high affinity. The potential of these acyl-CoA binding proteins to influence the level of free LCFA-CoA and thereby the amount of LCFA-CoA bound to regulatory sites in proteins and enzymes is only now being examined in detail. The purpose of this article is to explore the identity, nature, function, and pathobiology of these fascinating newly discovered long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding proteins. The relative contributions of these three different protein families to LCFA-CoA utilization and/or regulation of cellular activities are the focus of new directions in this field.

  15. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  16. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  17. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  18. The use of ene adducts to study and engineer enoyl-thioester reductases.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Raoul G; Vögeli, Bastian; Quade, Nick; Capitani, Guido; Kiefer, Patrick; Vorholt, Julia A; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Erb, Tobias J

    2015-06-01

    An improved understanding of enzymes' catalytic proficiency and stereoselectivity would further enable applications in chemistry, biocatalysis and industrial biotechnology. We use a chemical probe to dissect individual catalytic steps of enoyl-thioester reductases (Etrs), validating an active site tyrosine as the cryptic proton donor and explaining how it had eluded definitive identification. This information enabled the rational redesign of Etr, yielding mutants that create products with inverted stereochemistry at wild type-like turnover frequency.

  19. Biochemical characterization of enoyl reductase involved in Type II fatty acid synthesis in the intestinal coccidium Eimeria tenella (Phylum Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaomin; Lorraine Fuller, A; McDougald, Larry R; Tan, Xiangshi; Cai, Jianping; Wang, Feng; Sacchettini, James C; Zhu, Guan

    2007-07-01

    An enoyl reductase (EtENR) closely related to those of green algae and involved in Type II fatty acid synthesis was characterized and localized to the apicoplast in the coccidium Eimeria tenella. Biochemical analysis using native EtENR protein extracted from parasites confirmed its function as an enoyl reductase using NADH as a cofactor. However, the recombinant form (rEtENR) expressed in bacteria was only able to oxidize NADH, but unable to transfer the electron to enoyl-CoA, possibly due to the inappropriate folding of rEtENR expressed in bacteria. The functions of both native and recombinant EtENR could be inhibited by triclosan (IC(50)=1.45 microM), suggesting that this enzyme may be explored as a drug target against coccidiosis.

  20. Mechanism and inhibition of the FabI enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nina; Cummings, Jason E.; England, Kathleen; Slayden, Richard A.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives As an initial step in developing novel antibacterials against Burkholderia pseudomallei, we have characterized the FabI enoyl-ACP reductase homologues in the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway from this organism and performed an initial enzyme inhibition study. Methods A BLAST analysis identified two FabI enoyl-ACP reductase homologues, bpmFabI-1 and bpmFabI-2, in the B. pseudomallei genome, which were cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Steady-state kinetics was used to determine the reaction mechanism and the sensitivity of bpmFabI-1 to four diphenyl ether FabI inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the inhibitors was assessed using a wild-type strain of Burkholderia thailandensis (E264) and an efflux pump mutant (Bt38). Results Consistent with its annotation as an enoyl-ACP reductase, bpmFabI-1 catalysed the NADH-dependent reduction of 2-trans-dodecenoyl-CoA via a sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In contrast, bpmFabI-2 was inactive with all substrates tested and only bpmfabI-1 was transcriptionally active under the growth conditions employed. The sensitivity of bpmFabI-1 to four diphenyl ethers was evaluated and in each case the compounds were slow-onset inhibitors with Ki values of 0.5–2 nM. In addition, triclosan and PT01 had MIC values of 30 and 70 mg/L for B. pseudomallei as well as a wild-type strain of B. thailandensis (E264), but MIC values of <1 mg/L for the efflux pump mutant Bt38. A reduction in MIC values was also observed for the pump mutant strain with the other diphenyl ethers. Conclusions Provided that efflux can be circumvented, bpmFabI-1 is a suitable target for drug discovery. PMID:21393229

  1. Mechanism and inhibition of the FabI enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nina; Cummings, Jason E; England, Kathleen; Slayden, Richard A; Tonge, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    As an initial step in developing novel antibacterials against Burkholderia pseudomallei, we have characterized the FabI enoyl-ACP reductase homologues in the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway from this organism and performed an initial enzyme inhibition study. A BLAST analysis identified two FabI enoyl-ACP reductase homologues, bpmFabI-1 and bpmFabI-2, in the B. pseudomallei genome, which were cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Steady-state kinetics was used to determine the reaction mechanism and the sensitivity of bpmFabI-1 to four diphenyl ether FabI inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the inhibitors was assessed using a wild-type strain of Burkholderia thailandensis (E264) and an efflux pump mutant (Bt38). Consistent with its annotation as an enoyl-ACP reductase, bpmFabI-1 catalysed the NADH-dependent reduction of 2-trans-dodecenoyl-CoA via a sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In contrast, bpmFabI-2 was inactive with all substrates tested and only bpmfabI-1 was transcriptionally active under the growth conditions employed. The sensitivity of bpmFabI-1 to four diphenyl ethers was evaluated and in each case the compounds were slow-onset inhibitors with K(i) values of 0.5-2 nM. In addition, triclosan and PT01 had MIC values of 30 and 70 mg/L for B. pseudomallei as well as a wild-type strain of B. thailandensis (E264), but MIC values of <1 mg/L for the efflux pump mutant Bt38. A reduction in MIC values was also observed for the pump mutant strain with the other diphenyl ethers. Provided that efflux can be circumvented, bpmFabI-1 is a suitable target for drug discovery.

  2. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of diaryl ether inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Muench, Stephen P; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A; Mui, Ernest J; Fomovska, Alina; Lai, Bo Shiun; Prigge, Sean T; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patty J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Rice, David W; McLeod, Rima

    2013-04-01

    Triclosan is a potent inhibitor of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase (TgENR), which is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. In view of triclosan's poor druggability, which limits its therapeutic use, a new set of B-ring modified analogs were designed to optimize its physico-chemical properties. These derivatives were synthesized and evaluated by in vitro assay and TgENR enzyme assay. Some analogs display improved solubility, permeability and a comparable MIC50 value to that of triclosan. Modeling of these inhibitors revealed the same overall binding mode with the enzyme as triclosan, but the B-ring modifications have additional interactions with the strongly conserved Asn130.

  3. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S M; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  4. Evaluating thermodynamic integration performance of the new amber molecular dynamics package and assess potential halogen bonds of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) benzimidazole inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin-Chih; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-04-05

    Thermodynamic integration (TI) can provide accurate binding free energy insights in a lead optimization program, but its high computational expense has limited its usage. In the effort of developing an efficient and accurate TI protocol for FabI inhibitors lead optimization program, we carefully compared TI with different Amber molecular dynamics (MD) engines (sander and pmemd), MD simulation lengths, the number of intermediate states and transformation steps, and the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb Softcore potentials parameters in the one-step TI, using eleven benzimidazole inhibitors in complex with Francisella tularensis enoyl acyl reductase (FtFabI). To our knowledge, this is the first study to extensively test the new AMBER MD engine, pmemd, on TI and compare the parameters of the Softcore potentials in the one-step TI in a protein-ligand binding system. The best performing model, the one-step pmemd TI, using 6 intermediate states and 1 ns MD simulations, provides better agreement with experimental results (RMSD = 0.52 kcal/mol) than the best performing implicit solvent method, QM/MM-GBSA from our previous study (RMSD = 3.00 kcal/mol), while maintaining similar efficiency. Briefly, we show the optimized TI protocol to be highly accurate and affordable for the FtFabI system. This approach can be implemented in a larger scale benzimidazole scaffold lead optimization against FtFabI. Lastly, the TI results here also provide structure-activity relationship insights, and suggest the parahalogen in benzimidazole compounds might form a weak halogen bond with FabI, which is a well-known halogen bond favoring enzyme.

  5. Evaluating Thermodynamic Integration Performance of the New Amber Molecular Dynamics Package and Assess Potential Halogen Bonds of Enoyl-ACP Reductase (FabI) Benzimidazole Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pin-Chih; Johnson, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic integration (TI) can provide accurate binding free energy insights in a lead optimization program, but its high computational expense has limited its usage. In the effort of developing an efficient and accurate TI protocol for FabI inhibitors lead optimization program, we carefully compared TI with different Amber molecular dynamics (MD) engines (sander and pmemd), MD simulation lengths, the number of intermediate states and transformation steps, and the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb Softcore potentials parameters in the one-step TI, using eleven benzimidazole inhibitors in complex with Francisella tularensis enoyl acyl reductase (FtFabI). To our knowledge, this is the first study to extensively test the new AMBER MD engine, pmemd, on TI and compare the parameters of the Softcore potentials in the one-step TI in a protein-ligand binding system. The best performing model, the one-step pmemd TI, using 6 intermediate states and 1 ns MD simulations, provides better agreement with experimental results (RMSD = 0.52 kcal/mol) than the best performing implicit solvent method, QM/MM-GBSA from our previous study (RMSD = 3.00 kcal/mol), while maintaining similar efficiency. Briefly, we show the optimized TI protocol to be highly accurate and affordable for the FtFabI system. This approach can be implemented in a larger scale benzimidazole scaffold lead optimization against FtFabI. Lastly, the TI results here also provide structure-activity relationship insights, and suggest the para-halogen in benzimidazole compounds might form a weak halogen bond with FabI, which is a well-known halogen bond favoring enzyme. PMID:26666582

  6. Design and synthesis of 2-pyridones as novel inhibitors of the Bacillus anthracis enoyl-ACP reductase.

    PubMed

    Tipparaju, Suresh K; Joyasawal, Sipak; Forrester, Sara; Mulhearn, Debbie C; Pegan, Scott; Johnson, Michael E; Mesecar, Andrew D; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-06-15

    Enoyl-ACP reductase (ENR), the product of the FabI gene, from Bacillus anthracis (BaENR) is responsible for catalyzing the final step of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. A number of novel 2-pyridone derivatives were synthesized and shown to be potent inhibitors of BaENR.

  7. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  8. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  9. Arginyl residues are involved in acyl-CoA binding to the elongase from etiolated leek seedlings.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, X; Chevalier, S; Cassagne, C; Lessire, R

    1998-04-22

    The C18:0-CoA elongase from etiolated leek seedling microsomes was inactivated by treatment with phenylglyoxal, a reagent which specifically modifies arginyl residues. In the presence of 20 mM phenylglyoxal, 95% of the C18:0-CoA elongation was inhibited. The condensation and dehydration reactions of the overall elongation were totally inhibited, whereas enoyl-CoA reductase activity was diminished by 75%, but the nature of the final elongation product was unchanged. Phenylglyoxal did not modify the C18:0-CoA partition between membrane and aqueous compartments; moreover, [1-14C]phenylglyoxal labeling experiments showed a covalent binding of the inhibitor to membrane proteins. The ability of several substrates to prevent the inactivation by phenylglyoxal was investigated. NADH and NADPH had no effect. CoA led to a 75% protection, and the incorporation of [14C]phenylglyoxal was strongly affected by 10 mM CoA. The acyl chain length of the acyl-CoAs played also a crucial role in preventing the binding of phenylglyoxal. The maximal prevention of phenylglyoxal inhibition was obtained with C18:0-CoA. This suggests that arginyl residues could be present in the vicinity of the acyl-CoA binding site of the subunits of C18:0-CoA elongase. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Stereochemistry of the acyl dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyl exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, S J; Satsangi, N; Weintraub, S T

    1991-02-01

    The fatty acid of acyl dihydroxyacetone phosphate can be exchanged enzymatically for another fatty acid. It has been shown that this reaction proceeds by cleavage of the oxygen bound to C-1 of the dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) moiety rather than by the more common cleavage at the acyl to oxygen bond. In the present study, the stereochemistry of this reaction was defined further; using deuterated substrates and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, it was shown that the fatty acid exchange involves the stereospecific labilization of the pro-R hydrogen at C-1 of the DHAP moiety of acyl DHAP. The mechanism of ether bond formation, in which acyl DHAP is converted to O-alkyl DHAP, also proceeds via labilization of the pro-R hydrogen and cleavage of the fatty acid at the C-1 to oxygen bond. In addition, other workers have provided evidence that the enzyme responsible for the exchange reaction is O-alkyl DHAP synthetase. Therefore, the present results support the hypothesis that the acyl exchange is the reverse reaction of the first step in O-alkyl DHAP synthesis; in both of these reactions the pro-R hydrogen of C-1 of the DHAP moiety of acyl DHAP and the fatty acid moiety are labilized with cleavage of the fatty acid at the DHAP C-1 to oxygen bond.

  11. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  12. Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa acyl-homoserinelactone synthase LasI.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ty A; Schweizer, Herbert P; Churchill, Mair E A

    2004-08-01

    The LasI/LasR quorum-sensing system plays a pivotal role in virulence gene regulation of the opportunistic human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we report the crystal structure of the acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase LasI that produces 3-oxo-C12-AHL from the substrates 3-oxo-C12-acyl-carrier protein (acyl-ACP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The LasI six-stranded beta sheet platform, buttressed by three alpha helices, forms a V-shaped substrate-binding cleft that leads to a tunnel passing through the enzyme that can accommodate the acyl-chain of acyl-ACP. This tunnel places no apparent restriction on acyl-chain length, in contrast to a restrictive hydrophobic pocket seen in the AHL-synthase EsaI. Interactions of essential conserved N-terminal residues, Arg23, Phe27 and Trp33, suggest that the N-terminus forms an enclosed substrate-binding pocket for S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Analysis of AHL-synthase surface residues identified a binding site for acyl-ACP, a role that was supported by in vivo reporter assay analysis of the mutated residues, including Arg154 and Lys150. This structure and the novel explanation of AHL-synthase acyl-chain-length selectivity promise to guide the design of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-specific quorum-sensing inhibitors as antibacterial agents.

  13. ACBP and cholesterol differentially alter fatty acyl CoA utilization by microsomal ACAT.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsu; Zhou, Minglong; McIntosh, Avery; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2003-01-01

    Microsomal acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is stimulated in vitro and/or in intact cells by proteins that bind and transfer both substrates, cholesterol, and fatty acyl CoA. To resolve the role of fatty acyl CoA binding independent of cholesterol binding/transfer, a protein that exclusively binds fatty acyl CoA (acyl CoA binding protein, ACBP) was compared. ACBP contains an endoplasmic reticulum retention motif and significantly colocalized with acyl-CoA cholesteryl acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and endoplasmic reticulum markers in L-cell fibroblasts and hepatoma cells, respectively. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT was stimulated in the order: ACBP > sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) > liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). Stimulation was in the same order as the relative affinities of the proteins for fatty acyl CoA. In contrast, in the absence of exogenous cholesterol, these proteins inhibited microsomal ACAT, but in the same order: ACBP > SCP-2 > L-FABP. The extracellular protein BSA stimulated microsomal ACAT regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous cholesterol. Thus, ACBP was the most potent intracellular fatty acyl CoA binding protein in differentially modulating the activity of microsomal ACAT to form cholesteryl esters independent of cholesterol binding/transfer ability.

  14. The Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Maize GL8 Protein Is a Component of the Acyl-Coenzyme A Elongase Involved in the Production of Cuticular Waxes1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Dietrich, Charles R.; Lessire, Rene; Nikolau, Basil J.; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2002-01-01

    The gl8 gene is required for the normal accumulation of cuticular waxes on maize (Zea mays) seedling leaves. The predicted GL8 protein exhibits significant sequence similarity to a class of enzymes that catalyze the reduction of a ketone group to a hydroxyl group. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant Escherichia coli-expressed GL8 protein were used to investigate the function of this protein in planta. Subcellular fractionation experiments indicate that the GL8 protein is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Furthermore, polyclonal antibodies raised against the partially purified leek (Allium porrum) microsomal acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) elongase can react with the E. coli-expressed GL8 protein. In addition, anti-GL8 immunoglobulin G inhibited the in vitro elongation of stearoyl-CoA by leek and maize microsomal acyl-CoA elongase. In combination, these findings indicate that the GL8 protein is a component of the acyl-CoA elongase. In addition, the finding that anti-GL8 immunoglobulin G did not significantly inhibit the 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA dehydrase, and (E) 2,3-enoyl-CoA reductase partial reactions of leek or maize acyl-CoA elongase lends further support to our previous hypothesis that the GL8 protein functions as a β-ketoacyl reductase during the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids required for the production of cuticular waxes. PMID:11891248

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of diaryl ether inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Muench, Stephen P.; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Mui, Ernest J.; Fomovska, Alina; Lai, Bo Shiun; Prigge, Sean T.; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Rice, David W.; McLeod, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Triclosan is a potent inhibitor of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase (TgENR), which is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. In view of triclosan’s poor druggability, which limits its therapeutic use, a new set of B-ring modified analogs were designed to optimize its physico-chemical properties. These derivatives were synthesized and evaluated by in vitro assay and TgENR enzyme assay. Some analogs display improved solubility, permeability and a comparable MIC50 value to that of triclosan. Modeling of these inhibitors revealed the same overall binding mode with the enzyme as triclosan, but the Bring modifications have additional interactions with the strongly conserved Asn130. PMID:23453069

  16. 4-Pyridone derivatives as new inhibitors of bacterial enoyl-ACP reductase FabI.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Hideo; Kumura, Ko; Takahata, Sho; Iida, Maiko; Atsumi, Kunio

    2007-01-15

    Bacterial FAS provides essential fatty acids for use in the assembly of key cellular components. Among them, FabI is an enoyl-ACP reductase which catalyzes the final and rate-limiting step of bacterial FAS. It is a potential target for selective antibacterial action, because it shows low overall sequence homology with mammalian enzymes. Until today, various compounds have been reported as inhibitors of bacterial FabI-inhibitory compounds. To discover novel small-molecular FabI inhibitors, we initially screened our compound library for inhibitory activity toward FabI of Escherichia coli. And discovered 4-pyridone derivatives as a lead compound. Structure optimization studies yielded 4-pyridone derivatives 7n having strong FabI-inhibitory and antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus. There have been no reports concerning 4-pyridone derivatives as FabI inhibitor.

  17. Enoyl-CoA hydratase mediates polyhydroxyalkanoate mobilization in Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Cai, Shuangfeng; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Dahe; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-04-07

    Although polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation and mobilization are one of the most general mechanisms for haloarchaea to adapt to the hypersaline environments with changeable carbon sources, the PHA mobilization pathways are still not clear for any haloarchaea. In this study, the functions of five putative (R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratases (R-ECHs) in Haloferax mediterranei, named PhaJ1 to PhaJ5, respectively, were thoroughly investigated. Through gene deletion and complementation, we demonstrated that only certain of these ECHs had a slight contribution to poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) biosynthesis. But significantly, PhaJ1, the only R-ECH that is associated with PHA granules, was shown to be involved in PHA mobilization in this haloarchaeon. PhaJ1 catalyzes the dehydration of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, the common product of PHA degradation, to enoyl-CoA, the intermediate of the β-oxidation cycle, thus could link PHA mobilization to β-oxidation pathway in H. mediterranei. This linkage was further indicated from the up-regulation of the key genes of β-oxidation under the PHA mobilization condition, as well as the obvious inhibition of PHA degradation upon inhibition of the β-oxidation pathway. Interestingly, 96% of phaJ-containing haloarchaeal species possess both phaC (encoding PHA synthase) and the full set genes of β-oxidation, implying that the mobilization of carbon storage in PHA through the β-oxidation cycle would be general in haloarchaea.

  18. Enoyl-CoA hydratase mediates polyhydroxyalkanoate mobilization in Haloferax mediterranei

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guiming; Cai, Shuangfeng; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Dahe; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation and mobilization are one of the most general mechanisms for haloarchaea to adapt to the hypersaline environments with changeable carbon sources, the PHA mobilization pathways are still not clear for any haloarchaea. In this study, the functions of five putative (R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratases (R-ECHs) in Haloferax mediterranei, named PhaJ1 to PhaJ5, respectively, were thoroughly investigated. Through gene deletion and complementation, we demonstrated that only certain of these ECHs had a slight contribution to poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) biosynthesis. But significantly, PhaJ1, the only R-ECH that is associated with PHA granules, was shown to be involved in PHA mobilization in this haloarchaeon. PhaJ1 catalyzes the dehydration of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, the common product of PHA degradation, to enoyl-CoA, the intermediate of the β-oxidation cycle, thus could link PHA mobilization to β-oxidation pathway in H. mediterranei. This linkage was further indicated from the up-regulation of the key genes of β-oxidation under the PHA mobilization condition, as well as the obvious inhibition of PHA degradation upon inhibition of the β-oxidation pathway. Interestingly, 96% of phaJ-containing haloarchaeal species possess both phaC (encoding PHA synthase) and the full set genes of β-oxidation, implying that the mobilization of carbon storage in PHA through the β-oxidation cycle would be general in haloarchaea. PMID:27052994

  19. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  20. Acyl-sulfamates Target the Essential Glycerol-Phosphate Acyltransferase (PlsY) in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip; Yao, Jiangwei; Leonardi, Roberta; Maddox, Marcus M.; Luna, Vicki A.; Rock, Charles O.; Lee, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    PlsY is the essential first step in membrane phospholipid synthesis of Gram-positive pathogens. PlsY catalyzes the transfer of the fatty acid from acyl-phosphate to the 1-position of glycerol-3-phosphate to form the first intermediate in membrane biogenesis. A series of non-metabolizable, acyl-sulfamate analogs of the acyl-phosphate PlsY substrate were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus PlsY and for their Gram-positive antibacterial activities. From this series phenyl (8-phenyloctanoyl) sulfamate had the best overall profile, selectively inhibiting S. aureus phospholipid biosynthesis and causing the accumulation of both long-chain fatty acids and acyl-acyl carrier protein intermediates demonstrating that PlsY was the primary cellular target. Bacillus anthracis was unique in being more potently inhibited by long chain acyl-sulfamates than other bacterial species. However, it is shown that Bacillus anthracis PlsY is not more sensitive to the acyl-sulfamates than S. aureus PlsY. Metabolic profiling showed that B. anthracis growth inhibition by the acyl-sulfamates was not specific for lipid synthesis illustrating that the amphipathic acyl-sulfamates can also have off-target effects in Gram-positive bacteria. Nonetheless, this study further advances PlsY as a druggable target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics, through the discovery and validation of the probe compound phenyl (8-phenyloctanoyl) sulfamate as a S. aureus PlsY inhibitor. PMID:22795901

  1. N-Acylation During Glidobactin Biosynthesis by the Tridomain Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module GlbF

    PubMed Central

    Imker, Heidi J.; Krahn, Daniel; Clerc, Jérôme; Kaiser, Markus; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Glidobactins are hybrid NRPS-PKS natural products that function as irreversible proteasome inhibitors. A variety of medium chain 2(E),4(E)-diene fatty acids N-acylate the peptidolactam core and contribute significantly to the potency of proteasome inhibition. We have expressed the initiation NRPS module GlbF (C-A-T) in Escherichia coli and observe soluble active protein only on co-expression with the 8 kDa MbtH-like protein, GlbE. Following adenylation and installation of Thr as a T-domain thioester, the starter condensation domain utilizes fatty acyl-CoA donors to acylate the Thr1 amino group and generate the fatty acyl-Thr1-S-pantetheinyl-GlbF intermediate to be used in subsequent chain elongation. Previously proposed to be mediated via acyl carrier protein fatty acid donors, direct utilization of fatty acyl-CoA donors for N-acylation of T-domain tethered amino acids is likely a common strategy for chain initiation in NRPS-mediated lipopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:21035730

  2. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  3. Identification of the missing trans-acting enoyl reductase required for phthiocerol dimycocerosate and phenolglycolipid biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Siméone, Roxane; Constant, Patricia; Guilhot, Christophe; Daffé, Mamadou; Chalut, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM) and phenolglycolipids (PGL) are functionally important surface-exposed lipids of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their biosynthesis involves the products of several genes clustered in a 70-kb region of the M. tuberculosis chromosome. Among these products is PpsD, one of the modular type I polyketide synthases responsible for the synthesis of the lipid core common to DIM and PGL. Bioinformatic analyses have suggested that this protein lacks a functional enoyl reductase activity domain required for the synthesis of these lipids. We have identified a gene, Rv2953, that putatively encodes an enoyl reductase. Mutation in Rv2953 prevents conventional DIM formation and leads to the accumulation of a novel DIM-like product. This product is unsaturated between C-4 and C-5 of phthiocerol. Consistently, complementation of the mutant with a functional pks15/1 gene from Mycobacterium bovis BCG resulted in the accumulation of an unsaturated PGL-like substance. When an intact Rv2953 gene was reintroduced into the mutant strain, the phenotype reverted to the wild type. These findings indicate that Rv2953 encodes a trans-acting enoyl reductase that acts with PpsD in phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol biosynthesis.

  4. Identification of acylation products in SHAPE chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaoqi; Poyer, Salomé; Zargarian, Loussiné; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier; Xie, Juan

    2017-06-01

    SHAPE chemistry (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) has been developed to specifically target flexible nucleotides (often unpaired nucleotides) independently to their purine or pyrimidine nature for RNA secondary structure determination. However, to the best of our knowledge, the structure of 2'-O-acylation products has never been confirmed by NMR or X-ray data. We have realized the acylation reactions between cNMP and NMIA under SHAPE chemistry conditions and identified the acylation products using standard NMR spectroscopy and LC-MS/MS experiments. For cAMP and cGMP, the major acylation product is the 2'-O-acylated compound (>99%). A trace amount of N-acylated cAMP has also been identified by LC-UV-MS(2). While for cCMP, the isolated acylation products are composed of 96% of 2'-O-acylated, 4% of N,O-diacylated, and trace amount of N-acylated compounds. In addition, the characterization of the major 2'-O-acylated compound by NMR showed slight differences in the conformation of the acylated sugar between the three cyclic nucleotides. This interesting result should be useful to explain some unexpected reactivity of the SHAPE chemistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ghrelin acylation and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, O; Tschöp, M H; Tong, J

    2011-11-01

    Since its discovery, many physiologic functions have been ascribed to ghrelin, a gut derived hormone. The presence of a median fatty acid side chain on the ghrelin peptide is required for the binding and activation of the classical ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) was recently discovered as the enzyme responsible for this acylation process. GOAT is expressed in all tissues that have been found to express ghrelin and has demonstrated actions on several complex endocrine organ systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal, insular and adrenal axis as well as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone and gustatory system. Ghrelin acylation is dependent on the function of GOAT and the availability of substrates such as proghrelin and short- to medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). This process is governed by GOAT activity and has been shown to be modified by dietary lipids. In this review, we provided evidence that support an important role of GOAT in the regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism by modulating acyl ghrelin (AG) production. The relevance of GOAT and AG during periods of starvation remains to be defined. In addition, we summarized the recent literature on the metabolic effects of GOAT specific inhibitors and shared our view on the potential of targeting GOAT for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  6. Chemical Reporters for Exploring Protein Acylation

    PubMed Central

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Hang, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are acylated by a variety of metabolites that regulates many important cellular pathways in all kingdoms of life. Acyl groups in cells can vary in structure from the smallest unit, acetate, to modified long chain fatty acids, all of which can be activated and covalently attached to diverse amino acid side chains and consequently modulate protein function. For example, acetylation of Lys residues can alter the charge state of proteins and generate new recognition elements for protein–protein interactions. Alternatively, long chain fatty-acylation targets proteins to membranes and enables spatial control of cell signalling. To facilitate the analysis of protein acylation in biology, acyl analogues bearing alkyne or azide tags have been developed that enable fluorescent imaging and proteomic profiling of modified proteins using bioorthogonal ligation methods. Herein, we summarize the currently available acylation chemical reporters and highlight their utility to discover and quantify the roles of protein acylation in biology. PMID:25849926

  7. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a novel enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitor for Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2014-09-06

    Here we evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of PT119, a potent Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.01 nM and a residence time of 750 min on the enzyme target in mice. PT119 was found to have promising antibacterial activity in two different S. aureus infection models: it caused a 3 log reduction in the CFU’s in a mouse thigh muscle infection model and increased the survival rate from 0% to 50% in a mouse systemic infection model. PT119 was then radiolabeled with carbon-11 to evaluate its biodistribution and PK in both healthy and S. aureus infected mice using positron emission tomography (PET). The biodistribution of [11C]PT119 and/or its labeled metabolites did not differ significantly between the healthy group and the infected group, and PT119 was found to distribute equally between serum and tissue during the ~1 h of analysis permitted by the carbon-11 half life. This approach provides important data for PK/PD modeling and is the first step in identifying radiotracers that can non-invasively image bacterial infection in vivo.

  8. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a novel enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitor for Staphylococcus aureus

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hui; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; ...

    2014-09-06

    Here we evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of PT119, a potent Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.01 nM and a residence time of 750 min on the enzyme target in mice. PT119 was found to have promising antibacterial activity in two different S. aureus infection models: it caused a 3 log reduction in the CFU’s in a mouse thigh muscle infection model and increased the survival rate from 0% to 50% in a mouse systemic infection model. PT119 was then radiolabeled with carbon-11 to evaluate its biodistribution and PK in both healthymore » and S. aureus infected mice using positron emission tomography (PET). The biodistribution of [11C]PT119 and/or its labeled metabolites did not differ significantly between the healthy group and the infected group, and PT119 was found to distribute equally between serum and tissue during the ~1 h of analysis permitted by the carbon-11 half life. This approach provides important data for PK/PD modeling and is the first step in identifying radiotracers that can non-invasively image bacterial infection in vivo.« less

  9. Targeting InhA, the FASII Enoyl-ACP Reductase: SAR Studies on Novel Inhibitor Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pan; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) pathway is an essential but unexploited target for drug discovery. In this review we summarize SAR studies on inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase from the FASII pathway in M. tuberculosis. Inhibitor scaffolds that are described include the diaryl ethers, pyrrolidine carboxamides, piperazine indoleformamides, pyrazoles, arylamides, fatty acids, and imidazopiperidines, all of which form ternary complexes with InhA and the NAD cofactor, as well as isoniazid and the diazaborines which covalently modify the cofactor. Analysis of the structural data has enabled the development of a common binding mode for the ternary complex inhibitors, which includes a hydrogen bond network, a large hydrophobic pocket and a third ‘size-limited’ binding area comprised of both polar and non-polar groups. A critical factor in InhA inhibition involves ordering of the substrate binding loop, located close to the active site, and a direct link is proposed between loop ordering and slow onset enzyme inhibition. Slow onset inhibitors have long residence times on the enzyme target, a property that is of critical importance for in vivo activity. PMID:22283812

  10. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a novel enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitor for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of PT119, a potent Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.01 nM and a residence time of 750 min on the enzyme target, has been evaluated in mice. PT119 was found to have promising antibacterial activity in two different S. aureus infection models: it caused a 3 log reduction in the CFU’s in a mouse thigh muscle infection model and increased the survival rate from 0% to 50% in a mouse systemic infection model. PT119 was then radiolabeled with carbon-11 to evaluate its biodistribution and PK in both healthy and S. aureus infected mice using positron emission tomography (PET). The biodistribution of [11C]PT119 and/or its labeled metabolites did not differ significantly between the healthy group and the infected group, and PT119 was found to distribute equally between serum and tissue during the ~1 h of analysis permitted by the carbon-11 half life. This approach provides important data for PK/PD modeling and is the first step in identifying radiotracers that can non-invasively image bacterial infection in vivo. PMID:25217335

  11. Identification and Development of Novel Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii Enoyl Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Muench, Stephen P.; Mui, Ernest J.; Ruzheinikov, Sergey N.; Lu, Jeffrey Z.; Hutson, Samuel L.; Kirisits, Michael J.; Prigge, Sean T.; Roberts, Craig W.; Henriquez, Fiona L.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Rice, David W.; McLeod, Rima L.

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis causes significant morbidity and mortality and yet available medicines are limited by toxicities and hypersensitivity. Since improved medicines are needed urgently, rational approaches were used to identify novel lead compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase (TgENR), a type II fatty acid synthase enzyme essential in parasites but not present in animals. Fifty-three compounds, including three classes that inhibit ENRs, were tested. Six compounds have anti-parasite MIC90s ≤6μM without toxicity to host cells, three compounds have IC90s <45nM against recombinant TgENR and two protect mice. To further understand the mode of inhibition, the co-crystal structure of one of the most promising candidate compounds in complex with TgENR has been determined to 2.7Å. The crystal structure reveals that the aliphatic side chain of compound 19 occupies, as predicted, space made available by replacement of a bulky hydrophobic residue in homologous bacterial ENRs by Ala in TgENR. This provides a paradigm, conceptual foundation, reagents, and lead compounds for future rational development and discovery of improved inhibitors of T. gondii. PMID:20698542

  12. The role of enoyl reductase genes in phloridzin biosynthesis in apple.

    PubMed

    Dare, Andrew P; Tomes, Sumathi; Cooney, Janine M; Greenwood, David R; Hellens, Roger P

    2013-11-01

    Phloridzin is the predominant polyphenol in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) where it accumulates to high concentrations in many tissues including the leaves, bark, roots and fruit. Despite its relative abundance in apple the biosynthesis of phloridzin and other related dihydrochalcones remains only partially understood. The key unidentified enzyme in phloridzin biosynthesis is a putative carbon double bond reductase which is thought to act on p-coumaroyl-CoA to produce the dihydro-p-coumaroyl-CoA precursor. A functional screen of six apple enoyl reductase-like (ENRL) genes was carried out using transient infiltration into tobacco and gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) in order to determine carbon double bond reductase activity and contribution to foliar phloridzin concentrations. The ENRL-3 gene caused a significant increase in phloridzin concentration when infiltrated into tobacco leaves whilst a second protein ENRL-5, with over 98% amino acid sequence similarity to ENRL-3, showed p-coumaroyl-CoA reductase activity in enzyme assays. Finally, an RNAi study showed that reducing the transcript levels of ENRL-3 in transgenic 'Royal Gala' led to a 66% decrease in the concentration of dihydrochalcones in the leaves in the one available silenced line. Overall these results suggest that ENRL-3, and its close homolog ENRL-5, may contribute to the biosynthesis of phloridzin in apple.

  13. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla) nuts: cloning, characterization and their impact on oil composition.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which macadamia nuts accumulate the unusual palmitoleic and asclepic acyl moieties, which constitute up to 20% of the fatty acids in some varieties, are still unknown. Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (EC 3.1.2.14) are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate the synthesis of fatty acids in plants and that facilitate the export of the acyl moieties to the endoplasmic reticulum where they can be used in the production of glycerolipids. Here, we have investigated the possible role of acyl-ACP thioesterase activity in the composition of macadamia kernel oil. Accordingly, two acyl-ACP thioesterases were cloned from developing macadamia kernels, one of the FatA type and the other of the FatB type. These enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant thioesterases were purified, characterized kinetically and assayed with a variety of substrates, demonstrating the high specificity of macadamia FatA towards 16:1-ACP. Acyl-ACP thioesterase activity was also characterized in crude extracts from two different varieties of macadamia, Cate and Beaumont, which accumulate different amounts of n-7 fatty acids. The impact of acyl-ACP thioesterase activities on the oil composition of these kernels is discussed in the light of these results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant fatty acyl reductases: enzymes generating fatty alcohols for protective layers with potential for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Owen; Domergue, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Primary fatty alcohols are found throughout the biological world, either in free form or in a combined state. They are common components of plant surface lipids (i.e. cutin, suberin, sporopollenin, and associated waxes) and their absence can significantly perturb these essential barriers. Fatty alcohols and/or derived compounds are also likely to have direct functions in plant biotic and abiotic interactions. An evolutionarily related set of alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases (FARs) is present in all kingdoms of life. Plant microsomal and plastid-associated FAR enzymes have been characterized, acting on acyl-coenzymeA (acyl-CoA) or acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates, respectively. FARs have distinct substrate specificities both with regard to chain length and chain saturation. Fatty alcohols and wax esters, which are a combination of fatty alcohol and fatty acid, have a variety of commercial applications. The expression of FARs with desired specificities in transgenic microbes or oilseed crops would provide a novel means of obtaining these valuable compounds. In the present review, we report on recent progress in characterizing plant FAR enzymes and in understanding the biological roles of primary fatty alcohols, as well as describe the biotechnological production and industrial uses of fatty alcohols.

  15. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  16. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  17. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  18. Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Wang, Derek; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis invades cells as an infectious elementary body (EB). The EB is internalized into a vacuole that is hidden from the host defense mechanism, and is modified to sustain the development of the replicative reticulate body (RB). Inside this parasitophorous compartment, called the inclusion, the pathogen survives supported by an active exchange of nutrients and proteins with the host cell. We show that host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The bacterial acylating enzymes for the essential lipids 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and 1-acyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine were identified as CT453 and CT775, respectively. Bacterial CT775 was found to be associated with lipid droplets (LDs). During the development of C. trachomatis, the human acyl-CoA carrier hACBD6 was recruited to cytosolic LDs and translocated into the inclusion. hACBD6 protein modulated the activity of CT775 in an acyl-CoA dependent fashion and sustained the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase by buffering the concentration of acyl-CoAs. We propose that disruption of the binding activity of the acyl-CoA carrier might represent a new drug-target to prevent growth of C. trachomatis. PMID:25604091

  19. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  20. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  1. Crystallization and rhenium MAD phasing of the acyl-homoserinelactone synthase EsaI

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Murphy IV, Frank V.; Gould, Ty A.; Jambeck, Per; Val, Dale L.; Cronan, Jr., John E.; Beck von Bodman, Susan; Churchill, Mair E.A.

    2009-04-22

    Acyl-homoserine-L-lactones (AHLs) are diffusible chemical signals that are required for virulence of many Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs are produced by AHL synthases from two substrates, S-adenosyl-L-methionine and acyl-acyl carrier protein. The AHL synthase EsaI, which is homologous to the AHL synthases from other pathogenic bacterial species, has been crystallized in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.40, c = 47.33 {angstrom}. The structure was solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction with a novel use of the rhenium anomalous signal. The rhenium-containing structure has been refined to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} and the perrhenate ion binding sites and liganding residues have been identified.

  2. Measurement of the acyl-CoA intermediates of beta-oxidation by h.p.l.c. with on-line radiochemical and photodiode-array detection. Application to the study of [U-14C]hexadecanoate oxidation by intact rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Watmough, N J; Turnbull, D M; Sherratt, H S; Bartlett, K

    1989-01-01

    The quantitative isolation of acyl-CoA esters of chain length C2-C17 from mitochondrial incubations and their analysis by reverse-phase radio-h.p.l.c. is described. Photodiode-array detection was used to characterize 2-enoyl-CoA esters. The chromatographic behaviour of all 27 intermediates of the beta-oxidation of hexadecanoyl-CoA is documented. Only C16, C14 and C12 intermediates were detected in uncoupled mitochondria oxidizing [U-14C]hexadecanoyl-CoA in the presence of fluorocitrate and carnitine, providing evidence for some organization of the enzymes of beta-oxidation [Garland, Shepherd & Yates (1965) Biochem. J. 97, 587-594; Sumegi & Srere (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 8748-8752]. Rotenone increased concentrations of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA and 2-enoyl-CoA esters and inhibited flux. These experiments provide the first direct unambiguous measurements of acyl-CoA esters in intact respiring rat liver mitochondrial fractions. PMID:2818568

  3. Acyl chain preference and inhibitor identification of Moraxella catarrhalis LpxA: Insight through crystal structure and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Shivendra; Kesari, Pooja; Yadav, Ravi; Dev, Aditya; Narwal, Manju; Kumar, Pravindra

    2017-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important surface component and a potential virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative bacteria. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA) enzyme catalyzes the first reaction of LPS biosynthesis, reversible transfer of R-3-hydroxy-acyl moiety from donor R-3-hydroxy-acyl-acyl carrier protein to the 3' hydroxyl position of UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine. LpxA enzyme's essentiality in bacterial survival and absence of any homologous protein in humans makes it a promising target for anti-bacterial drug development. Herein, we present the crystal structure of Moraxella catarrhalis LpxA (McLpxA). We propose that L171 is responsible for limiting the acyl chain length in McLpxA to 10C or 12C. The study reveals the plausible interactions between the highly conserved clusters of basic residues at the C-terminal end of McLpxA and acidic residues of acyl carrier protein (ACP). Furthermore, the crystal structure of McLpxA was used to screen potential inhibitors from NCI open database using various computational approaches viz. pharmacophore mapping, virtual screening and molecular docking. Molecules Mol212032, Mol609399 and Mol152546 showed best binding affinity with McLpxA among all screened molecules. These molecules mimic the substrate-LpxA binding interactions.

  4. Carrier Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... available for a limited number of diseases, including cystic fibrosis , fragile X syndrome , sickle cell disease , and Tay– ... are already pregnant are offered carrier screening for cystic fibrosis, hemoglobinopathies , and spinal muscular atrophy . You can have ...

  5. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  6. Characterisation of acyl-ACP desaturases from Macadamia integrifolia Maiden & Betche and Nerium oleander L.

    PubMed

    Gummeson; Lenman; Lee; Singh; Stymne

    2000-05-15

    The seed oil in Macadamia integrifolia contains about 30% palmitoleic acid (16:1(Delta9)) and Nerium oleander about 12% isoricinoleic acid (Delta9-hydroxy-18:1(Delta12)). It has been shown that palmitoleic acid can be produced by acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases and it has also been shown that fatty acid hydroxylation can occur via direct substitution of a hydrogen atom. Therefore it seemed possible that the enzymes responsible for the making of these unusual fatty acids in M. integrifolia and N. oleander were of acyl-ACP desaturase type. Extracts from developing M. integrifolia developing seeds showed a relative ratio of 16:0-ACP to 18:0-ACP desaturation that was about 13 times higher than in sunflower seeds. N. oleander seed extracts catalysed conversion of 18:0-ACP to 18:1(Delta9) but only trace amounts of Delta9-hydroxy fatty acids were formed. A total of four cDNAs were isolated from developing seeds, of both species, using a fragment isolated with PCR amplification. The M. integrifolia acyl-ACP desaturase cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. A partly purified fraction of the enzyme showed a 16:0-ACP to 18:0-ACP desaturation ratio about 90-fold less than that in the Macadamia extracts. Expressed N. oleander acyl-ACP desaturase cDNAs showed predominantly 18:0-ACP desaturase activity and no hydroxylase activity. Thus it is not likely that any of the four acyl-ACP desaturases cloned from M. integrifolia or N. oleander is involved in the production of unusual fatty acids.

  7. Intramitochondrial control of the oxidation of hexadecanoate in skeletal muscle. A study of the acyl-CoA esters which accumulate during rat skeletal-muscle mitochondrial beta-oxidation of [U-14C]hexadecanoate and [U-14C]hexadecanoyl-carnitine.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Bhuiyan, A K; Kler, R S; Turnbull, D M; Bartlett, K

    1993-01-01

    1. We describe the acyl-CoA and acyl-carnitine esters which arise from the incubation of well-coupled State 3 rat skeletal-muscle mitochondrial fractions with [U-14C]hexadecanoate and [U-14C]hexadecanoyl-carnitine. 2. Acyl-CoA ester intermediates of chain length 16, 14, 12, 10 and 8 carbons were detected. 3. Although incubations were in steady state in respect of oxygen consumption, 14CO2 production and generation of acid-soluble radioactivity, quantitative analysis of acyl-CoA esters showed that steady state was not achieved in respect of all intermediates. 4. 3-Hydroxyacyl- and 2-enoyl-CoA and -carnitine esters were found under normoxic conditions. 5. Direct measurement of NAD+ and NADH shows that under identical incubation conditions our observations cannot be explained by gross perturbation of the [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio. 6. We hypothesize that there is a small pool of rapidly recycling NAD+ channelled between complex I of the respiratory chain and the newly described mitochondrial-inner-membrane-associated beta-oxidation trifunctional enzyme [Uchida, Izai, Orii and Hashimoto (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 1034-1041]. PMID:8424753

  8. Cloning of an ORF with homology to Mycobacterium echA1, encoding the enoyl-CoA hydratase, in Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Humanes, L; García-Fernández, J M; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1999-01-01

    An open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of significant homology (55.7% identity) with the enoyl-CoA hydratase encoded by the gene echA1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been found in the genome of the plant-pathogen bacteria Rhodococcus fascians strain NRRL-B-15096. Sequence alignments showed that it possesses several conserved blocks common to E. coli, M. tuberculosis and human mitochondria. One of such blocks includes a glutamate residue located at position 149, corresponding to the glutamate 139 of Escherichia coli. This glutamate was previously shown to be the catalytic residue of enoyl-CoA hydratase in the multienzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation from E. coli. Our results provide additional information on the conserved domains of this enzyme. Significant homologies in other genome regions between R. fascians and M. tuberculosis confirm their phylogenetic relationship.

  9. Radiolabelling and positron emission tomography of PT70, a time-dependent inhibitor of InhA, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Li; Lu, Yang; ...

    2015-07-14

    PT70 is a diaryl ether inhibitor of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. It has a residence time of 24 min on the target, and also shows antibacterial activity in a mouse model of tuberculosis infection. Due to the interest in studying target tissue pharmacokinetics of PT70, we developed a method to radiolabel PT70 with carbon-11 and have studied its pharmacokinetics in mice and baboons using positron emission tomography.

  10. Radiolabelling and positron emission tomography of PT70, a time-dependent inhibitor of InhA, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Li; Lu, Yang; Pan, Pan; Hooker, Jacob M.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-07-14

    PT70 is a diaryl ether inhibitor of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. It has a residence time of 24 min on the target, and also shows antibacterial activity in a mouse model of tuberculosis infection. Due to the interest in studying target tissue pharmacokinetics of PT70, we developed a method to radiolabel PT70 with carbon-11 and have studied its pharmacokinetics in mice and baboons using positron emission tomography.

  11. Generation of cell-to-cell signals in quorum sensing: acyl homoserine lactone synthase activity of a purified Vibrio fischeri LuxI protein.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, A L; Val, D L; Hanzelka, B L; Cronan, J E; Greenberg, E P

    1996-09-03

    Many bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone signals to monitor cell density in a type of gene regulation termed quorum sensing and response. Synthesis of these signals is directed by homologs of the luxi gene of Vibrio fischeri. This communication resolves two critical issues concerning the synthesis of the V. fischeri signal. (i) The luxI product is directly involved in signal synthesis-the protein is an acyl homoserine lactone synthase; and (ii) the substrates for acyl homoserine lactone synthesis are not amino acids from biosynthetic pathways or fatty acid degradation products, but rather they are S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and an acylated acyl carrier protein (ACP) from the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. We purified a maltose binding protein-LuxI fusion polypeptide and showed that, when provided with the appropriate substrates, it catalyzes the synthesis of an acyl homoserine lactone. In V. fischeri, luxi directs the synthesis of N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone and hexanoyl homoserine lactone. The purified maltose binding protein-LuxI fusion protein catalyzes the synthesis of hexanoyl homoserine lactone from hexanoyl-ACP and SAM. There is a high level of specificity for hexanoyl-ACP over ACPs with differing acyl group lengths, and hexanoyl homoserine lactone was not synthesized when SAM was replaced with other amino acids, such as methionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, homoserine, or homoserine lactone, or when hexanoyl-SAM was provided as the substrate. This provides direct evidence that the LuxI protein is an auto-inducer synthase that catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between SAM and a fatty acyl-ACP and then catalyzes the formation of the acyl homoserine lactone from the acyl-SAM intermediate.

  12. ROMPgel beads in IRORI format: acylations revisited.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard S

    2005-01-01

    Functionalized "designer" polymers derived from ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMPgels) are attractive for their high loading, high purity, and ease of synthesis. Their physical state may vary from liquid to gel to granular solid, making a general method of handling these polymers difficult. By incorporating a suitable norbornene-substituted linker on standard Wang beads, ROMPgels can be easily grafted onto the resin, adding the convenience of a bead format while still maintaining the high loading and excellent site accessibility. This advantage is demonstrated by the use of an N-hydroxysuccinimide ROMPgel (3.3 mmol g(-1), a 3-fold increase from the parent linker resin) in IRORI Kan format. Conditions for the acylation of these IRORI-formatted ROMPgels are reported, along with the scope and limitations of the choice of acylating reagents. Yields are greatly improved by the use of perfluorinated solvents as a nonparticipating cosolvent in the acylation process. A simple titration method for the quantification of the acylated ROMPgels is also reported. Spent Kans are regenerated after each use without apparent loss of activity or purity after several cycles. Due to the high loading and reduced swelling of the ROMPgel resin, up to 0.39 mmol acyl group has successfully been recovered from a single IRORI miniKan, demonstrating the high capacity of the resin and applicability to both lead discovery and optimization programs.

  13. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  14. In vivo modification of native carrier protein domains.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Meier, Jordan L; Torpey, Justin W; Burkart, Michael D

    2009-04-17

    Carrier proteins are central to the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in all organisms. Here we describe metabolic labeling and manipulation of native acyl carrier proteins in both type I and II fatty acid synthases. By utilizing natural promiscuity in the CoA biosynthetic pathway in combination with synthetic pantetheine analogues, we demonstrate metabolic labeling of endogenous carrier proteins with reporter tags in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and in a human carcinoma cell line. The highly specific nature of the post-translational modification that was utilized for tagging allows for simple visualization of labeled carrier proteins, either by direct fluorescence imaging or after chemical conjugation to a fluorescent reporter. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of this approach for the isolation and enrichment of carrier proteins by affinity purification. Finally, we use these techniques to identify a carrier protein from an unsequenced organism, a finding that validates this proteomic approach to natural product biosynthetic enzyme discovery.

  15. Identification of Middle Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Ligase Responsible for the Biosynthesis of 2-Alkylmalonyl-CoAs for Polyketide Extender Unit*

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Shunji; Kawata, Akihiro; Panthee, Suresh; Hayashi, Teruo; Shimizu, Takeshi; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of the atypical polyketide extender unit is important for the development of bioactive natural products. Reveromycin (RM) derivatives produced by Streptomyces sp. SN-593 possess several aliphatic extender units. Here, we studied the molecular basis of 2-alkylmalonyl-CoA formation by analyzing the revR and revS genes, which form a transcriptional unit with the revT gene, a crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase homolog. We mainly focused on the uncharacterized adenylate-forming enzyme (RevS). revS gene disruption resulted in the reduction of all RM derivatives, whereas reintroduction of the gene restored the yield of RMs. Although RevS was classified in the fatty acyl-AMP ligase clade based on phylogenetic analysis, biochemical characterization revealed that the enzyme catalyzed the middle chain fatty acyl-CoA ligase (FACL) but not the fatty acyl-AMP ligase activity, suggesting the molecular evolution for acyl-CoA biosynthesis. Moreover, we examined the in vitro conversion of fatty acid into 2-alkylmalonyl-CoA using purified RevS and RevT. The coupling reaction showed efficient conversion of hexenoic acid into butylmalonyl-CoA. RevS efficiently catalyzed C8–C10 middle chain FACL activity; therefore, we speculated that the acyl-CoA precursor was truncated via β-oxidation and converted into (E)-2-enoyl-CoA, a RevT substrate. To determine whether the β-oxidation process is involved between the RevS and RevT reaction, we performed the feeding experiment using [1,2,3,4-13C]octanoic acid. 13C NMR analysis clearly demonstrated incorporation of the [3,4-13C]octanoic acid moiety into the structure of RM-A. Our results provide insight into the role of uncharacterized RevS homologs that may catalyze middle chain FACL to produce a unique polyketide extender unit. PMID:26378232

  16. In silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Tim; Lewis, Richard; Luker, Tim; Bonnert, Roger; Bernstein, Michael A.; Birkinshaw, Timothy N.; Thom, Stephen; Wenlock, Mark; Paine, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Drugs and drug candidates containing a carboxylic acid moiety, including many widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often metabolized to form acyl glucuronides (AGs). NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen are amongst the most widely used drugs on the market, whereas similar carboxylic acid drugs such as Suprofen have been withdrawn due to adverse events. Although the link between these AG metabolites and toxicity is not proven, there is circumstantial literature evidence to suggest that more reactive acyl glucuronides may, in some cases, present a greater risk of exhibiting toxic effects. We wished therefore to rank the reactivity of potential new carboxylate-containing drug candidates, and performed kinetic studies on synthetic acyl glucuronides to benchmark our key compounds. Driven by the desire to quickly rank the reactivity of compounds without the need for lengthy synthesis of the acyl glucuronide, a correlation was established between the degradation half-life of the acyl glucuronide and the half life for the hydrolysis of the more readily available methyl ester derivative. This finding enabled a considerable broadening of chemical property space to be investigated. The need for kinetic measurements was subsequently eliminated altogether by correlating the methyl ester hydrolysis half-life with the predicted 13C NMR chemical shift of the carbonyl carbon together with readily available steric descriptors in a PLS model. This completely in silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity is applicable within the earliest stages of drug design with low cost and acceptable accuracy to guide intelligent molecular design. This reactivity data will be useful alongside the more complex additional pharmacokinetic exposure and distribution data that is generated later in the drug discovery process for assessing the overall toxicological risk of acidic drugs.

  17. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  18. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  19. Characterization of acyl-ACP thioesterases of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) seed and high levels of stearate production in transgenic canola.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, D J; Kridl, J C

    1998-03-01

    Acyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are, at least in part, responsible for the fatty acyl chain length composition of seed storage oils. Acyl-ACP thioesterases with specificity for each of the saturated acyl-ACP substrates from 8:0 through 16:0 have been cloned, with the exception of 18:0, and are members of the FatB class of thioesterases. The authors have determined that the tropical tree species mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) stores 18:0 (stearate) in its seed oil in amounts of up to 56% by weight. Acyl-ACP thioesterase activity as measured in crude mangosteen seed extracts showed a preference for 18:1-ACP substrates, but had significant activity with 18:0 relative to that with 16:0-ACP, suggesting a thioesterase might be involved in the production of stearate. Three distinct acyl-ACP thioesterases were cloned from mangosteen seed cDNA; two representative of the FatA class and one representative of the FatB class. When expressed in vitro, the enzyme encoded by one of the FatAs (Garm FatA1) while preferring 18:1-ACP showed relatively low activity with 16:0-ACP as compared to 18:0-ACP, similar to the substrate preferences shown by the crude seed extract. Expression of Garm FatA1 in Brassica seeds led to the accumulation of stearate up to 22% in seed oil. These results suggest that Garm FatA1 is at least partially responsible for determining the high stearate composition of mangosteen seed oil and that FatA as well FatB thioesterases have evolved for specialized roles.

  20. Characterization of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases from Camelina sativa, Macadamia tetraphylla and Dolichandra unguis-cati.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando Rodríguez; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-04-15

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases (EC 1.14.19.2) are soluble enzymes that catalyse the insertion of a double bond into saturated fatty acid bound in saturated acyl chains bound to ACP in higher plants, producing cis-monounsaturated fatty acids. Three types of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases have been described: Δ(9)-acyl-ACP, Δ(6)-acyl-ACP and Δ(4)-acyl-ACP desaturases, which differ in the substrate specificity and the position in which the double bond is introduced. In the present work, Camelina sativa (CsSAD), Macadamia tetraphylla (MtSAD) and Dolichandra unguis-cati (DuSAD) desaturases were cloned, sequenced and characterized. Single copies of CsSAD, MtSAD and DuSAD with three, one and two different alleles, respectively, were found. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization in protein extracts. The recombinant CsSAD enzyme showed 300-fold higher specificity towards 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Similar profile exhibited MtSAD although the differences in the specificity were lower, around 170-fold higher for 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Furthermore, DuSAD presented a profile showing preference towards 16:0-ACP against 18:0-ACP, around twice more, being so a Δ(9) palmitoyl-ACP desaturase. Also, we reported the expression profile of CsSAD, which showed the highest levels of expression in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm. Moreover, the possibility to express a new desaturase in C. sativa (oilseed crop that store high levels of oil and is easy to transform) to create a new line rich in short monounsaturated fatty acid is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Acyl anion free N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah J; Candish, Lisa; Lupton, David W

    2013-06-21

    Reaction discovery using N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis has been dominated by the chemistry of acyl anion equivalents. Recent studies demonstrate that NHCs are far more diverse catalysts, with a variety of reactions discovered that proceed without acyl anion equivalent formation. In this tutorial review selected examples of acyl anion free NHC catalysis using carbonyl compounds are presented.

  2. Acylation of Escherichia coli Hemolysin: A Unique Protein Lipidation Mechanism Underlying Toxin Function

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Peter; Koronakis, Vassilis; Hughes, Colin

    1998-01-01

    The pore-forming hemolysin (HlyA) of Escherichia coli represents a unique class of bacterial toxins that require a posttranslational modification for activity. The inactive protoxin pro-HlyA is activated intracellularly by amide linkage of fatty acids to two internal lysine residues 126 amino acids apart, directed by the cosynthesized HlyC protein with acyl carrier protein as the fatty acid donor. This action distinguishes HlyC from all bacterial acyltransferases such as the lipid A, lux-specific, and nodulation acyltransferases, and from eukaryotic transferases such as N-myristoyl transferases, prenyltransferases, and thioester palmitoyltransferases. Most lipids directly attached to proteins may be classed as N-terminal amide-linked and internal ester-linked acyl groups and C-terminal ether-linked isoprenoid groups. The acylation of HlyA and related toxins does not equate to these but does appear related to a small number of eukaryotic proteins that include inflammatory cytokines and mitogenic and cholinergic receptors. While the location and structure of lipid moieties on proteins vary, there are common effects on membrane affinity and/or protein-protein interactions. Despite being acylated at two residues, HlyA does not possess a “double-anchor” motif and does not have an electrostatic switch, although its dependence on calcium binding for activity suggests that the calcium-myristoyl switch may have relevance. The acyl chains on HlyA may provide anchorage points onto the surface of the host cell lipid bilayer. These could then enhance protein-protein interactions either between HlyA and components of a host signal transduction pathway to influence cytokine production or between HlyA monomers to bring about oligomerization during pore formation. PMID:9618444

  3. Bacillus cereus-type polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthetic gene cluster contains R-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase gene.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Takahiro; Hiroe, Ayaka; Ishii-Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2017-08-01

    Bacillus cereus and Bacillus megaterium both accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) but their PHA biosynthetic gene (pha) clusters that code for proteins involved in PHA biosynthesis are different. Namely, a gene encoding MaoC-like protein exists in the B. cereus-type pha cluster but not in the B. megaterium-type pha cluster. MaoC-like protein has an R-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase (R-hydratase) activity and is referred to as PhaJ when involved in PHA metabolism. In this study, the pha cluster of B. cereus YB-4 was characterized in terms of PhaJ's function. In an in vitro assay, PhaJ from B. cereus YB-4 (PhaJYB4) exhibited hydration activity toward crotonyl-CoA. In an in vivo assay using Escherichia coli as a host for PHA accumulation, the recombinant strain expressing PhaJYB4 and PHA synthase led to increased PHA accumulation, suggesting that PhaJYB4 functioned as a monomer supplier. The monomer composition of the accumulated PHA reflected the substrate specificity of PhaJYB4, which appeared to prefer short chain-length substrates. The pha cluster from B. cereus YB-4 functioned to accumulate PHA in E. coli; however, it did not function when the phaJYB4 gene was deleted. The B. cereus-type pha cluster represents a new example of a pha cluster that contains the gene encoding PhaJ.

  4. Use of enoyl coenzyme A hydratase of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis for the serological diagnosis of Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2013-10-01

    Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), remains difficult to control because of the lack of specific and sensitive diagnostic tests. In order to improve the specificity of sero-diagnosis for JD, the phage display library derived from genomic DNA of MAP was immunoscreened to identify novel antigenic targets. We selected a clone using antibodies from MAP experimentally infected cattle, and annotated its coding sequence as MAP1197 in the MAP genome, which encoded "echA12_2" in the MAP protein (Map-echA) belonging to Enoyl-CoA hydratase, known as a crotonase enzyme. The Map-echA was expressed in Esherichia coli and purified as a histidine-tag recombinant protein (rMap-echA), and the diagnostic potential of the protein was further evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Antibody responses to rMap-echA were higher in MAP-infected cattle than in uninfected cattle. The specificity of the Map-echA ELISA was also confirmed by evaluation with hyper-immune sera against various kinds of Mycobacterium species. Furthermore, in all experimentally infected cattle the antibody against rMap-echA was detected 2-7months earlier than by a commercially available ELISA kit. These results suggested that Map-echA can be used as a specific and sensitive serological diagnostic antigen for the detection of MAP infection.

  5. Crystal structure and biochemical studies of the trans-acting polyketide enoyl reductase LovC from lovastatin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Nguyen, Chi; Bruegger, Joel; Smith, Peter; Xu, Wei; Ma, Suzanne; Wong, Emily; Wong, Steven; Xie, Xinkai; Li, Jesse W.-H.; Vederas, John C.; Tang, Yi; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Lovastatin is an important statin prescribed for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Biosynthesis of lovastatin uses an iterative type I polyketide synthase (PKS). LovC is a trans-acting enoyl reductase (ER) that specifically reduces three out of eight possible polyketide intermediates during lovastatin biosynthesis. Such trans-acting ERs have been reported across a variety of other fungal PKS enzymes as a strategy in nature to diversify polyketides. How LovC achieves such specificity is unknown. The 1.9-Å structure of LovC reveals that LovC possesses a medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) fold with a unique monomeric assembly. Two LovC cocrystal structures and enzymological studies help elucidate the molecular basis of LovC specificity, define stereochemistry, and identify active-site residues. Sequence alignment indicates a general applicability to trans-acting ERs of fungal PKSs, as well as their potential application to directing biosynthesis. PMID:22733743

  6. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella Tularensis: Residence Time and In Vivo Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; England, Kathleen; Ende, Christopher am; Truglio, James J.; Luckner, Sylvia; Reddy, B. Gopal; Marlenee, Nikki; Knudson, Susan E.; Knudson, Dennis L.; Bowen, Richard A.; Kisker, Caroline; Slayden, Richard A.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 μg/ml. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency. PMID:19206187

  7. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  8. A [32P]-NAD+-based method to identify and quantitate long residence time enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weixuan; Neckles, Carla; Chang, Andrew; Bommineni, Gopal Reddy; Spagnuolo, Lauren; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Nina; Lai, Christina; Truglio, James; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The classical methods for quantifying drug-target residence time (tR) use loss or regain of enzyme activity in progress curve kinetic assays. However, such methods become imprecise at very long residence times, mitigating the use of alternative strategies. Using the NAD(P)H-dependent FabI enoyl-ACP reductase as a model system, we developed a Penefsky column-based method for direct measurement of tR, where the off-rate of the drug was determined with radiolabeled [adenylate-32P] NAD(P+) cofactor. Twenty-three FabI inhibitors were analyzed and a mathematical model was used to estimate limits to the tR values of each inhibitor based on percent drug-target complex recovery following gel filtration. In general, this method showed good agreement with the classical steady state kinetic methods for compounds with tR values of 10-100 min. In addition, we were able to identify seven long tR inhibitors (100-1500 min) and to accurately determine their tR values. The method was then used to measure tR as a function of temperature, an analysis not previously possible using the standard kinetic approach due to decreased NAD(P)H stability at elevated temperatures. In general, a 4-fold difference in tR was observed when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 37 °C . PMID:25684450

  9. Synthesis and mass spectrometry of 1-acyl and 3-acyl-sn-glycerol carbonates.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschläger, J; Gercken, G

    1978-08-01

    sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate was prepared fromD-serine,sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate fromL-serine, via 1-0- or 3-0-benzyl-sn-glycerol, respectively.sn-Glycerol-2,3-carbonate was also prepared fromD-mannitol orD-serine following thesn-glycerol-3-β,β,β-trichloroethylcarbonate route.sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate andsn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate were acylated with saturated and unsaturated fatty acid chlorides to form 3-acyl-sn-glycerol-1,2-carbonates and 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonates, respectively. The mass spectra of the enantiomeric monoacyl-sn-glycerol carbonates showed molecular ions and acyl cations (RCO(+)) of high intensity. The heterocyclic dioxolan-2-one ring was remarkably stable during electron impact.

  10. Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma russeliana.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Farag, Mohamed A; Al-Yahya, Mohammad Abdul-Aziz

    2007-05-01

    The chloroform extract of the aerial parts of Caralluma russeliana yielded four acylated pregnane glycosides, namely russeliosides E-H, three were found now. The structures of the compounds were elucidated using MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, NOESY and HMBC experiments.

  11. Expanding the Reader Landscape of Histone Acylation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Bridgers, Joseph B; Strahl, Brian D

    2017-04-04

    In this issue of Structure,Klein et al. (2017) expand our understanding of what reader domains bind to by showing that MORF, a double PHD domain containing lysine acetyltransferase, is a preferential reader of histone lysine acylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation.

  13. Molar absorptivity and color characteristics of acylated and non-acylated pelargonidin-based anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Giusti, M M; Rodríguez-Saona, L E; Wrolstad, R E

    1999-11-01

    The effects of glycosylation and acylation on the spectral characteristics, molar absorptivity, and color attributes of purified acylated and non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives were compared. Pigments were obtained from strawberries, radishes, red-fleshed potatoes, and partially hydrolyzed radish pigments. Individual pigments were isolated by using semipreparative HPLC. Spectral and color (CIELch) attributes of purified pigments were measured. Molar absorptivity ranged from 15 600 to 39 590 for pelargonidin-3-glucoside (pg-3-glu) and pg-3-rutinoside-5-glucoside acylated with p-coumaric acid, respectively. The presence of cinnamic acid acylation had a considerable impact on spectral and color characteristics, causing a bathochromic shift of lambda(max). Sugar substitution also played an important role, with a hypsochromic shift caused by the presence of glycosylation. Pg-3, 5-diglu and pg-3,5-triglu possessed a higher hue angle (>40 degrees ) than the other pg derivatives at pH 1.0, corresponding to the yellow-orange region of the color solid. Acylation with malonic acid did not affect lambda(max) and showed little effect on color characteristics. The solvent system had an effect not only on the molar absorptivity, but also on the visual color characteristic of the pigments.

  14. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A; Williams, Todd D; Welti, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG (galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses.

  15. Induction, immunochemical identity and immunofluorescence localization of an 80000-molecular-weight peroxisome-proliferation-associated polypeptide (polypeptide PPA-80) and peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase of mouse liver and renal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Narendra D.; Reddy, M. Kumudavalli; Mangkornkanok-Mark, Mai; Reddy, Janardan K.

    1981-01-01

    The hypolipidaemic drugs methyl clofenapate, BR-931, Wy-14643 and procetofen induced a marked proliferation of peroxisomes in the parenchymal cells of liver and the proximal-convoluted-tubular epithelium of mouse kidney. The proliferation of peroxisomes was associated with 6–12-fold increase in the peroxisomal palmitoyl-CoA oxidizing capacity of the mouse liver. Enhanced activity of the peroxisomal palmitoyl-CoA oxidation system was also found in the renal-cortical homogenates of hypolipidaemic-drug-treated mice. The activity of enoyl-CoA hydratase in the mouse liver increased 30–50-fold and in the kidney cortex 3–5-fold with hypolipidaemic-drug-induced peroxisome proliferation in these tissues, and over 95% of this induced activity was found to be heat-labile peroxisomal enzyme in both organs. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoretic analysis of large-particle and microsomal fractions obtained from the liver and kidney cortex of mice treated with hypolipidaemic peroxisome proliferators demonstrated a substantial increase in the quantity of an 80000-mol.wt. peroxisome-proliferation-associated polypeptide (polypeptide PPA-80). The heat-labile peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase was purified from the livers of mice treated with the hypolipidaemic drug methyl clofenapate; the antibodies raised against this electrophoretically homogeneous protein yielded a single immunoprecipitin band with purified mouse liver enoyl-CoA hydratase and with liver and kidney cortical extracts of normal and hypolipidaemic-drug-treated mice. These anti-(mouse liver enoyl-CoA hydratase) antibodies also cross-reacted with purified rat liver enoyl-CoA hydratase and with the polypeptide PPA-80 obtained from rat and mouse liver. Immunofluorescence studies with anti-(polypeptide PPA-80) and anti-(peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase) provided visual evidence for the localization and induction of polypeptide PPA-80 and peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase in the liver and kidney

  16. Radiolabelling and positron emission tomography of PT70, a time-dependent inhibitor of InhA, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Li; Lu, Yang; Pan, Pan; Hooker, Jacob M; Fowler, Joanna S; Tonge, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    PT70 is a diaryl ether inhibitor of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. It has a residence time of 24 min on the target, and also shows antibacterial activity in a mouse model of tuberculosis infection. Due to the interest in studying target tissue pharmacokinetics of PT70, we developed a method to radiolabel PT70 with carbon-11 and have studied its pharmacokinetics in mice and baboons using positron emission tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  18. N-acylated alanine methyl esters (NAMEs) from Roseovarius tolerans, structural analogs of quorum-sensing autoinducers, N-acylhomoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Hilke; Thiel, Verena; Voget, Sonja; Patzelt, Diana; Daniel, Rolf; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The Roseobacter clade is one of the most important bacteria group living in the ocean. Liquid cultures of Roseovarius tolerans EL 164 were investigated for the production of autoinducers such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) and other secondary metabolites. The XAD extracts were analyzed by GC/MS. Two AHLs, Z7-C14 : 1-homoserine lactone (HSL) and C15 : 1-HSL, were identified. Additionally, the extract contained five compounds with molecular-ion peaks at m/z 104, 145, and 158, thus exhibiting mass spectra similar to those of AHLs with corresponding peaks at m/z 102, 143, and 156. Isolation of the main compound by column chromatography, NMR analysis, dimethyl disulfide derivatization for the determination of the location of the CC bond and finally synthesis of the compound with the proposed structure confirmed the compound to be (Z)-N-(hexadec-9-enoyl)alanine methyl ester. Four additional minor compounds were identified as C14 : 0-, C15 : 0-, C16 : 0-, and C17 : 1-N-acylated alanine methyl esters (NAMEs). All NAMEs have not been described from natural sources before. A BLASTp search showed the presence of AHL-producing luxI genes, but no homologous genes potentially responsible for the structurally closely related NAMEs were found. The involvement of the NAMEs in chemical communication processes of the bacteria is discussed.

  19. Selectivity of Pyridone- and Diphenyl Ether-Based Inhibitors for the Yersinia pestis FabV Enoyl-ACP Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Neckles, Carla; Pschibul, Annica; Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Hirschbeck, Maria; Kuper, Jochen; Davoodi, Shabnam; Zou, Junjie; Liu, Nina; Pan, Pan; Shah, Sonam; Daryaee, Fereidoon; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Lai, Cristina; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The enoyl-ACP reductase (ENR) catalyzes the last reaction in the elongation cycle of the bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) pathway. While the FabI ENR is a well validated drug target in organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus, alternate ENR isoforms have been discovered in other pathogens including the FabV enzyme that is the sole ENR in Yersinia pestis (ypFabV). Previously, we showed that the prototypical ENR inhibitor triclosan was a poor inhibitor of ypFabV and that inhibitors based on the 2-pyridone scaffold were more potent. These studies were performed with the T276S FabV variant. In the present work, we describe a detailed examination of the mechanism and inhibition of wild-type ypFabV and the T276S variant. The T276S mutation significantly reduces the affinity of diphenyl ether inhibitors for ypFabV (20->100 fold). In addition, while T276S ypFabV generally displays higher affinity for 2-pyridone inhibitors compared to the wild-type enzyme, the 4-pyridone scaffold yields compounds with similar affinity for both wild-type and T276S ypFabV. T276 is located at the N-terminus of the helical substrate-binding loop, and structural studies coupled with site-directed mutagenesis reveal that alterations in this residue modulate the size of the active site portal. Subsequently we were able to probe the mechanism of time-dependent inhibition in this enzyme family by extending the inhibition studies to include P142W ypFabV, a mutation that results in gain of slow-onset inhibition for the 4-pyridone PT156. PMID:27136302

  20. Role of (R)-specific enoyl coenzyme A hydratases of Pseudomonas sp in the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reeta; Chandrashekar, Arun; Shamala, Tumkur R

    2008-03-01

    Four (R)-specific enoyl CoA hydratases (PhaJ) interconnect the beta-oxidation pathway with PHA biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The use of antisense technique and over-expression to delineate the role of two of these enzymes, PhaJ1 and PhaJ4 forms the basis of this study. It has been observed that P. aeruginosa recombinant with phaJ1 antisense construct, fed with different fatty acids, produces PHA with less hydroxy octanoate (7-11% reduction) and a proportionate increase in other monomer fractions, compared to that of the control. Recombinants bearing phaJ4 antisense construct are found to contain less hydroxy decanoate (10-11% reduction) and more or less equal amount of hydroxy octanoate, compared to that of the control. P. aeruginosa has produced PHA with more hydroxy octanoate and decanoate (6-17% increase), respectively, when PhaJ1 and PhaJ4 have been over-expressed individually or along with PhaC1. PhaJ1 and PhaJ4 are found to be involved mainly in the production of hydroxy octanoyl CoA and hydroxy decanoyl CoA, respectively, in P. aeruginosa. The strongest accumulation of hydroxy octanoate and hydroxy decanoate has been observed along with hydroxy butyrate, in PHA, produced by E. coli, when PhaC1 has been co-expressed with PhaJ1 and PhaJ4, respectively. We have demonstrated, for the first time, the polymerization of hydroxy butyryl CoA monomers in recombinant E. coli by PhaC1 of P. aeruginosa.

  1. Rationalizing the Binding Kinetics for the Inhibition of the Burkholderia pseudomallei FabI1 Enoyl-ACP Reductase.

    PubMed

    Neckles, Carla; Eltschkner, Sandra; Cummings, Jason E; Hirschbeck, Maria; Daryaee, Fereidoon; Bommineni, Gopal R; Zhang, Zhuo; Spagnuolo, Lauren; Yu, Weixuan; Davoodi, Shabnam; Slayden, Richard A; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2017-04-04

    There is growing awareness of the link between drug-target residence time and in vivo drug activity, and there are increasing efforts to determine the molecular factors that control the lifetime of a drug-target complex. Rational alterations in the drug-target residence time require knowledge of both the ground and transition states on the inhibition reaction coordinate, and we have determined the structure-kinetic relationship for 22 ethyl- or hexyl-substituted diphenyl ethers that are slow-binding inhibitors of bpFabI1, the enoyl-ACP reductase FabI1 from Burkholderia pseudomallei. Analysis of enzyme inhibition using a two-dimensional kinetic map demonstrates that the ethyl and hexyl diphenyl ethers fall into two distinct clusters. Modifications to the ethyl diphenyl ether B ring result in changes to both on and off rates, where residence times of up to ∼700 min (∼11 h) are achieved by either ground state stabilization (PT444) or transition state destabilization (slower on rate) (PT404). By contrast, modifications to the hexyl diphenyl ether B ring result in residence times of 300 min (∼5 h) through changes in only ground state stabilization (PT119). Structural analysis of nine enzyme:inhibitor complexes reveals that the variation in structure-kinetic relationships can be rationalized by structural rearrangements of bpFabI1 and subtle changes to the orientation of the inhibitor in the binding pocket. Finally, we demonstrate that three compounds with residence times on bpFabI1 from 118 min (∼2 h) to 670 min (∼11 h) have in vivo efficacy in an acute B. pseudomallei murine infection model using the virulent B. pseudomallei strain Bp400.

  2. Acyl glucuronides: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sophie L; Maggs, James L; Hammond, Thomas G; Lambert, Craig; Williams, Dominic P; Park, B Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Acyl glucuronidation is the major metabolic conjugation reaction of most carboxylic acid drugs in mammals. The physiological consequences of this biotransformation have been investigated incompletely but include effects on drug metabolism, protein binding, distribution and clearance that impact upon pharmacological and toxicological outcomes. In marked contrast, the exceptional but widely disparate chemical reactivity of acyl glucuronides has attracted far greater attention. Specifically, the complex transacylation and glycation reactions with proteins have provoked much inconclusive debate over the safety of drugs metabolised to acyl glucuronides. It has been hypothesised that these covalent modifications could initiate idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. However, despite a large body of in vitro data on the reactions of acyl glucuronides with protein, evidence for adduct formation from acyl glucuronides in vivo is limited and potentially ambiguous. The causal connection of protein adduction to adverse drug reactions remains uncertain. This review has assessed the intrinsic reactivity, metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties of acyl glucuronides in the context of physiological, pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Although numerous experiments have characterised the reactions of acyl glucuronides with proteins, these might be attenuated substantially in vivo by rapid clearance of the conjugates. Consequently, to delineate a relationship between acyl glucuronide formation and toxicological phenomena, detailed pharmacokinetic analysis of systemic exposure to the acyl glucuronide should be undertaken adjacent to determining protein adduct concentrations in vivo. Further investigation is required to ascertain whether acyl glucuronide clearance is sufficient to prevent covalent modification of endogenous proteins and consequentially a potential immunological response. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency as decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Li, Duoling; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuying; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-06-01

    We report a case with late onset riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) characterized by decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum which is consistent with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (CDSP) while just the contrary to a typical MADD. This patient complained with muscle weakness, muscle pain and intermittent vomiting, and was diagnosed as polymyositis, received prednisone therapy before consulted with us. Muscle biopsy revealed mild lipid storage. The findings of serum acyl-carnitines were consistent with CDSP manifesting as decreased free and total carnitines in serum. But oral L-carnitine supplementation was not very effective to this patient and mutation analysis of the SLC22A5 gene for CDSP was normal. Later, another acyl-carnitine analysis revealed a typical MADD profile in serum, which was characterized by increased multiple acyl-carnitines. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in electron transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene which confirmed the diagnosis of MADD. After administration of riboflavin, he improved dramatically, both clinically and biochemically. Thus, late onset riboflavin-responsive MADD should be included in the differential diagnosis for adult carnitine deficiency.

  4. Fatty Acyl Chains of Mycobacterium marinum Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Yoann; Alibaud, Laeticia; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Maes, Emmanuel; Tokarski, Caroline; Elass, Elisabeth; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    We have recently established the fine structure of the glycan backbone of lipooligosaccharides (LOS-I to LOS-IV) isolated from Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies culminated with the description of an unusual terminal N-acylated monosaccharide that confers important biological functions to LOS-IV, such as macrophage activation, that may be relevant to granuloma formation. It was, however, also suggested that the lipid moiety was required for LOSs to exert their immunomodulatory activity. Herein, using highly purified LOSs from M. marinum, we have determined through a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR techniques, the structure and localization of the fatty acids composing the lipid moiety. The occurrence of two distinct polymethyl-branched fatty acids presenting specific localizations is consistent with the presence of two highly related polyketide synthases (Pks5 and Pks5.1) in M. marinum and presumably involved in the synthesis of these fatty acyl chains. In addition, a bioinformatic search permitted us to identify a set of enzymes potentially involved in the biosynthesis or transfer of these lipids to the LOS trehalose unit. These include MMAR_2343, a member of the Pap (polyketide-associated protein) family, that acylates trehalose-based glycolipids in M. marinum. The participation of MMAR_2343 to LOS assembly was demonstrated using a M. marinum mutant carrying a transposon insertion in the MMAR_2343 gene. Disruption of MMAR_2343 resulted in a severe LOS breakdown, indicating that MMAR_2343, hereafter designated PapA4, fulfills the requirements for LOS acylation and assembly. PMID:21803773

  5. Expression of Cyanobacterial Acyl-ACP Reductase Elevates the Triacylglycerol Level in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Kawase, Yasuko; Hayakawa, Jumpei; Matsuda, Mami; Nakamura, Mami; Era, Atsuko; Tanaka, Kan; Kondo, Akihiko; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Imamura, Sousuke; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen starvation is known to induce the accumulation of triacylglycerol (TAG) in many microalgae, and potential use of microalgae as a source of biofuel has been explored. However, nitrogen starvation also stops cellular growth. The expression of cyanobacterial acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae chloroplasts resulted in an accumulation of TAG, which led to an increase in the number and size of lipid droplets while maintaining cellular growth. Transcriptome and metabolome analyses showed that the expression of acyl-ACP reductase altered the activities of several metabolic pathways. The activities of enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis in chloroplasts, such as acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, were up-regulated, while pyruvate decarboxylation in mitochondria and the subsequent consumption of acetyl-CoA by the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were down-regulated. Aldehyde dehydrogenase, which oxidizes fatty aldehydes to fatty acids, was also up-regulated in the acyl-ACP reductase expresser. This activation was required for the lipid droplet accumulation and metabolic changes observed in the acyl-ACP reductase expresser. Nitrogen starvation also resulted in lipid droplet accumulation in C. merolae, while cell growth ceased as in the case of other algal species. The metabolic changes that occur upon the expression of acyl-ACP reductase are quite different from those caused by nitrogen starvation. Therefore, there should be a method for further increasing the storage lipid level while still maintaining cell growth that is different from the metabolic response to nitrogen starvation.

  6. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A.; Williams, Todd D.; Welti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  7. Mass-Tag Labeling Using Acyl-PEG Exchange for the Determination of Endogenous Protein S-Fatty Acylation.

    PubMed

    Percher, Avital; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Hang, Howard

    2017-08-01

    The covalent coupling of fatty acids to proteins provides an important mechanism of regulation in cells. In eukaryotes, cysteine fatty acylation (S-fatty acylation) has been shown to be critical for protein function in a variety of cellular pathways as well as microbial pathogenesis. While methods developed over the past decade have improved the detection and profiling of S-fatty acylation, these are hampered in their ability to characterize endogenous protein S-fatty acylation levels under physiological conditions. Furthermore, understanding the contribution of specific sites and levels of S-fatty acylation remains a major challenge. To evaluate S-fatty acylation of endogenous proteins as well as to determine the number of S-fatty acylation events, we developed the acyl-PEG exchange (APE) that utilizes cysteine-specific chemistry to exchange S-fatty acylation sites with mass-tags of defined size, which can be readily observed by western blotting. APE provides a readily accessible approach to investigate endogenous S-fatty acylation from any sample source, with high sensitivity and broad applicability that complements the current toolbox of methods for thioester-based post-translational modifications. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Physiological Consequences of Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the complex physiological demands of mammalian life requires strict control of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs because of the multiplicity of their cellular functions. Acyl-CoAs are substrates for energy production; stored within lipid droplets as triacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, and retinol esters; esterified to form membrane phospholipids; or used to activate transcriptional and signaling pathways. Indirect evidence suggests that acyl-CoAs do not wander freely within cells, but instead, are channeled into specific pathways. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for acyl-CoA compartmentalization, highlight the key modes of acyl-CoA regulation, and diagram potential mechanisms for controlling acyl-CoA partitioning. PMID:26124277

  9. Mechanism-based protein cross-linking probes to investigate carrier protein-mediated biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Andrew S; Rivera, Heriberto; Torpey, Justin W; Alexander, Matthew D; Burkart, Michael D

    2006-12-20

    Fatty acid, polyketide, and nonribosomal peptide biosynthetic enzymes perform structural modifications upon small molecules that remain tethered to a carrier protein. This manuscript details the design and analysis of cross-linking substrates that are selective for acyl carrier proteins and their cognate condensing enzymes. These inactivators are engineered through a covalent linkage to fatty acid acyl carrier protein via post-translational modification to contain a reactive probe that traps the active site cysteine residue of ketosynthase domains. These proteomic tools are applied to Escherichia coli fatty acid synthase enzymes, where KASI and KASII selectively cross-link ACP-bound epoxide and chloroacrylate moieties. These mechanism-based, protein-protein fusion reagents also demonstrated cross-linking of KASI to type II polyketide ACPs, while nonribosomal peptide carrier proteins showed no reactivity. Similar investigations into protein-protein interactions, proximity effects, and substrate specificities will be required to complete the mechanistic understanding of these pathways.

  10. Accumulation of medium-chain, saturated fatty acyl moieties in seed oils of transgenic Camelina sativa

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Jyoti; Vasani, Naresh; Lopez, Harry O.; Sederoff, Heike W.

    2017-01-01

    With its high seed oil content, the mustard family plant Camelina sativa has gained attention as a potential biofuel source. As a bioenergy crop, camelina has many advantages. It grows on marginal land with low demand for water and fertilizer, has a relatively short life cycle, and is stress tolerant. As most other crop seed oils, camelina seed triacylglycerols (TAGs) consist of mostly long, unsaturated fatty acyl moieties, which is not desirable for biofuel processing. In our efforts to produce shorter, saturated chain fatty acyl moieties in camelina seed oil for conversion to jet fuel, a 12:0-acyl-carrier thioesterase gene, UcFATB1, from California bay (Umbellularia californica Nutt.) was expressed in camelina seeds. Up to 40% of short chain laurate (C12:0) and myristate (C14:0) were present in TAGs of the seed oil of the transgenics. The total oil content and germination rate of the transgenic seeds were not affected. Analysis of positions of these two fatty acyl moieties in TAGs indicated that they were present at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions, but not sn-2, on the TAGs. Suppression of the camelina KASII genes by RNAi constructs led to higher accumulation of palmitate (C16:0), from 7.5% up to 28.5%, and further reduction of longer, unsaturated fatty acids in seed TAGs. Co-transformation of camelina with both constructs resulted in enhanced accumulation of all three medium-chain, saturated fatty acids in camelina seed oils. Our results show that a California bay gene can be successfully used to modify the oil composition in camelina seed and present a new biological alternative for jet fuel production. PMID:28212406

  11. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) based silencing of cotton enoyl-CoA reductase (ECR) gene and the role of very long chain fatty acids in normal leaf development and resistance to wilt disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay was employed as a reverse genetic approach to study gene function in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). This approach was used to investigate the function of Enoyl-CoA reductase (GhECR) in pathogen defense. Amino acid sequence al...

  12. Plasma levels of acylated ghrelin in patients with functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Jin Oh; Kim, Wan Jung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Jeon, Seong Ran; Jeong, Hoe Su

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between plasma acylated ghrelin levels and the pathophysiology of functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Twenty-two female patients with functional dyspepsia and twelve healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. The functional dyspepsia patients were each diagnosed based on the Rome III criteria. Eligible patients completed a questionnaire concerning the severity of 10 symptoms. Plasma acylated ghrelin levels before and after a meal were determined in the study participants using a commercial human acylated enzyme immunoassay kit; electrogastrograms were performed for 50 min before and after a standardized 10-min meal containing 265 kcal. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in plasma acylated ghrelin levels between healthy volunteers and patients with functional dyspepsia. However, in patients with functional dyspepsia, there was a negative correlation between fasting plasma acylated ghrelin levels and the sum score of epigastric pain (r = -0.427, P = 0.047) and a positive correlation between the postprandial/fasting plasma acylated ghrelin ratio and the sum score of early satiety (r = 0.428, P =0.047). Additionally, there was a negative correlation between fasting acylated ghrelin plasma levels and fasting normogastria (%) (r = -0.522, P = 0.013). Interestingly, two functional dyspepsia patients showed paradoxically elevated plasma acylated ghrelin levels after the meal. CONCLUSION: Abnormal plasma acylated ghrelin levels before or after a meal may be related to several of the dyspeptic symptoms seen in patients with functional dyspepsia. PMID:22611317

  13. Glutamate-119 of the large alpha-subunit is the catalytic base in the hydration of 2-trans-enoyl-coenzyme A catalyzed by the multienzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    He, X Y; Yang, S Y

    1997-09-09

    Glu139 of the large alpha-subunit of the multienzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation from Escherichia coli was identified as the catalytic residue of enoyl-CoA hydratase [Yang, S.-Y., He, X.-Y., & Schulz, H. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 6441-6447]. To determine whether any of the other conserved protic residues is directly involved in the hydratase catalysis, the multienzyme complexes with either an alpha/Asp69 --> Asn or an alpha/Glu119 --> Gln mutation were overproduced and characterized. The catalytic properties of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and l-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase of the mutant complexes were almost unaffected. The amidation of Asp69 and Glu119 caused a 7.6- and 88-fold decrease, respectively, in the kcat of enoyl-CoA hydratase without a significant change in the Km value of the hydratase as well as a 5.9- and 62-fold increase, respectively, in the Km of Delta3-cis-Delta2-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase with a very small decrease in the kcat of the latter enzyme. The data suggest that the carboxyl group of Glu119 is particularly important to the catalytic activity of enoyl-CoA hydratase. Furthermore, the wild-type hydratase shows a bell-shaped pH dependence of the kcat/Km with pKa values of 5.9 and 9.2, whereas the Glu119 --> Gln mutant hydratase has only a single pKa of 9.5. A simple explanation for these observations is that a deprotonated Glu119 and a protonated Glu139 are required for the high kcat of the enoyl-CoA hydratase. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, together with the structural information about the spatial arrangement of two conserved glutamate residues of rat liver enoyl-CoA hydratase [Engel, C. K., Mathieu, M., Zeelen, J. P., Hiltunen, J. K., and Wierenga, R. K. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 5135-5145] to which Glu119 and Glu139 of the large alpha-subunit correspond, lead to the conclusion that the gamma-carboxyl group of Glu119 serves as the second general acid-base functional group in catalyzing the hydration of 2-trans-enoyl-CoA.

  14. Mechanistic and Structural Insights into the Regioselectivity of an Acyl-CoA Fatty Acid Desaturase via Directed Molecular Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Vanhercke, Thomas; Shrestha, Pushkar; Green, Allan G.; Singh, Surinder P.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases and related enzymes play a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of unsaturated and various unusual fatty acids. Structural insights into the remarkable catalytic diversity and wide range of substrate specificities of this class of enzymes remain limited due to the lack of a crystal structure. To investigate the structural basis of the double bond positioning (regioselectivity) of the desaturation reaction in more detail, we relied on a combination of directed evolution in vitro and a powerful yeast complementation assay to screen for Δx regioselectivity. After two selection rounds, variants of the bifunctional Δ12/Δ9-desaturase from the house cricket (Acheta domesticus) exhibited increased Δ9-desaturation activity on shorter chain fatty acids. This change in specificity was the result of as few as three mutations, some of them near the putative active site. Subsequent analysis of individual substitutions revealed an important role of residue Phe-52 in facilitating Δ9-desaturation of shorter chain acyl substrates and allowed for the redesign of the cricket Δ12/Δ9-desaturase into a 16:0-specific Δ9-desaturase. Our results demonstrate that a minimal number of mutations can have a profound impact on the regioselectivity of acyl-CoA fatty acid desaturases and include the first biochemical data supporting the acyl-CoA acyl carrier specificity of a desaturase able to carry out Δ12-desaturation. PMID:21300802

  15. Multiple receptor conformers based molecular docking study of fluorine enhanced ethionamide with mycobacterium enoyl ACP reductase (InhA).

    PubMed

    Khan, Akib Mahmud; Shawon, Jakaria; Halim, Mohammad A

    2017-09-14

    A major limitation in current molecular docking method is that of failure to account for receptor flexibility. Herein we report multiple receptor conformers based molecular docking as a practical alternative to account for the receptor flexibility. Multiple (forty) conformers of Mycobacterium Enoyl ACP Reductase (InhA) are generated from Molecular Dynamics simulation and twenty crystallographic structures of InhA bound to different inhibitors are obtained from the Protein Data Bank. Fluorine directed modifications are performed to currently available anti-tuberculosis drug ethionamide. The modified drugs are optimized using B3LYP 6-31G (d,p) level of theory. Dipole moment, frontier orbital gap and thermodynamical properties such as electronic energy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy of these optimized drugs are investigated. These drugs are subsequently docked against the conformers of InhA. Molecular docking against multiple InhA conformations show variation in ligand binding affinity and suggest that Ser94, Gly96, Lys165 and Ile194 amino acids play critical role on strong drug-InhA interaction. Modified drug N1 showed greater binding affinity compared to EN in most conformations. Structure of PDB ID: 2NSD and snapshot conformer at 5.5ns show most favorable binding with N1 compared to other conformers. Fluorine participates in forming fluorine bonds and contributes significantly in increasing binding affinity. Our study reveal that addition of trifluoromethyl group explicitly shows promise in improving thermodynamic properties and in enhancing hydrogen bonding and non-bonded interactions. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation show that EN and N1 remained in the binding pocket similar to the docked pose of EN-InhA and E1-InhA complexes and also suggested that InhA binds to its inhibitor in inhibitor-induced folding manner. ADMET calculations predict modified drugs to have improved pharmacokinetic properties. Our study concludes that multiple receptor conformers based

  16. Acyl hydrazides as acyl donors for the synthesis of diaryl and aryl alkyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Akhbar, Ahmed R; Chudasama, Vijay; Fitzmaurice, Richard J; Powell, Lyn; Caddick, Stephen

    2014-01-21

    In this communication we describe a novel strategy for the formation of valuable diaryl and aryl alkyl ketones from acyl hydrazides. A wide variety of ketones are prepared and the mild reaction conditions allow for the use of a range of functionalities, especially in the synthesis of diaryl ketones.

  17. Estrogen elevates the peak overnight production rate of acylated ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Remberto C; Brundage, Richard; Cosma, Mihaela; Mielke, Kristi L; Bowers, Cyril Y; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2008-11-01

    Acylated ghrelin is the putatively bioactive GH secretagogue. Estradiol (E2) stimulates the synthesis rather than inhibits the metabolic clearance of acylated ghrelin. The study took place at an academic medical center. Healthy postmenopausal women participated. Interventions included prospectively randomized, double-blind separate-day iv infusions of saline or five graded doses of ghrelin in estrogen-deficient (n=12) and E2-supplemented (n=8) women. Metabolic clearance rate (MCR), volume of distribution, half-life, and secretion rate of acylated ghrelin were assessed. In pilot iv bolus ghrelin infusions, the median half-lives of acylated and total ghrelin were 21 and 36 min (P<0.01), MCRs 58 and 8.1 liters/kg.d (P<0.01), and volumes of distribution of 1.0 and 0.32 liters/kg (P<0.01), respectively. Transdermal E2 supplementation for 3 wk increased peak nighttime acylated ghrelin concentrations from 99+/-12 to 141+/-34 pg/ml (P=0.039). Exposure to E2 did not alter the linear relationships between 1) plasma acylated ghrelin concentration and ghrelin infusion rate (638+/-12 slope units), 2) MCR of acylated ghrelin and ghrelin infusion rate (10+/-2.5 slope units), and 3) MCR and plasma concentration of acylated ghrelin (0.017+/-0.004 slope units). These data predict peak nighttime production rates of acylated ghrelin of 3.8+/-0.9 (E2) and 1.9+/-0.2 (no E2) ng/kg.min (P=0.039). Acylated ghrelin has a multifold larger distribution volume and MCR than total ghrelin. An estrogenic milieu augments synthesis and/or acylation of ghrelin peptide without altering its MCR.

  18. Acylated flavonol glycoside from Platanus orientalis.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Mudasir A; Akbar, Seema; Dar, Javid A; Irtiza, Syed; Galal, Ahmed; Khuroo, Mohammad A; Ghazanfar, Khalid

    2012-03-01

    The ethylacetate and n-butanol fractions of ethanolic extract of Platanus orientalis leaves led to the isolation of new acylated flavonol glycoside as 3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavonol 3-[O-2-O-(2,4-Dihydroxy)-E-cinnamoyl-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, along with seven known compounds. All the compounds were characterized by NMR including 2D NMR techniques. The isolates were evaluated for NF-κB, nitric oxide (NO), aromatase and QR2 chemoprevention activities and some of them appeared to be modestly active.

  19. Structural studies of acyl esters of entacapone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppänen, J.; Wegelius, E.; Nevalainen, T.; Järvinen, T.; Gynther, J.; Huuskonen, J.

    2001-05-01

    The crystal structures of entacapone [( E)-2-cyano- N, N-diethyl-3-(3,4-dihydroxy-5-nitrophenyl)propenamide] and three of its acyl esters were solved. Entacapone, and its monopivaloate and diacetate derivatives, exist in the E-form while its dibenzoate derivative adopts the Z-form in the crystalline state. The ethyl substituents of the E-form are not freely rotating, as demonstrated by the broad signals in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The rotation barrier for the E-form was defined by the crystal structures, which show that free rotation of the ethyl substituents is blocked by the cyano-group.

  20. Enrichment of hydroxylated C24- and C26-acyl-chain sphingolipids mediates PIN2 apical sorting at trans-Golgi network subdomains

    PubMed Central

    Wattelet-Boyer, Valérie; Brocard, Lysiane; Jonsson, Kristoffer; Esnay, Nicolas; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Mongrand, Sébastien; Raikhel, Natasha; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.; Moreau, Patrick; Boutté, Yohann

    2016-01-01

    The post-Golgi compartment trans-Golgi Network (TGN) is a central hub divided into multiple subdomains hosting distinct trafficking pathways, including polar delivery to apical membrane. Lipids such as sphingolipids and sterols have been implicated in polar trafficking from the TGN but the underlying mechanisms linking lipid composition to functional polar sorting at TGN subdomains remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that sphingolipids with α-hydroxylated acyl-chains of at least 24 carbon atoms are enriched in secretory vesicle subdomains of the TGN and are critical for de novo polar secretory sorting of the auxin carrier PIN2 to apical membrane of Arabidopsis root epithelial cells. We show that sphingolipid acyl-chain length influences the morphology and interconnections of TGN-associated secretory vesicles. Our results uncover that the sphingolipids acyl-chain length links lipid composition of TGN subdomains with polar secretory trafficking of PIN2 to apical membrane of polarized epithelial cells. PMID:27681606

  1. In vivo and in vitro Trans-Acylation by BryP, the Putative Bryostatin Pathway Acyltransferase Derived from an Uncultured Marine Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Lopanik, Nicole B.; Shields, Jennifer A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Rath, Christopher M.; Hothersall, Joanne; Haygood, Margo G.; Håkansson, Kristina; Thomas, Christopher M.; Sherman, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The putative modular polyketide synthase (PKS) that prescribes biosynthesis of the bryostatin natural products from the uncultured bacterial symbiont of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina possesses a discrete ORF (bryP) that encodes a protein containing tandem acyltransferase (AT) domains upstream of the PKS ORFs. BryP is hypothesized to catalyze in trans acylation of the PKS modules for polyketide chain elongation. To verify conservation of function, bryP was introduced into AT-deletion mutant strains of a heterologous host containing a PKS cluster with similar architecture, and polyketide production was partially rescued. Biochemical characterization demonstrated that BryP catalyzes selective malonyl-CoA acylation of native and heterologous acyl carrier proteins and complete PKS modules in vitro. The results support the hypothesis that BryP loads malonyl-CoA onto Bry PKS modules, and provide the first biochemical evidence of the functionality of the bry cluster. PMID:19022178

  2. Progress toward Understanding Protein S-acylation: Prospective in Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaxiao; Qi, Baoxiu

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation, also known as S-palmitoylation or palmitoylation, is a reversible post-translational lipid modification in which long chain fatty acid, usually the 16-carbon palmitate, covalently attaches to a cysteine residue(s) throughout the protein via a thioester bond. It is involved in an array of important biological processes during growth and development, reproduction and stress responses in plant. S-acylation is a ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotes catalyzed by a family of enzymes called Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs). Since the discovery of the first PAT in yeast in 2002 research in S-acylation has accelerated in the mammalian system and followed by in plant. However, it is still a difficult field to study due to the large number of PATs and even larger number of putative S-acylated substrate proteins they modify in each genome. This is coupled with drawbacks in the techniques used to study S-acylation, leading to the slower progress in this field compared to protein phosphorylation, for example. In this review we will summarize the discoveries made so far based on knowledge learnt from the characterization of protein S-acyltransferases and the S-acylated proteins, the interaction mechanisms between PAT and its specific substrate protein(s) in yeast and mammals. Research in protein S-acylation and PATs in plants will also be covered although this area is currently less well studied in yeast and mammalian systems.

  3. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  4. Progress toward Understanding Protein S-acylation: Prospective in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaxiao; Qi, Baoxiu

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation, also known as S-palmitoylation or palmitoylation, is a reversible post-translational lipid modification in which long chain fatty acid, usually the 16-carbon palmitate, covalently attaches to a cysteine residue(s) throughout the protein via a thioester bond. It is involved in an array of important biological processes during growth and development, reproduction and stress responses in plant. S-acylation is a ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotes catalyzed by a family of enzymes called Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs). Since the discovery of the first PAT in yeast in 2002 research in S-acylation has accelerated in the mammalian system and followed by in plant. However, it is still a difficult field to study due to the large number of PATs and even larger number of putative S-acylated substrate proteins they modify in each genome. This is coupled with drawbacks in the techniques used to study S-acylation, leading to the slower progress in this field compared to protein phosphorylation, for example. In this review we will summarize the discoveries made so far based on knowledge learnt from the characterization of protein S-acyltransferases and the S-acylated proteins, the interaction mechanisms between PAT and its specific substrate protein(s) in yeast and mammals. Research in protein S-acylation and PATs in plants will also be covered although this area is currently less well studied in yeast and mammalian systems. PMID:28392791

  5. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-04-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation.

  6. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores.

  7. Enzymatic preparation of arbutin derivatives: lipase-catalyzed direct acylation without the need of vinyl ester as an acyl donor.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kohji; Katsube, Yasuko; Kumazawa, Nozomi; Kuratani, Mari; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi

    2010-06-01

    Direct and regioselective acylation of arbutin with aromatic or aliphatic acid using a lipase obtained from Candida antarctica in an organic solvent was investigated. We achieved the enzymatic synthesis of feruloyl arbutin and lipoyl arbutin without the need of vinyl ferulate and vinyl lipoate as acyl donors, respectively. (c) 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cysteine-286 as the site of acylation of the Lux-specific fatty acyl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Meighen, E A

    1997-04-04

    The channelling of fatty acids into the fatty aldehyde substrate for the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is catalyzed by a fatty acid reductase multienzyme complex, which channels fatty acids through the thioesterase (LuxD), synthetase (LuxE) and reductase (LuxC) components. Although all three components can be readily acylated in extracts of different luminescent bacteria, this complex has been successfully purified only from Photobacterium phosphoreum and the sites of acylation identified on LuxD and LuxE. To identify the acylation site on LuxC, the nucleotide sequence of P. phosphoreum luxC has been determined and the gene expressed in a mutant Escherichia coli strain. Even in crude extracts, the acylated reductase intermediate as well as acyl-CoA reductase activity could be readily detected, providing the basis for analysis of mutant reductases. Comparison of the amino-acid sequences of LuxC from P. phosphoreum, P. leiognathi and other luminescent bacteria, showed that only three cysteine residues (C171, C279, and C286) were conserved. As a cysteine residue on LuxC has been implicated in fatty acyl transfer, each of the conserved cysteine residues of the P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi reductases was converted to a serine residue, and the properties of the mutant proteins examined. Only mutation of C286-blocked reductase activity and prevented formation of the acylated reductase intermediate, showing that C286 is the site of acylation on LuxC.

  9. Discovery of new potential hits of Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-ACP reductase through ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches.

    PubMed

    Neves, Bruno J; Bueno, Renata V; Braga, Rodolpho C; Andrade, Carolina H

    2013-04-15

    We here report the discovery of novel Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-ACP reductase (PfENR) inhibitors as new antimalarial hits through ligand- and structure-based drug design approaches. We performed 2D and 3D QSAR studies on a set of rhodanine analogues using hologram QSAR (HQSAR), comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) techniques. Statistical and satisfactory results were obtained for the best HQSAR (r(2) of 0.968 and qLOO(2) of 0.751), CoMFA (r(2) of 0.955 and qLOO(2) of 0.806) and CoMSIA (r(2) of 0.965 and qLOO(2) of 0.659) models. The information gathered from the QSAR models guided us to design new PfENR inhibitors. Three new hits were predicted with potency in the submicromolar range and presented drug-like properties.

  10. Structural and biological evaluation of a novel series of benzimidazole inhibitors of Francisella tularensis enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI).

    PubMed

    Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Jinhua; Hevener, Kirk E; Su, Pin-Chih; Boci, Teuta; Brubaker, Libby; Truong, Lena; Mistry, Tina; Deng, Jiangping; Cook, James L; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Ghosh, Arun K; Johnson, Michael E

    2015-03-15

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, presents a significant biological threat and is a Category A priority pathogen due to its potential for weaponization. The bacterial FASII pathway is a viable target for the development of novel antibacterial agents treating Gram-negative infections. Here we report the advancement of a promising series of benzimidazole FabI (enoyl-ACP reductase) inhibitors to a second-generation using a systematic, structure-guided lead optimization strategy, and the determination of several co-crystal structures that confirm the binding mode of designed inhibitors. These compounds display an improved low nanomolar enzymatic activity as well as promising low microgram/mL antibacterial activity against both F. tularensis and Staphylococcus aureus and its methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA). The improvements in activity accompanying structural modifications lead to a better understanding of the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity that encompasses both enzymatic and whole-cell activity.

  11. A facile Friedel-Crafts acylation for the synthesis of polyethylenimine-grafted multi-walled carbon nanotubes as efficient gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Nia, Azadeh Hashem; Amini, Abbas; Taghavi, Sahar; Eshghi, Hossein; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-04-11

    Low chemical reactivity of carbon nanotubes is one of the major obstacles in their functionalization via chemical reactions. As a non-destructive method, Friedel-Crafts acylation was suggested among the explored reactions for which only a few methods have been reported under harsh reaction conditions, e.g., high temperature all leading to low yields. In this study, we propose a novel method for the acylation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at a low temperature (i.e., 42°C), using SiO2-Al2O3 as a catalyst and 6-bromohexanoic acid as the acylating agent to produce high yield functionalized MWCNTs. After acylation, MWCNTs are conjugated with polyethylenimines (PEIs) with three molecular weights (1.8, 10 and 25kDa). Three different MWCNT-PEI conjugates are synthesized and evaluated for their condensation ability, viability, size and zeta potential properties. The transfection efficiency of the functionalized MWCNTs is evaluated using luciferase assay and flow cytometry in a Neuroblastoma cell line. MWCNT-PEI (10 kDa) conjugate shows the highest transfection efficacy compared to others. For this carrier transfection efficacy exceeds the amount of PEI 25 kDa at similar carrier to plasmid weight ratio (C/P) and is around 3 times higher compared to PEI 25 kDa at C/P=0.8 as positive control regarding its high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei--Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishnamurthy Narasimha; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-05-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  13. A new strategy for strain improvement of Aurantiochytrium sp. based on heavy-ions mutagenesis and synergistic effects of cold stress and inhibitors of enoyl-ACP reductase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Rong; Sun, Zhi-Jie; Cui, Gu-Zhen; Song, Xiaojin; Cui, Qiu

    2016-11-01

    Developing a strain with high docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) yield and stable fermenting-performance is an imperative way to improve DHA production using Aurantiochytrium sp., a microorganism with two fatty acid synthesis pathways: polyketide synthase (PKS) pathway and Type I fatty acid synthase (FAS) pathway. This study investigated the growth and metabolism response of Aurantiochytrium sp. CGMCC 6208 to two inhibitors of enoyl-ACP reductase of Type II FAS pathway (isoniazid and triclosan), and proposed a method of screening high DHA yield Aurantiochytrium sp. strains with heavy ion mutagenesis and pre-selection by synergistic usage of cold stress (4°C) and FAS inhibitors (triclosan and isoniazid). Results showed that (1) isoniazid and triclosan have positive effects on improving DHA level of cells; (2) mutants from irradiation dosage of 120Gy yielded more DHA compared with cells from 40Gy, 80Gy treatment and wild type; (3) DHA contents of mutants pre-selected by inhibitors of enoyl-ACP reductase of Type II FAS pathway (isoniazid and triclosan)at 4°C, were significantly higher than that of wild type; (4) compared to the wild type, the DHA productivity and yield of a mutant (T-99) obtained from Aurantiochytrium sp. CGMCC 6208 by the proposed method increased by 50% from 0.18 to 0.27g/Lh and 30% from 21 to 27g/L, respectively. In conclusion, this study developed a feasible method to screen Aurantiochytrium sp. with high DHA yield by a combination of heavy-ion mutagenesis and mutant-preselection by FAS inhibitors and cold stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei—Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha Rao, Krishnamurthy; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  15. Differential turnover of phospholipid acyl groups in mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwae, T.; Schmid, P.C.; Johnson, S.B.; Schmid, H.H. )

    1990-03-25

    Phospholipid acyl turnover was assessed in mouse peritoneal exudate cells which consisted primarily of macrophages. The cells were incubated for up to 5 h in media containing 40% H218O, and uptake of 18O into ester carbonyls of phospholipids was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of hydrogenated methyl esters. The uptake was highest in choline phospholipids and phosphatidylinositol, less in ethanolamine phospholipids, and much less in phosphatidylserine. Acyl groups at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of diacyl glycerophospholipids, including arachidonic and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, acquired 18O at about the same rate. Acyl groups of alkylacyl glycerophosphocholine exhibited lower rates of 18O uptake, and acyl groups of ethanolamine plasmalogens (alkenylacyl glycerophosphoethanolamines) acquired only minimal amounts of 18O within 5 h, indicating a low average acyl turnover via free fatty acids. Pulse experiments with exogenous 3H-labeled arachidonic acid supported the concept that acylation of alkenyl glycerophosphoethanolamine occurs by acyl transfer from other phospholipids rather than via free fatty acids and acyl-CoA. The 18O content of intracellular free fatty acids increased gradually over a 5-h period, whereas in extracellular free fatty acids it reached maximal 18O levels within the first hour. Arachidonate and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids were found to participate readily in deacylation-reacylation reactions but were present only in trace amounts in the free fatty acid pools inside and outside the cells. We conclude that acyl turnover of macrophage phospholipids through hydrolysis and reacylation is rapid but tightly controlled so that appreciable concentrations of free arachidonic acid do not occur.

  16. Synthesis of coenzyme A thioesters using methyl acyl phosphates in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mohan; Bearne, Stephen L

    2014-12-28

    Regioselective S-acylation of coenzyme A (CoA) is achieved under aqueous conditions using various aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids activated as their methyl acyl phosphate monoesters. Unlike many hydrophobic activating groups, the anionic methyl acyl phosphate mixed anhydride is more compatible with aqueous solvents, making it useful for conducting acylation reactions in an aqueous medium.

  17. Tumor-targeted delivery of siRNA using fatty acyl-CGKRK peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Do, Hung; Parang, Keykavous; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri

    2017-07-21

    Tumor-targeted carriers provide efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumor tissue. CGKRK is one of the well-known tumor targeting peptides with significant specificity for angiogenic blood vessels and tumor cells. Here, we designed fatty acyl conjugated CGKRK peptides, based on the hypothesis that hydrophobically-modified CGKRK peptide could enhance cellular permeation and delivery of siRNA targeted to tumor cells for effective silencing of selected proteins. We synthesized six fatty acyl-peptide conjugates, using a diverse chain of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids to study the efficiency of this approach. At peptide:siRNA weight/weight ratio of 10:1 (N/P ≈ 13.6), almost all the peptides showed complete binding with siRNA, and at a w/w ratio of 20:1 (N/P ≈ 27.3), complete protection of siRNA from early enzymatic degradation was observed. Conjugated peptides and peptide/siRNA complexes did not show significant cytotoxicity in selected cell lines. The oleic acid-conjugated peptide showed the highest efficiency in siRNA uptake and silencing of kinesin spindle protein at peptide:siRNA w/w ratio of 80:1 (N/P ≈ 109). The siRNA internalization into non-tumorigenic kidney cells was negligible with all fatty acyl-peptide conjugates. These results indicate that conjugation of fatty acids to CGKRK could create an efficient delivery system for siRNA silencing specifically in tumor cells.

  18. The activity of Rhizomuchor miehei lipase as a biocatalyst in enzymatic acylation of cyclic alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftitah, Elvina Dhiaul; Srihardyastuti, Arie; Ariefin, Mokhamat

    2017-03-01

    We report the activity of Rhizomuchor miehei lipase (RML) as a biocatalyst, in particular the investigations concerning the effort of substrate-structure reactivity on the enzymatic acylation. The acylation was studied using acetic anhydride as an acyl donor and performed in n-hexane as a solvent. The selectivity of the enzymatic acylation was revealed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectra. We observed that, RML has shown different behavior when catalyzing the acylation of isopulegol and mixture of isopulegol and citronellal (ratio 1:1). The chemoselectivity for the O-acylation was improved when the acyl acceptor included mixture of isopulegol and citronellal

  19. A 10-kDa acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Brassica napus enhances acyl exchange between acyl-CoA and phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Yurchenko, Olga P; Nykiforuk, Cory L; Moloney, Maurice M; Ståhl, Ulf; Banaś, Antoni; Stymne, Sten; Weselake, Randall J

    2009-09-01

    The gene encoding a 10-kDa acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Brassica napus was over-expressed in developing seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana. Biochemical analysis of T(2) and T(3) A. thaliana seeds revealed a significant increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) (18:2(cisDelta9,12) and 18:3(cisDelta9,12,15)) at the expense of very long monounsaturated FA (20:1(cisDelta11)) and saturated FAs. In vitro assays demonstrated that recombinant B. napus ACBP (rBnACBP) strongly increases the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the absence of added lysophosphatidylcholine in microsomes from DeltaYOR175c yeast expressing A. thaliana lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (AthLPCAT) cDNA or in microsomes from microspore-derived cell suspension cultures of B. napus L. cv. Jet Neuf. rBnACBP or bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also shown to be crucial for AthLPCAT to catalyse the transfer of acyl group from PC into acyl-CoA in vitro. These data suggest that the cytosolic 10-kDa ACBP has an effect on the equilibrium between metabolically active acyl pools (acyl-CoA and phospholipid pools) involved in FA modifications and triacylglycerol bioassembly in plants. Over-expression of ACBP during seed development may represent a useful biotechnological approach for altering the FA composition of seed oil.

  20. Carrier-mediated electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steven P; Fyles, Thomas M

    2011-06-14

    Supported liquid membranes containing valinomycin or a calix[4]arene carrier can support electrodialysis under an imposed transmembrane potential. Under optimal conditions both transmembrane flux and carrier-based cation selectivity are enhanced relative to simple dialysis mediated by the same carriers. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  1. Acylated cyanidin 3-sambubioside-5-glucosides in Matthiola incana.

    PubMed

    Saito, N; Tatsuzawa, F; Nishiyama, A; Yokoi, M; Shigihara, A; Honda, T

    1995-03-01

    Four acylated cyanidin 3-sambubioside-5-glucosides were isolated from purple-violet flowers of Matthiola incana and their structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Three acylated anthocyanins were cyanidin 3-O-(6-O-acyl-2-O-(2-O-sinapyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-beta-D- glucopyranosides)-5-O-(6-O-malonyl-beta-D-glucopyranosides), in which the acyl group is p-coumaryl, caffeyl or ferulyl, respectively. The remaining pigment is free from malonic acid and was identified as cyanidin 3-O-(6-O-trans-ferulyl-2-O-(2- O-trans-sinapyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside)-5-O- (beta-D-glucopyranoside). Analysis of the anthocyanin constituents in 16 purple-violet cultivars revealed that they contained the above triacylated anthocyanins in variable amounts as main pigments. An aromatic pair of pigments containing sinapic and ferulic acids are considered to produce an important intramolecular effect, making bluish colours in these flowers.

  2. Acyl Meldrum's acid derivatives: application in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janikowska, K.; Rachoń, J.; Makowiec, S.

    2014-07-01

    This review is focused on an important class of Meldrum's acid derivatives commonly known as acyl Meldrum's acids. The preparation methods of these compounds are considered including the recently proposed and rather rarely used ones. The chemical properties of acyl Meldrum's acids are described in detail, including thermal stability and reactions with various nucleophiles. The possible mechanisms of these transformations are analyzed. The bibliography includes 134 references.

  3. Oxidative activation of dihydropyridine amides to reactive acyl donors.

    PubMed

    Funder, Erik Daa; Trads, Julie B; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2015-01-07

    Amides of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) are activated by oxidation for acyl transfer to amines, alcohols and thiols. In the reduced form the DHP amide is stable towards reaction with amines at room temperature. However, upon oxidation with DDQ the acyl donor is activated via a proposed pyridinium intermediate. The activated intermediate reacts with various nucleophiles to give amides, esters, and thio-esters in moderate to high yields.

  4. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from Camelina sativa: cloning, enzymatic characterization and implication in seed oil fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in the plastids of higher plants by hydrolyzing the thioester bond between ACP and the fatty acid synthesized. Free fatty acids are then esterified with coenzyme A prior to being incorporated into the glycerolipids synthesized through the eukaryotic pathway. Acyl-ACP thioesterases belong to the TE14 family of thioester-active enzymes and can be classified as FatAs and FatBs, which differ in their amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. Here, the FatA and FatB thioesterases from Camelina sativa seeds, a crop of interest in plant biotechnology, were cloned, sequenced and characterized. The mature proteins encoded by these genes were characterized biochemically after they were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. C. sativa contained three different alleles of both the FatA and FatB genes. These genes were expressed most strongly in expanding tissues in which lipids are very actively synthesized, such as developing seed endosperm. The CsFatA enzyme displayed high catalytic efficiency on oleoyl-ACP and CsFatB acted efficiently on palmitoyl-ACP. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of C. sativa oil was discussed in the light of these results.

  5. Characterization of acyl carrier protein and LytB in Babesia bovis apicoplast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apicoplast is a highly specialized organelle that mediates required functions in the growth and replication of apicomplexan parasites. Despite structural conservation of the apicoplast among different parasite genera and species, there are also critical differences in the metabolic requirements ...

  6. Acyl-carrier protein - Phosphopantetheinyltransferase partnerships in fungal fatty acid synthases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The synthesis of fatty acids is an essential primary metabolic process for energy storage and cellular structural integrity. Assembly of saturated fatty acids is achieved by fatty acid synthases (FASs) that combine acetyl- and malonyl-CoAs by repetitive decarboxylative Claisen condensations with su...

  7. Structural Basis for the Sugar Nucleotide and Acyl Chain Selectivity of Leptospira interrogans LpxA

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Lori I.; Williams, Allison H.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2009-01-01

    The first step of lipid A biosynthesis is catalyzed by LpxA in Escherichia coli (EcLpxA), an acyltransferase selective for UDP-GlcNAc and R-3-hydroxymyristoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). Leptospira interrogans LpxA (LiLpxA) is extremely selective for R-3-hydroxylauroyl-ACP and an analogue of UDP-GlcNAc, designated UDP-GlcNAc3N, in which NH2 replaces the GlcNAc 3-OH group. EcLpxA does not discriminate between UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-GlcNAc3N; however, E. coli does not make UDP-GlcNAc3N. With LiLpxA R-3-hydroxylauroyl-methylphosphopantetheine efficiently substitutes for R-3-hydroxylauroyl-ACP. We now present crystal structures of free LiLpxA, and of its complexes with its product UDP-3-N-(R-3-hydroxylauroyl)-GlcNAc3N and with its substrate R-3-hydroxylauroyl-methylphosphopantetheine. The positions of the acyl chains of the R-3-hydroxylauroyl-methylphosphopantetheine and of the UDP-3-N-(R-3-hydroxylauroyl)-GlcNAc3N are almost identical, and are similar to that of the acyl chain in the EcLpxA/UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-GlcNAc complex. The selectivity of LiLpxA for UDP-GlcNAc3N may be explained by the orientation of the backbone carbonyl group of Q68, which differs by ∼82° from the corresponding Q73 carbonyl group in EcLpxA. This arrangement provides an extra hydrogen bond acceptor for the 3-NH2 group of UDP-GlcNAc3N in LiLpxA. The R-3-hydroxylauroyl-selectivity of LiLpxA is explained by the position of the K171 side chain, which limits the length of the acyl chain-binding groove. Our results support the role of LiLpxA H120 (which corresponds to EcLpxA H125) as the catalytic base and provide the first structural information about the orientation of the phosphopantetheine moiety during LpxA catalysis. PMID:19456129

  8. Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma quadrangula.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; Osman, Abdel-Moneim M; Almehdar, Hussein; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2013-04-01

    In a previous study, the methanolic extract as well as the chloroform fraction of the aerial parts of Caralluma quadrangula (Forssk.) N.E.Br. indigenous to Saudi Arabia showed significant in vitro cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line. In a biologically-guided fractionation approach, four acylated pregnane glycosides were isolated from the chloroform fraction of C. quadrangula. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by the analysis of their MS and NMR data. The compounds were identified as 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (1), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (2), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (3) and 12,20-di-O-benzoyl-3β,5α,12β,14β,20-pentahydroxy-(20R)-pregn-6-ene 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (4). The isolated compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line.

  9. A Class of Reactive Acyl-CoA Species Reveals the Non-enzymatic Origins of Protein Acylation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gregory R; Bhatt, Dhaval P; O'Connell, Thomas M; Thompson, J Will; Dubois, Laura G; Backos, Donald S; Yang, Hao; Mitchell, Grant A; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Stevens, Robert D; Grimsrud, Paul A; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2017-04-04

    The mechanisms underlying the formation of acyl protein modifications remain poorly understood. By investigating the reactivity of endogenous acyl-CoA metabolites, we found a class of acyl-CoAs that undergo intramolecular catalysis to form reactive intermediates that non-enzymatically modify proteins. Based on this mechanism, we predicted, validated, and characterized a protein modification: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl(HMG)-lysine. In a model of altered HMG-CoA metabolism, we found evidence of two additional protein modifications: 3-methylglutaconyl(MGc)-lysine and 3-methylglutaryl(MG)-lysine. Using quantitative proteomics, we compared the "acylomes" of two reactive acyl-CoA species, namely HMG-CoA and glutaryl-CoA, which are generated in different pathways. We found proteins that are uniquely modified by each reactive metabolite, as well as common proteins and pathways. We identified the tricarboxylic acid cycle as a pathway commonly regulated by acylation and validated malate dehydrogenase as a key target. These data uncover a fundamental relationship between reactive acyl-CoA species and proteins and define a new regulatory paradigm in metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure-activity studies of the inhibition of FabI, the enoyl reductase from Escherichia coli, by triclosan: kinetic analysis of mutant FabIs.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Sharada; Zwahlen, Jacque; Bell, Alasdair F; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Tonge, Peter J

    2003-04-22

    Triclosan, a common antibacterial additive used in consumer products, is an inhibitor of FabI, the enoyl reductase enzyme from type II bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. In agreement with previous studies [Ward, W. H., Holdgate, G. A., Rowsell, S., McLean, E. G., Pauptit, R. A., Clayton, E., Nichols, W. W., Colls, J. G., Minshull, C. A., Jude, D. A., Mistry, A., Timms, D., Camble, R., Hales, N. J., Britton, C. J., and Taylor, I. W. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12514-12525], we report here that triclosan is a slow, reversible, tight binding inhibitor of the FabI from Escherichia coli. Triclosan binds preferentially to the E.NAD(+) form of the wild-type enzyme with a K(1) value of 23 pM. In agreement with genetic selection experiments [McMurry, L. M., Oethinger, M., and Levy, S. B. (1998) Nature 394, 531-532], the affinity of triclosan for the FabI mutants G93V, M159T, and F203L is substantially reduced, binding preferentially to the E.NAD(+) forms of G93V, M159T, and F203L with K(1) values of 0.2 microM, 4 nM, and 0.9 nM, respectively. Triclosan binding to the E.NADH form of F203L can also be detected and is defined by a K(2) value of 51 nM. We have also characterized the Y156F and A197M mutants to compare and contrast the binding of triclosan to InhA, the homologous enoyl reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As observed for InhA, Y156F FabI has a decreased affinity for triclosan and the inhibitor binds to both E.NAD(+) and E.NADH forms of the enzyme with K(1) and K(2) values of 3 and 30 nM, respectively. The replacement of A197 with Met has no impact on triclosan affinity, indicating that differences in the sequence of the conserved active site loop cannot explain the 10000-fold difference in affinities of FabI and InhA for triclosan.

  11. Construction of Global Acyl Lipid Metabolic Map by Comparative Genomics and Subcellular Localization Analysis in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Mori, Natsumi; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pathways of lipid metabolism have been established in land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, but the information on exact pathways is still under study in microalgae. In contrast with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is currently studied extensively, the pathway information in red algae is still in the state in which enzymes and pathways are estimated by analogy with the knowledge in plants. Here we attempt to construct the entire acyl lipid metabolic pathways in a model red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as an initial basis for future genetic and biochemical studies, by exploiting comparative genomics and localization analysis. First, the data of whole genome clustering by Gclust were used to identify 121 acyl lipid-related enzymes. Then, the localization of 113 of these enzymes was analyzed by GFP-based techniques. We found that most of the predictions on the subcellular localization by existing tools gave erroneous results, probably because these tools had been tuned for plants or green algae. The experimental data in the present study as well as the data reported before in our laboratory will constitute a good training set for tuning these tools. The lipid metabolic map thus constructed show that the lipid metabolic pathways in the red alga are essentially similar to those in A. thaliana, except that the number of enzymes catalyzing individual reactions is quite limited. The absence of fatty acid desaturation to produce oleic and linoleic acids within the plastid, however, highlights the central importance of desaturation and acyl editing in the endoplasmic reticulum, for the synthesis of plastid lipids as well as other cellular lipids. Additionally, some notable characteristics of lipid metabolism in C. merolae were found. For example, phosphatidylcholine is synthesized by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine as in yeasts. It is possible that a single 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase is involved in the condensation reactions of fatty acid

  12. Construction of Global Acyl Lipid Metabolic Map by Comparative Genomics and Subcellular Localization Analysis in the Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Natsumi; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pathways of lipid metabolism have been established in land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, but the information on exact pathways is still under study in microalgae. In contrast with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is currently studied extensively, the pathway information in red algae is still in the state in which enzymes and pathways are estimated by analogy with the knowledge in plants. Here we attempt to construct the entire acyl lipid metabolic pathways in a model red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, as an initial basis for future genetic and biochemical studies, by exploiting comparative genomics and localization analysis. First, the data of whole genome clustering by Gclust were used to identify 121 acyl lipid-related enzymes. Then, the localization of 113 of these enzymes was analyzed by GFP-based techniques. We found that most of the predictions on the subcellular localization by existing tools gave erroneous results, probably because these tools had been tuned for plants or green algae. The experimental data in the present study as well as the data reported before in our laboratory will constitute a good training set for tuning these tools. The lipid metabolic map thus constructed show that the lipid metabolic pathways in the red alga are essentially similar to those in A. thaliana, except that the number of enzymes catalyzing individual reactions is quite limited. The absence of fatty acid desaturation to produce oleic and linoleic acids within the plastid, however, highlights the central importance of desaturation and acyl editing in the endoplasmic reticulum, for the synthesis of plastid lipids as well as other cellular lipids. Additionally, some notable characteristics of lipid metabolism in C. merolae were found. For example, phosphatidylcholine is synthesized by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine as in yeasts. It is possible that a single 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase is involved in the condensation reactions of fatty acid

  13. Site-specific S-Acylation of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Katharina; Kordyukova, Larisa V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Mintaev, Ramil R.; Alexeevski, Andrei V.; Veit, Michael

    2014-01-01

    S-Acylation of hemagglutinin (HA), the main glycoprotein of influenza viruses, is an essential modification required for virus replication. Using mass spectrometry, we have previously demonstrated specific attachment of acyl chains to individual acylation sites. Whereas the two cysteines in the cytoplasmic tail of HA contain only palmitate, stearate is exclusively attached to a cysteine positioned at the end of the transmembrane region (TMR). Here we analyzed recombinant viruses containing HA with exchange of conserved amino acids adjacent to acylation sites or with a TMR cysteine shifted to a cytoplasmic location to identify the molecular signal that determines preferential attachment of stearate. We first developed a new protocol for sample preparation that requires less material and might thus also be suitable to analyze cellular proteins. We observed cell type-specific differences in the fatty acid pattern of HA: more stearate was attached if human viruses were grown in mammalian compared with avian cells. No underacylated peptides were detected in the mass spectra, and even mutations that prevented generation of infectious virus particles did not abolish acylation of expressed HA as demonstrated by metabolic labeling experiments with [3H]palmitate. Exchange of conserved amino acids in the vicinity of an acylation site had a moderate effect on the stearate content. In contrast, shifting the TMR cysteine to a cytoplasmic location virtually eliminated attachment of stearate. Thus, the location of an acylation site relative to the transmembrane span is the main signal for stearate attachment, but the sequence context and the cell type modulate the fatty acid pattern. PMID:25349209

  14. Benzylic C-H trifluoromethylation of phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Egami, Hiromichi; Ide, Takafumi; Kawato, Yuji; Hamashima, Yoshitaka

    2015-12-04

    Phenol derivatives were trifluoromethylated using copper/Togni reagent. In dimethylformamide, the benzylic C-H bond at the para position of the hydroxyl group was selectively substituted with a CF3 group. In contrast, aromatic C-H trifluoromethylation occurred in alcoholic solvents. Practical utility of the reactions was demonstrated by application to the synthesis of a potent enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitor.

  15. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  16. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes ofmore » mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  17. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  18. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods.

  19. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Yang, Weili; Shorrosh, Basil; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.

  20. Structural and biological evaluation of a novel series of benzimidazole inhibitors of Francisella tularensis enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Jinhua; Hevener, Kirk E.; Su, Pin-Chih; Boci, Teuta; Brubaker, Libby; Truong, Lena; Mistry, Tina; Deng, Jiangping; Cook, James L.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2015-01-29

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, presents a significant biological threat and is a Category A priority pathogen due to its potential for weaponization. In the bacterial FASII pathway we found it a viable target for the development of novel antibacterial agents treating Gram-negative infections. Here, we report the advancement of a promising series of benzimidazole FabI (enoyl-ACP reductase) inhibitors to a second-generation using a systematic, structure-guided lead optimization strategy, and the determination of several co-crystal structures that confirm the binding mode of designed inhibitors. Furthermore, these compounds display an improved low nanomolar enzymatic activity as well as promising low microgram/mL antibacterial activity against both F. tularensis and Staphylococcus aureus and its methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA). Finally, the improvements in activity accompanying structural modifications lead to a better understanding of the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity that encompasses both enzymatic and whole-cell activity.

  1. Structural and biological evaluation of a novel series of benzimidazole inhibitors of Francisella tularensis enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI)

    DOE PAGES

    Mehboob, Shahila; Song, Jinhua; Hevener, Kirk E.; ...

    2015-01-29

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, presents a significant biological threat and is a Category A priority pathogen due to its potential for weaponization. In the bacterial FASII pathway we found it a viable target for the development of novel antibacterial agents treating Gram-negative infections. Here, we report the advancement of a promising series of benzimidazole FabI (enoyl-ACP reductase) inhibitors to a second-generation using a systematic, structure-guided lead optimization strategy, and the determination of several co-crystal structures that confirm the binding mode of designed inhibitors. Furthermore, these compounds display an improved low nanomolar enzymatic activity as well as promisingmore » low microgram/mL antibacterial activity against both F. tularensis and Staphylococcus aureus and its methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA). Finally, the improvements in activity accompanying structural modifications lead to a better understanding of the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity that encompasses both enzymatic and whole-cell activity.« less

  2. Enoyl-Coenzyme A Hydratase and Antigen 85B of Mycobacterium habana Are Specifically Recognized by Antibodies in Sera from Leprosy Patients ▿

    PubMed Central

    Serafín-López, J.; Talavera-Paulin, M.; Amador-Molina, J. C.; Alvarado-Riverón, M.; Vilchis-Landeros, M. M.; Méndez-Ortega, P.; Fafutis-Morris, M.; Paredes-Cervantes, V.; López-Santiago, R.; León, C. I.; Guerrero, M. I.; Ribas-Aparicio, R. M.; Mendoza-Hernández, G.; Carreño-Martínez, C.; Estrada-Parra, S.; Estrada-García, I.

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which is a noncultivable bacterium. One of the principal goals of leprosy research is to develop serological tests that will allow identification and early treatment of leprosy patients. M. habana is a cultivable nonpathogenic mycobacterium and candidate vaccine for leprosy, and several antigens that cross-react between M. leprae and M. habana have been discovered. The aim of the present study was to extend the identification of cross-reactive antigens by identifying M. habana proteins that reacted by immunoblotting with antibodies in serum samples from leprosy patients but not with antibodies in sera from tuberculosis (TB) patients or healthy donors (HDs). A 28-kDa antigen that specifically reacted with sera from leprosy patients was identified. To further characterize this antigen, protein spots were aligned in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels and Western blots. Spots cut out from the gels were then analyzed by mass spectrometry. Two proteins were identified: enoyl-coenzyme A hydratase (lipid metabolism; ML2498) and antigen 85B (Ag85B; mycolyltransferase; ML2028). These proteins represent promising candidates for the design of a reliable tool for the serodiagnosis of lepromatous leprosy, which is the most frequent form in Mexico. PMID:21613461

  3. Aqueous Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the M. tuberculosis Enoyl-ACP Reductase-NADH System and Its Complex with a Substrate Mimic or Diphenyl Ethers Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Lima, Camilo Henrique; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Kaiser, Carlos Roland; de Souza, Marcus Vinícius Nora; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 12 aqueous systems of the NADH-dependent enoyl-ACP reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (InhA) were carried out for up to 20–40 ns using the GROMACS 4.5 package. Simulations of the holoenzyme, holoenzyme-substrate, and 10 holoenzyme-inhibitor complexes were conducted in order to gain more insight about the secondary structure motifs of the InhA substrate-binding pocket. We monitored the lifetime of the main intermolecular interactions: hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Our MD simulations demonstrate the importance of evaluating the conformational changes that occur close to the active site of the enzyme-cofactor complex before and after binding of the ligand and the influence of the water molecules. Moreover, the protein-inhibitor total steric (ELJ) and electrostatic (EC) interaction energies, related to Gly96 and Tyr158, are able to explain 80% of the biological response variance according to the best linear equation, pKi = 7.772 − 0.1885 × Gly96 + 0.0517 × Tyr158 (R2 = 0.80; n = 10), where interactions with Gly96, mainly electrostatic, increase the biological response, while those with Tyr158 decrease. These results will help to understand the structure-activity relationships and to design new and more potent anti-TB drugs. PMID:26457706

  4. Study of the interaction between sodium salts of (2E)-3-(4'-halophenyl)prop-2-enoyl sulfachloropyrazine and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuan; Du, Chuanrong; Wei, Jinrui; Deng, Jiang; Lin, Yijie; Lin, Cuiwu

    2013-01-01

    Three sodium salts of (2E)-3-(4'-halophenyl)prop-2-enoyl sulfachloropyrazine (CCSCP) were synthesized and their structures were determined by (1)H and (13)C NMR, LC-MS and IR. The binding properties between CCSCPs and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy. The results indicate that the fluorescence quenching mechanisms between BSA and CCSCPs were static quenching at low concentrations of CCSCPs or combined quenching (static and dynamic) at higher CCSCP concentrations of 298, 303 and 308 K. The binding constants, binding sites and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) were calculated at different temperatures. All ΔG values were negative, which revealed that the binding processes were spontaneous. Although all CCSCPs had negative ΔH and positive ΔS, the contributions of ΔH and ΔS to ΔG values were different. When the 4'-substituent was fluorine or chlorine, van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were the main interaction forces. However, when the halogen was bromine, ionic interaction and proton transfer controlled the overall energetics. The binding distances between CCSCPs and BSA were determined using the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory and the effects of CCSCPs on the conformation of BSA were analyzed by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Dual Functions of the Trans-2-Enoyl-CoA Reductase TER in the Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Metabolic Pathway and in Fatty Acid Elongation*

    PubMed Central

    Wakashima, Takeshi; Abe, Kensuke; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) functions as a lipid mediator and as a key intermediate of the sole sphingolipid to glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway (S1P metabolic pathway). In this pathway, S1P is converted to palmitoyl-CoA through 4 reactions, then incorporated mainly into glycerophospholipids. Although most of the genes responsible for the S1P metabolic pathway have been identified, the gene encoding the trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase, responsible for the saturation step (conversion of trans-2-hexadecenoyl-CoA to palmitoyl-CoA) remains unidentified. In the present study, we show that TER is the missing gene in mammals using analyses involving yeast cells, deleting the TER homolog TSC13, and TER-knockdown HeLa cells. TER is known to be involved in the production of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). A significant proportion of the saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs are used for sphingolipid synthesis. Therefore, TER is involved in both the production of VLCFAs used in the fatty acid moiety of sphingolipids as well as in the degradation of the sphingosine moiety of sphingolipids via S1P. PMID:25049234

  6. A Moderate Zinc Deficiency Does Not Impair Gene Expression of PPARα, PPARγ, and Mitochondrial Enoyl-CoA Delta Isomerase in the Liver of Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and mitochondrial Δ3Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver. Weanling rats were assigned to five groups (eight animals each) and fed semi-synthetic, low-carbohydrate diets containing 7 or 50 mg Zn/kg (low-Zn (LZ) or high-Zn (HZ)) and 22% cocoa butter (CB) or 22% safflower (SF) oil for four weeks. One group each was fed the LZ-CB, LZ-SF, or HZ-SF diet free choice, and one group each was fed the HZ-CB and HZ-SF diets in restricted amounts according to intake of the respective LZ diets. The LZ diets markedly lowered growth and zinc concentrations in plasma and femur. Hepatic mRNA levels of PPARα, PPARγ, and ECI were not reduced by the moderate zinc deficiency. Overall, ECI-mRNA abundance was marginally higher in the SF-fed than in the CB-fed animals. PMID:24855375

  7. Antibacterial activity of fractions from three Chumash medicinal plant extracts and in vitro inhibition of the enzyme enoyl reductase by the flavonoid jaceosidin.

    PubMed

    Allison, Brittany J; Allenby, Mark C; Bryant, Shane S; Min, Jae Eun; Hieromnimon, Mark; Joyner, P Matthew

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the in vitro antibacterial bioactivity of dichloromethane-soluble fractions of Artemisia californica, Trichostema lanatum, Salvia apiana, Sambucus nigra ssp. cerulea and Quercus agrifolia Née against a ΔtolC mutant strain of Escherichia coli. These plants are traditional medicinal plants of the Chumash American Indians of Southern California. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of three flavonoid compounds from A. californica: jaceosidin (1), jaceidin (2), and chrysoplenol B (3). Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli ΔtolC in liquid cultures. The in vitro activity of 1 against the enoyl reductase enzyme (FabI) was measured using a spectrophotometric assay and found to completely inhibit FabI activity at a concentration of 100 μM. However, comparison of minimum inhibitory concentration values for 1-3 against E. coli ΔtolC and an equivalent strain containing a plasmid constitutively expressing fabI did not reveal any selectivity for FabI in vivo.

  8. Role of the host-selective ACT-toxin synthesis gene ACTTS2 encoding an enoyl-reductase in pathogenicity of the tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Naoya; Miyamoto, Yoko; Masunaka, Akira; Tsuge, Takashi; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Ohtani, Kouhei; Fukumoto, Takeshi; Gomi, Kenji; Peever, Tobin L; Izumi, Yuriko; Tada, Yasuomi; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2010-02-01

    ABSTRACT The tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata produces host-selective ACT-toxin and causes Alternaria brown spot disease of tangerines and tangerine hybrids. Sequence analysis of a genomic BAC clone identified a previously uncharacterized portion of the ACT-toxin biosynthesis gene cluster (ACTT). A 1,034-bp gene encoding a putative enoyl-reductase was identified by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends and polymerase chain reaction and designated ACTTS2. Genomic Southern blots demonstrated that ACTTS2 is present only in ACT-toxin producers and is carried on a 1.9 Mb conditionally dispensable chromosome by the tangerine pathotype. Targeted gene disruption of ACTTS2 led to a reduction in ACT-toxin production and pathogenicity, and transcriptional knockdown of ACTTS2 using RNA silencing resulted in complete loss of ACT-toxin production and pathogenicity. These results indicate that ACTTS2 is an essential gene for ACT-toxin biosynthesis in the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata and is required for pathogenicity of this fungus.

  9. Observed crowding effects on Mycobacterium tuberculosis 2-trans-enoyl-ACP (CoA) reductase enzyme activity are not due to excluded volume only.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Mariane; Timmers, Luis F S M; Sequeiros-Borja, Carlos; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Souza, Osmar N; Santos, Diogenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2017-07-28

    The cellular milieu is a complex and crowded aqueous solution. Macromolecular crowding effects are commonly studied in vitro using crowding agents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects, if any, of macromolecular synthetic crowding agents on the apparent steady-state kinetic parameters (K m , k cat , and k cat /K m ) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 2-trans-enoyl-ACP (CoA) reductase (InhA). Negligible effects on InhA activity were observed for ficoll 70, ficoll 400 and dextran 70. A complex effect was observed for PEG 6000. Glucose and sucrose showed, respectively, no effect on InhA activity and decreased k cat /K m for NADH and k cat for 2-trans-dodecenoyl-CoA. Molecular dynamics results suggest that InhA adopts a more compact conformer in sucrose solution. The effects of the crowding agents on the energy (E a and E η ), enthalpy (∆H (#) ), entropy (∆S (#) ), and Gibbs free energy (∆G (#) ) of activation were determined. The ∆G (#) values for all crowding agents were similar to buffer, suggesting that excluded volume effects did not facilitate stable activated ES (#) complex formation. Nonlinear Arrhenius plot for PEG 6000 suggests that "soft" interactions play a role in crowding effects. The results on InhA do not unequivocally meet the criteria for crowding effect due to exclude volume only.

  10. Design, synthesis, and biological and crystallographic evaluation of novel inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum enoyl-ACP-reductase (PfFabI).

    PubMed

    Belluti, Federica; Perozzo, Remo; Lauciello, Leonardo; Colizzi, Francesco; Kostrewa, Dirk; Bisi, Alessandra; Gobbi, Silvia; Rampa, Angela; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Recanatini, Maurizio; Brun, Reto; Scapozza, Leonardo; Cavalli, Andrea

    2013-10-10

    Malaria, a disease of worldwide significance, is responsible for over one million deaths annually. The liver-stage of Plasmodium's life cycle is the first, obligatory, but clinically silent step in malaria infection. The P. falciparum type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (PfFAS-II) has been found to be essential for complete liver-stage development and has been regarded as a potential antimalarial target for the development of drugs for malaria prophylaxis and liver-stage eradication. In this paper, new coumarin-based triclosan analogues are reported and their biological profile is explored in terms of inhibitory potency against enzymes of the PfFAS-II pathway. Among the tested compounds, 7 and 8 showed the highest inhibitory potency against Pf enoyl-ACP-reductase (PfFabI), followed by 15 and 3. Finally, we determined the crystal structures of compounds 7 and 11 in complex with PfFabI to identify their mode of binding and to confirm outcomes of docking simulations.

  11. The role of S-acylation in protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Daniotti, Jose L; Pedro, Maria P; Valdez Taubas, Javier

    2017-08-24

    Protein S-acylation, also known as palmitoylation, consists of the addition of a lipid molecule to one or more cysteine residues through a thioester bond. This modification, which is widespread in eukaryotes, is thought to affect over 12% of the human proteome. S-acylation allows the reversible association of peripheral proteins with membranes or, in the case of integral membrane proteins, modulates their behavior within the plane of the membrane. This review focuses on the consequences of protein S-acylation on intracellular trafficking and membrane association. We summarize relevant information that illustrates how lipid modification of proteins plays an important role in dictating precise intracellular movements within cells by regulating membrane-cytosol exchange through membrane microdomain segregation, or by modifying the flux of the proteins by means of vesicular or diffusional transport systems. Finally, we highlight some of the key open questions and major challenges in the field. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Asymmetric Allylboration of Acyl Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Diols

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sha; Moquist, Philip N.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral BINOL-derived diols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric allylboration of acyl imines. The reaction requires 15 mol% of (S)-3,3′-Ph2-BINOL as the catalyst and allyldiisopropoxyborane as the nucleophile. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (75 – 94%) and high enantiomeric ratios (95:5 – 99.5:0.5) for aromatic and aliphatic imines. High diastereoselectivities (dr > 98:2) and enantioselectivities (er > 98:2) are obtained in the reactions of acyl imines with crotyldiisopropoxyboranes. This asymmetric transformation is directly applied to the synthesis of maraviroc, the selective CCR5 antagonist with potent activity against HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic investigations of the allylboration reaction including IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry study indicate that acyclic boronates are activated by chiral diols via exchange of one of the boronate alkoxy groups with activation of the acyl imine via hydrogen bonding. PMID:18020334

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase Assays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Frane, Nicole D; Brecht, Ryan M; Keeler, Jesse; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing is cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinate attacks on their hosts by inducing virulent gene expression, biofilm production, and other cellular functions, including antibiotic resistance. AHL synthase enzymes synthesize N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, commonly referred to as autoinducers, to facilitate quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. Studying the synthases, however, has proven to be a difficult road. Two assays, including a radiolabeled assay and a colorimetric (DCPIP) assay are well-documented in literature to study AHL synthases. In this paper, we describe additional methods that include an HPLC-based, C-S bond cleavage and coupled assays to investigate this class of enzymes. In addition, we compare and contrast each assay for both acyl-CoA- and acyl-ACP-utilizing synthases. The expanded toolkit described in this study should facilitate mechanistic studies on quorum sensing signal synthases and expedite discovery of antivirulent compounds.

  14. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    After outlining the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibility for regulating interstate common carrier communication (non-broadcast communication whose carriers are required by law to furnish service at reasonable charges upon request), this information bulletin reviews the history, technological development, and current…

  15. Sphingomyelin interfacial behavior: the impact of changing acyl chain composition.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X M; Smaby, J M; Momsen, M M; Brockman, H L; Brown, R E

    2000-01-01

    Sphingomyelins (SMs) containing homogeneous acyl chains with 12, 14, 16, 18, 24, or 26 carbons were synthesized and characterized using an automated Langmuir-type film balance. Surface pressure was monitored as a function of lipid molecular area at constant temperatures between 10 degrees C and 30 degrees C. SM containing lauroyl (12:0) acyl chains displayed only liquid-expanded behavior. Increasing the length of the saturated acyl chain (e.g., 14:0, 16:0, or 18:0) resulted in liquid-expanded to condensed two-dimensional phase transitions at many temperatures in the 10-30 degrees C range. Similar behavior was observed for SMs with lignoceroyl (24:0) or (cerotoyl) 26:0 acyl chains, but isotherms showed only condensed behavior at 10 and 15 degrees C. Insights into the physico-mechanical in-plane interactions occurring within the different SM phases and accompanying changes in SM phase state were provided by analyzing the interfacial area compressibility moduli. At similar surface pressures, SM fluid phases were less compressible than those of phosphatidylcholines with similar chain structures. The area per molecule and compressibility of SM condensed phases depended upon the length of the saturated acyl chain and upon spreading temperature. Spreading of SMs with very long saturated acyl chains at temperatures 30-35 degrees below T(m) resulted in condensed films with lower in-plane compressibilities, but consistently larger cross-sectional molecular areas than the condensed phases achieved by spreading at temperatures only 10-20 degrees below T(m). This behavior is discussed in terms of the enhancement of SM lateral aggregation by temperature reduction, a common approach used during domain isolation from biomembranes. PMID:10733971

  16. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  17. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  18. Copper(II)/amine synergistically catalyzed enantioselective alkylation of cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shutao; Mao, Ying; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-07-07

    The first catalytic asymmetric alkylation of N-acyl quinoliniums with aldehydes has been described. A copper/amine synergistic catalytic system has been developed, allowing the addition of functionalized aldehydes to a wide range of electronically varied N-acyl quinoliniums in good yields with excellent enantiocontrol. The synergistic catalytic system was also effective for N-acyl dihydroisoquinoliniums and β-caboliniums, demonstrating the general applicability of the protocol in the enantioselective alkylation of diverse cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals.

  19. The Level of Circulating Octanoate Does Not Predict Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase (GOAT)-Mediated Acylation of Ghrelin During Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Nikolayev, Alexander; Liu, Jianhua; Pezzoli, Suzan S.; Farhy, Leon S.; Patrie, James; Gaylinn, Bruce D.; Heiman, Mark; Thorner, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acyl-ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide released from the stomach. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) attaches an 8-carbon medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) (octanoate) to serine 3 of ghrelin. This acylation is necessary for the activity of ghrelin. Animal data suggest that MCFAs provide substrate for GOAT and an increase in nutritional octanoate increases acyl-ghrelin. Objectives: To address the question of the source of substrate for acylation, we studied whether the decline in ghrelin acylation during fasting is associated with a decline in circulating MCFAs. Methods: Eight healthy young men (aged 18–28 years, body mass index range, 20.6–26.2 kg/m2) had blood drawn every 10 minutes for acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin and every hour for free fatty acids (FFAs) during the last 24 hours of a 61.5-hour fast and during a fed day. FFAs were measured by a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy method. Acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin were measured in an in-house assay; the results were published previously. Ghrelin acylation was assessed by the ratio of acyl-ghrelin to total ghrelin. Results: With the exception of MCFAs C8 and C10, all other FFAs, the MCFAs (C6 and C12), and the long-chain fatty acids (C14–C18) significantly increased with fasting (P < .05). There was no significant association between the fold change in ghrelin acylation and circulating FFAs. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in circulating MCFAs are not linked to the decline in ghrelin acylation during fasting and support the hypothesis that acylation of ghrelin depends at least partially on the availability of gastroluminal MCFAs or the regulation of GOAT activity. PMID:25337923

  20. Phospholipase activity on N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines is critically dependent on the N-acyl chain length.

    PubMed Central

    Caramelo, Julio J; Florin-Christensen, Jorge; Delfino, José M

    2003-01-01

    We have recently shown that an endogenous phospholipase A2 from bovine erythrocytes does not hydrolyse NAPEs (N-acyl L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamines), which accumulate remarkably in this system [Florin-Christensen, Suarez, Florin-Christensen, Wainszelbaum, Brown, McElwain and Palmer (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 7736-7741]. Here we investigate the causes underlying this resistance. N-acylation of PE (L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine) results in alteration of charge, head-group volume and conformation, the last two features depending on the N-acyl chain length. To evaluate each effect separately, we synthesized NAPEs with selected N-acyl chain length. We found that phospholipase A2 has considerable activity against N-acetyl PE, but is poorly active against N-butanoyl PE and only marginally active against N-hexanoyl PE, whereas the activity is completely lost when N-hexadecanoyl PE is presented as a substrate. On the other hand, N-hexanoyl PE does not inhibit phospholipase A2 activity, suggesting that this substrate fails to enter the hydrophobic channel. Phospholipase C presents a similar, but less sharp pattern. Molecular dynamics simulations of the polar head group of selected NAPEs reveal a substantially increased conformational variability as the N-acyl chain grows. This larger conformational space represents an increased impairment limiting the access of these molecules to the active site. Our data indicate that, whereas a change in charge contributes to diminished activity, the most relevant effects come from steric hindrance related to the growth of the N-acyl chain. PMID:12765548

  1. Enhanced free fatty acid production by codon-optimized Lactococcus lactis acyl-ACP thioesterase gene expression in Escherichia coli using crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Park, Soohyun; Park, Chulhwan; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2014-12-01

    Fatty acid production and composition are determined by the type of acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) expressed in Escherichia coli. Bacterial acyl-ACP TEs from Lactococcus lactis (SGJS47), Enterococcus faecalis (SGJS49), and Burkholderia cepacia (SGJS50) were codon-optimized and expressed in E. coli for enhanced fatty acid production. Samples were extracted at the lag, log, and stationary phases of cell growth, and gene expression levels of the codon optimized acy-ACP TEs as well as fatty acid production were monitored. At 24h after initiation of gene expression, the OPLlTE expression level and fatty acid production in SGJS47 increased up to 15.8-fold and 3.2-fold compared to the control and other recombinant strains, respectively. Additionally, in SGJS47, improvement in free fatty acid (FFA) composition, high-specificity production of short-chain fatty acids (C8, C10) and unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1) was achieved in crude glycerol medium condition. Compared with control strain, the percentage of FFAs (C8 and C10) was enhanced by approximately 16- to 21-fold, C16:1 FFA ratio increased approximately 18-fold. Observation of codon-optimized acyl-ACP TE genes expression level in E. coli may be useful for understanding mechanisms towards improving fatty acid production. Engineered strains have the potential to overproduce specific FFAs and thereby reduce the cost of fatty acid production by using industrially inexpensive carbon sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct acylation of aryl bromides with aldehydes by palladium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jiwu; Saidi, Ourida; Iggo, Jonathan A; Xiao, Jianliang

    2008-08-13

    A new protocol for the direct acylation of aryl bromides with aldehydes is established. It appears to involve palladium-amine cooperative catalysis, affording synthetically important alkyl aryl ketones in moderate to excellent yields in a straightforward manner, and broadening the scope of metal-catalyzed coupling reactions.

  3. Lubricity characteristics of seed oils modified by acylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chemically modified seed oils via acylation of epoxidized and polyhydroxylated derivatives were investigated for their potential as candidates for lubrication. The native oil was preliminarily epoxidized and ring-opened in a one-pot reaction using formic acid-H2O2 followed by aqueous HCl treatment t...

  4. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules.

  5. One-Step Conversion of Methyl Ketones to Acyl Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Florencio

    2015-10-16

    Treatment of aromatic and heteroaromatic methyl ketones with sulfur monochloride and catalytic amounts of pyridine in refluxing chlorobenzene leads to the formation of acyl chlorides. Both electron-rich and electron-poor aryl methyl ketones can be used as starting materials. The resulting C1-byproduct depends on the precise reaction conditions chosen.

  6. Acyl migration kinetics of vegetable oil 1,2-diacylglycerols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The acyl migration kinetics of long-chain 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) to form 1,3-diacylglycerol (1,3-DAG) over the temperature range of 25 to 80 degrees Celsius were examined using proton NMR spectroscopy. The 1,2-DAG mole fraction of 0.32 at equilibrium was found to be insensitive to temperature...

  7. A new acylated isoflavone glucoside from Pterocarpus santalinus.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, K S; Srinivasa Rao, J V

    2000-09-01

    Phytochemical investigation on the constituents of heartwood of Pterocarpus santalinus resulted in the isolation of a new acylated isoflavone glucoside. The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectral studies as 4',5-dihydroxy-7-O-methyl isoflavone 3'-O-D-(3''-E-cinnamoyl)glucoside.

  8. Preservation of polyunsaturated fatty acyl glycerides via intramolecular antioxidant coupling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl di-gamma-linolenoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant for preventing the oxidation of its gamma-linolenoyl polyunsaturated fatty acyl groups in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molec...

  9. Kinetics of 2-monoacylglycerol acyl migration in model chylomicra.

    PubMed

    Lyubachevskaya, G; Boyle-Roden, E

    2000-12-01

    In the metabolism of triacylglycerol (TG)-rich lipoproteins, 2-monoacylglycerols (2-MG) are produced by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolysis of TG. The metabolic fate of 2-MG is not known with certainty. 2-MG that accumulate on the chylomicra surface have been proposed to isomerize spontaneously to 1(3)-MG, which are then hydrolyzed by LPL to free fatty acids and glycerol. In this study the rate and the effect of acyl chain saturation on the spontaneous acyl migration of 2-MG in in vitro model chylomicra emulsions were determined. After 1 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, less than 20% of 2-monoolein (2-MO) or 2-monopalmitin (2-MP) spontaneously isomerized to 1(3)-MO or 1(3)-MP, respectively. Accordingly, it was concluded that spontaneous isomerization of 2-MG is not the major mechanism for 2-MG metabolism post-TG hydrolysis in chylomicra. Isomerization rates, expressed as decrease in percentage of 2-MG remaining per hour, were -5.12 and -5.86 in water, and -0.43 and -0.41 in hexane for 2-MO and 2-MP, respectively. There was no significant difference between the isomerization rates of 2-MO and 2-MP. Thus, in the present study, saturation of the MG acyl chain did not influence spontaneous acyl migration in either water or hexane, but isomerization of 2-MG was faster in water than in hexane.

  10. The Acylation State of Surface Lipoproteins of Mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii*

    PubMed Central

    Serebryakova, Marina V.; Demina, Irina A.; Galyamina, Maria A.; Kondratov, Ilya G.; Ladygina, Valentina G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Acylation of the N-terminal Cys residue is an essential, ubiquitous, and uniquely bacterial posttranslational modification that allows anchoring of proteins to the lipid membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, acylation proceeds through three sequential steps requiring lipoprotein diacylglyceryltransferase, lipoprotein signal peptidase, and finally lipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The apparent lack of genes coding for recognizable homologs of lipoprotein N-acyltransferase in Gram-positive bacteria and Mollicutes suggests that the final step of the protein acylation process may be absent in these organisms. In this work, we monitored the acylation state of eight major lipoproteins of the mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii using a combination of standard two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein separation, blotting to nitrocellulose membranes, and MALDI-MS identification of modified N-terminal tryptic peptides. We show that for each A. laidlawii lipoprotein studied a third fatty acid in an amide linkage on the N-terminal Cys residue is present, whereas diacylated species were not detected. The result thus proves that A. laidlawii encodes a lipoprotein N-acyltransferase activity. We hypothesize that N-acyltransferases encoded by genes non-homologous to N-acyltransferases of Gram-negative bacteria are also present in other mollicutes and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21540185

  11. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  12. Functional, thermodynamics, structural and biological studies of in silico-identified inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP(CoA) reductase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Leonardo K. B.; Rotta, Mariane; Villela, Anne D.; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S.; Abbadi, Bruno L.; Trindade, Rogério V.; Petersen, Guilherme O.; Danesi, Giuliano M.; Nery, Laura R.; Pauli, Ivani; Campos, Maria M.; Bonan, Carla D.; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; Basso, Luiz A.; Santos, Diogenes S.

    2017-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics agents are needed to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). The M. tuberculosis 2-trans-enoyl-ACP(CoA) reductase enzyme (MtInhA) is the druggable bona fide target of isoniazid. New chemotypes were previously identified by two in silico approaches as potential ligands to MtInhA. The inhibition mode was determined by steady-state kinetics for seven compounds that inhibited MtInhA activity. Dissociation constant values at different temperatures were determined by protein fluorescence spectroscopy. van’t Hoff analyses of ligand binding to MtInhA:NADH provided the thermodynamic signatures of non-covalent interactions (ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°). Phenotypic screening showed that five compounds inhibited in vitro growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain. Labio_16 and Labio_17 compounds also inhibited the in vitro growth of PE-003 multidrug-resistant strain. Cytotoxic effects on Hacat, Vero and RAW 264.7 cell lines were assessed for the latter two compounds. The Labio_16 was bacteriostatic and Labio_17 bactericidal in an M. tuberculosis-infected macrophage model. In Zebrafish model, Labio_16 showed no cardiotoxicity whereas Labio_17 showed dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Accordingly, a model was built for the MtInhA:NADH:Labio_16 ternary complex. The results show that the Labio_16 compound is a direct inhibitor of MtInhA, and it may represent a hit for the development of chemotherapeutic agents to treat TB. PMID:28436453

  13. The isoniazid-NAD adduct is a slow, tight-binding inhibitor of InhA, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl reductase: adduct affinity and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Richa; Whitty, Adrian; Tonge, Peter J

    2003-11-25

    Isoniazid (INH), a frontline antitubercular drug, inhibits InhA, the enoyl reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, by forming a covalent adduct with the NAD cofactor. Here, we report that the INH-NAD adduct is a slow, tight-binding competitive inhibitor of InhA. Demonstration that the adduct binds to WT InhA by a two-step enzyme inhibition mechanism, with initial, weak binding (K(-1) = 16 +/- 11 nM) followed by slow conversion to a final inhibited complex (EI*) with overall Ki = 0.75 +/- 0.08 nM, reconciles existing contradictory values for the inhibitory potency of INH-NAD for InhA. The first order rate constant for conversion of the initial EI complex to EI* (k2 = 0.13 +/- 0.01 min(-1)) is similar to the maximum rate constant observed for InhA inhibition in reaction mixtures containing InhA, INH, NADH, and the INH-activating enzyme KatG (catalase/peroxidase from M. tuberculosis), consistent with an inhibition mechanism in which the adduct forms in solution rather than on the enzyme. Importantly, three mutations that correlate with INH resistance, I21V, I47T, and S94A, have little impact on the inhibition constants. Thus, drug resistance does not result simply from a reduction in affinity of INH-NAD for pure InhA. Instead, we hypothesize that protein-protein interactions within the FASII complex are critical to the mechanism of INH action. Finally, for M161V, an InhA mutation that correlates with resistance to the common biocide triclosan in Mycobacterium smegmatis, binding to form the initial EI complex is significantly weakened, explaining why this mutant inactivates more slowly than WT InhA when incubated with INH, NADH, and KatG.

  14. Functional, thermodynamics, structural and biological studies of in silico-identified inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP(CoA) reductase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Leonardo K. B.; Rotta, Mariane; Villela, Anne D.; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S.; Abbadi, Bruno L.; Trindade, Rogério V.; Petersen, Guilherme O.; Danesi, Giuliano M.; Nery, Laura R.; Pauli, Ivani; Campos, Maria M.; Bonan, Carla D.; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; Basso, Luiz A.; Santos, Diogenes S.

    2017-04-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics agents are needed to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). The M. tuberculosis 2-trans-enoyl-ACP(CoA) reductase enzyme (MtInhA) is the druggable bona fide target of isoniazid. New chemotypes were previously identified by two in silico approaches as potential ligands to MtInhA. The inhibition mode was determined by steady-state kinetics for seven compounds that inhibited MtInhA activity. Dissociation constant values at different temperatures were determined by protein fluorescence spectroscopy. van’t Hoff analyses of ligand binding to MtInhA:NADH provided the thermodynamic signatures of non-covalent interactions (ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°). Phenotypic screening showed that five compounds inhibited in vitro growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain. Labio_16 and Labio_17 compounds also inhibited the in vitro growth of PE-003 multidrug-resistant strain. Cytotoxic effects on Hacat, Vero and RAW 264.7 cell lines were assessed for the latter two compounds. The Labio_16 was bacteriostatic and Labio_17 bactericidal in an M. tuberculosis-infected macrophage model. In Zebrafish model, Labio_16 showed no cardiotoxicity whereas Labio_17 showed dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Accordingly, a model was built for the MtInhA:NADH:Labio_16 ternary complex. The results show that the Labio_16 compound is a direct inhibitor of MtInhA, and it may represent a hit for the development of chemotherapeutic agents to treat TB.

  15. Lethal neonatal case and review of primary short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (SCEH) deficiency associated with secondary lymphocyte pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bedoyan, Jirair K; Yang, Samuel P; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jack, Rhona M; Miron, Alexander; Grahame, George; DeBrosse, Suzanne D; Hoppel, Charles L; Kerr, Douglas S; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in ECHS1 result in short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (SCEH) deficiency which mainly affects the catabolism of various amino acids, particularly valine. We describe a case compound heterozygous for ECHS1 mutations c.836T>C (novel) and c.8C>A identified by whole exome sequencing of proband and parents. SCEH deficiency was confirmed with very low SCEH activity in fibroblasts and nearly absent immunoreactivity of SCEH. The patient had a severe neonatal course with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid lactate and pyruvate concentrations, high plasma alanine and slightly low plasma cystine. 2-Methyl-2,3-dihydroxybutyric acid was markedly elevated as were metabolites of the three branched-chain α-ketoacids on urine organic acids analysis. These urine metabolites notably decreased when lactic acidosis decreased in blood. Lymphocyte pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity was deficient, but PDC and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex activities in cultured fibroblasts were normal. Oxidative phosphorylation analysis on intact digitonin-permeabilized fibroblasts was suggestive of slightly reduced PDC activity relative to control range in mitochondria. We reviewed 16 other cases with mutations in ECHS1 where PDC activity was also assayed in order to determine how common and generalized secondary PDC deficiency is associated with primary SCEH deficiency. For reasons that remain unexplained, we find that about half of cases with primary SCEH deficiency also exhibit secondary PDC deficiency. The patient died on day-of-life 39, prior to establishing his diagnosis, highlighting the importance of early and rapid neonatal diagnosis because of possible adverse effects of certain therapeutic interventions, such as administration of ketogenic diet, in this disorder. There is a need for better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and phenotypic variability in this relatively recently discovered disorder.

  16. Structural mechanism of enoyl-CoA hydratase: three atoms from a single water are added in either an E1cb stepwise or concerted fashion.

    PubMed

    Bahnson, Brian J; Anderson, Vernon E; Petsko, Gregory A

    2002-02-26

    We have determined the crystal structure of the enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECH) from rat liver with the bound substrate 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)cinnamoyl-CoA using X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 2.3 A. In addition to the thiolester substrate, the catalytic water, which is added in the hydration reaction, has been modeled into well-defined electron density in each of the six active sites of the physiological hexamer within the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The catalytic water bridges Glu(144) and Glu(164) of the enzyme and has a lone pair of electrons poised to react with C(3) of the enzyme-bound alpha,beta-unsaturated thiolester. The water molecule, which bridges two glutamate residues, is reminiscent of the enolase active site. However, unlike enolase, which has a lysine available to donate a proton, there are no other sources of protons available from other active site residues in ECH. Furthermore, an analysis of the hydrogen-bonding network of the active site suggests that both Glu(144) and Glu(164) are ionized and carry a negative charge with no reasonable place to have a protonated carboxylate. This lack of hydrogen-bonding acceptors that could accommodate a source of a proton, other than from the water molecule, leads to a hypothesis that the three atoms from a single water molecule are added across the double bond to form the hydrated product. The structural results are discussed in connection with details of the mechanism, which have been elucidated from kinetics, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectroscopy of enzyme-substrate species, in presenting an atomic-resolution mechanism of the reaction. Contrary to the previous interpretation, the structure of the E-S complex together with previously determined kinetic isotope effects is consistent with either a concerted mechanism or an E1cb stepwise mechanism.

  17. Inhibiting activities of the secondary metabolites of Phlomis brunneogaleata against parasitic protozoa and plasmodial enoyl-ACP Reductase, a crucial enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kirmizibekmez, Hasan; Calis, Ihsan; Perozzo, Remo; Brun, Reto; Dönmez, Ali A; Linden, Anthony; Rüedi, Peter; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2004-08-01

    Anti-plasmodial activity-guided fractionation of Phlomis brunneogaleata (Lamiaceae) led to the isolation of two new metabolites, the iridoid glycoside, brunneogaleatoside and a new pyrrolidinium derivative (2 S,4 R)-2-carboxy-4-( E)- p-coumaroyloxy-1,1-dimethylpyrrolidinium inner salt [(2 S,4 R)-1,1-dimethyl-4-( E)- p-coumaroyloxyproline inner salt]. Moreover, a known iridoid glycoside, ipolamiide, six known phenylethanoid glycosides, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, forsythoside B, echinacoside, glucopyranosyl-(1-->G (i)-6)-martynoside and integrifolioside B, two flavone glycosides, luteolin 7- O-beta- D-glucopyranoside ( 10) and chrysoeriol 7- O-beta- D-glucopyranoside ( 11), a lignan glycoside liriodendrin, an acetophenone glycoside 4-hydroxyacetophenone 4- O-(6'- O-beta- D-apiofuranosyl)-beta- D-glucopyranoside and three caffeic acid esters, chlorogenic acid, 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid methyl ester and 5- O-caffeoylshikimic acid were isolated. The structures of the pure compounds were elucidated by means of spectroscopic methods (UV, IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR, [alpha] (D)) and X-ray crystallography. Compounds 10 and 11 were determined to be the major anti-malarial principles of the crude extract (IC (50) values of 2.4 and 5.9 micrograms/mL, respectively). They also exhibited significant leishmanicidal activity (IC (50) = 1.1 and 4.1 micrograms/mL, respectively). The inhibitory potential of the pure metabolites against plasmodial enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI), which is the key regulator of type II fatty acid synthases (FAS-II) in P. falciparum, was also assessed. Compound 10 showed promising FabI inhibiting effect (IC (50) = 10 micrograms/mL) and appears to be the first anti-malarial natural product targeting FabI of P. falciparum.

  18. Reduction in the appearance of facial hyperpigmentation by topical N-undecyl-10-enoyl-L-phenylalanine and its combination with niacinamide.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Donald L; Robinson, Larry R; Raleigh, Patricia S; Miyamoto, Kukizo; Hakozaki, Tomohiro; Li, Jim; Kelm, Gary R

    2009-12-01

    N-undecyl-10-enoyl-L-phenylalanine (Sepiwhite), N-undecylenoyl phenylalanine), a reported alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) receptor antagonist, has been observed to reduce melanin production in cultured melanocytes. In other testing, niacinamide has been found to inhibit melanosome transfer in cultured cells and to reduce the appearance of hyperpigmented spots in clinical studies. Since these two agents function by different mechanisms, we conducted two studies to determine if their combination is more effective than niacinamide alone in reducing facial hyperpigmentation. Two double-blind, 10-week (2-week washout + 8-week treatment), left-right randomized, split-face clinical studies were conducted. In one, two groups of Japanese women applied one of two pairs of test emulsion formulations: a vehicle control and a 5% niacinamide formulation (n= 40), or a 5% niacinamide and a 5% niacinamide plus 1%N-undecylenoyl phenylalanine formulation (n = 40). Each formulation was applied to the randomly assigned side of the face. In the second study, Caucasian women applied one of three emulsions: vehicle control, 5% niacinamide formulation, or combination 5% niacinamide plus 1%N-undecylenoyl-phenylalanine formulation to the randomly assigned side of the face (n = approximately 60 treatment sites per formulation). In both studies, hyperpigmented spots were evaluated at weeks 4 and 8 by quantitative image analysis. In both studies, the combination formulation was significantly more effective than the vehicle and the 5% niacinamide formulation in reducing the appearance of hyperpigmentation after 8 weeks. The combination of 5% niacinamide and 1%N-undecylenoyl phenylalanine is an effective anti-aging technology for use on facial skin.

  19. Functional, thermodynamics, structural and biological studies of in silico-identified inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP(CoA) reductase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Leonardo K B; Rotta, Mariane; Villela, Anne D; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Abbadi, Bruno L; Trindade, Rogério V; Petersen, Guilherme O; Danesi, Giuliano M; Nery, Laura R; Pauli, Ivani; Campos, Maria M; Bonan, Carla D; de Souza, Osmar Norberto; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diogenes S

    2017-04-24

    Novel chemotherapeutics agents are needed to kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). The M. tuberculosis 2-trans-enoyl-ACP(CoA) reductase enzyme (MtInhA) is the druggable bona fide target of isoniazid. New chemotypes were previously identified by two in silico approaches as potential ligands to MtInhA. The inhibition mode was determined by steady-state kinetics for seven compounds that inhibited MtInhA activity. Dissociation constant values at different temperatures were determined by protein fluorescence spectroscopy. van't Hoff analyses of ligand binding to MtInhA:NADH provided the thermodynamic signatures of non-covalent interactions (ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°). Phenotypic screening showed that five compounds inhibited in vitro growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain. Labio_16 and Labio_17 compounds also inhibited the in vitro growth of PE-003 multidrug-resistant strain. Cytotoxic effects on Hacat, Vero and RAW 264.7 cell lines were assessed for the latter two compounds. The Labio_16 was bacteriostatic and Labio_17 bactericidal in an M. tuberculosis-infected macrophage model. In Zebrafish model, Labio_16 showed no cardiotoxicity whereas Labio_17 showed dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Accordingly, a model was built for the MtInhA:NADH:Labio_16 ternary complex. The results show that the Labio_16 compound is a direct inhibitor of MtInhA, and it may represent a hit for the development of chemotherapeutic agents to treat TB.

  20. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  1. Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2008-05-01

    Acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes are essential for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of membranes. Activation of fatty acids requires a two-step reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. In the first step, an acyl-AMP intermediate is formed from ATP. AMP is then exchanged with CoA to produce the activated acyl-CoA. The release of AMP in this reaction defines the superfamily of AMP-forming enzymes. The length of the carbon chain of the fatty acid species defines the substrate specificity for the different acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). On this basis, five sub-families of ACS have been characterized. The purpose of this review is to report on the large family of mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which activate fatty acids with chain lengths of 12 to 20 carbon atoms. Five genes and several isoforms generated by alternative splicing have been identified and limited information is available on their localization. The structure of these membrane proteins has not been solved for the mammalian ACSLs but homology to a bacterial form, whose structure has been determined, points at specific structural features that are important for these enzymes across species. The bacterial form acts as a dimer and has a conserved short motif, called the fatty acid Gate domain, that seems to determine substrate specificity. We will discuss the characterization and identification of the different spliced isoforms, draw attention to the inconsistencies and errors in their annotations, and their cellular localizations. These membrane proteins act on membrane-bound substrates probably as homo- and as heterodimer complexes but have often been expressed as single recombinant isoforms, apparently purified as monomers and tested in Triton X-100 micelles. We will argue that such studies have failed to provide an accurate assessment of the activity and of the distinct function of these enzymes in mammalian cells.

  2. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis. PMID:22151413

  3. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds.

    PubMed

    Hellenbrand, Janine; Biester, Eva-Maria; Gruber, Jens; Hamberg, Mats; Frentzen, Margrit

    2011-12-12

    Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  4. Evolution of the acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP)

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Mark; Rose, Timothy M.; Færgeman, Nils J.; Knudsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein that binds C12–C22 acyl-CoA esters with high affinity. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that it is involved in multiple cellular tasks including modulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, enzyme regulation, regulation of the intracellular acyl-CoA pool size, donation of acyl-CoA esters for β-oxidation, vesicular trafficking, complex lipid synthesis and gene regulation. In the present study, we delineate the evolutionary history of ACBP to get a complete picture of its evolution and distribution among species. ACBP homologues were identified in all four eukaryotic kingdoms, Animalia, Plantae, Fungi and Protista, and eleven eubacterial species. ACBP homologues were not detected in any other known bacterial species, or in archaea. Nearly all of the ACBP-containing bacteria are pathogenic to plants or animals, suggesting that an ACBP gene could have been acquired from a eukaryotic host by horizontal gene transfer. Many bacterial, fungal and higher eukaryotic species only harbour a single ACBP homologue. However, a number of species, ranging from protozoa to vertebrates, have evolved two to six lineage-specific paralogues through gene duplication and/or retrotransposition events. The ACBP protein is highly conserved across phylums, and the majority of ACBP genes are subjected to strong purifying selection. Experimental evidence indicates that the function of ACBP has been conserved from yeast to humans and that the multiple lineage-specific paralogues have evolved altered functions. The appearance of ACBP very early on in evolution points towards a fundamental role of ACBP in acyl-CoA metabolism, including ceramide synthesis and in signalling. PMID:16018771

  5. Rates of thrombin acylation and deacylation upon reaction with low molecular weight acylating agents, carbamylating agents and carbonylating agents.

    PubMed

    Brown, A D; Powers, J C

    1995-08-01

    Acylated derivatives of thrombin have been made using low molecular weight acylating agents, carbamylating agents and carbonylating agents. The compounds used to acylate the active site serine include isatoic anhydrides, benzoxazinones, benzylisocyanate, N-(benzylcarbonyloxy)succinimide and p-(dimethylamino)benzoylimidazolide. The rates of acylation and deacylation were determined. The best overall inhibitors of thrombin are 2-ethoxy-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one, isatoic anhydride and tert-butyl-2,4-dioxo-2H-3,1-benzoxazine-1(4H)-acetate, which have k2/Ki values of 52,700 M-1s-1, 48,900 M-1s-1 and 5400 M-1s-1, respectively. The carbamyl derivative of thrombin formed with benzylisocyanate had the slowest rate of deacylation (2.3 x 10(-7) s-1), while the ester derivative formed with 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)methylimino-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one had the fastest rate of deacylation (1.9 x 10(-4) s-1).

  6. Sterol carrier protein-2 localization in endoplasmic reticulum and role in phospholipid formation.

    PubMed

    Starodub, O; Jolly, C A; Atshaves, B P; Roths, J B; Murphy, E J; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    2000-10-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2; also called nonspecific lipid transfer protein) binds fatty acids and fatty acyl-CoAs, its role in fatty acid metabolism is not fully understood. L-cell fibroblasts stably expressing SCP-2 were used to resolve the relationship between SCP-2 intracellular location and fatty acid transacylation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Indirect immunofluorescence double labeling and laser scanning confocal microscopy detected SCP-2 in peroxisomes > endoplasmic reticulum > mitochondria > lysosomes. SCP-2 enhanced incorporation of exogenous [(3)H]oleic acid into phospholipids and triacylglycerols of overexpressing cells 1.6- and 2.5-fold, respectively, stimulated microsomal incorporation of [1-(14)C]oleoyl-CoA into phosphatidic acid in vitro 13-fold, and exhibited higher specificity for unsaturated versus saturated fatty acyl-CoA. SCP-2 enhanced the rate-limiting step in microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis mediated by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. SCP-2 also enhanced microsomal acyl-chain remodeling of phosphatidylethanolamine up to fivefold and phosphatidylserine twofold, depending on the specific fatty acyl-CoA, but had no effect on other phospholipid classes. In summary, these results were consistent with a role for SCP-2 in phospholipid synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  7. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  8. Structure of human Fe-S assembly subcomplex reveals unexpected cysteine desulfurase architecture and acyl-ACP-ISD11 interactions.

    PubMed

    Cory, Seth A; Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Brignole, Edward J; Patra, Shachin; Winge, Dennis R; Drennan, Catherine L; Rutter, Jared; Barondeau, David P

    2017-07-03

    In eukaryotes, sulfur is mobilized for incorporation into multiple biosynthetic pathways by a cysteine desulfurase complex that consists of a catalytic subunit (NFS1), LYR protein (ISD11), and acyl carrier protein (ACP). This NFS1-ISD11-ACP (SDA) complex forms the core of the iron-sulfur (Fe-S) assembly complex and associates with assembly proteins ISCU2, frataxin (FXN), and ferredoxin to synthesize Fe-S clusters. Here we present crystallographic and electron microscopic structures of the SDA complex coupled to enzyme kinetic and cell-based studies to provide structure-function properties of a mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase. Unlike prokaryotic cysteine desulfurases, the SDA structure adopts an unexpected architecture in which a pair of ISD11 subunits form the dimeric core of the SDA complex, which clarifies the critical role of ISD11 in eukaryotic assemblies. The different quaternary structure results in an incompletely formed substrate channel and solvent-exposed pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor and provides a rationale for the allosteric activator function of FXN in eukaryotic systems. The structure also reveals the 4'-phosphopantetheine-conjugated acyl-group of ACP occupies the hydrophobic core of ISD11, explaining the basis of ACP stabilization. The unexpected architecture for the SDA complex provides a framework for understanding interactions with acceptor proteins for sulfur-containing biosynthetic pathways, elucidating mechanistic details of eukaryotic Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, and clarifying how defects in Fe-S cluster assembly lead to diseases such as Friedreich's ataxia. Moreover, our results support a lock-and-key model in which LYR proteins associate with acyl-ACP as a mechanism for fatty acid biosynthesis to coordinate the expression, Fe-S cofactor maturation, and activity of the respiratory complexes.

  9. Acylation of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2: Interaction with Lipid Membranes and In Vitro Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Background Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation as well as increasing enzymatic stability without disrupting biological potency. Acylation has furthermore been shown to increase interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells. The extent to which such interactions hinder or benefit delivery of acylated peptide drugs across cellular barriers such as the intestinal epithelia is currently unknown. The present study investigates the effect of acylating peptide drugs from a drug delivery perspective. Purpose We hypothesize that the membrane interaction is an important parameter for intestinal translocation, which may be used to optimize the acylation chain length for intestinal permeation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the intestinotrophic Glucagon-like peptide-2 by systematically increasing acyl chain length, in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. Results Peptide self-association and binding to both model lipid and cell membranes was found to increase gradually with acyl chain length, whereas translocation across Caco-2 cells depended non-linearly on chain length. Short and medium acyl chains increased translocation compared to the native peptide, but long chain acylation displayed no improvement in translocation. Co-administration of a paracellular absorption enhancer was found to increase translocation irrespective of acyl chain length, whereas a transcellular enhancer displayed increased synergy with the long chain acylation. Conclusions These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get ‘stuck’ in the cell

  10. Acylation of Glucagon-like peptide-2: interaction with lipid membranes and in vitro intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation as well as increasing enzymatic stability without disrupting biological potency. Acylation has furthermore been shown to increase interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells. The extent to which such interactions hinder or benefit delivery of acylated peptide drugs across cellular barriers such as the intestinal epithelia is currently unknown. The present study investigates the effect of acylating peptide drugs from a drug delivery perspective. We hypothesize that the membrane interaction is an important parameter for intestinal translocation, which may be used to optimize the acylation chain length for intestinal permeation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the intestinotrophic Glucagon-like peptide-2 by systematically increasing acyl chain length, in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. Peptide self-association and binding to both model lipid and cell membranes was found to increase gradually with acyl chain length, whereas translocation across Caco-2 cells depended non-linearly on chain length. Short and medium acyl chains increased translocation compared to the native peptide, but long chain acylation displayed no improvement in translocation. Co-administration of a paracellular absorption enhancer was found to increase translocation irrespective of acyl chain length, whereas a transcellular enhancer displayed increased synergy with the long chain acylation. These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get 'stuck' in the cell membrane. Applying a transcellular absorption

  11. Incorporation of hydrogen atoms from deuterated water and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled nicotin amide nucleotides into fatty acids with the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthetase system.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S; Seyama, Y; Yamakawa, T

    1980-05-28

    The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation into fatty acids was investigated with intact Escherichia coli cells, a crude enzyme preparation and purified reductases of fatty acid synthetase system. The distributions of deuterium atoms incorporated into fatty acids from 2H2O and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled NADPH or NADH were determined by mass spectrometry. When E. coli was grown in 2H2O, almost every hydrogen atom of cellular fatty acids was incorporated from the medium. When fatty acids were synthesized from acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and NADPH in the presence of a crude enzyme preparation of either E. coli or Bacillus subtilis, almost every hydrogen atom was also incorporated from the medium. In contrast to these results, purified beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier reductase directly transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH to beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein, and purified enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase also transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH and NADH directly to enoyl acyl carrier protein. In the crude enzyme preparation of E. coli, we found high activities which exchanged the HB hydrogen of NADPH with the deuterium of 2h2o. the conflicting results of the origin of hydrogen atoms of fatty acids mentioned above are explained by the presence of enzymes, which catalyzed the rapid exchange of NADPH with the deterium of 2H2O prior to the reaction of fatty acid synthetase.

  12. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Finn P.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA. PMID:27573844

  13. Automatic carrier acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunce, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic carrier acquisition system for a phase locked loop (PLL) receiver is disclosed. It includes a local oscillator, which sweeps the receiver to tune across the carrier frequency uncertainty range until the carrier crosses the receiver IF reference. Such crossing is detected by an automatic acquisition detector. It receives the IF signal from the receiver as well as the IF reference. It includes a pair of multipliers which multiply the IF signal with the IF reference in phase and in quadrature. The outputs of the multipliers are filtered through bandpass filters and power detected. The output of the power detector has a signal dc component which is optimized with respect to the noise dc level by the selection of the time constants of the filters as a function of the sweep rate of the local oscillator.

  14. Metabolic Glycoengineering with N-Acyl Side Chain Modified Mannosamines.

    PubMed

    Wratil, Paul R; Horstkorte, Rüdiger; Reutter, Werner

    2016-08-08

    In metabolic glycoengineering (MGE), cells or animals are treated with unnatural derivatives of monosaccharides. After entering the cytosol, these sugar analogues are metabolized and subsequently expressed on newly synthesized glycoconjugates. The feasibility of MGE was first discovered for sialylated glycans, by using N-acyl-modified mannosamines as precursor molecules for unnatural sialic acids. Prerequisite is the promiscuity of the enzymes of the Roseman-Warren biosynthetic pathway. These enzymes were shown to tolerate specific modifications of the N-acyl side chain of mannosamine analogues, for example, elongation by one or more methylene groups (aliphatic modifications) or by insertion of reactive groups (bioorthogonal modifications). Unnatural sialic acids are incorporated into glycoconjugates of cells and organs. MGE has intriguing biological consequences for treated cells (aliphatic MGE) and offers the opportunity to visualize the topography and dynamics of sialylated glycans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo (bioorthogonal MGE).

  15. [S-Acyl derivatives of thiosalicylamides having antifungal activity. II].

    PubMed

    Mazza, M; Modena, T; Montanari, L; Pavanetto, F

    1978-07-01

    Some S-acyl derivatives of N-alkylthiosalicylamides [Table I: substances (I leads to XXXI)] were prepared and tested for antifungal activity. The substances, most of which had not been previously reported, were prepared by condensation of 2-mercapto-N-alkylbenzamides with suitable acylating agents. The antifungal activity of the compounds was tested in vitro against Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. For some compounds the was tested activity against the above strains fungicidal, Candida tropicalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many of the compounds proved to have high antifungal activity comparable with that of Clotrimazol. The results extended knowledge on the structure-antifungal activity relationships of this class of compounds. The compounds with the highest antifungal activity were: 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-heptylbenzamide (XXVIII); 2-acetylmercapto-5-Cl-N,n-propylbenzamide (XIV); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-octylbenzamide (XXXI); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-pentylbenzamide (XXV); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-hexylbenzamide (XXVII).

  16. C-Metalated Nitriles: Electrophile-Dependent Alkylations and Acylations

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Zhang, Zhiyu; Wei, Guoqing; Steward, Omar W.

    2006-01-01

    Sequential carbonyl addition-conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to 3-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonitrile generates C-magnesiated nitriles whose alkylation stereoselectivities intimately depend on the nature of the electrophile. Alkylating these C-magnesiated nitriles with alkyl halides, sulfonates, and unstrained ketones occur with retention of the C-Mg configuration, whereas aldehyde and acyl cyanide acylations proceed with inversion of stereochemistry. Mechanistic probes indicate that the stereoselectivity is controlled by stereoelectronic effects for most electrophiles except allylic, benzylic, and cyclopropyl halides where single electron transfer processes intervene. Screening numerous alkylations of C-magnesiated nitriles with a diverse range of electrophiles reveals the reaction scope and delineates the fundamental stereoelectronic effects responsible for the highly unusual electrophile-dependent alkylations. PMID:16468790

  17. Thiourea-Catalyzed Aminolysis of N-acyl Homoserine Lactones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), molecules integral to bacterial quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the...SUBJECT TERMS quorum sensing Michael A. Bertucci, Stephen J. Lee, Michel R. Gagné University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Office of Sponsored... quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the control in CD3CN. Mild catalysis in other polar aprotic solvents is

  18. Six new acylated anthocyanins from red radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Tsuji, Kouji; Yongzhen, Piao; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-09-01

    Six new acylated anthocyanins (1-6) were isolated along with the three known congeners (7-9) from the fresh roots of red radishes (Raphanus sativus L.) cultivated by our group. Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic properties. Among the six new anthocyanins, the five constituents (1, 2, 4-6) were shown to contain the malonyl function at 6-OH in the glucopyranosyl residue linked to C-5 in the pelargonidin nucleus.

  19. Glycosyltransferases from oat (Avena) implicated in the acylation of avenacins.

    PubMed

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T; Goss, Rebecca J M; Field, Robert A; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-02-08

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid.

  20. Acylation Type Determines Ghrelin's Effects on Energy Homeostasis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D.; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M.; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L.; DiMarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin. PMID:22865372

  1. Exercise-induced suppression of acylated ghrelin in humans.

    PubMed

    Broom, D R; Stensel, D J; Bishop, N C; Burns, S F; Miyashita, M

    2007-06-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone secreted from endocrine cells in the stomach and other tissues. Acylation of ghrelin is essential for appetite regulation. Vigorous exercise induces appetite suppression, but this does not appear to be related to suppressed concentrations of total ghrelin. This study examined the effect of exercise and feeding on plasma acylated ghrelin and appetite. Nine male subjects aged 19-25 yr participated in two, 9-h trials (exercise and control) in a random crossover design. Trials began at 0800 in the morning after an overnight fast. In the exercise trial, subjects ran for 60 min at 72% of maximum oxygen uptake between 0800 and 0900. After this, they rested for 8 h and consumed a test meal at 1100. In the control trial, subjects rested for 9 h and consumed a test meal at 1100. Area under the curve values for plasma acylated ghrelin concentration (assessed from venous blood samples) were lower over the first 3 h and the full 9 h of the exercise trial compared with the control trial: 317+/-135 vs. 510+/-186 pg.ml(-1).3 h and 917+/-342 vs. 1,401+/-521 pg.ml(-1).9 h (means+/-SE) respectively (P<0.05). Area under the curve values for hunger (assessed using a visual scale) were lower over the first 3 h of the exercise trial compared with the control trial (P=0.013). These findings demonstrate that plasma acylated ghrelin concentration and hunger are suppressed during running.

  2. Glycosyltransferases from Oat (Avena) Implicated in the Acylation of Avenacins*

    PubMed Central

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T.; Goss, Rebecca J. M.; Field, Robert A.; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid. PMID:23258535

  3. Acylation type determines ghrelin's effects on energy homeostasis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L; Dimarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M; Woods, Stephen C; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-10-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin.

  4. Antinociceptive property of new 4-acyl-arylhydrazone pyrazole compounds.

    PubMed

    Matheus, M E; Oliveira, L F; Freitas, A C; Carvalho, A M; Barreiro, E J

    1991-01-01

    A series of new 4-acyl-arylhydrazone pyrazole compounds were tested for antinociceptive activity using the inhibition of abdominal contortions induced by acetylcholine (4 mg/kg, ip) in the mouse. Dipyrone was used for comparison of the antinociceptive potency of the compounds being tested. All drugs were administered po in saline (dipyrone) or in propylene glycol (4-acyl-arylhydrazones). The maximum response induced by dipyrone (86% inhibition) was assigned an efficacy index of 1.0. Although none of the compounds had an efficacy index greater than 1.0, all three reached 1.0. The two most potent compounds, W1d and W1g, which also had an efficacy similar to that of dipyrone, contain a p-N(CH3)2 and m-OH,p-OCH3 group in the aromatic ring of the acyl-hydrazone, respectively. W1d presented the lowest antinociceptive ED50 in the series (1.41 mg/kg) and was eleven times more potent than dipyrone (ED50 = 15.80 mg/kg). Other substitutions at the para position had lower potency than W1d. The present results indicate that the introduction of a group at the para position of the acyl-arylhydrazone ring increases the antinociceptive activity of these compounds to provide compounds of the same efficacy but greater potency than dipyrone to which these new compounds are structurally related. Other assays of nociceptive activity are being used to characterize the mechanism of action of the potential new drugs.

  5. Acylated flavonoids in callus cultures of Citrus aurantifolia.

    PubMed

    Berhow, M A; Bennett, R D; Poling, S M; Vannier, S; Hidaka, T; Omura, M

    1994-07-01

    Two new acylated flavonol glycosides were isolated along with kaempferol 3-O-beta-rutinoside from 10-year-old callus cultures of Mexican lime. The structures of these new compounds are kaempferol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside-6"-(3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutarate) and kaempferol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside-6"-(3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutarate)-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside.

  6. A new cytotoxic acylated apigenin glucoside from Phyllanthus emblica L.

    PubMed

    El-Desouky, S K; Ryu, Shi Young; Kim, Young-Kyoon

    2008-01-10

    A new acylated apigenin glucoside (apigenin-7-O-(6''-butyryl-beta-glucopyranoside) (1) was isolated from the methanolic extract of the leaves of Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae) together with the known compounds; gallic acid (2), methyl gallate (3), 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloylglucose (4) and luteolin-4'-O-neohesperiodoside (5). Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic studies ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, HSQC, HMBC).

  7. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from castor (Ricinus communis L.): an enzymatic system appropriate for high rates of oil synthesis and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Alicia; Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are enzymes that terminate the intraplastidial fatty acid synthesis in plants by hydrolyzing the acyl-ACP intermediates and releasing free fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipids. These enzymes are classified in two families, FatA and FatB, which differ in amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. In the present work, both FatA and FatB thioesterases were cloned, sequenced and characterized from castor (Ricinus communis) seeds, a crop of high interest in oleochemistry. Single copies of FatA and FatB were found in castor resulting to be closely related with those of Jatropha curcas. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization after purification, resulting in high catalytic efficiency of RcFatA on oleoyl-ACP and palmitoleoyl-ACP and high efficiencies of RcFatB for oleoyl-ACP and palmitoyl-ACP. The expression profile of these genes displayed the highest levels in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm and young expanding leaves. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of castor oil is discussed.

  8. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted.

  9. Fatty acid acylation of salivary mucin in rat submandibular glands

    SciTech Connect

    Slomiany, B.L.; Murty, V.L.; Takagi, A.; Tsukada, H.; Kosmala, M.; Slomiany, A.

    1985-11-01

    The acylation of salivary mucin with fatty acids and its biosynthesis was investigated by incubating rat submandibular salivary gland cells with (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and (/sup 3/H)proline. The elaborated extracellular and intracellular mucus glycoproteins following delipidation, Bio-Gel P-100 chromatography, and CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation were analyzed for the distribution of the labeled tracers. The incorporation of both markers into mucus glycoprotein increased steadily with time up to 4 h, at which time about 65% of (/sup 3/H)palmitate and (/sup 3/H)proline were found in the extracellular glycoprotein and 35% in the intracellular glycoprotein. The incorporation ratio of proline/palmitate, while showing an increase with incubation time in the extracellular glycoprotein, remained essentially unchanged with time in the intracellular glycoprotein and at 4 h reached respective values of 0.14 and 1.12. The fact that the proline/palmitate incorporation ratio in the intracellular glycoprotein at 1 h of incubation was 22 times higher than in the extracellular and 8 times higher after 4 h suggests that acylation occurs intracellularly and that fatty acids are added after apomucin polypeptide synthesis. As the incorporation of palmitate within the intracellular mucin was greater in the mucus glycoprotein subunit, it would appear that fatty acid acylation of mucin subunits preceeds their assembly into the mucus glycoprotein polymer.

  10. Acyl Chain Length of Phosphatidylserine Is Correlated with Plant Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xuejun; Li, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    Plant lifespan is affected by factors with genetic and environmental bases. The laws governing these two factors and how they affect plant lifespan are unclear. Here we show that the acyl chain length (ACL) of phosphatidylserine (PS) is correlated with plant lifespan. Among the detected eight head-group classes of membrane lipids with lipidomics based on triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, the ACL of PS showed high diversity, in contrast to the ACLs of the other seven classes, which were highly conserved over all stages of development in all plant species and organs and under all conditions that we studied. Further investigation found that acyl chains of PS lengthened during development, senescence, and under environmental stresses and that increasing length was accelerated by promoted- senescence. The acyl chains of PS were limited to a certain carbon number and ceased to increase in length when plants were close to death. These findings suggest that the ACL of PS can count plant lifespan and could be a molecular scale ruler for measuring plant development and senescence. PMID:25058060

  11. Binding of the tautomeric forms of isoniazid-NAD adducts to the active site of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase (InhA): a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Stigliani, Jean-Luc; Arnaud, Philippe; Delaine, Tamara; Bernardes-Génisson, Vania; Meunier, Bernard; Bernadou, Jean

    2008-11-01

    The front-line antituberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) inhibits InhA, the NADH-dependent fatty acid biosynthesis enoyl ACP-reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, via formation of covalent adducts with NAD (INH-NAD adducts). While ring tautomers were found the main species formed in solution, only the 4S chain INH-NAD tautomer was evidenced in the crystallized InhA:INH-NAD complex. In this study we attempted to explore the modes of interaction and energy binding of the different isomers placed in the active site of InhA with the help of various molecular modelling techniques. Ligand and enzyme models were generated with the help of the Vega ZZ program package. Resulting ligands were then docked into the InhA active site individually using computational automated docking package AUTODOCK 3.0.5. The more relevant docked conformations were then used to compute the interaction energy between the ligands and the InhA cavity. The AM1 Hamiltonian and the QM/MM ONIOM methodologies were used and the results compared. The various tautomers were found docked in almost the same place where INH-NAD was present as predicted by earlier X-ray crystallographic studies. However, some changes of ligand conformation and of the interactions ligand-protein were evidenced. The lower binding energy was observed for the 4S chain adduct that probably represents the effective active form of the INH-NAD adducts, as compared to the 4R epimer. The two 4S,7R and 4R,7S ring tautomers show intermediate and similar binding energies contrasting with their different experimental inhibitory potency on InhA. As a possible explanation based on calculated conformations, we formulated the hypothesis of an initial binding of the two ring tautomers to InhA followed by opening of only the ring hemiamidal 4S,7R tautomer (possibly catalyzed by Tyr158 phenolate basic group) to give the 4S chain INH-NAD tight-binding inhibitor. The predictions of ligand-protein interactions at the molecular level can be of

  12. Suppressor Screen and Phenotype Analyses Revealed an Emerging Role of the Monofunctional Peroxisomal Enoyl-CoA Hydratase 2 in Compensated Cell Enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Katano, Mana; Takahashi, Kazuki; Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Abe, Tomoko; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ferjani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Efficient use of seed nutrient reserves is crucial for germination and establishment of plant seedlings. Mobilizing seed oil reserves in Arabidopsis involves β-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis, which provide essential energy and the carbon skeletons needed to sustain seedling growth until photoautotrophy is acquired. We demonstrated that H+-PPase activity is required for gluconeogenesis. Lack of H+-PPase in fugu5 mutants increases cytosolic pyrophosphate (PPi) levels, which partially reduces sucrose synthesis de novo and inhibits cell division. In contrast, post-mitotic cell expansion in cotyledons was unusually enhanced, a phenotype called compensation. Therefore, it appears that PPi inhibits several cellular functions, including cell cycling, to trigger compensated cell enlargement (CCE). Here, we mutagenized fugu5-1 seeds with 12C6+ heavy-ion irradiation and screened mutations that restrain CCE to gain insight into the genetic pathway(s) involved in CCE. We isolated A#3-1, in which cell size was severely reduced, but cell number remained similar to that of original fugu5-1. Moreover, cell number decreased in A#3-1 single mutant (A#3-1sm), similar to that of fugu5-1, but cell size was almost equal to that of the wild type. Surprisingly, A#3-1 mutation did not affect CCE in other compensation exhibiting mutant backgrounds, such as an3-4 and fugu2-1/fas1-6. Subsequent map-based cloning combined with genome sequencing and HRM curve analysis identified enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 (ECH2) as the causal gene of A#3-1. The above phenotypes were consistently observed in the ech2-1 allele and supplying sucrose restored the morphological and cellular phenotypes in fugu5-1, ech2-1, A#3-1sm, fugu5-1 ech2-1, and A#3-1; fugu5-1. Taken together, these results suggest that defects in either H+-PPase or ECH2 compromise cell proliferation due to defects in mobilizing seed storage lipids. In contrast, ECH2 alone likely promotes CCE during the post-mitotic cell

  13. Common Carrier Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This bulletin outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibilities in regulating the interstate and foreign common carrier communication via electrical means. Also summarized are the history, technological development, and current capabilities and prospects of telegraph, wire telephone, radiotelephone, satellite communications,…

  14. Synthetic carriers of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dellacherie, E; Labrude, P; Vigneron, C; Riess, J G

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade, construction of artificial carriers of oxygen for transfusion purposes has evolved in three main directions, which can be reviewed as follows. The first approach consists of modifying hemoglobin (Hb), the natural oxygen carrier, in order to lower its oxygen affinity and increase its intravascular persistence. To achieve this aim, two basic procedures have been used: molecular and environmental modification. In the first case, Hb is modified with chemical reagents; the second requires encapsulation of Hb to obtain artificial erythrocytes. The second approach is based on the use of synthetic oxygen-carrying chelates that mimic the oxygenation function of Hb. The main products in this class are metalloporphyrins, whose chemical environment is designed to render them efficient as reversible carriers of oxygen in vivo. Finally, the third approach deals with the perfluorochemicals used in emulsified form. Perfluorochemical liquids are excellent gas solvents, but some problems remain unsolved with regard to their development as oxygen carriers in vivo: low O2 dissolving capacity, toxicity, and excretion.

  15. The 2.1Å Crystal Structure of an Acyl-CoA Synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans reveals an alternate acyl binding pocket for small branched acyl substrates†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish B.; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Cooper, Leroy L.; Qu, Jun; Meng, Yu; Smith, Kerry S.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The acyl-AMP forming family of adenylating enzymes catalyze two-step reactions to activate a carboxylate with the chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for multiple members of this family and, together with biochemical studies, provide insights into the active site and catalytic mechanisms used by these enzymes. These studies have shown that the enzymes use a domain rotation of 140° to reconfigure a single active site to catalyze the two partial reactions. We present here the crystal structure of a new medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans. The binding pocket for the three substrates is analyzed, with many conserved residues present in the AMP binding pocket. The CoA binding pocket is compared to the pockets of both acetyl-CoA synthetase and 4-chlorobenzoate:CoA ligase. Most interestingly, the acyl binding pocket of the new structure is compared with other acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases. A comparison of the acyl-binding pocket of the acyl-CoA synthetase from M. acetivorans with other structures identifies a shallow pocket that is used to bind the medium chain carboxylates. These insights emphasize the high sequence and structural diversity among this family in the area of the acyl binding pocket. PMID:19544569

  16. Structural basis for the acyl chain selectivity and mechanism of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Allison H.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2007-01-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) acyltransferase (LpxA) catalyzes the first step of lipid A biosynthesis, the reversible transfer of the R-3-hydroxyacyl chain from R-3-hydroxyacyl acyl carrier protein to the glucosamine 3-OH group of UDP-GlcNAc. Escherichia coli LpxA is highly selective for R-3-hydroxymyristate. The crystal structure of the E. coli LpxA homotrimer, determined previously in the absence of lipid substrates or products, revealed that LpxA contains an unusual, left-handed parallel β-helix fold. We have now solved the crystal structures of E. coli LpxA with the bound product UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-GlcNAc at a resolution of 1.74 Å and with bound UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxydecanoyl)-GlcNAc at 1.85 Å. The structures of these complexes are consistent with the catalytic mechanism deduced by mutagenesis and with a recent 3.0-Å structure of LpxA with bound UDP-GlcNAc. Our structures show how LpxA selects for 14-carbon R-3-hydroxyacyl chains and reveal two modes of UDP binding. PMID:17698807

  17. Retrospective study of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ventura, F V; Leandro, P; Luz, A; Rivera, I A; Silva, M F B; Ramos, R; Rocha, H; Lopes, A; Fonseca, H; Gaspar, A; Diogo, L; Martins, E; Leão-Teles, E; Vilarinho, L; Tavares de Almeida, I

    2014-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the commonest genetic defect of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. About 60% of MCADD patients are homozygous for the c.985A>G (p.Lys329Glu) mutation in the ACADM gene (G985 allele). Herein, we present the first report on the molecular and biochemical spectrum of Portuguese MCADD population. From the 109 patients studied, 83 were diagnosed after inclusion of MCADD in the national newborn screening, 8 following the onset of symptoms and 18 through segregation studies. Gypsy ancestry was identified in 85/109 patients. The G985 allele was found in homozygosity in 102/109 patients, in compound heterozygosity in 6/109 and was absent in one patient. Segregation studies in the Gypsy families showed that 93/123 relatives were carriers of the G985 allele, suggesting its high prevalence in this ethnic group. Additionally, three new substitutions-c.218A>G (p.Tyr73Cys), c.503A>T (p.Asp168Val) and c.1205G>T (p.Gly402Val)-were identified. Despite the particularity of the MCADD population investigated, the G985 allele was found in linkage disequilibrium with H1(112) haplotype. Furthermore, two novel haplotypes, H5(212) and H6(122) were revealed.

  18. Characterization of Lipid A Variants by Energy-Resolved Mass Spectrometry: Impact of Acyl Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Christopher M.; Akin, Lucas D.; Morrison, Lindsay J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2017-06-01

    Lipid A molecules consist of a diglucosamine sugar core with a number of appended acyl chains that vary in their length and connectivity. Because of the challenging nature of characterizing these molecules and differentiating between isomeric species, an energy-resolved MS/MS strategy was undertaken to track the fragmentation trends and map genealogies of product ions originating from consecutive cleavages of acyl chains. Generalizations were developed based on the number and locations of the primary and secondary acyl chains as well as variations in preferential cleavages arising from the location of the phosphate groups. Secondary acyl chain cleavage occurs most readily for lipid A species at the 3' position, followed by primary acyl chain fragmentation at both the 3' and 3 positions. In the instances of bisphosphorylated lipid A variants, phosphate loss occurs readily in conjunction with the most favorable primary and secondary acyl chain cleavages. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Direct nonchromatographic assay for 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekharan, R.; Ray, T.K.; Cronan, J.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    1-Acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (also called lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase) which catalyzes the acylation of 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to phosphatidic acid is generally assayed by the use of a radioactive substrate followed by a time-consuming chromatographic separation of substrate and product. We report a direct and highly sensitive nonchromatographic assay for this enzyme based on the ability of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase to dephosphorylate 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate but not phosphatidic acid. This selective hydrolysis coupled with the use of /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate as substrate permits measurement of the product, /sup 32/P-labeled phosphatidic acid by solvent extraction or precipitation. We also report a series of enzymatic reactions for the efficient conversion of /sup 32/Pi to /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate.

  20. Plant Microsomal Phospholipid Acyl Hydrolases Have Selectivities for Uncommon Fatty Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, U.; Banas, A.; Stymne, S.

    1995-01-01

    Developing endosperms and embryos accumulating triacylglycerols rich in caproyl (decanoyl) groups (i.e. developing embryos of Cuphea procumbens and Ulmus glabra) had microsomal acyl hydrolases with high selectivities toward phosphatidylcholine with this acyl group. Similarly, membranes from Euphorbia lagascae and Ricinus communis endosperms, which accumulate triacylglycerols with vernoleate (12-epoxy-octadeca-9-enoate) and ricinoleate (12-hydroxy-octadeca-9-enoate), respectively, had acyl hydrolases that selectively removed their respective oxygenated acyl group from the phospholipids. The activities toward phospholipid substrates with epoxy, hydroxy, and medium-chain acyl groups varied greatly between microsomal preparations from different plant species. Epoxidated and hydroxylated acyl groups in sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylcholine and in sn-1-lysophosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed to a similar extent, whereas the hydrolysis of caproyl groups was highly dependent on the positional localization. PMID:12228415

  1. Characterization of Lipid A Variants by Energy-Resolved Mass Spectrometry: Impact of Acyl Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Christopher M.; Akin, Lucas D.; Morrison, Lindsay J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-12-01

    Lipid A molecules consist of a diglucosamine sugar core with a number of appended acyl chains that vary in their length and connectivity. Because of the challenging nature of characterizing these molecules and differentiating between isomeric species, an energy-resolved MS/MS strategy was undertaken to track the fragmentation trends and map genealogies of product ions originating from consecutive cleavages of acyl chains. Generalizations were developed based on the number and locations of the primary and secondary acyl chains as well as variations in preferential cleavages arising from the location of the phosphate groups. Secondary acyl chain cleavage occurs most readily for lipid A species at the 3' position, followed by primary acyl chain fragmentation at both the 3' and 3 positions. In the instances of bisphosphorylated lipid A variants, phosphate loss occurs readily in conjunction with the most favorable primary and secondary acyl chain cleavages.

  2. Sealed substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Ganti, Kalyana Bhargava [Fremont, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The substrate carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are held, and conductive lines are embedded within the carrier body. A conductive bus bar is embedded into a top side of the carrier body and is conductively coupled to the conductive lines. A thermoplastic overmold covers a portion of the bus bar, and there is a plastic-to-plastic bond between the thermoplastic overmold and the non-conductive carrier body. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  3. ZrCl4-mediated regio- and chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation of indole.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Sankar K; Kashyap, Maneesh; Kamble, Harshad

    2011-06-03

    An efficient method for regio- and chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation of indole using acyl chlorides in the presence of ZrCl(4) has been discovered. It minimizes/eliminates common competing reactions that occur due to high and multiatom-nucleophilic character of indole. In this method, a wide range of aroyl, heteroaroyl alkenoyl, and alkanoyl chlorides undergo smooth acylation with various indoles without NH protection and afford 3-acylindoles in good to high yields.

  4. Acute ethanol treatment induces a bimodal response of phospholipid acylation rates in rat red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verine, A.; Valette, A.; Richard, D.; Boyer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol in rats elicited a bimodal response of acylation rates in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine of intact red blood cells. Within an initial period, ethanol inhibited acylation rates. The inhibition then reversed, leading to increased values which persisted as long as ethanol was present in plasma. Acylation rates were not correlated to ethanol concentrations in plasma. The authors suggest that red cells first desensitize to, then overcompensate for the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acylation reactions. These adaptive changes may be one of the events mediating membrane tolerance to ethanol.

  5. A novel plasmid for detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Ling, Elizabeth A; Ellison, Matthew L; Pesci, Everett C

    2009-07-01

    Many bacteria utilize acyl-homoserine lactones as cell to cell signals that can regulate the expression of numerous genes. Structural differences in acyl-homoserine lactones produced by different bacteria, such as acyl side chain length and the presence or absence of an oxy group, make many of the commonly used detection bioassays impractical for broad range detection. Here we present a simple, broad range acyl-homoserine lactone detection bioassay that can be used to detect a wide range of these chemical signals. A plasmid (pEAL01) was constructed and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain QSC105 to allow for detection of a broad range of acyl-homoserine lactones through induction of a lasB'-lacZ transcriptional fusion. Monitoring beta-galactosidase activity from this bioassay showed that P. aeruginosa strain QSC105 (pEAL01) could detect the presence of eight acyl-homoserine lactones tested at physiological concentrations. This novel strain could also detect acyl-homoserine lactones from the extracts of four different bacteria that produce different acyl-homoserine lactones signals. These data indicate that strain QSC105 (pEAL01) can be used to detect a wide variety of acyl-homoserine lactones by a simple beta-galactosidase assay and this bioassay could be a useful and inexpensive tool to quickly identify the presence of these signal molecules.

  6. Yarn carrier with clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyne, Richard A. (Inventor); Benson, Rio H. (Inventor); El-Shiekh, Aly (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A yarn carrier apparatus particularly suited for use in braiding machinery or the like due to its capability of continuous yarn feeding and retraction of long lengths of yarn. The yarn carrier apparatus comprises a yarn supply spool which is rotatably mounted within the housing, a spring motor also mounted within the housing and operatively connected to the yarn supply spool through a mechanical transmission assembly which is adapted to multiply rotational movement between the first element of the gear assembly operatively connected to the spring motor and the final element of the gear assembly operatively connected to the yarn supply spool. The spring motor is adapted to tension the yarn during both feeding and retraction thereof, and it is further adapted to periodically rotatably slip within the housing and partially unwind so as to allow for continuous withdrawal of a long length of yarn without the spring motor becoming fully wound and preventing further yarn retraction.

  7. Shuttle Carrier Aircraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-23

    It has been called the world's greatest piggyback ride: a space shuttle, atop a Boeing 747 jet aircraft. But this is no ordinary 747, this is the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft...the SCA. This specially modified jumbo jet was not only a taxi service for the shuttle, but also helped in the development of the shuttle itself. In 30 years of flying, the majestic image of a spacecraft joined to the SCA, became a symbol of American invention and ingenuity.

  8. Xanthomonas campestris RpfB is a fatty Acyl-CoA ligase required to counteract the thioesterase activity of the RpfF diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongkai; Yu, Yonghong; Dong, Huijuan; Wang, Haihong; Cronan, John E

    2014-07-01

    In Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the proteins encoded by the rpf (regulator of pathogenicity factor) gene cluster produce and sense a fatty acid signal molecule called diffusible signalling factor (DSF, 2(Z)-11-methyldodecenoic acid). RpfB was reported to be involved in DSF processing and was predicted to encode an acyl-CoA ligase. We report that RpfB activates a wide range of fatty acids to their CoA esters in vitro. Moreover, RpfB can functionally replace the paradigm bacterial acyl-CoA ligase, Escherichia coli FadD, in the E. coli ß-oxidation pathway and deletion of RpfB from the Xcc genome results in a strain unable to utilize fatty acids as carbon sources. An essential RpfB function in the pathogenicity factor pathway was demonstrated by the properties of a strain deleted for both the rpfB and rpfC genes. The ΔrpfB ΔrpfC strain grew poorly and lysed upon entering stationary phase. Deletion of rpfF, the gene encoding the DSF synthetic enzyme, restored normal growth to this strain. RpfF is a dual function enzyme that synthesizes DSF by dehydration of a 3-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) fatty acid synthetic intermediate and also cleaves the thioester bond linking DSF to ACP. However, the RpfF thioesterase activity is of broad specificity and upon elimination of its RpfC inhibitor RpfF attains maximal activity and its thioesterase activity proceeds to block membrane lipid synthesis by cleavage of acyl-ACP intermediates. This resulted in release of the nascent acyl chains to the medium as free fatty acids. This lack of acyl chains for phospholipid synthesis results in cell lysis unless RpfB is present to counteract the RpfF thioesterase activity by catalysing uptake and activation of the free fatty acids to give acyl-CoAs that can be utilized to restore membrane lipid synthesis. Heterologous expression of a different fatty acid activating enzyme, the Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase, replaced RpfB in counteracting the effects of high

  9. Overexpression of the (R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase gene from Pseudomonas chlororaphis HS21 in Pseudomonas strains for the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates of altered monomer composition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moon Gyu; Rhee, Young Ha

    2012-01-01

    The (R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase gene (phaJ(HS21)) from Pseudomonas chlororaphis HS21 was overexpressed in various Pseudomonas strains, alone and in combination with the polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene (phaC(HS21)), for the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) of altered monomer composition. Recombinant Pseudomonas strains harboring phaC(HS21) and phaJ(HS21) generated saturated and unsaturated monomers of C12-C14 in their PHAs. In particular, the level of the 3-hydroxytetradecenoate monomer in recombinant P. chlororaphis HS21 increased by approximately 260%. PhaJ(HS21) is expected to be useful in the biosynthesis of PHAs consisting of unusual monomer units.

  10. Scheduled feeding results in adipogenesis and increased acylated ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Verbaeys, I; Tolle, V; Swennen, Q; Zizzari, P; Buyse, J; Epelbaum, J; Cokelaere, M

    2011-06-01

    Ghrelin, known to stimulate adipogenesis, displays an endogenous secretory rhythmicity closely related to meal patterns. Therefore, a chronic imposed feeding schedule might induce modified ghrelin levels and consequently adiposity. Growing Wistar rats were schedule-fed by imposing a particular fixed feeding schedule of 3 meals/day without caloric restriction compared with total daily control intake. After 14 days, their body composition was measured by DEXA and compared with ad libitum-fed controls and to rats daily intraperitoneal injection with ghrelin. Feeding patterns, circadian activity, and pulsatile acylated ghrelin variations were monitored. After 14 days, rats on the imposed feeding schedule displayed, despite an equal daily calorie intake, a slower growth rate compared with ad libitum-fed controls. Moreover, schedule-fed rats exhibiting a feeding pattern with intermittent fasting periods had a higher fat/lean ratio compared with ad libitum-fed controls. Interestingly, ghrelin-treated rats also showed an increase in fat mass, but the fat/lean ratio was not significantly increased compared with controls. In the schedule-fed rats, spontaneous activity and acylated ghrelin levels were increased and associated with the scheduled meals, indicating anticipatory effects. Our results suggest that scheduled feeding, associated with intermittent fasting periods, even without nutrient/calorie restriction on a daily basis, results in adipogenesis. This repartitioning effect is associated with increased endogenous acylated ghrelin levels. This schedule-fed model points out the delicate role of meal frequency in adipogenesis and provides an investigative tool to clarify any effects of endogenous ghrelin without the need for ghrelin administration.

  11. Acyl-protein thioesterase 2 catalyzes the deacylation of peripheral membrane-associated GAP-43.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Vanesa M; Trenchi, Alejandra; Gomez, Guillermo A; Daniotti, Jose L

    2010-11-30

    An acylation/deacylation cycle is necessary to maintain the steady-state subcellular distribution and biological activity of S-acylated peripheral proteins. Despite the progress that has been made in identifying and characterizing palmitoyltransferases (PATs), much less is known about the thioesterases involved in protein deacylation. In this work, we investigated the deacylation of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a dually acylated protein at cysteine residues 3 and 4. Using fluorescent fusion constructs, we measured in vivo the rate of deacylation of GAP-43 and its single acylated mutants in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 and human HeLa cells. Biochemical and live cell imaging experiments demonstrated that single acylated mutants were completely deacylated with similar kinetic in both cell types. By RT-PCR we observed that acyl-protein thioesterase 1 (APT-1), the only bona fide thioesterase shown to mediate deacylation in vivo, is expressed in HeLa cells, but not in CHO-K1 cells. However, APT-1 overexpression neither increased the deacylation rate of single acylated GAP-43 nor affected the steady-state subcellular distribution of dually acylated GAP-43 both in CHO-K1 and HeLa cells, indicating that GAP-43 deacylation is not mediated by APT-1. Accordingly, we performed a bioinformatic search to identify putative candidates with acyl-protein thioesterase activity. Among several candidates, we found that APT-2 is expressed both in CHO-K1 and HeLa cells and its overexpression increased the deacylation rate of single acylated GAP-43 and affected the steady-state localization of diacylated GAP-43 and H-Ras. Thus, the results demonstrate that APT-2 is the protein thioesterase involved in the acylation/deacylation cycle operating in GAP-43 subcellular distribution.

  12. Acyl-Protein Thioesterase 2 Catalizes the Deacylation of Peripheral Membrane-Associated GAP-43

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Vanesa M.; Trenchi, Alejandra; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    An acylation/deacylation cycle is necessary to maintain the steady-state subcellular distribution and biological activity of S-acylated peripheral proteins. Despite the progress that has been made in identifying and characterizing palmitoyltransferases (PATs), much less is known about the thioesterases involved in protein deacylation. In this work, we investigated the deacylation of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a dually acylated protein at cysteine residues 3 and 4. Using fluorescent fusion constructs, we measured in vivo the rate of deacylation of GAP-43 and its single acylated mutants in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 and human HeLa cells. Biochemical and live cell imaging experiments demonstrated that single acylated mutants were completely deacylated with similar kinetic in both cell types. By RT-PCR we observed that acyl-protein thioesterase 1 (APT-1), the only bona fide thioesterase shown to mediate deacylation in vivo, is expressed in HeLa cells, but not in CHO-K1 cells. However, APT-1 overexpression neither increased the deacylation rate of single acylated GAP-43 nor affected the steady-state subcellular distribution of dually acylated GAP-43 both in CHO-K1 and HeLa cells, indicating that GAP-43 deacylation is not mediated by APT-1. Accordingly, we performed a bioinformatic search to identify putative candidates with acyl-protein thioesterase activity. Among several candidates, we found that APT-2 is expressed both in CHO-K1 and HeLa cells and its overexpression increased the deacylation rate of single acylated GAP-43 and affected the steady-state localization of diacylated GAP-43 and H-Ras. Thus, the results demonstrate that APT-2 is the protein thioesterase involved in the acylation/deacylation cycle operating in GAP-43 subcellular distribution. PMID:21152083

  13. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An [Milpitas, CA; Abas, Emmanuel Chua [Laguna, PH; Divino, Edmundo Anida [Cavite, PH; Ermita, Jake Randal G [Laguna, PH; Capulong, Jose Francisco S [Laguna, PH; Castillo, Arnold Villamor [Batangas, PH; Ma,; Xiaobing, Diana [Saratoga, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  14. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma, Diana Xiaobing

    2016-08-02

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  15. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes 1

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jaen; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663076

  16. Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives’ Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang; Wang, Erpei; Lu, Yuyun; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Yan, Rian

    2015-01-01

    This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively. PMID:26098744

  17. Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives' Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Wang, Erpei; Lu, Yuyun; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Yan, Rian

    2015-01-01

    This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

  18. 49 CFR 369.2 - Classification of carriers-motor carriers of property, household goods carriers, and dual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... formula in Note A. (b)(1) The class to which any carrier belongs shall be determined by annual carrier... applying the revenue deflator formula in Note A. Class II. Carriers having annual carrier operating... applying the revenue deflator formula in Note A. Class III. Carriers having annual carrier operating...

  19. Stereoelectronic basis for the kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles with chiral acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sheng-Ying; Wanner, Benedikt; Wheeler, Philip; Beauchemin, André M; Rovis, Tomislav; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2014-06-10

    The kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles with chiral acylating agents reveals a previously unrecognized stereoelectronic effect in amine acylation. Combined with a new achiral hydroxamate, this effect makes possible the resolution of various N-heterocycles by using easily prepared reagents. A transition-state model to rationalize the stereochemical outcome of this kinetic resolution is also proposed.

  20. The Role of Mitochondrial Non-Enzymatic Protein Acylation in Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shin Yee; Ng, Li Theng; Ng, Li Fang; Inoue, Takao; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Hagen, Thilo; Gruber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, various large-scale proteomic studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial proteins are highly acylated, most commonly by addition of acetyl and succinyl groups. These acyl modifications may be enzyme catalysed but can also be driven non-enzymatically. The latter mechanism is promoted in mitochondria due to the nature of the mitochondrial microenvironment, which is alkaline and contains high concentrations of acyl-CoA species. Protein acylation may modify enzyme activity, typically inhibiting it. We posited that organismal ageing might be accompanied by an accumulation of acylated proteins, especially in mitochondria, and that this might compromise mitochondrial function and contribute to ageing. In this study, we used R. norvegicus, C. elegans and D. melanogaster to compare the acylation status of mitochondrial proteins between young and old animals. We observed a specific age-dependent increase in protein succinylation in worms and flies but not in rat. Rats have two substrate-specific mitochondrial deacylases, SIRT3 and SIRT5 while both flies and worms lack these enzymes. We propose that accumulation of mitochondrial protein acylation contributes to age-dependent mitochondrial functional decline and that SIRT3 and SIRT5 enzymes may promote longevity through regulation of mitochondrial protein acylation during ageing. PMID:28033361

  1. Ortho C-H Acylation of Aryl Iodides by Palladium/Norbornene Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhe; Wang, Jianchun; Ren, Zhi; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-10-19

    Reported herein is a palladium/norbornene-catalyzed ortho-arene acylation of aryl iodides by a Catellani-type C-H functionalization. This transformation is enabled by isopropyl carbonate anhydrides, which serve as both an acyl cation equivalent and a hydride source.

  2. Fatty acid acylation of rat brain myelin proteolipid protein in vitro: identification of the lipid donor.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, O A; Lees, M B

    1986-02-01

    The immediate acyl chain donor for fatty acid esterification of proteolipid protein (PLP) was identified in an in vitro system. Rat brain total membranes, after removal of crude nuclear and mitochondrial fractions, were incubated with radioactive acyl donors, extracted with chloroform/methanol, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the presence of [3H]palmitic acid, CoA, ATP, and Mg2+, acylation of endogenous PLP occurred at a linear rate for at least 2 h. The radioactivity was associated with the protein via an ester linkage, mainly as palmitic acid. Omission of ATP, CoA, Mg2+, or all three reduced fatty acid incorporation into PLP to 44, 27, 8, and 4%, respectively, of the values in the complete system. Incubation of the membrane fraction with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of CoA and ATP led to highly labeled PLP. These data demonstrate that activation of free fatty acid is required for acylation. Phospholipids and glycolipids were not able to acylate the PLP directly. Finally, when isolated myelin was incubated with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of cofactors, only PLP was labeled, thus confirming the identity of palmitoyl-CoA as the direct acyl chain donor and suggesting that the acylating activity and the PLP pool available for acylation are both in the myelin.

  3. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Li, Conghu; Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen.

  4. Selective acylation of plasma membrane proteins of Mycoplasma agalactiae: the causal agent of agalactia.

    PubMed

    Le Hénaff, M; Guéguen, M M; Fontenelle, C

    2000-01-01

    Revealed by in vivo labeling with (14)C-palmitic acid, about 15 acylated proteins were identified in the plasma membrane of Mycoplasma agalactiae (type strain PG2), including the major component p40. Triton X-114 phase partitioning and Western blotting demonstrated the amphiphilic properties of the acyl proteins and showed that they were also antigenic components. Chemical analyses of fatty acids bound to proteins revealed the following selectivity order within acylation: stearic acid (18:0) > linoleic acid (18:2c) approximately palmitic acid (16:0) > oleic acid (18:1c) > myristic acid (14:0), with 16:0 and 18:1c preferred for the O-acylation and 18:0 for the N-acylation. The ratio [O-ester- + amide-bound acyl chains]/O-ester-linked chains being close to 1.4 as well as the presence of S-glycerylcysteine suggest that acyl proteins in M. agalactiae are true lipoproteins containing N-acyl diacyl glycerylcysteine, probably processed by a mechanism analogous to that described for Gram-negative eubacteria.

  5. Synthesis of acylated methyl beta-D-xylopyranosides and their enzymic deacylations by rabbit serum esterases.

    PubMed

    Petrović, V; Tomić, S; Ljevaković, D; Tomasić, J

    1997-07-11

    Selective pivaloylations of methyl beta-D-xylopyranoside have been studied under various reaction conditions. Partially pivaloylated products were submitted to additional acetylations. The structures were established by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Representatives of acylated methyl beta-D-xylopyranosides (acyl being pivaloyl, acetyl, or a combination of both) were submitted to hydrolysis catalyzed by rabbit serum and esterases isolated from rabbit serum.

  6. Membrane Topology and Transient Acylation of Toxoplasma gondii Glycosylphosphatidylinositols

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Jürgen; Smith, Terry K.; Azzouz, Nahid; Gerold, Peter; Seeber, Frank; Lingelbach, Klaus; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Schwarz, Ralph T.

    2006-01-01

    Using hypotonically permeabilized Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, we investigated the topology of the free glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The morphology and permeability of parasites were checked by electron microscopy and release of a cytosolic protein. The membrane integrity of organelles (ER and rhoptries) was checked by protease protection assays. In initial experiments, GPI biosynthetic intermediates were labeled with UDP-[6-3H]GlcNAc in permeabilized parasites, and the transmembrane distribution of the radiolabeled lipids was probed with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). A new early intermediate with an acyl modification on the inositol was identified, indicating that inositol acylation also occurs in T. gondii. A significant portion of the early GPI intermediates (GlcN-PI and GlcNAc-PI) could be hydrolyzed following PI-PLC treatment, indicating that these glycolipids are predominantly present in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the ER. Permeabilized T. gondii parasites labeled with either GDP-[2-3H]mannose or UDP-[6-3H]glucose showed that the more mannosylated and side chain (Glc-GalNAc)-modified GPI intermediates are also preferentially localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the ER. PMID:16896225

  7. Fatty acid hydrolysis of acyl marinobactin siderophores by Marinobacter acylases.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Naka, Hiroaki; Iinishi, Akira; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2015-01-27

    The marine bacteria Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and Marinobacter nanhaiticus D15-8W produce a suite of acyl peptidic marinobactin siderophores to acquire iron under iron-limiting conditions. During late-log phase growth, the marinobactins are hydrolyzed to form the marinobactin headgroup with release of the corresponding fatty acid tail. The bntA gene, a homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine acylase gene, pvdQ, was identified from Marinobacter sp. DS40M6. A bntA knockout mutant of Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produced the suite of acyl marinobactins A-E, without the usual formation of the marinobactin headgroup. Another marinobactin-producing species, M. nanhaiticus D15-8W, is predicted to have two pvdQ homologues, mhtA and mhtB. MhtA and MhtB have 67% identical amino acid sequences. MhtA catalyzes hydrolysis of the apo-marinobactin siderophores as well as the quorum sensing signaling molecule, dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone. In contrast to hydrolysis of the suite of apo-marinobactins by MhtA, hydrolysis of the iron(III)-bound marinobactins was not observed.

  8. Impact of intracerebroventricular obestatin on plasma acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1 levels, and on gastric emptying in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Lee, Wei-Jei; Chong, Keong; Lee, Shou-Dong; Liao, You-Di

    2012-07-01

    Obestatin, which is a putative 23-amino-acid peptide, is derived from the C-terminal part of the mammalian preproghrelin gene. Nesfatin-1 mRNA is co-expressed with ghrelin in gastric endocrine X/A-like cells; therefore, nesfatin-1 may also interact with preproghrelin gene products in the stomach. In this study, we investigated the impact of obestatin on the plasma levels of acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1, and on the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal 2 h after an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection in conscious, fasted rats. The rats were implanted with ICV catheters. Plasma levels of acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1, expected to be co-expressed with obestatin, were measured, whereas the human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (h/rCRF) was applied as an inhibitor of gastric emptying. The ICV administration of obestatin (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 nmol/rat) did not modify the plasma acyl ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin levels, the acyl ghrelin/des-acyl ghrelin ratio and nesfatin-1 concentrations. The ICV acute administration of obestatin had no influence on the 2-h rate of gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal, but the ICV h/rCRF injection delayed it. The weight of food ingested 1 h before ICV injection significantly, but negatively correlated with the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal. Our study indicates that the ICV injection of obestatin does not change the 2-h rate of gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal and the relatively weak interrelationships between ghrelin gene products and nesfatin-1. However, the weight of the ingested food negatively affects the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal in conscious, fasted rats.

  9. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Strauss, Holger M; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate its influence on intestinal cell translocation and membrane interaction. We find that acylation drastically increases in vitro intestinal peptide flux and confers a transient permeability enhancing effect on the cell layer. The analogues permeabilize model lipid membranes, indicating that the effect is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain provides 6- or 9-fold increase in peptide translocation at pH 7.4 and 5.5, respectively. Prolonging the chain length appears to hamper translocation, possibly due to self-association or aggregation, although the long chain acylated analogues remain superior to the unacylated peptide. For K(18)-acylation a short chain provides a moderate improvement, whereas medium and long chain analogues are highly efficient, with a 12-fold increase in permeability compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, on par with currently employed oral permeation enhancers. For K(18)-acylation the medium chain acylation appears to be optimal, as elongating the chain causes greater binding to the cell membrane but similar permeability, and we speculate that increasing the chain length further may

  10. Effects of acylation on the structure, lipid binding, and transfer activity of wheat lipid transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Pato, Christine; Tran, Vinh; Marion, Didier; Douliez, Jean Paul

    2002-03-01

    Study of the effect of protein chemical acylation on their functional properties or activity often brings valuable information regarding structure-function relationships. We performed such work on wheat lipid transfer protein, LTP1, to investigate the role of grafted acyl chains on the lipid binding and transfer properties. LTP1 was acylated by using anhydride derivatives of various chain lengths from C2 to C6. Only the chemical modifications with hexanoic acid yielded a marked effect on the tertiary structure and a slight change in the secondary structure. The affinity of the modified proteins for myristoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine was similar to that of the native protein accompanied by a slight decrease in stoichiometry. Interestingly, the acylation of LTP1 enhanced the lipid transfer activity by at least a factor of 10 for hexanoic chain length. Finally, the grafting of acyl chains was investigated by means of molecular modelling, and an attempt is made to correlate with our experimental data.

  11. SIRT6 regulates Ras-related protein R-Ras2 by lysine defatty-acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Spiegelman, Nicole A; Nelson, Ornella D; Jing, Hui; Lin, Hening

    2017-04-13

    The Ras family of GTPases are important in cell signaling and frequently mutated in human tumors. Understanding their regulation is thus important for studying biology and human diseases. Here, we report that a novel posttranslational mechanism, reversible lysine fatty acylation, regulates R-Ras2, a member of the Ras family. SIRT6, a sirtuin with established tumor suppressor function, regulates the lysine fatty acylation of R-Ras2. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), Sirt6 knockout (KO) increased R-Ras2 lysine fatty acylation. Lysine fatty acylation promotes the plasma membrane localization of R-Ras2 and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase PI3K, leading to activated Akt and increased cell proliferation. Our study establishes lysine fatty acylation as a previously unknown mechanism that regulates the Ras family of GTPases and provides an important mechanism by which SIRT6 functions as a tumor suppressor.

  12. Non-enzymatic protein acylation as a carbon stress regulated by sirtuin deacylases

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular proteins are decorated with a wide range of acetyl and other acyl modifications. Many studies have demonstrated regulation of site-specific acetylation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Acylation is emerging as a new type of lysine modification, but less is known about its overall regulatory role. Furthermore, the mechanisms of lysine acylation, its overlap with protein acetylation, and how it influences cellular function are major unanswered questions in the field. In this review, we discuss the known roles of acetyltransferases and deacetylases, and the sirtuins as a conserved family of NAD+-dependent protein deacylases that are important for response to cellular stress and homeostasis. We also consider the evidence for an emerging idea of non-enzymatic protein acylation. Finally, we put forward the hypothesis that protein acylation is a form of protein “carbon stress”, that the deacylases evolved to remove as a part of a global protein quality control network. PMID:24725594

  13. Mechanism for Remodeling of the Acyl Chain Composition of Cardiolipin Catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tafazzin*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Yui; Oku, Masahide; Sawada, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Eriko; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-01-01

    Remodeling of the acyl chains of cardiolipin (CL) is responsible for final molecular composition of mature CL after de novo CL synthesis in mitochondria. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes tafazzin-mediated CL remodeling, in which tafazzin serves as a transacylase from phospholipids to monolyso-CL (MLCL). In light of the diversity of the acyl compositions of mature CL between different organisms, the mechanism underlying tafazzin-mediated transacylation remains to be elucidated. We investigated the mechanism responsible for transacylation using purified S. cerevisiae tafazzin with liposomes composed of various sets of acyl donors and acceptors. The results revealed that tafazzin efficiently catalyzes transacylation in liposomal membranes with highly ordered lipid bilayer structure. Tafazzin elicited unique acyl chain specificity against phosphatidylcholine (PC) as follows: linoleoyl (18:2) > oleoyl (18:1) = palmitoleoyl (16:1) ≫ palmitoyl (16:0). In these reactions, tafazzin selectively removed the sn-2 acyl chain of PC and transferred it into the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of MLCL isomers at equivalent rates. We demonstrated for the first time that MLCL and dilyso-CL have inherent abilities to function as an acyl donor to monolyso-PC and acyl acceptor from PC, respectively. Furthermore, a Barth syndrome-associated tafazzin mutant (H77Q) was shown to completely lack the catalytic activity in our assay. It is difficult to reconcile the present results with the so-called thermodynamic remodeling hypothesis, which premises that tafazzin reacylates MLCL by unsaturated acyl chains only in disordered non-bilayer lipid domain. The acyl specificity of tafazzin may be one of the factors that determine the acyl composition of mature CL in S. cerevisiae mitochondria. PMID:27268057

  14. Comparison of the actions of acylated and desacylated ghrelin on acid secretion in the rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Tomoya; Ro, Shoki; Onouchi, Tsuneko; Ohno, Shino; Aoyama, Tohru; Chinen, Katsuya; Takabayashi, Hidehiko; Kato, Shingo; Takayama, Kiyoshige; Yakabi, Koji

    2010-11-01

    Ghrelin, a growth-hormone-releasing peptide, has two major molecular forms: acylated (acyl) and desacylated (desacyl). Recent studies suggest different roles for these two forms. In the present study, we compared desacyl and acyl ghrelin with regard to acid secretion and histamine production in the rat stomach. We performed in vivo experiments using gastric lumen-perfused rats. The effects of the two forms of ghrelin on gastrin (gastrin-17)-stimulated acid secretion were also examined. Furthermore, to examine the effects of ghrelin on histamine production, histidine decarboxylase messenger ribonucleic acid in the gastric corpus mucosa was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Intravenous administration of acyl ghrelin at 20 μg/kg increased gastric acid secretion to 4.8 times greater than control levels. However, desacyl ghrelin had no effect on acid secretion, even at 200 μg/kg. Acyl ghrelin enhanced gastrin-stimulated acid secretion while desacyl ghrelin did not. Vagotomy markedly inhibited the enhancement of gastrin-stimulated acid secretion by acyl ghrelin. Acyl ghrelin increased histidine decarboxylase messenger ribonucleic acid concentration by 2.3 times compared with basal levels at 1 h after administration and by 2.7 times at 2 h after administration; desacyl ghrelin had no such effect. Synergism between acyl ghrelin and gastrin was seen regarding histidine decarboxylase messenger ribonucleic acid concentration. The results indicate that acyl ghrelin stimulates gastric acid secretion via a mechanism involving activation of the vagus nerve and histamine release and synthesis and that desacyl ghrelin has no action on gastric acid secretion. Furthermore, the results demonstrate synergism between gastrin and acyl ghrelin in terms of gastric acid secretion via a mechanism involving histamine release and synthesis.

  15. 40 CFR 721.7270 - 1-propanaminium, 3-amino-, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-soya acyl derivs., chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-trimethyl-N-soya acyl derivs., chloride. 721.7270 Section 721.7270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-soya acyl derivs., chloride. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1-propanaminium, 3-amino-, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-soya acyl...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10056 - Benzenemethanaminium, N-(3-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. 721.10056 Section 721.10056 Protection of Environment...-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides (PMN P-03-47; CAS No. 90194-13-1) is subject to reporting...

  17. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  18. Age-Dependent Decline in Acyl-Ghrelin Concentrations and Reduced Association of Acyl-Ghrelin and Growth Hormone in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Farhy, Leon S.; Liu, Jianhua; Pezzoli, Suzan S.; Johnson, Michael L.; Gaylinn, Bruce D.; Thorner, Michael O.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acyl-ghrelin is thought to have both orexigenic effects and to stimulate GH release. A possible cause of the anorexia of aging is an age-dependent decrease in circulating acyl-ghrelin levels. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to compare acyl-ghrelin and GH concentrations between healthy old and young adults and to examine the relationship of acyl-ghrelin and GH secretion in both age groups. Methods: Six healthy older adults (age 62–74 y, body mass index range 20.9–29 kg/m2) and eight healthy young men (aged 18–28 y, body mass index range 20.6–26.2 kg/m2) had frequent blood samples drawn for hormone measurements every 10 minutes for 24 hours. Ghrelin was measured in an in-house, two-site sandwich ELISA specific for full-length acyl-ghrelin. GH was measured in a sensitive assay (Immulite 2000), and GH peaks were determined by deconvolution analysis. The acyl-ghrelin/GH association was estimated from correlations between amplitudes of individual GH secretory events and the average acyl-ghrelin concentration in the 60-minute interval preceding each GH burst. Results: Twenty-four-hour mean (±SEM) GH (0.48 ± 0.14 vs 2.2 ± 0.3 μg/L, P < .005) and acyl-ghrelin (14.7 ± 2.3 vs 27.8 ± 3.9 pg/mL, P < .05) levels were significantly lower in older adults compared with young adults. Twenty-four-hour cortisol concentrations were higher in the old than the young adults (15.1 ± 1.0 vs 10.6 ± 0.9 μg/dL, respectively, P < .01). The ghrelin/GH association was more than 3-fold lower in the older group compared with the young adults (0.16 ± 0.12 vs 0.69 ± 0.04, P < .001). Conclusions: These results provide further evidence of an age-dependent decline in circulating acyl-ghrelin levels, which might play a role both in the decline of GH and in the anorexia of aging. Our data also suggest that with normal aging, endogenous acyl-ghrelin levels are less tightly linked to GH regulation. PMID:24285677

  19. Personnel emergency carrier vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lester J. (Inventor); Fedor, Otto H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A personnel emergency carrier vehicle is disclosed which includes a vehicle frame supported on steerable front wheels and driven rear wheels. A supply of breathing air is connected to quick connect face mask coupling and umbilical cord couplings for supplying breathing air to an injured worker or attendant either with or without a self-contained atmospheric protection suit for protection against hazardous gases at an accident site. A non-sparking hydraulic motion is utilized to drive the vehicle and suitable direction and throttling controls are provided for controlling the delivery of a hydraulic driving fluid from a pressurized hydraulic fluid accumulator. A steering axis is steerable through a handle to steer the front wheels through a linkage assembly.

  20. Spectrophotometric studies of acyl-coenzyme A synthetases of rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Yates, D. W.; Haddock, B. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Deca-2,4,6,8-tetraenoic acid is a substrate for both ATP-specific (EC 6.2.1.2 or 3) and GTP-specific (EC 6.2.1.–) acyl-CoA synthetases of rat liver mitochondria. The enzymic synthesis of decatetraenoyl-CoA results in new spectral characteristics. The difference spectrum for the acyl-CoA minus free acid has a maximum at 376nm with εmM 34. Isosbestic points are at 345nm and 440nm. 2. The acylation of CoA by decatetraenoate in mitochondrial suspensions can be continuously measured with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. 3. By using this technique, three distinct types of acyl-CoA synthetase activity were demonstrated in rat liver mitochondria. One of these utilized added CoA and ATP, required added Mg2+ and corresponded to a previously described `external' acyl-CoA synthetase. The other two acyl-CoA synthetase activities utilized intramitochondrial CoA and did not require added Mg2+. Of these two `internal' acyl-CoA synthetases, one was insensitive to uncoupling agents, was inhibited by phosphate or arsenate, and corresponded to the GTP-specific enzyme. The other corresponded to the ATP-specific enzyme. 4. Atractylate inhibited the activity of the two internal acyl-CoA synthetases only when the energy source was added ATP. 5. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA acylated by decatetraenoate was independent of whether the internal ATP-specific or GTP-specific acyl-CoA synthetase was active. It is concluded that these two internal acyl-CoA synthetases have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA. 6. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA that could be acylated with decatetraenoate was decreased by the addition of palmitoyl-dl-carnitine, 2-oxoglutarate, or pyruvate. These observations indicated that pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1), oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.2), carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.–), citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), and succinyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.4) all have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA as do

  1. Apolipoprotein A-I Helsinki promotes intracellular acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juan D; Garda, Horacio A; Cabaleiro, Laura V; Cuellar, Angela; Pellon-Maison, Magali; Gonzalez-Baro, Maria R; Gonzalez, Marina C

    2013-05-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport is a process of high antiatherogenic relevance in which apolipoprotein AI (apoA-I) plays an important role. The interaction of apoA-I with peripheral cells produces through mechanisms that are still poorly understood the mobilization of intracellular cholesterol depots toward plasma membrane. In macrophages, these mechanisms seem to be related to the modulation of the activity of acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), the enzyme responsible for the intracellular cholesterol ester biosynthesis that is stored in lipid droplets. The activation of ACAT and the accumulation of lipid droplets play a key role in the transformation of macrophages into foam cells, leading to the formation of atheroma or atherosclerotic plaque. ApoA-I Helsinki (or ∆K107) is a natural apoA-I variant with a lysine deletion in the central protein region, carriers of which have increased atherosclerosis risk. We herein show that treatment of cultured RAW macrophages or CHOK1 cells with ∆K107, but not with wild-type apoA-I or a variant containing a similar deletion at the C-terminal region (∆K226), lead to a marked increase (more than 10 times) in the intracellular ACAT1 protein level as detected by western blot analysis. However, we could only detect a slight increase in cholesteryl ester produced by ∆K107 mainly when Chol loading was supplied by low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although a similar choline-phospholipid efflux is evoked by these apoA-I variants, the change in phosphatidylcholine/sphyngomyelin distribution produced by wild-type apoA-I is not observed with either ∆K107 or ∆K226.

  2. Toxicity of Carboxylic Acid-Containing Drugs: The Role of Acyl Migration and CoA Conjugation Investigated.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Hokkanen, Juho; Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Mattila, Sampo; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-12-21

    Many carboxylic acid-containing drugs are associated with idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT), which may be caused by reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. The rate of acyl migration has been earlier suggested as a predictor of acyl glucuronide reactivity. Additionally, acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates are known to be reactive. Here, 13 drugs with a carboxylic acid moiety were incubated with human liver microsomes to produce acyl glucuronide conjugates for the determination of acyl glucuronide half-lives by acyl migration and with HepaRG cells to monitor the formation of acyl CoA conjugates, their further conjugate metabolites, and trans-acylation products with glutathione. Additionally, in vitro cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity experiments were performed with HepaRG cells to compare the predictability of toxicity. Clearly, longer acyl glucuronide half-lives were observed for safe drugs compared to drugs that can cause IDT. Correlation between half-lives and toxicity classification increased when "relative half-lives," taking into account the formation of isomeric AG-forms due to acyl migration and eliminating the effect of hydrolysis, were used instead of plain disappearance of the initial 1-O-β-AG-form. Correlation was improved further when a daily dose of the drug was taken into account. CoA and related conjugates were detected primarily for the drugs that have the capability to cause IDT, although some exceptions to this were observed. Cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity did not correlate to drug safety. On the basis of the results, the short relative half-life of the acyl glucuronide (high acyl migration rate), high daily dose and detection of acyl CoA conjugates, or further metabolites derived from acyl CoA together seem to indicate that carboxylic acid-containing drugs have a higher probability to cause drug-induced liver injury (DILI).

  3. Future Carrier vs. Super Carrier: New Issues and Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    the 24 Steven S. Weatherspoon, :Naval Forces 2/2003,” North American Focus , ( EBSCO ...alternative to lack of host nation support or limited access to airports and seaports of debarkation. Some visions of future carriers remove CTOL...American Focus. EBSCO Publishing 2003. Periodical Articles and Reports: Ackerman, Robert K. “Future carrier designed for evolution.” Signal

  4. Tunable Oleo-Furan Surfactants by Acylation of Renewable Furans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An important advance in fluid surface control was the amphiphilic surfactant composed of coupled molecular structures (i.e., hydrophilic and hydrophobic) to reduce surface tension between two distinct fluid phases. However, implementation of simple surfactants has been hindered by the broad range of applications in water containing alkaline earth metals (i.e., hard water), which disrupt surfactant function and require extensive use of undesirable and expensive chelating additives. Here we show that sugar-derived furans can be linked with triglyceride-derived fatty acid chains via Friedel–Crafts acylation within single layer (SPP) zeolite catalysts. These alkylfuran surfactants independently suppress the effects of hard water while simultaneously permitting broad tunability of size, structure, and function, which can be optimized for superior capability for forming micelles and solubilizing in water. PMID:27924310

  5. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the flower of Elaeagnus angustifolia L.

    PubMed

    Bendaikha, Sarah; Gadaut, Méredith; Harakat, Dominique; Magid, Alabdul

    2014-07-01

    Seven acylated flavonol glycosides named elaeagnosides A-G, in addition to seven known flavonoids were isolated from the flowers of Elaeagnus angustifolia. Their structures were elucidated by different spectroscopic methods including 1D, 2D NMR experiments and HR-ESI-MS analysis. In order to identify natural antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitor agents, the abilities of these flavonoids to scavenge the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and to inhibit tyrosinase activity were evaluated. Results revealed that two of these compounds had significant anti-oxidant effect and one compound showed weak tyrosinase-inhibitory activity compared with kojic acid, quercetin, or ascorbic acid, which were used as positive control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of acyl derivatives of salicin, salirepin, and arbutin.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Elena V; Belyanin, Maxim L; Filimonov, Victor D

    2014-03-31

    The total synthesis of two natural phenolglycosides of the family Salicaceae, namely: populoside and 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-5-hydroxy benzyl (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy) cinnamoate and nine not found yet in plants acyl derivatives of phenoglycosides: 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzylcinnamoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl (4-hydroxy) benzoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy) benzoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-5-hydroxy benzyl (3,4-dihydroxy) cinnamoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-5-hydroxy benzylcinnamoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-5-hydroxy benzyl (4-hydroxy) benzoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-5-hydroxy benzyl (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy) benzoate, 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-5-benzoyloxy benzylbenzoate and 4-(β-d-glucopyranosyloxy)-phenylbenzoate, starting from readily available phenols and glucose was developed for the first time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tunable Oleo-Furan Surfactants by Acylation of Renewable Furans

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Dae Sung; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Koehle, Maura; ...

    2016-10-19

    One important advance in fluid surface control was the amphiphilic surfactant composed of coupled molecular structures (i.e., hydrophilic and hydrophobic) to reduce surface tension between two distinct fluid phases. However, implementation of simple surfactants has been hindered by the broad range of applications in water containing alkaline earth metals (i.e., hard water). This disrupts surfactant function and requires extensive use of undesirable and expensive chelating additives. We show that sugar-derived furans can be linked with triglyceride-derived fatty acid chains via Friedel–Crafts acylation within single layer (SPP) zeolite catalysts. Finally, these alkylfuran surfactants independently suppress the effects of hard water whilemore » simultaneously permitting broad tunability of size, structure, and function, which can be optimized for superior capability for forming micelles and solubilizing in water.« less

  8. Tunable Oleo-Furan Surfactants by Acylation of Renewable Furans

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Dae Sung; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Koehle, Maura; Krumm, Christoph; Ren, Limin; Damen, Jonathan N.; Shete, Meera H.; Lee, Han Seung; Zuo, Xiaobing; Lee, Byeongdu; Fan, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Lobo, Raul F.; Tsapatsis, Michael; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2016-11-23

    An important advance in fluid surface control was the amphiphilic surfactant comprised of coupled molecular structures (i.e. hydrophilic and hydrophobic) to reduce surface tension between two distinct fluid phases. However, implementation of simple surfactants has been hindered by the broad range of applications in water containing alkaline earth metals (i.e. hard water), which disrupt surfactant function and require extensive use of undesirable and expensive chelating additives. Here we show that sugar-derived furans can be linked with triglyceride-derived fatty acid chains via Friedel-Crafts acylation within single layer (SPP) zeolite catalysts. These alkylfuran surfactants independently suppress the effects of hard water while simultaneously permitting broad tunability of size, structure, and function, which can be optimized for superior capability for forming micelles and solubilizing in water.

  9. Assays for Acetylation and Other Acylations of Lysine Residues.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Nadine; Grégoire, Serge; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2017-02-02

    Lysine acetylation refers to addition of an acetyl moiety to the epsilon-amino group of a lysine residue and is important for regulating protein functions in various organisms from bacteria to humans. This is a reversible and precisely controlled covalent modification that either serves as an on/off switch or participates in a codified manner with other post-translational modifications to regulate different cellular and developmental processes in normal and pathological states. This unit describes methods for in vitro and in vivo determination of lysine acetylation. Such methods can be easily extended for analysis of other acylations (such as propionylation, butyrylation, crotonylation, and succinylation) that are also present in histones and many other proteins. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing: from evolution to application.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Sexton, D Joseph; Diggle, Stephen P; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria that employs autoinducing chemical signals to coordinate diverse, often cooperative activities such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, and exoenzyme secretion. Signaling via acyl-homoserine lactones is the paradigm for QS in Proteobacteria and is particularly well understood in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite thirty years of mechanistic research, empirical studies have only recently addressed the benefits of QS and provided support for the traditional assumptions regarding its social nature and its role in optimizing cell-density-dependent group behaviors. QS-controlled public-goods production has served to investigate principles that explain the evolution and stability of cooperation, including kin selection, pleiotropic constraints, and metabolic prudence. With respect to medical application, appreciating social dynamics is pertinent to understanding the efficacy of QS-inhibiting drugs and the evolution of resistance. Future work will provide additional insight into the foundational assumptions of QS and relate laboratory discoveries to natural ecosystems.

  11. Acylation in trypanosomatids: an essential process and potential drug target

    PubMed Central

    Goldston, Amanda M.; Sharma, Aabha I.; Paul, Kimberly S.; Engman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acylation—the addition of fatty acid moieties such as myristate and palmitate to proteins—is essential for the survival, growth, and infectivity of the trypanosomatids: Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania. Myristoylation and palmitoylation are critical for parasite growth, targeting and localization, and the intrinsic function of some proteins. The trypanosomatids possess a single N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) and multiple palmitoyl acyltransferases, and these enzymes and their cellular targets are only now being characterized. Global inhibition of either process leads to cell death in trypanosomatids, and genetic ablation of NMT compromises virulence. Moreover, NMT inhibitors effectively cure T. brucei infection in rodents. Thus, protein acylation represents an attractive target for the development of trypanocidal drugs. PMID:24954795

  12. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Jindong; Liu, Yue; Fuqua, Clay; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS) may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments. PMID:24402124

  13. Acylated quercetagetin glycosides with antioxidant activity from Tagetes maxima.

    PubMed

    Parejo, Irene; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles

    2005-10-01

    The fractionation of a methanolic extract of Tagetes maxima guided for antioxidant activity resulted in the isolation of three acylated quercetagetin glycosides, quercetagetin-7-O-(6-O-caffeoyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside), quercetagetin-7-O-(6-O-p-coumaroyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside) and quercetagetin-7-O-(6-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside), as well as four known flavonoid glycosides. The structural elucidation was accomplished by spectroscopic methods (ESI-MS/MS and NMR). The antioxidant activity of fractions and isolated compounds was determined by checking the scavenging activity against three different radicals: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH*), hydroxyl (*OH), and superoxide (O2*-). The three isolated compounds exhibited a high radical scavenging activity in comparison with reference compounds.

  14. Metabolism of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Signals by Variovorax paradoxus

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Jared R.; Greenberg, E. P.

    2000-01-01

    Acyl-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) serve as dedicated cell-to-cell signaling molecules in many species of the class Proteobacteria. We have addressed the question of whether these compounds can be degraded biologically. A motile, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from soil based upon its ability to utilize N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone as the sole source of energy and nitrogen. The bacterium was classified as a strain of Variovorax paradoxus. The V. paradoxus isolate was capable of growth on all of the acyl-HSLs tested. The molar growth yields correlated with the length of the acyl group. HSL, a product of acyl-HSL metabolism, was used as a nitrogen source, but not as an energy source. Cleavage and partial mineralization of the HSL ring were demonstrated by using radiolabeled substrate. This study indicates that some strains of V. paradoxus degrade and grow on acyl-HSL signals as the sole energy and nitrogen sources. This study provides clues about the metabolic pathway of acyl-HSL degradation by V. paradoxus. PMID:11092851

  15. Acyl spermidines in inflorescence extracts of elder (Sambucus nigra L., Adoxaceae) and elderflower drinks.

    PubMed

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Larsson, Sonny; Veitch, Nigel C; Porter, Elaine A; Ding, Ning; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2013-04-10

    LC-UV-MS analyses of inflorescence extracts of Sambucus nigra L. (elder, Adoxaceae) revealed the presence of numerous acyl spermidines, with isomers of N,N-diferuloylspermidine and N-acetyl-N,N-diferuloylspermidine being most abundant. Pollen was the main source of the acyl spermidines in the inflorescence. Three of the major acyl spermidines were isolated and their structures determined by NMR spectroscopy as N⁵,N¹⁰-di-(E,E)-feruloylspermidine and the new compounds N¹-acetyl-N⁵,N¹⁰-di-(Z,E)-feruloylspermidine and N¹-acetyl-N⁵,N¹⁰-di-(E,E)-feruloylspermidine. An isomer of N,N,N-triferuloylspermidine was also obtained and identified as N¹,N⁵,N¹⁰-tri-(E,E,E)-feruloylspermidine. In addition to stereoisomers of the isolated acyl spermidines, other acyl spermidines detected by the positive ion LC-UV-MS were isomers of N-caffeoyl-N,N-diferuloylspermidine, N-coumaroyl-N,N-diferuloylspermidine, N-caffeoyl-N-feruloylspermidine, N-coumaroyl-N-feruloylspermidine, N-acetyl-N-caffeoyl-N-feruloylspermidine, and N-acetyl-N-coumaroyl-N-feruloylspermidine. Analysis of commercial elderflower drinks showed that acyl spermidines were persistent in these processed elderflower products. Examination of inflorescence extracts from Sambucus canadensis L. (American elder) revealed the presence of acyl spermidines that were different from those of S. nigra.

  16. The TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 S-acyl transferase regulates plant cell growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Kemp, Alison C; Grierson, Claire S

    2005-09-01

    TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana affects cell growth throughout the plant and has a particularly strong effect on root hair growth. We have identified TIP1 by map-based cloning and complementation of the mutant phenotype. TIP1 encodes an ankyrin repeat protein with a DHHC Cys-rich domain that is expressed in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems, and floral tissue. Two homologues of TIP1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens) have been shown to have S-acyl transferase (also known as palmitoyl transferase) activity. S-acylation is a reversible hydrophobic protein modification that offers swift, flexible control of protein hydrophobicity and affects protein association with membranes, signal transduction, and vesicle trafficking within cells. We show that TIP1 binds the acyl group palmitate, that it can rescue the morphological, temperature sensitivity, and yeast casein kinase2 localization defects of the yeast S-acyl transferase mutant akr1Delta, and that inhibition of acylation in wild-type Arabidopsis roots reproduces the Tip1- mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that S-acylation is essential for normal plant cell growth and identify a plant S-acyl transferase, an essential research tool if we are to understand how this important, reversible lipid modification operates in plant cells.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of novel acyl derivatives from jatropha oil as potential lubricant basestocks.

    PubMed

    Sammaiah, Arukali; Padmaja, Korlipara V; Prasad, Rachapudi B N

    2014-05-21

    A novel class of jatropha oil-based acylated derivatives from hydroxy alkyl esters of jatropha fatty acids (C1, C3, C4, and C8) and various anhydrides (C2, C3, C4, and C6) were synthesized and their physicochemical and lubricant properties reported. Jatropha fatty acid alkyl esters were dihydroxylated using the in situ performic acid method and further acylated with different anhydrides to produce acylated derivatives. Acylated derivatives of dihydroxy jatropha fatty acid alkyl esters were charaterized by NMR, FTIR, GC, and GC-MS analysis and were evaluated for their viscosity, viscosity index, pour and flash points, and oxidation stability. Most of the derivatives are either in ISO VG 22 or 32 viscosity grade with good viscosity index. It was observed that increase in acyl chain length and branching in the end-chain ester improved the pour point of the diacyl derivatives. All of the hexanoylated esters exhibited better oxidation stability compared to other acylated products, and their pour points are comparable to those of synthetic esters such as TMP trioleates. In general, isoalcohol esters with longer acyl chains showed promise as potential candidates for hydraulic fluids and metal-working fluids in ISO VG 22 and 32 viscosity range.

  18. Metabolism of acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals by Variovorax paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Leadbetter, J R; Greenberg, E P

    2000-12-01

    Acyl-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) serve as dedicated cell-to-cell signaling molecules in many species of the class Proteobacteria. We have addressed the question of whether these compounds can be degraded biologically. A motile, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from soil based upon its ability to utilize N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone as the sole source of energy and nitrogen. The bacterium was classified as a strain of Variovorax paradoxus. The V. paradoxus isolate was capable of growth on all of the acyl-HSLs tested. The molar growth yields correlated with the length of the acyl group. HSL, a product of acyl-HSL metabolism, was used as a nitrogen source, but not as an energy source. Cleavage and partial mineralization of the HSL ring were demonstrated by using radiolabeled substrate. This study indicates that some strains of V. paradoxus degrade and grow on acyl-HSL signals as the sole energy and nitrogen sources. This study provides clues about the metabolic pathway of acyl-HSL degradation by V. paradoxus.