Science.gov

Sample records for enstatite-rich warm debris

  1. ENSTATITE-RICH WARM DEBRIS DUST AROUND HD165014

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Yamashita, Takuya; Fukagawa, Misato; Nakagawa, Takao; Kataza, Hirokazu; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2010-05-01

    We present the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the main-sequence star HD165014, which is a warm ({approx_gt}200 K) debris disk candidate discovered by the AKARI All-Sky Survey. The star possesses extremely large excess emission at wavelengths longer than 5 {mu}m. The detected flux densities at 10 and 20 {mu}m are {approx}10 and {approx}30 times larger than the predicted photospheric emission, respectively. The excess emission is attributable to the presence of circumstellar warm dust. The dust temperature is estimated as 300-750 K, corresponding to the distance of 0.7-4.4 AU from the central star. Significant fine-structured features are seen in the spectrum and the peak positions are in good agreement with those of crystalline enstatite. Features of crystalline forsterite are not significantly seen. HD165014 is the first debris disk sample that has enstatite as a dominant form of crystalline silicate rather than forsterite. Possible formation of enstatite dust from differentiated parent bodies is suggested according to the solar system analog. The detection of an enstatite-rich debris disk in the current study suggests the presence of large bodies and a variety of silicate dust processing in warm debris disks.

  2. 2D condensation model for the inner Solar Nebula: an enstatite-rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Liffman, Kurt; Maddison, Sarah T.; Brooks, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Infrared observations provide the dust composition in the protoplanetary discs surface layers, but cannot probe the dust chemistry in the mid-plane, where planet formation occurs. Meteorites show that dynamics was important in determining the dust distribution in the Solar Nebula and needs to be considered if we are to understand the global chemistry in discs. 1D radial condensation sequences can only simulate one disc layer at a time and cannot describe the global chemistry or the complexity of meteorites. To address these limitations, we compute for the first time the 2D distribution of condensates in the inner Solar Nebula using a thermodynamic equilibrium model, and derive time-scales for vertical settling and radial migration of dust. We find two enstatite-rich zones within 1 AU from the young Sun: a band ˜0.1 AU thick in the upper optically-thin layer of the disc interior to 0.8 AU, and in the optically-thick disc mid-plane out to ˜0.4 AU. The two enstatite-rich zones support recent evidence that Mercury and enstatite chondrites (ECs) shared a bulk material with similar composition. Our results are also consistent with infrared observation of protoplanetary disc which show emission of enstatite-rich dust in the inner surface of discs. The resulting chemistry and dynamics suggests that the formation of the bulk material of ECs occurred in the inner surface layer of the disc, within 0.4 AU. We also propose a simple alternative scenario in which gas fractionation and vertical settling of the condensates lead to an enstatite-chondritic bulk material.

  3. Warm Debris Disk Candidates from WISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Deborah; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Liu, Wilson; Leisawitz, David

    2011-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has just completed a sensitive all-sky survey in photometric bands at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns. We report on a preliminary investigation of main sequence Hipparcos and Tycho catalog stars with 22 micron emission in excess of photospheric levels. This warm excess emission traces material in the circumstellar region likely to host terrestrial planets and is preferentially found in young systems with ages < 1 Gyr. Nearly a hundred new warm debris disk candidates are detected among FGK stars and 150 A stars within 120 pc. We are in the process of obtaining spectra to determine spectral types and activity level of these stars and are using HST, Herschel and Keck to characterize the dust, multiplicity, and substellar companions of these systems. In this contribution, we will discuss source selection methods and individual examples from among the WISE debris disk candidates.

  4. What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Gáspár, András

    2017-08-01

    The architectures of debris disks encode the history of planet formation in these systems. Studies of debris disks via their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have found infrared excesses arising from cold dust, warm dust, or a combination of the two. The cold outer belts of many systems have been imaged, facilitating their study in great detail. Far less is known about the warm components, including the origin of the dust. The regularity of the disk temperatures indicates an underlying structure that may be linked to the water snow line. If the dust is generated from collisions in an exo-asteroid belt, the dust will likely trace the location of the water snow line in the primordial protoplanetary disk where planetesimal growth was enhanced. If instead the warm dust arises from the inward transport from a reservoir of icy material farther out in the system, the dust location is expected to be set by the current snow line. We analyze the SEDs of a large sample of debris disks with warm components. We find that warm components in single-component systems (those without detectable cold components) follow the primordial snow line rather than the current snow line, so they likely arise from exo-asteroid belts. While the locations of many warm components in two-component systems are also consistent with the primordial snow line, there is more diversity among these systems, suggesting additional effects play a role.

  5. Brief communication: Thinning of debris-covered and debris-free glaciers in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Argha

    2017-01-01

    Recent geodetic mass-balance measurements reveal similar thinning rates on glaciers with or without debris cover in the Himalaya-Karakoram region. This comes as a surprise as a thick debris cover reduces the surface melting significantly due to its insulating effects. Here we present arguments, supported by results from numerical flowline model simulations of idealised glaciers, that a competition between the changes in the surface mass-balance forcing and that of the emergence/submergence velocities can lead to similar thinning rates on these two types of glaciers. As the climate starts warming, the thinning rate on a debris-covered glacier is initially smaller than that on a similar debris-free glacier. Subsequently, the rate on the debris-covered glacier becomes comparable to and then larger than that on the debris-free one. The time evolution of glacier-averaged thinning rates after an initial warming is strongly controlled by the time variation of the corresponding emergence velocity profile.

  6. Does warm debris dust stem from asteroid belts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiler, Fabian; Krivov, Alexander V.

    2017-06-01

    Many debris discs reveal a two-component structure, with a cold outer and a warm inner component. While the former are likely massive analogues of the Kuiper belt, the origin of the latter is still a matter of debate. In this work, we investigate whether the warm dust may be a signature of asteroid belt analogues. In the scenario tested here, the current two-belt architecture stems from an originally extended protoplanetary disc, in which planets have opened a gap separating it into the outer and inner discs which, after the gas dispersal, experience a steady-state collisional decay. This idea is explored with an analytic collisional evolution model for a sample of 225 debris discs from a Spitzer/IRS catalogue that are likely to possess a two-component structure. We find that the vast majority of systems (220 out of 225, or 98 per cent) are compatible with this scenario. For their progenitors, original protoplanetary discs, we find an average surface density slope of -0.93 ± 0.06 and an average initial mass of (3.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3})× 10^{-3} solar masses, both of which are in agreement with the values inferred from submillimetre surveys. However, dust production by short-period comets and - more rarely - inward transport from the outer belts may be viable, and not mutually excluding, alternatives to the asteroid belt scenario. The remaining five discs (2 per cent of the sample: HIP 11486, HIP 23497, HIP 57971, HIP 85790, HIP 89770) harbour inner components that appear inconsistent with dust production in an 'asteroid belt.' Warm dust in these systems must either be replenished from cometary sources or represent an aftermath of a recent rare event, such as a major collision or planetary system instability.

  7. AKARI/IRC 18 μm survey of warm debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, H.; Ishihara, D.; Onaka, T.; Takita, S.; Kataza, H.; Yamashita, T.; Fukagawa, M.; Ootsubo, T.; Hirao, T.; Enya, K.; Marshall, J. P.; White, G. J.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Little is known about the properties of the warm (Tdust ≳ 150 K) debris disk material located close to the central star, which has a more direct link to the formation of terrestrial planets than does the low-temperature debris dust that has been detected to date. Aims: To discover new warm debris disk candidates that show large 18 μm excess and estimate the fraction of stars with excess based on the AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared All-Sky Survey data. Methods: We searched for point sources detected in the AKARI/IRC All-Sky Survey, which show a positional match with A-M dwarf stars in the Tycho-2 Spectral Type Catalogue and exhibit excess emission at 18 μm compared to what is expected from the KS magnitude in the 2MASS catalogue. Results: We find 24 warm debris candidates including 8 new candidates among A-K stars. The apparent debris disk frequency is estimated to be 2.8 ± 0.6%. We also find that A stars and solar-type FGK stars have different characteristics of the inner component of the identified debris disk candidates. While debris disks around A stars are cooler and consistent with steady-state evolutionary model of debris disks, those around FGK stars tend to be warmer and cannot be explained by the steady-state model.

  8. Initiation of Recent Debris Flows on Mount Rainier, Washington: A Climate Warming Signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, E. A.; Kennard, P.; Nolin, A. W.; Lancaster, S. T.; Grant, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The first week of November 2006 an intense rainstorm inundated the Pacific Northwest and triggered debris flows on many large volcanoes in the Cascade Range of Washington and Oregon. At Mount Rainier, Washington, 45.7 cm of rain was recorded in 36 hours; the storm was preceded by a week of light precipitation and moderate temperatures, so that rain fell on nearly-saturated ground with minimal snow cover. The November 2006 storm was exceptional in that it resulted in a 100-year flood and caused an unprecedented six-month closure of Mount Rainier National Park. It also focused inquiry as to whether debris flows from Cascade volcanoes are likely to occur more frequently in the future as glaciers recede due to climate warming, leaving unstable moraines and sediment that can act as initiation sites. We examined the recent history of debris flows from Mount Rainier using aerial photographs and field surveyed debris flow tracks. Prior to 2001, debris flows were recorded in association with rainfall or glacial outburst floods in 4 drainages, but 3 additional drainages were first impacted by debris flows in 2001, 2005, and 2006, respectively. We discovered that most of the recent debris flows initiated as small gullies in unconsolidated material at the edge of fragmented glaciers or areas of permanent snow and ice. Other initiation sites occur on steep-sided un-vegetated moraines. Of the 28 named glaciers on Mount Rainier, debris flows initiated near five glaciers in the exceptional storm of 2006 (Winthrop, Inter, Kautz-Success, Van Trump, Pyramid, and South Tahoma). Less exceptional storms, however, have also produced wide-spread debris flows: in September 2005, 15.3 cm of rain fell in 48 hours on minimal snow cover and caused debris flows in all except 2 of the glacier drainages that initiated in 2006. Debris flows from both storms initiated at elevations of 1980 to 2400 m, traveled 5 to 10 kilometers, and caused significant streambed aggradation. These results suggest a

  9. Probing the terrestrial regions of planetary systems: warm debris disks with emission features

    SciTech Connect

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Rieke, George H.; Gáspár, András

    2014-09-20

    Observations of debris disks allow for the study of planetary systems, even where planets have not been detected. However, debris disks are often only characterized by unresolved infrared excesses that resemble featureless blackbodies, and the location of the emitting dust is uncertain due to a degeneracy with the dust grain properties. Here, we characterize the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 22 debris disks exhibiting 10 μm silicate emission features. Such features arise from small warm dust grains, and their presence can significantly constrain the orbital location of the emitting debris. We find that these features can be explained by the presence of an additional dust component in the terrestrial zones of the planetary systems, i.e., an exozodiacal belt. Aside from possessing exozodiacal dust, these debris disks are not particularly unique; their minimum grain sizes are consistent with the blowout sizes of their systems, and their brightnesses are comparable to those of featureless warm debris disks. These disks are in systems of a range of ages, though the older systems with features are found only around A-type stars. The features in young systems may be signatures of terrestrial planet formation. Analyzing the spectra of unresolved debris disks with emission features may be one of the simplest and most accessible ways to study the terrestrial regions of planetary systems.

  10. Transient dust in warm debris disks. Detection of Fe-rich olivine grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, J.; Juhász, A.; Henning, Th.; Mutschke, H.; Tamanai, A.; Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Debris disks trace remnant reservoirs of leftover planetesimals in planetary systems. In the past years, a handful of "warm" debris disks have been discovered in which emission in excess starts in the mid-infrared. An interesting subset of these warm debris disks shows emission features in mid-infrared spectra, which points towards the presence of μm-sized dust grains, with temperatures above hundreds K. Given the ages of the host stars, the presence of these small grains is puzzling, and raises questions about their origin and survival in time. Aims: This study focuses on determining the mineralogy of the dust around seven debris disks with evidence for warm dust, based on Spitzer/IRS spectroscopic data, to provide new insights into the origin of the dust grains. Methods: We developed and present a new radiative transfer code (Debra) dedicated to spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of optically thin disks. The Debra code is designed such that it can simultaneously determine dust composition and disk properties. We used this code on the SEDs of seven warm debris disks, in combination with recent laboratory experiments on dust optical properties. Results: We find that most, if not all, debris disks in our sample are experiencing a transient phase, suggesting a production of small dust grains on relatively short timescales. Dust replenishment should be efficient on timescales of months for at least three sources. From a mineralogical point of view, we find that crystalline pyroxene grains (enstatite) have low abundances compared to crystalline olivine grains. The main result of our study is that we find evidence for Fe-rich crystalline olivine grains (Fe/[Mg + Fe] ~ 0.2) for several debris disks. This finding contrasts with studies of gas-rich protoplanetary disks, where Fe-bearing crystalline grains are usually not observed. Conclusions: These Fe-rich olivine grains, and the overall differences between the mineralogy of dust in Class II disks

  11. THE ABSENCE OF COLD DUST AROUND WARM DEBRIS DISK STAR HD 15407A

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi; Takita, Satoshi; Kataza, Hirokazu; Murakami, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Takuya; Fukagawa, Misato; Ishihara, Daisuke

    2012-11-01

    We report Herschel and AKARI photometric observations at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths of the debris disk around the F3V star HD 15407A, in which the presence of an extremely large amount of warm dust ({approx}500-600 K) has been suggested by mid-infrared (MIR) photometry and spectroscopy. The observed flux densities of the debris disk at 60-160 {mu}m are clearly above the photospheric level of the star, suggesting excess emission at FIR as well as at MIR wavelengths previously reported. The observed FIR excess emission is consistent with the continuum level extrapolated from the MIR excess, suggesting that it originates in the inner warm debris dust and cold dust ({approx}50-130 K) is absent in the outer region of the disk. The absence of cold dust does not support a late-heavy-bombardment-like event as the origin of the large amount of warm debris dust around HD 15047A.

  12. WARM DEBRIS DISKS PRODUCED BY GIANT IMPACTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Genda, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Kokubo, E.

    2015-09-10

    In our solar system, Mars-sized protoplanets frequently collided with each other during the last stage of terrestrial planet formation, called the giant impact stage. Giant impacts eject a large amount of material from the colliding protoplanets into the terrestrial planet region, which may form debris disks with observable infrared excesses. Indeed, tens of warm debris disks around young solar-type stars have been observed. Here we quantitatively estimate the total mass of ejected materials during the giant impact stages. We found that ∼0.4 times the Earth’s mass is ejected in total throughout the giant impact stage. Ejected materials are ground down by collisional cascade until micron-sized grains are blown out by radiation pressure. The depletion timescale of these ejected materials is determined primarily by the mass of the largest body among them. We conducted high-resolution simulations of giant impacts to accurately obtain the mass of the largest ejected body. We then calculated the evolution of the debris disks produced by a series of giant impacts and depleted by collisional cascades to obtain the infrared excess evolution of the debris disks. We found that the infrared excess is almost always higher than the stellar infrared flux throughout the giant impact stage (∼100 Myr) and is sometimes ∼10 times higher immediately after a giant impact. Therefore, giant impact stages would explain the infrared excess from most observed warm debris disks. The observed fraction of stars with warm debris disks indicates that the formation probability of our solar-system-like terrestrial planets is approximately 10%.

  13. Faint warm debris disks around nearby bright stars explored by AKARI and IRSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Nami; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi

    2017-05-01

    Context. Debris disks are important observational clues for understanding planetary-system formation process. In particular, faint warm debris disks may be related to late planet formation near 1 au. A systematic search of faint warm debris disks is necessary to reveal terrestrial planet formation. Aims: Faint warm debris disks show excess emission that peaks at mid-IR wavelengths. Thus we explore debris disks using the AKARI mid-IR all-sky point source catalog (PSC), a product of the second generation unbiased IR all-sky survey. Methods: We investigate IR excess emission for 678 isolated main-sequence stars for which there are 18 μm detections in the AKARI mid-IR all-sky catalog by comparing their fluxes with the predicted fluxes of the photospheres based on optical to near-IR fluxes and model spectra. The near-IR fluxes are first taken from the 2MASS PSC. However, 286 stars with Ks < 4.5 in our sample have large flux errors in the 2MASS photometry due to saturation. Thus we have measured accurate J, H, and Ks band fluxes, applying neutral density (ND) filters for Simultaneous InfraRed Imager for Unbiased Survey (SIRIUS) on IRSF, the φ1.4 m near-IR telescope in South Africa, and improved the flux accuracy from 14% to 1.8% on average. Results: We identified 53 debris-disk candidates including eight new detections from our sample of 678 main-sequence stars. The detection rate of debris disks for this work is 8%, which is comparable with those in previous works by Spitzer and Herschel. Conclusions: The importance of this study is the detection of faint warm debris disks around nearby field stars. At least nine objects have a large amount of dust for their ages, which cannot be explained by the conventional steady-state collisional cascade model. The full version of Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A72

  14. Herschel/PACS photometry of transiting-planet host stars with candidate warm debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merín, Bruno; Ardila, David R.; Ribas, Álvaro; Bouy, Hervé; Bryden, Geoffrey; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Padgett, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    Dust in debris disks is produced by colliding or evaporating planetesimals, which are remnants of the planet formation process. Warm dust disks, known by their emission at ≤24 μm, are rare (4% of FGK main sequence stars) and especially interesting because they trace material in the region likely to host terrestrial planets, where the dust has a very short dynamical lifetime. Statistical analyses of the source counts of excesses as found with the mid-IR Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) suggest that warm-dust candidates found for the Kepler transiting-planet host-star candidates can be explained by extragalactic or galactic background emission aligned by chance with the target stars. These statistical analyses do not exclude the possibility that a given WISE excess could be due to a transient dust population associated with the target. Here we report Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron follow-up observations of a sample of Kepler and non-Kepler transiting-planet candidates' host stars, with candidate WISE warm debris disks, aimed at detecting a possible cold debris disk in any one of them. No clear detections were found in any one of the objects at either wavelength. Our upper limits confirm that most objects in the sample do not have a massive debris disk like that in β Pic. We also show that the planet-hosting star WASP-33 does not have a debris disk comparable to the one around η Crv. Although the data cannot be used to rule out rare warm disks around the Kepler planet-hosting candidates, the lack of detections and the characteristics of neighboring emission found at far-IR wavelengths support an earlier result suggesting that most of the WISE-selected IR excesses around Kepler candidate host stars are likely due to either chance alignment with background IR-bright galaxies and/or to interstellar emission. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important

  15. Plant growth on debris covered glacier surfaces - ecology, vegetation patterns and implications for debris mantled glaciers serving as cold and warm stage plant refugia in the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickert, Thomas; Friend, Donald; Grüninger, Friederike; Molnia, Bruce; Richter, Michael

    2017-04-01

    As stated at the International Conference on Debris-Covered Glaciers in 2000, "debris-covered glaciers comprise a significant fraction of the global population of glaciers...." Given a minimum of debris thickness and sufficient stability, these surfaces host surprisingly diverse plant assemblages, both floristically and structurally. Observations of plant growth on glacier surfaces are reported from around the world - including mature forests with trees more than 50cm in diameter. Debris covered glacier surfaces are mobile habitats for plants, which migrate downhill with glacier movement, but are able to spread upward with strong anabatic valley winds. Plant growth is possible even on a very shallow debris cover. Depending on site conditions, floristic composition and structure of vegetation on debris covered glaciers represent a mosaic of environments, including subnival pioneer communities, glacier foreland early- to late-successional stages, and morainal locations. The taxa involved display a wide spectrum of adaptations to habitat conditions with particular migration and dispersal strategies. With a shallow debris cover, alpine/subnival taxa can grow considerably below their usual altitudinal niche due to the cooler subsurface soil temperatures. In contrast, a greater thickness of debris cover allows even thermophilous plants of lower elevations to grow on glacier surfaces. Employing the principle of actualism, debris covered glaciers provided important and previously undocumented refugia for plants during the Pleistocene cold stages from which alpine and arctic plant species were able to re-establish and spread in post-glacial time. This assumption is complementary to the two competing ideas to explain the fate of alpine and/or arctic taxa during the Pleistocene, the nunatak hypothesis (i.e. in-situ survival of plants on unglaciated summits) and tabula rasa theory (i.e. displacement of plants and subsequent remigration). Vice versa debris covered glaciers

  16. Cross-stratified Wood: Enigmatic Woody Debris Deposits in Warm-Polar Fluvial Sediments (Pliocene Beaufort Formation, Nunavut)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N. S.; Gosse, J. C.; Rybczynski, N.

    2012-04-01

    Woody debris has been an important sediment component and a significant geomorphic agent in pristine fluvial systems since the Devonian. In recent years a large volume of research has focussed on various aspects of the importance of woody debris within the fluvial realm; from the evolutionary significance of fossil wood accumulations in the rock record to studies of the biogeomorphological and ecological importance of woody debris in modern rivers. In this presentation we describe cross-stratified woody debris deposits comprising organic detritus from a boreal-type treeline forest that included species of pine, birch, poplar, alder, spruce, eastern cedar, and larch, in both shrub and tree form. The cross-stratified wood is an enigmatic subset of fine woody debris which, to our knowledge, has never before been described from either the global stratigraphic record or modern fluvial environments. The deposits we describe are located within the Pliocene Beaufort Formation on Meighen Island, Nunavut, Canada, at a latitude of 80°N, and are compared with other cross-stratified woody debris deposits that have been noted elsewhere in the Pliocene of the Canadian Arctic. We make the robust observation that these deposits appear to be geographically and stratigraphically restricted to polar latitudes from a period of warm climatic conditions during the Pliocene (15-20 °C warmer mean annual temperature than the present day). In this regard it is possible to speculate that the transport of large amounts of woody debris as bedload is potentially a unique feature of forested high latitude rivers. Such bedload deposition requires a large amount of woody debris with a greater density than the fluid transporting it. The softwood composition of the debris suggests that this was most likely attained by saturation and subsequent entrainment of extensive accumulations of deadwood, promoted by unusually high rates of tree mortality and low rates of bacterial decomposition arising from

  17. Simulating the response of debris-covered, lake-calving glaciers to climate warming; Southern Alps, New Zealand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, A.; Anderson, B.; Zammit, C.; Sood, A.

    2016-12-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are less sensitive to warming than clean glaciers because parts of their ablation areas have lower melt rates. However, many of the factors that promote debris cover also leave glaciers susceptible to lake calving. Surface debris on glaciers is increasing in a warming climate, and it is particularly common in tectonically active mountain ranges such as the Southern Alps of New Zealand, and the Himalaya. The Southern Alps contains many glaciers with with a partial debris cover with debris covering 8% of total glacier area. Large proglacial lakes have developed in the last few decades and their growth is set to continue. We explore the future evolution of these glaciers using a coupled mass-balance/ice-flow model. The model is initialised from late 19th Century ice extent, and driven by climate data and Representative Concentration Pathway - based climate model projections to 2100 AD. By the end of the 21st Century, these glaciers have lost 61-70% of their present-day volume. However, the style, and timing of retreat varies from glacier to glacier, depending on how much surface debris is present and whether the sub-glacial topography is suitable for pro-glacial lake development. Debris-covered glacier remnants that are not lost to calving can persist for decades in spite of, in some cases, these glaciers losing their accumulation areas to melting. Such slowly-melting, debris-covered ice masses may continue to supply meltwater to proglacial rivers well into the next century.

  18. Identification of debris-flow hazards in warm deserts through analyzing past occurrences: Case study in South Mountain, Sonoran Desert, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.

    2016-11-01

    After recognition that debris flows co-occur with human activities, the next step in a hazards analysis involves estimating debris-flow probability. Prior research published in this journal in 2010 used varnish microlamination (VML) dating to determine a minimum occurrence of 5 flows per century over the last 8100 years in a small mountain range of South Mountain adjacent to neighborhoods of Phoenix, Arizona. This analysis led to the conclusion that debris flows originating in small mountain ranges in arid regions like the Sonoran Desert could pose a hazard. Two major precipitation events in the summer of 2014 generated 35 debris flows in the same study area of South Mountain-providing support for the importance of probability analysis as a key step in a hazards analysis in warm desert settings. Two distinct mechanisms generated the 2014 debris flows: intense precipitation on steep slopes in the first storm; and a firehose effect whereby runoff from the second storm was funneled rapidly by cleaned-out debris-flow chutes to remobilize Pleistocene debris-flow deposits. When compared to a global database on debris flows, the 2014 storms were among the most intense to generate desert debris flows - indicating that storms of lesser intensity are capable of generating debris flows in warm desert settings. The 87Sr/86Sr analyses of fines and clasts in South Mountain debris flows of different ages reveal that desert dust supplies the fines. Thus, wetter climatic periods of intense rock decay are not needed to resupply desert slopes with fines; instead, a combination of dust deposition supplying fines and dirt cracking generating coarse clasts can re-arm chutes in a warm desert setting with abundant dust.

  19. Extended warm gas in the ULIRG Mrk273: Galactic outflows and tidal debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Zaurín, J.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Rupke, D. S. N.; Veilleux, S.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Chiaberge, M.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Batcheldor, D.; Sparks, W. B.

    2014-11-01

    We present new HST/ACS medium- and narrow-band images and optical Isaac Newton Telescope long-slit spectra of the merging system Mrk273. The HST observations sample the [OIII]λλ4959,5007 emission from the galaxy and the nearby continuum. These data were taken as a part of a larger study of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with the aim of investigating the importance of the warm, AGN induced outflows in such objects. The HST images show that the morphologies of the extended continuum and the ionised gas emission from the galaxy are decoupled, extending almost perpendicular to each other. In particular, we detect for the first time a spectacular structure of ionised gas in the form of filaments and clumps that extend ~23 kpc to the east of the nuclear region. The quiescent ionised gas kinematics at these locations suggests that these filaments are tidal debris left over from a secondary merger event that are illuminated by an AGN in the nuclear regions. The images also reveal a complex morphology in the nuclear region of the galaxy for both the continuum and the [OIII] emission. Consistent with this complexity, we find a wide diversity of emission line profiles in these regions. Kinematic disturbance in the form of broad (FWHM> 500 km s-1) and/or strongly shifted (| ΔV | > 150 km s-1 ) emission line components is found at almost all locations in the nuclear regions, but confined to a radius of ~4 kpc to the east and west of the northern nucleus. In most cases, we are able to fit the profiles of all the emission lines of different ionisation with a kinematic model using two or three Gaussian components. From these fits, we derive diagnostic line ratios that are used to investigate the ionisation mechanisms at the different locations in the galaxy. We show that these line ratios are generally consistent with photoionisation by an AGN as the main ionisation mechanism. Finally, the highest surface brightness [OIII] emission is found in a compact region that is

  20. The Response of Rock Glaciers and Protalus Lobes to Ice and Debris Supply in a Warming World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, B.; Azizi, F.

    2012-12-01

    Valley glacier mass balances in upland areas are indicators of temperature and precipitation distribution and also respond in their distribution to altitude and continentality. Rock glaciers (valley floor) with low velocities, originally considered as restricted to continental interiors, have also been found in maritime areas. Rock glaciers have been considered as indicators of permafrost but have also been found with (glacier) ice cores. Protalus lobes (lobate rock glaciers) also show low velocities and thought to be admixtures of meltwater-derived ice plus rock debris and related to and indicative of permafrost. Climate forcing may be expected to produce differing responses in terms of movement and the form of the traces left when ice has melted from the system (relict/fossil forms). The formation and maintenance of these forms needs to be understood before present and palaeo-forms can be interpreted correctly. The difficulty of using admixtures of rock debris and interstitial ice to explain flow has been argued previously. This paper investigates the distribution of ice origin and debris supply to these features as part of an explanation of their origin, distribution and response to a warming climate. It also makes some predictions that should be seen in individual cases and generally for the type of feature seen. The present day distribution of glaciers, rock glaciers, protalus lobes and scree slopes from several areas is discussed (Svalbard, Iceland, Alpes Martimes, Central Alaska, New Zealand, Hundu Kush). Distributions of rock glaciers and protalus lobes are rarely coincident. This paper shows that, in the great majority of cases, small valley glaciers co-exist with rock glaciers but scree slopes (talus) only supply debris to them from valley heads. This is true in areas of known permafrost as well as where such conditions are unlikely. Glacier ice cores can be observed or inferred in both situations. Climate warming will ultimately produce modified

  1. Response of Himalayan debris-covered glaciers to climate warming: from observations to predictive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, D.; Lefeuvre, P.; Ng, F.; Nicholson, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Field observations and remote-sensing studies have shown that Himalayan debris-covered glaciers tend to follow distinctive evolutionary pathways during periods of negative mass balance. Initially, debris-covered glacier tongues downwaste rather than retreat, resulting in thinning and a reduction of ice surface gradient. Reduced driving stresses lead to lower velocities and eventual stagnation of the tongue. These geometrical and dynamic changes reduce the efficiency of the hydrological system, leading to increased retention of meltwater and the formation of ephemeral supraglacial lakes. High ablation rates around lakes and internal ablation in association with englacial conduits serve to accelerate mass loss and downwasting. In some cases, this evolutionary cascade results in the formation of moraine-dammed lakes, which can present significant outburst flood risks if large lake volumes coincide with weak moraine dams . While this evolutionary sequence has been observed on numerous glaciers, numerical prediction of future glacier behavior requires quantification or parameterization of several complex processes. In addition, system behavior is highly non-linear with multiple process thresholds, creating considerable modeling challenges. An essential first step is to develop robust mass-balance models, including patterns of snow accumulation in extreme terrain and the effects of both debris and climate on melting. Accumulation models need to incorporate vertical variations in precipitation as well as redistribution by wind and avalanching. Newly available precipitation estimates from satellite data can provide important model input. Ablation modeling can be done using a range of approaches, including degree-day and full energy balance models. Mass balance gradients calculated using the latter approach indicate ablation maxima some distance above the glacier termini, where debris cover is relatively thin. Mass balance modeling also indicates that in monsoonal regions

  2. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm and cold season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. The first objective of this study is to investigate this hypothesis. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations, availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions, and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions necessary for the initiation of slope instability, and should therefore be considered explicitly in landslide hazard assessments. Moreover, the relationships between slope stability and interflow are

  3. Newly Discovered Silicate Features in the Spectra of Young Warm Debris Disks: Probing Terrestrial Regions of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballering, N.; Rieke, G.

    2014-03-01

    Terrestrial planets form by the collisional accretion of planetesimals during the first 100 Myr of a system’s lifetime. For most systems, the terrestrial regions are too near their host star to be directly seen with high-contrast imaging (e.g. with HST, MagAO, or LBTI) and too warm to be imaged with submillimeter interferometers (e.g. ALMA). Mid-infrared excess spectra—originating from the thermal emission of the circumstellar dust leftover from these collisions—remain the best data to constrain the properties of the debris in these regions. The spectra of most debris disks are featureless, taking the shape of (modified) blackbodies. Determining the properties of debris disks with featureless spectra is complicated by a degeneracy between the grain size and location (large grains near the star and small grains farther from the star may be indistinguishable). Debris disk spectra that exhibit solid state emission features allow for a more accurate determination of the dust size and location (e.g. Chen et al. 2006; Olofsson et al. 2012). Such features probe small, warm dust grains in the inner regions of these systems where terrestrial planet formation may be proceeding (Lisse et al. 2009). We report here a successful search for such features. We identified our targets with a preliminary search for signs of emission features in the Spitzer IRS spectra of a number of young early type stars known to harbor warm debris disks. We fit to each target a physically-motivated model spectrum consisting of the sum of the stellar photosphere (modeled as a blackbody) and thermal emission from two dust belts. Each belt was defined by 6 parameters: the inner and outer orbital radii (rin and rout), the index of the radial surface density power law (rexp), the minimum and maximum grain sizes (amin and amax), and the index of the grain size distribution power law (aexp). aexp was fixed to -3.65 and amax was fixed to 1000 μm for all models; all other parameters were allowed to

  4. WARM DUSTY DEBRIS DISKS AND DISTANT COMPANION STARS: V488 PER AND 2M1337

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.

    2015-01-10

    A possible connection between the presence of large quantities of warm (T ≥ 200 K) circumstellar dust at youthful stars and the existence of wide-separation companion stars has been noted in the literature. Here we point out the existence of a distant companion star to V488 Per, a K-type member of the α Persei cluster with the largest known fractional excess infrared luminosity (∼16%) of any main sequence star. We also report the presence of a distant companion to the previously recognized warm dust star 2M1337. With these discoveries the existence of a cause and effect relationship between a distant companion and large quantities of warm dust in orbit around youthful stars now seems compelling.

  5. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm- and cold-season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm-season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold-season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. We further hypothesize that the transient mass fluxes associated with the temporal-spatial dynamics of interflow govern the timing of shallow landslide initiation, and subsequent debris flow mobilization. The first objective of this study is to investigate this relationship. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations; availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions; and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions

  6. The twofold debris disk around HD 113766 A. Warm and cold dust as seen with VLTI/MIDI and Herschel/PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, J.; Henning, Th.; Nielbock, M.; Augereau, J.-C.; Juhàsz, A.; Oliveira, I.; Absil, O.; Tamanai, A.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Warm debris disks are a sub-sample of the large population of debris disks, and display excess emission in the mid-infrared. Around solar-type stars, very few objects (~2% of all debris disks) show emission features in mid-IR spectroscopic observations that are attributed to small, warm silicate dust grains. The origin of this warm dust could be explained either by a recent catastrophic collision between several bodies or by transport from an outer belt similar to the Kuiper belt in the solar system. Aims: We present and analyze new far-IR Herschel/PACS photometric observations, supplemented by new and archival ground-based data in the mid-IR (VLTI/MIDI and VLT/VISIR), for one of these rare systems: the 10-16 Myr old debris disk around HD 113766 A. We improve an existing model to account for these new observations. Methods: We implemented the contribution of an outer planetesimal belt in the Debra code, and successfully used it to model the spectral energy distribution (SED) as well as complementary observations, notably MIDI data. We better constrain the spatial distribution of the dust and its composition. Results: We underline the limitations of SED modeling and the need for spatially resolved observations. We improve existing models and increase our understanding of the disk around HD 113766 A. We find that the system is best described by an inner disk located within the first AU, well constrained by the MIDI data, and an outer disk located between 9-13 AU. In the inner dust belt, our previous finding of Fe-rich crystalline olivine grains still holds. We do not observe time variability of the emission features over at least an eight-year time span in an environment subjected to strong radiation pressure. Conclusions: The time stability of the emission features indicates that μm-sized dust grains are constantly replenished from the same reservoir, with a possible depletion of sub- μm-sized grains. We suggest that the emission features may arise from

  7. The devastating Zhouqu storm-triggered debris flow of August 2010: Likely causes and possible trends in a future warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Diandong

    2014-04-01

    On 8 August 2010 in the northwestern Chinese province of Gansu, a rainstorm-triggered debris flow devastated the small county of Zhouqu. A modeling study, using a new multiple-phase scalable and extensible geofluid model, suggests that the cause is an intersection of several events. These were a heavy rainstorm, not necessarily the result of global warming, which triggered the landslide and followed a drought that created surface cracks and crevasses; the geology of the region, notably the loess covering heavily weathered surface rock; and the bedrock damage, that deepened the surface crevasses inflicted by the 7.9 magnitude Wenchuan earthquake of 12 May 2008. Deforestation and topsoil erosion were critical contributors to the massive size of the debris flow. The modeling results underscore the urgency for a high-priority program of revegetation of Zhouqu County, without which the region will remain exposed to future disastrous, "progressive bulking" type landslides. Debris flows are more predictable types of landslides; consequently, a series of "pseudo climate change" model experiments of future extreme precipitation events are carried out using the Weather Research and Forecasting model, forced by temperature perturbations from an ensemble of climate models. In a possibly future warmer climate, extreme precipitation events are anticipated to be more severe, and this study has identified an atmospheric blocking pattern that might produce future extreme precipitation events in the peri-Tibetan Plateau (TP) area (located to the northeast of the TP). Importantly, observations from gravity field measuring satellites indicate that the larger geological environment of this region also is becoming increasingly unstable.

  8. Flash Floods and Storm-Triggered Debris Avalanches in the Appalachians and Possible Trends in a Future Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, D.; Hong, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Shen, X.; Leslie, L. M.; Mahmood, R.; Duan, Q.; Rappin, E.; Li, Y.; Luo, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes storm-triggered landslides in the US Appalachians, in the current geological setting. Concave valleys that favor the convergence of surface runoff are the primary locales for landslides. If the slopes are weathered to the same degree and have the same vegetation coverage, slope orientation (azimuthal) is not critical for slope stability. However, it is found that for the region south of the Black Mountains (North Carolina), north-facing slopes are more prone to slide, because the northern slopes usually are grass slopes for the regions not limited by annual precipitation (water availability). For the slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains, south facing slopes are more prone to slide. Deforestation and topsoil erosion are critical contributors to the massive sizes of the debris flows. Gravity measurements over the past decade reveal that geological conditions, the chute system and underground cracks over the region are stable, and sliding material is plentiful. Future changes in storm-triggered landslide frequency are primarily controlled by changes in extreme precipitation. Thus, a series of ensemble climate model experiments is carried out of possible changes in future extreme precipitation events, using the WRF model forced by temperature perturbations. The focus is the impact on storm-triggered landslides, and over 50 locations are identified as prone to future landslides. In a future warmer climate, more severe extreme precipitation events are projected because of increased vapor content and more frequent passage of tropical cyclone remnants. There also is a likely shift of tropical cyclone tracks and associated extreme precipitation, and the Appalachians scarps cluster center is expected to move westward. The remote sensing way of detecting unstable regions are applicable to other regions of interest. We further examine the following regions (except the Fuji Mount) recently (since 1900) experienced volcanic eruption: Pelee, Agung, Elchichon

  9. Antarctic Ice Sheet response to a long warm interval across Marine Isotope Stage 31: A cross-latitudinal study of iceberg-rafted debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitler, Lora; Florindo, Fabio; Warnke, Detlef A.; Filippelli, Gabriel M.; Kupp, Gary; Taylor, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Constraining the nature of Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) response to major past climate changes may provide a window onto future ice response and rates of sea level rise. One approach to tracking AIS dynamics, and differentiating whole system versus potentially heterogeneous ice sheet sector changes, is to integrate multiple climate proxies for a specific time slice across widely distributed locations. This study presents new iceberg-rafted debris (IRD) data across the interval that includes Marine Isotope Stage 31 (MIS 31: 1.081-1.062 Ma, a span of ∼19 kyr; Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005), which lies on the cusp of the mid-Brunhes climate transition (as glacial cycles shifted from ∼41,000 yr to ∼100,000 yr duration). Two sites are studied-distal Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 177 Site 1090 (Site 1090) in the eastern subantarctic sector of the South Atlantic Ocean, and proximal ODP Leg 188 Site 1165 (Site 1165), near Prydz Bay, in the Indian Ocean sector of the Antarctic margin. At each of these sites, MIS 31 is marked by the presence of the Jaramillo Subchron (0.988-1.072 Ma; Lourens et al., 2004) which provides a time-marker to correlate these two sites with relative precision. At both sites, records of multiple climate proxies are available to aid in interpretation. The presence of IRD in sediments from our study areas, which include garnets indicating a likely East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) origin, supports the conclusion that although the EAIS apparently withdrew significantly over MIS 31 in the Prydz Bay region and other sectors, some sectors of the EAIS must still have maintained marine margins capable of launching icebergs even through the warmest intervals. Thus, the EAIS did not respond in complete synchrony even to major climate changes such as MIS 31. Further, the record at Site 1090 (supported by records from other subantarctic locations) indicates that the glacial MIS 32 should be reduced to no more than a stadial, and the warm interval of Antarctic

  10. Woody debris

    Treesearch

    Donna B. Scheungrab; Carl C. Trettin; Russ Lea; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2000-01-01

    Woody debris can be defined as any dead, woody plant material, including logs, branches, standing dead trees, and root wads. Woody debris is an important part of forest and stream ecosystems because it has a role in carbon budgets and nutrient cycling, is a source of energy for aquatic ecosystems, provides habitat for terrestrial and aquatic organisms, and contributes...

  11. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  12. Debris Flow

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-14

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows downslope movement of material from the hill at the top of the image. Linear ridges and channels are visible on the surface to the debris flow deposit.

  13. Columbia Debris

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-06

    George D'Heilly and John Cassanto, scientists with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., display for the media part of the apparatus recovered during the search for Columbia debris. It was part of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 that included the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS) experiment and crystals grown for cancer research. The GOBBSS experiment was sponsored by the Planetary Society, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student, and developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and JSC Astrobiology Center.

  14. Rocky Ring of Debris Around Vega Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-08

    This artist concept illustrates an asteroid belt around the bright star Vega. Evidence for this warm ring of debris was found using NASA Spitzer Space Telescope, and the European Space Agency Herschel Space Observatory.

  15. Space Shuttle Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Reynaldo J., III

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the assessment of debris damage to the Space Shuttle, and the use of computation to assist in the space shuttle applications. The presentation reviews the sources of debris, a mechanism for determining the probability of damaging debris impacting the shuttle, tools used, eliminating potential damaging debris sources, the use of computation to assess while inflight damage, and a chart showing the applications that have been used on increasingly powerful computers simulate the shuttle and the debris transport.

  16. Herschel Observations of Debris Disks from WISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Liu, W.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.

    2012-01-01

    The \\Vide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has just completed a sensitive all-sky survey in photometric bands at 3.4, 4.6,12 and 22 microns. We report on a study of main sequence Hipparcos and Tycho catalog stars within 120 pc with WISE 22 micron emission in excess of photospheric levels. This warm excess emission traces material in the circumstellar region likely to host terrestrial planets and is preferentially found in young systems with ages < 1 Gyr. Nearly a hundred of the WISE new warm debris disk candidates detected among FGK stars are being observed by Herschel/PACS to characterize circumstellar dust. Preliminary results indicate 70 micron detection rates in excess of 80% for these targets, suggesting that most of these systems have both warm and cool dust in analogy to our asteroid and Kuiper belts. In this contribution, we will discuss the WISE debris disk survey and latest results from Herschel observations of these sources.

  17. Orbital Debris: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, Davis S. F. (Editor); Loftus, Joseph P., Jr. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This chronology covers the 37-year history of orbital debris concerns. It tracks orbital debris hazard creation, research, observation, experimentation, management, mitigation, protection, and policy. Included are debris-producing, events; U.N. orbital debris treaties, Space Shuttle and space station orbital debris issues; ASAT tests; milestones in theory and modeling; uncontrolled reentries; detection system development; shielding development; geosynchronous debris issues, including reboost policies: returned surfaces studies, seminar papers reports, conferences, and studies; the increasing effect of space activities on astronomy; and growing international awareness of the near-Earth environment.

  18. Roll Call Debris - Race

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and threatens human health and safety. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) is tapping existing programs and resources to advance the prevention, reduction and clean-up of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. EPA Pacific Southwest activities build upon specific recommendations of the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee by targeting threats and sources of debris and responding to debris impacts. EPA is initiating a three-pronged effort to reduce sources of marine debris, prevent trash from entering the oceans, and assess the human and ecosystem impacts and potential for cleanup.

  19. Fleet Debris Levels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and threatens human health and safety. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) is tapping existing programs and resources to advance the prevention, reduction and clean-up of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. EPA Pacific Southwest activities build upon specific recommendations of the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee by targeting threats and sources of debris and responding to debris impacts. EPA is initiating a three-pronged effort to reduce sources of marine debris, prevent trash from entering the oceans, and assess the human and ecosystem impacts and potential for cleanup.

  20. Special Report Debris - Race

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and threatens human health and safety. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) is tapping existing programs and resources to advance the prevention, reduction and clean-up of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. EPA Pacific Southwest activities build upon specific recommendations of the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee by targeting threats and sources of debris and responding to debris impacts. EPA is initiating a three-pronged effort to reduce sources of marine debris, prevent trash from entering the oceans, and assess the human and ecosystem impacts and potential for cleanup.

  1. Report on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The success of space endeavors depends upon a space environment sufficiently free of debris to enable the safe and dependable operation of spacecraft. An environment overly cluttered with debris would threaten the ability to utilize space for a wide variety of scientific, technological, military, and commercial purposes. Man made space debris (orbital debris) differs from natural meteoroids because it remains in earth orbit during its lifetime and is not transient through the space around the Earth. The orbital debris environment is considered. The space environment is described along with sources of orbital debris. The current national space policy is examined, along with ways to minimize debris generation and ways to survive the debris environment. International efforts, legal issues and commercial regulations are also examined.

  2. Turbomachinery debris remover

    DOEpatents

    Krawiec, Donald F.; Kraf, Robert J.; Houser, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

  3. Debris exhaust system

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Donald D.; Bua, Dominic; Domankevitz, Yacov; Nishioka, Norman

    1998-01-01

    A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping.

  4. Debris exhaust system

    DOEpatents

    McBride, D.D.; Bua, D.; Domankevitz, Y.; Nishioka, N.

    1998-06-23

    A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping. 9 figs.

  5. Global Warming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1989-01-01

    States the foundations of the theory of global warming. Describes methodologies used to measure the changes in the atmosphere. Discusses steps currently being taken in the United States and the world to slow the warming trend. Recognizes many sources for the warming and the possible effects on the earth. (MVL)

  6. Global Warming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hileman, Bette

    1989-01-01

    States the foundations of the theory of global warming. Describes methodologies used to measure the changes in the atmosphere. Discusses steps currently being taken in the United States and the world to slow the warming trend. Recognizes many sources for the warming and the possible effects on the earth. (MVL)

  7. THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Su, K. Y. L.; Rieke, G. H.; Smith, P. S.; Misselt, K. A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bryden, G.; Moro-Martin, A.; Williams, J. P.

    2009-11-01

    We have obtained a full suite of Spitzer observations to characterize the debris disk around HR 8799 and to explore how its properties are related to the recently discovered set of three massive planets orbiting the star. We distinguish three components to the debris system: (1) warm dust (T approx 150 K) orbiting within the innermost planet; (2) a broad zone of cold dust (T approx 45 K) with a sharp inner edge orbiting just outside the outermost planet and presumably sculpted by it; and (3) a dramatic halo of small grains originating in the cold dust component. The high level of dynamical activity implied by this halo may arise due to enhanced gravitational stirring by the massive planets. The relatively young age of HR 8799 places it in an important early stage of development and may provide some help in understanding the interaction of planets and planetary debris, an important process in the evolution of our own solar system.

  8. Ice and debris in the fretted terrain, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Viking moderate and high resolution images along the northern highland margin have been monoscopically and stereoscopically examined in order to study the development of fretted terrain. Young debris aprons around mesas and debris in tributary channels create typical fretted morphologies identical to ancient fretted morphologies. This suggests that the debris-apron process operating relatively recently also shaped the fretted terrain of the past. The debris aprons were lubricated by interstitial ice derived from ground ice. Abundant collapse features suggest that ground ice existed and may have flowed in places. The fretting process has been active for a long period and may be active today. The location of debris aprons in two latitudinal belts may be controlled by atmospheric conditions that permit ice in the region to remain in the ground below depths of about one meter and temperatures warm enough for ice to flow.

  9. Observations of space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Optical observations of near Earth and deep-space debris conducted at M.I.T.'s artificial satellite observatory will be discussed. A brief review of observing technique, regions of high debris density, and amount of debris in orbit will be given. The unique, duplex facilities of the observatory allow the discrimination of debris from meteors, the construction of an orbital element set, and real-time identification of catalogued artificial satellites. Near-Earth debris is present in large numbers in all the popular near-Earth orbits; at least 5-6 times the 5000-6000 objects in the NORAD catalog. In deep-space, the new presence of Ariane-related debris adds significantly to the existing population which is treble that catalogued by NORAD.

  10. Optical orbital debris spotter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph R.; Bays, J. Timothy; Marr, Kenneth D.; Brown, Charles M.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2014-11-01

    The number of man-made debris objects orbiting the Earth, or orbital debris, is alarmingly increasing, resulting in the increased probability of degradation, damage, or destruction of operating spacecraft. In part, small objects (<10 cm) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) are of concern because they are abundant and difficult to track or even to detect on a routine basis. Due to the increasing debris population it is reasonable to assume that improved capabilities for on-orbit damage attribution, in addition to increased capabilities to detect and track small objects are needed. Here we present a sensor concept to detect small debris with sizes between approximately 1.0 and 0.01 cm in the vicinity of a host spacecraft for near real time damage attribution and characterization of dense debris fields and potentially to provide additional data to existing debris models.

  11. Space debris detection and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Allahdadi, F.

    1993-01-01

    Space debris is defined as all useless man-made objects in space. This conference covers the following areas: debris detection, tracking, and surveillance; orbital debris analytical modeling; debris environment and safety issues; and orbital debris mitigation. Separate abstracts were prepared for 26 papers in this conference.

  12. Debris Disks: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D.

    2004-12-01

    An overview regarding planetary debris disks: First, more history to complement Low and Aumann's summary appearing elsewhere in this volume. Then, commentary on the nature of debris disks and what we've learned from them: properties of the original ``Fabulous Four" archetypes, results from surveys showing that a large fraction of ordinary stars may be hosts for debris disks, and relatively detailed discussion of β Pictoris, the most prominent disk. Finally, discussion of the connection between debris disks, our solar system's Kuiper Belt, and the zodiacal dust cloud. Open questions about these objects will be highlighted which can lead on to the remainder of the proceedings.

  13. Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Susan H.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is an international problem that threatens the success of future space ventures. An analysis of a wide variety of alternative solutions for active debris removal (ADR) has been performed. The solution selected is an efficient, effective, and executable solution to remove large debris in LEO, primarily spent rocket bodies. Removing large debris objects is a critical step in reducing the hazard from orbital debris, because of the large amount of medium and small debris created through large body collisions. Based on the analysis of alternatives, the concept and design for a vehicle which could efficiently address the debris hazard by disposing of several large objects per mission has been developed. This concept establishes a comprehensive, detailed technical approach for an actual end-to-end, on-orbit ADR solution to remove large debris. This robust solution enables the start of solving the problem of debris removal before it reaches a critical and potentially irreversible state by "getting there as soon as possible, as economically as possible, with the most capability".

  14. The response of debris-covered glaciers to climate change: A numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly-eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. Continuous debris cover can therefore reduce the mass balance gradient in the ablation zone, leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes deposition of debris on the glacier surface, and both englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations in which a steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to new steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier. The debris flux onto the glacier surface, and the details of the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to debris-free glaciers forced by the same climate. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). The model reproduces first-order relationships between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocities reported from glaciers in High Asia. We also explore the response of debris-covered glaciers to increases in the equilibrium-line altitude (climate warming). We highlight the conditions required to generate a low surface velocity 'dead' ice terminal reach during a warming climate, and the associated increase of fractional glacier surface debris. We also compare our debris-covered glacier climate response results with data from glaciers in High Asia. Our model provides a quantitative, theoretical

  15. Orbital debris issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Man-made orbital debris, identified as a potential hazard to future space activities, is grouped into size categories. At least 79 satellites have broken up in orbit to date and, in combination with exploded rocket casings and antisatellite debris, threaten 10 km/sec collisions with other orbiting platforms. Only 5 percent of the debris is connected to payloads. The total population of orbiting objects over 4 cm in diameter could number as high as 15,000, and at 1 cm in diameter could be 32,000, based on NASA and NORAD studies. NASA has initiated the 10 yr Space Debris Assessment Program to characterize the hazards of orbiting debris, the potential damage to typical spacecraft components, and to identify means of controlling the damage.

  16. Orbital Debris Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Jarkey, D. R.; Stansbery, G.

    2014-01-01

    Policies on limiting orbital debris are found throughout the US Government, many foreign space agencies, and as adopted guidelines in the United Nations. The underlying purpose of these policies is to ensure the environment remains safe for the operation of robotic and human spacecraft in near- Earth orbit. For this reason, it is important to consider orbital debris mitigation during the design of all space vehicles. Documenting compliance with the debris mitigation guidelines occurs after the vehicle has already been designed and fabricated for many CubeSats, whereas larger satellites are evaluated throughout the design process. This paper will provide a brief explanation of the US Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices, a discussion of international guidelines, as well as NASA's process for compliance evaluation. In addition, it will discuss the educational value of considering orbital debris mitigation requirements as a part of student built satellite design.

  17. Modeling debris-covered glaciers: response to steady debris deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. If continuous debris cover is present, ablation rates can be significantly reduced leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2-D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations on a linear bed profile in which a hypothetical steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier terminus. Our model and parameter selections can produce 2-fold increases in glacier length. Debris flux onto the glacier and the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude re-emerges high in the ablation zone and therefore impacts melt rate over a greater fraction of the glacier surface. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to initial debris-free glaciers. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). Our simulations reproduce the "general trends" between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocity patterns from modern debris-covered glaciers. We provide a quantitative, theoretical foundation to interpret the effect of debris cover on the moraine record, and to assess the effects of climate change on debris-covered glaciers.

  18. Current orbital debris environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    NASA has instituted a plan for the definition of activities and resources required over the coming decade for the deepening of current understanding of anthropogenic orbital debris, and its effects on future mission operations. This understanding will be the basis of policy definition and policy implementation efforts. The most immediate requirement is the definition of the debris environment, with emphasis on data for debris sizes smaller than 4 cm. Systems-damage criteria and hypervelocity-impact theory will then be used to define the hazard to specific spacecraft.

  19. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  20. Orbital debris: A technical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleghorn, George; Asay, James; Atkinson, Dale; Flury, Walter; Johnson, Nicholas; Kessler, Donald; Knowles, Stephen; Rex, Dietrich; Toda, Susumu; Veniaminov, Stanislav

    1995-01-01

    To acquire an unbiased technical assessment of (1) the research needed to better understand the debris environment, (2) the necessity and means of protecting spacecraft against the debris environment, and (3) potential methods of reducing the future debris hazard, NASA asked the National Research Council to form an international committee to examine the orbital debris issue. The committee was asked to draw upon available data and analyses to: characterize the current debris environment, project how this environment might change in the absence of new measures to alleviate debris proliferation, examine ongoing alleviation activities, explore measures to address the problem, and develop recommendations on technical methods to address the problems of debris proliferation.

  1. Disposal of Cleaning Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    trees. In addition, the debris contains some plastic bottles , balls, rubber items, and glass . The wood debris is in various stages of...the upper portion, which contains vegetation falls into the river. Plastic bottles and various other discarded objects periodically float into the...the reservoir includes tree stumps, tree branches, tree trunks, tires, oil drums, plastic bottles , signs from recreational areas in the White

  2. Orbital Debris Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation outlne: (1) The NASA Orbital Debris (OD) Engineering Model -- A mathematical model capable of predicting OD impact risks for the ISS and other critical space assets (2) The NASA OD Evolutionary Model -- A physical model capable of predicting future debris environment based on user-specified scenarios (3) The NASA Standard Satellite Breakup Model -- A model describing the outcome of a satellite breakup (explosion or collision)

  3. Albedo estimates for debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Henize, Karl G.; Talent, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The albedo of upper-stage breakup debris is proposed as an accurate discriminator among the various possible causes of breakup, which encompass residual fuel explosions and hypervelocity particle impacts. The fragments from an impact are covered with a thin layer of soot deposited from the destruction of polymeric circuit boards, while pressure vessel explosion fragments can be expected to remain soot-free. Albedo also facilitates the interpretation of small-debris optical telescope measurements.

  4. SILICA-RICH BRIGHT DEBRIS DISK AROUND HD 15407A

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Takeda, Yoichi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Murakami, Hiroshi; Fukagawa, Misato

    2012-04-20

    We report an intriguing debris disk toward the F3V star HD 15407A in which an extremely large amount of warm fine dust ({approx}10{sup -7} M{sub Circled-Plus }) is detected. The dust temperature is derived as {approx}500-600 K and the location of the debris dust is estimated as 0.6-1.0 AU from the central star, a terrestrial planet region. The fractional luminosity of the debris disk is {approx}0.005, which is much larger than those predicted by steady-state models of the debris disk produced by planetesimal collisions. The mid-infrared spectrum obtained by Spitzer indicates the presence of abundant {mu}m-sized silica dust, suggesting that the dust comes from the surface layer of differentiated large rocky bodies and might be trapped around the star.

  5. Shielding against debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Avans, Sherman L.

    1988-01-01

    The damage to spacecraft caused by debris and design of the Space Station to minimize damage from debris are discussed. Although current estimates of the debris environment show that fragments bigger than 2 cm are not likely to hit the Space Station, orbital debris from about 0.5 mm to 2 cm will pose a hazard, especially on brittle surfaces, such as glass. Spacesuits are being designed to reduce debris caused dangers to astronauts during EVA. About 5 cm of high-strength aluminum are needed to prevent penetration by a 1 cm piece of aluminum with a mass near 1.5 g colliding at 10 km/sec. Because aluminum bumpers have the drawback of metallic debris ejected outward after a hypervelocity collision, the use of nonmetallic materials for bumpers is being studied. Methods of reducing the weight and volume of the shield for the Space Station are also being researched. A space station habitation module using bumpers has a 99.6 percent chance of avoiding penetration during its lifetime.

  6. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  7. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    Space debris has become a growing concern in recent years, since collisions at orbital velocities can be highly damaging to functioning satellites and can also produce even more space debris in the process. Some spacecraft, like the International Space Station, are now armored to deal with this hazard but armor and mitigation measures can be prohibitively costly when trying to protect satellites or human spaceflight vehicles like the shuttle. This paper describes the current orbital debris environment, outline its main sources, and identify mitigation measures to reduce orbital debris growth by controlling these sources. We studied the literature on the topic Space Debris. We have proposed some methods to solve this problem of space debris. We have also highlighted the shortcomings of already proposed methods by space experts and we have proposed some modification in those methods. Some of them can be very effective in the process of mitigation of space debris, but some of them need some modification. Recently proposed methods by space experts are maneuver, shielding of space elevator with the foil, vaporizing or redirecting of space debris back to earth with the help of laser, use of aerogel as a protective layer, construction of large junkyards around international space station, use of electrodynamics tether & the latest method proposed is the use of nano satellites in the clearing of the space debris. Limitations of the already proposed methods are as follows: - Maneuvering can't be the final solution to our problem as it is the act of self-defence. - Shielding can't be done on the parts like solar panels and optical devices. - Vaporizing or redirecting of space debris can affect the human life on earth if it is not done in proper manner. - Aerogel has a threshold limit up to which it can bear (resist) the impact of collision. - Large junkyards can be effective only for large sized debris. In this paper we propose: A. The Use of Nano Tubes by creating a mesh

  8. Global Warming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Julia Christensen; Brown, Jeff A.

    1994-01-01

    Presents information and data on an experiment designed to test whether different atmosphere compositions are affected by light and temperature during both cooling and heating. Although flawed, the experiment should help students appreciate the difficulties that researchers face when trying to find evidence of global warming. (PR)

  9. Global Warming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Julia Christensen; Brown, Jeff A.

    1994-01-01

    Presents information and data on an experiment designed to test whether different atmosphere compositions are affected by light and temperature during both cooling and heating. Although flawed, the experiment should help students appreciate the difficulties that researchers face when trying to find evidence of global warming. (PR)

  10. Benefits of Active Debris Removal on the LEO Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniwa, Kazuaki; Hanada, Toshiya; Kawamoto, Satomi

    Since the launch of Sputnik, orbital debris population continues to increase due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions. In the future, a great deal of fragments can be expected to be created by explosions and collisions. In spite of prevention of satellite and rocket upper stage explosions and other mitigation measures, debris population in low Earth orbit may not be stabilized. To better limit the growth of the future debris population, it is necessary to remove the existing debris actively. This paper studies about the effectiveness of active debris removal in low Earth orbit where the collision rate with and between space debris is high. This study does not consider economic problems, but investigates removing debris which may stabilize well the current debris population based on the concept of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

  11. On the influence of debris in glacier melt modelling: a new temperature-index model accounting for the debris thickness feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carenzo, Marco; Mabillard, Johan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Reid, Tim; Brock, Ben; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    is comparable to the one of the physically based approach. The definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the warming/insulating effect suggested by the Ostrem curve. We show that it is important indeed to take into account the effect of debris thickness also in empirical approaches, especially for thin debris mantles. The new DETI model is an innovative approach that can be included in continuous mass balance models of debris-covered glaciers, because of its limited data requirements. As such, we expect its application to lead to an improvement in simulations of the debris covered glacier response to climate.

  12. Response of debris-covered glaciers to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, D. I.; Lindsey, N.; Kathryn, H.

    2004-12-01

    The presence of supraglacial debris strongly influences glacier ablation, and the mass balance of debris-covered glaciers differs significantly from that of clean glaciers in similar climatic settings. Predicting the response of debris-covered glaciers to climate change is important for hazard mitigation strategies in many high mountain environments, especially where temporary lakes are likely to form on stagnating glacier tongues. Accurate prediction of glacier evolution requires a robust mass balance function which incorporates the effect of debris cover. We present a new model for calculating ablation beneath supraglacial debris layer from meteorological data, based on coupling the surface energy balance and conductive heat flux through the debris layer. The model performs well in a wide range of climatic settings, and results correlate well with measured melt rates in the European Alps and Svalbard. The ablation model is used to construct theoretical mass balance curves for debris covered glaciers, providing surface boundary conditions for glacier flow models. Modelled mass balance curves display reverse gradients on glacier termini where the effect of thickening debris cover with decreasing altitude outweighs that of higher air temperatures. This explains the widely-noted tendency for debris-covered glaciers to stagnate under warming climates. When the mass balance of the glacier as a whole is negative, increasing ablation with altitude causes the lower tongue to decrease in gradient. As gradients and ice thicknesses decline, the process is reinforced by a positive feedback with velocity, so less ice is delivered to the terminal zone. Low surface gradients encourage the formation of supraglacial ponds which can grow rapidly, significantly increasing mass loss from the glacier and potentially posing flood hazards.

  13. The Correlation between Metallicity and Debris Disk Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáspár, András; Rieke, George H.; Ballering, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    We find that the initial dust masses in planetary debris disks are correlated with the metallicities of their central stars. We compiled a large sample of systems, including Spitzer, the Herschel DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, and WISE debris disk candidates. We also merged 33 metallicity catalogs to provide homogeneous [Fe/H] and {σ }[{Fe/{{H}}]} values. We analyzed this merged sample, including 222 detected disks (74 warm and 148 cold) around a total of 187 systems (some with multiple components) and 440 disks with only upper limits (125 warm and 315 cold) around a total of 360 systems. The disk dust masses at a common early evolutionary point in time were determined using our numerical disk evolutionary code, evolving a unique model for each of the 662 disks backward to an age of 1 Myr. We find that disk-bearing stars seldom have metallicities less than {{[Fe/H]}}=-0.2 and that the distribution of warm component masses lacks examples with large mass around stars of low metallicity ({{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -0.085). Previous efforts to find a correlation have been largely unsuccessful; the primary improvements supporting our result are (1) basing the study on dust masses, not just infrared excess detections; (2) including upper limits on dust mass in a quantitative way; (3) accounting for the evolution of debris disk excesses as systems age; (4) accounting fully for the range of uncertainties in metallicity measurements; and (5) having a statistically large enough sample.

  14. Space debris detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eather, Robert H.

    1992-12-01

    A feasibility study on the possibility of detecting less than or = 10 cm space debris using a large-aperture ground-based telescope (with an intensified CCD detector) was completed, showing that detection should be possible. A detector system was designed and built, and installed on the 2.54 m WRDC telescope at Wright Patterson AFB. Bad seeing conditions in the Dayton area prevented the expected debris detection. Subsequently, a small 40 cm telescope was built and operated from the Haystack Observatory (Groton, MA). Known objects were used to test pointing and acquisition procedures, and the system was then shipped to Rattlesnake Observatory (Richland, WA) for participation in the ODERAC's debris calibration experiment from the Space Shuttle. This experiment failed, and our instrument has been stored at Rattlesnake in anticipation of a new ODERAC's flight in late 1993.

  15. Modelling the feedbacks between mass balance, ice flow and debris transport to predict the response to climate change of debris-covered glaciers in the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Ann V.; Egholm, David L.; Quincey, Duncan J.; Glasser, Neil F.

    2015-11-01

    Many Himalayan glaciers are characterised in their lower reaches by a rock debris layer. This debris insulates the glacier surface from atmospheric warming and complicates the response to climate change compared to glaciers with clean-ice surfaces. Debris-covered glaciers can persist well below the altitude that would be sustainable for clean-ice glaciers, resulting in much longer timescales of mass loss and meltwater production. The properties and evolution of supraglacial debris present a considerable challenge to understanding future glacier change. Existing approaches to predicting variations in glacier volume and meltwater production rely on numerical models that represent the processes governing glaciers with clean-ice surfaces, and yield conflicting results. We developed a numerical model that couples the flow of ice and debris and includes important feedbacks between debris accumulation and glacier mass balance. To investigate the impact of debris transport on the response of a glacier to recent and future climate change, we applied this model to a large debris-covered Himalayan glacier-Khumbu Glacier in Nepal. Our results demonstrate that supraglacial debris prolongs the response of the glacier to warming and causes lowering of the glacier surface in situ, concealing the magnitude of mass loss when compared with estimates based on glacierised area. Since the Little Ice Age, Khumbu Glacier has lost 34% of its volume while its area has reduced by only 6%. We predict a decrease in glacier volume of 8-10% by AD2100, accompanied by dynamic and physical detachment of the debris-covered tongue from the active glacier within the next 150 yr. This detachment will accelerate rates of glacier decay, and similar changes are likely for other debris-covered glaciers in the Himalaya.

  16. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  17. Orbital Debris: A Policy Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing orbital debris from a policy perspective is shown. The contents include: 1) Voyage through near-Earth Space-animation; 2) What is Orbital Debris?; 3) Orbital Debris Detectors and Damage Potential; 4) Hubble Space Telescope; 5) Mir Space Station Solar Array; 6) International Space Station; 7) Space Shuttle; 8) Satellite Explosions; 9) Satellite Collisions; 10) NASA Orbital Debris Mitigation Guidelines; 11) International Space Station Jettison Policy; 12) Controlled/Uncontrolled Satellite Reentries; 13) Return of Space Objects; 14) Orbital Debris and U.S. National Space Policy; 15) U.S Government Policy Strategy; 16) Bankruptcy of the Iridium Satellite System; 17) Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC); 18) Orbital Debris at the United Nations; 19) Chinese Anti-satellite System; 20) Future Evolution of Satellite Population; and 21) Challenge of Orbital Debris

  18. Global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, John

    2005-06-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources.

  19. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  20. On the connection of permafrost and debris flow activity in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Thomas; Kaitna, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows represent a severe hazard in alpine regions and typically result from a critical combination of relief energy, water, and sediment. Hence, besides water-related trigger conditions, the availability of abundant sediment is a major control on debris flows activity in alpine regions. Increasing temperatures due to global warming are expected to affect periglacial regions and by that the distribution of alpine permafrost and the depth of the active layer, which in turn might lead to increased debris flow activity and increased interference with human interests. In this contribution we assess the importance of permafrost on documented debris flows in the past by connecting the modeled permafrost distribution with a large database of historic debris flows in Austria. The permafrost distribution is estimated based on a published model approach and mainly depends of altitude, relief, and exposition. The database of debris flows includes more than 4000 debris flow events in around 1900 watersheds. We find that 27 % of watersheds experiencing debris flow activity have a modeled permafrost area smaller than 5 % of total area. Around 7 % of the debris flow prone watersheds have an area larger than 5 %. Interestingly, our first results indicate that watersheds without permafrost experience significantly less, but more intense debris flow events than watersheds with modeled permafrost occurrence. Our study aims to contribute to a better understanding of geomorphic activity and the impact of climate change in alpine environments.

  1. Asteroid Belts in Debris Disk Twins: Vega and Fomalhaut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate Y.; Rieke, G.

    2013-01-01

    Nearby debris disks have been playing an important role in our understanding the complexity of the underlying planetary architectures (planets, minor bodies and debris) since their first discovery by IRAS through infrared excesses. Among them, the two early-type stars, Vega and Fomalhaut, are similar in terms of mass, age, distance and global disk properties; therefore, they are often referred as “Debris Disk Twins”. Much attention has been focused on their large, cold Kuiper-belt-analog rings because they contain the majority of the left-over planetesimals and fine debris that covers a large surface area, making them readily detectable through infrared and submillimeter observations. We present Spitzer 10-35 μm spectroscopic data centered at both stars, and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared using data probed area within ~5" diameter from the star and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of ~30 μm from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of ~170 K, just above the temperature at which water ice sublimates. Interestingly, two other systems, eps Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm component using the same approach of combining imaging and mid-infrared spectroscopy. These warm components may be analogous to our asteroid belt, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of ~1e-5 - 1e-6). The dust characteristic temperature and tentative detections at submillimeter suggest the warm excess arises from a planetesimal ring placed near the ice line and presumably created by processes occurring near the equivalent location in other debris systems as well. In light of the current detection limits on the planetary

  2. Debris Disks around White Dwarfs: The DAZ Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Mukremin; von Hippel, Ted; Leggett, S. K.; Winget, D. E.

    2006-07-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopic observations of 20 previously known DAZ white dwarfs obtained at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Two of these white dwarfs (G29-38 and GD 362) are known to display significant K-band excesses due to circumstellar debris disks. Here we report the discovery of excess K-band radiation from another DAZ white dwarf, WD 0408-041 (GD 56). Using spectroscopic observations, we show that the excess radiation cannot be explained by a stellar or substellar companion, and is likely to be caused by a warm debris disk. Our observations strengthen the connection between the debris disk phenomena and the observed metal abundances in cool DAZ white dwarfs. However, we do not find any excess infrared emission from the most metal rich DAZs with Teff=16,000-20,000 K. This suggests that the metal abundances in warmer DAZ white dwarfs may require another explanation.

  3. Unravelling the evolution and avulsion mechanisms of debris-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Densmore, Alex; Stoffel, Markus; Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan; Suwa, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Fumitoshi; Wasklewicz, Thad

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows are water-laden masses of soil and fragmented rock that rush down mountainsides and spill out onto valley floors and alluvial fans, where they can devastate people and property. Expansion of human population into mountainous regions and the effects of global warming have increased the hazardous effects of debris flows over the last decades. Debris-flow channel avulsions (channel shifts) are critical to debris-flow fan evolution and hazard mitigation, because avulsions distribute debris flows and associated hazards through space and time. However, both the long-term evolution of debris-flow fans and their avulsion process are poorly understood. We aim to unravel the spatio-temporal patterns of debris-flow fan evolution and their avulsion mechanisms and tendency. Here we present a combined analysis of laboratory experiments; field data (repeat topographic analyses and dendrogeomorphological and lichenometrical reconstructions from debris-flow fans in Japan, USA, Switserland and France) and numerical modelling, identifying the main drivers of avulsion on debris-flow fans and their associated spatio-temporal evolution. We show that there are two main processes driving avulsions on debris-flow fans operating at two distinct timescales. (1) Channel plugs locally block channels forcing subsequent flows to avulse and follow alternative flow paths. The frequent but stochastic nature of channel-plug formation leads to a partly unpredictable avulsion and spatial depositional patterns on timescales of a few events. (2) Nevertheless, over timescales of tens of events the average locus of debris-flow deposition is observed to gradually shift towards the topographically lower parts of a fan, highlighting the importance of topographic compensation in the avulsion process on debris-flow fans. We further show that the magnitude-frequency distribution of the debris flows feeding a fan strongly affects the spatio-temporal patterns of deposition. Our results have strong

  4. STS-125 Orbital Debris

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-02

    JSC2010-E-054445 (2 July 2009) --- Members of the Orbital Debris Program Office and the Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility at JSC record images of impact craters and other surface data on the returned Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) of the Hubble Space Telescope. Inspection took place at the Goddard Space Flight Center during the summer of 2009. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Debris - Onboard GT-10

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-46241 (18 July 1966) --- Debris on spacecraft window in picture taken from inside the Gemini-10 spacecraft. At this time Gemini-10 was docked with the Agena Target Docking Vehicle 5005. Taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 217) color film. The Gemini-10 crew is astronaut John W. Young, command pilot, and Michael Collins, pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Young Debris Disks With Newly Discovered Emission Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballering, N.

    2014-04-01

    We analyzed the Spitzer/IRS spectra of young A and F stars that host debris disks with previously unidentified silicate emission features. Such features probe small, warm dust grains in the inner regions of these young systems where terrestrial planet formation may be proceeding (Lisse et al. 2009). For most systems, these regions are too near their host star to be directly seen with high-contrast imaging and too warm to be imaged with submillimeter interferometers. Mid-infrared excess spectra - originating from the thermal emission of the debris disk dust - remain the best data to constrain the properties of the debris in these regions. For each target, we fit physically-motivated model spectra to the data. Typical spectra of unresolved debris disks are featureless and suffer severe degeneracies between the dust location and the grain properties; however, spectra with solid-state emission features provide significantly more information, allowing for a more accurate determination of the dust size, composition, and location (e.g. Chen et al. 2006; Olofsson et al. 2012). Our results shed light on the dynamic properties occurring in the terrestrial regions of these systems. For instance, the sizes of the smallest grains and the nature of the grain size distribution reveal whether the dust originates from steady-state collisional cascades or from stochastic collisions. The properties of the dust grains - such as their crystalline or amorphous structure - can inform us of grain processing mechanisms in the disk. The location of this debris illuminates where terrestrial planet forming activity is occurring. We used results from the Beta Pictoris - which has a well-resolved debris disk with emission features (Li et al. 2012) - to place our results in context. References: Chen et al. 2006, ApJS, 166, 351 Li et al. 2012, ApJ, 759, 81 Lisse et al. 2009, ApJ, 701, 2019 Olofsson et al. 2012, A&A, 542, A90

  7. Orbital debris issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  8. Space Debris Modeling at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOLVE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been released with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NASA Safety Standard 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the

  9. Infrared thermographic surveying of building debris: Tomsk High Military School of Communication Engineering catastrophe case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Vladimir P.

    1998-03-01

    IR thermography was used in surveying dormitory debris of Tomsk High Military School of Communication Engineering in Siberia that collapsed on July 17, 1997, with 12 students dead. In total, the debris had the ambient temperature but plentiful joints between vertical brick-made columns and horizontal concrete beams were detected to be abnormally warm. The reasons for this temperature elevation are discussed. The arguments pro and contra possibility to identify temperature patterns as abnormal mechanical stresses are considered.

  10. Eddy covariance and lysimeter measurements of moisture fluxes over supraglacial debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Supraglacial debris covers have the potential to evaporate large quantities of water derived from either sub-debris ice melt or precipitation. Currently, knowledge of evaporation and condensation rates in supraglacial debris is limited due to the difficulty of making direct measurements. This paper presents eddy covariance and lysimeter measurements of moisture fluxes made over a 0.2 m debris layer at Miage debris covered glacier, Italian Alps, during the 2013 ablation season. The meteorological data are complimented by reflectometer measurements of volumetric water fraction in the saturated and vadose zones of the debris layer. The lysimeters were designed specifically to mimic the debris cover and were embedded within the debris matrix, level with the surface. Over the ablation season, the latent heat flux is dominated by evaporation, and the flux magnitude closely follows the daily cycle of daytime solar heating and night time radiative cooling of debris. Mean flux values are of the order of 1 kg m-2 day-1, but often higher for short periods following rainfall. Condensation rates are relatively small and restricted to night time and humid conditions when the debris-atmosphere vapour pressure gradient reverses due to relatively warm air overlying cold debris. The reflectometer measurements provide evidence of vertical water movement through capillary rise in the upper part of the fine-grained debris layer, just above the saturated horizon, and demonstrate how debris bulk water content increases after rainfall. The latent heat flux responds directly to changes in wind speed, indicating that atmospheric turbulence can penetrate porous upper debris layers to the saturated horizon. Hence, vertical sorting of debris sediments and antecedent rainfall are important in determining evaporation rates, in addition to current meteorological conditions. Comparison of lysimeter measurements with rainfall data provides an estimate that between 45% and 89% of rainfall is

  11. External tank space debris considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N.; Baillif, F.; Robinson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital debris issues associated with maintaining a Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) on orbit are presented. The first issue is to ensure that the ET does not become a danger to other spacecraft by generating space debris, and the second is to protect the pressurized ET from penetration by space debris or meteoroids. Tests on shield designs for penetration resistance showed that when utilized with an adequate bumper, thermal protection system foam on the ET is effective in preventing penetration.

  12. DEBRIS FLOWS AND HYPERCONCENTRATED STREAMFLOWS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of recent debris-flow and hyperconcentrated-streamflow events in the western United States reveals (1) the topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and vegetative conditions that affect initiation of debris flows and (2) the wide ranging climatic conditions that can trigger debris flows. Recognition of these physiographic and climatic conditions has aided development of preliminary methods for hazard evaluation. Recent developments in the application of electronic data gathering, transmitting, and processing systems shows potential for real-time hazard warning.

  13. Debris flow grain size scales with sea surface temperature over glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Araújo, João Paulo C.

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows are common erosional processes responsible for a large volume of sediment transfer across a range of landscapes from arid settings to the tropics. They are also significant natural hazards in populated areas. However, we lack a clear set of debris flow transport laws, meaning that: (i) debris flows remain largely neglected by landscape evolution models; (ii) we do not understand the sensitivity of debris flow systems to past or future climate changes; and (iii) it remains unclear how to interpret debris flow stratigraphy and sedimentology, for example whether their deposits record information about past tectonics or palaeoclimate. Here, we take a grain size approach to characterising debris flow deposits from 35 well-dated alluvial fan surfaces in Owens Valley, California. We show that the average grain sizes of these granitic debris flow sediments precisely scales with sea surface temperature throughout the entire last glacial-interglacial cycle, increasing by ~ 7 % per 1 ° C of climate warming. We compare these data with similar debris flow systems in the Mediterranean (southern Italy) and the tropics (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and find equivalent signals over a total temperature range of ~ 14 ° C. In each area, debris flows are largely governed by rainfall intensity during triggering storms, which is known to increase exponentially with temperature. Therefore, we suggest that these debris flow systems are transporting predictably coarser-grained sediment in warmer, stormier conditions. This implies that debris flow sedimentology is governed by discharge thresholds and may be a sensitive proxy for past changes in rainfall intensity. Our findings show that debris flows are sensitive to climate changes over short timescales (≤ 104 years) and therefore highlight the importance of integrating hillslope processes into landscape evolution models, as well as providing new observational constraints to guide this. Finally, we comment on what grain size

  14. Debris-covered Himalayan glaciers under a changing climate: observations and modelling of Khumbu Glacier, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Ann; Quincey, Duncan; Egholm, David; Gibson, Morgan; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Porter, Philip; Glasser, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Many mountain glaciers are characterised in their lower reaches by thick layers of rock debris that insulate the glacier surface from solar radiation and atmospheric warming. Supraglacial debris modifies the response of these glaciers to climate change compared to glaciers with clean-ice surfaces. However, existing modelling approaches to predicting variations in the extent and mass balance of debris-covered glaciers have relied on numerical models that represent the processes governing glaciers with clean-ice surfaces, and yield conflicting results. Moreover, few data exist describing the mass balance of debris-covered glaciers and many observations are only made over short periods of time, but these data are needed to constrain and validate numerical modelling experiments. To investigate the impact of supraglacial debris on the response of a glacier to climate change, we developed a numerical model that couples the flow of ice and debris to include important feedbacks between mass balance, ice flow and debris accumulation. We applied this model to a large debris-covered Himalayan glacier - Khumbu Glacier in the Everest region of Nepal. Our results demonstrate that supraglacial debris prolongs the response of the glacier to warming air temperatures and causes lowering of the glacier surface in situ, concealing the magnitude of mass loss when compared with estimates based on glacierised area. Since the Little Ice Age, the volume of Khumbu Glacier has reduced by 34%, while glacier area has reduced by only 6%. We predict a further decrease in glacier volume of 8-10% by AD2100 accompanied by dynamic and physical detachment of the debris-covered tongue from the active glacier within the next 150 years. For five months during the 2014 summer monsoon, we measured temperature profiles through supraglacial debris and proglacial discharge on Khumbu Glacier. We found that temperatures at the ice surface beneath 0.4-0.7 m of debris were sufficient to promote considerable

  15. Current Issues in Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    During the past two decades, great strides have been made in the international community regarding orbital debris mitigation. The majority of space-faring nations have reached a consensus on an initial set of orbital debris mitigation measures. Implementation of and compliance with the IADC and UN space debris mitigation guidelines should remain a high priority. Improvements of the IADC and UN space debris mitigation guidelines should continue as technical consensus permits. The remediation of the near-Earth space environment will require a significant and long-term undertaking.

  16. Asteroid Belts in Debris Disk Twins: Vega and Fomalhaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Malhortra, Renu; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bonsor, Amy; Wilner, David J.; Balog, Zoltan; Watson, Dan M.; Werner, Michael W.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Vega and Fomalhaut are similar in terms of mass, ages, and global debris disk properties; therefore, they are often referred to as debris disk twins. We present Spitzer 10-35 micrometers spectroscopic data centered at both stars and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of approximately 30 micrometers from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of approximately 170 K. Interestingly, two other systems, Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm dust using the same approach. These warm components may be analogous to the solar system s zodiacal dust cloud, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of approximately 10(exp-5) to 10(exp-6) compared to 10(exp-8) to 10(exp-7). The dust temperature and tentative detections in the submillimeter suggest that the warm excess arises from dust associated with a planetesimal ring located near the water-frost line and presumably created by processes occurring at similar locations in other debris systems as well. We also review the properties of the 2 micrometers hot excess around Vega and Fomalhaut, showing that the dust responsible for the hot excess is not spatially associated with the dust we detected in the warm belt.We suggest it may arise from hot nano grains trapped in the magnetic field of the star. Finally, the separation between the warm and cold belt is rather large with an orbital ratio greater than or approximately 10 in all four systems. In light of the current upper limits on the masses of planetary objects and the large gap, we discuss the possible implications for their underlying planetary architecture and suggest that multiple, low

  17. ASTEROID BELTS IN DEBRIS DISK TWINS: VEGA AND FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Misselt, Karl A.; Malhotra, Renu; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bonsor, Amy; Balog, Zoltan; Watson, Dan M.; Werner, Michael W.

    2013-02-15

    Vega and Fomalhaut are similar in terms of mass, ages, and global debris disk properties; therefore, they are often referred to as 'debris disk twins'. We present Spitzer 10-35 {mu}m spectroscopic data centered at both stars and identify warm, unresolved excess emission in the close vicinity of Vega for the first time. The properties of the warm excess in Vega are further characterized with ancillary photometry in the mid-infrared and resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The Vega warm excess shares many similar properties with the one found around Fomalhaut. The emission shortward of {approx}30 {mu}m from both warm components is well described as a blackbody emission of {approx}170 K. Interestingly, two other systems, {epsilon} Eri and HR 8799, also show such an unresolved warm dust using the same approach. These warm components may be analogous to the solar system's zodiacal dust cloud, but of far greater mass (fractional luminosity of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} compared to 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7}). The dust temperature and tentative detections in the submillimeter suggest that the warm excess arises from dust associated with a planetesimal ring located near the water-frost line and presumably created by processes occurring at similar locations in other debris systems as well. We also review the properties of the 2 {mu}m hot excess around Vega and Fomalhaut, showing that the dust responsible for the hot excess is not spatially associated with the dust we detected in the warm belt. We suggest it may arise from hot nano grains trapped in the magnetic field of the star. Finally, the separation between the warm and cold belt is rather large with an orbital ratio {approx}>10 in all four systems. In light of the current upper limits on the masses of planetary objects and the large gap, we discuss the possible implications for their underlying planetary architecture and suggest that multiple, low-mass planets likely reside between the

  18. Measuring the structure and composition of circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballering, Nicholas Paul

    In this dissertation, I measure the structure and composition of circumstellar debris disks to probe the underlying planetary systems. In Chapter 1, I provide an introduction to the field of debris disks. I highlight our current observational and theoretical understanding of the field, rather than providing a detailed history. This is intended to give the reader context and motivation for the subsequent chapters. I also describe important developments in debris disk science that are not the focus of this dissertation, but are nevertheless vital for a complete overview. In Chapter 2, I describe my analysis of a large sample of cold (<130 K) debris disks seen in Spitzer/IRS data. Previous work had suggested a common temperature for these disk components, regardless of spectral type. I find that there is trend with spectral type and argue that the locations of cold disks are not set by snow lines, but more likely by the formation/evolution of planets. This work was published in Ballering et al. (2013). In Chapter 3, I turn my focus to the warm (˜190 K) debris components identified in Chapter 2--specifically those exhibiting silicate emission features. I show that these features arise from exozodiacal dust in the habitable zones around these stars. This was published in Ballering et al. (2014). In Chapter 4, I examine the remainder of the warm disks to investigate what mechanism sets their location. I find that for many systems, the locations trace the water snow line in the primordial protoplanetary disk, rather than the current snow line. This favors the interpretation that warm debris components arise from asteroid belts in these systems. This study will be published soon. In Chapter 5, I analyze images of the debris disk around beta Pictoris at five different wavelengths, including in thermal emission and scattered light. I find that matching the disk brightness at all wavelengths constrains the composition of the dust, with a mixture of astronomical silicates and

  19. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  20. Space Debris Hazard Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, Elmer H.; Winslow, Paul C., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The hazard to space vehicles from natural space debris has been explored. A survey of the available information pertinent to this problem is presented. The hope is that this presentation gives a coherent picture of the knowledge to date in terms of the topic covered. The conclusion reached is that a definite hazard exists but that it can only be poorly assessed on the basis of present information. The need for direct measurement of this hazard is obvious, and some of the problems involved in making these direct measurements have been explored.

  1. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  2. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  3. Microplastic debris in sandhoppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, A.; Ungherese, G.; Ciofini, M.; Lapucci, A.; Camaiti, M.

    2013-09-01

    Adults of the sandhopper Talitrus saltator were fed with dry fish food mixed with polyethylene microspheres (diameter 10-45 μm). Observations of homogenized guts revealed the presence of microspheres independently of their dimensions. The gut resident time (GRT) was recorded and most of the microspheres are expelled in 24 h. Microspheres are totally expelled in one week. Preliminary investigations did not show any consequence of microsphere ingestion on the survival capacity in the laboratory. FT-IR analyses carried out on faeces of freshly collected individuals revealed the presence of polyethylene and polypropylene. This confirms that microplastic debris could be swallowed by T. saltator in natural conditions.

  4. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect.

    PubMed

    Carenzo, M; Pellicciotti, F; Mabillard, J; Reid, T; Brock, B W

    2016-08-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are increasingly studied because it is assumed that debris cover extent and thickness could increase in a warming climate, with more regular rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and more englacial melt-out material. Debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancement/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya, and can be difficult to extrapolate. Due to their lower data requirements, empirical models have been used extensively in clean glacier melt modelling. For debris-covered glaciers, however, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of varying debris thickness on melt and prescribe a constant reduction for the entire melt across a glacier. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model that accounts for debris thickness in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The model empirical parameters are optimized at the point scale for varying debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter is validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. We develop the model on Miage Glacier, Italy, and then test its transferability on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. The performance of the new debris temperature-index (DETI) model in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale is comparable to the one of the physically based approach, and the definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the nonlinear relationship of melt rate to debris thickness, summarised by the

  5. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carenzo, M.; Pellicciotti, F.; Mabillard, J.; Reid, T.; Brock, B. W.

    2016-08-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are increasingly studied because it is assumed that debris cover extent and thickness could increase in a warming climate, with more regular rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and more englacial melt-out material. Debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancement/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya, and can be difficult to extrapolate. Due to their lower data requirements, empirical models have been used extensively in clean glacier melt modelling. For debris-covered glaciers, however, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of varying debris thickness on melt and prescribe a constant reduction for the entire melt across a glacier. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model that accounts for debris thickness in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The model empirical parameters are optimized at the point scale for varying debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter is validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. We develop the model on Miage Glacier, Italy, and then test its transferability on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. The performance of the new debris temperature-index (DETI) model in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale is comparable to the one of the physically based approach, and the definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the nonlinear relationship of melt rate to debris thickness, summarised by the

  6. Space debris executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-09-01

    Spacecraft, boosters, and fragments are potential hazards to space vehicles, and it is argued that collisions between them could produce a cascade that could preclude activity in LEO in 25 to 50 years. That has generated pressure for constraints on military space operations, so the AF SAB performed a study of technical aspects of the debris problem. The Study was independent of the efforts of the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) as well as those of and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which is the principal advocate for cascades and constraints. Most work on space debris has been performed by AFSPC and JSC, so the Study was in part an assessment of their efforts, in which both have been cooperative. The Study identified the main disagreements and quantified their impacts. It resolved some issues and provided bounds for the rest. It treated radar and optical observations; launch, explosion, and decay rates; and the number and distribution of fragments from explosions and collisions. That made it possible to address hazard to manned spacecraft at low altitudes and the possibility of cascading at higher altitudes, both of which now appear less likely.

  7. DEBRIS DISKS IN KEPLER EXOPLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2012-06-10

    The Kepler mission recently identified 997 systems hosting candidate extrasolar planets, many of which are super-Earths. Realizing these planetary systems are candidates to host extrasolar asteroid belts, we use mid-infrared data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to search for emission from dust in these systems. We find excesses around eight stars, indicating the presence of warm to hot dust ({approx}100-500 K), corresponding to orbital distances of 0.1-10 AU for these solar-type stars. The strongest detection, KOI 1099, demands {approx}500 K dust interior to the orbit of its exoplanet candidate. One star, KOI 904, may host very hot dust ({approx}1200 K, corresponding to 0.02 AU). Although the fraction of these exoplanet-bearing stars with detectable warm excesses ({approx}3%) is similar to that found by Spitzer surveys of solar-type field stars, the excesses detectable in the WISE data have much higher fractional luminosities (L{sub dust}/L{sub *}) than most known debris disks, implying that the fraction with debris disks of comparable luminosity may actually be significantly higher. It is difficult to explain the presence of dust so close to the host stars, generally corresponding to dust rings at radii <0.3 AU; both the collisional and Poynting-Robertson drag timescales to remove dust from the system are hundreds of years or less at these distances. Assuming a steady state for these systems implies large mass consumption rates with these short removal timescales, meaning that the dust production mechanism in these systems must almost certainly be episodic in nature.

  8. Small-Scale Variations in Melt of the Debris-Covered Emmons Glacier, Mount Rainier, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dits, T. M.; Nelson, L. I.; Moore, P. L.; Pasternak, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    In a warming climate the vitality of mid-latitude glaciers is an important measure of local response to global climate change. However, debris-covered glaciers can respond to climate change in a nonlinear manner. Supraglacial debris alters the energy balance at the atmosphere-glacier interface compared with debris-free glaciers, and can result in both accelerated and reduced ablation through complex processes that occur on a variety of scales. Emmons Glacier, on the northeast slope of Mount Rainier (Washington, USA), offers an opportunity to study these processes in supraglacial debris that are otherwise difficult to study in situ (e.g. Himalayan glaciers). Emmons Glacier underwent a steady advance in the late 20th century despite a warming climate, in part due to increased surface debris cover. Key energy balance variables were measured in August of 2013 and 2014 using a temporary weather station installed directly on the debris-covered terminus of Emmons Glacier. Ablation of debris-covered ice was monitored in situ with ablation stakes drilled into the debris-covered ice in a 3600 m2 grid, a size comparable to a single pixel in leading thermal remote-sensing platforms. Debris thickness at the study site ranged from 3-50 cm at the ablation stakes, and textures varied from sand and gravel to large boulders with open pore space. Daily ablation rates varied by a factor of 5 in this small area and were affected by debris thickness, texture, and moisture as well as local surface slope and aspect. On this scale, ablation rates correlated better with debris surface temperature than air temperature. Spatial gradients in ablation rate may strongly influence long-term melt rates through evolving surface topography and consequent redistribution of supraglacial debris, but cannot be resolved using thermal imagery from most current satellite platforms. A preliminary field experiment with a ground-based thermal infrared camera yielded temperature measurements with fine spatial

  9. Space debris modeling at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-10-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOVLE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard (NSS) 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been completed with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NSS 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the application of

  10. Remote Sensing of Plastic Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaba, S. P.; Dierssen, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    Plastic debris is becoming a nuisance in the environment and as a result there has been a dire need to synoptically detect and quantify them in the ocean and on land. We investigate the possible utility of spectral information determined from hand held, airborne and satellite remote sensing tools in the detection and identification polymer source of plastic debris. Sampled debris will be compared to our derived spectral library of typical raw polymer sources found at sea and in household waste. Additional work will be to determine ways to estimate the abundance of plastic debris in target areas. Implications of successful remote detection, tracking and quantification of plastic debris will be towards validating field observations over large areas and at repeated time intervals both on land and at sea.

  11. The Challenge of Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Since the dawn of the Space Age more than 50 years ago, humans have been launching objects into the space environment faster than they have been removed by active means or natural decay. This has led to a proliferation of debris -- derelict satellites, discarded rocket upper stages, and pieces from satellite breakups -- in Earth orbit, especially in well-used orbital regimes. This talk will summarize the current knowledge of the debris environment and describe plans to address the challenges orbital debris raises for the future usability of near-Earth space. The talk will be structured around 4 categories: Measurements, Modeling, Shielding, and Mitigation. This will include discussions of the long-term prognosis of debris growth (i.e., the "Kessler Syndrome") as well as plans for active debris removal.

  12. Space debris: modeling and detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Lorenz, J.; Radtke, J.; Kebschull, C.; Horstmann, A.; Stoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision orbit determination is required for the detection and removal of space debris. Knowledge of the distribution of debris objects in orbit is necessary for orbit determination by active or passive sensors. The results can be used to investigate the orbits on which objects of a certain size at a certain frequency can be found. The knowledge of the orbital distribution of the objects as well as their properties in accordance with sensor performance models provide the basis for estimating the expected detection rates. Comprehensive modeling of the space debris environment is required for this. This paper provides an overview of the current state of knowledge about the space debris environment. In particular non-cataloged small objects are evaluated. Furthermore, improvements concerning the update of the current space debris model are addressed. The model of the space debris environment is based on the simulation of historical events, such as fragmentations due to explosions and collisions that actually occurred in Earth orbits. The orbital distribution of debris is simulated by propagating the orbits considering all perturbing forces up to a reference epoch. The modeled object population is compared with measured data and validated. The model provides a statistical distribution of space objects, according to their size and number. This distribution is based on the correct consideration of orbital mechanics. This allows for a realistic description of the space debris environment. Subsequently, a realistic prediction can be provided concerning the question, how many pieces of debris can be expected on certain orbits. To validate the model, a software tool has been developed which allows the simulation of the observation behavior of ground-based or space-based sensors. Thus, it is possible to compare the results of published measurement data with simulated detections. This tool can also be used for the simulation of sensor measurement campaigns. It is

  13. Orbital Debris Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.

    2009-01-01

    The United States has one of the most active programs of research of the orbital debris environment in the world. Much of the research is conducted by NASA s Orbital Debris Program Office at the Johnson Space Center. Past work by NASA has led to the development of national space policy which seeks to limit the growth of the debris population and limit the risk to spacecraft and humans in space and on the Earth from debris. NASA has also been instrumental in developing consistent international policies and standards. Much of NASA's efforts have been to measure and characterize the orbital debris population. The U.S. Department of Defense tracks and catalogs spacecraft and large debris with it's Space Surveillance Network while NASA concentrates on research on smaller debris. In low Earth orbit, NASA has utilized short wavelength radars such as Haystack, HAX, and Goldstone to statistically characterize the population in number, size, altitude, and inclination. For higher orbits, optical telescopes have been used. Much effort has gone into the understanding and removal of observational biases from both types of measurements. NASA is also striving to understand the material composition and shape characteristics of debris to assess these effects on the risk to operational spacecraft. All of these measurements along with data from ground tests provide the basis for near- and long-term modeling of the environment. NASA also develops tools used by spacecraft builders and operators to evaluate spacecraft and mission designs to assess compliance with debris standards and policies which limit the growth of the debris environment.

  14. An Introduction to Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David

    2008-04-01

    Space debris is any human-made object in orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose, including defunct satellites, discarded equipment and rocket stages, and fragments from the breakup of satellites and rocket stages. It is a concern because--due to its very high speed in orbit--even relatively small pieces can damage or destroy satellites in a collision. Since debris at high altitudes can stay in orbit for decades or longer, it accumulates as more is produced and the risk of collisions with satellites grows. Since there is currently no effective way to remove large amounts of debris from orbit, controlling the production of debris is essential for preserving the long-term use of space. Today there are 860 active satellites in orbit, supporting a wide range of civil and military uses. The 50 years of space activity since the launch of Sputnik 1 has also resulted in well over half a million pieces of orbiting debris larger than 1 cm in size. There are two main sources of space debris: (1) routine space activity and the accidental breakup of satellites and stages placed in orbit by such activity, and (2) the testing or use of destructive anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons that physically collide with satellites at high speed. The international community is attempting to reduce the first category by developing strict guidelines to limit the debris created as a result of routine space activities. However, the destruction of a single large spy satellite by an ASAT weapon could double the total amount of large debris in low earth orbit, and there are currently no international restrictions on these systems. This talk will give an introduction to what's in space, the origins of space debris, efforts to stem its growth, the threat it poses to satellites in orbit, and the long-term evolution of the debris population.

  15. Meteorological factors driving glacial till variation and the associated periglacial debris flows in Tianmo Valley, south-eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingfeng; Chen, Ningsheng; Liu, Mei

    2017-03-01

    Meteorological studies have indicated that high alpine environments are strongly affected by climate warming, and periglacial debris flows are frequent in deglaciated regions. The combination of rainfall and air temperature controls the initiation of periglacial debris flows, and the addition of meltwater due to higher air temperatures enhances the complexity of the triggering mechanism compared to that of storm-induced debris flows. On the south-eastern Tibetan Plateau, where temperate glaciers are widely distributed, numerous periglacial debris flows have occurred over the past 100 years, but none occurred in the Tianmo watershed until 2007. In 2007 and 2010, three large-scale debris flows occurred in the Tianmo Valley. In this study, these three debris flow events were chosen to analyse the impacts of the annual meteorological conditions, including the antecedent air temperature and meteorological triggers. The remote sensing images and field measurements of the adjacent glacier suggested that sharp glacier retreats occurred in the 1 to 2 years preceding the events, which coincided with spikes in the mean annual air temperature. Glacial till changes providing enough active sediment driven by a prolonged increase in the air temperature are a prerequisite of periglacial debris flows. Different factors can trigger periglacial debris flows, and they may include high-intensity rainfall, as in the first and third debris flows, or continuous, long-term increases in air temperature, as in the second debris flow event.

  16. Implementation of the hazardous debris rule

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, J.E.

    1993-01-05

    Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

  17. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The website provides information about the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at JSC, which is the lead NASA center for orbital debris research. It is recognized world-wide for its leadership in addressing orbital debris issues. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has taken the international lead in conducting measurements of the environment and in developing the technical consensus for adopting mitigation measures to protect users of the orbital environment. Work at the center continues with developing an improved understanding of the orbital debris environment and measures that can be taken to control its growth. Major Contents: Orbital Debris research is divided into the following five broad efforts. Each area of research contains specific information as follows: 1) Modeling - NASA scientists continue to develop and upgrade orbital debris models to describe and characterize the current and future debris environment. Evolutionary and engineering models are described in detail. Downloadable items include a document in PDF format and executable software. 2) Measurements - Measurements of near-Earth orbital debris are accomplished by conducting ground-based and space-based observations of the orbital debris environment. The data from these sources provide validation of the environment models and identify the presence of new sources. Radar, optical and surface examinations are described. External links to related topics are provided. 3) Protection - Orbital debris protection involves conducting hypervelocity impact measurements to assess the risk presented by orbital debris to operating spacecraft and developing new materials and new designs to provide better protection from the environment with less weight penalty. The data from this work provides the link between the environment defined by the models and the risk presented by that environment to operating spacecraft and provides recommendations on design and operations procedures to reduce the risk as

  18. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The website provides information about the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at JSC, which is the lead NASA center for orbital debris research. It is recognized world-wide for its leadership in addressing orbital debris issues. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has taken the international lead in conducting measurements of the environment and in developing the technical consensus for adopting mitigation measures to protect users of the orbital environment. Work at the center continues with developing an improved understanding of the orbital debris environment and measures that can be taken to control its growth. Major Contents: Orbital Debris research is divided into the following five broad efforts. Each area of research contains specific information as follows: 1) Modeling - NASA scientists continue to develop and upgrade orbital debris models to describe and characterize the current and future debris environment. Evolutionary and engineering models are described in detail. Downloadable items include a document in PDF format and executable software. 2) Measurements - Measurements of near-Earth orbital debris are accomplished by conducting ground-based and space-based observations of the orbital debris environment. The data from these sources provide validation of the environment models and identify the presence of new sources. Radar, optical and surface examinations are described. External links to related topics are provided. 3) Protection - Orbital debris protection involves conducting hypervelocity impact measurements to assess the risk presented by orbital debris to operating spacecraft and developing new materials and new designs to provide better protection from the environment with less weight penalty. The data from this work provides the link between the environment defined by the models and the risk presented by that environment to operating spacecraft and provides recommendations on design and operations procedures to reduce the risk as

  19. Reduction of CO2 and orbital debris: can CO2 emission trading principles be applied to debris reduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Giovanni; Kinnersley, Mark; Starke, Juergen; Hugel, Sebastian; Hartner, Gloria; Singh, Sanjay; Loubiere, Vincent; Staebler, Dominik-Markus; O'Brien-Organ, Christopher; Schwindt, Stefan; Serreau, Francois; Sharma, Mohit

    In the past years global pollution and the specific situation of global warming changes have been strongly influencing public opinion and thus obliged politicians to initiate/ negotiate in-ternational agreements to control, avoid or at least reduce the impact of CO2 emissions e.g. The Kyoto Protocol (1997) and the International Copenhagen conference on Climate Change (2009). In the orbital debris area the collision between the Iridium33 and Cosmos 2251 satel-lites in 2009 has again pushed to the forefront the discussion of the space pollution by space debris and the increasing risk of critical and catastrophic events during the nominal life time of space objects. It is shown by simulations that for Low Earth Orbits the critical debris situation is already achieved and the existing space objects will probably produce sufficient space debris elements -big enough -to support the cascade effect (Kessler Syndrome). In anal-ogy with CO2 emissions, potential recommendations / regulations to reduce the production of Space Debris or its permanence in orbit, are likely to open new markets involving Miti-gation and Removal of Space Debris. The principle approach for the CO2 emission trading model will be investigated and the applicability for the global space debris handling will be analysed. The major differences of the two markets will be derived and the consequences in-dicated. Potential alternative solutions will be proposed and discussed. For the example of the CO2 emission trading principles within EU and worldwide legal conditions for space debris (national / international laws and recommendations) will be considered as well as the commer-cial approach from the controlled situation of dedicated orders to a free / competitive market in steps. It is of interest to consider forms of potential industrial organisations and interna-tional co-operations to react on a similar architecture for the debris removal trading including incentives and penalties for the different

  20. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  1. Debris disks: a theorist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivov, A. V.

    2007-08-01

    Debris disks are roughly solar system-sized, optically thin, gas-poor dust disks that encircle a notable fraction of main-sequence stars at ages ranging from about 10 Myr to several Gyr. They are thought to be continuously replenished by collisions between "exoasteroids" and activity of "exocomets", small bodies left over from the planet formation process. I will first outline main physical mechanisms operating in debris disks and compare them with other dusty systems: protoplanetary disks, dusty planetary rings, and classical Saturn's rings. I will then review basic methods and essential results of debris disks modeling, covering both steady-state and stochastic models of axisymmetric and structured disks.

  2. Herschel DEBRIS survey of debris discs around A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, N.

    2014-11-01

    The Herschel DEBRIS survey (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) brings a unique perspective to the study of debris discs around main-sequence A-type stars. We have observed a sample of 89 A-stars with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on the Herschel space telescope at 100 and 160 μm. A statistical analysis of the data shows a lower debris disc rate than has previously been found. The drop is due in part to the fact that some excess sources were resolved as background objects by the superior angular resolution (a factor of 2.5) of PACS-100 relative to that of Spitzer (MIPS-70). We found a 3-σ detection rate of 23 myblue which is similar to the the detection rate around main-sequence F, G and K stars. Most of the debris discs were detected around the youngest and hottest stars in our sample. The incidence of discs in single and multiple systems was similar. The debris discs in multiple systems ware found either in tight binary systems (<1 AU) or wide ones (>100 AU). Debris discs in both tight and wide binary systems have physical properties that are statistically similar to those of discs around single stars. We did not detect any debris discs in binary systems with intermediate separation, in which the orbit and the debris disc would be on the same scale. One possible explanation is that discs in intermediate systems have evolved much faster owing to the disc-companion interactions and they are now undetectable.

  3. The Dynamical Structure of HR 8799's Inner Debris Disk.

    PubMed

    Contro, B; Wittenmyer, Robert A; Horner, J; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The HR 8799 system, with its four giant planets and two debris belts, has an architecture closely mirroring that of our Solar system where the inner, warm asteroid belt and outer, cool Edgeworth-Kuiper belt bracket the giant planets. As such, it is a valuable laboratory for examining exoplanetary dynamics and debris disk-exoplanet interactions. Whilst the outer debris belt of HR 8799 has been well resolved by previous observations, the spatial extent of the inner disk remains unknown. This leaves a significant question mark over both the location of the planetesimals responsible for producing the belt's visible dust and the physical properties of those grains. We have performed the most extensive simulations to date of the inner, unresolved debris belt around HR 8799, using UNSW Australia's Katana supercomputing facility to follow the dynamical evolution of a model inner disk comprising 300,298 particles for a period of 60 Ma. These simulations have enabled the characterisation of the extent and structure of the inner disk in detail, and will in future allow us to provide a first estimate of the small-body impact rate and water delivery prospects for possible (as-yet undetected) terrestrial planet (s) in the inner system.

  4. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  5. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  6. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  7. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  8. Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Neal R; Cohen, Denis; Hooyer, Thomas S; Fischer, Urs H; Jackson, Miriam; Moore, Peter L; Lappegard, Gaute; Kohler, Jack

    2003-07-04

    Glacier movement is resisted partially by debris, either within glaciers or under glaciers in water-saturated layers. In experiments beneath a thick, sliding glacier, ice containing 2 to 11% debris exerted shear traction of 60 to 200 kilopascals on a smooth rock bed, comparable to the total shear traction beneath glaciers and contrary to the usual assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Imposed pore-water pressure that was 60 to 100% of the normal stress in a subglacial debris layer reduced shear traction on the debris sufficiently to halt its deformation and cause slip of ice over the debris. Slip resistance was thus less than debris shearing resistance.

  9. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  10. Imaging Debris Disks with CCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, G.; Matthews, B. C.; Isella, A.; Ricci, L.; Swift, J.

    2013-01-01

    Debris disks are sustained by the collisional grinding of planetesimals down to micron-sized particles. The mechanisms by which the planetesimals are perturbed include stirring by planetary mass bodies, which interact gravitationally to sculpt the disk by scattering dust particles out of the disk, and capturing dust in mean motion resonances as particles drift inwards from Poynting-Robertson drag or as planets migrate. Thus the location of the debris dust can trace where planetesimals have formed, as well as the dynamical history of the disk. With high angular resolution and high sensitivity at submillimeter wavelengths, CCAT will be a powerful telescope to discover and image the structure of debris disks around nearby stars. This poster will describe various surveys that CCAT will conduct to search for new debris disks.

  11. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  12. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  13. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  14. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  15. DebriSat Laboratory Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    thomas.huynh@us.af.mil Jesse Edwards SMC/ENC jesse.edwards.4@us.af.mil J.-C. Liou NASA-JSC jer -chyi.l iou-1 @nasa.gov John Opiela NASA-JSC...DebriSat Team Members: J.-C. Liou : NASA Space Debris Program Office, NASA JSC AEDC Range G Light Gas Gun Staff Charles Griffice: Aerospace Marlon

  16. Backwater development by woody debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geertsema, Tjitske; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Hoitink, Ton

    2017-04-01

    Placement of woody debris is a common method for increasing ecological values in river and stream restoration, and is thus widely used in natural environments. Water managers, however, are afraid to introduce wood in channels draining agricultural and urban areas. Upstream, it may create backwater, depending on hydrodynamic characteristics including the obstruction ratio, the Froude number and the surface level gradient. Patches of wood may trigger or counter morphological activity, both laterally, through bank erosion and protection, and vertically, with pool and riffle formation. Also, a permeable construction composed of wood will weather over time. Both morphodynamic activity and weathering cause backwater effects to change in time. The purpose of this study is to quantify the time development of backwater effects caused by woody debris. Hourly water levels gauged upstream and downstream of patches and discharge are collected for five streams in the Netherlands. The water level drop over the woody debris patch relates to discharge in the streams. This relation is characterized by an increasing water level difference for an increasing discharge, up to a maximum. If the discharge increases beyond this level, the water level difference reduces to the value that may represent the situation without woody debris. This reduction depends primarily on the obstruction ratio of the woody debris in the channel cross-section. Morphologic adjustments in the stream and reorientation of the woody material reduce the water level drop over the patches in time. Our results demonstrate that backwater effects can be reduced by optimizing the location where woody debris is placed and manipulating the obstruction ratio. Current efforts are focussed on representing woody debris in a one-dimensional numerical model, aiming to obtain a generic tool to achieve a stream design with woody debris that minimizes backwater.

  17. Remote sensing of debris-covered glaciers: Change detection and analysis using multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Huh, K.; Mark, B. G.; La Frenierre, J.; Gulley, J. D.; Park, K.

    2013-12-01

    Debris-cover can insulate glaciers and hinder surface melting, but also challenges accurate assessment of change detection and subsequent risk evaluation of outburst floods from moraine-dammed supra-glacial lakes that endanger downstream inhabitants. These events have been predicted to increase frequency along with the coverage of debris as warming accelerates. Enhanced monitoring capability from optical air and space-borne sensors has improved the detection of changes in surface-derived characteristics such as areal and volumetric fluctuations as well as glacier velocity over debris-covered glaciers, improving the accuracy of geometric and temporal resolutions in hydrological analysis. In this study we present case studies from Nepal, Peru and Ecuador focusing on: 1) time series of debris-coverage and moraine-dammed lakes; and 2) the relationship of remotely sensed observable quantities from different sensors such as aerial photographs, ASTER, Landsat imagery and Airborne/Terrestrial Laser Scanner.

  18. Optimizing Orbital Debris Monitoring with Optical Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Continued growth in the orbital debris population has renewed concerns over the long-term use of space. Debris poses an increasing risk to manned...in a catalog. Passive optical systems hold great promise to provide a cost-effective means to monitor orbital debris . Recent advances in optical...non-tracking mode for uncued debris detection. The governing radiometric equations for sensing orbital debris are developed, illustrating the

  19. Decision time on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P.; Tilton, Lee E.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    1988-01-01

    The problem of orbital debris, especially in LEO is discussed, stressing ways to minimize hazards caused by debris. There are over 7,000 objects making up 2.4 X 10 to the 6th kg of debris in LEO with velocities up to 7 km/sec. The least costly way of minimizing hazards from debris is to make spent rocket stages inert, to preclude failures after their useful life, by insuring that all residual propellants and pressurant gases are vented while the stage is still subject to command. A more costly option is the actively controlled deorbit of spent stages and spacecraft at the end of their useful mission life. The removal of inert stages or spacecraft is too costly to be practical. The least expensive methods of removal are deorbit for altitudes below 25,000 km and placing the object in earth-escape trajectory for objects at higher altitudes. NASA is developing a special radar to measure the existing small-particle debris and its changes over time, and international agreements are expected to set standards of operational practices to minimize debris.

  20. The physics of debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ???10 m3 of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  1. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  2. Optical Observations of Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Abercromby, Kira; Rodriquez, Heather; Barker, Edwin S.; Kelecy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of optical telescopes to observe space debris. .It will present a brief review of how the survey is conducted, and what some of the significant results encompass. The goal is to characterize the population of debris objects at GEO, with emphasis on the faint object population. Because the survey observations extend over a very short arc (5 minutes), a full six parameter orbit can not be determined. Recently we have begun to use a second telescope, the 0.9-m at CTIO, as a chase telescope to do follow-up observations of potential GEO debris candidates found by MODEST. With a long enough sequence of observations, a full six-parameter orbit including eccentricity can be determined. The project has used STK since inception for planning observing sessions based on the distribution of bright cataloged objects and the anti-solar point (to avoid eclipse). Recently, AGI's Orbit Determination Tool Kit (ODTK) has been used to determine orbits, including the effects of solar radiation pressure. Since an unknown fraction of the faint debris at GEO has a high area-to-mass ratio (A/M), the orbits are perturbed significantly by solar radiation. The ODTK analysis results indicate that temporal variations in the solar perturbations, possibly due to debris orientation dynamics, can be estimated in the OD process. Additionally, the best results appear to be achieved when solar forces orthogonal to the object-Sun line are considered. Determining the A/M of individual objects and the distribution of A/M values of a large sample of debris is important to understanding the total population of debris at GEO

  3. Adaptive optics for laser space debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Francis; Conan, Rodolphe; D'Orgeville, Celine; Dawson, Murray; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian; Smith, Craig; Uhlendorf, Kristina

    2012-07-01

    Space debris in low Earth orbit below 1500km is becoming an increasing threat to satellites and spacecrafts. Radar and laser tracking are currently used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris and active satellites are able to use this information to manoeuvre out of the way of a predicted collision. However, many satellites are not able to manoeuvre and debris-on debris collisions are becoming a signicant contributor to the growing space debris population. The removal of the space debris from orbit is the preferred and more denitive solution. Space debris removal may be achieved through laser ablation, whereby a high power laser corrected with an adaptive optics system could, in theory, allow ablation of the debris surface and so impart a remote thrust on the targeted object. The goal of this is to avoid collisions between space debris to prevent an exponential increase in the number of space debris objects. We are developing an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of laser ablation for space debris removal. This laser ablation demonstrator utilises a pulsed sodium laser to probe the atmosphere ahead of the space debris and the sun re ection of the space debris is used to provide atmospheric tip{tilt information. A deformable mirror is then shaped to correct an infrared laser beam on the uplink path to the debris. We present here the design and the expected performance of the system.

  4. Warm Up with Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyle, R. J.; Smith, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    Too little time is often spent on warm-up activities in the school or recreation class. Warm-ups are often perfunctory and unimaginative. Several suggestions are made for warm-up activities that incorporate both previously learned and new skills, while preparing the body for more vigorous activity. (IAH)

  5. Biodiversity: invasions by marine life on plastic debris.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2002-04-25

    Colonization by alien species poses one of the greatest threats to global biodiversity. Here I investigate the colonization by marine organisms of drift debris deposited on the shores of 30 remote islands from the Arctic to the Antarctic (across all oceans) and find that human litter more than doubles the rafting opportunities for biota, particularly at high latitudes. Although the poles may be protected from invasion by freezing sea surface temperatures, these may be under threat as the fastest-warming areas anywhere are at these latitudes.

  6. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  7. Space Telescopes and Orbital Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Almost 12,000 artificial objects orbiting the Earth are currently in the public catalog of orbital elements maintained by the USAF. Only a small fraction of them are operational satellites. The remainder is satellites whose missions have ended, rocket bodies, and parts and debris from larger parent objects. And the catalog only contains the biggest and brightest of the objects in orbit. The Low Earth Orbit (LEO) regime where most of this population concentrates is also a regime of incredible interest to astronomers, since it is where flagship missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and other Great Observatories operate. I'll review the current state of knowledge of the orbital debris population, how it has grown with time, and how this environment could affect current and future space telescopes. There are mitigation measures which many spacecraft operators have adopted which can control the growth of the debris population. Orbital debris research at the University of Michigan is funded by NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas.

  8. Modeling UHMWPE wear debris generation.

    PubMed

    Baudriller, H; Chabrand, P; Moukoko, D

    2007-02-01

    It is widely recognized that polyethylene wear debris is one of the main causes of long-term prosthesis loosening. The noxious bioreactivity associated with this debris is determined by its size, shape, and quantity. The aim of this study was to develop a numerical tool that can be used to investigate the primary polyethylene wear mechanisms involved. This model illustrates the formation of varying flow of polyethylene debris with various shapes and sizes caused by elementary mechanical processes. Instead of using the classical continuum mechanics formulation for this purpose, we used a divided materials approach to simulate debris production and release. This approach involves complex nonlinear bulk behaviors, frictional adhesive contact, and characterizes material damage as a loss of adhesion. All the associated models were validated with various benchmark tests. The examples given show the ability of the numerical model to generate debris of various shapes and sizes such as those observed in implant retrieval studies. Most of wear mechanisms such as abrasion, adhesion, and the shearing off of micro-asperities can be described using this approach. Furthermore, it could be applied to study the effects of friction couples, macroscopic geometries, and material processing (e.g. irradiation) on wear. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hydroplaning and submarine debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blasio, Fabio V.; Engvik, Lars; Harbitz, Carl B.; ElverhøI, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Examination of submarine clastic deposits along the continental margins reveals the remnants of holocenic or older debris flows with run-out distances up to hundreds of kilometers. Laboratory experiments on subaqueous debris flows, where typically one tenth of a cubic meter of material is dropped down a flume, also show high velocities and long run-out distances compared to subaerial debris flows. Moreover, they show the tendency of the head of the flow to run out ahead of the rest of the body. The experiments reveal the possible clue to the mechanism of long run-out. This mechanism, called hydroplaning, begins as the dynamic pressure at the front of the debris flow becomes of the order of the pressure exerted by the weight of the sediment. In such conditions a layer of water can intrude under the sediment with a lubrication effect and a decrease in the resistance forces between the sediment and the seabed. A physical-mathematical model of hydroplaning is presented and investigated numerically. The model is applied to both laboratory- and field-scale debris flows. Agreement with laboratory experiments makes us confident in the extrapolation of our model to natural flows and shows that long run-out distances can be naturally attained.

  10. Geosynchronous Earth orbital debris campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Africano, John L.; Sydney, Paul F.; Talent, David L.; Stansbery, Eugene G.; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Monet, David G.; Seitzer, Patrick

    2000-10-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) is conducting systematic searches of the Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) environment as part of an international measurement campaign under the auspices of the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). The objectives for this survey are to determine the extent and character of debris in GEO, buy obtaining distributions for the brightness, inclination, Right Ascension of Ascending Node (RAAN), and mean motion of the debris. The Charged Coupled Device (CCD) Debris Telescope (CDT), an automated 0.32 meter aperture, transportable Schmidt telescope presently located at Cloudcroft, New Mexico, is used nightly to monitor the GEO debris environment. The CDT is equipped with a CCD camera capable of detecting 17th magnitude objects in a 20 second exposure. This corresponds to a 0.6 meter diameter object having a 0.2 albedo at 36000 km. Two other larger telescopes have been used for this purpose, the United States Naval Observatory's new 1.3 meter telescope located in Flagstaff Arizona and a 0.6 m Schmidt telescope located at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) near La Serena Chile. Data reduction and analysis software used to reduce this data exploit tools developed by both the astronomical and DoD communities. These tools and data results are presented.

  11. Optical surveys for space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Space debris—man-made non-functional objects of all sizes in near-Earth space—has been recognized as an increasing threat for current and future space operations. The debris population in near-Earth space has therefore been extensively studied during the last decade. Information on objects at altitudes higher than about 2,000 km is, however, still comparatively sparse. Debris in this region is best detected by surveys utilizing optical telescopes. Moreover, the instruments and the applied observation techniques, as well as the processing methods, have many similarities with those used in optical surveys for ‘astronomical’ objects like near-Earth objects (NEOs). The present article gives a general introduction to the problem of space debris, presents the used observation and processing techniques emphasizing the similarities and differences compared to optical surveys for NEOs, and reviews the results from optical surveys for space debris in high-altitude Earth orbits. Predictions on the influence of space debris on the future of space research and space astronomy in particular are reported as well.

  12. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  13. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  14. Summary of Orbital Debris Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    An Orbital Debris Workshop was conducted in July 1982. The working groups established were related to measurements of large particles, modeling of large particles, measurements of small particles, spacecraft hazard and shielding requirements, and space object management. The results of the Orbital Debris Workshop reaffirm the need for research to better understand the character of orbital debris, its effects on future spacecraft, and the related requirements for policy. A clear charter is required for this research to receive the necessary support, focus, and coordination. It was recommended that NASA assume the role of lead agency. The first task is to develop an overall plan with both Department of Defense and the North American Aerospace Defense Command participation.

  15. Atomic gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, M. J.; Crawford, I. A.; Casassus, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have conducted a search for optical circumstellar absorption lines in the spectra of 16 debris disc host stars. None of the stars in our sample showed signs of emission line activity in either Hα, Ca II or Na I, confirming their more evolved nature. Four stars were found to exhibit narrow absorption features near the cores of the photospheric Ca II and Na I D lines (when Na I D data were available). We analyse the characteristics of these spectral features to determine whether they are of circumstellar or interstellar origins. The strongest evidence for circumstellar gas is seen in the spectrum of HD 110058, which is known to host a debris disc observed close to edge-on. This is consistent with a recent ALMA detection of molecular gas in this debris disc, which shows many similarities to the β Pictoris system.

  16. Space Debris Environent Remediation Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Johnson, N. L.

    2009-03-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also at sizes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. A collisional cascading may ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention.The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities, and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an on-going activity, an IAA study group looks into methods of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial castastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electro-dynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be discussed.

  17. Looking inside a debris flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Sanvitale, Nicoletta; Bird, Joshua

    2014-05-01

    Debris flows, masses of saturated, channelized, granular materials that flow at high speeds downslope, present a hazard to lives and infrastructure in regions of high relief and runoff. They also present a challenge to modelling due to the heterogeneous, multi-phase, nature of the constituent materials, with particles ranging from boulder-size to silt-size and fluid viscosity being altered by the presence of fine particles and clay. As a debris flow travels on its flow path, it will tend to segregate, with larger particles being focused to the flow front and fluid being concentrated in the tail - resulting in different rheological behaviour in time and space. It will also tend to erode and deposit material as it moves through different channel segments or reaches, with this behaviour influenced by the confinement of the channel and the angle of the slope within each reach. Flume studies offer the potential to examine in detail the behaviour of model debris flows within the penultimate and final (deposit fan area) reaches - zones which are generally of most interest in terms of human risk. Flume studies which are conducted using transparent debris offer additional benefits to more traditional methods that use opaque materials, enabling insights to the flow behaviour that are inaccessible via other physical methods. We present flume model work which has been designed to capture some essential aspects of debris flow behaviour using well graded (polydisperse) transparent debris, albeit at reduced scale. These aspects include the final deposit spread or runout increasing for a lower concentration of solids and a higher penultimate reach slope angle, and observable particle size segregation during downslope motion. We present time-varying measurements made internally and externally at a point in the channel via Plane Laser Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV. The measurements enable velocity distributions of the segregating flows over time to be

  18. Debris flow sensitivity to glacial-interglacial climate change - supply vs transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models suggest that small mountain catchment-alluvial fan systems might be sensitive to climate changes over glacial-interglacial cycles, and record these palaeoclimate signals in the sedimentology of their deposits. However, these models are still largely untested, and the propagation of climate signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological records from 8 debris flow fan systems in Owens Valley, California, that capture the past ~ 120 ka of deposition. We identify a strong and sustained relationship between deposit grain size and palaeoclimate records over a full glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits found in warm and dry periods. Our data show that these systems are highly sensitive to climate with a rapid response timescale of < 10ka, which we attribute to rapid transfer from source to sink. This sensitive record might be explained by changes in sediment supply and/or changes in sediment mobilisation, and we evaluate these mechanisms quantitatively. We find little evidence that changes in catchment hypsometry, weathering patterns, past glaciation or sediment production can explain the grain size changes we observe on the fans. However we do find that grain size has increased exponentially with rising temperatures, at a rate that matches the intensification of storms with warming. As these debris flows are triggered by surface runoff during intense storms, we interpret that enhanced runoff rates in warm and stormy conditions are responsible for entraining larger clasts during debris flow initiation. This implies that debris flow fans might record signals of past storm intensity. Our study utilises field sedimentology and focuses on short transport distances (~ 10 km) and climate changes over ~ 1-100 ka timespans, but could additionally have important implications for how eroding landscapes might respond to future warming scenarios. We address the

  19. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  20. Physical Properties of Supraglacial Debris on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M. H.; Carter, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The thickness and physical properties of surface debris preserving glacial ice in the mid-latitudes of Mars is assessed using crater morphology and radar sounding data. We suggest that this debris layer is much thicker than has been hypothesized.

  1. NASA Orbital Debris Requirements and Best Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of orbital debris accumulation is an international and national concern, reflectedin NASA debris limitation requirements. These requirements will be reviewed, along with some practices that can be employed to achieve the requirements.

  2. Debris Flows Within The Greater Caucasus Northern Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panova, S.

    Debris flows are recorded everywhere within the Greater Caucasus northern slope. In last decades studies of debris flows appeared to be very important due to an intensive anthropogenic activity in the mountainous areas. Debris flow spatial distribution, as well as their genesis and means of protection are critical, too. The studied terri- tory has significant absolute altitudes, especially in the central and eastern parts. Also large amount of atmospheric precipitation with maximum in a warm period is typical for the region. Modern glaciation with soil-covered moraine deposits of modern and Holocene age is developed in the region. Geological and geomorphological conditions lead to debris flows formation within the entire territory. However, the amount of atmospheric precipitation drastically decreases from west to east and in the eastern part (Dagestan) debris flow is less active than in the central even under the presence of enormous amounts of loose detrital material of different genesis. In the western part debris flows are less developed due to insignificant altitudes and considerable forest coverage and soil-cover. Powerful modern glaciation with vast development of purely moraine and fluvial-glacial deposits results in intensive debris flow activity in the central part of the northern slope (the Terek river basin). In the upper reaches of all the Terek tributaries moraine deposits reach up to several dozen meters. They are widespread at altitudes higher than 2000 m (above the forest boundary) and almost everywhere uncovered by soils. They are a key source of sediments under debris flow formation. Within the Greater Caucasus northern slope there are 1700 debris flow basins with the total area about 7000 km2. Their average area is 4.0 km2 with minimum 0.20 km2 and maximum 173.8 km2. Moreover, there are many riverbeds in the area where form mountain mud floods more than 3000 km long. Debris flows occur between January and October with clear altitudinal zoning

  3. Space Debris: Its Causes and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2002-01-01

    Orbital debris is internationally recognized as an environmental issue which needs to be addressed today to preserve near-Earth space for future generations. All major space agencies are committed to mitigating the growth of the debris environment. Many commercial space system operators have responded positively to orbital debris mitigation principles and recommendations. Orbital debris mitigation measures are most cost-effective if included in the design development phase.

  4. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American...Examples are the results from the European Space Debris Facility in the Canary Islands, MODEST (the Michigan orbital DEbris Survey Telescope at Cerro ...filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American

  5. Orbital Debris: Cost Impact on Setting Policy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    As the exploration of space increases, the problems associated with orbital debris also increase. 0rbital debris continues to grow at a linear rate...and at worst, unusable. When mitigating orbital debris , cost and policy issues must be addressed. Currently no policy exists that makes the mitigation...of orbital debris mandatory but it only strongly recommends mitigation as long as it is cost effective. This thesis addresses the cost impact of

  6. Comparison on micrometeorology and surface energy fluxes between debris-free and debris-covered glaciers in the southeast Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Yongjie

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of meteorology and energy fluxes on the debris-free and debris-covered glacier is important for understanding how different glaciers behaviors heterogeneous to regional climate change. Based on the observations during 2016 ablation season at the debris-free Parlung No.4 Glacier and the debris-covered 24K Glacier in southeast Tibetan Plateau, a comparative analysis was made to shed light on the micrometeorology and surface energy fluxes and to gain knowledge about the influencing factors controlling melting process at different type glaciers. The meteorological correlations showed that the variables including air temperature, relative humidity and incoming longwave radiation (Lin) display a regionally synchronous pattern, but there are notable differences in precipitation, incoming shortwave radiation (Sin) and wind speed between two glaciers. The most striking is the difference in precipitation, with 5 times larger in the 24K Glacier. The energy fluxes between two glaciers display contrasting pattern due to different surface conditions and monsoonal precipitation. More Sin was absorbed due to lower debris albedo (0.05) In spite of same amount of total Sin and more Lin (W/m2 larger) was supplied from warm and humidity air at the 24K Glacier. However, such excess energy supply was mainly used to warm the debris temperature, leading to the increase of energy output by outgoing longwave radiation and turbulent heat fluxes, rather than glacier melting. These energy outputs are very sensitive to the debris thickness in which is less than 10 cm and the amount of Sin, leading to significant spatial change of underneath ice melting magnitude. At the debris-free surface at AWS of Parlung No.4 Glacier, surface melting is mainly supplied by net shortwave radiation and turbulent sensible heat fluxes (Hse). Comparing with energy fluxes in 2009, the reduced melting energy in 2016 on the debris-free Parlung No.4 Glacier is attributed to the decrease of Sin and Hse by

  7. Applying Knowledge from Terrestrial Debris-Covered Glaciers to Constrain the Evolution of Martian Debris-Covered Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutnik, M. R.; Pathare, A. V.; Todd, C.; Waddington, E.; Christian, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We will discuss the application of terrestrial knowledge on debris emplacement, the effects of debris on glacier-surface topography, debris transport by ice flow, deformation of debris-laden ice, and atmosphere-glacier feedbacks to Mars ice.

  8. The August 2010 Zhouqu debris flow: Likely causes and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Diandong

    2014-05-01

    On August 8, 2010 in the northwestern Chinese province of Gansu, a rainstorm-triggered debris flow devastated the small county of Zhouqu. A modeling study, using a new multiple-phase scalable and extensible geo-fluid model, suggests that the cause is an intersection of several events. These were: a heavy rainstorm, not necessarily the result of global warming, which triggered the landslide and followed a drought that created surface cracks and crevasses; the geology of the region, notably the loess covering heavily weathered surface rock; and the bedrock damage, that deepened the surface crevasses inflicted by the 7.9 magnitude Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008. Deforestation and topsoil erosion were critical contributors to the massive size of the debris flow. The modeling results underscore the urgency for a high priority program of re-vegetation of Zhouqu County, without which the region will remain exposed to future disastrous, 'progressive bulking' type landslides. Debris flows are more predictable types of landslides; consequently, a series of 'pseudo-climate change' model experiments of future extreme precipitation events is carried out using the WRF model, forced by temperature perturbations from an ensemble of climate models. In a likely future warmer climate, extreme precipitation events are anticipated to be more severe, and this study has identified an atmospheric blocking pattern that might produce future extreme precipitation events in the peri-Tibetan Plateau (TP) area (located to the north east of the TP).

  9. Orbital Debris and Future Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the historical and current orbital debris environment. Included is information about: Projected growth of the future debris population, The need for active debris removal (ADR), A grand challenge for the 21st century and The forward path

  10. Microchemical Analysis Of Space Operation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Virginia J.; Kim, Hae Soo

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses techniques used in analyzing debris relative to space shuttle operations. Debris collected from space shuttle, expendable launch vehicles, payloads carried by space shuttle, and payloads carried by expendable launch vehicles. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry, analytical electron microscopy with wavelength-dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction chosen as techniques used in examining samples of debris.

  11. Simulations of SSLV Ascent and Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart; Aftosmis, Michael; Murman, Scott; Chan, William; Gomez, Ray; Gomez, Ray; Vicker, Darby; Stuart, Phil

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Simulation of Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle (SSLV) ascent and debris transport analysis is shown. The topics include: 1) CFD simulations of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle ascent; 2) Debris transport analysis; 3) Debris aerodynamic modeling; and 4) Other applications.

  12. RTF Analysis-Shuttle Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This demo will rewew the findings of the Shuttle's Debris Transport analysis. The demo focuses on aero analysis of the entlre vehicle in ascent (orbiter, SRB and ET together at low Mach number) for debris transoort and determining maximum allowable debris sizes from various sources. We will present analysis results along with performance data of the simulation runs on Supercomputers such as Columbia.

  13. Spaceborne Sensors Track Marine Debris Circulation in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reahard, Ross; Mitchell, Brandie; Lee, Lucas; Pezold, Blaise; Brook, Chris; Mallett, Candis; Barrett, Shelby; Albin, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Marine debris is a problem for coastal areas throughout the world, including the Gulf of Mexico. To aid the NOAA Marine Debris Program in monitoring marine debris dispersal and regulating marine debris practices, sea surface height and height anomaly data provided by the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research at the University of Colorado, Boulder, were utilized to help assess trash and other discarded items that routinely wash ashore in southeastern Texas, at Padre Island National Seashore. These data were generated from the NASA radar altimeter satellites TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason 1, and Jason 2, as well as the European altimeter satellites ERS-1, ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite), and ENVISAT (Environmental Satellite). Sea surface temperature data from MODIS were used to study of the dynamics of the Loop Current. Sea surface height and MODIS data analysis were used to show that warm water in the core of eddies, which periodically separate from the Loop Current, can be as high as 30 cm above the surrounding water. These eddies are known to directly transfer marine debris to the western continental shelf and the elevated area of water can be tracked using satellite radar altimeter data. Additionally, using sea surface height, geostrophic velocity, and particle path data, foretracking and backtracking simulations were created. These simulation runs demonstrated that marine debris on Padre Island National Seashore may arise from a variety of sources, such as commercial fishing/shrimping, the oil and gas industry, recreational boaters, and from rivers that empty into the Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Space Debris Detection and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    7F AD-A282 012 PL.-TR-94-206 Space Debris Detection and Analysis Robert H. Eather Ron Siewert Keo Consultants 27 Irving St. Brookline MA 02146 28...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Keo Consultants 27 Irving St. Brookline MA 02146 9. SPONSORINGI MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING

  15. A Passive Nuclear Debris Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, John J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a nuclear debris collector which removes trace substances from the lower atmosphere during rainfall. Suggests that the collector could be implemented into courses at various educational levels and could result in developing a network for monitoring the geographical extent of nuclear contamination. (Author/SA)

  16. A Passive Nuclear Debris Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, John J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a nuclear debris collector which removes trace substances from the lower atmosphere during rainfall. Suggests that the collector could be implemented into courses at various educational levels and could result in developing a network for monitoring the geographical extent of nuclear contamination. (Author/SA)

  17. THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND {gamma} DORADUS RESOLVED WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Booth, Mark; Kavelaars, J. J.; Koning, Alice; Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Lawler, Samantha M.; Qi, Chenruo; Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Wilner, David J.; Greaves, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of the debris disk around {gamma} Doradus, an F1V star, from the Herschel Key Programme DEBRIS (Disc Emission via Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre). The disk is well resolved at 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m, resolved along its major axis at 250 {mu}m, detected but not resolved at 350 {mu}m, and confused with a background source at 500 {mu}m. It is one of our best resolved targets and we find it to have a radially broad dust distribution. The modeling of the resolved images cannot distinguish between two configurations: an arrangement of a warm inner ring at several AU (best fit 4 AU) and a cool outer belt extending from {approx}55 to 400 AU or an arrangement of two cool, narrow rings at {approx}70 AU and {approx}190 AU. This suggests that any configuration between these two is also possible. Both models have a total fractional luminosity of {approx}10{sup -5} and are consistent with the disk being aligned with the stellar equator. The inner edge of either possible configuration suggests that the most likely region to find planets in this system would be within {approx}55 AU of the star. A transient event is not needed to explain the warm dust's fractional luminosity.

  18. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  19. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  20. HEO space debris orbit predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorowicz, Dorota; Pospieszynski, Remigiusz; Golembiewska, Justyna; Wnuk, Edwin

    2012-07-01

    HEO (Highly Elliptical Orbit) satellites are objects with an elliptic orbit with a low-altitude perigee and a high-altitude apogee. Perigee mainly cross the LEO orbits and apogee reaches regions above GEO orbits. Number of satellites on the orbits are old racket bodies and other space debris. Most of HEO objects has the eccentricity more than 0.7. Many trackable objects are included in the NORAD TLE Catalogue but much more small debris exist which we could not track. Objects on as highly elliptical orbit are very danger for satellites in LEO region because of increasing velocity near the perigee. In order to calculate the trajectory of space debris we have to take into account force model consisting of geopotential, luni-solar effects, solar radiation pressure and for objects with low-altitude of perigee, atmospheric drag. This last perturbation is very important to calculate orbits with high accuracy but also one of the hardest to predict. Many atmospheric space debris objects parameters should be taken into account in this case, but we do not have sufficient data from observations, in particular S/M (area-to-mass) ratio. Fortunately we have some archival data for some debris included in TLE Catalogue, which are very helpful to estimate the approximate value of the parameter. In this paper we present the results of calculations of orbit predictions for short and medium time span (up to several weeks). We tried to designate the S/M parameter for some HEO objects from archival data from the TLE Catalogue and predict its orbital elements for several weeks. With better knowledge about approximate mean value of the S/M parameter we are able to improve the accuracy of predicted orbits.

  1. Detecting debris flows using ground vibrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Debris flows are rapidly flowing mixtures of rock debris, mud, and water that originate on steep slopes. During and following volcanic eruptions, debris flows are among the most destructive and persistent hazards. Debris flows threaten lives and property not only on volcanoes but far downstream in valleys that drain volcanoes where they arrive suddenly and inundate entire valley bottoms. Debris flows can destroy vegetation and structures in their path, including bridges and buildings. Their deposits can cover roads and railways, smother crops, and fill stream channels, thereby reducing their flood-carrying capacity and navigability.

  2. Orbital Debris Research in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Gene

    2009-01-01

    The presentation includes information about growth of the satellite population, the U.S. Space Surveillance Network, tracking and catalog maintenance, Haystack and HAX radar observation, Goldstone radar, the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST), spacecraft surface examinations and sample of space shuttle impacts. GEO/LEO observations from Kwajalein Atoll, NASA s Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2008), a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris Model (LEGEND), Debris Assessment Software (DAS) 2.0, the NASA/JSC BUMPER-II meteoroid/debris threat assessment code, satellite reentry risk assessment, optical size and shape determination, work on more complicated fragments, and spectral studies.

  3. An optimal trajectory design for debris deorbiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Dong, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The problem of deorbiting debris is studied in this paper. As a feasible measure, a disposable satellite would be launched, attach to debris, and deorbit the space debris using a technology named electrodynamic tether (EDT). In order to deorbit multiple debris as many as possible, a suboptimal but feasible and efficient trajectory set has been designed to allow a deorbiter satellite tour the LEO small bodies per one mission. Finally a simulation given by this paper showed that a 600 kg satellite is capable of deorbiting 6 debris objects in about 230 days.

  4. Analysis of Geomorphic and Hydrologic Characteristics of Mount Jefferson Debris Flow, Oregon, November 6, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven; Uhrich, Mark A.; Piatt, David R.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2008-01-01

    On November 6, 2006, a rocky debris flow surged off the western slopes of Mount Jefferson into the drainage basins of Milk and Pamelia Creeks in Oregon. This debris flow was not a singular event, but rather a series of surges of both debris and flooding throughout the day. The event began during a severe storm that brought warm temperatures and heavy rainfall to the Pacific Northwest. Precipitation measurements near Mount Jefferson at Marion Forks and Santiam Junction showed that more than 16.1 centimeters of precipitation fell the week leading up to the event, including an additional 20.1 centimeters falling during the 2 days afterward. The flooding associated with the debris flow sent an estimated 15,500 to 21,000 metric tons, or 9,800 to 13,000 cubic meters, of suspended sediment downstream, increasing turbidity in the North Santiam River above Detroit Lake to an estimated 35,000 to 55,000 Formazin Nephelometric Units. The debris flow started small as rock and ice calved off an upper valley snowfield, but added volume as it eroded weakly consolidated deposits from previous debris flows, pyroclastic flows, and glacial moraines. Mud run-up markings on trees indicated that the flood stage of this event reached depths of at least 2.4 meters. Velocity calculations indicate that different surges of debris flow and flooding reached 3.9 meters per second. The debris flow reworked and deposited material ranging in size from sand to coarse boulders over a 0.1 square kilometer area, while flooding and scouring as much as 0.45 square kilometer. Based on cross-sectional transect measurements recreating pre-event topography and other field measurements, the total volume of the deposit ranged from 100,000 to 240,000 cubic meters.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Debris Flow Force Caused by Climate Change and Its application to Check Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S. D.; Jun, K.; JUN, B. H.; Lee, H. J.; TAK, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to global warming, climate change cause a super hurricane and heavy rainfall frequently. Heavy rainfall cause by debris flow in mountainous terrains, and disasters by debris flow force have continuously increased. The purpose of this study is to analyze the characteristics of debris flow force acting on the check dam. The numerical approach to the debris flow force was performed by the Finite Difference Method (FDM) based on the erosion-deposition combination model including the equation of continuity, mass conservation, and momentum conservation. In order to investigate behavior of the debris flow force according to the variance of supplying water discharge and channel slope angle, a rectangular straight channel and one closed type check dam was set up for conducting numerical simulations. As the supply water discharges increase, the curve of the impact force by debris flow becomes unstable and fluctuation with high impact force occurred as time passes. And the peak impact force showed a steeper slope and appeared more quickly, the high impact force undergoes a fluctuation with high speed, and acting on the check dam. At the mountainous upstream, strong rainfall energy provoke a repeat erosion and deposition which results in debris flow force causing much damage along the check dam at the mountainous place. The analyses of the present study help provide information to predict future debris flow force and how to design for the check dam. This research was supported by a grant [MPSS-NH-2014-74] through the Disaster and Safety Management Institute funded by Ministry of Public Safety and Security of Korean government

  6. Orbiting space debris: Dangers, measurement and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ross T.

    1992-06-01

    Space debris is a growing environmental problem. Accumulation of objects in earth orbit threatens space systems through the possibility of collisions and runaway debris multiplication. The amount of debris in orbit is uncertain due to the lack of information on the population of debris between 1 and 10 centimeters diameter. Collisions with debris even smaller than 1 cm can be catastrophic due to the high orbital velocities involved. Research efforts are under way at NASA, United States Space Command and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to detect and catalog the debris population in near-earth space. Current international and national laws are inadequate to control the proliferation of space debris. Space debris is a serious problem with large economic, military, technical and diplomatic components. Actions need to be taken now to: determine the full extent of the orbital debris problem; accurately predict the future evolution of the debris population; decide the extent of the debris mitigation procedures required; implement these policies on a global basis via an international treaty. Action must be initiated now, before the loss of critical space systems such as the space shuttle or the space station.

  7. Orbiting space debris: Dangers, measurement, and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ross T.

    1992-01-01

    Space debris is a growing environmental problem. Accumulation of objects in Earth orbit threatens space systems through the possibility of collisions and runaway debris multiplication. The amount of debris in orbit is uncertain due to the lack of information on the population of debris between 1 and 10 centimeters diameter. Collisions with debris even smaller than 1 cm can be catastrophic due to the high orbital velocities involved. Research efforts are under way at NASA, Unites States Space Command and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to detect and catalog the debris population in near-Earth space. Current international and national laws are inadequate to control the proliferation of space debris. Space debris is a serious problem with large economic, military, technical, and diplomatic components. Actions need to be taken now for the following reasons: determine the full extent of the orbital debris problem; accurately predict the future evolution of the debris population; decide the extent of the debris mitigation procedures required; implement these policies on a global basis via an international treaty. Action must be initiated now, before the the loss of critical space systems such as the Space Shuttle or the Space Station.

  8. Supraglacial lakes on Himalayan debris-covered glacier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, A.; Fujita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in many of the world's mountain ranges, including in the Himalayas. Himalayan debris-covered glacier also contain abundant glacial lakes, including both proglacial and supraglacial types. We have revealed that heat absorption through supraglacial lakes was about 7 times greater than that averaged over the whole debris-covered zone. The heat budget analysis elucidated that at least half of the heat absorbed through the water surface was released with water outflow from the lakes, indicating that the warm water enlarge englacial conduits and produce internal ablation. We observed some portions at debris-covered area has caved at the end of melting season, and ice cliff has exposed at the side of depression. Those depression has suggested that roof of expanded water channels has collapsed, leading to the formation of ice cliffs and new lakes, which would accelerate the ablation of debris-covered glaciers. Almost glacial lakes on the debris-covered glacier are partially surrounded by ice cliffs. We observed that relatively small lakes had non-calving, whereas, calving has occurred at supraglacial lakes with fetch larger than 80 m, and those lakes expand rapidly. In the Himalayas, thick sediments at the lake bottom insulates glacier ice and lake water, then the lake water tends to have higher temperature (2-4 degrees C). Therefore, thermal undercutting at ice cliff is important for calving processes in the glacial lake expansion. We estimated and subaqueous ice melt rates during the melt and freeze seasons under simple geomorphologic conditions. In particular, we focused on valley wind-driven water currents in various fetches during the melt season. Our results demonstrate that the subaqueous ice melt rate exceeds the ice-cliff melt rate above the water surface when the fetch is larger than 20 m with the water temperature of 2-4 degrees C. Calculations suggest that onset of calving due to thermal undercutting is controlled by water

  9. The fast debris evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  10. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  11. Global Warming Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Philip D.; Wigley, Tom M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the analysis of land and marine records from the past century are presented. It is indicated that the planet earth has warmed about one-half of a degree celsius. The uncertainty of these measurements and future warming trends are discussed. (CW)

  12. Warm-Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingguang, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how warm-up activities can help to make the English-as-a-foreign-language classroom a lively and interesting place. Warm-up activities are games carried out at the beginning of each class to motivate students to make good use of class time. (Author/VWL)

  13. Global Warming Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Philip D.; Wigley, Tom M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the analysis of land and marine records from the past century are presented. It is indicated that the planet earth has warmed about one-half of a degree celsius. The uncertainty of these measurements and future warming trends are discussed. (CW)

  14. Comparison of space debris estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.P.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    Debris is thought to be a hazard to space systems through impact and cascading. The current environment is assessed as not threatening to defense systems. Projected reductions in launch rates to LEO should delay concerns for centuries. There is agreement between AFSPC and NASA analyses on catalogs and collision rates, but not on fragmentation rates. Experiments in the laboratory, field, and space are consistent with AFSPC estimates of the number of fragments per collision. A more careful treatment of growth rates greatly reduces long-term stability issues. Space debris has not been shown to be an issue in coming centuries; thus, it does not appear necessary for the Air Force to take additional steps to mitigate it.

  15. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  16. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  17. Workers Search for Columbia's Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Members of a US Forest Service search team walk a grid during a Columbia recovery search near the Hemphill, Texas site. The group is accompanied by a space program worker able to identify potential hazards of Shuttle parts. Workers from every NASA Center and numerous federal, state, and local agencies searched for Columbia's debris in the recovery effort. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation

  18. Net Catches Debris From Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B.; Schneider, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Device restrains fragments and absorbs their kinetic energy. Net of stitched webbing folds compactly over honeycomb plug. Attaches to frame mounted on wall around rectangular area to be cut out by explosion. Honeycomb panel absorbs debris from explosion and crumples into net. Dissipates energy by ripping about 9 in. of stitched net. Developed for emergency escape system in Space Shuttle, adaptable to restraint belts for vehicles; subjecting passengers to more gradual deceleration and less shock.

  19. Comparison of debris flux models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdunnus, H.; Beltrami, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Matney, M.; Nazarenko, A.; Wegener, P.

    The availability of models to estimate the impact risk from the man-made space debris and the natural meteoroid environment is essential for both, manned and unmanned satellite missions. Various independent tools based on different approaches have been developed in the past years. Due to an increased knowledge of the debris environment and its sources e.g. from improved measurement capabilities, these models could be updated regularly, providing more detailed and more reliable simulations. This paper addresses an in-depth, quantitative comparison of widely distributed debris flux models which were recently updated, namely ESA's MASTER 2001 model, NASA's ORDEM 2000 and the Russian SDPA 2000 model. The comparison was performed in the frame of the work of the 20t h Interagency Debris Coordination (IADC) meeting held in Surrey, UK. ORDEM 2000ORDEM 2000 uses careful empirical estimates of the orbit populations based onthree primary data sources - the US Space Command Catalog, the H ystackaRadar, and the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft returned surfaces.Further data (e.g. HAX and Goldstone radars, impacts on Shuttle windows andradiators, and others) were used to adjust these populations for regions in time,size, and space not covered by the primary data sets. Some interpolation andextrapolation to regions with no data (such as projections into the future) wasprovided by the EVOLVE model. MASTER 2001The ESA MASTER model offers a full three dimensional description of theterrestrial debris distribution reaching from LEO up to the GEO region. Fluxresults relative to an orbiting target or to an inertial volume can be resolved intosource terms, impactor characteristics and orbit, as well as impact velocity anddirection. All relevant debris source terms are considered by the MASTERmodel. For each simulated source, a corresponding debris generation model interms of mass/diameter distribution, additional velocities, and directionalspreading has been developed. A

  20. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  1. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Mann, B.; Read, M.; Kerr, T.; Irwin, M.; Cross, N.; Bold, M.,; Varricatt, W.; Madsen, G.

    2014-09-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU. This paper will present the January and February results of the orbital debris surveys with WFCAM.

  2. Lightcurves of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Meng, Huan; Su, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We have recently discovered that some planetary debris disks with extreme fractional luminosities are variable on the timescale of a few years. This behavior opens a new possibility to understand planet building. Two of the known variable disks are around solar-like stars in the age range of 30 to 100+ Myr, which is the expected era of the final stages of terrestrial planet building. Such variability can be attributed to violent collisions (up to ones on the scale of the Moon-forming event between the proto-Earth and another proto-planet). The collisional cascades that are the aftermaths of these events can produce large clouds of tiny dust grains, possibly even condensed from silica vapor. A Spitzer pilot program has obtained the lightcurve of such a debris disk and caught two minor outbursts. Here we propose to continue the lightcurve monitoring with higher sampling rates and to expand it to more disks. The proposed time domain observations are a new dimension of debris disk studies that can bring unique insight to their evolution, providing important constraints on the collisional and dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation.

  3. Glacier Debris Cover Variation in the Hindu Kush and Karakoram Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroder, J.; Bishop, M.; Haritashya, U.; Olsenholler, J.; Bulley, H.; Sartan, J.

    2006-12-01

    Alpine glaciers in the Hindu Kush of Afghanistan and the Western Himalaya of Pakistan are heavily debris- covered and exhibit high spatial distribution and depth variability. This property of a glacier surface plays a major role in the energy balance and partially controls the ablation rate. Consequently as the GLIMS Regional Center for Southwest Asia, we wanted to determine if climate forcing and thinning glaciers would generate more debris cover that would have an influence on the mass- balance gradient. Therefore, we conducted a multi-temporal study of debris cover variation on selected glaciers using satellite imagery. Specifically, co-registered, multi-decadal satellite imagery (Landsat ETM, TM, MSS and ASTER) were orthorectified and overlaid, from which cloud-free, snow-free subareas of the glaciers were identified. Visual and quantitative comparisons were performed on 20 small glaciers and ice- cored rock glaciers in Afghanistan, and the Batura, Biafo, and Baltoro glaciers of the Karakoram, and Raikot and Buldar glaciers in the Nanga Parbat Himalaya in Pakistan. All subareas were classified using the ISODATA clustering algorithm. Comparison complexities caused by temporally irregular variations in satellite coverage through the ablation season make interpretation difficult. Nonetheless, our results indicate a general debris-cover increase through time, as would be expected in a climatic-warming scenario. For example, the small glaciers of the Hindu Kush are down-wasting and back-wasting where they are mostly clean ice, but where they are mostly debris covered the change is less visible. In the Karakoram multiple white-ice streams from ice falls flow down-glacier, interspersed with multiple high standing or ribbed medial moraines between. These medial moraines progressively converge down-glacier to form a continuous debris cover that itself looses its ribbed character and down-wastes into a chaotic terrain of hummocks, hollows, and supraglacial lakes. The

  4. Effects of Debris Flows on Stream Ecosystems of the Klamath Mountains, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, M. R.; Delafuente, J. A.; Resh, V. H.

    2006-12-01

    We examined the long-term effects of debris flows on channel characteristics and aquatic food webs in steep (0.04-0.06 slope), small (4-6 m wide) streams. A large rain-on-snow storm event in January 1997 resulted in numerous landslides and debris flows throughout many basins in the Klamath Mountains of northern California. Debris floods resulted in extensive impacts throughout entire drainage networks, including mobilization of valley floor deposits and removal of vegetation. Comparing 5 streams scoured by debris flows in 1997 and 5 streams that had not been scoured as recently, we determined that debris-flows decreased channel complexity by reducing alluvial step frequency and large woody debris volumes. Unscoured streams had more diverse riparian vegetation, whereas scoured streams were dominated by dense, even-aged stands of white alder (Alnus rhombiflia). Benthic invertebrate shredders, especially nemourid and peltoperlid stoneflies, were more abundant and diverse in unscoured streams, reflecting the more diverse allochthonous resources. Debris flows resulted in increased variability in canopy cover, depending on degree of alder recolonization. Periphyton biomass was higher in unscoured streams, but primary production was greater in the recently scoured streams, suggesting that invertebrate grazers kept algal assemblages in an early successional state. Glossosomatid caddisflies were predominant scrapers in scoured streams; heptageniid mayflies were abundant in unscoured streams. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were of similar abundance in scoured and unscoured streams, but scoured streams were dominated by young-of-the-year fish while older juveniles were more abundant in unscoured streams. Differences in the presence of cold-water (Doroneuria) versus warm-water (Calineuria) perlid stoneflies suggest that debris flows have altered stream temperatures. Debris flows have long-lasting impacts on stream communities, primarily through the cascading effects of

  5. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Debris Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Kristin; Kanner, Howard; Yu, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident revealed a fundamental problem of the Space Shuttle Program regarding debris. Prior to the tragedy, the Space Shuttle requirement stated that no debris should be liberated that would jeopardize the flight crew and/or mission success. When the accident investigation determined that a large piece of foam debris was the primary cause of the loss of the shuttle and crew, it became apparent that the risk and scope of - damage that could be caused by certain types of debris, especially - ice and foam, were not fully understood. There was no clear understanding of the materials that could become debris, the path the debris might take during flight, the structures the debris might impact or the damage the impact might cause. In addition to supporting the primary NASA and USA goal of returning the Space Shuttle to flight by understanding the SRB debris environment and capability to withstand that environment, the SRB debris assessment project was divided into four primary tasks that were required to be completed to support the RTF goal. These tasks were (1) debris environment definition, (2) impact testing, (3) model correlation and (4) hardware evaluation. Additionally, the project aligned with USA's corporate goals of safety, customer satisfaction, professional development and fiscal accountability.

  6. Behavior of tethered debris with flexible appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanov, Vladimir S.; Yudintsev, Vadim V.

    2014-11-01

    Active exploration of the space leads to growth of a near-Earth space pollution. The frequency of the registered collisions of space debris with functional satellites highly increased during last 10 years. As a rule a large space debris can be observed from the Earth and catalogued, then it is possible to avoid collision with the active spacecraft. However every large debris is a potential source of a numerous small debris particles. To reduce debris population in the near Earth space the large debris should be removed from working orbits. The active debris removal technique is considered that intend to use a tethered orbital transfer vehicle, or a space tug attached by a tether to the space debris. This paper focuses on the dynamics of the space debris with flexible appendages. Mathematical model of the system is derived using the Lagrange formalism. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the mutual influence of the oscillations of flexible appendages and the oscillations of a tether. It is shown that flexible appendages can have a significant influence on the attitude motion of the space debris and the safety of the transportation process.

  7. Debris Flow Gullies at the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska: Implications for Analogous Features on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, D. M.; Dinwiddie, C. L.; Mcginnis, R. N.; Smart, K. J.; Roberts, M.

    2011-12-01

    Debris flows with fresh-appearing gullies or erosion tracks occur on the slopes of several mid- to high-latitude dune fields in both Martian hemispheres. These features originate in alcoves near dune crests, become channelized down lee faces, and terminate with depositional fans. They bear a striking resemblance to small meltwater-induced debris flows observed on the lee slopes of large dunes at the 67 degrees N latitude Great Kobuk Sand Dunes (GKSD), Kobuk Valley National Park, Alaska. The high-latitude, cold-climate GKSD are an optimal terrestrial system within which to conduct a Mars analog study focused on understanding the integrated factors that cause alluvial debris flows to initiate on the lee slopes of aeolian dunes. Debris flow processes in the GKSD are activated by seasonal thawing and consist of a mixture of sand and liquid water cascading down the dune slipface. A distinguishing environmental attribute that separates cold-climate dune fields from temperate and warm-climate dune fields is the seasonal and prolonged occurrence of snow and ice. Cold region dunes often include niveo-aeolian deposits composed of interbedded sand, snow, and ice. The GKSD are variably affected by snowcover for ~70% of each year, which likely has direct analogy to hydrocryospheric factors that influence debris flow development on Mars. Melting and/or sublimation of snow and ice during warm periods cause distinctive morphologic and sedimentologic phenomena ascribed as denivation features or forms, including spongy and hummocky surfaces, tensional cracks, deformed strata, slumping, and compressional structures. We observed small debris flows, niveo-aeolian deposits, and denivation features in the GKSD during fieldwork in March 2010. Wind-transported sand and snow accumulated on the lee slopes of large transverse, longitudinal, and barchanoid dunes. Snow banks with intercalated sand layers are especially prominent and thickest near the top of westward-facing lee slopes at the

  8. Debris Flow Distributed Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoretti, C.

    The debris flow distributed propagation model is a DEM-based model. The fan is dis- cretized by square cells and each cell is assigned an altitude on the sea level. The cells of the catchment are distinguished in two categories: the source cells and the stripe cells. The source cells receive the input hydograph: the cells close to the torrent which are flooded by the debris flow overflowing the torrent embankment are source cells. The stripes cells are the cells flooded by debris flow coming from the surrounding cells. At the first time step only the source cells are flooded by debris flow coming from the torrent. At the second time step a certain number of cells are flooded by de- bris flow coming from the source cells. These cells constitute a stripe of cells and are assigned order two. At the third time step another group of cells are flooded by the debris flow coming from the cells whose order is two. These cells constitute another stripe and are assigned order three. The cell order of a stripe is the time step number corresponding to the transition from dry to flooded state. The mass transfer or mo- mentum exchange between cells is governed by two different mechanisms. The mass transfer is allowed only by a positive or equal to zero flow level difference between the drained cell and the receiving cell. The mass transfer is limited by a not negative final flow level difference between the drained cell and the receiving cells. This limitation excludes the case of possible oscillations in the mass transfer. Another limitation is that the mass drained by a cell should be less than the available mass in that cell. This last condition provides the respect of mass conservation. The first mechanism of mass transfer is the gravity. The mass in a cell is transferred to the neighbouring cells with lower altitude and flow level according to an uniform flow law: The second mecha- nism of mass transfer is the broad crested weir. The mass in a cell is transferred to the

  9. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  10. Rapids configuration and flow dynamics at Warm Springs Rapid on the Yampa River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, L.A.; Wohl, E.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Debris flows from the mouths of tributaries form the majority of the rapids in the Green and Colorado River systems. On June 10, 1965, a large debris flow dammed the Yampa River at Warm Springs Draw in Dinosaur National Monument, depositing nearly 10,000 metric tons of gravel and boulders in the river channel and forming Warm Springs Rapid. The Yampa River is the only river in the Colorado River system that is unregulated, and thus provides one of the few opportunities to study a canyon system under natural flow conditions. Kieffer (1985) has proposed that the configuration of a debris fan-rapid represents the interactions between the sediment characteristics (grain size, cementation) of the debris flow, the hydraulic conditions within the construction (roughness, velocities, channel dimensions), and the discharge history of the river since its modification. Warm Springs Rapid currently exhibits a constriction width to upstream channel width ratio of 0.59. Discharges on the Yampa River for June of 1965 averaged 420 m[sup 3]/sec. Estimates of the mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) through the initial channel constriction show that critical threshold velocities for sediment transport were reached for the range of boulder sizes contained in the debris fan (intermediate axis = 20--200 cm). However, the width and configuration of the present channel constriction could not have been formed by these flows. A discharge of 940 m[sup 3]/sec was recorded on the Yampa River on May 18, 1984. Mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) associated with a discharge of this magnitude may have been competent to erode the channel into its present configuration. Step-backwater modeling will be used to simulate the modification of Warm Springs Rapid through time and to quantify the exact relationship between the morphologic and hydraulic conditions in the evolution of a debris fan-rapid.

  11. The increasing wildfire and post-fire debris-flow threat in western USA, and implications for consequences of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; DeGraff, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    In southern California and the intermountain west of the USA, debris flows generated from recently-burned basins pose significant hazards. Increases in the frequency and size of wildfires throughout the western USA can be attributed to increases in the number of fire ignitions, fire suppression practices, and climatic influences. Increased urbanization throughout the western USA, combined with the increased wildfire magnitude and frequency, carries with it the increased threat of subsequent debris-flow occurrence. Differences between rainfall thresholds and empirical debris-flow susceptibility models for southern California and the intermountain west indicate a strong influence of climatic and geologic settings on post-fire debris-flow potential. The linkages between wildfires, debris-flow occurrence, and global warming suggests that the experiences in the western United States are highly likely to be duplicated in many other parts of the world, and necessitate hazard assessment tools that are specific to local climates and physiographies.

  12. Orbital debris characterization with impact flash signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.

    1991-12-31

    Orbital debris is recognized as a serious and growing threat to man`s utilization and exploration of space. While some information is available on the material composition of orbital debris, most measurements of orbital debris size and velocity distributions do not distinguish material type. The analysis and understanding of impact flash signatures can lead to an in-situ detector system with the ability to determine size and impact velocity distribution for orbital debris segregated by material type. This detector concept is based on an understanding of how material shock properties govern the flash signature arising from the impact of a piece of orbital debris (impactor) against a witness plate (target). Analytical results are presented that identify the most promising witness plate materials with respect to producing impact flash signatures that characterize the orbital debris material. 7 refs.

  13. Orbital debris characterization with impact flash signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Orbital debris is recognized as a serious and growing threat to man's utilization and exploration of space. While some information is available on the material composition of orbital debris, most measurements of orbital debris size and velocity distributions do not distinguish material type. The analysis and understanding of impact flash signatures can lead to an in-situ detector system with the ability to determine size and impact velocity distribution for orbital debris segregated by material type. This detector concept is based on an understanding of how material shock properties govern the flash signature arising from the impact of a piece of orbital debris (impactor) against a witness plate (target). Analytical results are presented that identify the most promising witness plate materials with respect to producing impact flash signatures that characterize the orbital debris material. 7 refs.

  14. Orbital debris: Technical issues and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    An international conference on orbital debris sponsored jointly by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, NASA, and the Department of Defense, was held in Baltimore, Maryland, 16-19 Apr. 1990. Thirty-three papers were presented. The papers were grouped into the areas of measurements, modeling, and implications of orbital debris for space flight. New radar and optical measurements of orbital debris were presented that showed the existence of a large population of small debris. Modeling of potential future environments showed that runaway growth of the debris population from random collisions was a real possibility. New techniques for shielding against orbital debris and methods for removal of satellites from orbit were discussed.

  15. Debris impact on Earth-orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation of Earth-orbiting space debris leads to important new design considerations. Some 5,000 orbiting objects, many of them explosion fragments, are currently being tracked and future collision of these objects with each other is predicted. These collisions will occur at high velocities. Each collision will be explosive, ejecting thousands, of new orbiting objects, in turn increasing the frequency of future collisions. The debris population may thus become self-regenerative, and the future flux of orbiting debris will exceed that of meteoroids. As a result, a large space structure in Earth-orbit for several years has a significant probability of impact by debris objects. As a design problem, debris impact is significantly different from meteoroid impact. Protection against such large objects may require structural measures. The consideration of debris impact in the design of large, Earth-orbiting spacecraft is recommended.

  16. Evaluating tsunami hazards from debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows that enter water bodies may have significant kinetic energy, some of which is transferred to water motion or waves that can impact shorelines and structures. The associated hazards depend on the location of the affected area relative to the point at which the debris flow enters the water. Three distinct regions (splash zone, near field, and far field) may be identified. Experiments demonstrate that characteristics of the near field water wave, which is the only coherent wave to emerge from the splash zone, depend primarily on debris flow volume, debris flow submerged time of motion, and water depth at the point where debris flow motion stops. Near field wave characteristics commonly may be used as & proxy source for computational tsunami propagation. This result is used to assess hazards associated with potential debris flows entering a reservoir in the northwestern USA. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  17. The impact of debris on marine life.

    PubMed

    Gall, S C; Thompson, R C

    2015-03-15

    Marine debris is listed among the major perceived threats to biodiversity, and is cause for particular concern due to its abundance, durability and persistence in the marine environment. An extensive literature search reviewed the current state of knowledge on the effects of marine debris on marine organisms. 340 original publications reported encounters between organisms and marine debris and 693 species. Plastic debris accounted for 92% of encounters between debris and individuals. Numerous direct and indirect consequences were recorded, with the potential for sublethal effects of ingestion an area of considerable uncertainty and concern. Comparison to the IUCN Red List highlighted that at least 17% of species affected by entanglement and ingestion were listed as threatened or near threatened. Hence where marine debris combines with other anthropogenic stressors it may affect populations, trophic interactions and assemblages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reconciling Warming Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew T.; Tsigaridis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Climate models projected stronger warming over the past 15 years than has been seen in observations. Conspiring factors of errors in volcanic and solar inputs, representations of aerosols, and El NiNo evolution, may explain most of the discrepancy.

  19. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  20. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.

    1995-03-01

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  1. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  2. Warm core rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Gulf stream phenomena have been the focus of numerous studies by U.S. and Canadian oceanographic laboratories. Two years ago, observations of warm core rings associated with the Gulf Stream were reported in The Oceanography Report, (November 2, 1982, p. 834). It was noted then that the structure of warm core rings can undergo rapid transformation. Recently, a multidisciplinary group of physical and biological oceanographic institutions has examined the evolution of warm core rings in detail [Nature, 308, pp. 837-840, 1984]. The study has involved research vessels Endeavor, Atlantis II, and Albatross IV for surface measurements of temperature, salinity, and for measurement surface pigments to assess the concentration of marine plants. The results are that even though warm core rings are often very stable, undergoing only slow changes, it turns out that major alterations in structure can and do occur in short periods of 2-5 days.

  3. Debris Removal: An Opportunity for Cooperative Research?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    Space debris mitigation practices will be insufficient to prevent the continued growth of the Earth satellite population. Removal of orbital debris can improve the reliability of present and future space systems. The challenges of developing an effective, affordable debris removal capability are considerable. The time is right for a new look at space remediation concepts. In concert with or following the current IAA study An international approach to the remediation of the near-Earth space environment will likely be required.

  4. Orbiting Space Debris: Dangers, Measurement and Mitigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    B.5 Raw Video Signal of Debris Streak - Single Frame 281 Figure B.6 50 Shifted and Added Video Frames After 282 Background Subtraction Figure B.7...caused collisions. The leading candidate for a hyper-velocity collision with debris is the Cosmos 1275 fragmentation in 1981 which created 281 ...sensitivity. 280 SA ~ .0 . n I I4 MOM- Figure B.5 Raw Video Signal of Debris Streak - Single Frame 281 Figure B.6 50 Shifted and Added Video Frames After

  5. Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams.

    Treesearch

    S.T. Lancaster; G.E. Grant

    2005-01-01

    In forested, mountain landscapes where debris flows are common, valley-spanning debris dams formed by debris-flow deposition are a common feature of headwater valleys. In this paper, we examine how wood and boulder steps, i.e., debris dams, affect longitudinal profile relief and gradient at the debris-flow-fluvial transition in three sites in the Oregon Coast Range,...

  6. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  7. Variations in debris distribution and thickness on Himalayan debris-covered glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Morgan; Rowan, Ann; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Quincey, Duncan; Glasser, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Many Himalayan glaciers are characterised by extensive supraglacial debris coverage; in Nepal 33% of glaciers exhibit a continuous layer of debris covering their ablation areas. The presence of such a debris layer modulates a glacier's response to climatic change. However, the impact of this modulation is poorly constrained due to inadequate quantification of the impact of supraglacial debris on glacier surface energy balance. Few data exist to describe spatial and temporal variations in parameters such as debris thickness, albedo and surface roughness in energy balance calculations. Consequently, improved understanding of how debris affects Himalayan glacier ablation requires the assessment of surface energy balance model sensitivity to spatial and temporal variability in these parameters. Measurements of debris thickness, surface temperature, reflectance and roughness were collected across Khumbu Glacier during the pre- and post-monsoon seasons of 2014 and 2015. The extent of the spatial variation in each of these parameters are currently being incorporated into a point-based glacier surface energy balance model (CMB-RES, Collier et al., 2014, The Cryosphere), applied on a pixel-by-pixel basis to the glacier surface, to ascertain the sensitivity of glacier surface energy balance and ablation values to these debris parameters. A time series of debris thickness maps have been produced for Khumbu Glacier over a 15-year period (2000-2015) using Mihalcea et al.'s (2008, Cold Reg. Sci. Technol.) method, which utilised multi-temporal ASTER thermal imagery and our in situ debris surface temperature and thickness measurements. Change detection between these maps allowed the identification of variations in debris thickness that could be compared to discrete measurements, glacier surface velocity and morphology of the debris-covered area. Debris thickness was found to vary spatially between 0.1 and 4 metres within each debris thickness map, and temporally on the order of 1

  8. Primary dispersal of supraglacial debris and debris cover formation on alpine glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkbride, M. P.; Deline, P.

    2009-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are receiving increased attention due to the modulation of runoff by supraglacial covers, and to the lake outburst flood hazard at many covered glacier termini. Observed increases in debris cover extents cannot presently be explained in terms of glaciological influences. The supply of englacial debris to the supraglacial zone has previously been understood only in terms of local dispersal due to differential ablation between covered and uncovered ice, for example on medial moraines. Here, we introduce the term primary dispersal to describe the process of migration of the outcrops of angled debris septa across melting, thinning ablation zones. Understanding primary debris dispersal is an essential step to understanding how supraglacial debris cover is controlled by glaciological variables, and hence is sensitive to climatically-induced fluctuation. Three measures of a glacier's ability to evacuate supraglacial debris are outlined: (1) a concentration factor describing the focussing of englacial debris into specific supraglacial mass loads; (2) the rate of migration of a septum outcrop relative to the local ice surface; and (3) a downstream velocity differential between a septum outcrop and the ice surface. (1) and (2) are inversely related, while (3) increases downglacier to explain why slow-moving, thinning ice rapidly becomes debris covered. Data from Glacier d'Estelette (Italian Alps) illustrate primary dispersal processes at a site where debris cover is increasing in common with many other shrinking alpine glaciers. We develop a model of the potential for debris cover formation and growth in different glaciological environments. This explains why glaciers whose termini are obstructed often have steep debris septa feeding debris covers which vary slowly in response to mass balance change. In contrast, at glaciers with gently-dipping debris-bearing foliation, the debris cover extent is sensitive to glaciological change. These findings

  9. Debris Selection and Optimal Path Planning for Debris Removal on the SSO: Impulsive-Thrust Option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olympio, J. T.; Frouvelle, N.

    2013-08-01

    The current paper deals with the mission design of a generic active space debris removal spacecraft. Considered debris are all on a sun-synchronous orbit. A perturbed Lambert's problem, modelling the transfer between two debris, is devised to take into account J2 perturbation, and to quickly evaluate mission scenarios. A robust approach, using techniques of global optimisation, is followed to find optimal debris sequence and mission strategy. Manoeuvres optimization is then performed to refine the selected trajectory scenarii.

  10. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  11. Space debris measurement program at Phillips Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dao, Phan D.; Mcnutt, Ross T.

    1992-01-01

    Ground-based optical sensing was identified as a technique for measuring space debris complementary to radar in the critical debris size range of 1 to 10 cm. The Phillips Laboratory is building a staring optical sensor for space debris measurement and considering search and track optical measurement at additional sites. The staring sensor is implemented in collaboration with Wright Laboratory using the 2.5 m telescope at Wright Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio. The search and track sensor is designed to detect and track orbital debris in tasked orbits. A progress report and a discussion of sensor performance and search and track strategies will be given.

  12. Space debris mitigation measures in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthy, V.; Ganeshan, A. S.

    2006-02-01

    The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) recognizes the importance of the current space debris scenario, and the impact it has on the effective utilization of space technology for the improvement in the quality of life on the Earth. ISRO is committed to effective management of the threats due to space debris. Towards this commitment ISRO works on different aspects of space debris, including the debris mitigation measures. This paper highlights the activities and achievements in the implementation of the mitigation measures. ISRO successfully designed and developed a propellant venting system for implementation in the existing upper stage of India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), which uses Earth-storable liquid propellants. GSLV also employs passivation of the Cryogenic Upper Stage at the end of its useful mission. ISRO's communication satellites in GSO are designed with adequate propellant margins for re-orbiting at the end of their useful life to a higher graveyard orbit. A typical successful operation in connection with INSAT-2C is described. ISRO developed its debris environmental models and software to predict the close approach of any of the debris to the functional satellites. The software are regularly used for the debris risk management of the orbiting spacecraft and launch vehicles. ISRO recognizes the role of international cooperation in the debris mitigation measures and actively contributes to the efforts of the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) and United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS).

  13. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

  14. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

  15. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention,...

  16. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention,...

  17. Columbia Debris - Congressman Dave Weldon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-20

    Congressman Dave Weldon (second from right) looks over the pieces of Columbia debris stored in the RLV Hangar. At right is Steve Altemus, Space Shuttle test director . Accompanying Weldon are (left toright) Greg Katnick, Grant Case, J.B. Kump and Center Director Roy Bridges. Workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter as part of the ongoing investigation of the accident that destroyed the Columbia and claimed the lives of seven astronauts as they returned to Earth after a 16-day research mission, STS-107.

  18. Improved Quantitative Debris Monitoring Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    voltage increase. A rate increase of the output was expected. The results were inconclusive because the oil contained 12 - r b a large amount of the 10...34ME%7A= - %ZT.ATQf This research was partially funded by the in-house 1 rdt )eri (lent research fund. 𔃻 CCSATI CODIES a S%.9jECT bE~,ohq. n~f...q.-bwrI This report describes the operation and performance evaluation results of a QDmi Mark TI prototype fine ferrous debris monitoring system

  19. The Fast Debris Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Hugh G.; Swinerd, Graham; Newland, Rebecca; Saunders, Arrun

    The ‘Particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent (1992) removed the need for computerintensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FaDE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects (˜ 10 cm) are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent (1992) based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FaDE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FaDE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using Javascript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FaDE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ˜ 10 cm low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model. The results demonstrate that the FaDE model is able to capture comparable time-series of collisions and number of objects as predicted by DAMAGE in several scenarios. Further, and perhaps more importantly

  20. Processes of mass loss on a debris covered glacier determined by high resolution DEM differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Sarah; Benn, Doug I.; Mertes, Jordan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the response of debris-covered glaciers to climatic warming has seen significant disscussion. The insulating properties of a debris layer (> 5-6 cm) are well established however, in the Himalayas regionally averaged thinning rates, based on satellite laser altimetry, were found to be very similar on both debris-covered, and clean ice glaciers in the Himalayas. Overall mass loss rates on large debris covered glaciers have been discussed in conjunction with supraglacial lake development and growth but the processes involved in downwasting are often numerous and complex. Here we report on mass loss measurements, from a combination of in situ lake surveys and remote sensing, on large debris covered glacier in the Khumbu Himal Nepal. Lake bathymetry sonar surveys were conducted in the winter of 2009 and 2012, and GeoEye-1 stereo imagery was acquired in 2010 and 2012. The temporal data sets were combined and differencd to allow detailed investigation of glacial surface change over the 2 year period. Ngozumpa Glacier has a stagnant ice tongue extending down to ~4650 m asl, the lower 15 km of which is debris covered. This debris covered region is highly irregular with many hollows occupied by studded with numerous supraglacial ponds and lakes. In the early 1990s a base level lake was identified ~1 km from the glacier terminus. Our results show a highly complex pattern of glacial downwasting and lake change. Numerous examples of rapid supra glacial growth and drainage are evident, including the formation and enlargement of lakes along preexisting structures such as relic englacial drainage conduits. However, also in evidence are areas of significant lake shrinkage due to sedimentation and lake shore debris collapse. In addition to lake induced mass loss a background downwasting rate of ~ 0.5 m a-1 is evident in the lower ablation area where debris thicknesses are known to be between 1-3 m thick. The results illustrate the highly complex nature of debris

  1. Warm up to the idea: Global warming is here

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.F.

    1996-07-01

    This article summarizes recent information about global warming as well as the history of greenhouse gas emissions which have lead to more and more evidence of global warming. The primary source detailed is the second major study report on global warming by the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change. Along with comments about the environmental effects of global warming such as coastline submersion, the economic, social and political aspects of alleviating greenhouse emissions and the threat of global warming are discussed.

  2. Global warming on trial

    SciTech Connect

    Broeker, W.S.

    1992-04-01

    Jim Hansen, a climatologist at NASA's Goddard Space Institute, is convinced that the earth's temperature is rising and places the blame on the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Unconvinced, John Sununu, former White House chief of staff, doubts that the warming will be great enough to produce serious threat and fears that measures to reduce the emissions would throw a wrench into the gears that drive the Unites States' troubled economy. During his three years at the White House, Sununu's view prevailed, and although his role in the debate has diminished, others continue to cast doubt on the reality of global warming. A new lobbying group called the Climate Council has been created to do just this. Burning fossil fuels is not the only problem; a fifth of emissions of carbon dioxide now come from clearing and burning forests. Scientists are also tracking a host of other greenhouse gases that emanate from a variety of human activities; the warming effect of methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide combined equals that of carbon dioxide. Although the current warming from these gases may be difficult to detect against the background noise of natural climate variation, most climatologists are certain that as the gases continue to accumulate, increases in the earth's temperature will become evident even to skeptics. If the reality of global warming were put on trial, each side would have trouble making its case. Jim Hansen's side could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have warmed the planet. But neither could John Sununu's side prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the warming expected from greenhouse gases has not occurred. To see why each side would have difficulty proving its case, this article reviews the arguments that might be presented in such a hearing.

  3. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  4. Small Orbital Debris Mitigation Mission Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Small orbital debris in LEO (1-10 cm in size) presents a clear and present danger to operational LEO spacecraft. This debris field has dramatically increased (nearly doubled) in recent years following the Chinese ASAT Test in 2007 and the Iridium/Cosmos collision in 2009. Estimates of the number of small debris have grown to 500,000 objects after these two events; previously the population was 300,000 objects. These small, untracked debris objects (appproximately 500,000) outnumber the larger and tracked objects (appproximately 20,000) by a factor 25 to 1. Therefore, the risk of the small untracked debris objects to operational spacecraft is much greater than the risk posed by the larger and tracked LEO debris objects. A recent study by The Aerospace Corporation found that the debris environment will increase the costs of maintaining a constellation of government satellites by 5%, a constellation of large commercial satellites by 11%, and a constellation of factory built satellites by 26% from $7.6 billion to $9.57 billion. Based upon these facts, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) performed an architecture study on Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) using a space-based nonweapons- class laser satellite for LEO debris removal. The goal of the SODAR study was to determine the ability of a space-based laser system to remove the most pieces of debris (1 cm to 10 cm, locations unknown), in the shortest amount of time, with the fewest number of spacecraft. The ESA developed MASTER2005 orbital debris model was used to probabilistically classify the future debris environment including impact velocity, magnitude, and directionality. The study ground rules and assumptions placed the spacecraft into a high inclination Low Earth Orbit at 800 km as an initial reference point. The architecture study results found that a spacecraft with an integrated forward-firing laser is capable of reducing the small orbital debris flux within

  5. Sampling supraglacial debris thickness using terrestrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Mertes, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    The melt rate of debris-covered ice differs to that of clean ice primarily as a function of debris thickness. The spatial distribution of supraglacial debris thickness must therefore be known in order to understand how it is likely to impact glacier behaviour, and meltwater contribution to local hydrological resources and global sea level rise. However, practical means of determining debris cover thickness remain elusive. In this study we explore the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry to produce high resolution, scaled and texturized digital terrain models of debris cover exposures above ice cliffs as a means of quantifying and characterizing debris thickness. Two Nikon D5000 DSLRs with Tamron 100mm lenses were used to photograph a sample area of the Ngozumpa glacier in the Khumbu Himal of Nepal in April 2016. A Structure from Motion workflow using Agisoft Photoscan software was used to generate a surface models with <10cm resolution. A Trimble Geo7X differential GPS with Zephyr antenna, along with a local base station, was used to precisely measure marked ground control points to scale the photogrammetric surface model. Measurements of debris thickness along the exposed cliffline were made from this scaled model, assuming that the ice surface at the debris-ice boundary is horizontal, and these data are compared to 50 manual point measurements along the same clifftops. We conclude that sufficiently high resolution photogrammetry, with precise scaling information, provides a useful means to determine debris thickness at clifftop exposures. The resolution of the possible measurements depends on image resolution, the accuracy of the ground control points and the computational capacity to generate centimetre scale surface models. Application of such techniques to sufficiently high resolution imagery from UAV-borne cameras may offer a powerful means of determining debris thickness distribution patterns over debris covered glacier termini.

  6. Space debris, remarks on current legal issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrest, Armel

    2001-10-01

    A legal definition of space debris must take into consideration its consequences on the legal status of the object. For the purpose of mitigation of space debris at the time of the launch, any object launched in outer pace will turn sooner or later into a space debris. For liability purposes, a definition of a "space object " is more useful that the notion of "space debris". It must be sure that every space debris is considered as a space objet according to the liability convention. At the end and certainly a more difficult issue is the qualification of a space object as a space debris when it will be technically feasible to remove it. The question of the property of the debris or object should be important. States are responsible and liable for space debris. According to article VI and VII of the Outer Space Treaty, they must authorise and control any national space activity and make sure these activities will not be conducted against the law. In the case of an accident and excepting the use of nuclear power sources, the main problem lies on damage in outer space to other spacecraft. In that case, the victim must prove a fault. According with the lack of precise rules it should be difficult. It should be necessary to precise the law applicable to space debris. At the domestic level, rules must be taken to prevent space debris through an assessment of risk within the licensing process. At the international level, the principle of an obligation to mitigate debris should be clearly accepted. Some general rules should be useful to avoid breach of competition between commercial actors. The adoption of a clear and precise code of conduct should be of great help because it would determine the good launching States' behaviour and greatly helps the judge appreciating the proof of a fault in case of an accident.

  7. Assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Study of debris-flow geomorphology and initiation mechanism has led to better understanding of debris-flow processes. This paper reviews how this understanding is used in current techniques for assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards.

  8. Two-temperature Debris Disks: Signposts for Directly Imaged Planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    This work considers debris disks whose spectra can be modelled by dust emission at two different temperatures. These disks are typically assumed to be a sign of multiple belts, but only a few cases have been confirmed via high resolution observations. We derive the properties of a sample of two-temperature disks, and explore whether this emission can arise from dust in a single narrow belt. While some two-temperature disks arise from single belts, it is probable that most have multiple spatial components. These disks are plausibly similar to the outer Solar System's configuration of Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts separated by giant planets. Alternatively, the inner component could arise from inward scattering of material from the outer belt, again due to intervening planets. For either scenario, the ratio of warm/cool component temperatures is indicative of the scale of outer planetary systems, which typically span a factor of about ten in radius.

  9. Riding a Trail of Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the comet Encke riding along its pebbly trail of debris (long diagonal line) between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. This material actually encircles the solar system, following the path of Encke's orbit. Twin jets of material can also be seen shooting away from the comet in the short, fan-shaped emission, spreading horizontally from the comet.

    Encke, which orbits the Sun every 3.3 years, is well traveled. Having exhausted its supply of fine particles, it now leaves a long trail of larger more gravel-like debris, about one millimeter in size or greater. Every October, Earth passes through Encke's wake, resulting in the well-known Taurid meteor shower.

    This image was captured by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer when Encke was 2.6 times farther away than Earth is from the Sun. It is the best yet mid-infrared view of the comet at this great distance. The data are helping astronomers understand how rotating comets eject particles as they circle the Sun.

  10. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bold, Matthew; Cross, Nick; Irwin, Mike; Kendrick, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lederer, Susan; Mann, Robert; Sutorius, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU.

  11. Dynamical Processes in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beust, H.

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are dusty and/or gasous disk that are viewed in scattered light and thermal emission around stars around 107-108 yr. It is well known that the dust in these system is not primodial. It is short lived and must be continuously replenished by colliding planetesimals. Most of them appear distorted by the gravitational pertubations by inner planets or stellar companions. This is why these systems are viewed today as young planetary systems. Debris disks are collisional systems. Thanks to collisional cascade towards smaller size, the dust particles are transported outwards by radiation or stellar wind pressure. Below a given blow-off size they escape the system. This model explains the radial density profiles observed. The various asymmetries, clumps and other dynamical structures such as spiral arms are though to originate in gravitational perturbations by planets and/or companions. Planets usually create gaps in disks, but they also sculpt disks via their mean-motion resonances. Clumpy structures are often invoked as resulting from such an interaction. Stellar companions usually truncate the disk, sometimes confining them to thin annular structures. They also help creating spiral patterns, either tidally or by secular interaction. In this context, the situation is different whether the perturbing companions are bound or just passing stars. In any case, dynamical studies (often specific to each system) can greatly help constraining the configuration and the past history of these systems.

  12. Ocean Surface Circulation with Implication for Marine Debris Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jan; Maximenko, Nikolai; Niiler, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Modern, multi-instrumental Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) includes satellites and in situ observations, monitoring the ocean state at the highest accuracy and resolution ever. By combining data of satellite altimetry, surface drifters, wind and gravity, ocean currents can be assessed globally and at research quality. The map of the mean surface currents shows a complex pattern of oceanic fronts and gyres. Distinct are the convergences of Ekman currents in subtropical gyres that, through the Sverdrup mechanism, are feeding anticyclonic circulation in the gyres. Drifter trajectories can also be utilized to simulate the evolution of the marine debris. Main problem is the inhomogeneous drifter data density, both due to convergence/divergence of the ocean currents and due to the drifter deployment scheme. A model constructed from statistics of the drifters exchange between small bins corrects this bias and was run from the uniform initial condition to study the fate of debris in the ocean. In addition to such actively studied debris accumulation areas as the Great Garbage Patch in the North Pacific, a new so far unrecognized, the world-strongest convergence is discovered in the South Pacific from the model solution. The same model reveals a complex pattern of convergence/divergence on the cold/warm flanks of major oceanic fronts. This pattern is studied in the framework of nonlinear interaction between Ekman drift and geostrophic baroclinic fronts outcropping at the sea surface. Results are generalized to assess the dynamics of internal Ekman layer distributed along the thermocline and controlling the secondary circulation at the fronts.

  13. Do two-temperature debris discs have multiple belts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, G. M.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of debris discs whose spectra are well modelled by dust emission at two different temperatures. These discs are typically assumed to be a sign of multiple belts, which in only a few cases have been confirmed via high-resolution observations. We first compile a sample of two-temperature discs to derive their properties, summarized by the ratios of the warm and cool component temperatures and fractional luminosities. The ratio of warm to cool temperatures is constant in the range 2-4, and the temperature of both warm and cool components increases with stellar mass. We then explore whether this emission can arise from dust in a single narrow belt, with the range of temperatures arising from the size variation of grain temperatures. This model can produce two-temperature spectra for Sun-like stars, but is not supported where it can be tested by observed disc sizes and far-infrared/mm spectral slopes. Therefore, while some two-temperature discs arise from single belts, it is probable that most have multiple spatial components. These discs are plausibly similar to the outer Solar system's configuration of Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts separated by giant planets. Alternatively, the inner component could arise from inward scattering of material from the outer belt, again due to intervening planets. In either case, we suggest that the ratio of warm/cool component temperatures is indicative of the scale of outer planetary systems, which typically span a factor of about 10 in radius.

  14. Formation Flying Guidance for Space Debris Observation, Manipulation and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas V.

    This article provides a brief overview of the space debris population, debris attitude dynamics, technologies for debris removal, followed by a more in-depth discussion of robotic arm based capture of debris. Guidance aspects of active debris removal missions are discussed. Mission phases for active debris removal missions are rendezvous, inspection, attitude synchronization and capture and de-tumbling. The need for attitude synchronization is driven by recent observations of Envisat which exhibits a fairly high rotation rate.

  15. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  16. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    Astronauts Lee Archambault and Joan Higginbotham look at a piece of Columbia debris placed on the grid in the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  17. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    Shuttle Program Manager Ron Dittemore (leaning over) examines a piece of Columbia debris in the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from the collection point at Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident that claimed Columbia and her crew of seven, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  18. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    The reconstruction team checks out the Columbia debris after it was offloaded at the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  19. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    A worker examines a piece of the Columbia debris on the floor of the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  20. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    Members of the reconstruction team check out the Columbia debris inside the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  1. A high severity space hazard - Orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, G. K.; Disimile, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the orbital debris-meteoroid hazard that will be encountered by the Space Station Freedom. Recent reports on the orbital debris studies are discussed with special attention given to the procedures and techniques that can be used to minimize the impact damage, to avoid the collision, and to design shielding distribution so as to reduce the penetration damage.

  2. Interagency Report on Orbital Debris, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 1995 report updates the findings and recommendations of the 1989 report and reflects the authors' progress in understanding and managing the orbital debris environment. It provides an up-to-date portrait of their measurement, modeling, and mitigation efforts; and a set of recommendations outlining specific steps they should pursue, both domestically and internationally, to minimize the potential hazard posed by orbital debris.

  3. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  4. DEBRIS DISTRIBUTION IN HD 95086—A YOUNG ANALOG OF HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Smith, Paul S.; Rieke, George H.; Morrison, Sarah; Malhotra, Renu; Balog, Zoltan

    2015-02-01

    HD 95086 is a young early-type star that hosts (1) a 5 M{sub J} planet at the projected distance of 56 AU revealed by direct imaging, and (2) a prominent debris disk. Here we report the detection of 69 μm crystalline olivine feature from the disk using the Spitzer/MIPS-SED data covering 55-95 μm. Due to the low resolution of the MIPS-SED mode, this feature is not spectrally resolved, but is consistent with the emission from crystalline forsterite contributing ∼5% of the total dust mass. We also present detailed analysis of the disk spectral energy distribution and re-analysis of resolved images obtained by Herschel. Our results suggest that the debris structure around HD 95086 consists of a warm (∼175 K) belt, a cold (∼55 K) disk, and an extended disk halo (up to ∼800 AU), and is very similar to that of HR 8799. We compare the properties of the three debris components, and suggest that HD 95086 is a young analog of HR 8799. We further investigate and constrain single-planet, two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet architectures that can account for the observed debris structure and are compatible with dynamical stability constraints. We find that equal-mass four-planet configurations of geometrically spaced orbits, with each planet of mass ∼ 5 M{sub J} , could maintain the gap between the warm and cold debris belts, and also be just marginally stable for timescales comparable to the age of the system.

  5. G-warm inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Ramón

    2017-05-01

    A warm inflationary universe in the context of Galileon model or G-model is studied. Under a general formalism we study the inflationary dynamics and the cosmological perturbations considering a coupling of the form G(phi,X)=g(phi) X. As a concrete example, we consider an exponential potential together with the cases in which the dissipation and Galilean coefficients are constants. Also, we study the weak regime given by the condition R<1+3gHdot phi, and the strong regime in which 1warm inflation, assuming the condition for warm inflation in which the temperature T>H, the conditions or the weak and strong regimes, together with the consistency relation r=r(ns) from Planck data.

  6. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Joe; Liou, J. -C.; Anz-Meador, P.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital Navy-NASA Sensor (DRAGONS) is an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize collisions with small orbital debris: from 50 microns to greater than 1millimeter debris size detection; Characterizes debris size, speed, direction, and density. The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a flight demonstration of DRAGONS on the International Space Station: Approximately 1 square meter of detection area facing the ISS velocity vector; Minimum two year mission on Columbus External Payloads Facility (EPF); Minimal obstruction from ISS hardware; Development is nearing final checkout and integration with the ISS; Current launch schedule is SpaceX13, about September 2017, or SpaceX14, about Jan 2018.

  7. Debris flows: behavior and hazard assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows are water-laden masses of soil and fragmented rock that rush down mountainsides, funnel into stream channels, entrain objects in their paths, and form lobate deposits when they spill onto valley floors. Because they have volumetric sediment concentrations that exceed 40 percent, maximum speeds that surpass 10 m/s, and sizes that can range up to ~109 m3, debris flows can denude slopes, bury floodplains, and devastate people and property. Computational models can accurately represent the physics of debris-flow initiation, motion and deposition by simulating evolution of flow mass and momentum while accounting for interactions of debris' solid and fluid constituents. The use of physically based models for hazard forecasting can be limited by imprecise knowledge of initial and boundary conditions and material properties, however. Therefore, empirical methods continue to play an important role in debris-flow hazard assessment.

  8. Aquatic Debris Detection Using Embedded Camera Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Dianhong; Lu, Qian; Luo, Dapeng; Fang, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic debris monitoring is of great importance to human health, aquatic habitats and water transport. In this paper, we first introduce the prototype of an aquatic sensor node equipped with an embedded camera sensor. Based on this sensing platform, we propose a fast and accurate debris detection algorithm. Our method is specifically designed based on compressive sensing theory to give full consideration to the unique challenges in aquatic environments, such as waves, swaying reflections, and tight energy budget. To upload debris images, we use an efficient sparse recovery algorithm in which only a few linear measurements need to be transmitted for image reconstruction. Besides, we implement the host software and test the debris detection algorithm on realistically deployed aquatic sensor nodes. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach is reliable and feasible for debris detection using camera sensors in aquatic environments. PMID:25647741

  9. Development of the Space Debris Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Corsaro, B.; Giovane, F.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a NASA experiment scheduled to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2017. The SDS is the first flight demonstration of the Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital NASA-Navy Sensor (DRAGONS) developed and matured by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. The DRAGONS concept combines several technologies to characterize the size, speed, direction, and density of small impacting objects. With a minimum two-year operational lifetime, SDS is anticipated to collect statistically significant information on orbital debris ranging from 50 micron to 500 micron in size. This paper describes the SDS features and how data from the ISS mission may be used to update debris environment models. Results of hypervelocity impact testing during the development of SDS and the potential for improvement on future sensors at higher altitudes will be reviewed.

  10. The debris-flow rheology myth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Models that employ a fixed rheology cannot yield accurate interpretations or predictions of debris-flow motion, because the evolving behavior of debris flows is too complex to be represented by any rheological equation that uniquely relates stress and strain rate. Field observations and experimental data indicate that debris behavior can vary from nearly rigid to highly fluid as a consequence of temporal and spatial variations in pore-fluid pressure and mixture agitation. Moreover, behavior can vary if debris composition changes as a result of grain-size segregation and gain or loss of solid and fluid constituents in transit. An alternative to fixed-rheology models is provided by a Coulomb mixture theory model, which can represent variable interactions of solid and fluid constituents in heterogeneous debris-flow surges with high-friction, coarse-grained heads and low-friction, liquefied tails. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  11. Spatial Density Evolution of Space Debris Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Canan; Pang, Baojun; Ding, Li

    2009-03-01

    It is known that the space debris provide great risks to the safety of on-orbit space vehicles, which makes it necessary to establish a model to evaluate their impact risks. In order to provide the scenario of the future space debris environment for space vehicle designers, this paper addresses a simplified mathematical model for the future evolution of space debris environment. While the spatial density is of more concern to engineers, this paper is devoted to study the evolution of the distribution of spatial density of space debris. Given the initial spatial density, this paper develops the algorithm to obtained the spatial density of space debris at any moment of future, by considering the orbital propagation and collisions.

  12. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Corsaro, B.; Giovane, F.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a NASA experiment scheduled to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2018. The SDS is the first flight demonstration of the Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital NASA-Navy Sensor (DRAGONS) developed and matured at NASA Johnson Space Center's Orbital Debris Program Office. The DRAGONS concept combines several technologies to characterize the size, speed, direction, and density of small impacting objects. With a minimum two-year operational lifetime, SDS is anticipated to collect statistically significant information on orbital debris ranging from 50 microns to 500 microns in size. This paper describes the features of SDS and how data from the ISS mission may be used to update debris environment models. Results of hypervelocity impact testing during the development of SDS and the potential for improvement on future sensors at higher altitudes will be reviewed.

  13. Molecular Gas In Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Debris disks are generally thought to be the gas poor descendants of protoplanetary disks. While this characteristic may be true for most debris systems, recent surveys in rotational transitions of carbon monoxide led to a growing sample of debris disks where gas has been detected. The origin of gas in these disks is unclear yet. It may be secondary, i.e., similarly to dust grains it is continuously replenished via erosion of larger bodies. However, because of their youth, one cannot exclude that some disks may be hybrid in the sense that they retain their residual primordial gas, while the dust component may predominantly be second generation. The first observations of gaseous debris disks with ALMA provided examples of both types. This talk will review the currently known CO-rich debris disks with special emphasis on the origin of gas and on the commonly shared disk/host star properties.

  14. Geosynchronous Large Debris Reorbiter: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Hanspeter; Moorer, Daniel F.

    2012-06-01

    An elegant solution is proposed to an old problem of how to remove expired or malfunctioning satellites from the geosynchronous belt. Previous "space-tug" concepts describe a scenario where one craft (the tug) docks with another (debris) and then boosts that object to a super-synchronous orbit. The most challenging aspect of these concepts is the very complex proximity operations to an aging, possibly rotating and, probably, non-cooperative satellite. Instead, the proposed method uses an elegant blend of electrostatic charge control and low-thrust propulsion to avoid any contact requirement. The Geosynchronous Large Debris Reorbiter (GLiDeR) uses active charge emission to raise its own absolute potential to 10's of kilovolts and, in addition, directs a stream of charged particles at the debris to increase its absolute potential. In a puller configuration the opposite polarity of the debris creates an attractive force between the GLiDeR and the debris. Pusher configurations are feasible as well. Next, fuel-efficient micro-thrusters are employed to gently move the reorbiter relative to the debris, and then accelerate the debris out of its geosynchronous slot and deposit it in a disposal orbit. Preliminary analysis shows that a 1000 kg debris object can be re-orbited over two-four months. During the reorbit phase the separation distance is held nominally fixed without physical contact, even if the debris is tumbling, by actively controlling the charge transfer between the reorbiter and the debris. Numerical simulations are presented illustrating the expected performance, taking into account also the solar radiation pressure.

  15. OT1_jsimon01_1: A Population of Dusty B Stars in the SMC: The First Extragalactic Debris Disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J.

    2010-07-01

    Using data from the Spitzer Survey of the SMC, we have discovered a population of 120 main sequence B stars with large 24 micron excesses. Optical spectroscopy and the IRAC SEDs demonstrate that they are not ordinary YSOs or Be stars. We suggest instead that these objects may be debris disks around massive main sequence stars. Confirmation of this hypothesis would provide one of the only ways to study the process of planet formation in a low-metallicity external galaxy. We have measured the mid-IR SED of the dust emission with IRS spectroscopy and determined that both cold and warm dust is present. We now propose PACS photometry at 70 microns to unambiguously separate the dust into its warm (and therefore circumstellar) and cold (possibly interstellar) components. These data will enable us to determine how much of the dust is warm and better constrain the temperature distribution; any targets with substantial amounts of warm dust are almost certainly debris disks. If the B stars do indeed host debris disks, they provide perhaps the only plausible method for constraining planet formation in an external galaxy for the foreseeable future.

  16. How to implement data for improved modelling - Results from an extensive field campaign on the debris covered Lirung Glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Lene; Immerzeel, Walter; Shahi, Sonika; Baral, Prashant; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Debris covered glaciers have become a focus of current research because of growing evidence of an increase in debris cover associated with a warming climate and the effect that debris has on melt rates. Mass balance models increasingly aim at including the melt rate enhancing/reduction effect due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, knowledge about debris cover and thickness, its distribution and characteristics is limited and data are scarce, especially in the HKKH region where debris-covered glaciers are numerous. In this work we present a data set that is complementary to modelling efforts carried out to improve our understanding of processes occurring at the debris cover surface and how debris effects can be implemented into melt and mass balance models of different complexity. A key requirement for distributed melt modelling is the availability of debris cover and thickness maps and knowledge about characteristics of the debris layer and their spatial variability. An extensive field campaign was conducted from May to October 2012 on the debris covered Lirung Glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas. The collected data set consists of observations from an automatic weather station (AWS) measuring wind direction, wind speed, air and surface temperature, incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation, relative humidity and snow height, 14 sensors measuring 2 m air temperature and 7 surface temperature sensors, 3 temperature systems (tinytags) measuring temperature at the debris surface and the ice below the debris layer and one thermistors chain (with 8 temperature sensors) measuring the temperature profile in the debris layer. In the study region there is a key difference between meteorological conditions during monsoon and the dry period. We analyze separately all meteorological records for these different climatic conditions and show how temperature, albedo, relative humidity and wind speed and direction are affected. Wind speed and direction show similar

  17. Erosion of steepland valleys by debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, J.D.; Dietrich, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Episodic debris flows scour the rock beds of many steepland valleys. Along recent debris-flow runout paths in the western United States, we have observed evidence for bedrock lowering, primarily by the impact of large particles entrained in debris flows. This evidence may persist to the point at which debris-flow deposition occurs, commonly at slopes of less than ???0.03-0.10. We find that debris-flow-scoured valleys have a topographic signature that is fundamentally different from that predicted by bedrock river-incision models. Much of this difference results from the fact that local valley slope shows a tendency to decrease abruptly downstream of tributaries that contribute throughgoing debris flows. The degree of weathering of valley floor bedrock may also decrease abruptly downstream of such junctions. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that valley slope is adjusted to the long-term frequency of debris flows, and that valleys scoured by debris flows should not be modeled using conventional bedrock river-incision laws. We use field observations to justify one possible debris-flow incision model, whose lowering rate is proportional to the integral of solid inertial normal stresses from particle impacts along the flow and the number of upvalley debris-flow sources. The model predicts that increases in incision rate caused by increases in flow event frequency and length (as flows gain material) downvalley are balanced by rate reductions from reduced inertial normal stress at lower slopes, and stronger, less weathered bedrock. These adjustments lead to a spatially uniform lowering rate. Although the proposed expression leads to equilibrium long-profiles with the correct topographic signature, the crudeness with which the debris-flow dynamics are parameterized reveals that we are far from a validated debris-flow incision law. However, the vast extent of steepland valley networks above slopes of ???0.03-0.10 illustrates the need to understand debris

  18. The Technology of Modeling Debris Cloud Produced by Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhaoxia; Huang, Jie; Liang, Shichang; Zhou, Zhixuan; Ren, Leisheng; Liu, Sen

    2013-08-01

    Because of the large amount of debris in a debris cloud, it is hard to achieve a complete description of all the debris by a simple function. One workable approach is to use a group of complete distribution functions and MonteCarlo method to simplify the debris cloud simulation. Enough debris samples are produced by SPH simulation and debris identification program firstly. According to the distribution functions of debris mass, velocity and space angles determined by statistical analysis, the engineering model of debris cloud is set up. Combining the engineering model and MonteCarlo method, the fast simulation of debris cloud produced by an aluminum projectile impacting an aluminum plate is realized. An application example of the debris cloud engineering model to predict satellite damage caused by space debris impact is given at the end.

  19. Characterizing Secondary Debris Impact Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, W. P.

    1999-01-01

    All spacecraft in low-Earth orbit are subject to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and orbital debris particles. These impacts can damage flight-critical systems which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for an Earth-orbiting mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystem components. In addition to threatening the operation of the spacecraft itself, on-orbit impacts also generate a significant amount of ricochet particles. These high-speed particles can destroy critical external spacecraft subsystem and also increase the contamination of the orbital environment. This report presents a summary of the work performed towards the development of an empirical model that characterizes the secondary ejecta created by a high-speed impacta on a typical aerospace structural surface.

  20. Space debris studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Susumu; Yasaka, Tetsuo

    1993-08-01

    The Space Debris Study Group of the Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences was established in September 1990 and the Interim Report was published in January 1992. The group has five subgroups: Observation, Cause, Modeling, Protection, and Social Impact. It intends to promote an awareness for the problem and put together related researches, to define the urgently needed activity area by first describing the present situation in each engineering field and then summarizing on-going respective researches. It is expected that sound technological base line understandings to the problem are to be attained at various institutions. International cooperations are indispensable, and Japanese efforts should be focused on those which do not duplicate but are complementary to achievements in other countries. Some of the results obtained by the group are presented and several examples of individual researches are summarized.

  1. LDEF meteoroid and debris database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardano, C. B.; See, Thomas H.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) database is maintained at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, and consists of five data tables containing information about individual features, digitized images of selected features, and LDEF hardware (i.e., approximately 950 samples) archived at JSC. About 4000 penetrations (greater than 300 micron in diameter) and craters (greater than 500 micron in diameter) were identified and photodocumented during the disassembly of LDEF at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), while an additional 4500 or so have subsequently been characterized at JSC. The database also contains some data that have been submitted by various PI's, yet the amount of such data is extremely limited in its extent, and investigators are encouraged to submit any and all M&D-type data to JSC for inclusion within the M&D database. Digitized stereo-image pairs are available for approximately 4500 features through the database.

  2. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  3. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  4. Warming Up to Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Lucia Caycedo; Rusch, Debbie

    Daily warm-up exercises are advocated as a means of bridging the gap between previously unrelated activities outside the classroom and immersion into the second language, relaxing the class, and establishing a mood for communication. Variety, careful preparation, assuring that the students understand the activity, feeling free to discontinue an…

  5. Global warming 'confirmed'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    In October, the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project, funded in part by climate sceptics, concluded that the Earth is warming based on the most comprehensive review of the data yet. Nature Climate Change talks to the project's director, physicist Richard Muller.

  6. Final Design for a Comprehensive Orbital Debris Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The rationale and specifics for the design of a comprehensive program for the control of orbital debris, as well as details of the various components of the overall plan, are described. The problem of orbital debris has been steadily worsening since the first successful launch in 1957. The hazards posed by orbital debris suggest the need for a progressive plan for the prevention of future debris, as well as the reduction of the current debris level. The proposed debris management plan includes debris removal systems and preventative techniques and policies. The debris removal is directed at improving the current debris environment. Because of the variance in sizes of debris, a single system cannot reasonably remove all kinds of debris. An active removal system, which deliberately retrieves targeted debris from known orbits, was determined to be effective in the disposal of debris tracked directly from earth. However, no effective system is currently available to remove the untrackable debris. The debris program is intended to protect the orbital environment from future abuses. This portion of the plan involves various environment from future abuses. This portion of the plan involves various methods and rules for future prevention of debris. The preventative techniques are protective methods that can be used in future design of payloads. The prevention policies are rules which should be employed to force the prevention of orbital debris.

  7. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DEBRIS DISK CATALOG. I. CONTINUUM ANALYSIS OF UNRESOLVED TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Christine H.; Mittal, Tushar; Kuchner, Marc; Forrest, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Lisse, Carey M.; Manoj, P.; Sargent, Benjamin A.

    2014-04-01

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, Guaranteed Time Observers, Legacy Teams, and General Observers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates. We calibrated the spectra of 571 candidates, including 64 new IRAS and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) debris disks candidates, modeled their stellar photospheres, and produced a catalog of excess spectra for unresolved debris disks. For 499 targets with IRS excess but without strong spectral features (and a subset of 420 targets with additional MIPS 70 μm observations), we modeled the IRS (and MIPS data) assuming that the dust thermal emission was well-described using either a one- or two-temperature blackbody model. We calculated the probability for each model and computed the average probability to select among models. We found that the spectral energy distributions for the majority of objects (∼66%) were better described using a two-temperature model with warm (T {sub gr} ∼ 100-500 K) and cold (T {sub gr} ∼ 50-150 K) dust populations analogous to zodiacal and Kuiper Belt dust, suggesting that planetary systems are common in debris disks and zodiacal dust is common around host stars with ages up to ∼1 Gyr. We found that younger stars generally have disks with larger fractional infrared luminosities and higher grain temperatures and that higher-mass stars have disks with higher grain temperatures. We show that the increasing distance of dust around debris disks is inconsistent with self-stirred disk models, expected if these systems possess planets at 30-150 AU. Finally, we illustrate how observations of debris disks may be used to constrain the radial dependence of material in the minimum mass solar nebula.

  8. Impact of fine debris on ice melt rates at Russell Glacier, central-west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Linighan, James; Cumming, Alex M. J.

    2017-04-01

    Losses from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) have increased sharply in recent years, due to accelerated glacier discharge and increased surface melting. In 2012, 99% of the Greenland ice sheet experienced melt, which was exceptional on centennial timescales, but is expected to occur frequently in the future, as climate warms. Ice albedo is a primary control on melt rates and remotely sensed data shows that the GrIS has darkened substantial in recent decades, due to both inorganic and biological material. This has been particularly marked in south- and central-west Greenland and can lead to the development of positive feedbacks. Consequently, it is important to understand the relationship between melt and surface albedo on the GrIS. Here we use a combination of satellite remote sensing and field data to assess the impact of fine debris on melt rates at Russell Glacier, central-west Greenland. Our field data demonstrate that areas with a greater percentage coverage of fine, largely inorganic debris experienced higher melt rates than in areas with a sparse coverage. However, the relationship between melt and debris cover was highly spatially variable. Furthermore, the debris cover evolved substantially over time and we saw marked changes over a period of a few days. Using ASTER imagery, we show that the spatial extent of debris has expanded markedly in this section of the GrIS during the last decade, which could substantially accelerate melting. However, the complex and variable relationship between debris cover and melt rates highlights the need for further research, in order to accurately forecast its impact on GrIS melt rates.

  9. Orbital debris removal and meteoroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Taylor, Charles R.; Smalley, Larry L.; Dickerson, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    Orbital debris in low-Earth orbit in the size range from 1 to 10 cm in diameter can be detected but not tracked reliably enough to be avoided by spacecraft. It can cause catastrophic damage even to a shielded spacecraft. With adaptive optics, a ground-based pulsed laser ablating the debris surface can produce enough propulsion in several hundred pulses to cause such debris to reenter the atmosphere. A single laser station could remove all of the 1 - 10 cm debris in three years or less. A technology demonstration of laser space propulsion is proposed which would pave the way for the implementation of such a debris removal system. The cost of the proposed demonstration is comparable with the estimated annual cost of spacecraft operations in the present orbital debris environment. Orbital debris is not the only space junk that is deleterious to the Earth's environment. Collisions with asteroids have caused major havoc to the Earth's biosphere many times in the ancient past. Since the possibility still exists for major impacts of asteroids with the Earth, it shown that it is possible to scale up the systems to prevent these catastrophic collisions providing sufficient early warning is available from new generation space telescopes plus deep space radar tracking.

  10. The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Beltrami, P.; Hauptmann, S.; Martin, C.; Sdunnus, H.; Stokes, H.; Walker, R.; Wilkinson, J.

    2004-01-01

    The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002 was jointly produced by an industrial consortium and ESA, under an ESA contract. The Handbook is a non-regulatory, self-standing document, providing technical information in support of European debris mitigation standards. The necessity of debris mitigation is illustrated in the context of historic launch activities and operational practices, which led to the current debris environment, with corresponding collision flux levels. Based on detailed population evolution models, this initial population is analyzed with respect to its growth and stability under different traffic assumptions. The implementation of debris mitigation measures, in particular the de-orbiting of spacecraft and upper stages, is shown to reduce the debris growth to an acceptable level within a few decades. The risk on ground due to re-entering space objects, its assessment, and its control is also analyzed. For on-orbit systems, collision risk reduction by avoidance manoeuvres, and passive protection by shielding is outlined. ESA's Handbook also compares recommended debris mitigation and risk reduction practices proposed by several other space agencies. The Handbook will be available at the begin of 2003.

  11. The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Beltrami, P.; Hauptmann, S.; Martin, C.; Sdunnus, H.; Stokes, H.; Walker, R.; Wilkinson, J.

    The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002 was jointly produced by an industrial consortium and ESA, under an ESA contract. The Handbook is a non-regulatory, self-standing document, providing technical information in support of European debris mitigation standards. The necessity of debris mitigation is illustrated in the context of historic launch activities and operational practices, which led to the current debris environment, with corresponding collision flux levels. Based on detailed population evolution models, this initial population is analysed with respect to its growth and stability under different traffic assumptions. The implementation of debris mitigation measures, in particular the de-orbiting of spacecraft and upper stages, is shown to reduce the debris growth to an acceptable level within a few decades. The risk on ground due to re-entering space objects, its assessment, and its control is also analysed. For on-orbit systems, collision risk reduction by avoidance manoeuvres, and passive protection by shielding is outlined. ESA's Handbook also compares recommended debris mitigation and risk reduction practices proposed by several other space agencies. The Handbook will be available by the end of 2002.

  12. Nuclear-powered space debris sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, John D.; Leclaire, Rene J., Jr.; Howe, Steven D.; Burgin, Karen C.

    1989-01-01

    Future spacecraft design will be affected by collisions with man-made debris orbiting the earth. Most of this orbital space debris comes from spent rocket stages. It is projected that the source of future debris will be the result of fragmentation of large objects through hypervelocity collisions. Orbiting spacecraft will have to be protected from hypervelocity debris in orbit. The options are to armor the spacecraft, resulting in increased mass, or actively removing the debris from orbit. An active space debris sweeper is described which will utilize momentum transfer to the debris through laser-induced ablation to alter its orbital parameters to reduce orbital lifetime with eventual entry into the earth's atmosphere where it will burn. The paper describes the concept, estimates the amount of velocity change (Delta V) that can be imparted to an object through laser-induced ablation, and investigates the use of a neutral particle beam for the momentum transfer. The space sweeper concept could also be extended to provide a collision avoidance system for the space station and satellites, or could be used for collision protection during interplanetary travel.

  13. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  14. Orbital Debris and NASA's Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Africano, J. L.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2002-05-01

    Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the number of manmade objects in orbit around the Earth has dramatically increased. The United States Space Surveillance Network (SSN) tracks and maintains orbits on over nine thousand objects down to a limiting diameter of about ten centimeters. Unfortunately, active spacecraft are only a small percentage ( ~ 7%) of this population. The rest of the population is orbital debris or ``space junk" consisting of expended rocket bodies, dead payloads, bits and pieces from satellite launches, and fragments from satellite breakups. The number of these smaller orbital debris objects increases rapidly with decreasing size. It is estimated that there are at least 130,000 orbital debris objects between one and ten centimeters in diameter. Most objects smaller than 10 centimeters go untracked! As the orbital debris population grows, the risk to other orbiting objects, most importantly manned space vehicles, of a collision with a piece of debris also grows. The kinetic energy of a solid 1 cm aluminum sphere traveling at an orbital velocity of 10 km/sec is equivalent to a 400 lb. safe traveling at 60 mph. Fortunately, the volume of space in which the orbiting population resides is large, collisions are infrequent, but they do occur. The Space Shuttle often returns to earth with its windshield pocked with small pits or craters caused by collisions with very small, sub-millimeter-size pieces of debris (paint flakes, particles from solid rocket exhaust, etc.), and micrometeoroids. To get a more complete picture of the orbital-debris environment, NASA has been using both radar and optical techniques to monitor the orbital debris environment. This paper gives an overview of the orbital debris environment and NASA's measurement program.

  15. POST Earthquake Debris Management - AN Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Raju

    Every year natural disasters, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, and tornadoes, challenge various communities of the world. Earthquakes strike with varying degrees of severity and pose both short- and long-term challenges to public service providers. Earthquakes generate shock waves and displace the ground along fault lines. These seismic forces can bring down buildings and bridges in a localized area and damage buildings and other structures in a far wider area. Secondary damage from fires, explosions, and localized flooding from broken water pipes can increase the amount of debris. Earthquake debris includes building materials, personal property, and sediment from landslides. The management of this debris, as well as the waste generated during the reconstruction works, can place significant challenges on the national and local capacities. Debris removal is a major component of every post earthquake recovery operation. Much of the debris generated from earthquake is not hazardous. Soil, building material, and green waste, such as trees and shrubs, make up most of the volume of earthquake debris. These wastes not only create significant health problems and a very unpleasant living environment if not disposed of safely and appropriately, but also can subsequently impose economical burdens on the reconstruction phase. In practice, most of the debris may be either disposed of at landfill sites, reused as materials for construction or recycled into useful commodities Therefore, the debris clearance operation should focus on the geotechnical engineering approach as an important post earthquake issue to control the quality of the incoming flow of potential soil materials. In this paper, the importance of an emergency management perspective in this geotechnical approach that takes into account the different criteria related to the operation execution is proposed by highlighting the key issues concerning the handling of the construction

  16. POST Earthquake Debris Management — AN Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Raju

    Every year natural disasters, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, and tornadoes, challenge various communities of the world. Earthquakes strike with varying degrees of severity and pose both short- and long-term challenges to public service providers. Earthquakes generate shock waves and displace the ground along fault lines. These seismic forces can bring down buildings and bridges in a localized area and damage buildings and other structures in a far wider area. Secondary damage from fires, explosions, and localized flooding from broken water pipes can increase the amount of debris. Earthquake debris includes building materials, personal property, and sediment from landslides. The management of this debris, as well as the waste generated during the reconstruction works, can place significant challenges on the national and local capacities. Debris removal is a major component of every post earthquake recovery operation. Much of the debris generated from earthquake is not hazardous. Soil, building material, and green waste, such as trees and shrubs, make up most of the volume of earthquake debris. These wastes not only create significant health problems and a very unpleasant living environment if not disposed of safely and appropriately, but also can subsequently impose economical burdens on the reconstruction phase. In practice, most of the debris may be either disposed of at landfill sites, reused as materials for construction or recycled into useful commodities Therefore, the debris clearance operation should focus on the geotechnical engineering approach as an important post earthquake issue to control the quality of the incoming flow of potential soil materials. In this paper, the importance of an emergency management perspective in this geotechnical approach that takes into account the different criteria related to the operation execution is proposed by highlighting the key issues concerning the handling of the construction

  17. Climatic regions as an indicator of forest coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, Christopher W; Liknes, Greg C

    2008-01-01

    Background Coarse and fine woody debris are substantial forest ecosystem carbon stocks; however, there is a lack of understanding how these detrital carbon stocks vary across forested landscapes. Because forest woody detritus production and decay rates may partially depend on climatic conditions, the accumulation of coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks in forests may be correlated with climate. This study used a nationwide inventory of coarse and fine woody debris in the United States to examine how these carbon stocks vary by climatic regions and variables. Results Mean coarse and fine woody debris forest carbon stocks vary by Köppen's climatic regions across the United States. The highest carbon stocks were found in regions with cool summers while the lowest carbon stocks were found in arid desert/steppes or temperate humid regions. Coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks were found to be positively correlated with available moisture and negatively correlated with maximum temperature. Conclusion It was concluded with only medium confidence that coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks may be at risk of becoming net emitter of carbon under a global climate warming scenario as increases in coarse or fine woody debris production (sinks) may be more than offset by increases in forest woody detritus decay rates (emission). Given the preliminary results of this study and the rather tenuous status of coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks as either a source or sink of CO2, further research is suggested in the areas of forest detritus decay and production. PMID:18541029

  18. Collector/Compactor for Waste or Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangialiardi, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Device collects and compacts debris by sweeping through volume with net. Consists of movable vane, fixed vane, and elastic net connected to both vanes. Movable vane is metal strip curved to follow general contour of container with clearance to prevent interference with other parts on inside wall of container. One end of movable vane mounted in bearing and other end connected to driveshaft equipped with handle. User rotates movable vane, net stretched and swept through container. Captures most of debris coarser than mesh as it moves, compressing debris as it arrives at fixed vane. Applications include cleaning swimming pools and tanks.

  19. Modelling of space debris and meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Alby, F.

    1997-05-01

    Since several years, CNES has undertaken studies in the field of debris and meteoroids since the knowledge of this environment is of prime importance for space activities and will be a growing concern in the future. In the frame of this study, the main available models concerning space debris and meteoroids have been analysed: origin, principle of modelization, limits and evolution as a function of time. A reference model has been choosen and evaluated through comparisons with available data, coming from in flight experiments such as LDEF, EURECA, MIR and HUBBLE. This work will lead in the future to improve the models, particularly for the small size debris.

  20. Space Shuttle crew compartment debris-contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Villarreal, Leopoldo J.

    1992-01-01

    Remedial actions undertaken to reduce debris during manned flights and ground turnaround operations at Kennedy Space Center and Palmdale are addressed. They include redesign of selected ground support equipment and Orbiter hardware to reduce particularization/debris generation; development of new detachable filters for air-cooled avionics boxes; application of tape-on screens to filter debris; and implementation of new Orbiter maintenance and turnaround procedures to clean filters and the crew compartment. Most of these steps were implemented before the return-to-flight of STS-26 in September 1988 which resulted in improved crew compartment habitability and less potential for equipment malfunction.

  1. Algorithms for the Computation of Debris Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Determining the risks from space debris involve a number of statistical calculations. These calculations inevitably involve assumptions about geometry - including the physical geometry of orbits and the geometry of non-spherical satellites. A number of tools have been developed in NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office to handle these calculations; many of which have never been published before. These include algorithms that are used in NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0, as well as other tools useful for computing orbital collision rates and ground casualty risks. This paper will present an introduction to these algorithms and the assumptions upon which they are based.

  2. Algorithms for the Computation of Debris Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the risks from space debris involve a number of statistical calculations. These calculations inevitably involve assumptions about geometry - including the physical geometry of orbits and the geometry of satellites. A number of tools have been developed in NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office to handle these calculations; many of which have never been published before. These include algorithms that are used in NASA’s Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0, as well as other tools useful for computing orbital collision rates and ground casualty risks. This paper presents an introduction to these algorithms and the assumptions upon which they are based.

  3. Collector/Compactor for Waste or Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangialiardi, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Device collects and compacts debris by sweeping through volume with net. Consists of movable vane, fixed vane, and elastic net connected to both vanes. Movable vane is metal strip curved to follow general contour of container with clearance to prevent interference with other parts on inside wall of container. One end of movable vane mounted in bearing and other end connected to driveshaft equipped with handle. User rotates movable vane, net stretched and swept through container. Captures most of debris coarser than mesh as it moves, compressing debris as it arrives at fixed vane. Applications include cleaning swimming pools and tanks.

  4. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

  5. Debris-Covered Glaciers in the Sierra Nevada, California, and Their Implications for Snowline Reconstructions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.H.; Clark, M.M.; Gillespie, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Ice-walled melt ponds on the surfaces of active valley-floor rock glaciers and Matthes (Little Ice Age) moraines in the southern Sierra Nevada indicate that most of these landforms consist of glacier ice under thin (ca. 1 - 10 m) but continuous covers of rock-fall-generated debris. These debris blankets effectively insulate the underlying ice and greatly reduce rates of ablation relative to that of uncovered ice. Such insulation explains the observations that ice-cored rock glaciers in the Sierra, actually debris-covered glaciers, are apparently less sensitive to climatic warming and commonly advance to lower altitudes than do adjacent bare-ice glaciers. Accumulation-area ratios and toe-to-headwall-altitude ratios used to estimate equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) of former glaciers may therefore yield incorrect results for cirque glaciers subject to abundant rockfall. Inadvertent lumping of deposits from former debris-covered and bare-ice glaciers partially explains an apparently anomalous regional ELA gradient reported for the pre-Matthes Recess Peak Neoglacial advance. Distinguishing such deposits may be important to studies that rely on paleo-ELA estimates. Moreover, Matthes and Recess Peak ELA gradients along the crest evidently depend strongly on local orographic effects rather than latitudinal climatic trends, indicating that simple linear projections and regional climatic interpretations of ELA gradients of small glaciers may be unreliable.

  6. Planetary Collisions Outside the Solar System: Time Domain Characterization of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Huan Y. A.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Myers, Gordon; Cook, Michael; Erdelyi, Emery; Maloney, Chris; McMath, James; Persha, Gerald; Poshyachinda, Saran; Reichart, Daniel E.

    2015-05-01

    Luminous debris disks of warm dust in the terrestrial planet zones around solar-like stars were recently found to vary, which is indicative of ongoing large-scale collisions of rocky objects. We use Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm time-series observations in 2012 and 2013 (extended to 2014 in one case) to monitor five more debris disks with unusually high fractional luminosities (“extreme debris disk”), including P1121 in the open cluster M47 (80 Myr), HD 15407A in the AB Dor moving group (80 Myr), HD 23514 in the Pleiades (120 Myr), HD 145263 in the Upper Sco Association (10 Myr), and the field star BD+20 307 (≳1 Gyr). Together with the published results for ID8 in NGC 2547 (35 Myr), this makes the first systematic time-domain investigation of planetary impacts outside the solar system. Significant variations with timescales shorter than a year are detected in five out of the six extreme debris disks we monitored. However, different systems show diverse sets of characteristics in the time domain, including long-term decay or growth, disk temperature variations, and possible periodicity.

  7. Debris Examination Using Ballistic and Radar Integrated Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Anthony; Schottel, Matthew; Lee, David; Scully, Robert; Hamilton, Joseph; Kent, Brian; Thomas, Christopher; Benson, Jonathan; Branch, Eric; Hardman, Paul; Stuble, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Debris Examination Using Ballistic and Radar Integrated Software (DEBRIS) program was developed to provide rapid and accurate analysis of debris observed by the NASA Debris Radar (NDR). This software provides a greatly improved analysis capacity over earlier manual processes, allowing for up to four times as much data to be analyzed by one-quarter of the personnel required by earlier methods. There are two applications that comprise the DEBRIS system: the Automated Radar Debris Examination Tool (ARDENT) and the primary DEBRIS tool.

  8. Warm Little Inflaton.

    PubMed

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O; Rosa, João G

    2016-10-07

    We show that inflation can naturally occur at a finite temperature T>H that is sustained by dissipative effects, when the inflaton field corresponds to a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of a broken gauge symmetry. Similar to the Little Higgs scenarios for electroweak symmetry breaking, the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected against both quadratic divergences and the leading thermal corrections. We show that, nevertheless, nonlocal dissipative effects are naturally present and are able to sustain a nearly thermal bath of light particles despite the accelerated expansion of the Universe. As an example, we discuss the dynamics of chaotic warm inflation with a quartic potential and show that the associated observational predictions are in very good agreement with the latest Planck results. This model constitutes the first realization of warm inflation requiring only a small number of fields; in particular, the inflaton is directly coupled to just two light fields.

  9. Greenhouse warming still coming

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1986-05-02

    The growing store of carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation is a far larger and more pervasive problem than acid rain. The predictions of the latest models that have been applied to the problem, called GCM-mixed-layer ocean models, predict a global temperature increase between 3.5 and 4.2 degrees Celsius. They predict that the warming will be larger near the poles than near the equator. They also predict increases and decreases in precipitation depending on location, the largest changes being between 30/sup 0/N and 30/sup 0/S. If CO/sub 2/ and trace gas concentrations continue to rise as projected and model calculations are essentially correct, the increasing global scale warming should become much more evident over the next few decades. 1 figure.

  10. Warm Little Inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O.; Rosa, João G.

    2016-10-01

    We show that inflation can naturally occur at a finite temperature T >H that is sustained by dissipative effects, when the inflaton field corresponds to a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of a broken gauge symmetry. Similar to the Little Higgs scenarios for electroweak symmetry breaking, the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected against both quadratic divergences and the leading thermal corrections. We show that, nevertheless, nonlocal dissipative effects are naturally present and are able to sustain a nearly thermal bath of light particles despite the accelerated expansion of the Universe. As an example, we discuss the dynamics of chaotic warm inflation with a quartic potential and show that the associated observational predictions are in very good agreement with the latest Planck results. This model constitutes the first realization of warm inflation requiring only a small number of fields; in particular, the inflaton is directly coupled to just two light fields.

  11. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  12. Debris ingestion by juvenile marine turtles: an underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson Guimarães; Andrades, Ryan; Boldrini, Marcillo Altoé; Martins, Agnaldo Silva

    2015-04-15

    Marine turtles are an iconic group of endangered animals threatened by debris ingestion. However, key aspects related to debris ingestion are still poorly known, including its effects on mortality and the original use of the ingested debris. Therefore, we analysed the impact of debris ingestion in 265 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) over a large geographical area and different habitats along the Brazilian coast. We determined the death rate due to debris ingestion and quantified the amount of debris that is sufficient to cause the death of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we investigated the original use of the ingested debris. We found that a surprisingly small amount of debris was sufficient to block the digestive tract and cause death. We suggested that debris ingestion has a high death potential that may be masked by other causes of death. An expressive part of the ingested debris come from disposable and short-lived products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Assessment of the Current LEO Debris Environment and the Need for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-satellite test on the Fengun-1 C weather satellite in early 2007 and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 dramatically altered the landscape of the human-made orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit (LEO). The two events generated approximately 5500 fragments large enough to be tracked by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. Those fragments account for more than 60% increase to the debris population in LEO. However, even before the ASAT test, model analyses already indicated that the debris population (for those larger than 10 cm) in LEO had reached a point where the population would continue to increase, due to collisions among existing objects, even without any future launches. The conclusion implies that as satellites continue to be launched and unexpected breakup events continue to occur, commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be able to stop the collision-driven population growth. To remediate the debris environment in LEO, active debris removal must be considered. This presentation will provide an updated assessment of the debris environment after the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 collision, an analysis of several future environment projections based on different scenarios, and a projection of collision activities in LEO in the near future. The need to use active debris removal to stabilize future debris environment will be demonstrated and the effectiveness of various active debris removal strategies will be quantified.

  14. NASA's Long-term Debris Environment and Active Debris Removal Modeling Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the modeling activities for modeling of the long-term debris environment, the updated assessments of the environment, and the necessity to model the effectiveness of the technologies aimed at the removal of orbital debris. The model being used is named a LEO to GEO environment debris (LEGEND). It is a high fidelity three dimensional numerical simulation model with the capability to treat objects individually. It uses a Monte Carlo approach and a collision probability evaluation algorithm to simulate future satellite breakups and the growth of the debris populations.

  15. Comparison of an Inductance In-Line Oil Debris Sensor and Magnetic Plug Oil Debris Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Tuck, Roger; Showalter, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the performance of an inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor when detecting transmission component health in the same system under the same operating conditions. Both sensors were installed in series in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig during tests performed on 5 gear sets (pinion/gear) when different levels of damage occurred on the gear teeth. Results of this analysis found both the inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor have benefits and limitations when detecting gearbox component damage.

  16. Comparison of an Inductance In-Line Oil Debris Sensor and Magnetic Plug Oil Debris Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Tuck, Roger; Showalter, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the performance of an inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor when detecting transmission component health in the same system under the same operating conditions. Both sensors were installed in series in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig during tests performed on 5 gear sets (pinion/gear) when different levels of damage occurred on the gear teeth. Results of this analysis found both the inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor have benefits and limitations when detecting gearbox component damage.

  17. Spacelab J air filter debris analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenhuber, Donald C.

    1993-01-01

    Filter debris from the Spacelab module SLJ of STS-49 was analyzed for microbial contamination. Debris for cabin and avionics filters was collected by Kennedy Space Center personnel on 1 Oct. 1992, approximately 5 days postflight. The concentration of microorganisms found was similar to previous Spacelab missions averaging 7.4E+4 CFU/mL for avionics filter debris and 4.5E+6 CFU/mL for the cabin filter debris. A similar diversity of bacterial types was found in the two filters. Of the 13 different bacterial types identified from the cabin and avionics samples, 6 were common to both filters. The overall analysis of these samples as compared to those of previous missions shows no significant differences.

  18. Managing Debris After a Natural Disaster

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hauling Hurricane-related debris to the curb in participating areas. Following these specific guidelines (PDF) will make for a speedier removal process. Check with your local government on what is available to you.

  19. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  20. NASA-GSFC Orbital Debris Research Priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    While quite a lot is known about the orbital debris environment and how to limit its growth, more remains to be learned. The curent priorities for research and development, from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center perspective, will be discussed.

  1. Orbital Debris Shape Characterization Project Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    I have been working on a project to further our understanding of orbital debris by helping create a new dataset previously too complex to be implemented in past orbital debris propagation models. I am doing this by creating documentation and 3D examples and illustrations of the shape categories. Earlier models assumed all orbital debris to be spherical aluminum fragments. My project will help expand our knowledge of shape populations to 6 categories: Straight Needle/Rod/Cylinder, Bent Needle/Rod/Cylinder, Flat Plate, Bent Plate, Nugget/Parallelepiped/Spheroid, and Flexible. The last category, Flexible, is still up for discussion and may be modified. These categories will be used to characterize fragments in the DebriSat experiment.

  2. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  3. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  4. An adaptive strategy for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2014-04-01

    Many parameters influence the evolution of the near-Earth debris population, including launch, solar, explosion and mitigation activities, as well as other future uncertainties such as advances in space technology or changes in social and economic drivers that effect the utilisation of space activities. These factors lead to uncertainty in the long-term debris population. This uncertainty makes it difficult to identify potential remediation strategies, involving active debris removal (ADR), that will perform effectively in all possible future cases. Strategies that cannot perform effectively, because of this uncertainty, risk either not achieving their intended purpose, or becoming a hindrance to the efforts of spacecraft manufactures and operators to address the challenges posed by space debris. One method to tackle this uncertainty is to create a strategy that can adapt and respond to the space debris population. This work explores the concept of an adaptive strategy, in terms of the number of objects required to be removed by ADR, to prevent the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris population from growing in size. This was demonstrated by utilising the University of Southampton’s Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture to the Geosynchronous Environment (DAMAGE) tool to investigate ADR rates (number of removals per year) that change over time in response to the current space environment, with the requirement of achieving zero growth of the LEO population. DAMAGE was used to generate multiple Monte Carlo projections of the future LEO debris environment. Within each future projection, the debris removal rate was derived at five-year intervals, by a new statistical debris evolutionary model called the Computational Adaptive Strategy to Control Accurately the Debris Environment (CASCADE) model. CASCADE predicted the long-term evolution of the current DAMAGE population with a variety of different ADR rates in order to identify a removal rate that produced a zero net

  5. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act...

  6. Analyzing costs of space debris mitigation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Krag, H.; Bendisch, J.; Sdunnus, H.

    The steadily increasing number of space objects poses a considerable hazard to all kinds of spacecraft. To reduce the risks to future space missions different debris mitigation measures and spacecraft protection techniques have been investigated during the last years. However, the economic efficiency has not been considered yet in this context. This economical background is not always clear to satellite operators and the space industry. Current studies have the objective to evaluate the mission costs due to space debris in a business as usual (no mitigation) scenario compared to the missions costs considering debris mitigation. The aim i an estimation of thes time until the investment in debris mitigation will lead to an effective reduction of mission costs. This paper presents the results of investigations on the key problems of cost estimation for spacecraft and the influence of debris mitigation and shielding on cost. The shielding of a satellite can be an effective method to protect the spacecraft against debris impact. Mitigation strategies like the reduction of orbital lifetime and de- or re-orbit of non-operational satellites are methods to control the space debris environment. These methods result in an increase of costs. In a first step the overall costs of different types of unmanned satellites are analyzed. The key problem is, that it is not possible to provide a simple cost model that can be applied to all types of satellites. Unmanned spacecraft differ very much in mission, complexity of design, payload and operational lifetime. It is important to classify relevant cost parameters and investigate their influence on the respective mission. The theory of empirical cost estimation and existing cost models are discussed. A selected cost model is simplified and generalized for an application on all operational satellites. In a next step the influence of space debris on cost is treated, if the implementation of mitigation strategies is considered.

  7. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  8. Deformation of debris-ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Peter L.

    2014-09-01

    Mixtures of rock debris and ice are common in high-latitude and high-altitude environments and are thought to be widespread elsewhere in our solar system. In the form of permafrost soils, glaciers, and rock glaciers, these debris-ice mixtures are often not static but slide and creep, generating many of the landforms and landscapes associated with the cryosphere. In this review, a broad range of field observations, theory, and experimental work relevant to the mechanical interactions between ice and rock debris are evaluated, with emphasis on the temperature and stress regimes common in terrestrial surface and near-surface environments. The first-order variables governing the deformation of debris-ice mixtures in these environments are debris concentration, particle size, temperature, solute concentration (salinity), and stress. A key observation from prior studies, consistent with expectations, is that debris-ice mixtures are usually more resistant to deformation at low temperatures than their pure end-member components. However, at temperatures closer to melting, the growth of unfrozen water films at ice-particle interfaces begins to reduce the strengthening effect and can even lead to profound weakening. Using existing quantitative relationships from theoretical and experimental work in permafrost engineering, ice mechanics, and glaciology combined with theory adapted from metallurgy and materials science, a simple constitutive framework is assembled that is capable of capturing most of the observed dynamics. This framework highlights the competition between the role of debris in impeding ice creep and the mitigating effects of unfrozen water at debris-ice interfaces.

  9. Hot Wax Sweeps Debris From Narrow Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steven K.

    1990-01-01

    Safe and effective technique for removal of debris and contaminants from narrow passages involves entrainment of undesired material in thermoplastic casting material. Semisolid wax slightly below melting temperature pushed along passage by pressurized nitrogen to remove debris. Devised to clean out fuel passages in main combustion chamber of Space Shuttle main engine. Also applied to narrow, intricate passages in internal-combustion-engine blocks, carburetors, injection molds, and other complicated parts.

  10. Dimensional analysis of natural debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gordon; Ouyang, Chaojun

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows occur when masses of poorly sorted sediment, agitated and saturated with water, surge down slopes in response to gravitational attraction. They are of great concern because they often cause catastrophic disasters due to the long run-out distance and large impact forc-es. Different from rock avalanches and sediment-laden water floods, both solid and fluid phases affected by multiple parameters can influence the motion of debris flows and govern their rheological properties. A dimensional analysis for a systematic study of the governing parameters is presented in this manuscript. Multiple dimensionless numbers with clear physical meanings are critically reviewed. Field data on natural debris flows are available here based on the fifty years' observation and measurement in the Jiangjia Gully, which is located in the Dongchuan City, Yunnan Province of China. The applications of field data with the dimensional analysis for studying natural debris flows are demonstrated. Specific values of dimensionless numbers (e.g., modified Savage Number, Reynolds number, Friction number) for classifying flowing regimes of natural debris flows on the large scales are obtained. Compared to previous physical model tests conducted mostly on small scales, this study shows that the contact friction between particles dominates in natural debris flows. In addition, the solid inertial stress due to particle collisions and the pore fluid viscous shear stress play key roles in governing the dynamic properties of debris flows and the total normal stress acting on the slope surfaces. The channel width as a confinement to the flows can affect the solids discharge per unit width significantly. Furthermore, a dimensionless number related to pore fluid pressure dissipation is found for distinguishing surge flows and continuous flows in field satisfactorily. It indicates that for surge debris flows, the high pore fluid pressures generated in granular body dissipate quite slowly and may

  11. DebriSat Hypervelocity Impact Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    public release; distribution unlimited.  Targets: Scaled Multishock Shield, DebrisLV, and DebriSat  500-600 g hollow aluminum and nylon projectile...solar cells), NBK7 glass, titanium, sapphire, T1000 fiber, M55J carbon fiber, PVE film (sheet, wire ), kevlar, HDPE, polyurethane plastic, mylar...impact project. The design (Fig. 7) used a hollow aluminum cylinder made of 7075-T651 aluminum with a nylon sleeve. During assembly the aluminum

  12. Rapid movement of frozen debris-lobes: implications for permafrost degradation and slope instability in the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daanen, R.P.; Grosse, G.; Darrow, M.M.; Hamilton, T.D.; Jones, Benjamin M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a reconnaissance investigation of unusual debris mass-movement features on permafrost slopes that pose a potential infrastructure hazard in the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska. For the purpose of this paper, we describe these features as frozen debris-lobes. We focus on the characterisation of frozen debris-lobes as indicators of various movement processes using ground-based surveys, remote sensing, field and laboratory measurements, and time-lapse observations of frozen debris-lobe systems along the Dalton Highway. Currently, some frozen debris-lobes exceed 100 m in width, 20 m in height and 1000 m in length. Our results indicate that frozen debris-lobes have responded to climate change by becoming increasingly active during the last decades, resulting in rapid downslope movement. Movement indicators observed in the field include toppling trees, slumps and scarps, detachment slides, striation marks on frozen sediment slabs, recently buried trees and other vegetation, mudflows, and large cracks in the lobe surface. The type and diversity of observed indicators suggest that the lobes likely consist of a frozen debris core, are subject to creep, and seasonally unfrozen surface sediment is transported in warm seasons by creep, slumping, viscous flow, blockfall and leaching of fines, and in cold seasons by creep and sliding of frozen sediment slabs. Ground-based measurements on one frozen debris-lobe over three years (2008–2010) revealed average movement rates of approximately 1 cm day−1, which is substantially larger than rates measured in historic aerial photography from the 1950s to 1980s. We discuss how climate change may further influence frozen debris-lobe dynamics, potentially accelerating their movement. We highlight the potential direct hazard that one of the studied frozen debris-lobes may pose in the coming years and decades to the nearby Trans Alaska Pipeline System and the Dalton Highway, the main artery for transportation

  13. Rapid movement of frozen debris-lobes: implications for permafrost degradation and slope instability in the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daanen, R. P.; Grosse, G.; Darrow, M. M.; Hamilton, T. D.; Jones, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a reconnaissance investigation of unusual debris mass-movement features on permafrost slopes that pose a potential infrastructure hazard in the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska. For the purpose of this paper, we describe these features as frozen debris-lobes. We focus on the characterisation of frozen debris-lobes as indicators of various movement processes using ground-based surveys, remote sensing, field and laboratory measurements, and time-lapse observations of frozen debris-lobe systems along the Dalton Highway. Currently, some frozen debris-lobes exceed 100 m in width, 20 m in height and 1000 m in length. Our results indicate that frozen debris-lobes have responded to climate change by becoming increasingly active during the last decades, resulting in rapid downslope movement. Movement indicators observed in the field include toppling trees, slumps and scarps, detachment slides, striation marks on frozen sediment slabs, recently buried trees and other vegetation, mudflows, and large cracks in the lobe surface. The type and diversity of observed indicators suggest that the lobes likely consist of a frozen debris core, are subject to creep, and seasonally unfrozen surface sediment is transported in warm seasons by creep, slumping, viscous flow, blockfall and leaching of fines, and in cold seasons by creep and sliding of frozen sediment slabs. Ground-based measurements on one frozen debris-lobe over three years (2008-2010) revealed average movement rates of approximately 1 cm day-1, which is substantially larger than rates measured in historic aerial photography from the 1950s to 1980s. We discuss how climate change may further influence frozen debris-lobe dynamics, potentially accelerating their movement. We highlight the potential direct hazard that one of the studied frozen debris-lobes may pose in the coming years and decades to the nearby Trans Alaska Pipeline System and the Dalton Highway, the main artery for transportation

  14. Reflectance spectroscopy characterization of space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vananti, A.; Schildknecht, T.; Krag, H.

    2017-05-01

    When characterizing the space debris environment one important point is the identification of the physical properties of the space debris objects. Reflectance spectroscopy is a possible technique to study the surface material of these objects with observations from the ground. In this work the results collected from spectroscopy observations of space debris in orbit are presented. The observations were performed at the 1-m ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) in Tenerife equipped with a spectrograph in the 450-960 nm wavelength range. A preliminary classification using three different categories purely based on the shape and appearance of the spectra was proposed. Two debris objects with high AMR could be successfully associated with materials analyzed in the laboratory. The results show that the two debris objects are probably pieces of Kapton MLI with 'gold' and 'silver' coating, respectively. Color indices were extracted from the spectroscopic measurements. For high AMR objects the colors seem to be consistent with the proposed classification in three categories. The B-R and R-I laboratory measurements of 'gold' and 'silver' MLI taken from the literature are comparable with the obtained results.

  15. Gear Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to verify, when using an oil debris sensor, that accumulated mass predicts gear pitting damage and to identify a method to set threshold limits for damaged gears. Oil debris data was collected from 8 experiments with no damage and 8 with pitting damage in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Oil debris feature analysis was performed on this data. Video images of damage progression were also collected from 6 of the experiments with pitting damage. During each test, data from an oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. The data measured from the oil debris sensor during experiments with damage and with no damage was used to identify membership functions to build a simple fuzzy logic model. Using fuzzy logic techniques and the oil debris data, threshold limits were defined that discriminate between stages of pitting wear. Results indicate accumulated mass combined with fuzzy logic analysis techniques is a good predictor of pitting damage on spur gears.

  16. HOT DEBRIS DUST AROUND HD 106797

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Hirao, Takanori; Enya, Keigo; Fukagawa, Misato; Marshall, Jonathan P.; White, Glenn J.

    2009-04-10

    Photometry of the A0 V main-sequence star HD 106797 with AKARI and Gemini/T-ReCS is used to detect excess emission over the expected stellar photospheric emission between 10 and 20 {mu}m, which is best attributed to hot circumstellar debris dust surrounding the star. The temperature of the debris dust is derived as T {sub d} {approx} 190 K by assuming that the excess emission is approximated by a single temperature blackbody. The derived temperature suggests that the inner radius of the debris disk is {approx}14 AU. The fractional luminosity of the debris disk is 1000 times brighter than that of our own zodiacal cloud. The existence of such a large amount of hot dust around HD 106797 cannot be accounted for by a simple model of the steady state evolution of a debris disk due to collisions, and it is likely that transient events play a significant role. Our data also show a narrow spectral feature between 11 and 12 {mu}m attributable to crystalline silicates, suggesting that dust heating has occurred during the formation and evolution of the debris disk of HD 106797.

  17. Engineering Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Recent modeling studies on the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have underlined the need for active debris removal. A 2009 analysis by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office shows that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years, an active debris removal of about five objects per year is needed. The targets identified for removal are those with the highest mass and collision probability products in the environment. Many of these objects are spent upper stages with masses ranging from 1 to more than 8 metric tons, residing in several altitude regions and concentrated in about 10 inclination bands. To remove five of those objects on a yearly basis, in a cost-effective manner, represents many challenges in engineering, technology development, and operations. This paper outlines a conceptual end-to-end debris removal operation, including launch, precision tracking, rendezvous, stabilization (of the tumbling targets), capture, and deorbit of the targets; and highlights major challenges associated with the operations. Pros and cons of several proposed removal techniques are also evaluated.

  18. Conceptual design of an orbital debris collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonoghue, Peter (Editor); Brenton, Brian; Chambers, Ernest; Schwind, Thomas; Swanhart, Christopher; Williams, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The current Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) environment has become overly crowded with space debris. An evaluation of types of debris is presented in order to determine which debris poses the greatest threat to operation in space, and would therefore provide a feasible target for removal. A target meeting these functional requirements was found in the Cosmos C-1B Rocket Body. These launchers are spent space transporters which constitute a very grave risk of collision and fragmentation in LEO. The motion and physical characteristics of these rocket bodies have determined the most feasible method of removal. The proposed Orbital Debris Collector (ODC) device is designed to attach to the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), which provides all propulsion, tracking, and power systems. The OMV/ODC combination, the Rocket Body Retrieval Vehicle (RBRV), will match orbits with the rocket body, use a spin table to match the rotational motion of the debris, capture it, despin it, and remove it from orbit by allowing it to fall into the Earth's atmosphere. A disposal analysis is presented to show how the debris will be deorbited into the Earth's atmosphere. The conceptual means of operation of a sample mission is described.

  19. Marine debris survey manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, C.A.; Dixon, T.R.; Vining, I.; Duke, M.

    1991-10-01

    Over the last several years, concern has increased about the amount of man-made materials lost or discarded at sea and the potential impacts to the environment. The scope of the problem depends on the amounts and types of debris. One problem is making a regional comparison of debris is the lack of a standard methodology. The objective of this manual is to discuss designs and methodologies for assessment studies of marine debris. This manual has been written for managers, researchers, and others who are just entering this area of study and who seek guidance in designing marine debris surveys. Active researchers will be able to use this manual along with applicable references herein as a source for design improvement. To this end, the authors have reviewed and synthesized survey techniques that have been used in the past for assessing marine debris, such as sighting surveys, beach surveys, and trawl surveys, and have considered new methods (e.g., aerial photography). All techniques have been put into a general survey planning framework to assist in developing different marine debris surveys.

  20. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  1. LDEF meteoroid and debris database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardano, C. B.; See, Thomas H.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) database is maintained at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, and consists of five data tables containing information about individual features, digitized images of selected features, and LDEF hardware (i.e., approximately 950 samples) archived at JSC. About 4000 penetrations (greater than 300 micron in diameter) and craters (greater than 500 micron in diameter) were identified and photo-documented during the disassembly of LDEF at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), while an additional 4500 or so have subsequently been characterized at JSC. The database also contains some data that have been submitted by various PI's, yet the amount of such data is extremely limited in its extent, and investigators are encouraged to submit any and all M&D-type data to JSC for inclusion within the M&D database. Digitized stereo-image pairs are available for approximately 4500 features through the database.

  2. Micrometeoroids and debris on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, Jean-Claude

    1993-01-01

    Two experiments within the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) and devoted to the detection of cosmic dust were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). A variety of sensors and collecting devices have made possible the study of impact processes on dedicated sensors and on materials of technological interest. Examination of hypervelocity impact features on these experiments gives valuable information on the size distribution and nature of interplanetary dust particles in low-Earth orbit (LEO), within the 0.5-300 micrometer size range. However no crater smaller than 1.5 microns has been observed, thus suggesting a cut-off in the near Earth particle distribution. Chemical investigation of craters by EDX clearly shows evidence of elements (Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe) consistent with cosmic origin. However, remnants of orbital debris have been found in a few craters; this can be the result of particles in eccentric orbits about the Earth and of the 8 deg offset in the orientation of LDEF. Crater size distribution is compared with results from other dust experiments flown on LDEF and with current models. Possible origin and orbital evolution of micrometeoroids is discussed. Use of thin foil detectors for the chemical study of particle remnants looks promising for future experiments.

  3. Postdetonation nuclear debris for attribution.

    PubMed

    Fahey, A J; Zeissler, C J; Newbury, D E; Davis, J; Lindstrom, R M

    2010-11-23

    On the morning of July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was exploded in New Mexico on the White Sands Proving Ground. The device was a plutonium implosion device similar to the device that destroyed Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9 of that same year. Recently, with the enactment of US public law 111-140, the "Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act," scientists in the government and academia have been able, in earnest, to consider what type of forensic-style information may be obtained after a nuclear detonation. To conduct a robust attribution process for an exploded device placed by a nonstate actor, forensic analysis must yield information about not only the nuclear material in the device but about other materials that went into its construction. We have performed an investigation of glassed ground debris from the first nuclear test showing correlations among multiple analytical techniques. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence, obtainable only through microanalysis, that secondary materials used in the device can be identified and positively associated with the nuclear material.

  4. Postdetonation nuclear debris for attribution

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, A. J.; Zeissler, C. J.; Newbury, D. E.; Davis, J.; Lindstrom, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    On the morning of July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was exploded in New Mexico on the White Sands Proving Ground. The device was a plutonium implosion device similar to the device that destroyed Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9 of that same year. Recently, with the enactment of US public law 111-140, the “Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act,” scientists in the government and academia have been able, in earnest, to consider what type of forensic-style information may be obtained after a nuclear detonation. To conduct a robust attribution process for an exploded device placed by a nonstate actor, forensic analysis must yield information about not only the nuclear material in the device but about other materials that went into its construction. We have performed an investigation of glassed ground debris from the first nuclear test showing correlations among multiple analytical techniques. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence, obtainable only through microanalysis, that secondary materials used in the device can be identified and positively associated with the nuclear material. PMID:21059943

  5. Active Debris Removal Using Modified Launch Vehicle Upper Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S. Ali; Emanuelli, Matteo; Raval, Siddharth; Turconi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    During the past few years, several research programs have assessed the current state and future evolution of space debris in the Low Earth Orbit region. These studies indicate that space debris density could reach a critical level such that there will be a continuous increase in the number of debris objects, primarily driven by debris-debris collision activity known as the Kessler effect. These studies also highlight the urgency for active debris removal.An Active Debris Removal System (ADRS) is capable of approaching the debris object through a close-range rendezvous, stabilizing its attitude, establishing physical contact, and finally de-orbiting the debris object. The de-orbiting phase could be powered by propulsion systems such as chemical rockets or electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems.The aim of this project is to model and evaluate a debris removal mission in which an adapted rocket upper stage, equipped with an electrodynamic tether (EDT) system, is employed for de-orbiting a debris object. This ADRS package is installed initially as part of a launch vehicle on a normal satellite deployment mission, and a far-approach manoeuvre will be required to align the ADRS' orbit with that of the target debris. We begin by selecting a suitable target debris and launch vehicle, and then proceed with modelling the entire debris removal mission from launch to de-orbiting of the target debris object using Analytical Graphic Inc.'s Systems Tool Kit (STK).

  6. Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prevalence has changed over time, what types of debris are most commonly ingested, the geographic distribution of debris ingestion by marine turtles relative to global debris distribution, and which species and life-history stages are most likely to ingest debris. The probability of green (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) ingesting debris increased significantly over time, and plastic was the most commonly ingested debris. Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities. Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores. Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level.

  7. Global Warming And Meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratu, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to find new approaches and new ideas for my students to appreciate the importance of science in their daily life, I proposed a theme for them to debate. They had to search for global warming information and illustrations in the media, and discuss the articles they found in the classroom. This task inspired them to search for new information about this important and timely theme in science. I informed my students that all the best information about global warming and meltwater they found would be used in a poster that would help us to update the knowledge base of the Physics laboratory. I guided them to choose the most eloquent images and significant information. Searching and working to create this poster, the students arrived to better appreciate the importance of science in their daily life and to critically evaluate scientific information transmitted via the media. In the poster we created, one can find images, photos and diagrams and some interesting information: Global warming refers to the rising average temperature of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and its projected evolution. In the last 100 years, the Earth's average surface temperature increased by about 0.8 °C with about two thirds of the increase occurring over just the last three decades. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and scientists are more than 90% certain most of it is caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases produced by human activities such as deforestation and burning fossil fuel. They indicate that during the 21st century the global surface temperature is likely to rise a further 1.1 to 2.9 °C for the lowest emissions scenario and 2.4 to 6.4 °C for the highest predictions. An increase in global temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, and potentially result in expansion of subtropical deserts. Warming is expected to be strongest in the Arctic and would be associated with continuing decrease of

  8. A globally complete map of supraglacial debris cover and a new toolkit for debris cover research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreid, Sam; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    A growing canon of literature is focused on resolving the processes and implications of debris cover on glaciers. However, this work is often confined to a handful of glaciers that were likely selected based on criteria optimizing their suitability to test a specific hypothesis or logistical ease. The role of debris cover in a glacier system is likely to not go overlooked in forthcoming research, yet the magnitude of this role at a global scale has not yet been fully described. Here, we present a map of debris cover for all glacierized regions on Earth including the Greenland Ice Sheet using 30 m Landsat data. This dataset will begin to open a wider context to the high quality, localized findings from the debris-covered glacier research community and help inform large-scale modeling efforts. A global map of debris cover also facilitates analysis attempting to isolate first order geomorphological and climate controls of supraglacial debris production. Furthering the objective of expanding the inclusion of debris cover in forthcoming research, we also present an under development suite of open-source, Python based tools. Requiring minimal and often freely available input data, we have automated the mapping of: i) debris cover, ii) ice cliffs, iii) debris cover evolution over the Landsat era and iv) glacier flow instabilities from altered debris structures. At the present time, debris extent is the only globally complete quantity but with the expanding repository of high quality global datasets and further tool development minimizing manual tasks and computational cost, we foresee all of these tools being applied globally in the near future.

  9. Global warming - A reduced threat

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, P.J.; Stooksbury, D.E. )

    1992-10-01

    Issues associated with global warming are analyzed focusing on global and hemispheric temperature histories and trace gas concentrations; artificial warming from urban heat islands; high-latitude and diurnal temperatures; recent climate models; direct effects on vegetation of an increase in carbon dioxide; and compensatory cooling from other industrial products. Data obtained indicate that anthropogenerated sulfate emissions are mitigating some of the warming, and that increased cloudiness as a result of these emissions will further enhance night, rather than day, warming. It is noted that the sulfate emissions are not sufficient to explain all of the night warming. The sensitivity of climate to anthropogenerated aerosols, and the general lack of previously predicted warming, could drastically alter the debate on global warming in favor of less expensive policies. 61 refs.

  10. Laser system for space debris cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Erlandson, A. C.; Liedahl, D.

    2012-07-01

    Starting with intensity requirements for producing efficient ablation thrust, then applying orbital mechanics and taking beam transport into account, we have determined the laser pulse energy and the number of pulses required for removing orbital debris. Our calculations show that a ground-based, diode-pumped, gas-cooled multi-slab laser, that uses only modest extensions of existing technology, would be capable of removing most small debris from low-earth orbit, when used with a 3-m-diameter beam director. Such a laser would also be capable of moving large debris into orbits that avoid high-value satellites and of even removing large debris from orbit, by illuminating the debris over several encounters. The laser design we propose uses diode-pumped, Nd:glass, gas-cooled amplifiers with 25-cm square apertures. When operating at the laser fundamental wavelength of 1054 nm, each beamline would produce ˜ 8kJ/4ns pulses at 15 Hz. Two such beamlines, combined using established polarization-combining methods, would be sufficient for orbital debris cleaning. Alternatively, when operating at the second harmonic of 527 nm, each beamline would produce ˜ 7 kJ/4 ns pulses. Due to reduced beam divergence and a smaller beam diameter at the debris, a single harmonically-converted beamline can be useful. We estimate that the first-of-a-kind beamline could be deployed within 4-5 years of project start at a cost of 100-150M. Later beamlines would require less development and engineering costs and would have substantially lower overall cost.

  11. Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Krisko, Paula; Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A model of the manmade orbital debris environment is required by spacecraft designers, mission planners, and others in order to understand and mitigate the effects of the environment on their spacecraft or systems. A manmade environment is dynamic, and can be altered significantly by intent (e.g., the Chinese anti-satellite weapon test of January 2007) or accident (e.g., the collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 spacecraft in February 2009). Engineering models are used to portray the manmade debris environment in Earth orbit. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical and statistical techniques has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. The primary output of this model is the flux [#debris/area/time] as a function of debris size and year. ORDEM may be operated in spacecraft mode or telescope mode. In the former case, an analyst defines an orbit for a spacecraft and "flies" the spacecraft through the orbital debris environment. In the latter case, an analyst defines a ground-based sensor (telescope or radar) in terms of latitude, azimuth, and elevation, and the model provides the number of orbital debris traversing the sensor's field of view. An upgraded graphical user interface (GUI) is integrated with the software. This upgraded GUI uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional flux as a function of debris size for chosen analysis orbits (or views), for example, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2D) directional flux diagrams in local spacecraft elevation and azimuth.

  12. Searching for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Krisko, Paula; Silha, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We report on results from a search for optically faint debris (defined as R > 20th magnitude, or smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175)) at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope "Walter Baade" at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to characterize the brightness distribution of debris to the faintest limiting magnitude possible. Our data was obtained during 6 hours of observing time during the photometric nights of 26 and 27 March 2011 with the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a field of view (fov) of 0.5 degrees in diameter. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter, and calibrated by observations of Landolt standard stars. Our primary objective was to search for optically faint objects from one of the few known fragmentations at GEO: the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for unknown objects on similar orbits but with different mean anomalies. To establish the bright end of the debris population, calibrated observations were acquired on the same field centers, telescope rates, and time period with a similar filter on the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will show the calibrated brightness distributions from both telescopes, and compare the observed brightness distributions with that predicted for various population models of debris of different sizes.

  13. Debris analysis workstation: from concept to reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, David B.; Maethner, Scott R.; Shubert, Ann J.; Yates, Ken W.

    1995-06-01

    Determining the hazards from debris generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the US Air Force Phillips Laboratory Space Debris Research Program is developing a simulation platform called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW) which provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris studies. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for DoD space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts that are not debris experts. DAW has gone from concept to reality with the recent deliveries of Versions 0.1 to 0.4 to a number of customers. The current version of DAW incorporates a spacecraft break-up model, drag inclusive propagator, a collision dispersion model, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines, which together provide capabilities to conduct missile intercept range safety analyses. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated, user-friendly system, is an object oriented language layer that is scheduled to be added in 1995. Other candidate component models that are under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUN workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  14. Loopy, Floppy and Fragmented: Debris Characteristics Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, J.; Burgess, H. K.

    2016-02-01

    Marine debris is a world-wide problem threatening the health and safety of marine organisms, ecosystems, and humans. Recent and ongoing research shows that risk of harm is not associated with identity, but rather with a set of specific character states, where the character state space intersection is defined by the organism of interest. For example, intersections of material, color, rigidity and size predict the likelihood of an object being ingested: plastic, clear-white, floppy objects <100cm pose higher risks to sea turtles whereas yellow-red, rigid objects <10cm pose higher risks to albatrosses. A character state space approach allows prioritization of prevention and removal of marine debris informed by risk assessments for species of interest by comparing species ranges with spatio-temporal hotspots of all debris with characteristics known to be associated with increased risk of harm, regardless of identity. With this in mind, the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) developed and tested a 20 character data collection approach to quantifying the diversity and abundance of marine debris found on beaches. Development resulted in meta-analysis of the literature and expert opinion eliciting harmful character state space. Testing included data collection on inter-rater reliability and accuracy, where the latter included 75 participants quantifying marine debris characteristics on monthly surveys of 30 beaches along the Washington and Oregon coastlines over the past year. Pilot work indicates that characters must be simply and operationally defined, states must be listed, and examples must be provided for color states. Complex characters (e.g., windage, shape) are not replicable across multiple data collectors. Although data collection takes longer than other marine debris surveys for a given amount of debris and area surveyed, volunteer rapidity and accuracy improved within 3-5 surveys. Initial feedback indicated that volunteers were willing to

  15. Overview of the space debris environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshishnek, M. J.

    1995-03-01

    There is a component of the space environment that is man-made pollution, termed 'space debris' it exists at all inclinations and, primarily, at altitudes of roughly 350 km to 2000 km. The size of this debris ranges from several meters to a fraction of a micrometer in diameter, and the particle distribution follows an inverse power law, with the smaller size component far exceeding that of the larger. Debris is composed primarily of alumina from solid rocket motor exhausts, aluminum from spacecraft structures, and zinc and titanium oxides from thermal control coatings. The accepted model of the space debris environment is that of Kessler et al., a complex model that predicts the number of particles that will impact a surface as a function of altitude, inclination, solar cycle, and particle diameter, as well as their collision velocities. Recent data from LDEF has demonstrated both the accuracy and shortcomings of the Kessler model. Measured debris impactor fluxes are in good agreement with the model for ram surfaces. However, predictions of the model for other surfaces of a spacecraft are less accurate, most notably for the wake or trailing side. While the Kessler model is appropriate for long-term, average flux predictions, spatial-temporal impact fluxes measured on LDEF dramatically illustrated the presence of strong debris clouds that do not dissipate quickly in space and will encounter an orbiting spacecraft cyclically and repeatedly over its lifetime. LDEF data has also indicated the presence of debris in elliptical orbits, a fact not predicted by the Kessler model. This fact is responsible for the discrepancy between measured impact fluxes and predictions on trailing edge surfaces.

  16. Warm climate surprises

    SciTech Connect

    Overpeck, J.T.

    1996-03-29

    Over the last decade, paleoclimatic data from ice cores and sediments have shown that the climate system is capable of switching between significantly different modes, suggesting that climatic surprises may lie ahead. Most attention in the growing area of abrupt climatic change research continues to be focused on large changes observed during glacial periods. The weight of paleoclimatic evidence now suggests that conforting conclusions of benign warm climate variability may be incorrect. The article goes on to discuss the evidence for this. 17 refs.

  17. FLATs: Warming Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this proposal is to monitor the flat fields during the interval between the end of science observations and the exhaustion of cryogen and subsequent warming of the dewar to > 100K. These flats will provide a monitor for particulate comtamination {GROT} and detector lateral position {from the coronagraphic spot and FDA vignetting}. They will provide some measure of relative {flat field} and absolute QE variation as a function of temperature. When stars are visible they might provide a limited degree of focus determination.

  18. FLATs: Warming Up - continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, Daniela

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this proposal is to monitor the flat fields during the interval between the end of science observations and the exhaustion of cryogen and subsequent warming of the dewar to > 100K. These flats will provide a monitor for particulate comtamination {GROT} and detector lateral position {from the coronagraphic spot and FDA vignetting}. They will provide some measure of relative {flat field} and absolute QE variation as a function of temperature. When stars are visible they might provide a limited degree of focus determination.

  19. Mixed debris treatment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.C.; Porter, C.L.; Wallace, M.T.

    1993-10-01

    August 18, 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final revised treatment standards for hazardous debris, including mixed debris. (1) Whereas previous standards had been concentration based, the revised standards are performance based. Debris must be treated prior to land disposal, using specific technologies from one or more of the following families of debris treatment technologies: Extraction, destruction, or immobilization. Seventeen specific technologies with generic application are discussed in the final rule. The existing capabilities and types of debris at the INEL were scrubbed against the debris rule to determine an overall treatment strategy. Seven types of debris were identified: combustible, porous, non-porous, inherently hazardous, HEPA filters, asbestos contaminated, and reactive metals contaminated debris. With the exception of debris contaminated with reactive metals treatment can be achieved utilizing existing facilities coupled with minor modifications.

  20. Characterization of marine debris in North Carolina salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Viehman, Shay; Vander Pluym, Jenny L; Schellinger, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Marine debris composition, density, abundance, and accumulation were evaluated in salt marshes in Carteret County, North Carolina seasonally between 2007 and 2009. We assessed relationships between human use patterns and debris type. Wave effects on marine debris density were examined using a GIS-based forecasting tool. We assessed the influence of site wave exposure, period, and height on debris quantity. Presence and abundance of debris were related to wave exposure, vegetation type and proximity of the strata to human population and human use patterns. Plastic pieces accounted for the majority of all debris. Small debris (0-5 cm) was primarily composed of foam pieces and was frequently affiliated with natural wrack. Large debris (>100 cm) was encountered in all marsh habitat types surveyed and was primarily composed of anthropogenic wood and derelict fishing gear. Marsh cleanup efforts should be targeted to specific habitat types or debris types to minimize further damage to sensitive habitats.

  1. Linking social drivers of marine debris with actual marine debris on beaches.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Chris; Grage, Anna; Campbell, Marnie L

    2012-08-01

    The drivers (social) and pressures (physical) of marine debris have typically been examined separately. We redress this by using social and beach surveys at nine Tasmanian beaches, across three coastlines and within three categories of urbanisation, to examine whether people acknowledge that their actions contribute to the issue of marine debris, and whether these social drivers are reflected in the amount of marine debris detected on beaches. A large proportion (75%) of survey participants do not litter at beaches; with age, gender, income and residency influencing littering behaviour. Thus, participants recognise that littering at beaches is a problem. This social trend was reflected in the small amounts of debris that were detected. Furthermore, the amount of debris was not statistically influenced by the degree of beach urbanisation, the coastline sampled, or the proximity to beach access points. By linking social and physical aspects of this issue, management outcomes can be improved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Resolved imaging of the HR 8799 Debris disk with Herschel

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Brenda; Booth, Mark; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Marois, Christian; Kennedy, Grant; Wyatt, Mark; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Macintosh, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter maps of the debris disk associated with the HR 8799 planetary system. We resolve the outer disk emission at 70, 100, 160, and 250 μm and detect the disk at 350 and 500 μm. A smooth model explains the observed disk emission well. We observe no obvious clumps or asymmetries associated with the trapping of planetesimals that is a potential consequence of planetary migration in the system. We estimate that the disk eccentricity must be <0.1. As in previous work by Su et al., we find a disk with three components: a warm inner component and two outer components, a planetesimal belt extending from 100 to 310 AU, with some flexibility (±10 AU) on the inner edge, and the external halo that extends to ∼2000 AU. We measure the disk inclination to be 26° ± 3° from face-on at a position angle of 64° E of N, establishing that the disk is coplanar with the star and planets. The spectral energy distribution of the disk is well fit by blackbody grains whose semi-major axes lie within the planetesimal belt, suggesting an absence of small grains. The wavelength at which the spectrum steepens from blackbody, 47 ± 30 μm, however, is short compared with other A star debris disks, suggesting that there are atypically small grains likely populating the halo. The PACS longer wavelength data yield a lower disk color temperature than do MIPS data (24 and 70 μm), implying two distinct halo dust-grain populations.

  3. THE INNER DEBRIS STRUCTURE IN THE FOMALHAUT PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Defrére, Denis; Wang, Kuo-Song; Lee, Chin-Fei; Lai, Shih-Ping; Wilner, David J.; Lieshout, Rik van

    2016-02-10

    Fomalhaut plays an important role in the study of debris disks and small bodies in other planetary systems. The proximity and luminosity of the star make key features of its debris, like the water ice line, accessible. Here we present ALMA cycle 1, 870 μm (345 GHz) observations targeted at the inner part of the Fomalhaut system with a synthesized beam of 0.″45 × 0.″37 (∼3 AU linear resolution at the distance of Fomalhaut) and an rms of 26 μJy beam{sup −1}. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the ALMA data enable us to place strong constraints on the nature of the warm excess revealed by Spitzer and Herschel observations. We detect a point source at the star position with a total flux consistent with thermal emission from the stellar photosphere. No structures that are brighter than 3σ are detected in the central 15 AU × 15 AU region. Modeling the spectral energy distribution using parameters expected for a dust-producing planetesimal belt indicates a radial location in the range of ∼8–15 AU. This is consistent with the location where ice sublimates in Fomalhaut, i.e., an asteroid-belt analog. The 3σ upper limit for such a belt is <1.3 mJy at 870 μm. We also interpret the 2 and 8–13 μm interferometric measurements to reveal the structure in the inner 10 AU region as dust naturally connected to this proposed asteroid belt by Poynting–Robertson drag, dust sublimation, and magnetically trapped nanograins.

  4. The Inner Debris Structure in the Fomalhaut Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Defrére, Denis; Wang, Kuo-Song; Lai, Shih-Ping; Wilner, David J.; van Lieshout, Rik; Lee, Chin-Fei

    2016-02-01

    Fomalhaut plays an important role in the study of debris disks and small bodies in other planetary systems. The proximity and luminosity of the star make key features of its debris, like the water ice line, accessible. Here we present ALMA cycle 1, 870 μm (345 GHz) observations targeted at the inner part of the Fomalhaut system with a synthesized beam of 0.″45 × 0.″37 (˜3 AU linear resolution at the distance of Fomalhaut) and an rms of 26 μJy beam-1. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the ALMA data enable us to place strong constraints on the nature of the warm excess revealed by Spitzer and Herschel observations. We detect a point source at the star position with a total flux consistent with thermal emission from the stellar photosphere. No structures that are brighter than 3σ are detected in the central 15 AU × 15 AU region. Modeling the spectral energy distribution using parameters expected for a dust-producing planetesimal belt indicates a radial location in the range of ˜8-15 AU. This is consistent with the location where ice sublimates in Fomalhaut, i.e., an asteroid-belt analog. The 3σ upper limit for such a belt is <1.3 mJy at 870 μm. We also interpret the 2 and 8-13 μm interferometric measurements to reveal the structure in the inner 10 AU region as dust naturally connected to this proposed asteroid belt by Poynting-Robertson drag, dust sublimation, and magnetically trapped nanograins. Fomalhaut is a triple system; here we refer to the Fomalhaut planetary system as the one around the primary star Fomalhaut A.

  5. Modelling the inner debris disc of HR 8799

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contro, B.; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Marshall, J. P.; Hinse, T. C.

    2016-11-01

    In many ways, the HR 8799 planetary system strongly resembles our own. It features four giant planets and two debris belts, analogues to the Asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. Here, we present the results of dynamical simulations of HR8799's inner debris belt, to study its structure and collisional environment. Our results suggest that HR 8799's inner belt is highly structured, with gaps between regions of dynamical stability. The belt is likely constrained between sharp inner and outer edges, located at ˜6 and ˜8 au, respectively. Its inner edge coincides with a broad gap cleared by the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with HR 8799e. Within the belt, planetesimals are undergoing a process of collisional attrition like that observed in the Asteroid belt. However, whilst the mean collision velocity in the Asteroid belt exceeds 5 km s-1, the majority of collisions within HR 8799's inner belt occur with velocities of order 1.2 km s-1, or less. Despite this, they remain sufficiently energetic to be destructive - giving a source for the warm dust detected in the system. Interior to the inner belt, test particles remain dynamically unstirred, aside from narrow bands excited by distant high-order resonances with HR 8799e. This lack of stirring is consistent with earlier thermal modelling of HR 8799's infrared excess, which predicted little dust inside 6 au. The inner system is sufficiently stable and unstirred that the formation of telluric planets is feasible, although such planets would doubtless be subject to a punitive impact regime, given the intense collisional grinding required in the inner belt to generate the observed infrared excess.

  6. Collisional modelling of the debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Ch.; Löhne, T.; Krivov, A. V.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Eiroa, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of the debris disc around the nearby K2 V star HIP 17439. In the context of the Herschel DUNES key programme, the disc was observed and spatially resolved in the far-IR with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. In a previous study, we assumed that the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust are independent power laws. There, several scenarios capable of explaining the observations were suggested after exploring a very broad range of possible model parameters. In this paper, we perform a follow-up in-depth collisional modelling of these scenarios to further distinguish between them. In our models we consider collisions, direct radiation pressure, and drag forces, which are the actual physical processes operating in debris discs. We find that all scenarios discussed in the first paper are physically reasonable and can reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution along with the PACS surface brightness profiles reasonably well. In one model, the dust is produced beyond 120 au in a narrow planetesimal belt and is transported inwards by Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag. Good agreement with the observed radial profiles would require stellar winds by about an order of magnitude stronger than the solar value, which is not confirmed - although not ruled out - by observations. Another model consists of two spatially separated planetesimal belts, a warm inner and a cold outer one. This scenario would probably imply the presence of planets clearing the gap between the two components. Finally, we show qualitatively that the observations can be explained by assuming the dust is produced in a single, but broad planetesimal disc with a surface density of solids rising outwards, as expected for an extended disc that experiences a natural inside-out collisional depletion. Prospects of distinguishing between the competing scenarios by future observations are discussed.

  7. Glacial-interglacial climate changes recorded by debris flow fan deposits, Owens Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda-Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.

    2017-08-01

    It is hotly debated whether and how climate changes are recorded by terrestrial stratigraphy. Basin sediments produced by catchment-alluvial fan systems may record past climate over a variety of timescales, and could offer unique information about how climate controls sedimentation. Unfortunately, there are fundamental uncertainties about how climatic variables such as rainfall and temperature translate into sedimentological signals. Here, we examine 35 debris flow fan surfaces in Owens Valley, California, that record deposition throughout the past 125,000 years, during which climate has varied significantly. We show that the last full glacial-interglacial cycle is recorded with high fidelity by the grain size distributions of the debris flow deposits. These flows transported finer sediment during the cooler glacial climate, and became systematically coarser-grained as the climate warmed and dried. We explore the physical mechanisms that might explain this signal, and rule out changes in sediment supply through time. Instead, we propose that grain size records past changes in storm intensity, which is responsible for debris flow initiation in this area and is decoupled from average rainfall rates. This is supported by an exponential Clausius-Clapeyron-style scaling between grain size and temperature, and also reconciles with climate dynamics and the initiation of debris flows. The fact that these alluvial fans exhibit a strong, sustained sensitivity to orbital climate changes sheds new light on how eroding landscapes and their sedimentary products respond to climatic forcing. Finally, our findings highlight the importance of threshold-controlled events, such as storms and debris flows, in driving erosion and sedimentation at the Earth's surface in response to climate change.

  8. Multi-Decadal Comparison between Clean-Ice and Debris-Covered Glaciers in the Eastern Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J. M.; Rupper, S.

    2014-12-01

    Himalayan glaciers are important natural resources and climatic indicators. Many of these glaciers have debris-covered ablation zones, while others are mostly clean ice. Regarding glacier dynamics, it is expected that debris-covered glaciers will respond differently to atmospheric warming compared to clean ice glaciers. In the Bhutanese Himalaya, there are (1) north flowing clean-ice glaciers with high velocities, likely with large amounts of basal sliding, and (2) south flowing debris-covered glaciers with slow velocities, thermokarst features, and influenced more by the Indian Summer Monsoon. This region, therefore, is ideal for comparing the dynamical response of clean-ice versus debris-covered glaciers to climatic change. In particular, previous studies have suggested the north flowing glaciers are likely adjusting more dynamically (i.e. retreating) in response to climate variations, while the south flowing glaciers are likely experiencing downwasting, with stagnant termini locations. We test this hypothesis by assessing glacier changes over three decades in the Bhutan region using a newly-developed workflow to extract DEMs and orthorectified imagery from both 1976 historical spy satellite images and 2006 ASTER images. DEM differencing for both debris-covered and clean glaciers allows for quantification of glacier surface elevation changes, while orthorectified imagery allows for measuring changes in glacier termini. The same stereo-matching, denoising, and georeferencing methodology is used on both datasets to ensure consistency, while the three decade timespan allows for a better signal to noise ratio compared to studies performed on shorter timescales. The results of these analyses highlight the similarities and differences in the decadal response of clean-ice and debris-covered glaciers to climatic change, and provide insights into the complex dynamics of debris-covered glaciers in the monsoonal Himalayas.

  9. The glaciology of IRD events: warming and ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2003-04-01

    Heinrich events, the enormous glacial-period ice-rafting episodeshave been posited to be due to large-scale surges of the Laurentide ice-sheet (3). However, more frequent events such as the Bond events are difficult to explain this way. Recently acquired geological evidence (2,4) suggests that climatic perturbations are correlated with some N. Atlantic IRD events. A model (1) which show how climate perturbations can lead to IRD events is reviewed. The model shows how 20-50km retreats induced by ablation rates of 2 m/yr provide sufficient debris flux through the grounding line to produce large sedimentation events. Such ablation would reduce ice-shelf extent markedly, permitting debris to reach the calving front and be transported by icebergs leading to ice-rafted debris (IRD) events. Surges are not necessary conditions for the production of large IRD events. The glacial dynamics of this climate perturbation model is compared with the surge theory, with particular emphasis on the amount of sediment that either method can deliver to the oceans. Consideration of the non-exclusivety and consistency of the two mechanisms is emphasised. (1) R.C.A. Hindmarsh and A. Jenkins, Centurial-millenial ice-rafted debris pulses from ablating marine ice sheets, Geophys Res. Lett 22(12), 2477-2480, 2001; (2) Paul C. Knutz et al. G3 Multidecadal ocean variability and NW European ice sheet surges during the last deglaciation G3 3(12) 17 December 2002 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000351; (3) MacAyeal,D.R. Binge/purge oscillations of the Laurentide ice-sheet as a cause of the North-Atlantic's Heinrich events, Paleoceanography, 8(6), p.775-784, (1993); (4) M. Moros, et. al. Were glacial iceberg surges in the North Atlantic triggered by climatic warming?, Marine Geology, 192(4), 2002, p.393-417

  10. Debris mitigation techniques for petawatt-class lasers in high debris environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Kimmel, Mark; Geissel, Matthias; Robertson, Grafton; Ramsey, Marc; Headley, Daniel; Atherton, Briggs

    2010-04-01

    This paper addresses debris mitigation techniques for two different kinds of debris sources that are found in the high-energy density community. The first debris source stems from the laser-target interaction and this debris can be mitigated by avoiding a direct line of sight to the debris source (e.g. by using a sacrificial fold mirror) or by inserting a thin debris shield. Several thin film debris shields have been investigated and nitrocellulose was found to be the best suited. The second debris source originates from an external high-energy density driver or experiment. In our specific case, this is the Z accelerator, a Z-pinch machine that generates 2 MJ of x rays at 300 TW. The center section of the Z accelerator is an extremely violent environment which requires the development of novel debris mitigation approaches for backlighting with petawatt lasers. Two such approaches are presented in this paper. First, a self-closing focusing cone. In our facility, the focused beam on target is fully enclosed inside a solid focusing cone. In the first debris mitigation scenario, the last part of the cone has a “flapper” that should seal the cone when the pressure wave from the Z-pinch explosion hits it. In the second scenario, an enclosed target assembly is used, with the last part of the focusing cone connected to a “target can” which houses the laser target. The laser produced x rays for backlighting escape through a 3 mm diameter hole that is protected by an x-ray filter stack. Both techniques are discussed in detail and have been successfully tested on the Z accelerator.

  11. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  12. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; ilha, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan 1 telescope Walter Baade at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is estimated to be fainter than 22. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  13. Debris Flow Models With Vertical Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcelwaine, J. N.; Kowalski, J.

    2011-12-01

    The destructive power of debris flows is enormous and hence there is a need for quantitative models that can accurately describe their behavior and predict their flow paths, heights, velocities and corresponding impact pressures. The dynamics of a debris flows is effected by the pore pressure, which can be measured in experiments and in the field, but existing theories to not model this well. We introduce a new class of shallow debris flow models that includes an equation for the vertical distribution of material and show how this gives predictions of the pore pressure and can effect flow mobility. Debris flows exhibit different flow forms depending on water and solid concentration, particle size distribution and the topography of the flow path. The complex interplay between the fluid and solids of a whole range of different grain sizes leads to physical phenomena such as the development of a front with large boulders, lateral levee formation and, due to a varying fraction of particles being in suspension, an effective basal fluid pressure that can exceed the pure fluids hydrostatic pressure. Large scale debris flow data of the Illgraben torrent, Switzerland, show that a varying basal fluid pressure is characteristic for the snout of debris flows with a granular front and significantly affects basal shear stresses. A comprehensive mathematical debris flow model that explains all the observed phenomena will be extremely complicated; if it is achievable at all. However, promising approaches exist that successfully describe some of the effects in simple situations. Yet the observed basal fluid pressure data in granular front flows is not explained satisfactorily up to this point. One reason for this is that any change of the effective basal fluid pressure is associated with an internal redistribution of the solids above, and hence is caused by relative motion between the phases within the flowing body. However, this inter-component slip is usually neglected in the

  14. A Search For Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2011-09-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope ‘Walter Baade’ at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe preliminary results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r’ filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is measured to be fainter tan R = 21. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  15. Nature of the Warm Excess in eps Eri: Asteroid belt or Dragged-in Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George; Marengo, Massimo; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2016-01-01

    Eps Eri and its debris disk provide a unique opportunity to probe the outer zones of a planetary system due to its young age (roughly 1 Gyr) and proximity (3.22 pc, the closest prominent debris disk by more than a factor of two). It is the Rosetta Stone for more distant exoplanetary debris systems and thus critical to understanding the mid-term evolution of our Solar System. From resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter along with spectra from 10-35 and 55-95 microns, the eps Eri disk was suggested to have a complex structure, with multiple zones in both warm (asteroid-like) and cold (KBO-like) components. Alternatively, the warm excess can also originate from small grains in the cold disk, which are transported inward by the combination of Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drags. Here we present a SOFIA/FORCAST 35 micron image of the system, and provide additional constraints on the nature of the warm excess inferred fromprevious Spitzer and Herschel observations.

  16. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Beach, R. J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Caird, J. A.

    2010-10-08

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  17. Debris-flow mobilization from landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Field observations, laboratory experiments, and theoretical analyses indicate that landslides mobilize to form debris flows by three processes: (a) widespread Coulomb failure within a sloping soil, rock, or sediment mass, (b) partial or complete liquefaction of the mass by high pore-fluid pressures, and (c) conversion of landslide translational energy to internal vibrational energy (i.e. granular temperature). These processes can operate independently, but in many circumstances they appear to operate simultaneously and synergistically. Early work on debris-flow mobilization described a similar interplay of processes but relied on mechanical models in which debris behavior was assumed to be fixed and governed by a Bingham or Bagnold rheology. In contrast, this review emphasizes models in which debris behavior evolves in response to changing pore pressures and granular temperatures. One-dimensional infinite-slope models provide insight by quantifying how pore pressures and granular temperatures can influence the transition from Coulomb failure to liquefaction. Analyses of multidimensional experiments reveal complications ignored in one-dimensional models and demonstrate that debris-flow mobilization may occur by at least two distinct modes in the field.

  18. Orbital debris minimization and mitigation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P., Jr.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Reynolds, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Man's activity in space has generated significant amounts of debris that remain in orbit for periods of sufficient duration to become a hazard to future space activities. Upper stages and spacecraft that have ended their functional life are the largest objects. In the past, additional debris has been generated by inadvertent explosions of upper stages and spacecraft, by intentional explosions for military reasons, and possibly by a few breakups resulting from collisions. In the future, debris can be generated by collisions among spacecraft as the number of orbital objects continues to grow at rates greater than natural forces remove them from orbit. There are design and operations practices that can minimize the inadvertent generation of debris. There are other design and operations options for removing objects from space at the end of their useful service so they are not available as a source for the generation of future debris. Those studies are the primary concern of this paper. The most economic removal of objects is achieved when those objects have the capability to execute the necessary maneuvers with their own systems and resources. The most costly option is to have some other system remove the spacecraft after it has become a derelict. Numerous options are being studied to develop systems and techniques that can remove spacecraft from useful orbits at the end of their useful life and do so for the least mass penalty and economic cost.

  19. Debris dynamics under evection and inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Santos, M. T.; Celestino, C. C.; Winter, O. C.; Neto, E. V.; Cordeiro, R. R.

    The human activity in exploring the space has generated undesirable artificial debris Unfortunately the number of them is increasing so fast that a tremendous problem is arising The natural and artificial debris are distributed in a very large range of altitude and according to the semi major axis of the orbit the particle may survive for very long time For low altitude less than 200 km the life time of the particles is mostly dominated by the atmospheric drag while for more distant debris different disturbing forces should be considered and the dynamics is slight more complicated Although the maximum concentration of the debris is not at high altitude the problem at high altitudes is important since the mitigation mechanism to clean these regions is very slow Usually Poynting Robertson P-R effect and similar other forces are not efficient to remove rapidly the particles at high altitudes in opposition to human activities which are always feeding more rapidly almost any region of the space Therefore since the debris survive for very long time it is important to increase our theoretical knowledge on the dynamics of these regions In this work we show the existence of some important resonances which may give significant variations in the inclination and eccentricity of the particle In the case of the Earth they occur at about 10128 5 km and 12309 8 km and are related to a commensurability involving the mean longitude of the sun and

  20. Orbital debris minimization and mitigation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P., Jr.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Reynolds, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Man's activity in space has generated significant amounts of debris that remain in orbit for periods of sufficient duration to become a hazard to future space activities. Upper stages and spacecraft that have ended their functional life are the largest objects. In the past, additional debris has been generated by inadvertent explosions of upper stages and spacecraft, by intentional explosions for military reasons, and possibly by a few breakups resulting from collisions. In the future, debris can be generated by collisions among spacecraft as the number of orbital objects continues to grow at rates greater than natural forces remove them from orbit. There are design and operations practices that can minimize the inadvertent generation of debris. There are other design and operations options for removing objects from space at the end of their useful service so they are not available as a source for the generation of future debris. Those studies are the primary concern of this paper. The most economic removal of objects is achieved when those objects have the capability to execute the necessary maneuvers with their own systems and resources. The most costly option is to have some other system remove the spacecraft after it has become a derelict. Numerous options are being studied to develop systems and techniques that can remove spacecraft from useful orbits at the end of their useful life and do so for the least mass penalty and economic cost.

  1. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Beach, R. J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Caird, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called "LIFE" laser system. Because a single "LIFE" beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  2. ESA Technologies for Space Debris Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormnes, K.; Le Letty, R.; Summerer, L.; Schonenborg, R.; Dubois-Matra, O.; Luraschi, E.; Cropp, A.; Krag, H.; Delaval, J.

    2013-08-01

    Space debris is an existing and growing problem for space operations. Studies show that for a continued use of LEO, 5 - 10 large and strategically chosen debris need to be removed every year. The European Space Agency (ESA) is actively pursuing technologies and systems for space debris removal under its Clean Space initiative. This overview paper describes the activities that are currently ongoing at ESA and that have already been completed. Additionally it outlines the plan for the near future. The technologies under study fall in two main categories corresponding to whether a pushing or a pulling manoeuvre is required for the de-orbitation. ESA is studying the option of using a tethered capture system for controlled de-orbitation through pulling where the capture is performed using throw-nets or alternatively a harpoon. The Agency is also studying rigid capture systems with a particular emphasis on tentacles (potentially combined with a robotic arm). Here the de-orbitation is achieved through a push-manoeuvre. Additionally, a number of activities will be discussed that are ongoing to develop supporting technologies for these scenarios, or to develop systems for de-orbiting debris that can be allowed to re-enter in an uncontrolled manner. The short term goal and main driver for the current technology developments is to achieve sufficient TRL on required technologies to support a potential de-orbitation mission to remove a large and strategically chosen piece of debris.

  3. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

    2010-02-05

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  4. Space debris and related legal issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferranderie, G.

    2001-10-01

    "We are now witnessing an extraordinary event, the first of the 21st century, the MIR space station's plunge to Earth, producing of course impressive fireworks, but also a massive amount of debris." The first launchings created the first space debris. Space debris is the immediate, logical consequence of the exploration and use of outer space (around the Earth) involving manmade objects. This situation will persist, making launching, exploration and use increasingly difficult and risky - unless we turn to the type of rocket dreamt up by Hergé for Tintin's trips to the Moon. Worldwide concern has been expressed in particular in the Vienna Space Millennium Declaration adopted at the Unispace Conference in Vienna in July 1999, with the contributions of the Space Law Workshop organised by the International Institute of Space Law (session eight).

  5. Dust and Debris Tolerant Retractable Cover Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Dokos, Adam G. (Inventor); Townsend, III, Ivan I. (Inventor); Carlson, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Bastin, Gary L. (Inventor); Murtland, Kevin A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A debris exclusion and removal apparatus for connectors which have retractable cover configurations which include internal wafers that clean the connectors prior to mating. XXXX connectors. More particularly, embodiments relate to dust tolerant connectors. Some embodiments also relate to an intelligent connector system capable of detecting damage to or faults within a conductor and then rerouting the energy to a non-damaged spare conductor. Discussion Connectors of the present invention may be used to transfer electrical current, fluid, and gas in a wide variety of environments containing dust and other debris, wherein that debris may present substantial challenges. For example, lunar/Martian dust intrusion and/or accumulation in connectors used to transfer oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, etc., may lead to larger system failures as well as loss of life in extraterrestrial human exploration endeavors. Additionally, embodiments of the present invention may also be suitable for use where connectors must resist water intrusion, such as terrestrial deep water operations.

  6. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Campbell, David; Marine, Micky; Saad, Mohamad; Bertles, Daniel; Nichols, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Advanced designs are being continued to develop the ultimate goal of a GETAWAY special to demonstrate economical removal of orbital debris utilizing local resources in orbit. The fundamental technical feasibility was demonstrated in 1988 through theoretical calculations, quantitative computer animation, a solar focal point cutter, a robotic arm design and a subcase model. Last year improvements were made to the solar cutter and the robotic arm. Also performed last year was a mission analysis which showed the feasibility of retrieve at least four large (greater than 1500 kg) pieces of debris. Advances made during this reporting period are the incorporation of digital control with the existing placement arm, the development of a new robotic manipulator arm, and the study of debris spin attenuation. These advances are discussed.

  7. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This work continues to develop advanced designs toward the ultimate goal of a Get Away Special to demonstrate economical removal of orbital debris using local resources in orbit. The fundamental technical feasibility was demonstrated in 1988 through theoretical calculations, quantitative computer animation, a solar focal point cutter, a robotic arm design, and a subscale model. Last year improvements were made to the solar cutter and the robotic arm. Also performed last year was a mission analysis that showed the feasibility of retrieving at least four large (greater than 1500-kg) pieces of debris. Advances made during this reporting period are the incorporation of digital control with the existing placement arm, the development of a new robotic manipulator arm, and the study of debris spin attenuation. These advances are discussed here.

  8. Parametric analysis: SOC meteoroid and debris protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The meteoroid and man made space debris environments of an Earth orbital manned space operations center are discussed. Protective shielding thickness and design configurations for providing given levels of no penetration probability were also calculated. Meteoroid/debris protection consists of a radiator/shield thickness, which is actually an outer skin, separated from the pressure wall, thickness by a distance. An ideal shield thickness, will, upon impact with a particle, cause both the particle and shield to vaporize, allowing a minimum amount of debris to impact the pressure wall itself. A shield which is too thick will crater on the outside, and release small particles of shield from the inside causing damage to the pressure wall. Inversely, if the shield is too thin, it will afford no protection, and the backup must provide all necessary protection. It was concluded that a double wall concept is most effective.

  9. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  10. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  11. Orbiting meteoroid and debris counting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Armstrong, Dwayne; Crockett, Sharon K.; Jones, James L., Jr.; Kassel, Philip C., Jr.; Wortman, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Orbiting Meteoroid and Debris Counting Experiment (OMDC) flew for approximately 90 days in a highly elliptical earth orbit onboard the Clementine Interstage Adapter (ISA) Spacecraft. This experiment obtained data on the impact flux of natural micrometeoroids and it provided limited information on the population of small mass man-made debris as a function of altitude in near earth space. The flight of the OMDC experiment on the ISA spacecraft also demonstrated that the ultra-lightweight, low-power, particle impact detector system that was used is a viable system for flights on future spacecraft to monitor the population of small mass man-made debris particles and to map the cosmic dust environment encountered on interplanetary missions. An overview of the ISA spacecraft mission, the approach to the OMDC experiment, and the data obtained by the experiment are presented.

  12. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, Jason W.; Mcguire, Luke; Rengers, Francis; Smith, Joel B.; Staley, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  13. Frozen debris lobes, permafrost slope instability, and a potential infrastructure hazard in the south-central Brooks Range of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daanen, R. P.; Darrow, M.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Here we report on investigations carried out at unusual debris mass-movement features (frozen debris lobes) on permafrost slopes in the south central portion of the Brooks Range of northern Alaska. The features under investigation are located in mountainous terrain near the southern border of continuous permafrost. The frozen debris lobes consist mainly of boulders, cobles, platy gravel sand and silt frozen debris derived from weathering mountain tops. The general dimensions of these lobes are either lobate or tongue shaped with widths up to 500 m and lengths up to 1200 m. In accumulation zones where slopes converge, the debris slowly moves as solifluction lobes, mud flows and potentially sliding toward the valley. These features were previously referred to as stable rock glaciers in the past, as evidenced by a dense cover of vegetation, and exhibiting no known downslope movement. Our investigations however, have shown that these features are indeed moving downslope as a result of creep, slumping, viscous flow, blockfall and leaching of fines in the summer; and in cold seasons by creep and sliding of frozen sediment slabs. Movement indicators observed in the field include toppling trees, slumps and scarps, detachment slides, striation marks on frozen sediment slabs, recently buried trees and other vegetation, mudflows, and large cracks in the lobe surface. Ground-based measurements on one frozen debris-lobe over three years (2008-2010) revealed average movement rates of approximately 1 cm day-1, which is substantially larger than rates measured in historic aerial photography from the 1950s to 1980s. Current observations , through lidar, ifsar, insar and ground based measurements using boreholes, geophysics and repeat photography of these features show an increase in movement activity that could be the result of rising summer temperatures in the region. Warming of ice rich permafrost slopes and frozen debris lobes in the Brooks Range pose a direct threat to the

  14. The Debris Flow of September 20, 2014, in Mud Creek, Mount Shasta Volcano, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Fuente, J. A.; Bachmann, S.; Courtney, A.; Meyers, N.; Mikulovsky, R.; Rust, B.; Coots, F.; Veich, D.

    2015-12-01

    The debris flow in Mud Creek on September 20, 2014 occurred during a warm spell at the end of an unusually long and hot summer. No precipitation was recorded during or immediately before the event, and it appears to have resulted from rapid glacial melt. It initiated on the toe of the Konwakiton Glacier, and immediately below it. The flow track was small in the upper parts (40 feet wide), but between 8,000 and 10,000 feet in elevation, it entrained a large volume of debris from the walls and bed of the deeply incised gorge and transported it down to the apex of the Mud Creek alluvial fan (4,800'). At that point, it overflowed the channel and deposited debris on top of older (1924) debris flow deposits, and the debris plugged a road culvert 24 feet wide and 12 feet high. A small fraction of the flow was diverted to a pre-existing overflow channel which parallels Mud Creek, about 1,000 feet to the west. The main debris flow traveled down Mud Creek, confined to the pre-existing channel, but locally got to within a foot or so of overflowing the banks. At elevation 3920', video was taken during the event by a private citizen and placed on YouTube. The video revealed that the flow matrix consisted of a slurry of water/clay/silt/sand/gravel, transporting boulders 1-6 feet in diameter along with the flow. Cobble-sized rock appears to be absent. Sieve analysis of the debris flow matrix material revealed a fining of particles in a downstream direction, as expected. The thickness of deposits on the fan generally decreased in a downstream direction. Deposits were 5-6 feet deep above the Mud Creek dam, which is at 4,800' elevation, and 4-5 feet deep at the dam itself. Further downstream, thicknesses decreased as follows: 3920'aqueduct crossing, 3-4 feet; 3620' Pilgrim Creek Road crossing, 2-3 feet; 3,520', 1-2 feet; 3,440' abandoned railroad grade, 1 foot. This event damaged roads, and future events could threaten life and property. There is a need to better understand local

  15. Debris flow hazards mitigation--Mechanics, prediction, and assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Major, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Debris-Flow Hazards Mitigation: Mechanics, Prediction, and Assessment held in Chengdu, China, September 10-13, 2007. The papers cover a wide range of topics on debris-flow science and engineering, including the factors triggering debris flows, geomorphic effects, mechanics of debris flows (e.g., rheology, fluvial mechanisms, erosion and deposition processes), numerical modeling, various debris-flow experiments, landslide-induced debris flows, assessment of debris-flow hazards and risk, field observations and measurements, monitoring and alert systems, structural and non-structural countermeasures against debris-flow hazards and case studies. The papers reflect the latest devel-opments and advances in debris-flow research. Several studies discuss the development and appli-cation of Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technologies in debris-flow hazard/risk assessment. Timely topics presented in a few papers also include the development of new or innovative techniques for debris-flow monitoring and alert systems, especially an infra-sound acoustic sensor for detecting debris flows. Many case studies illustrate a wide variety of debris-flow hazards and related phenomena as well as their hazardous effects on human activities and settlements.

  16. The Debris Disk Explorer: A Balloon-Borne Coronagraph for Observing Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lewis C. Jr; Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to DDX. It will achieve a raw contrast of 10(exp -7), with a processed contrast of 10(exp -8). A technology benefit of DDX is that operation in the near-space environment will raise the Technology Readiness Level of internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  17. Debris flow, debris avalanche and flood hazards at and downstream from Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Kevin M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier volcano has produced many large debris flows and debris avalanches during the last 10,000 years. These flows have periodically traveled more than 100 kilometers from the volcano to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound Lowland. Meteorological floods also have caused damage, but future effects will be partly mitigated by reservoirs. Mount Rainier presents the most severe flow risks of any volcano in the United States. Volcanic debris flows (lahars) are of two types: (1) cohesive, relatively high clay flows originating as debris avalanches, and (2) noncohesive flows with less clay that begin most commonly as meltwater surges. Three case histories represent important subpopulations of flows with known magnitudes and frequencies. The risks of each subpopulation may be considered for general planning and design. A regional map illustrates the extent of inundation by the case-history flows, the largest of which originated as debris avalanches and moved from Mount Rainier to Puget Sound. The paleohydrologic record of these past flows indicates the potential for inundation by future flows from the volcano. A map of the volcano and its immediate vicinity shows examples of smaller debris avalanches and debris flows in the 20th century.

  18. Effect of perturbations on debris-to-debris orbital transfers: A quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kartik; Hekma, Enne; Agrawal, Abhishek; Topputo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Lambert solver (Izzo, 2014) for preliminary design of Multi-Target Active Debris Removal missions. Firstly, we computed ≈25 million debris-to-debris transfers using the Lambert solver for selected sets of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit, Geostationary Transfer Orbit, and Geosynchronous Orbit. Subsequently, we propagated the departure states of the Lambert transfers below selected ΔV cut-offs using the SGP4/SDP4 propagator (Vallado et al., 2006). We recorded the arrival position and velocity error vectors incurred by neglecting perturbations and analyzed the results for each orbital regime. Our results indicate that perturbations can play a significant role in determining the feasibility of debris-to-debris transfers. By using the Lambert solver and neglecting perturbations, the errors in the arrival position and velocity for individual legs can be large. The largest errors were obtained for transfers between debris objects in Sun-Synchronous Orbit (O (100) km error in magnitude of position vector and O (0.1) km/s error in magnitude of velocity vector). Hence, solely employing the Lambert solver to rank transfer legs could lead to incorrect choices for sequencing of multi-target trajectories. This is particularly relevant for transfers in Low Earth Orbit, where the effects of perturbations are the strongest.

  19. Improvements to NASA's Debris Assessment Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opiela, J.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Debris Assessment Software (DAS) has been substantially revised and expanded. DAS is designed to assist NASA programs in performing orbital debris assessments, as described in NASA s Guidelines and Assessment Procedures for Limiting Orbital Debris. The extensive upgrade of DAS was undertaken to reflect changes in the debris mitigation guidelines, to incorporate recommendations from DAS users, and to take advantage of recent software capabilities for greater user utility. DAS 2.0 includes an updated environment model and enhanced orbital propagators and reentry-survivability models. The ORDEM96 debris environment model has been replaced by ORDEM2000 in DAS 2.0, which is also designed to accept anticipated revisions to the environment definition. Numerous upgrades have also been applied to the assessment of human casualty potential due to reentering debris. Routines derived from the Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool, Version 6 (ORSAT 6), determine which objects are assessed to survive reentry, and the resulting risk of human casualty is calculated directly based upon the orbital inclination and a future world population database. When evaluating reentry risks, the user may enter up to 200 unique hardware components for each launched object, in up to four nested levels. This last feature allows the software to more accurately model components that are exposed below the initial breakup altitude. The new DAS 2.0 provides an updated set of tools for users to assess their mission s compliance with the NASA Safety Standard and does so with a clear and easy-to-understand interface. The new native Microsoft Windows graphical user interface (GUI) is a vast improvement over the previous DOS-based interface. In the new version, functions are more-clearly laid out, and the GUI includes the standard Windows-style Help functions. The underlying routines within the DAS code are also improved.

  20. Warm up II: performance changes following active warm up and how to structure the warm up.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David

    2003-01-01

    While warm up is considered to be essential for optimum performance, there is little scientific evidence supporting its effectiveness in many situations. As a result, warm-up procedures are usually based on the trial and error experience of the athlete or coach, rather than on scientific study. Summarising the findings of the many warm-up studies conducted over the years is difficult. Many of the earlier studies were poorly controlled, contained few study participants and often omitted statistical analyses. Furthermore, over the years, warm up protocols consisting of different types (e.g. active, passive, specific) and structures (e.g. varied intensity, duration and recovery) have been used. Finally, while many studies have investigated the physiological responses to warm up, relatively few studies have reported changes in performance following warm up. The first part of this review critically analyses reported changes in performance following various active warm-up protocols. While there is a scarcity of well-controlled studies with large subject numbers and appropriate statistical analyses, a number of conclusions can be drawn regarding the effects of active warm up on performance. Active warm up tends to result in slightly larger improvements in short-term performance (<10 seconds) than those achieved by passive heating alone. However, short-term performance may be impaired if the warm-up protocol is too intense or does not allow sufficient recovery, and results in a decreased availability of high-energy phosphates before commencing the task. Active warm up appears to improve both long-term (>/=5 minutes) and intermediate performance (>10 seconds, but <5 minutes) if it allows the athlete to begin the subsequent task in a relatively non-fatigued state, but with an elevated baseline oxygen consumption (VO(2)). While active warm up has been reported to improve endurance performance, it may have a detrimental effect on endurance performance if it causes a

  1. Global Warming on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; McDonald, S. W.; Person, M. J.; Olkin, C. B.; Dunham, E. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Buie, M. W.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; McConnochie, T. H.

    1998-01-01

    Triton, Neptune's largest moon, has been predicted to undergo significant seasonal changes that would reveal themselves as changes in its mean frost temperature. But whether this temperature should at the present time be increasing, decreasing or constant depends on a number of parameters (such as the thermal properties of the surface, and frost migration patterns) that are unknown. Here we report observations of a recent stellar occultation by Triton which, when combined with earlier results, show that Triton has undergone a period of global warming since 1989. Our most conservative estimates of the rate of temperature and surface-pressure increase during this period imply that the atmosphere is doubling in bulk every 10 years, significantly faster than predicted by any published frost model for Triton. Our result suggests that permanent polar caps on Triton play a c dominant role in regulating seasonal atmospheric changes. Similar processes should also be active on Pluto.

  2. Warm waters, bleached corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-10-12

    Two researchers, Tom Goreau of the Discovery Laboratory in Jamaica and Raymond Hayes of Howard University, claim that they have evidence that nearly clinches the temperature connection to the bleached corals in the Caribbean and that the coral bleaching is an indication of Greenhouse warming. The incidents of scattered bleaching of corals, which have been reported for decades, are increasing in both intensity and frequency. The researchers based their theory on increased temperature of the seas measured by satellites. However, some other scientists feel that the satellites measure the temperature of only the top few millimeters of the water and that since corals lie on reefs perhaps 60 to 100 feet below the ocean surface, the elevated temperatures are not significant.

  3. Global warming challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hengeveld, H. )

    1994-11-01

    Global warming will necessitate significant adjustments in Canadian society and its economy. In 1979, the Canadian federal government created its Canadian Climate Program (CCP) in collaboration with other agencies, institutions, and individuals. It sought to coordinate national efforts to understand global and regional climate, and to promote better use of the emerging knowledge. Much of the CCP-coordinated research into sources and sinks of greenhouse gases interfaces with other national and international programs. Other researchers have become involved in the Northern Wetlands Study, a cooperative United States-Canada initiative to understand the role of huge northern bogs and muskegs in the carbon cycle. Because of the need to understand how the whole, linked climate system works, climate modeling emerged as a key focus of current research. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2016-06-21

    The cold dark matter paradigm has been extremely successful in explaining the large-scale structure of the Universe. However, it continues to face issues when confronted by observations on sub-Galactic scales. A major caveat, now being addressed, has been the incomplete treatment of baryon physics. We first summarize the small-scale issues surrounding cold dark matter and discuss the solutions explored by modern state-of-the-art numerical simulations including treatment of baryonic physics. We identify the too big to fail in field galaxies as among the best targets to study modifications to dark matter, and discuss the particular connection with sterile neutrino warm dark matter. We also discuss how the recently detected anomalous 3.55 keV X-ray lines, when interpreted as sterile neutrino dark matter decay, provide a very good description of small-scale observations of the Local Group.

  5. Competent and Warm?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karolina; Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Most research on ethnicity has focused on visual cues. However, accents are strong social cues that can match or contradict visual cues. We examined understudied reactions to people whose one cue suggests one ethnicity, whereas the other cue contradicts it. In an experiment conducted in Germany, job candidates spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent with their (German or Turkish) appearance. Based on ethnolinguistic identity theory, we predicted that accents would be strong cues for categorization and evaluation. Based on expectancy violations theory we expected that incongruent targets would be evaluated more extremely than congruent targets. Both predictions were confirmed: accents strongly influenced perceptions and Turkish-looking German-accented targets were perceived as most competent of all targets (and additionally most warm). The findings show that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete picture of the processes underlying impression formation.

  6. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  7. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  8. Giant Exoplanet and Debris Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-11

    This artist's rendering shows a giant exoplanet causing small bodies to collide in a disk of dust. A study in The Astronomical Journal finds that giant exoplanets with long-period orbits are more likely to be found around young stars that have a disk of dust and debris than those without disks. The study focused on planets more than five times the mass of Jupiter. The astronomers are conducting the largest survey to date of stars with dusty debris disks, and finding the best evidence yet that giant planets are responsible for keeping that material in check. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22082

  9. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  10. Possible Fengyun-1C debris fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golebiewska, J.; Nowak, M.; Muszyński, A.; Wnuk, E.

    2017-05-01

    A fall of small objects took place on 27th April 2012 in Wargowo village near Oborniki, about 25 km NW from Poznań (Poland). There was only one eye-witness of the fall, who found two separate pieces (ca. 2.7 cm and ca. 2 cm), with several small additional fragments. After microscopic observations and chemical analysis a meteoritic origin of these objects was excluded. They are identified as space debris, therefore man-made. The most probable source of the observed fall was space debris 35127 Fengyun 1C DEB, created during destruction of the Chinese weather satellite Fengyun-1C (FY-1C).

  11. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  12. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  13. DebriSat Pre Preshot Laboratory Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-27

    panels consisting of fiberglass (E-glass, #1,2,4,5), stainless steel mesh (#3) and Kevlar (#6,7). In contrast to the DebriSat and Debris-LV impact...shield supplied by NASA which consisted of seven bumper panels consisting of fiberglass (E-glass, #1,2,4,5), stainless steel mesh (#3) and Kevlar (#6,7...stainless steel bumper though it also contains significant amounts Al and Si. The Al and Si contents are about equal in early arriving Fe-Cr-Ni while

  14. Patterns In Debris Disks: No Planets Required?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Debris disks like those around Fomalhaut and Beta Pictoris show striking dust patterns often attributed to hidden exoplanets. These patterns have been crucial for constraining the masses and orbits of these planets. But adding a bit of gas to our models of debris disks--too little gas to detect--seems to alter this interpretation. Small amounts of gas lead to new dynamical instabilities that may mimic the narrow eccentric rings and other structures planets would create in a gas-free disk. Can we still use dust patterns to find hidden exoplanets?

  15. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P. [Trafford, PA; Tilbrook, Roger W. [Monroeville, PA; Heylmun, Neal F. [Pittsburgh, PA

    1977-07-19

    Apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed.

  16. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  17. Electrometallurgical treatment of TMI-2 fuel debris

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Gourishankar, K.V.; Johnson, G.K.

    1997-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed an electrometallurgical treatment process suitable for conditioning DOE oxide spent fuel for long-term storage or disposal. The process consists of an initial oxide reduction step that converts the actinide oxides to a metallic form, followed by an electrochemical separation of uranium from the other fuel constituents. The final product of the process is a uniform set of stable waste forms suitable for long-term storage or disposal. The suitability of the process for treating core debris from the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) reactor is being evaluated. This paper reviews the results of preliminary experimental work performed using simulated TMI-2 fuel debris.

  18. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  19. An Assessment of Potential Detectors to Monitor the Man-made Orbital Debris Environment. [space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. C.; Ruck, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Observations using NORAD radar showed that man made debris exceeds the natural environment for large objects. For short times (a few days to a few weeks) after solid rocket motor (SRM) firings in LEO, man made debris in the microparticle size range also appears to exceed the meteoroid environment. The properties of the debris population between these size regimes is currently unknown as there has been no detector system able to perform the required observations. The alternatives for obtaining data on this currently unobserved segment of the population are assessed.

  20. Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Vol. 13, No. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C. (Editor); Shoots, Debi (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    Topics include: debris clouds left by satellite collision; debris flyby near the International Space Station; and break-up of an ullage motor from a Russian Proton launch vehicle. Findings from the analysis of the STS-126 Shuttle Endeavour window impact damage are provided. Abstracts from the NASA Orbital Debris program office are presented and address a variety of topics including: Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime; Shape Distribution of Fragments From Microsatellite Impact Tests; Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Threat Mitigation Techniques for the Space Shuttle Orbiter; Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts; and, In Situ Measurement Activities at the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. Additionally, a Meeting Report is provided for the 12 meeting of the NASA/DoD Orbital Debris Working Group.

  1. Marine debris collects within the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone.

    PubMed

    Pichel, William G; Churnside, James H; Veenstra, Timothy S; Foley, David G; Friedman, Karen S; Brainard, Russell E; Nicoll, Jeremy B; Zheng, Quanan; Clemente-Colón, Pablo

    2007-08-01

    Floating marine debris, particularly derelict fishing gear, is a hazard to fish, marine mammals, turtles, sea birds, coral reefs, and even human activities. To ameliorate the economic and environmental impact of marine debris, we need to efficiently locate and retrieve dangerous debris at sea. Guided by satellite-derived information, we made four flights north of Hawaii in March and April 2005. During these aerial surveys, we observed over 1800 individual pieces of debris, including 122 derelict fishing nets. The largest debris concentrations were found just north of the North Pacific Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF) within the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone (STCZ). Debris densities were significantly correlated with sea-surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla), and the gradient of Chla. A Debris Estimated Likelihood Index (DELI) was developed to predict where high concentrations of debris would be most likely in the North Pacific during spring and early summer.

  2. An Overview of NASA's Oribital Debris Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Using updated measurement data, analysis tools, and modeling techniques; the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created a new Orbital Debris Environment Model. This model extends the coverage of orbital debris flux throughout the Earth orbit environment, and includes information on the mass density of the debris as well as the uncertainties in the model environment. This paper will give an overview of this model and its implications for spacecraft risk analysis.

  3. Orbiting Debris: a Space Environmental Problem. Background Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Artificial debris, deposited in a multitude of orbits about the Earth as the result of the exploration and use of the space environment, poses a growing hazard to future space operations. Unless nations sharply reduce the amount of orbital debris they produce, future space activites could suffer loss of capability, loss of income, and even loss of life as a result of collisions between spacecraft and debris. This background paper discusses the sources of debris and how they can be greatly reduced.

  4. The Orbital Debris Problem and the Challenges for Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Orbital debris scientists from major international space agencies, including JAXA and NASA, have worked together to predict the trend of the future environment. A summary presentation was given to the United Nations in February 2013. The orbital debris population in LEO will continue to increase. Catastrophic collisions will continue to occur every 5 to 9 years center dot To limit the growth of the future debris population and to better protect future spacecraft, active debris removal, should be considered.

  5. Orbiting Debris: a Space Environmental Problem. Background Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Artificial debris, deposited in a multitude of orbits about the Earth as the result of the exploration and use of the space environment, poses a growing hazard to future space operations. Unless nations sharply reduce the amount of orbital debris they produce, future space activites could suffer loss of capability, loss of income, and even loss of life as a result of collisions between spacecraft and debris. This background paper discusses the sources of debris and how they can be greatly reduced.

  6. Committed warming inferred from observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten; Pincus, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lifetime of CO2, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the temporary impacts of short-lived aerosols and reactive greenhouse gases, the Earth’s climate is not equilibrated with anthropogenic forcing. As a result, even if fossil-fuel emissions were to suddenly cease, some level of committed warming is expected due to past emissions as studied previously using climate models. Here, we provide an observational-based quantification of this committed warming using the instrument record of global-mean warming, recently improved estimates of Earth’s energy imbalance, and estimates of radiative forcing from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Compared with pre-industrial levels, we find a committed warming of 1.5 K (0.9-3.6, 5th-95th percentile) at equilibrium, and of 1.3 K (0.9-2.3) within this century. However, when assuming that ocean carbon uptake cancels remnant greenhouse gas-induced warming on centennial timescales, committed warming is reduced to 1.1 K (0.7-1.8). In the latter case there is a 13% risk that committed warming already exceeds the 1.5 K target set in Paris. Regular updates of these observationally constrained committed warming estimates, although simplistic, can provide transparent guidance as uncertainty regarding transient climate sensitivity inevitably narrows and the understanding of the limitations of the framework is advanced.

  7. Blodgett Forest Warming Experiment 1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pries, Caitlin Hicks (ORCID:0000000308132211); Castanha, Cristina; Porras, Rachel; Torn, Margaret

    2017-03-24

    Carbon stocks and density fractions from soil pits used to characterize soils of the Blodgett warming experiment as well as gas well CO2, 13C, and 14C data from experimental plots. The experiment consisted of 3 control and heated plot pairs. The heated plots are warmed +4°C above the control from 10 to 100 cm.

  8. Planetary Collisions outside the Solar System: Time Domain Characterization of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Huan; Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George

    2015-01-01

    Luminous debris disks of warm dust in the terrestrial planet zones around solar-like stars are recently found to vary, indicative of ongoing collisions of rocky objects. We use Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micron time-series observations in 2012 and 2013 to monitor 5 more extreme debris disks, including P1121 in the open cluster M47 (80 Myr), HD 15407A in the AB Dor moving group (80 Myr), HD 23514 in the Pleiades (120 Myr), HD 145263 in the Upper Sco Association (10 Myr), and the field star BD+20 207 (>1 Gyr). Together with the published results for ID8 in NGC 2547 (35 Myr), this makes the first systematic time-domain investigation of planetary impacts outside the solar system. Significant variations with timescales shorter than a year are detected in five out of the six extreme debris disks we have monitored. However, different systems show diverse sets of characteristics in the time domain, including long-term trends, disk temperature variations, and possible periodicity.

  9. Physical consequences of large organic debris in Pacific Northwest streams.

    Treesearch

    Frederick J. Swanson; George W. Lienkaemper

    1978-01-01

    Large organic debris in streams controls the distribution of aquatic habitats, the routing of sediment through stream systems, and the stability of streambed and banks. Management activities directly alter debris loading by addition or removal of material and indirectly by increasing the probability of debris torrents and removing standing streamside trees. We propose...

  10. Assessment of Debris Flow Hazards, North Mountain, Phoenix, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reavis, K. J.; Wasklewicz, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Urban sprawl in many western U.S. cities has expanded development onto alluvial fans. In the case of metropolitan Phoenix, AZ (MPA), urban sprawl has led to an exponential outward growth into surrounding mountainous areas and onto alluvial fans. Building on alluvial fans places humans at greater risk to flooding and debris flow hazards. Recent research has shown debris flows often supply large quantities of material to many alluvial fans in MPA. However, the risk of debris flows to built environments is relatively unknown. We use a 2D debris flow modeling approach, aided by high-resolution airborne LiDAR and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) topographic data, to examine debris flow behavior in a densely populated portion of the MPA to assess the risk and vulnerability of debris flow damage to the built infrastructure. A calibrated 2D debris flow model is developed for a "known" recent debris flow at an undeveloped site in MPA. The calibrated model and two other model scenarios are applied to a populated area with historical evidence of debris flow activity. Results from the modeled scenarios show evidence of debris flow damage to houses built on the alluvial fan. Debris flow inundation is also evident on streets on the fan. We use housing values and building damage to estimate the costs assocaited with various modeled debris flow scenarios.

  11. Debris growth sensitivity to launch and cascade rates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-10-24

    Two-component models provide a good description of debris growth from the outset of launch to the present, predictions of future trends, and assessments of their sensitivity. Launch rate reductions produce less than proportional reductions in debris, for reasons that are discussed. The shift of debris to higher altitudes is assessed quantitatively, although the details of the growth are discussed elsewhere.

  12. Space Shuttle Systems Engineering Processes for Liftoff Debris Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Michael; Riley, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the systems engineering process designed to reduce the risk from debris during Space Shuttle Launching. This process begins the day of launch from the tanking to the vehicle tower clearance. Other debris risks (i.e., Ascent, and micrometeoroid orbital debit) are mentioned) but are not the subject of this presentation. The Liftoff debris systems engineering process and an example of how it works are reviewed (i.e.,STS-119 revealed a bolt liberation trend on the Fixed Service Structure (FSS) 275 level elevator room). The process includes preparation of a Certification of Flight Readiness (CoFR) that includes (1) Lift-off debris from previous mission dispositioned, (2) Flight acceptance rationale has been provided for Lift-off debris sources/causes (3) Lift-off debris mission support documentation, processes and tools are in place for the up-coming mission. The process includes a liftoff debris data collection that occurs after each launch. This includes a post launch walkdown, that records each liftoff debris, and the entry of the debris into a database, it also includes a review of the imagery from the launch, and a review of the instrumentation data. There is also a review of the debris transport analysis process, that includes temporal and spatial framework and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. which incorporates a debris transport analyses (DTA), debris materials and impact tests, and impact analyses.

  13. An Overview of NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of Orbital debris engineering models. They are mathematical tools to assess orbital debris flux. It briefly reviews the history of the orbital debris engineering models, and reviews the new features in the current model (i.e., ORDEM2010).

  14. 33 CFR 209.160 - The California Debris Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The California Debris Commission..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.160 The California Debris Commission. Section 1 of the Act of Congress of March 1, 1893 (27 Stat. 507; 33 U.S.C. 661), created the California Debris...

  15. 33 CFR 209.160 - The California Debris Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The California Debris Commission..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.160 The California Debris Commission. Section 1 of the Act of Congress of March 1, 1893 (27 Stat. 507; 33 U.S.C. 661), created the California Debris...

  16. 33 CFR 209.160 - The California Debris Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The California Debris Commission..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.160 The California Debris Commission. Section 1 of the Act of Congress of March 1, 1893 (27 Stat. 507; 33 U.S.C. 661), created the California Debris...

  17. Review of gas and dust in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.

    2016-12-01

    This proceeding summarises a talk given on the state-of-the-art of debris disc modelling. We first review the basics of debris disc physics, which is followed by a short overview of the state-of-the-art in terms of modelling dust and gas in debris disc systems.

  18. Consistency of warm k -inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhi-Peng; Yu, Jia-Ning; Zhu, Jian-Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2016-11-01

    We extend k -inflation which is a type of kinetically driven inflationary model under the standard inflationary scenario to a possible warm inflationary scenario. The dynamical equations of this warm k -inflation model are obtained. We rewrite the slow-roll parameters which are different from the usual potential driven inflationary models and perform a linear stability analysis to give the proper slow-roll conditions in warm k -inflation. Two cases, a power-law kinetic function and an exponential kinetic function, are studied, when the dissipative coefficient Γ =Γ0 and Γ =Γ (ϕ ), respectively. A proper number of e-folds is obtained in both concrete cases of warm k -inflation. We find a constant dissipative coefficient (Γ =Γ0) is not a workable choice for these two cases while the two cases with Γ =Γ (ϕ ) are self-consistent warm inflationary models.

  19. Policy implications of greenhouse warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Rob

    1992-03-01

    A study panel of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine recently issued the report Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. That report examined relevant scientific knowldeg and evidence about the potential of greenhouse warming, and assayed actions that could slow the onset of warming (mitigation policies) or help human and natural systems of plants and animals adapt to climatic changes (adaptation policies). The panel found that, even given the considerable uncertainties knowledge of the relevant phenomena, greenhouse warming poses a threat sufficient to merit prompt action. People in this country could probably adapt to the changes likely to accompany greenhouse warming. The costs, however, could be substantial. Investment in mitigation acts as insurance protection against the great uncertainties and the possibility of dramatic surprises. The panel found mitigation options that could reduce U.S. emissions by an estimated 10 to 40 percent at modest cost.

  20. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activation; (2) Launch vehicle explosion; (3) Aerodynamic loads; (4) Inertial loads; (5) Atmospheric reentry... characteristics. The debris lists must describe the physical, aerodynamic, and harmful characteristics of each...; (4) Lift and drag characteristics; (5) Properties of the incremental velocity distribution imparted...

  1. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activation; (2) Launch vehicle explosion; (3) Aerodynamic loads; (4) Inertial loads; (5) Atmospheric reentry... characteristics. The debris lists must describe the physical, aerodynamic, and harmful characteristics of each...; (4) Lift and drag characteristics; (5) Properties of the incremental velocity distribution imparted...

  2. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activation; (2) Launch vehicle explosion; (3) Aerodynamic loads; (4) Inertial loads; (5) Atmospheric reentry... characteristics. The debris lists must describe the physical, aerodynamic, and harmful characteristics of each...; (4) Lift and drag characteristics; (5) Properties of the incremental velocity distribution imparted...

  3. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activation; (2) Launch vehicle explosion; (3) Aerodynamic loads; (4) Inertial loads; (5) Atmospheric reentry... characteristics. The debris lists must describe the physical, aerodynamic, and harmful characteristics of each...; (4) Lift and drag characteristics; (5) Properties of the incremental velocity distribution imparted...

  4. 14 CFR 417.211 - Debris analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activation; (2) Launch vehicle explosion; (3) Aerodynamic loads; (4) Inertial loads; (5) Atmospheric reentry... characteristics. The debris lists must describe the physical, aerodynamic, and harmful characteristics of each...; (4) Lift and drag characteristics; (5) Properties of the incremental velocity distribution imparted...

  5. Sampling coarse woody debris along spoked transects

    Treesearch

    Paul C. Van Deusen; Jeffery H. Gove

    2011-01-01

    Line transects are commonly used for sampling coarse woody debris (CWD). The USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis programme uses a variant of this method that involves sampling for CWD along transects that radiate from the centre of a circular plot-like spokes on a wheel. A new approach for analysis of data collected with spoked transects is developed....

  6. Space debris impact experiment (S0001)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are to establish the population and size distribution of meteoroids in the mass range from 10 to the minus 10 power to 10 to the minus 4 power G, to establish the current population of man-made debris in the same mass range, and to obtain data on the physical properties (composition and density) of meteoroids.

  7. Space Debris and Space Safety - Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, W.; Krag, H.

    Man's activities in space are creating a shell of space debris around planet Earth which provides a growing risk of collision with operating satellites and manned systems. Including both the larger tracked objects and the small, untracked debris, more than 98% of the estimated 600,000 objects larger than 1 cm currently in orbit are “space junk”--dead satellites, expended rocket stages, debris from normal operations, fragments from explosions and collisions, and other material. Recognizing the problem, space faring nations have joined together to develop three basic principles for minimizing the growth of the debris population: prevent on-orbit breakups, remove spacecraft and orbital stages that have reached the end of their mission operations from the useful densely populated orbit regions, and limit the objects released during normal operations. This paper provides an overview of what is being done to support these three principles and describes proposals that an active space traffic control service to warn satellite operators of pending collisions with large objects combined with a program to actively remove large objects may reduce the rate of future collisions. The paper notes that cost and cost effectiveness are important considerations that will affect the evolution of such systems.

  8. Small Debris on the Ground Beside Curiosity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-15

    This image from NASA Mars rover Curiosity shows a small bright object on the ground beside the rover at the Rocknest site. The rover team has assessed this object as debris from the spacecraft, possibly from the events of landing on Mars.

  9. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Marine, Micky; Colvin, James; Crockett, Richard; Sword, Lee; Putz, Jennifer; Woelfle, Sheri

    1991-01-01

    The development of an Autonomous Space Processor for Orbital Debris (ASPOD) was the goal. The nature of this craft, which will process, in situ, orbital debris using resources available in low Earth orbit (LEO) is explained. The serious problem of orbital debris is briefly described and the nature of the large debris population is outlined. The focus was on the development of a versatile robotic manipulator to augment an existing robotic arm, the incorporation of remote operation of the robotic arms, and the formulation of optimal (time and energy) trajectory planning algorithms for coordinated robotic arms. The mechanical design of the new arm is described in detail. The work envelope is explained showing the flexibility of the new design. Several telemetry communication systems are described which will enable the remote operation of the robotic arms. The trajectory planning algorithms are fully developed for both the time optimal and energy optimal problems. The time optimal problem is solved using phase plane techniques while the energy optimal problem is solved using dynamic programming.

  10. Rates inferred from the space debris catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Collision and fragmentation rates are inferred from the AFSPC space debris catalog and compare with estimates from other treatments. The collision rate is evaluated without approximation. The fragmentation rate requires additional empirical assessments. The number of fragments per collision is low compared to analytic and numerical treatments, is peaked low, and falls rapidly with altitude.

  11. Numerical modeling of the debris flows runout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Francesco; Cesali, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Rapid debris flows are identified among the most dangerous of all landslides. Due to their destructive potential, the runout length has to be predicted to define the hazardous areas and design safeguarding measures. To this purpose, a continuum model to predict the debris flows mobility is developed. It is based on the well known depth-integrated avalanche model proposed by Savage and Hutter (S&H model) to simulate the dry granular materials flows. Conservation of mass and momentum equations, describing the evolving geometry and the depth averaged velocity distribution, are re-written taking into account the effects of the interstitial pressures and the possible variation of mass along the motion due to erosion/deposition processes. Furthermore, the mechanical behaviour of the debris flow is described by a recently developed rheological law, which allows to take into account the dissipative effects of the grain inelastic collisions and friction, simultaneously acting within a `shear layer', typically at the base of the debris flows. The governing PDEs are solved by applying the finite difference method. The analysis of a documented case is finally carried out.

  12. First Sentinel-1 detections of avalanche debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malnes, E.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Vickers, H.

    2015-03-01

    Snow avalanches are natural hazards, occurring in snow covered mountain terrain worldwide. Present avalanche research and forecasting relies on complete avalanche activity records in a given area over an entire winter season, which cannot be provided with traditional, mainly field based methods. Remote sensing, using weather, and light independent SAR satellites has the potential of filling these data gaps, however, to date their use was limited by high acquisition costs, long repeat cycles, and small ground swath. Sentinel-1A (S1A), on the other hand, operational since October 2014 provides free-of-charge, 20 m spatial resolution, 250 km × 150 km ground swath images every 12 days. In this paper, we present for the first time, that it is possible to detect avalanche debris using S1A images. We successfully apply a change detection method that enhances avalanche debris zones, by comparing repeat pass images before and after the avalanche occurred. Due to the increase in backscatter from avalanche debris, manual detection is possible. With this first proof-of-concept, we show the detection of 489 avalanche debris zones in a S1A image from 6 January 2015, covering the counties Troms and parts of Nordland in Northern Norway. We validate our avalanche detection using very high resolution Radarsat-2 Ultrafine images, as well as extensive field reconnaissance. Our results give us confidence, that S1A detection of avalanches is a critical step towards operational use of SAR avalanche detection in avalanche forecasting.

  13. Value analysis for orbital debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Leonard; Mense, Allan

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents methods for deriving first order monetary benefits from removing individual debris objects in high value sun-synchronous orbits. These analyses are intended to serve as an economic metric by which competing debris removal methods can be evaluated. Orbital debris flux level estimates from NASA’s updated ORDEM2000 model are used to establish small debris population estimates. When combined with the replacement cost of satellites in sun-synchronous orbit, the present value of removing individual small (0.5 cm-2.0 cm) objects from orbit is derived. Large object removal value is more complicated due to the necessity of incorporating effects of impact fragmentation observed with any object about 10 cm or larger. Breakup models published by NASA (Johnson, N.L., Krisko, P.H., Liou, J.C., Anz-Meador, P.D. NASA’s new breakup model of evolve 4.0. Adv. Space Res. 28 (9), 1377-1384, 2001.) provide a basis for establishing fragmentation statistics. Assuming the current population of operational sun-synchronous satellites, removal value is then derived via present value analysis.

  14. Orbiting Space Debris: Dangers, Measurement and Mitigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    sure how many undetectable particles the fragmentation of a satellite creates. Actual ground-based tesis have been conducted in an attempt to...conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory lo measure the presence of 0.2 lo 0.5 cm and 0.5 to 2 cm sized debris. The Areclbo radar in Puerto Rico

  15. SIRTF (Spitzer), Debris Disks, and Fred Gillett

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M. W.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2004-12-01

    The study of planetary debris disks over the full range of infrared wavelengths requires the use of a cryogenic telescope in space because of the low surface brightness of these intrinsically faint, spatially extended systems. The next cryogenic infrared telescope will be NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), which is currently in the final stages of integration and test leading to launch in 2003. Fred Gillett made many critical contributions to the technical definition of SIRTF and played a key role in the advocacy of SIRTF, both within the science community and at NASA Headquarters. SIRTF will carry three focal plane instruments built around large-format infrared detector arrays and thus will be the first infrared space observatory to make extensive use - both for imaging and spectroscopy - of this very powerful new technology. The study of debris disks forms a big portion of one of the four science programs which have defined SIRTF's measurement capabilities; as a result SIRTF has great power for the study of the debris disk phenomenon. This paper reviews the SIRTF mission design and measurement functionality and describes SIRTF's potential studies of debris disks, drawing examples from the programs planned by the SIRTF Guaranteed Time Observers (GTO's) and the SIRTF Legacy Teams. We also summarize the opportunities for community participation in SIRTF.

  16. Early Deterioration of Coarse Woody Debris

    Treesearch

    F.H. Tainter; J.W. McMinn

    1999-01-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southern forest ecosystems. CWD loading may be affected by different decomposition rates on sites of varying quality. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three (hydric, mesic. and xeric) sites at the Savannah River Site and sampled over a 16-week period. Major changes...

  17. The Collisional Evolution of Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáspár, A.; Rieke, G. H.; Psaltis, D.; Özel, F.; Balog, Z.

    2014-03-01

    With their discovery, debris disks gave the first proof of existence of extrasolar planetary systems (Aumann et al. 1984, Smith & Terrile 1984). Although extrasolar planets are now readily detected, the importance of debris disks in characterizing their host systems is not diminished. Debris disks are relatively easy to detect at infrared wavelengths, independent of their viewing angle; they enable the study of the dynamical evolution of their host systems; they are able to reveal the outer regions of the systems where planets are difficult to detect; and coronagraphic scattered light images show the active sites of major dust production within the systems. During their operational lifetime, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory have observed many hundreds of resolved and unresolved debris disks. These detections have helped us characterize the thermal emission and also location of the disks. The observations have also shown a general decay in the observed infrared luminosity of the debris disks as a function of system age and disk location. This evolution must be understood thoroughly before probing other parameters, such as their dependence on stellar metallicity or binarity. A second critical parameter is the shape of the particle size distribution, which can strongly influence conclusions from spectral energy distribution models. I will describe results obtained with our collisional cascade code, which has been optimized to study the time evolution of debris disk dust. I will show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a value of Lir(t)~-0.6. This is slower than the ~-1 decay given by traditional analytic models. I will show how our numerical code can reproduce the fraction of detected debris disk sources within an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 µm observations (Gaspar et al. 2013). I will also

  18. Laser space debris removal: now, not later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude R.

    2015-02-01

    Small (1-10cm) debris in low Earth orbit (LEO) are extremely dangerous, because they spread the breakup cascade depicted in the movie "Gravity." Laser-Debris-Removal (LDR) is the only solution that can address both large and small debris. In this paper, we briefly review ground-based LDR, and discuss how a polar location can dramatically increase its effectiveness for the important class of sun-synchronous orbit (SSO) objects. No other solutions address the whole problem of large ( 1000cm, 1 ton) as well as small debris. Physical removal of small debris (by nets, tethers and so on) is impractical because of the energy cost of matching orbits. We also discuss a new proposal which uses a space-based station in low Earth orbit (LEO), and rapid, head-on interaction in 10- 40s rather than 4 minutes, with high-power bursts of 100ps, 355nm pulses from a 1.5m diameter aperture. The orbiting station employs "heat-capacity" laser mode with low duty cycle to create an adaptable, robust, dualmode system which can lower or raise large derelict objects into less dangerous orbits, as well as clear out the small debris in a 400-km thick LEO band. Time-average laser optical power is less than 15kW. The combination of short pulses and UV wavelength gives lower required energy density (fluence) on target as well as higher momentum coupling coefficient. This combination leads to much smaller mirrors and lower average power than the ground-based systems we have considered previously. Our system also permits strong defense of specific assets. Analysis gives an estimated cost of about 1k each to re-enter most small debris in a few months, and about 280k each to raise or lower 1-ton objects by 40km. We believe it can do this for 2,000 such large objects in about four years. Laser ablation is one of the few interactions in nature that propel a distant object without any significant reaction on the source.

  19. Optical Photometric Observations of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Kelecy, Thomas M.; Horstman, Matt

    2010-01-01

    We report on a continuing program of optical photometric measurements of faint orbital debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). These observations can be compared with laboratory studies of actual spacecraft materials in an effort to determine what the faint debris at GEO may be. We have optical observations from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile of two samples of debris: 1. GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Curtis-Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 t11 magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. 2. A smaller sample of high area to mass ratio (AMR) objects discovered independently, and acquired using predictions from orbits derived from independent tracking data collected days prior to the observations. Our optical observations in standard astronomical BVRI filters are done with either telescope, and with the telescope tracking the debris object at the object's angular rate. Observations in different filters are obtained sequentially. We have obtained 71 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes. A total of 66 of these sequences have 3 or more good measurements in all filters (not contaminated by star streaks or in Earth's shadow). Most of these sequences show brightness variations, but a small subset has observed brightness variations consistent with that expected from observational errors alone. The majority of these stable objects are redder than a solar color in both B-R and R-I. There is no dependence on color with brightness. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and

  20. Nature of the Warm Excess in eps Eri: Asteroid belt or Dragged-in Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate

    2013-10-01

    Eps Eri and its debris disk provide a unique opportunity to probe the outer zones of a planetary system, due to its young age (~1 Gyr) and proximity (3.22 pc, the closest prominent debris disk by more than a factor of two). It is the Rosetta Stone for more distant exoplanetary debris systems and thus critical to understanding the mid-term evolution of our Solar System. From resolved images in the far-infrared and submillimeter along with spectra from 10-35 and 55-95 microns, Backman et al. (2009) found that the eps Eridani disk has a complex structure, with multiple zones in both warm (asteroid-like) and cold (KBO-like) components. However, Reidemeister et al. (2011), on the contrary, suggested that the system has one dominant cold belt and the warm excess originates from small grains in the cold disk, which are transported inward by the combination of P-R and stellar wind drags. Although both models fit the disk SED and marginally resolved far-infrared images relatively well, the resultant disk structures in the 15-50 AU range at mid-infrared are expected to be very different. We, therefore, propose to obtain a 35 micron image of the eps Eri system using the FORCAST on SOFIA to test the validity of any models for this zone in eps Eri. No other current and future planned facilities can obtain such a 35 micron image, which will provide general constrains on the nature of the warm excess and any potential shepherding planets and their orbits in this iconic debris system.

  1. Origin of Subglacial Debris-bed Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D. O.; Byers, J.; Iverson, N. R.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical models of glaciers sliding on hard beds assume that basal flow resistance is controlled entirely by viscous drag on bedrock bumps. However, observations and measurements indicate that basal ice can contain large concentrations of rock debris that exert significant frictional resistance: for example, locally high shear stress (˜500 kPa) was measured below 200 m of ice on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. This value of shear stress is an order of magnitude greater than estimated by leading theories. To better understand the origin of debris-bed friction, we built a new laboratory apparatus that recorded the contact force between a clast and a hard bed as a function of ice velocity toward the bed. An independent experiment with the same apparatus in which the clast is isolated from the bed was used to obtain the ice viscosity. After correcting for cavity formation and ice flow geometry, results indicate that the contact force between a clast and a hard bed is about twice the drag force on the same clast estimated using Stokes's law. This value is insufficient to explain the high debris-bed friction measured beneath Engabreen. An alternative explanation is that longitudinal ice extension caused by ice flowing over the rough topography near the smooth rock tablet increased the rate of ice convergence with the bed by a factor of 5. Our measurements confirm that debris-bed friction is controlled by contact forces caused by flow of ice towards the bed due to basal melting and longitudinal ice extension. This form of frictional drag has yet to be included in models of ice flow. Inclusion of debris-bed friction may prove important to properly estimating rates of basal sliding, energy dissipation and meltwater production at the bed, and, more importantly, to quantifying the stick-slip behavior of hard-bedded glaciers.

  2. Spacecraft Robustness to Orbital Debris: Guidelines & Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, S.; Legloire, D.; Tromba, A.; Tholot, M.; Nold, O.

    2013-09-01

    The ever increasing number of orbital debris has already led the space community to implement guidelines and requirements for "cleaner" and "safer" space operations as non-debris generating missions and end of mission disposal in order to get preserved orbits rid of space junks. It is nowadays well-known that man-made orbital debris impacts are now a higher threat than natural micro-meteoroids and that recent events intentionally or accidentally generated so many new debris that may initiate a cascade chain effect known as "the Kessler Syndrome" potentially jeopardizing the useful orbits.The main recommendations on satellite design is to demonstrate an acceptable Probability of Non-Penetration (PNP) with regard to small population (<5cm) of MMOD (Micro-Meteoroids and Orbital Debris). Compliance implies to think about spacecraft robustness as redundancies, segregations and shielding devices (as implemented in crewed missions but in a more complex mass - cost - criticality trade- off). Consequently the need is non-only to demonstrate the PNP compliance requirement but also the PNF (probability of Non-Failure) per impact location on all parts of the vehicle and investigate the probabilities for the different fatal scenarios: loss of mission, loss of spacecraft (space environment critical) and spacecraft fragmentation (space environment catastrophic).The recent THALES experience known on ESA Sentinel-3, of increasing need of robustness has led the ALTRAN company to initiate an internal innovative working group on those topics which conclusions may be attractive for their prime manufacturer customers.The intention of this paper is to present a status of this study : * Regulations, requirements and tools available * Detailed FMECA studies dedicated specifically to the MMOD risks with the introduction of new of probability and criticality classification scales. * Examples of design risks assessment with regard to the specific MMOD impact risks. * Lessons learnt on

  3. Debris measure subsystem of the nanosatellite IRECIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, M.; di Ciolo, L.; Ortenzi, A.; Petrozzi, M.; del Re, V.

    2003-09-01

    The on board resources, needed to perform the mission tasks, are very limited in nano-satellites. This paper proposes an Electronic real-time system that acquires space debris measures. It uses a piezo-electric sensor. The described device is a subsystem on board of the IRECIN nanosatellite composed mainly by a r.i.s.c. microprocessor, an electronic part that interfaces to the debris sensor in order to provide a low noise electrical and suitable range to ADC 12 bit converter, and finally a memory in order to store the data. The microprocessor handles the Debris Measure System measuring the impacts number, their intensity and storing their waves form. This subsystem is able to communicate with the other IRECIN subsystems through I2C Bus and principally with the "Main Microprocessor" subsystem allowing the data download directly to the Ground Station. Moreover this subsystem lets free the "Main Microprocessor Board" from the management and charge of debris data. All electronic components are SMD technology in order to reduce weight and size. The realized Electronic board are completely developed, realized and tested at the Vitrociset S.P.A. under control of Research and Development Group. The proposed system is implemented on the IRECIN, a modular nanosatellite weighting less than 1.5 kg, constituted by sixteen external sides with surface-mounted solar cells and three internal Al plates, kept together by four steel bars. Lithium-ions batteries are added for eclipse operations. Attitude is determined by two three-axis magnetometers and the solar panels data. Control is provided by an active magnetic control system. The spacecraft will be spin-stabilized with the spin-axis normal to the orbit. debris and micrometeoroids mass and velocity.

  4. Characterizing Debris Disks Around Young Suns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Gorlova, Nadya; Muzerolle, James; Rebull, Luisa; Siegler, Nick; Stauffer, John; Su, Kate; Young, Erick

    2006-05-01

    There is geological evidence that in the first few hundred Myr of the birth of the Solar System there was an epoch of strong bombardment caused by the collisions between growing planetesimals. Spitzer has the capability to probe that epoch in other stars by observing dust emission from debris disks around young solar system analogs. The MIPS GTO and FEPS Legacy teams have carried out a 24 micron survey of debris disks in a number of rich open clusters, with ages ranging from a few to 100 Myr. However, only a few of these clusters are close enough to detect fluxes in the MIPS bands to photospheric levels in solar mass stars; even fewer are close enough (<160 pc) to study disk properties by means of IRS spectroscopy. This proposal consists of two parts. 1) We will build on our previous investigation of the Pleiades core where we discovered a few solar analogs with MIPS excesses signaling debris disks. The excess fraction is tentatively bigger than among older field stars. To confirm this conclusion, we propose to observe the remaining F-G stars that are situated in the Pleiades corona and thus less affected by interstellar cirrus. 2) We will obtain IRS spectra for debris candidates in the Pleiades (100 Myr) as well as in two other intermediate-age clusters -- IC 2391 (50 Myr) and M47 (80 Myr). Disk spectra will allow us to constrain the disk geometry and other properties of debris dust, and to search for correlations of theses properties with the spectral type/mass of the host star. The IRS sample includes a range of spectral types from A to G stars. This program will provide the first representative sample of dust emission spectra at the intermediate age of 50-100 Myr, which likely corresponds to the final stages of terrestrial planet formation.

  5. Visible Light Spectroscopy of GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K. J.; Barker, E. S.; Cardona, T.; Lederer, S. M.; Cowardin, H.

    2012-09-01

    Our goal is to understand the physical characteristics of debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Our approach is to compare the observed reflectance as a function of wavelength with laboratory measurements of typical spacecraft surfaces to understand what the materials are likely to be. Because debris could be irregular in shape and tumbling at an unknown rate, rapid simultaneous measurements over a range of wavelengths are required. Acquiring spectra of optically faint objects with short exposure times to minimize these effects requires a large telescope. We describe optical spectroscopy obtained with two imaging spectrographs on the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our first observing run was 12-14 March 2012 with the IMACS imaging spectrograph on the 'Walter Baade' telescope, which was followed by a run on 1-2 May 2012 on the 'Landon Clay' telescope. Both telescopes have spectrographs with an imaging mode for acquisition. After acquisition and centering of a GEO object, a slit and grism are moved into the beam for spectroscopy. We used low resolution grisms blazed near 600 nm for wavelength coverage in the 400-800 nm region. Typical exposure times for spectra were 15-30 seconds. Spectra were obtained for objects in the GEO regime listed as debris in the US Space Command public catalog, and one high area to mass ratio GEO object. In addition spectra were obtained of IDCSP (Initial Defense Communications Satellite Program) satellites with known initial properties just below the GEO regime. All spectra were calibrated using white dwarf flux standards and solar analog stars. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris spectroscopy, and our initial results. 1. This work is supported by NASAs Orbital Debris Program Office, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA. 2. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. Millimeter Studies of Nearby Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, Meredith A.

    2017-01-01

    At least 20% of nearby main sequence stars are known to be surrounded by disks of dusty material resulting from the collisional erosion of planetesimals, larger bodies similar to asteroids and comets in our own Solar System. Since the dust-producing planetesimals are expected to persist in stable regions like belts and resonances, the locations, morphologies, and physical properties of dust in these ‘debris disks’ provide probes of planet formation and subsequent dynamical evolution. Observations at millimeter wavelengths are especially critical to our understanding of these systems, since the large grains that dominate emission at these long wavelengths do not travel far from their origin and therefore reliably trace the underlying planetesimal distribution. The newly upgraded capabilities of millimeter interferometers like ALMA are providing us with the opportunity to image these disks with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. In this dissertation talk, I will present my ongoing work, which uses observations of the angularly resolved brightness distribution and the spectral dependence of the flux density to constrain both the structure and grain size distribution of a sample of nearby debris disks. I will present constraints on the position, width, surface density gradient, and any asymmetric structure of several debris disks (including Epsilon Eridani, Tau Ceti, and Fomalhaut) determined from ALMA and SMA observations. In addition, I will present the results of a survey using the VLA and ATCA to measure the long wavelength spectral index and thus the grain size distribution of fifteen debris disks. Together these results provide a foundation to investigate the dynamical evolution of planetary systems through multi-wavelength observations of debris disks.

  7. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  8. Defining Sudden Stratospheric Warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Amy; Seidel, Dian; Hardiman, Steven; Butchart, Neal; Birner, Thomas; Match, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    The general form of the definition for Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) is largely agreed to be a reversal of the temperature gradient and of the zonal circulation polewards of 60° latitude at the 10 hPa level, as developed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in the 1960s and 1970s. However, the details of the definition and its calculation are ambiguous, resulting in inconsistent classifications of SSW events. These discrepancies are problematic for understanding the observed frequency and statistical relationships with SSWs, and for maintaining a robust metric with which to assess wintertime stratospheric variability in observations and climate models. To provide a basis for community-wide discussion, we examine how the SSW definition has changed over time and how sensitive the detection of SSWs is to the definition used. We argue that the general form of the SSW definition should be clarified to ensure that it serves current research and forecasting purposes, and propose possible ways to update the definition.

  9. Explaining Warm Coronal Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2008-01-01

    One of the great mysteries of coronal physics that has come to light in the last few years is the discovery that warn (- 1 INK) coronal loops are much denser than expected for quasi-static equilibrium. Both the excess densities and relatively long lifetimes of the loops can be explained with bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively to very high temperatures. Since neighboring strands are at different stages of cooling, the composite loop bundle is multi-thermal, with the distribution of temperatures depending on the details of the "nanoflare storm." Emission hotter than 2 MK is predicted, but it is not clear that such emission is always observed. We consider two possible explanations for the existence of over-dense warm loops without corresponding hot emission: (1) loops are bundles of nanoflare heated strands, but a significant fraction of the nanoflare energy takes the form of a nonthermal electron beam rather then direct plasma heating; (2) loops are bundles of strands that undergo thermal nonequilibrium that results when steady heating is sufficiently concentrated near the footpoints. We present numerical hydro simulations of both of these possibilities and explore the observational consequences, including the production of hard X-ray emission and absorption by cool material in the corona.

  10. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  11. 15 CFR 909.1 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 909.1 Section 909.1 Commerce and... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS MARINE DEBRIS § 909.1 Definition...

  12. 15 CFR 909.1 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 909.1 Section 909.1 Commerce and... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS MARINE DEBRIS § 909.1 Definition of...

  13. 15 CFR 909.1 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 909.1 Section 909.1 Commerce and... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS MARINE DEBRIS § 909.1 Definition of...

  14. 15 CFR 909.1 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 909.1 Section 909.1 Commerce and... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS MARINE DEBRIS § 909.1 Definition of...

  15. 15 CFR 909.1 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 909.1 Section 909.1 Commerce and... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS MARINE DEBRIS § 909.1 Definition of...

  16. Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Avifauna in Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Qamar A.; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Townsend, Kathy A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic debris in the world’s oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia’s coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian coastal and marine bird species. We investigated which Australian bird groups ingest marine debris, and whether debris-ingesting groups exhibit selectivity associated with their taxonomy, habitat or foraging methods. Here we present the largest multispecies study of anthropogenic debris ingestion in Australasian avifauna to date. We necropsied and investigated the gastrointestinal contents of 378 birds across 61 species, collected dead across eastern Australia. These species represented nine taxonomic orders, five habitat groups and six feeding strategies. Among investigated species, thirty percent had ingested debris, though ingestion did not occur uniformly within the orders of birds surveyed. Debris ingestion was found to occur in orders Procellariiformes, Suliformes, Charadriiformes and Pelecaniformes, across all surveyed habitats, and among birds that foraged by surface feeding, pursuit diving and search-by-sight. Procellariiformes, birds in pelagic habitats, and surface feeding marine birds ingested debris with the greatest frequency. Among birds which were found to ingest marine debris, we investigated debris selectivity and found that marine birds were selective with respect to both type and colour of debris. Selectivity for type and colour of debris significantly correlated with taxonomic order, habitat and foraging strategy. This study highlights the significant impact of feeding ecology on debris ingestion among Australia’s avifauna. PMID:27574986

  17. Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Avifauna in Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Roman, Lauren; Schuyler, Qamar A; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Townsend, Kathy A

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic debris in the world's oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia's coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian coastal and marine bird species. We investigated which Australian bird groups ingest marine debris, and whether debris-ingesting groups exhibit selectivity associated with their taxonomy, habitat or foraging methods. Here we present the largest multispecies study of anthropogenic debris ingestion in Australasian avifauna to date. We necropsied and investigated the gastrointestinal contents of 378 birds across 61 species, collected dead across eastern Australia. These species represented nine taxonomic orders, five habitat groups and six feeding strategies. Among investigated species, thirty percent had ingested debris, though ingestion did not occur uniformly within the orders of birds surveyed. Debris ingestion was found to occur in orders Procellariiformes, Suliformes, Charadriiformes and Pelecaniformes, across all surveyed habitats, and among birds that foraged by surface feeding, pursuit diving and search-by-sight. Procellariiformes, birds in pelagic habitats, and surface feeding marine birds ingested debris with the greatest frequency. Among birds which were found to ingest marine debris, we investigated debris selectivity and found that marine birds were selective with respect to both type and colour of debris. Selectivity for type and colour of debris significantly correlated with taxonomic order, habitat and foraging strategy. This study highlights the significant impact of feeding ecology on debris ingestion among Australia's avifauna.

  18. NASA's New Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the functionality and use of ORDEM2010, which replaces ORDEM2000, as the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) debris engineering model. Like its predecessor, ORDEM2010 serves the ODPO mission of providing spacecraft designers/operators and debris observers with a publicly available model to calculate orbital debris flux by current-state-of-knowledge methods. The key advance in ORDEM2010 is the input file structure of the yearly debris populations from 1995-2035 of sizes 10 micron - 1 m. These files include debris from low-Earth orbits (LEO) through geosynchronous orbits (GEO). Stable orbital elements (i.e., those that do not randomize on a sub-year timescale) are included in the files as are debris size, debris number, material density, random error and population error. Material density is implemented from ground-test data into the NASA breakup model and assigned to debris fragments accordingly. The random and population errors are due to machine error and uncertainties in debris sizes. These high-fidelity population files call for a much higher-level model analysis than what was possible with the populations of ORDEM2000. Population analysis in the ORDEM2010 model consists of mapping matrices that convert the debris population elements to debris fluxes. One output mode results in a spacecraft encompassing 3-D igloo of debris flux, compartmentalized by debris size, velocity, pitch, and yaw with respect to spacecraft ram direction. The second output mode provides debris flux through an Earth-based telescope/radar beam from LEO through GEO. This paper compares the new ORDEM2010 with ORDEM2000 in terms of processes and results with examples of specific orbits.

  19. Debris thickness and surface topography on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael; Nicholson, Lindsey; Rieg, Lorenzo; Klug, Christoph; Wirbel, Anna; Del Gobbo, Costanza; Pritchard, Hamish; Willis, Ian; Mayer, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The ablation zones of many Himalayan glaciers are partially to completely covered with a layer of rock debris, the thickness of which is a key control on surface melt rates. Although it is commonly assumed that supraglacial debris is redistributed by gravitational processes due to variable surface topography, the nature of such a relationship has not been fully explored. Here we present locally extensive debris thickness data collected on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal, using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and investigate, by comparison with a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM), the relationship between debris thickness and surface topography. We compare debris thickness with slope, aspect, and hillslope curvature and look at how debris thickness relates to features of interest on the glacier surface. The existence of a relationship between debris thickness and surface topography has potentially important implications for remote sensing estimates of debris thickness made using thermal band satellite imagery because DTMs are commonly available at relatively high spatial resolution. For this reason, we assess whether or not debris thickness and surface topography covary. Further, due to the typically non-linear relationship between debris thickness and surface temperature, remote sensing estimates of debris thickness are affected by sub-pixel scale debris thickness variability. To see how debris thickness varies at sub-pixel scale, and the extent to which such variability should affect remote sensing-derived debris thickness estimates, we explore the effects of resampling our debris thickness data to the resolution of the thermal bands of ASTER and Landsat satellite images.

  20. Pink marine sediments reveal rapid ice melt and Arctic meltwater discharge during Dansgaard-Oeschger warmings.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Tine L; Thomsen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The climate of the last glaciation was interrupted by numerous abrupt temperature fluctuations, referred to as Greenland interstadials and stadials. During warm interstadials the meridional overturning circulation was active transferring heat to the north, whereas during cold stadials the Nordic Seas were ice-covered and the overturning circulation was disrupted. Meltwater discharge, from ice sheets surrounding the Nordic Seas, is implicated as a cause of this ocean instability, yet very little is known regarding this proposed discharge during warmings. Here we show that, during warmings, pink clay from Devonian Red Beds is transported in suspension by meltwater from the surrounding ice sheet and replaces the greenish silt that is normally deposited on the north-western slope of Svalbard during interstadials. The magnitude of the outpourings is comparable to the size of the outbursts during the deglaciation. Decreasing concentrations of ice-rafted debris during the interstadials signify that the ice sheet retreats as the meltwater production increases.

  1. Orbital Debris: Quarterly News, Volume 14, Issue 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C. (Editor); Shoots, Debi (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    This bulletin contains articles from the Orbital Debris Program office. This issue's articles are: "Orbital Debris Success Story --A Decade in the Making", "Old and New Satellite Breakups Identified," "Update on Three Major Debris Clouds," and "MMOD Inspection of the HST Bay 5 Multi-Layer Insulation Panel" about micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) inspection of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) insulation panel. A project review is also included (i.e., "Small Debris Observations from the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 Collision.") There are also abstra cts of conference papers from the staff of the program office.

  2. Coarse woody debris dynamics in two old-growth ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, M.E. ); Chen Hua )

    1991-10-01

    In this article, the dynamics of coarse woody debris are compound deciduous old-growth forest system Changbai Mountain Biosphere Reserve in China, and a coniferous old-growth forest system, H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon. The objective is to compare in these two ecosystems the amount of coarse woody debris; the processes that affect coarse woody debris, such as tree mortality and decay rates; and the role of coarse woody debris in nutrient cycling. To assess importance in the global carbon budget, these two old-growth ecosystems are used to estimate the upper and lower limits of coarse woody debris mass for undisturbed temperate forests.

  3. Reading the Signatures of Extrasolar Planets in Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    An extrasolar planet sculpts the famous debris dish around Fomalhaut; probably ma ny other debris disks contain planets that we could locate if only we could better recognize their signatures in the dust that surrounds them. But the interaction between planets and debris disks involves both orbital resonances and collisions among grains and rocks in the disks --- difficult processes to model simultanemus]y. I will describe new 3-D models of debris disk dynamics that incorporate both collisions and resonant trapping of dust for the first time, allowing us to decode debris disk images and read the signatures of the planets they contain.

  4. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A; Crowe, Sean A; Hecky, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  5. Recent Warming of Lake Kivu

    PubMed Central

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A.; Crowe, Sean A.; Hecky, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient. PMID:25295730

  6. How the West Was Warmed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerling, M.; Eischeid, J.

    2006-05-01

    Is the West getting warmer? To be sure, the summer of 2005 was one of record heat in the West, and recent period of western US drought during 1998-2004 was also accompanied by unusual warmth. But warm conditions accompanied the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s and the 1950s. The question remains open whether recent western warming has been part of a externally forced climate trend, or whether other processes have been at play like urbanization or the inherent natural fluctuations of climate paterns? We perform analysis of the Fourth Assessment coupled ocean-atmosphere models for the period 1895-2005, together with atmospheric general circulation model experiments. These reveal that the recent warming of the West has very likely been a consequence of increasing greenhouse gases. In fact, no single member of 40 availabl GHG-forced simulations failed to warm the West during the past century. We further show that a warming of the tropical oceanic warm pool regions, itself a greenhouse gas forced response, has been a major contributor to the warming of the West since 1970.

  7. Glacial-Interglacial Climate Changes Recorded by Debris Flow Grain Size, Eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, M. K.; Whittaker, A. C.; Roda Boluda, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties remain about the sensitivity of eroding landscapes to climate changes over a range of frequencies and amplitudes. Numerical models suggest that simple catchment-fan systems should be responsive to glacial-interglacial climate cycles, recording them in both sediment flux and the grain size distribution of their deposits. However these models are largely untested and the propagation of climatic signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological data from 8 debris flow fans in Owens Valley, eastern California. These fans have an exceptionally well-constrained depositional record spanning the last 120 ka, which we use to examine how sediment export has varied as a function of high-amplitude climate changes. We find a strong and sustained relationship between debris flow grain size and paleoclimate proxies over an entire glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits correlated with warm and dry conditions. Our data suggest these systems are highly reactive to climate forcing, with a short response timescale of <10 ka and no evidence of signal buffering, which we interpret to be driven by rapid sediment transfer from source to sink. We demonstrate that debris flow grain size follows an exponential relationship with temperature, coarsening at a rate of ~10 % per °C. Using this observation, and a known relationship between temperature and storm intensity, we propose that the climate signal recorded in these fan deposits captures changing storm intensity during the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This study offers a direct test of existing models of catchment-fan systems, confirming that glacial-interglacial climate changes can be clearly expressed in their grain size records. Our results also suggest that these debris flow deposits contain a high-resolution, testable record of past storm intensity, and that storminess is the primary control on their sedimentological

  8. Density fluctuations from warm inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Chris; Moss, Ian G. E-mail: ian.moss@ncl.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    Thermal fluctuations provide the main source of large scale density perturbations in warm inflationary models of the early universe. For the first time, general results are obtained for the power spectrum in the case when the friction coefficient in the inflaton equation of motion depends on temperature. A large increase in the amplitude of perturbations occurs when the friction coefficient increases with temperature. This has to be taken into account when constructing models of warm inflation. New results are also given for the thermal fluctuations in the weak regime of warm inflation when the friction coefficient is relatively small.

  9. Marine Debris Composition on Remote Alaskan National Park Shores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pister, B.; Kunisch, E.; Polasek, L.; Bering, J.; Kim, S.; Neitlich, P.; Nicolato, K.

    2016-02-01

    Marine debris is a pervasive problem along coastlines around the world. The National Park Service manages approximately 3500 miles of shoreline in Alaska's national park units combined. Most of these shores are remote, difficult and expensive to access. In 2011 the Tohoku earthquake hit Japan and generated a devastating tsunami that washed an estimated 150 million tons of debris out to sea. Much of the debris washed ashore in Alaska. The tsunami brought new attention to the long standing problem of marine debris. In 2015 the National Park Service mounted a two pronged effort to remove as much debris as possible from the shores of five park units in Alaska, and initiate education programs about the issue. Almost 11,000 kg of debris were removed from the shores of: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, Kenai Fjords National Park, Katmai National Park, Bering Land Bridge National Preserve and Cape Krusenstern National Monument. Approximately 58% of the debris was plastic. Although much of the debris resembled items expected as a result of the tsunami, a great percentage of the debris was clearly from other sources, such as fishing and shipping. Preliminary analysis suggests that debris composition varied significantly between parks, possibly from locally-derived sources. This can influence how the National Park Service creates educational outreach programs that focus on marine debris prevention exercises.

  10. Orbital Debris Quarterly News, Volume 13, Issue 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi (Editor); Shoots, Debi (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    Although NASA has conducted research on orbital debris since the 1960s, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office is now considered to have been established in October 1979, following the recognition by senior NASA officials of orbital debris as a space environmental issue and the allocation by NASA Headquarters Advanced Programs Office to the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) of funds specifically dedicated for orbital debris investigations. In the 30 years since, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has pioneered the characterization of the orbital debris environment and its potential effects on current and future space systems, has developed comprehensive orbital debris mitigation measures, and has led efforts by the international aerospace community in addressing the challenges posed by orbital debris. In 1967 the Flight Analysis Branch at the Manned Spacecraft Center (renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in 1973) evaluated the risks of collisions between an Apollo spacecraft and orbital debris. Three years later the same group calculated collision risks for the forthcoming Skylab space station, which was launched in 1973. By 1976, the nucleus of NASA s yet-to-be-formed orbital debris research efforts, including Andrew Potter, Burton Cour-Palais, and Donald Kessler, was found in JSC s Environmental Effects Office, examining the potential threat of orbital debris to large space platforms, in particular the proposed Solar Power Satellites (SPS).

  11. [Research progress in post-fire debris flow].

    PubMed

    Di, Xue-ying; Tao, Yu-zhu

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of the secondary disasters of forest fire has significant impacts on the environment quality and human health and safety. Post-fire debris flow is one of the most hazardous secondary disasters of forest fire. To understand the occurrence conditions of post-fire debris flow and to master its occurrence situation are the critical elements in post-fire hazard assessment. From the viewpoints of vegetation, precipitation threshold and debris flow material sources, this paper elaborated the impacts of forest fire on the debris flow, analyzed the geologic and geomorphic conditions, precipitation and slope condition that caused the post-fire debris flow as well as the primary mechanisms of debris-flow initiation caused by shallow landslide or surface runoff, and reviewed the research progress in the prediction and forecast of post-fire debris flow and the related control measures. In the future research, four aspects to be focused on were proposed, i. e., the quantification of the relationships between the fire behaviors and environmental factors and the post-fire debris flow, the quantitative research on the post-fire debris flow initiation and movement processes, the mechanistic model of post-fire debris flow, and the rapid and efficient control countermeasures of post-fire debris flow.

  12. Debris flows in Glacier National Park, Montana: geomorphology and hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Forrest D.; Schmid, Ginger L.

    2003-09-01

    Debris flows are one of the many active slope-forming processes within Glacier National Park, Montana. Most debris flow landforms exhibit classic morphology with a distinct failure scarp, incised channel, channel levees, and toe deposits that often develop a lobate form. The Precambrian metasediments that dominate Glacier National Park's geology weather into angular clasts that range in size from platy gravels to boulders. Classic debris flows occur in areas where the topographic expression provides a debris source from cliff faces and an accumulation of regolith, often in the form of talus slopes. Many of these debris flows have long runout zones and can travel many hundreds of meters. Often they cross hiking trails or roads, including the main east-west highway, Going-to-the-Sun Road. Debris flows impacting the road have resulted in several near fatalities, and hikers have been forced to cross active debris flows to reach safe ground. The magnitude of debris flows varies between high magnitude channel incising events and low magnitude channel filling and/or reworking events. The frequency of debris flow events is irregular and appears to be controlled by the hydrology of triggering storms and antecedent moisture conditions, not by the debris supply. As a result, debris flow magnitude is not a function of frequency, but is more closely related to the characteristics of antecedent conditions and individual storms.

  13. A proposed in situ debris measurement in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opiela, J.; Liou, J.; Stansbery, E.

    Unlike the low Earth o bit (LEO) region, the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO)r debris environment is not well characterized. Since there is no natural mechanism to remove debris from GEO, where atmospheric drag is negligible, the GEO debris population will continue to grow. A good environment definition is needed for GEO satellite designers and operators to have reliable debris impact risk assessments and protection for their satellites. The current, general debris mitigation and protection measures may be applied to GEO satellites, but characterizing the GEO debris environment (flux, size distribution, orbit distribution, sources) will also allow measures tailored specifically for that environment. Ground-based GEO optical measurements in general have been limited to objects greater than about 15 cm. It is highly unlikely that any ground-based telescope can detect GEO debris smaller than 1 cm. In situ measurements are required to characterize the particle environment below the threshold of remote sensors. Firsthand knowledge of the untrackable debris population is critical to GEO environment definition. Two specific issues need to be addressed for any effective in situ measurements in GEO: detector type and potential contamination from interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this paper, we will discuss why the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) material makes an ideal GEO debris detector. We will also show that impacts from debris, interplanetary dust, and interstellar dust are very different in many ways (size, impact speed, flux, etc). Debris impacts can be easily distinguished from other impacts.

  14. Conceptual design of an Orbital Debris Defense System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedillion, Erik; Blevins, Gary; Bohs, Brian; Bragg, David; Brown, Christopher; Casanova, Jose; Cribbs, David; Demko, Richard; Henry, Brian; James, Kelly

    1994-08-01

    Man made orbital debris has become a serious problem. Currently NORAD tracks over 7000 objects in orbit and less than 10 percent of these are active payloads. Common estimates are that the amount of debris will increase at a rate of 10 percent per year. Impacts of space debris with operational payloads or vehicles is a serious risk to human safety and mission success. For example, the impact of a 0.2 mm diameter paint fleck with the Space Shuttle Challenger window created a 2 mm wide by 0.6 mm deep pit. The cost to replace the window was over $50,000. A conceptual design for a Orbital Debris Defense System (ODDS) is presented which considers a wide range of debris sizes, orbits and velocities. Two vehicles were designed to collect and remove space debris. The first would attach a re-entry package to de-orbit very large debris, e.g. inactive satellites and spent upper stages that tend to break up and form small debris. This vehicle was designed to contain several re-entry packages, and be refueled and resupplied with more re-entry packages as needed. The second vehicle was designed to rendezvous with and capture debris ranging from 10 cm to 2 m. Due to tracking limitations, no technically feasible method for collecting debris below 10 cm in size could be devised; it must be accomplished through international regulations which reduce the accumulation of space debris.

  15. Conceptual design of an Orbital Debris Defense System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedillion, Erik; Blevins, Gary; Bohs, Brian; Bragg, David; Brown, Christopher; Casanova, Jose; Cribbs, David; Demko, Richard; Henry, Brian; James, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    Man made orbital debris has become a serious problem. Currently NORAD tracks over 7000 objects in orbit and less than 10 percent of these are active payloads. Common estimates are that the amount of debris will increase at a rate of 10 percent per year. Impacts of space debris with operational payloads or vehicles is a serious risk to human safety and mission success. For example, the impact of a 0.2 mm diameter paint fleck with the Space Shuttle Challenger window created a 2 mm wide by 0.6 mm deep pit. The cost to replace the window was over $50,000. A conceptual design for a Orbital Debris Defense System (ODDS) is presented which considers a wide range of debris sizes, orbits and velocities. Two vehicles were designed to collect and remove space debris. The first would attach a re-entry package to de-orbit very large debris, e.g. inactive satellites and spent upper stages that tend to break up and form small debris. This vehicle was designed to contain several re-entry packages, and be refueled and resupplied with more re-entry packages as needed. The second vehicle was designed to rendezvous with and capture debris ranging from 10 cm to 2 m. Due to tracking limitations, no technically feasible method for collecting debris below 10 cm in size could be devised; it must be accomplished through international regulations which reduce the accumulation of space debris.

  16. Space Transportation System Liftoff Debris Mitigation Process Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Michael; Riley, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Liftoff debris is a top risk to the Space Shuttle Vehicle. To manage the Liftoff debris risk, the Space Shuttle Program created a team with in the Propulsion Systems Engineering & Integration Office. The Shutt le Liftoff Debris Team harnesses the Systems Engineering process to i dentify, assess, mitigate, and communicate the Liftoff debris risk. T he Liftoff Debris Team leverages off the technical knowledge and expe rtise of engineering groups across multiple NASA centers to integrate total system solutions. These solutions connect the hardware and ana lyses to identify and characterize debris sources and zones contribut ing to the Liftoff debris risk. The solutions incorporate analyses sp anning: the definition and modeling of natural and induced environmen ts; material characterizations; statistical trending analyses, imager y based trajectory analyses; debris transport analyses, and risk asse ssments. The verification and validation of these analyses are bound by conservative assumptions and anchored by testing and flight data. The Liftoff debris risk mitigation is managed through vigilant collab orative work between the Liftoff Debris Team and Launch Pad Operation s personnel and through the management of requirements, interfaces, r isk documentation, configurations, and technical data. Furthermore, o n day of launch, decision analysis is used to apply the wealth of ana lyses to case specific identified risks. This presentation describes how the Liftoff Debris Team applies Systems Engineering in their proce sses to mitigate risk and improve the safety of the Space Shuttle Veh icle.

  17. Evaluating the impacts of marine debris on cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Sarah; Perry, Clare

    2014-03-15

    Global in its distribution and pervading all levels of the water column, marine debris poses a serious threat to marine habitats and wildlife. For cetaceans, ingestion or entanglement in debris can cause chronic and acute injuries and increase pollutant loads, resulting in morbidity and mortality. However, knowledge of the severity of effects lags behind that for other species groups. This literature review examines the impacts of marine debris on cetaceans reported to date. It finds that ingestion of debris has been documented in 48 (56% of) cetacean species, with rates of ingestion as high as 31% in some populations. Debris-induced mortality rates of 0-22% of stranded animals were documented, suggesting that debris could be a significant conservation threat to some populations. We identify key data that need to be collected and published to improve understanding of the threat that marine debris poses to cetaceans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of debris flow disasters on Chengdu-Kunming Railway.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Xu, W L; Liu, S J

    2001-07-01

    Chengdu-Kunming Railway is an important transport line on southwestern China. However, this railway's safety is often threatened by debris flows. How to effectively forecast and alarm the debris flow disasters and reduce the losses is the aim to study the prevention system in this paper. The factors to cause or influence debris flow are divided into four parts--the basin environmental factors, the basin meteoric factors, the prevention work's elements and the flood-relief work's elements, and the prevention system is made up of three models--a judgment model to assess the debris flow gully's seriousness, a forecast model to predict the debris flow's occurrence and an alarm model to evaluate the debris flow's disaster. Afterwards, a concise structure chart is worked out and verified by the field data from Chengdu-Kunming Railway. This prevention system will provide beneficial reference for the debris flow's monitoring network to be executed on Chengdu-Kunming Railway.

  19. Assessing marine debris in deep seafloor habitats off California.

    PubMed

    Watters, Diana L; Yoklavich, Mary M; Love, Milton S; Schroeder, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    Marine debris is a global concern that pollutes the world's oceans, including deep benthic habitats where little is known about the extent of the problem. We provide the first quantitative assessment of debris on the seafloor (20-365 m depth) in submarine canyons and the continental shelf off California, using the Delta submersible. Fishing activities were the most common contributors of debris. Highest densities occurred close to ports off central California and increased significantly over the 15-year study period. Recreational monofilament fishing line dominated this debris. Debris was less dense and more diverse off southern than central California. Plastic was the most abundant material and will likely persist for centuries. Disturbance to habitat and organisms was low, and debris was used as habitat by some fishes and macroinvertebrates. Future trends in human activities on land and at sea will determine the type and magnitude of debris that accumulates in deep water.

  20. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.