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Sample records for enteric red mouth

  1. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification as an emerging technology for detection of Yersinia ruckeri the causative agent of enteric red mouth disease in fish

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mona; Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2008-01-01

    Background Enteric Redmouth (ERM) disease also known as Yersiniosis is a contagious disease affecting salmonids, mainly rainbow trout. The causative agent is the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia ruckeri. The disease can be diagnosed by isolation and identification of the causative agent, or detection of the Pathogen using fluorescent antibody tests, ELISA and PCR assays. These diagnostic methods are laborious, time consuming and need well trained personnel. Results A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated for detection of Y. ruckeri the etiological agent of enteric red mouth (ERM) disease in salmonids. The assay was optimised to amplify the yruI/yruR gene, which encodes Y. ruckeri quorum sensing system, in the presence of a specific primer set and Bst DNA polymerase at an isothermal temperature of 63°C for one hour. Amplification products were detected by visual inspection, agarose gel electrophoresis and by real-time monitoring of turbidity resulted by formation of LAMP amplicons. Digestion with HphI restriction enzyme demonstrated that the amplified product was unique. The specificity of the assay was verified by the absence of amplification products when tested against related bacteria. The assay had 10-fold higher sensitivity compared with conventional PCR and successfully detected Y. ruckeri not only in pure bacterial culture but also in tissue homogenates of infected fish. Conclusion The ERM-LAMP assay represents a practical alternative to the microbiological approach for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of Y. ruckeri in fish farms. The assay is carried out in one hour and needs only a heating block or water bath as laboratory furniture. The advantages of the ERM-LAMP assay make it a promising tool for molecular detection of enteric red mouth disease in fish farms. PMID:18700011

  2. From mouth to anus: Functional and structural relevance of enteric neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster gut.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Takayuki; Kenmoku, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal tract is the main organ involved in host nutritional homeostasis. Intestinal function in both vertebrates and invertebrates is partly controlled by enteric neurons that innervate the gut. Though anatomical and functional aspects of enteric neurons are relatively less characterized in Drosophila than in large insects, analyses of the role of the enteric neurons in flies have remarkably progressed in the last few years. In this review, we first provide a summary of the structure and function of the Drosophila intestine. We then discuss recent studies of the structure and function of enteric neurons in Drosophila melanogaster. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  4. Enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease The inflammation can also involve the stomach ( gastritis ) and large intestine ( colitis ). Risk factors include: Recent ... Crohn disease Dehydration Diarrhea - overview Fever Food poisoning Gastritis Radiation enteritis Salmonella enterocolitis Shigellosis Review Date 5/ ...

  5. Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Red Deer - Experimental Infection and Test Methods Performance.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, R; Nfon, C; Swekla, K; Zhang, Z; Hole, K; Bittner, H; Salo, T; Goolia, M; Embury-Hyatt, C; Bueno, R; Hannah, M; Swainsbury, R; O'Sullivan, C; Spence, R; Clough, R; McFadden, A; Rawdon, T; Alexandersen, S

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a number of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) test methods for use in red deer. Ten animals were intranasally inoculated with the FMD virus (FMDV) O UKG 11/2001, monitored for clinical signs, and samples taken regularly (blood, serum, oral swabs, nasal swabs, probang samples and lesion swabs, if present) over a 4-week period. Only one animal, deer 1103, developed clinical signs (lesions under the tongue and at the coronary band of the right hind hoof). It tested positive by 3D and IRES real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) in various swabs, lesion materials and serum. In a non-structural protein (NSP) in-house ELISA (NSP-ELISA-IH), one commercial ELISA (NSP-ELISA-PR) and a commercial antibody NSP pen side test, only deer 1103 showed positive results from day post-inoculation (dpi) 14 onwards. Two other NSP-ELISAs detected anti-NSP serum antibodies with lower sensitivity. It also showed rising antibody levels in the virus neutralization test (VNT), the in-house SPO-ELISA-IH and the commercial SPO-ELISA-PR at dpi 9, and in another two commercial SPO-ELISAs at dpi 12 (SPO-ELISA-IV) and dpi 19 (SPO-ELISA-IZ), respectively. Six of the red deer that had been rRT-PCR and antibody negative were re-inoculated intramuscularly with the same O-serotype FMDV at dpi 14. None of these animals became rRT-PCR or NSP-ELISA positive, but all six animals became positive in the VNT, the in-house SPO-ELISA-IH and the commercial SPO-ELISA-PR. Two other commercial SPO-ELISAs were less sensitive or failed to detect animals as positive. The rRT-PCRs and the four most sensitive commercial ELISAs that had been used for the experimentally inoculated deer were further evaluated for diagnostic specificity (DSP) using 950 serum samples and 200 nasal swabs from non-infected animals. DSPs were 100% for the rRT-PCRs and between 99.8 and 100% for the ELISAs.

  6. Heparan Sulfate-Binding Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Enters Cells Via Caveolae-Mediated Endocytosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) utilizes different cell surface macromolecules to facilitate infection of cultured cells. Virus which is virulent for susceptible animals infects cells via four members of the alpha V subclass of cellular integrins. In contrast, tissue culture adaptation of some...

  7. Effect of Strain Rate on the Mechanical Behavior of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the effect of hydrodynamic stress on red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on linear velocity profiles. Microfluidic devices have provided a means to examine the mechanical behavior of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a constriction, with previous work primarily focused on a fixed constriction taper angle and corresponding hydrodynamic strain rate. Here we investigate the effect of strain rate on the stretching dynamics exhibited by RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. Systematic variations in the constriction taper angle allow the strain rate to be precisely tuned, and high speed video yields precise measurements of the corresponding RBC deformations. We demonstrate that maximal RBC stretching occurs at an intermediate constriction taper angle, despite the lower magnitude of the strain rate. We interpret the results in terms of the time integral of the elongational strain rate, and we discuss the implications for shear-induced mechanotransduction.

  8. Effect of 2-(a Hydroxybenzyl) Benzimidazole on Teschen Disease Virus, Pig Enteric Viruses, and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Kidney Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Dardiri, A H; Delay, P D; Bachrach, H L

    1964-07-01

    The synthetic compound, 2-((a) hydroxybenzyl) benzimidazole (HBB) partially inhibited the cytopathogenicity and multiplication of Teschen disease virus (TDV) and 6 enteric-cytopathogenic porcine orphan (ECPO) viruses in swine cells but not of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in bovine kidney cells. For FMDV, there appeared to be a slight enhancement in virus yield and in cytopathic effect when HBB was present. The inhibition of the viral cytopathic effect and reproduction of TDV and ECPO viruses was related to the concentration of HBB. At the inhibitory level, the compound did not cause any changes in the microscopic structure of pig kidney or bovine kidney cells. The suppression of TDV multiplication was reversed when HBB was removed. The compound did not inactivate TDV or FMDV.

  9. Effect of 2-(a Hydroxybenzyl) Benzimidazole on Teschen Disease Virus, Pig Enteric Viruses, and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Kidney Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Dardiri, A. H.; DeLay, P. D.; Bachrach, H. L.

    1964-01-01

    The synthetic compound, 2-(a hydroxybenzyl) benzimidazole (HBB) partially inhibited the cytopathogenicity and multiplication of Teschen disease virus (TDV) and 6 enteric-cytopathogenic porcine orphan (ECPO) viruses in swine cells but not of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in bovine kidney cells. For FMDV, there appeared to be a slight enhancement in virus yield and in cytopathic effect when HBB was present. The inhibition of the viral cytopathic effect and reproduction of TDV and ECPO viruses was related to the concentration of HBB. At the inhibitory level, the compound did not cause any changes in the microscopic structure of pig kidney or bovine kidney cells. The suppression of TDV multiplication was reversed when HBB was removed. The compound did not inactivate TDV or FMDV. Imagesp164-a PMID:17649516

  10. Meth mouth.

    PubMed

    Heng, Christine K; Badner, Victor M; Schiop, Luminita Adela

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a drug traditionally sought by groups living on the fringes of society. But now, it has entered the mainstream. Over the last five years, meth has seen a surge in abuse, media coverage and attention from law-enforcement officers. Meth mouth is characterized by rampant caries, typically on the smooth surfaces of dentition. This article gives a history of meth use and abuse. It describes the condition of meth mouth and its etiology. Treatment options and other dental considerations are discussed.

  11. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  12. Better red than dead: carotenoid-based mouth coloration reveals infection in barn swallow nestlings.

    PubMed Central

    Saino, N; Ninni, P; Calza, S; Martinelli, R; De Bernardi, F; Møller, A P

    2000-01-01

    Nestling birds solicit food from their parents by displaying their open brightly coloured gapes. Carotenoids affect gape colour, but also play a central role in immunostimulation. Therefore, we hypothesize that, by differentially allocating resources to nestlings with more brightly coloured gapes, parents favour healthy offspring which are able to allocate carotenoids to gape coloration without compromising their immune defence. We demonstrated that, in the barn swallow Hirundo rustica, (i) parents differentially allocate food to nestlings with an experimentally brighter red gape, (ii) nestlings challenged with a novel antigen (sheep red blood cells, SRBCs) have less bright gape colour than their control siblings, (iii) nestlings challenged with SRBCs but also provided with the principal circulating carotenoid (lutein) have more brightly coloured red gapes than their challenged but unsupplemented siblings and (iv) the gape colour of nestlings challenged with SRBCs and provisioned with lutein exceeds that of siblings that were unchallenged. This suggests that parents may favour nestlings with superior health by preferentially feeding offspring with the brightest gapes. PMID:10670953

  13. Contribution of non-volatile and aroma fractions to in-mouth sensory properties of red wines: wine reconstitution strategies and sensory sorting task.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Navajas, María-Pilar; Campo, Eva; Avizcuri, José Miguel; Valentin, Dominique; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación; Ferreira, Vicente

    2012-06-30

    This work explores to what extent the aroma or the non-volatile fractions of red wines are responsible for the overall flavor differences perceived in-mouth. For this purpose, 14 samples (4 commercial and 10 reconstituted wines), were sorted by a panel of 30 trained assessors according to their sensory in-mouth similarities. Reconstituted wines were prepared by adding the same volatile fraction (coming from a red wine) to the non-volatile fraction of 10 different red wines showing large differences in perceived astringency. Sorting was performed under three different conditions: (a) no aroma perception: nose-close condition (NA), (b) retronasal aroma perception only (RA), and (c) allowing retro- and involuntary orthonasal aroma perception (ROA). Similarity estimates were derived from the sorting and submitted to multidimensional scaling (MDS) followed by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Results have clearly shown that, globally, aroma perception is not the major driver of the in-mouth sensory perception of red wine, which is undoubtedly primarily driven by the perception of astringency and by the chemical compounds causing it, particularly protein precipitable proanthocyanidins (PAs). However, aroma perception plays a significant role on the perception of sweetness and bitterness. The impact of aroma seems to be more important whenever astringency, total polyphenols and protein precipitable PAs levels are smaller. Results also indicate that when a red-black fruit odor nuance is clearly perceived in conditions in which orthonasal odor perception is allowed, a strong reduction in astringency takes place. Such red-black fruit odor nuance seems to be the result of a specific aroma release pattern as a consequence of the interaction between aroma compounds and the non-volatile matrix. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Viscoelastic properties of the human red blood cell membrane. II. Area and volume of individual red cells entering a micropipette.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, A W; Canham, P B

    1977-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that human red cells can be drawn into cylindrical glass micropipettes of internal diameter approximately 2.0 mum without lysing. For pipettes of less than approximately 2.9 mum inside diameter, the red cell must become less spherical, that is, reduce its volume-to-area ratio. In this work measurements were made from 16-mm film records that allowed the determination of the cellular area and volume of individual erythrocytes as they were drawn into a 2.0-mum pipette with negative pressures. The results showed that the total surface area of the membrane remains constant and that the cell endures the passage into the pipette by losing volume. The volume loss was interpreted to be due to cell water and solute loss when the membrane is under stress. The loss of cell volume, rather than the stretching of the membrane, adds confirmation that although it is very deformable, the membrane is very resistant to two-dimensional strain. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:836934

  15. Effect of Strain Rate on the Deformation of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2015-11-01

    Although much work has investigated the stretching behavior of RBCs in shear flows, relatively little work has examined the deformation that occurs in the physiologically important extensional flow at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, there is currently no analytical model to predict the extent of deformation as a function of the strain rate in the constriction entrance. Here we experimentally elucidate the relationship between strain rate and the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We systematically varied the flow rate and the microchannel geometry to vary the strain rate, and we measured the resulting RBC deformations with high speed video. We demonstrate that the Kelvin Voigt model captures the stretching dynamics, and that the RBC membrane elastic shear modulus increases approximately linearly with increasing strain rate.

  16. Mouth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard to eat, drink or even smile. Some common mouth problems include Cold sores - painful sores on the lips and around the mouth, caused by a virus Canker sores - painful sores in the mouth, caused ...

  17. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  18. Mouth Rinses

    MedlinePlus

    ... and bad breath. Anti-cavity mouth rinse uses fluoride to protect against tooth decay. Mouth rinses are ... anti-plaque/anti-gingivitis rinses or anti-cavity fluoride rinses, for example. Dentists will prescribe special rinses ...

  19. The Effect of Dietary Replacement of Ordinary Rice with Red Yeast Rice on Nutrient Utilization, Enteric Methane Emission and Rumen Archaeal Diversity in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L. Z.; Zhou, M. L.; Wang, J. W.; Wu, D.; Yan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty castrated Boer crossbred goats were used in the present study with two treatments to examine the effect of dietary replacement of ordinary rice with red yeast rice on nutrient utilization, enteric methane emission and ruminal archaea structure and composition. Two treatment diets contained (DM basis) 70.0% of forage, 21.8% of concentrates and 8.2% of either ordinary rice (control) or red yeast rice (RYR). Nutrient utilization was measured and enteric methane emissions were determined in respiration chambers. Results showed that RYR had significantly lower digestibility of N and organic matter compared to control group. However, feeding red yeast rice did not affect N retention as g/d or a proportion of N intake, and reduced heat production as MJ/d or as a proportion of metabolizable energy intake, thus leading to a higher proportion of metabolizable energy intake to be retained in body tissue. RYR also had significantly lower methane emissions either as g/d, or as a proportion of feed intake. Although feeding red yeast rice had no negative effect on any rumen fermentation variables, it decreased serum contents of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. In the present study, 75616 archaeal sequences were generated and clustered into 2364 Operational Taxonomic Units. At the genus level, the predominant archaea in the rumen of goats was Methanobrevibacter, which was significantly inhibited with the supplementation of red yeast rice. In conclusion, red yeast rice is a potential feed ingredient for mitigation of enteric methane emissions of goats. However, caution should be taken when it is used because it may inhibit the digestibility of some nutrients. Further studies are required to evaluate its potential with different diets and animal species, as well as its effects on animal health and food safety. PMID:27467559

  20. The Effect of Dietary Replacement of Ordinary Rice with Red Yeast Rice on Nutrient Utilization, Enteric Methane Emission and Rumen Archaeal Diversity in Goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Z; Zhou, M L; Wang, J W; Wu, D; Yan, T

    2016-01-01

    Twenty castrated Boer crossbred goats were used in the present study with two treatments to examine the effect of dietary replacement of ordinary rice with red yeast rice on nutrient utilization, enteric methane emission and ruminal archaea structure and composition. Two treatment diets contained (DM basis) 70.0% of forage, 21.8% of concentrates and 8.2% of either ordinary rice (control) or red yeast rice (RYR). Nutrient utilization was measured and enteric methane emissions were determined in respiration chambers. Results showed that RYR had significantly lower digestibility of N and organic matter compared to control group. However, feeding red yeast rice did not affect N retention as g/d or a proportion of N intake, and reduced heat production as MJ/d or as a proportion of metabolizable energy intake, thus leading to a higher proportion of metabolizable energy intake to be retained in body tissue. RYR also had significantly lower methane emissions either as g/d, or as a proportion of feed intake. Although feeding red yeast rice had no negative effect on any rumen fermentation variables, it decreased serum contents of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. In the present study, 75616 archaeal sequences were generated and clustered into 2364 Operational Taxonomic Units. At the genus level, the predominant archaea in the rumen of goats was Methanobrevibacter, which was significantly inhibited with the supplementation of red yeast rice. In conclusion, red yeast rice is a potential feed ingredient for mitigation of enteric methane emissions of goats. However, caution should be taken when it is used because it may inhibit the digestibility of some nutrients. Further studies are required to evaluate its potential with different diets and animal species, as well as its effects on animal health and food safety.

  1. Mouth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Mouth ProblemsMouth problems, such as sores, are very common. Follow this chart for more information about mouth problems in adults.Our trusted Symptom Checker is ...

  2. Complete genome sequence of Yersinia ruckeri str. CSF007-82, etiologic agent of enteric redmouth disease in salmonid fish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We present the complete, closed and finished chromosomal and extra-chromosomal genome sequences of Y. ruckeri strain CSF007-82, etiologic agent of enteric red mouth disease in salmonid fish. The chromosome is 3,799,036 bp with a G+C content of 47.5% and encodes 3,530 predicted CDS, 7 ribosomal opero...

  3. Distribution and environmental impacts of metals and natural radionuclides in marine sediments in-front of different wadies mouth along the Egyptian Red Sea Coast.

    PubMed

    el-Taher, A; Madkour, H A

    2011-02-01

    Forty-four marine sediment samples were collected in-front of wadis mouth along the Egyptian Red Sea coast: Wadi El-Hamra, Wadi El-Esh, Wadi Abu-Shaar, Wadi El-Gemal and Wadi Khashir (Hamata). Several investigations of natural activity and trace metals of surface sediments were carried out. Distributions of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the marine sediments were determined using NaI (Tl) γ-ray spectrometry. The average activities (range) of natural radionuclides in all wadis in the studied areas are 27.38 (18-48) Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 38.45 (34-110) Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th and 419.4 (214-641) Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. These results are in agreement with earlier reported data. A comparison of radionuclide activities in the sediment of the studied areas and in other coastal and aquatic environments is given. The radiation hazard parameters (absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index) are calculated and compared with the reported data. The results of measurements will serve as base line data and background reference level for Egyptian coastlines. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... protect your teeth may also help your dry mouth condition: Brush with a fluoride toothpaste and floss your teeth. Ask your dentist ... acids. Use a fluoride rinse or brush-on fluoride gel before ... historically to treat dry mouth, such as teas made from marshmallow or slippery ...

  5. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may ... mouth Images Oral thrush Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Lichen planus on the oral mucosa Mouth sores References Daniels TE, Jordan RC. ...

  6. Mouth Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rich in fruits and vegetables. The vitamins and antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables may help reduce your risk of mouth cancer. Avoid excessive sun exposure to your lips. Protect the skin on your lips from the sun by staying ...

  7. A Study on Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Red Blood Cell Indices in New Entering Students of the University of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Moafi, Alireza; Rahgozar, Soheila; Ghias, Majid; ahar, Elham Vahdat; Borumand, Amirbahador; Sabbaghi, Amirhosein; Sameti, Amirabass; Hashemi, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Obesity and increased blood pressure are identified as risk factors for cardiac and pulmonary disorders. On the other hand, iron deficiency (another preventable disease) is common in adolescence and considered as associated with health impairment. The present study evaluates body mass index (BMI) and its association with blood pressure and hematological indices in freshman students entering the University of Isfahan in 2009. Methods: All the 1675 students who entered the University of Isfahan in September 2009 were examined. Height, weight, BMI, blood pressure, hemoglobin (Hb) and red blood cell (RBC) indices of these students were measured. The prevalence of high blood pressure, its association with BMI and the relation between BMI and anemia, iron deficiency and educational achievement were assessed. Results: All participants, including 514 males and 1161 females, went under clinical observations. The average age was 20.7 ± 3.8. year Among the students, 18.2% of males and 20% of females were underweight. High systolic blood pressure was more common in the students with BMI > 25 kg/m2 (p < 0.001). Anemia was seen in 8.7% of females. In males, however, a relation between anemia frequency and BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 was more distinct (p = 0.002). There was no association between anemia and students’ average test scores. Conclusions: High incidence of abnormal BMI in the study population, and its association with systolic blood pressure indicate the importance of nutritional guidelines and counseling programs for freshman students. On the other hand, high incidence of anemia in this population ascertains the necessity of anemia screening programs before academic studies. PMID:22174970

  8. A study on body mass index, blood pressure, and red blood cell indices in new entering students of the university of isfahan.

    PubMed

    Moafi, Alireza; Rahgozar, Soheila; Ghias, Majid; Ahar, Elham Vahdat; Borumand, Amirbahador; Sabbaghi, Amirhosein; Sameti, Amirabass; Hashemi, Mostafa

    2011-10-01

    Obesity and increased blood pressure are identified as risk factors for cardiac and pulmonary disorders. On the other hand, iron deficiency (another preventable disease) is common in adolescence and considered as associated with health impairment. The present study evaluates body mass index (BMI) and its association with blood pressure and hematological indices in freshman students entering the University of Isfahan in 2009. All the 1675 students who entered the University of Isfahan in September 2009 were examined. Height, weight, BMI, blood pressure, hemoglobin (Hb) and red blood cell (RBC) indices of these students were measured. The prevalence of high blood pressure, its association with BMI and the relation between BMI and anemia, iron deficiency and educational achievement were assessed. All participants, including 514 males and 1161 females, went under clinical observations. The average age was 20.7 ± 3.8. year Among the students, 18.2% of males and 20% of females were underweight. High systolic blood pressure was more common in the students with BMI > 25 kg/m(2) (p < 0.001). Anemia was seen in 8.7% of females. In males, however, a relation between anemia frequency and BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2) was more distinct (p = 0.002). There was no association between anemia and students' average test scores. High incidence of abnormal BMI in the study population, and its association with systolic blood pressure indicate the importance of nutritional guidelines and counseling programs for freshman students. On the other hand, high incidence of anemia in this population ascertains the necessity of anemia screening programs before academic studies.

  9. Response of mink, skunk, red fox and raccoon to inoculation with mink virus enteritis, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus and prevalence of antibody to parvovirus in wild carnivores in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, I K; Povey, R C; Voigt, D R

    1983-01-01

    Mink virus enteritis, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus-2 were inoculated separately into groups of raccoon, mink, red fox and striped skunk. Raccoons were highly susceptible to mink virus enteritis and feline panleukopenia, with animals developing clinical illness, and several dying within six to ten days of inoculation with lesions typical of parvovirus infection. Both viruses were shed in high titre in the feces of infected raccoons, and high antibody titres were stimulated. Raccoons inoculated with canine parvovirus-2 showed no signs; shedding of virus was sporadic though moderate titres of antibody developed. Mink inoculated with mink virus enteritis and feline panleukopenia developed signs and lesions of early parvovirus infection. No signs or significant lesions followed canine parvovirus-2 inoculation. Shedding of virus was heavy (mink virus enteritis) or sporadic (feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus-2), though good serological responses were elicited to all three viruses. Red fox showed no signs of infection, shed all three viruses only sporadically, and the serological response was strong only to feline panleukopenia. Skunks developed low antibody titres, but no signs, and did not shed virus. Antibody to parvovirus was found in 79.2% of 144 wild red foxes; 22.3% of 112 wild raccoons; 1.3% of 157 wild skunks and 6/7 coyotes in southern Ontario. The likely significance of these viruses to wild and captive individuals and populations of these carnivores is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6309349

  10. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  11. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out.

  12. Enteral feedings.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, R

    1980-01-01

    The benefits, equipment used, commercially available sources, and the indications and techniques for administration of enteral nutrients are reviewed. In many malabsorption states, enteral feeding is preferable and parenteral nutrients are seldom indicated. Transitional enteral nutrient support usually is indicated after parenteral nutrient therapy. Enteral tube-feeding formulas should be matched to the patient's needs; formulas using blenderized natural foods or intact isolated nutrients are appropriate for patients with intact gastrointestinal tracts. Patients should be monitored for glucosuria and hyperglycemia, bloating, nausea, dehydration, and renal, hepatic and hematologic status. Formula dilution, and a reduced flow rate or use of continuous-drip feeding, will reduce the incidence of osmotic diarrhea. The effectiveness, low cost and low potential for serious complications make enteral feeding preferable to parenteral nutrient therapy for many patients.

  13. Mouth Problems and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... orientation. This information is for people who have mouth (oral) problems related to HIV infection. It explains ... look like. It also describes where in the mouth they occur and how they are treated. They ...

  14. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  15. Enteric viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characteristic clinical signs associated with viral enteritis in young poultry include diarrhea, anorexia, litter eating, ruffled feathers, and poor growth. Intestines may have lesions; intestines are typically dilated and are filled with fluid and gaseous contents. The sequela to clinical disease...

  16. Radiation enteritis.

    PubMed

    Harb, Ali H; Abou Fadel, Carla; Sharara, Ala I

    2014-01-01

    Radiation enteritis continues to be a major health concern in recipients of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation enteritis is expected to continue to rise during the coming years paralleling the unprecedented use of radiotherapy in pelvic cancers. Radiation enteritis can present as either an acute or chronic syndrome. The acute form presents within hours to days of radiation exposure and typically resolves within few weeks. The chronic form may present as early as 2 months or as long as 30 years after exposure. Risk factors can be divided into patient and treatment-related factors. Chronic radiation enteritis is characterized by progressive obliterative endarteritis with exaggerated submucosal fibrosis and can manifest by stricturing, formation of fistulae, local abscesses, perforation, and bleeding. In the right clinical context, diagnosis can be confirmed by cross-sectional imaging, flexible or video capsule endoscopy. Present treatment strategies are directed primarily towards symptom relief and management of emerging complications. Recently, however, there has been a shift towards rational drug design based on improved understanding of the molecular basis of disease in an effort to limit the fibrotic process and prevent organ damage.

  17. Campylobacter enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, M A; Fleming, P C

    1979-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni/coli has recently become recognized as a common bacterial cause of diarrhea. Infection can occur at any age. The usual incubation period of campylobacter enteritis is 2 to 5 days. Fever, diarrhea and abdominal pain are the most common clinical features. The stools frequently contain mucus and, a few days after the onset of symptoms, frank blood. Significant vomiting and dehydration are uncommon. A rapid presumptive laboratory diagnosis may be made during the acute phase of the illness by direct phase-contrast microscopy of stools. Isolation of the organism from stools requires culture in a selective medium containing antibiotics and incubation under reduced oxygen tension at 42 degrees C. The organism persists in the stools of untreated patients for up to 7 weeks following the onset of symptoms. Erythromycin may produce a rapid clinical and bacteriologic cure, and should be used to treat moderately to severely ill patients as well as patients with compromised host defences. The emergence of erythromycin-resistant strains requires close monitoring. The epidemiologic aspects of campylobacter enteritis will be fully understood only when methods become available for differentiating strains of C. jejuni/coli. The historical background and current knowledge of campylobacter enteritis are reviewed in this paper. Images FIG. 1 PMID:455209

  18. Enteric diseases.

    PubMed

    William, D C

    1981-03-01

    This paper focuses on the growing incidence of the "new" sexually transmitted parasitic enteric diseases: amebiasis and giardiasis. Two major behavioral factors influence transmission of these diseases in the gay community: 1) oral-rectal and oral-genital sexual contact and 2) multiple sexual partners. Pathogenesis, clinical signs and symptoms and complications associated with these diseases are also discussed. Although many patients present with severe symptoms, approximately 50 percent of infected patients are asymptomatic. The diagnostic procedures include a fresh purged stool examination, nonpurged warm stool examinations, and/or cold stool specimens. The serologic tests (serum precipitin and hemagglutination) are of value only in severely symptomatic invasive disease. Different treatment regimens and their side effects are discussed. Drugs used in the treatment of the enteric diseases include diiodohydroxyquin, metronidazole, furamide, and paromomycin. Only 60 to 70 percent of patients with the disease are cured, and 30 to 40 percent of patients require multiple courses of therapy. Test-of-cure examinations, ideally consisting of one or two purged stool specimens, are necessary in follow-up management.

  19. 33 CFR 207.260 - Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street; navigation. 207.260 Section 207.260... REGULATIONS § 207.260 Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher... canal at any stage from the mouth of the Yazoo Diversion Canal where it enters into the Mississippi...

  20. 33 CFR 207.260 - Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street; navigation. 207.260 Section 207.260... REGULATIONS § 207.260 Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher... canal at any stage from the mouth of the Yazoo Diversion Canal where it enters into the Mississippi...

  1. 33 CFR 207.260 - Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street; navigation. 207.260 Section 207.260... REGULATIONS § 207.260 Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher... canal at any stage from the mouth of the Yazoo Diversion Canal where it enters into the Mississippi...

  2. 33 CFR 207.260 - Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street; navigation. 207.260 Section 207.260... REGULATIONS § 207.260 Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher... canal at any stage from the mouth of the Yazoo Diversion Canal where it enters into the Mississippi...

  3. 33 CFR 207.260 - Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher Street; navigation. 207.260 Section 207.260... REGULATIONS § 207.260 Yazoo Diversion Canal, Vicksburg, Miss., from its mouth at Kleinston Landing to Fisher... canal at any stage from the mouth of the Yazoo Diversion Canal where it enters into the Mississippi...

  4. Statement on mouth cancer diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Kirby, J

    2014-01-01

    The number of people being diagnosed with mouth cancer (oral cancer) is increasing, with notable rises in incidence in younger people and in females. There are certain lifestyle habits that can increase the risk of mouth cancer, such as smoking or chewing tobacco, drinking alcohol above recommended levels (especially in those who also smoke), and chewing betel nut (areca nut). Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of some types of mouth cancer, and too much sun exposure may also raise the risk of lip cancers. The signs and symptoms of mouth cancer can often be seen or felt, and any red or white patch, ulcer or lump can be an early sign if it lasts for three or more weeks. If people notice any of these changes, they should seek help from their dentist, doctor, or another healthcare professional without delay, because if mouth cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, when the lesions are small, treatment is generally less complicated and more effective.

  5. Enteric Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Kumar, Ruchika

    2017-03-01

    Enteric fever is an important public-health problem in India. The clinical presentation of typhoid fever is very variable, ranging from fever with little other morbidities to marked toxemia and associated multisystem complications. Fever is present in majority of patients (>90 %) irrespective of their age group. Mortality is higher in younger children. Blood culture remains gold standard for diagnosis. Widal test has low sensitivity and specificity but may be used in second week to support the diagnosis. Emerging resistance to several antibiotics should be kept in mind when selecting antibiotics or revising the treatment. The key preventive strategies are safe water, safe food, personal hygiene, and appropriate sanitation. Vaccination is an additional effective tool for prevention.

  6. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron)  Infection in the mouth, such as a yeast infection  Acid reflux TREATMENT Your doctor will help ... the underlying medical condition, such as diabetes or yeast infection, is treated. If a drug is causing ...

  7. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron) Infection in the mouth, such as a yeast infection Acid reflux Back to Top Treatment Your ... the underlying medical condition, such as diabetes or yeast infection, is treated. If a drug is causing ...

  8. Dry Mouth - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hmoob) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Nepali (नेपाली) Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Ukrainian (українська ) ... नेपाली (Nepali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Russian (Русский) Expand Section Dry Mouth - English Dry Mouth - ...

  9. Enteric hepatitis viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses are infectious agents that can infect liver and cause inflammation. The infection triggers immune response against infected cells that leads to the destruction of hepatic cells. This destruction has two consequences: leaking ALT and AST liver enzymes which increases during the course of disease and accumulation of bilirubin- a red pigmented compound released from dead red cells- which causes the yellow coloration of eyes and skin. These viruses transmit through diverse routes i.e. blood transfusion, sexual contacts and consuming water or food contaminated by feces. Enteric hepatitis viruses use the latter route for transmission; hence their outbreaks are more common in underdeveloped countries. There are currently two distinguished enteric hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E. These viruses belong to different family of viruses and their epidemiological characteristics are different. These infections can be diagnosed by an ELISA for IgM antibody. A vaccine has been developed in last decade of twentieth century for hepatitis A virus, which is administered mostly in the developed world i.e. U.S and Japan. Treatment for these infections is mostly supportive; however, in the case of fulminant hepatitis the liver transplantation might be necessary. PMID:24834192

  10. Enteric hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses are infectious agents that can infect liver and cause inflammation. The infection triggers immune response against infected cells that leads to the destruction of hepatic cells. This destruction has two consequences: leaking ALT and AST liver enzymes which increases during the course of disease and accumulation of bilirubin- a red pigmented compound released from dead red cells- which causes the yellow coloration of eyes and skin. These viruses transmit through diverse routes i.e. blood transfusion, sexual contacts and consuming water or food contaminated by feces. Enteric hepatitis viruses use the latter route for transmission; hence their outbreaks are more common in underdeveloped countries. There are currently two distinguished enteric hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E. These viruses belong to different family of viruses and their epidemiological characteristics are different. These infections can be diagnosed by an ELISA for IgM antibody. A vaccine has been developed in last decade of twentieth century for hepatitis A virus, which is administered mostly in the developed world i.e. U.S and Japan. Treatment for these infections is mostly supportive; however, in the case of fulminant hepatitis the liver transplantation might be necessary.

  11. Nutritional assessment and enteral support of critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Ista, Erwin; Joosten, Koen

    2005-12-01

    Critical care nurses play an important role in feeding of critically ill children. Many procedures and caregiving interventions, such as placement of feeding tubes, registration of gastric retention, observation and care of the mouth, and administration of nutrition (enteral or parenteral), are within the nursing domain. This article discusses nutritional assessment techniques and enteral nutrition in critically ill children.

  12. Selective Attention to a Talker's Mouth in Infancy: Role of Audiovisual Temporal Synchrony and Linguistic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillairet de Boisferon, Anne; Tift, Amy H.; Minar, Nicholas J.; Lewkowicz, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have found that infants shift their attention from the eyes to the mouth of a talker when they enter the canonical babbling phase after 6 months of age. Here, we investigated whether this increased attentional focus on the mouth is mediated by audio-visual synchrony and linguistic experience. To do so, we tracked eye gaze in 4-,…

  13. 19. PIPELINE INTERSECTION AT THE MOUTH OF WAIKOLU VALLEY ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PIPELINE INTERSECTION AT THE MOUTH OF WAIKOLU VALLEY ON THE BEACH. VALVE AT RIGHT (WITH WRENCH NEARBY) OPENS TO FLUSH VALLEY SYSTEM OUT. VALVE AT LEFT CLOSES TO KEEP WATER FROM ENTERING SYSTEM ALONG THE PALI DURING REPAIRS. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  14. Healthy Mouth for Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All ... themselves. Until they are 7 or 8 years old, you will need to help them brush. Try ...

  15. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most ...

  16. Clinical estimation of mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Gunjigake, Kaori

    2009-11-01

    Breathing mode was objectively determined by monitoring airflow through the mouth, measuring nasal resistance and lip-seal function, and collecting information via questionnaire on the patient's etiology and symptoms of mouth breathing. The expiratory airflow through the mouth was detected with a carbon dioxide sensor for 30 minutes at rest. Fifteen men and 19 women volunteers (mean age, 22.4 +/- 2.5 years) were classified as nasal breathers, complete mouth breathers, or partial mouth breathers based on the mean duration of mouth breathing. Nasal resistance, lip-sealing function, and the subjective symptoms of mouth breathing ascertained by questionnaire were statistically compared by using 1-way and 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the chi-square test in the breathing groups. Nasal resistance was significantly (P <0.05) greater for the mouth breathers than for the nasal breathers, and significantly (P <0.05) greater for the partial mouth breathers than for the complete mouth breathers. There were no significant differences in the subjective responses to questions about mouth breathing among the 3 groups. Detecting airflow by carbon dioxide sensor can discriminate breathing mode. Degree of nasal resistance and subjective symptoms of mouth breathing do not accurately predict breathing mode.

  17. Side Effects: Mouth and Throat Problems

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatments may cause dental, mouth, and throat side effects such as changes in taste (dysgeusia), dry mouth (xerostomia), infections, mouth sores, pain or swelling in your mouth (oral mucositis), sensitivity to foods, and swallowing problems.

  18. Evaluation of the dry mouth patient.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the questions "who is the dry mouth patient and how is the dry mouth patient evaluated"? It reviews the clinical features of dry mouth. It presents current treatment options for dry mouth care.

  19. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  20. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoppay, Jaisri R; De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine N

    2013-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition that is characterized by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa without obvious clinical examination findings. This syndrome has complex characteristics, but its cause remains largely enigmatic, making treatment and management of patients with BMS difficult. Despite not being accompanied by evident organic changes, BMS can significantly reduce the quality of life for such patients. Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to diagnose and manage patients with BMS as a part of comprehensive care.

  1. Mouth opening in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer: a prospective repeated measures study.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, J I; Dijkstra, P U; van Leeuwen, M; Roodenburg, J L N; Langendijk, J A

    2015-05-01

    Aims of this prospective cohort study were (1) to analyze the course of mouth opening up to 48months post-radiotherapy (RT), (2) to assess risk factors predicting decrease in mouth opening, and (3) to develop a multivariable prediction model for change in mouth opening in a large sample of patients irradiated for head and neck cancer. Mouth opening was measured prior to RT (baseline) and at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48months post-RT. The primary outcome variable was mouth opening. Potential risk factors were entered into a linear mixed model analysis (manual backward-stepwise elimination) to create a multivariable prediction model. The interaction terms between time and risk factors that were significantly related to mouth opening were explored. The study population consisted of 641 patients: 70.4% male, mean age at baseline 62.3years (sd 12.5). Primary tumors were predominantly located in the oro- and nasopharynx (25.3%) and oral cavity (20.6%). Mean mouth opening at baseline was 38.7mm (sd 10.8). Six months post-RT, mean mouth opening was smallest, 36.7mm (sd 10.0). In the linear mixed model analysis, mouth opening was statistically predicted by the location of the tumor, natural logarithm of time post-RT in months (Ln (months)), gender, baseline mouth opening, and baseline age. All main effects interacted with Ln (months). The mean mouth opening decreased slightly over time. Mouth opening was predicted by tumor location, time, gender, baseline mouth opening, and age. The model can be used to predict mouth opening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome: update.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Eugenia; Salas, Enric Jané; López López, José

    2014-06-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder that predominately affects middle-aged women in the postmenopausal period. The condition is distinguished by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa and the absence of any clinical signs. The etiology of BMS is complex and it includes a variety of factors. Local, systemic and psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression are listed among the possible causes of BMS. BMS may sometimes be classified as BMS Type I, II or III. Although this syndrome is not accompanied by evident organic alterations and it does not present health risks, it can significantly reduce the patient's quality of life. This study analyzes the available literature related to BMS, and makes special reference to its therapeutic management. The pages that follow will also discuss the diagnostic criteria that should be respected, etiological factors, and clinical aspects. We used the PubMed database and searched it by using the keywords "burning mouth syndrome", "BMS and review", and "burning mouth and review", in the title or abstract of the publication. BMS treatment usually steers towards the management of the symptoms; however, the specific local factors that could play a significant role in worsening the oral burning sensation should be eradicated. The most widely accepted treatment options that show variable results include tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines and antipsychotic drugs; nevertheless there are other therapies that can also be carried out. Professionals that work in the field of dentistry should formulate standardized symptomatic and diagnostic criteria in order to more easily identify the most effective and reliable strategies in BMS treatment through multidisciplinary research.

  3. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Rajesh, E.; Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms. PMID:26015707

  4. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2010-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition characterized by burning of the oral mucosa, with or without dysgeusia and xerostomia, in the setting of no underlying systemic disease or identifiable abnormalities on physical examination or laboratory testing. BMS disproportionately affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of the disease is unknown; no single treatment has proven universally successful. In light of these shortcomings, having a practical approach to the evaluation and management of patients with BMS can improve both patient quality of life and physician satisfaction.

  5. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Grushka, Miriam; Su, Nan

    2016-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an enigmatic, misunderstood, and under-recognized painful condition. Symptoms associated with BMS can be varied, thereby providing a challenge for practitioners and having a negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for patients. Management also remains a challenge for practitioners because it is currently only targeted for symptom relief without a definitive cure. There is an urgent need for further investigations to determine the efficacy of different therapies because this is the only way viable therapeutic options can be established for patients with this chronic and painful syndrome.

  6. Mononucleosis - mouth (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Epstein-Barr virus. In teenagers and young adults, there is frequently a sore throat and red tonsils with whitish spots (exudate), as seen in this picture. Enlarged lymph nodes and fatigue are also common.

  7. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2013-02-07

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and metabolic disorders, as well as drug reactions. BMS has clear predisposition to peri-/post menopausal females. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated and involves peripheral and central neuropathic pathways. Clinical diagnosis relies on careful history taking, physical examination and laboratory analysis. Treatment is often tedious and is aimed at correction of underlying medical conditions, supportive therapy, and behavioral feedback. Drug therapy with alpha lipoic acid, clonazepam, capsaicin, and antidepressants may provide symptom relief. Psychotherapy may be helpful. Short term follow up data is promising, however, long term prognosis with treatment is lacking. BMS remains an important medical condition which often places a recognizable burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate recognition and treatment.

  8. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or at the corners of your mouth Your dentures may no longer fit well, causing sores on the gums Thirstiness Difficulty swallowing or talking Loss of your sense of taste Soreness or pain in the tongue and mouth Cavities (dental caries) Gum disease

  9. The lancelet and ammocoete mouths.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kinya; Kaji, Takao

    2008-10-01

    The evolutionary history of the vertebrate mouth has long been an intriguing issue in comparative zoology. When the prevertebrate state was considered, the oral structure in adult lancelets (amphioxus) was traditionally referred to because of its general similarity to that of the ammocoete larva of lampreys. The larval mouth in lancelets, however, shows a peculiar developmental mode. Reflecting this, the affinity of the lancelet mouth has long been argued, but is still far from a consensus. The increase in available data from molecular biology, comparative developmental biology, paleontology, and other related fields makes it prudent to discuss morphological homology and homoplasy. Here, we review how the lancelet mouth has been interpreted in the study of evolution of the vertebrate mouth, as well as recent advances in chordate studies. With this background of increased knowledge, our innervation analysis supports the interpretation that the morphological similarity in the oral apparatus between ammocoetes and lancelets is a homoplasy caused by their similar food habits.

  10. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamala, K A; Sankethguddad, S; Sujith, S G; Tantradi, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  11. [Materials for mouth protectors].

    PubMed

    Kloeg, E F; Collys, K

    2003-01-01

    Taking into account the number of teeth which are yearly irreversible traumatised during sport activities, the general use of mouthguards would contribute positively to the prevention of dental injuries. Custom-made mouthguards are more comfortable to wear and offer better retention and protection than stock and mouth-formed mouthguards. Different kinds of materials are available on the market for the construction of mouthguards. A polyethylene-polyvinylacetate copolymer (EVA) is the most suitable material. EVA allows the inclusion of hard or soft layers within the mouthguard. The thickness of a mouthguard is important for the reduction of applied forces to teeth: energy absorption capacity increases with material thickness. Increased thickness however, is associated with a reduction of comfort. Therefore, it is important that dentists take the patients' wishes and demands on both comfort and protection into consideration. A description of the clinical and technical method for the construction of a custom made mouthguard is given.

  12. [Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia)].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (glossalgia) is manifested by oral pin and tingling sensations, numbness and even burning and severe pains, more frequently in the tongue. Unpleasant sensations may involve the anterior two thirds of the tongue or be extended to the front part of the hard palate and the mucous membrane of the lower lip. This condition is characterized by "mirror" and "food dominant" symptoms, disordered salivation, dysgeusia, or psychological disorders. The disease shows a chronic course. Its etiology may be multifactorial. There are no universally accepted diagnostic criteria; the diagnosis of glossalgia is made to rule out all other causes. A thorough examination should be conducted to establish a differential diagnosis. Glossalgia occurs primarily in middle-aged and elderly people. Women get sick much more frequently than men of the same age. Glossalgia remains difficult to treat. Continuous symptomatic treatment and follow-up help relieve its symptoms.

  13. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele

    2012-01-01

    According to the International Association for the Study of Pain, burning mouth Syndrome (BMS) is defined as a burning pain in the tongue or other oral mucous membrane in the absence of clinical signs or laboratory findings. The etiology is unknown and presents a challenge for both researchers and clinicians. The management of BMS is still not satisfactory. The prognosis is poor and the burning sensation can last for many years causing a dramatic impact on the patient's quality of life. It is important to distinguish between true BMS and symptomatic burning sensation which occurs when the burning sensation is secondary to a local or systemic pathologic condition. Currently, there are no defined diagnostic criteria for BMS. A diagnosis is usually reached by exclusion of other diseases. This may lead to misdiagnoses, presenting an obstacle to successful treatment.

  14. Pediatric Enteric Feeding Techniques: Insertion, Maintenance, and Management of Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nijs, Els L. F.; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2010-12-15

    Enteral feeding is considered a widespread, well-accepted means of delivering nutrition to adults and children who are unable to consume food by mouth or who need support in maintaining adequate nutrition for a variety of reasons, including acute and chronic disease states. Delivery of enteral feeding to nutritionally deprived patients may be achieved by several means. In this article, the indications and insertion of enteral access in children will be reviewed. In addition, common complications and management of problems will be discussed.

  15. A Randomized Clinical Trial to Measure Mouth Moisturization and Dry Mouth Relief in Dry Mouth Subjects Using Dry Mouth Products.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anto; Atassi, Mounir; Shneyer, Lucy; Cronin, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    This study examined ratings of two subjective aspects (moisturization and dry mouth relief) that may be changed following the use of dry mouth relief products (an oral gel, an oral rinse, or a mouth spray), in comparison to water over a period of four hours following a single supervised use on two separate occasions. This was a single-center, two site, randomized, examiner blind, four treatment arm, stratified (by dry mouth screening score at baseline), parallel group study in healthy subjects with a self-reported feeling of dry mouth. Prior to product use, subjects rated their current subjective perception of moisturization and dry mouth on an 11-point scale. Subjects then rated the two questions immediately after product use and 30, 60, 90, 120, and 240 minutes later. At the 240-minute time point, subjects also rated global efficacy questions regarding "overall" and "long-lasting" moisturization and dry mouth relief, and overall product opinion. Subjects then used their assigned products at home for three days and the procedures were repeated on Day 4. In total, 300 subjects were randomized to treatment. Compared with water, all test products showed statistically significantly greater improvements over baseline on both Day 1 and Day 4 at most time points, on the area under the curve from baseline for the moisturization and dryness questions, and after 240 minutes for the global efficacy and overall opinion assessments (all p < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the pre-dosing assessments on Day 1 versus Day 4 (p < 0.001) for both efficacy questions. Products were generally well-tolerated. Three different types of dry mouth relief products were shown to provide significant relief of dry mouth and increased feelings of moisturization compared to water using subjective questionnaires.

  16. Juvenile salmonid migratory behavior at the mouth of the Columbia River and within the plume

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; O'Toole, Amanda C.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Trott, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    A total of 8,159 acoustic-tagged salmonid smolts were detected at the mouth of the Columbia River. Of the fish detected at the mouth, 14% of yearling Chinook salmon, 9% of steelhead, and 22% of subyearling Chinook salmon were detected on a sparse array deployed in the Columbia River plume. Chinook salmon smolts decreased travel rate as they left the river and entered the plume, while steelhead increased travel rate. Chinook salmon also spent more time in the transitional area between the river mouth and plume as compared to steelhead. In early spring, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead predominately migrated past the plume array towards the edge of the shelf and to the south. Later in the season, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tended to migrate out of the river mouth in a northerly direction. Subyearling Chinook salmon migrated predominately past the portion of the plume array to the north of the river mouth.

  17. Rupture of the stomach following mouth-to-mouth respiration

    PubMed Central

    Solowiejczyk, M.; Wapnick, S.; Koren, E.; Mandelbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    Successful repair and survival after rupture of the stomach in a patient who received mouth-to-mouth respiration is presented. We were able to find only one report in the literature where rupture of the stomach occurred following this manoeuvre—the patient did not survive. The possible aetiological factors and measures designed to avoid this complication are discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4469046

  18. Mouth and Teeth (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection, a dentist might need to remove them. Human teeth are made up of four different types of ... previous continue Normal Development of the Mouth and Teeth Humans are diphyodont, meaning that they develop two sets ...

  19. Dynamics of river mouth deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagherazzi, Sergio; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Nardin, William; Leonardi, Nicoletta; Canestrelli, Alberto; Falcini, Federico; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Mariotti, Giulio; Rowland, Joel C.; Slingerland, Rudy L.

    2015-09-01

    Bars and subaqueous levees often form at river mouths due to high sediment availability. Once these deposits emerge and develop into islands, they become important elements of the coastal landscape, hosting rich ecosystems. Sea level rise and sediment starvation are jeopardizing these landforms, motivating a thorough analysis of the mechanisms responsible for their formation and evolution. Here we present recent studies on the dynamics of mouth bars and subaqueous levees. The review encompasses both hydrodynamic and morphological results. We first analyze the hydrodynamics of the water jet exiting a river mouth. We then show how this dynamics coupled to sediment transport leads to the formation of mouth bars and levees. Specifically, we discuss the role of sediment eddy diffusivity and potential vorticity on sediment redistribution and related deposits. The effect of waves, tides, sediment characteristics, and vegetation on river mouth deposits is included in our analysis, thus accounting for the inherent complexity of the coastal environment where these landforms are common. Based on the results presented herein, we discuss in detail how river mouth deposits can be used to build new land or restore deltaic shorelines threatened by erosion.

  20. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  1. Enteric viruses of poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the economic importance of the poultry gut, very little is known about the complex gut microbial community. Enteric disease syndromes such as Runting-Stunting Syndrome (RSS) in broiler chickens and Poult Enteritis Complex (PEC) in young turkeys are difficult to characterize and reproduce in ...

  2. [Home enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Virgili, N; Vilarasau, M C

    1999-04-01

    Enteral nutrition in the home is applied to stabilized patients who do not require hospitalization or to chronically ill patients who can stay in their homes. However, ensuring the correct administration of this treatment requires a coordinated, expert multidisciplinary team. This article reviews the conditions for use of enteral nutrition in the home, the means of access, the nutritional formulas, the administrative technique, and the complications enteral nutrition in the home may present. Furthermore, the composition and characteristics of the multidisciplinary team which will be in charge of carrying out this treatment is discussed.

  3. [Application of enteral nutrition in pediatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Huagang

    2015-07-01

    To explore the value and safety of the application of enteral nutrition in pediatric surgery. Clinical data of 56 children patients who could not undertake oral feeding or those who required enteral nutrition by nasojejunal tube over 7 days in our ward from June 2007 to May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Children younger than one year old received enteral nutritional formulation Ai Er Shu mainly composed of short peptides or amino acids, and children over one year received Small peptide or Nengquansu mainly composed of short peptide. Among these 56 children patients, primary disease was pancreatitis in 20 cases, lacerated wound in 10, duodenal perforation in 6, duodenal septum-shape stenosis in 9, annular pancreas in 6, and hepatoblastoma in 5. All the patients successfully completed the enteral nutrition therapy within 7-37 (18±9.9) days with good recovery. During the treatment, 5 cases (8.9%) developed diarrhea, 3 cases (5.4%) nausea and vomiting, 2 cases (3.6%) mild abdominal distension, 5 cases(8.9%) mild abdominal pain, and the symptoms were relieved after adjustment of nutrient solution concentration and infusion rate. After enteral nutrition for 10 days, the nutritional status of children was improved, and weight, blood red cell count, hemoglobin, serum albumin, prealbumin increased significantly (P<0.05). Application of enteral nutrition in pediatric surgery is safe and effective, which can improve the nutritional status of children and promote the recovery.

  4. Mouth and neck radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... of salt and 2 tablespoons (30 grams) of baking soda in 4 cups (1 liter) of water DO NOT use rinses that have alcohol in them. You may use an antibacterial rinse 2 to 4 times a day for gum disease. To further take care of your mouth: DO NOT eat foods or drink beverages that ...

  5. Foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. An outbreak of FMD can have a significant economic impact because of the restrictions on international trade of susceptible animals and their products with FMD-free countries. In this chapter we discuss vario...

  6. Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth Clinicians: Please make as many copies of this ... Philadelphia, for authoring “Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth.” Ask your family doctor to discontinue or provide ...

  7. Dry Mouth? Don't Delay Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Dry Mouth? Don' ... or neck cancer. back to top Advice for Consumers If you have persistent dry mouth: Talk to ...

  8. Allergic enteritis in children

    PubMed Central

    Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczysława; Gawryjołek, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal form of food allergy is very common in children. The most frequently observed types are allergic proctitis and proctocolitis. In most cases the symptoms subside within the first 2 months of life. The babies seem healthy, and the only abnormality is a small amount of blood in stool. Symptoms can also include small intestine inflammation and colitis. Patients may present with irritability, abdominal pain, flatulence, colic, postprandial vomiting, chronic diarrhoea, and hindered physical development. The diagnosis of allergic enteritis is based on the clinical examination and the results of additional tests including an endoscopy of the lower digestive tract with histopathological assessment. Cow’s milk proteins are the most common nutrition proteins responsible for the development of the symptoms of allergic enteritis. The most essential method of treating allergic enteritis is the elimination diet. The symptoms should subside within 1–2 weeks from the beginning of the diet. PMID:28337229

  9. Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Handa, Yoshinori; Kai, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Takuhiro; Mukaida, Hidenori; Egawa, Hiromi; Kaneko, Mayumi

    2016-12-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our department due to abnormal shadows on a chest radiograph. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a 3-cm nodule in the right middle lung lobe, and bronchoscopy revealed adenocarcinoma cells with EGFR mutations. A lung resection was performed. Histological analysis revealed tumors comprising tall columnar cells that were similar to an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon that had been resected 13 years previously. Metastatic colorectal carcinoma was initially considered, but immunohistochemical staining indicated pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma. Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma was first described in 1991, and about 30 cases have since been described in the English literature. However, its concept and etiology are not clear. It is important to distinguish pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma from metastatic colorectal carcinoma because of obvious differences in therapeutic strategies and prognosis, especially with a past history of colorectal carcinoma. Immunohistochemical and gene mutation analyses seemed to be helpful.

  10. ENFit Enteral Nutrition Connectors.

    PubMed

    Guenter, Peggi; Lyman, Beth

    2016-12-01

    New enteral connectors are now available based on the development of standards using the International Organization of Standardization process to prevent misconnections between systems that should not connect. Enteral devices with the new patient access connectors, called ENFit, are being now introduced for the purpose of improving patient safety. Transitioning to these new connectors poses benefits and challenges for facilities or agencies implementing these new devices. Information from appropriate resources should be sought by clinicians who need to partner with their suppliers and clinical organizations to see how best to meet these challenges.

  11. [Severe limitation of mouth opening].

    PubMed

    Reiter, S; Winocur, E; Gavish, A; Eli, I

    2004-10-01

    Limitation of mouth opening is a common source of referral to an orofacial pain clinic with a proposed diagnosis of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD). The word "trismus" is defined by the American academy of orofacial pain as: "Myospasm of masticatory muscles specifically causing limited jaw opening; early symptom of tetanus". Therefore, once trismus is suspected, TMD should be ruled out. However, it is not uncommon to find the usage of this term to describe severe limitation of opening by causes other than myospasm, therefore posing the risk of misdiagnosis. The purpose of this article is to describe the differential diagnosis of hard end limitation of opening with emphasis on the clinical tools used to differentiate between muscle source of hard end limitation and other sources of hard end limitation. Several cases of hard end limitation of mouth opening are presented and through them major principles of orofacial diagnosis are discussed.

  12. Enteric bacteria mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Edney, Timothy; Jaques, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    Osteomyelitis of the mandible is a relatively rare inflammatory disease that usually stems from the odontogenic polymicrobial flora of the oral cavity. We are reporting 2 unusual cases of mandibular osteomyelitis resulting from enteric bacteria infection. In one patient, abundant clinical evidence suggested a diagnosis of a chronic factitious disease, whereas in the second patient no obvious etiology was found.

  13. Enteric Redmouth Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM), is a disease of salmonid fish species that is endemic in areas of the world where salmonids are intensively cultured. The disease causes a chronic to acute hemorrhagic septicemia which can lead to high rates of mortality partic...

  14. Enteral approaches in malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Avitzur, Yaron; Courtney-Martin, Glenda

    2016-04-01

    Enteral autonomy and freedom from parenteral nutrition dependency is the ultimate therapeutic goal in children with intestinal failure. This can be achieved following attainment of bowel adaptation in conditions such as short bowel syndrome. Enteral nutrition is a major therapeutic cornerstone in the management of children with intestinal failure. It promotes physiological development, bowel adaptation and enhances weaning from parenteral nutrition. The optimal method of delivery, type of nutrients, timing of initiation, promotion of feeds and transition to solid food in children with short bowel syndrome are debated. Lack of high quality human data hampers evidence based conclusions and impacts daily practices in the field. Clinical approaches and therapeutic decisions are regularly influenced by expert opinion and center practices. This review summarizes the physiological principles, medical evidence and practice recommendations on enteral nutrition approaches in short bowel syndrome and provides a practical framework for daily treatment of this unique group of patients. Oral and tube feeding, bolus and continuous feeding, type of nutrients, formulas, trace elements and solid food options are reviewed. Future collaborative multicenter, high quality clinical trials are needed to support enteral nutrition approaches in intestinal failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Entering a community dialogue.

    PubMed

    Britt, Teri; Player, Kathy; Parsons, Kathleen; Stover, Deanna

    2004-01-01

    Entering a new, unstructured community is facilitated when existing members embrace the thoughts, ideas, and experiences of new members. Watson's Caring Healing Model, including the caritas conscious and transpersonal caring components, provides a framework for understanding the experience of being a new community member (e.g., a "newbie") in the Global Nursing Exchange.

  16. Fibre and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B

    1989-01-01

    The recent launch of a number of fibre enriched polymeric diet in the United States and Europe has stimulated considerable interest in the topic of fibre and enteral nutrition, and several commercial concerns appear to be under considerable pressures from their consumers to produce similar products. As a means of identifying areas of potential application of fibre to enteral nutrition some of the recent knowledge gained about the physical properties of dietary fibre and the processes involved in the intestinal assimilation of fibre has been reviewed. Two areas of interest are identifiable. The first relates to the bulking properties of fibre and the application of this to the regulation of bowel function in enterally fed patients. It is clear from the clinical studies that have been reviewed that there remains a paucity of controlled data, and a great deal more research is needed before widespread use of fibre supplemented diets can be supported. Perhaps of greater interest academically is the potentially beneficial effects that appear to be exerted by the VFA's, liberated as a consequence of colonic bacterial fermentation of fibre, on morphology and function of ileal and colonic mucosa. Although there are a number of potential applications of fibre supplemented enteral diets in this area, more research is required before any firm recommendations can be made about recommending their use. The one exception concerns patients with the nutritionally inadequate short bowel syndrome. There does seem to be sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that clinical studies should be commenced using a pectin supplemented predigested 'elemental' diet in these patients. Overall therefore, one is forced to conclude that the increasing interest and use of fibre supplemented enteral diets is being driven more by market than scientific forces. Nevertheless, the promotion of these diets has already provided a powerful stimulus to the scientific community, and it remains entirely

  17. Enteral nutrition by tube.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P J; Hand, M S; Frederick, G S

    1990-01-01

    When oral intake is unsatisfactory or contraindicated, maintenance of nutrition by tube feeding is an alternative to the parenteral route. A large volume of research data supports the decision to use the enteral route whenever possible. Entry of food into the alimentary tract is a stimulus to structural and functional maintenance of that tract. Enteral nutrition can be given via indwelling nasoesophageal, pharyngostomy, esophagostomy, percutaneous or surgical gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube. Use of an appropriate catheter, familiarity with the technique used, and careful patient selection and monitoring are important factors in successful tube feeding. Blenderized pet food diets should be fed whenever possible; commercially available liquid diets provide an alternative when tube caliber or patient factors preclude the use of blenderized foods.

  18. Treatment of enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Arjyal, Amit; Pandit, Anil

    2008-12-01

    Enteric fever is systemic illness caused by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A, B and C. It is believed to be a readily treatable illness by many clinicians in the developing world where it is endemic; however, with the emergence of drug resistance to fluoroquinolones, treatment is becoming increasingly difficult. While drugs such as cefixime, previously believed to be effective, have been proven otherwise, new agents such as gatifloxacin and azithromycin have proven to be promising. Re-emergence of chloramphenicol sensitive strains in previously resistant areas points towards the concept of antibiotic recycling, preserving the use of older antibiotics. Antibiotic recycling has been used successfully in hospital settings. However, its usefulness in community settings, where the main burden of enteric fever resides, is challenging to manage due to logistics and a lack of infrastructure. Nalidixic acid resistance used to be a marker for clinical response to flouroquinolones; however, recent studies highlight the importance of decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility as a better marker. Enteric fever, as a public health problem, has been tackled by protection of food and water supplies in the industrialised countries of the world. Nonetheless, that goal seems too far-fetched in the developing world where there are hundreds of villages, towns and cities without adequate infrastructures. Perhaps the key to solving this problem is combining point-of-use-purification of water (by chlorination) with the treatment of illness in the community. Treatment of chronic carriers is also necessary in order to halt the cycles of transmission.

  19. [Hand, foot and mouth disease].

    PubMed

    Barriere, H; Berger, M; Billaudel, S

    1976-11-16

    Two characteristic cases encountered in young adults led the authors to present the hand foot and mouth syndrome. They report the characteristic distribution and vesicular appearance of the lesions. The course was benign. The viral origin of the disease was more or less easily confirmed by cell culture, inoculation in new born mice and demonstration of antibodies. Usually the virus was a Coxackie A 16. However in one of the authors cases, an Echo 11 was demonstrated. The apparent rareness of the disease may be explained by lack of recognition.

  20. Comparison of mouth-to-mouth, mouth-to-mask and mouth-to-face-shield ventilation by lay persons.

    PubMed

    Paal, Peter; Falk, Markus; Sumann, Günther; Demetz, Florian; Beikircher, Werner; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ellerton, John; Brugger, Hermann

    2006-07-01

    A prospective randomised study on 70 volunteers without previous first aid education (42 males, 28 females, mean age 17) was performed to compare mouth-to-mouth ventilation (MMV, n = 24) versus mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (MPV, n = 25) and mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (MFV, n =21), and to evaluate if an instruction period of 10 min would be sufficient to teach lay persons artificial ventilation. Every volunteer performed three ventilation series using a bench model of an unprotected airway. MMV and MPV show higher mean tidal volume (TV) than MFV (values of series 3: 976 +/- 454 and 868 +/- 459 versus 604 +/- 328 ml, P = 0.002 and P = 0.025, respectively). We found a higher inter-individual variation in TV than in previous studies (P = 0.031). The recommended TV of 700-1000 ml was reached in only 23%, most frequently with MPV (MMV 16.7%, MPV 32%, MFV 19%) but the difference was not significant (P = 0.391). However, we found a significantly higher percentage with a TV below 700 ml with MFV (MMV 33.3%, MPV 36%, MFV 66.7% P = 0.047) and a significantly higher percentage of TV exceeding 1000 ml with MMV (MMV 50%, MPV 32%, MFV 14.3%) (P = 0.039). "Stomach" inflation was highest with MMV (79.2%) followed by MPV (52%) and MFV (42.9%) (P = 0.034). We found further differences between the sexes; males produced a higher TV (P = 0.003) and a higher percentage of stomach inflation (P = 0.029). MPV showed the best ventilation quality. It resulted in a more adequate TV than MMV and MFV and lower stomach inflation than MMV. Only a relatively low percentage of ventilations were within the recommended range for TV and this may be related to the short training duration. We found different performances between the sexes, a high inter-individual variation and mainly a low ventilation quality. Therefore, further studies have to focus more on teaching duration, sex differences and ventilation quality.

  1. [Relationship between abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-wu; Li, Hong-fa; Wang, Qiu-rui; Xu, Hao; He, Jing-nan

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing. Thirty-eight patients with abnormal swallowing and 38 patients with normal swallowing were selected. All patients presented with no airway constriction. The age range of the patients was 11-14 years old. The number of patients with mouth breathing was calculated. Statistical analysis (χ(2) test) was performed. The number of patients with mouth breathing in the abnormal swallowing group (17, 45%) was significantly higher than that in the normal swallowing group (5, 13%) (χ(2) = 9.212, P = 0.002). Abnormal swallowing was related to mouth breathing.

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder. PMID:23411996

  3. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  4. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  5. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000164.htm Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems To use the sharing features ... trouble breathing, call 911. References Mcclave SA. Enteral nutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  6. Oesophageal bezoar as a complication of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. Two case studies.

    PubMed

    Gil-Almagro, Fernanda; Carmona-Monge, Francisco Javier

    2016-02-01

    Enteral nutrition has a relatively low incidence of major complications. The most common complications are mechanical problems, bronchoaspiration and diarrhoea. A rare complication associated with the use of enteral nutrition is oesophageal bezoar. A bezoar is a body of undigested and partially digested matter in the gastrointestinal tract. The main risks factors are gastric motility dysfunction and the use of opiates or sucralfate. The aim of this paper was to present two cases of oesophageal obstruction resulting from the formation of bezoars due to enteral nutrition. Both patients experienced prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and were receiving enteral nutrition, and both cases involved an obstruction of the nasogastric tube and the regurgitation of solid chunks of enteral nutrition through the mouth and the nose. Impactions of solidified enteral nutrition in the distal parts of the oesophagus were confirmed with gastroscopies. Enzymatic complexes containing papain, cellulose, pancreatin, pepsin and diastase were used to successfully dissolve the bezoars in both cases.

  7. [Fiber and enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Gómez Candela, C; de Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C

    2002-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a mixture of various substances and is essential for maintaining appropriate intestinal functionality and it is currently considered to be a necessary part of a healthy diet. Current recommendations for fibre consumption by adults range from 20 to 35 g/day. Enteral nutrition is an emerging therapeutic variation in both hospital and domestic settings. To a great extent, this development has been made possible thanks to the design of new formulas that adapt better and better to the clinicla conditions or our patients. The type of fibre used in these preparations varies greatly. Some have only one source of fibre while others use differnet combinations. There are currently 32 formulas available on the Spanish market, without counting the modules or specific preparations of individual types of fibre. Despite the enormous advances in the knowledge of the beneficial effects of fibre, the fact of the matter is that enteral nutrition that we routinely prescribe in normal clinical practice does not contain fibre. The are several explanations for this, perhaps the most plausible is that these formulas may lead to problems in their administration and tolerance. It is necessary to choose the correct calibre of catheter and define the best infusion method and timing. Another difficulty may be the gastrointestinal tolerance of the formulas containing fibre. No large-scale problems of intolerance have however been described in healthy volunteers nor in patients with acute or chronic pathologies, although it is of fundamental importance to monitor the rhythm of depositions in all patients with enteral nutrition (EN) and ensure proper intake of liquids, which would also be useful to prevent occlusion of the catheter. The theoretical benefits of EN with fibre with a view to maintaining or improving normal intestinal structure and function are very varied. Nonetheless, it has noit yet been possible to prove many of these effects in controlled clinical trials. At the

  8. Candida in mouth or on dummy?

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D J; Coughlin, R P; Poskitt, E M

    1985-01-01

    Mouth and dummy swabs for Candida spp. were obtained from 100 children under 18 months old admitted with acute medical conditions. Forty four per cent of dummies were colonised by Candida spp. Children who sucked dummies had clinical thrush and positive mouth swabs for candida more frequently than those who did not. PMID:4004318

  9. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children may be more likely than adults to be exposed to pesticides following a residential application as a result of hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children less ...

  10. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children, as compared to adults, are more likely to be exposed after a pesticide application due to potential hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children <60 months of...

  11. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children, as compared to adults, are more likely to be exposed after a pesticide application due to potential hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children <60 months of...

  12. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children may be more likely than adults to be exposed to pesticides following a residential application as a result of hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children less ...

  13. Entering the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vince, Gaia

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence that we are now entering a new geological age defined by human influence on the planet, the Anthropocene. Millions of years from now, a stripe in the accumulated layers of rock on Earth's surface will reveal our human fingerprint just as we can see evidence of dinosaurs in rocks of the Jurassic, or the explosion of life that marks the Cambrian. There is now no part of the planet untouched by human influence. The realisation that we wield such planetary power requires a quite extraordinary shift in perception, fundamentally toppling the scientific, cultural and religious philosophies that define our place in the world. This session explores these issues and examines our new relationship with nature now that we so strongly influence the biosphere. And this session will look at what the impacts of our planetary changes mean for us, and how we might deal with the consequences of the Anthropocene we have created.

  14. [Clostridium difficile enteritis].

    PubMed

    Ramos Martínez, Antonio; Romero Pizarro, Yolanda; Martínez Arrieta, Félix; Balandín Moreno, Bárbara; Múñez Rubio, Elena; Cuiñas León, Karina; Sánchez Romero, Isabel; Cantos López de Ibargüen, Blanca; Asensio Vegas, Angel

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection of the small intestine is infrequent. We present the first case of C. difficile enteritis (CDE) diagnosed in Spain and provide a review of the literature. A 30-year-old man underwent surgery for recurrence of a retroperitoneal germ cell tumor. Seven days later the patient developed vomiting, diarrhea and, finally, intestinal obstruction due to pseudomembranes caused by CDE. Only 57 cases of CDE have been reported in the literature. The mean age was 52±17 years with a range of 18 to 86 years. Twenty-nine patients (50%) had inflammatory bowel disease. Forty-seven (81%) had a history of colon or small intestine surgery. Mortality was higher in older patients and in those without inflammatory bowel disease. CDE is characterized by high severity and mortality. 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. [Dehydration due to "mouth broken"].

    PubMed

    Meijler, D P M; van Mossevelde, P W J; van Beek, R H T

    2012-09-01

    Two children were admitted to a medical centre due to dehydration after an oral injury and the extraction of a tooth. One child complained of "mouth broken". Dehydration is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance in children. Babies and young children are prone to dehydration due to their relatively large body surface area, the high percentage extracellular fluid, and the limited ability of the kidneys to conserve water. After the removal ofa tooth, after an oral trauma or in case of oral discomfort, a child is at greater risk of dehydration by reduced fluid and food intake due to oral pain and/or discomfort and anxiety to drink. In those cases, extra attention needs to be devoted to the intake of fluids.

  16. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  17. Role of Jumonji c-domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6) in infectivity of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) can utilize as many as three distinct groups of receptor molecules to attach and enter a susceptible host cell. Four integrin heterodimers (alphavBeta1, alphavBeta3, alphavBeta6, and alphavBeta8) can function as the primary receptor for FMDV field strains. FMDV ...

  18. Willingness to administer mouth-to-mouth ventilation in a first response program in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mecrow, Tom Stefan; Rahman, Aminur; Mashreky, Saidur Rahman; Rahman, Fazlur; Nusrat, Nahida; Scarr, Justin; Linnan, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Timely mouth-to-mouth ventilation is critical to resuscitate drowning victims. While drowning is frequent, there are no lay persons trained in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in rural Bangladesh. As part of a feasibility study to create a first response system in a conservative Islamic village environment, a pilot was undertaken to examine willingness to provide mouth-to-mouth ventilation for drowning resuscitation. A questionnaire was administered to 721 participants at the beginning of a village-based CPR training course. Trainees were asked regarding willingness to administer mouth-to-mouth ventilation on a variety of hypothetical victims. Responses were tabulated according to the age, sex and relationship of the trainee to the postulated victim. Willingness to deliver mouth-to-mouth ventilation was influenced by sex of a potential recipient and relationship to the trainee. Adolescent participants were significantly more willing to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation on someone of the same sex. Willingness increased for both sexes when the postulated victim was an immediate family member. Willingness was lower with extended family members and lowest with strangers. Adult trainees were more likely to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation than adolescent trainees in any scenario. Adults express more willingness to resuscitate a broader range of drowning victims than adolescents. However in rural Bangladesh, adolescents are more likely to be in close proximity to a drowning in progress. Further efforts are needed to increase willingness of adolescents to provide resuscitation to drowning victims. However, despite potential cultural limitations, trained responders appear to be willing to give mouth-to-mouth ventilation to various recipients. Final determination will require evidence on response outcomes which is being collected.

  19. An indirect technique for assuring simplicity and marginal integrity of provisional restorations during full mouth rehabilitation☆

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S.; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Smith, Jesse W.; Iacopino, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation with fixed prosthodontics can be a time- and labor-intensive process. The use of provisional restorations allows the treating clinician to determine the functional and esthetic requirements of the definitive prostheses. However, in the case of full mouth rehabilitation, the individual preparation of provisional restorations for multiple teeth may complicate the provisional phase and increase the treatment time. This article describes a method to simplify the indirect fabrication of provisional restorations for full mouth reconstruction. Provisional restorations may be easily achieved by splinting the provisional restorations in sextants, trimming them according to red pencil marks around the prepared margins as guidelines, and fitting them in the laboratory, utilizing a second set of solid casts for the prepared teeth. PMID:23960554

  20. Detection of pepsin in mouth swab: correlation with clinical gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Farhath, Sabeena; He, Zhaoping; Saslow, Judy; Soundar, Sam; Amendolia, Barbara; Bhat, Vishwanath; Pyon, Kee; Stahl, Gary; Mehta, Dev; Aghai, Zubair H

    2013-05-01

    To study the relationship between pepsinogen/pepsin in a mouth swab and clinical gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in preterm infants. Preterm infants (birth weight ≤ 2000 g) on full enteral feeds were enrolled. Mouth swabs from cheek and below the tongue were collected one, two and three hours after feeding. An enzymatic assay with substrate fluorescein isothiocyanate-casein was used to detect pepsin A and C activities with further confirmation by western blot. Blinded investigators reviewed the infant's medical record to clinically diagnose GER. A total of 101 premature infants were enrolled. Pepsinogen/pepsin was detected in 45/101 (44.5%) infants in at least one sample. A clinical diagnosis of GER was made in 36/101 (35.6%) infants. Mouth swabs were positive in 26/36 (72%) infants with clinical GER and only 19/65 (29%) infants without GER (p < 0.001). Similarly, the levels of pepsinogen/pepsin A and C were higher in the mouth swabs of infants with clinical GER. The detection of pepsinogen/pepsin in a mouth swab correlates with clinical GER in premature infants.

  1. Mechanical Response of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2013-11-01

    Most work on RBC dynamic response to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity gradients. Relatively little experimental work has examined how RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as in an abrupt contraction. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,000 RBCs. We show that approximately 90% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, almost 40% of the cells exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity gradients. We present detailed statistical analyses on the dynamics of each motion and demonstrate that the behavior is highly sensitive to the location of the RBC within the channel. Finally, we show that the tumbling and rolling motions can be rationalized qualitatively in terms of rigid body rotation, whereas twisting motion cannot, suggesting that twisting is a consequence of the viscoelastic nature of the RBCs.

  2. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of ... 2000 - The Red Sea between the East Africa coast and Saudi Arabian peninsula. project:  MISR category:  ...

  3. [Modular enteral nutrition in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Murillo Sanchís, S; Prenafeta Ferré, M T; Sempere Luque, M D

    1991-01-01

    Modular Enteral Nutrition may be a substitute for Parenteral Nutrition in children with different pathologies. Study of 4 children with different pathologies selected from a group of 40 admitted to the Maternal-Childrens Hospital "Valle de Hebrón" in Barcelona, who received modular enteral nutrition. They were monitored on a daily basis by the Dietician Service. Modular enteral nutrition consists of modules of proteins, peptides, lipids, glucids and mineral salts-vitamins. 1.--Craneo-encephalic traumatisms with loss of consciousness, Feeding with a combination of parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition for 7 days. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended and modular enteral nutrition alone used up to a total of 43 days. 2.--55% burns with 36 days of hyperproteic modular enteral nutrition together with normal feeding. A more rapid recovery was achieved with an increase in total proteins and albumin. 3.--Persistent diarrhoea with 31 days of modular enteral nutrition, 5 days on parenteral nutrition alone and 8 days on combined parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended. 4.--Mucoviscidosis with a total of 19 days on modular enteral nutrition, 12 of which were exclusively on modular enteral nutrition and 7 as a night supplement to normal feeding. We administered proteic intakes of up to 20% of the total calorific intake and in concentrations of up to 1.2 calories/ml of the final preparation, always with a good tolerance. Modular enteral nutrition can and should be used as a substitute for parenteral nutrition in children with different pathologies, thus preventing the complications inherent in parenteral nutrition.

  4. Decreased chewing activity during mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H-Y; Yamaguchi, K

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the effect of mouth breathing on the strength and duration of vertical effect on the posterior teeth using related functional parameters during 3 min of gum chewing in 39 nasal breathers. A CO(2) sensor was placed over the mouth to detect expiratory airflow. When no airflow was detected from the mouth throughout the recording period, the subject was considered a nasal breather and enrolled in the study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded during 3 min of gum chewing. The protocol was repeated with the nostrils occluded. The strength of the vertical effect was obtained as integrated masseter muscle EMG activity, and the duration of vertical effect was also obtained as chewing stroke count, chewing cycle variation and EMG activity duration above baseline. Baseline activity was obtained from the isotonic EMG activity during jaw movement at 1.6 Hz without making tooth contact. The duration represented the percentage of the active period above baseline relative to the 3-min chewing period. Paired t-test and repeated analysis of variance were used to compare variables between nasal and mouth breathing. The integrated EMG activity and the duration of EMG activity above baseline, chewing stroke count and chewing cycle significantly decreased during mouth breathing compared with nasal breathing (P<0.05). Chewing cycle variance during mouth breathing was significantly greater than nasal breathing (P<0.05). Mouth breathing reduces the vertical effect on the posterior teeth, which can affect the vertical position of posterior teeth negatively, leading to malocclusion.

  5. Foot-and-mouth disease in British deer: transmission of virus to cattle, sheep and deer.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, E P; Herniman, K A; Lawman, M J; Sellers, R F

    1975-06-28

    After exposure for two hours to cattle with foot-and-mouth disease, each of the five species of deer found in the British countryside became infected. Clinical disease was typical and severe in the roe and muntjac deer, with some animals dying, less severe in the sika deer and usually subclinical in the fallow and red deer. Each species transmitted disease to its own species and to cattle and sheep. The amounts of virus present in the blood, and in oesophageal/pharyngeal samples and excreted as an aerosol during the course of the infection in the deer were similar to those recorded for the sheep and cattle in the same experiment. The fallow and sika deer commonly carried virus in the pharynx beyond 28 days after exposure; some red deer also became carriers. In epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease in the UK, it is likely that deer would have such intimate contact with farm animals as occurred in this study. The natural behavior of free-living deer in the UK suggests that, although the five species are susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease, they are unlikely to be an important factor in the maintenance and transmission of the virus during an epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in domestic livestock.

  6. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  7. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5th International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy. PMID:25759526

  8. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  9. Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, Marvin J.; Baxt, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. The disease was initially described in the 16th century and was the first animal pathogen identified as a virus. Recent FMD outbreaks in developed countries and their significant economic impact have increased the concern of governments worldwide. This review describes the reemergence of FMD in developed countries that had been disease free for many years and the effect that this has had on disease control strategies. The etiologic agent, FMD virus (FMDV), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is examined in detail at the genetic, structural, and biochemical levels and in terms of its antigenic diversity. The virus replication cycle, including virus-receptor interactions as well as unique aspects of virus translation and shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis, is discussed. This information has been the basis for the development of improved protocols to rapidly identify disease outbreaks, to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, and to begin to identify and test novel vaccine candidates. Furthermore, this knowledge, coupled with the ability to manipulate FMDV genomes at the molecular level, has provided the framework for examination of disease pathogenesis and the development of a more complete understanding of the virus and host factors involved. PMID:15084510

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as “an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions.” BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients. PMID:26929531

  11. Has Modern Biology Entered the Mouth? The Clinical Impact of Biological Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Three areas of biological research that are beginning to have an impact on clinical medicine are examined, including molecular biology, cell biology, and biotechnology. It is concluded that oral biologists and educators must work cooperatively to bring rapid biological and biomedical advances into dental training in a meaningful way. (MSE)

  12. Has Modern Biology Entered the Mouth? The Clinical Impact of Biological Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Three areas of biological research that are beginning to have an impact on clinical medicine are examined, including molecular biology, cell biology, and biotechnology. It is concluded that oral biologists and educators must work cooperatively to bring rapid biological and biomedical advances into dental training in a meaningful way. (MSE)

  13. Coastal Processes Study of San Bernard River Mouth, Texas: Stability and Maintenance of Mouth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    This report documents an investigation of the coastal and inlet physical processes acting at the San Bernard River mouth, Texas. The U.S. Army...Brazos River and the San Bernard River and vicinity. In recent years, a spit has grown from northeast to southwest across the San Bernard River mouth...for maintaining the San Bernard River mouth. The San Bernard River is located in north-central Texas and flows through the alluvial valleys of the

  14. Hookworm - mouth of the organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This photograph shows the front section of the hookworm, and the mouth parts which it uses to ... blood for nourishment, are visible. Three species of hookworm cause infection in the United States, including this ...

  15. Precision attachments for the partially dentate mouth

    PubMed Central

    Preiskel, H W

    1974-01-01

    Some uses of precision attachments in restoring the partially dentate mouth are considered. These devices are indicated where neither the clasp-retained denture nor the fixed bridge is entirely suitable. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4614689

  16. Treatment of radiation enteritis: a comparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Loiudice, T.A.; Lang, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with severe radiation injury to the small bowel seen over a 4-year period were randomized to four treatment groups: 1) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po, 2) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, 3) total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, and 4) Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po. Patients received nothing by mouth except water in groups II and III, and only Vivonex-HN in groups I and IV. Patients were treated for 8-wk periods. Improvement was gauged by overall nutritional assessment measurements, nitrogen balance data and by radiological and clinical parameters. No significant difference between groups I, II, III, and IV could be found for age, sex, mean radiation dosage, time of onset after radiation therapy, or initial nutritional assessment data. Differences statistically could be found between groups II and III and I and IV regarding nutritional assessment data, nitrogen balance, radiographic and clinical parameters after therapy, with marked improvement noted in groups II and III. We conclude that a treatment regimen consisting of total parenteral nutrition and bowel rest is beneficial in the treatment of radiation enteritis. Methylprednisolone appears to enhance this effect and indeed, may be responsible for a longer lasting response.

  17. [Epidermoid cyst of the mouth floor].

    PubMed

    Sanjuán Rodríguez, S; Morán Penco, J M; Ruiz Orpez, A; Santamaria Ossorio, J I; Berchi García, F J

    2003-07-01

    The epidermoid cysts are frequent during childhood, however mouth floor location are very unusual, because of their more difficult diagnosis and therapeutic approach. We present a 5 years old male, symptoms free until a week before, when his parents noticed a well defined mass in the mouth floor. A physical examination leaded to the diagnosis of possible epidermoid cyst. The tumor was excised through an introral approach. A review of different diagnostic means and surgical management are undertaken.

  18. Dynamics of Mouth Opening in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jason A.; Hyland, Callen; Steele, Robert E.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    Hydra, a simple freshwater animal famous for its regenerative capabilities, must tear a hole through its epithelial tissue each time it opens its mouth. The feeding response of Hydra has been well-characterized physiologically and is regarded as a classical model system for environmental chemical biology. However, due to a lack of in vivo labeling and imaging tools, the biomechanics of mouth opening have remained completely unexplored. We take advantage of the availability of transgenic Hydra lines to perform the first dynamical analysis, to our knowledge, of Hydra mouth opening and test existing hypotheses regarding the underlying cellular mechanisms. Through cell position and shape tracking, we show that mouth opening is accompanied by changes in cell shape, but not cellular rearrangements as previously suggested. Treatment with a muscle relaxant impairs mouth opening, supporting the hypothesis that mouth opening is an active process driven by radial contractile processes (myonemes) in the ectoderm. Furthermore, we find that all events exhibit the same relative rate of opening. Because one individual can open consecutively to different amounts, this suggests that the degree of mouth opening is controlled through neuronal signaling. Finally, from the opening dynamics and independent measurements of the elastic properties of the tissues, we estimate the forces exerted by the myonemes to be on the order of a few nanoNewtons. Our study provides the first dynamical framework, to our knowledge, for understanding the remarkable plasticity of the Hydra mouth and illustrates that Hydra is a powerful system for quantitative biomechanical studies of cell and tissue behaviors in vivo. PMID:26958895

  19. Dynamics of Mouth Opening in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason A; Hyland, Callen; Steele, Robert E; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2016-03-08

    Hydra, a simple freshwater animal famous for its regenerative capabilities, must tear a hole through its epithelial tissue each time it opens its mouth. The feeding response of Hydra has been well-characterized physiologically and is regarded as a classical model system for environmental chemical biology. However, due to a lack of in vivo labeling and imaging tools, the biomechanics of mouth opening have remained completely unexplored. We take advantage of the availability of transgenic Hydra lines to perform the first dynamical analysis, to our knowledge, of Hydra mouth opening and test existing hypotheses regarding the underlying cellular mechanisms. Through cell position and shape tracking, we show that mouth opening is accompanied by changes in cell shape, but not cellular rearrangements as previously suggested. Treatment with a muscle relaxant impairs mouth opening, supporting the hypothesis that mouth opening is an active process driven by radial contractile processes (myonemes) in the ectoderm. Furthermore, we find that all events exhibit the same relative rate of opening. Because one individual can open consecutively to different amounts, this suggests that the degree of mouth opening is controlled through neuronal signaling. Finally, from the opening dynamics and independent measurements of the elastic properties of the tissues, we estimate the forces exerted by the myonemes to be on the order of a few nanoNewtons. Our study provides the first dynamical framework, to our knowledge, for understanding the remarkable plasticity of the Hydra mouth and illustrates that Hydra is a powerful system for quantitative biomechanical studies of cell and tissue behaviors in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of deer for experimental studies with foor-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, E P; McDiarmid, A; Rowe, J J

    1975-06-07

    Red, sika, fallow, roe and muntjac deer adapted to captivity in experimental units designed for working with foot-and-mouth disease. The red, sika and fallow deer readily accepted rolled oats and hay as their staple diet. This diet was replaced for the roe and muntjac deer with flaked maize, calf starter pellets and green browse. Etorphine/acepromazine ans xylazine were found to be suitable sedatives for detailed examination of the tongue and oral cavity of the various species of deer and gave adequate analgesia for the inoculation and collection of virus samples.

  1. Percutaneous approaches to enteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Ponsky, J L; Gauderer, M W; Stellato, T A; Aszodi, A

    1985-01-01

    Feeding gastrostomy and jejunostomy provide effective access for long-term enteral nutrition. Traditional operative techniques for the performance of these procedures requires laparotomy and often, general anesthesia. This report describes our experience with two relatively new methods, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy. Results of percutaneous gastrostomy and jejunostomy to date in 323 cases include a morbidity of 5.9 percent and a 0.3 percent operative mortality. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and jejunostomy should become the procedures of choice for the establishment of enteral access in patients requiring long-term enteral alimentation.

  2. The effect of Bacillus subtilis mouth rinsing in patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tsubura, S; Mizunuma, H; Ishikawa, S; Oyake, I; Okabayashi, M; Katoh, K; Shibata, M; Iizuka, T; Toda, T; Iizuka, T

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis is an effective probiotic product for prevention of enteric infections both in humans and animals. We hypothesized that a mouth rinse containing Bacillus subtilis should adhere to and colonize part of the oral bacteria on periodontal tissue. The rinsing ability of Extraction 300E (containing Bacillus subtilis: E-300) was compared with that of a mouth wash liquid , Neosteline Green (benzethonium chloride; NG) that is commonly used in Japan. Compared with NG rinsing, E-300 rinsing resulted in a marked change in the BANA-score. The mean BANA values (score +/- SD) over the course of the study from 0 to 30 days were 1.52 +/- 0.51 (p < or = 0.1) and 0.30 +/- 0.47 (p < or = 0.01) for E-300, and 1.56 +/- 0.51 and 0.93 +/- 0.68 for NG, respectively. Gingival Index also had improvement, while probing pocket depth and bleeding on probing showed small improvements. Mouth rinsing with E-300 significantly reduced periodontal pathogens compared with NG. These results suggest that Bacillus subtilis is an appropriate mouth rinse for patients with periodontitis.

  3. The mouth and dis/ability.

    PubMed

    Liddiard, K; Goodley, D

    2016-06-01

    Our aims in this paper are threefold. First, to understand how the mouth reveals the kinds of human beings that are de/valued in specific national locations and in global discourses with special attention on disability. Second, to subject the mouth to analysis from critical disability studies, specifically, an approach we describe as dis/ability studies. Third, to ask how the mouth might work as a site of resistance for disabled people. The paper begins by providing an introduction to critical disability studies, a perspective that foregrounds disability as the primary focus for thinking through the ways in which the body and society are shaped together. We move in this literature review towards a dis/ability studies approach that recognises the simultaneous processes of disablism (the exclusion of people with impairments) and ableism (the system by which standards of human autonomy and capability are made as key indicators of human worth). We then analyse the mouth in relation to pathologisation, human enhancement and resistance. We conclude with some final thoughts on the offerings of a dis/ability studies approach to those of interested with the intersections of the mouth and society.

  4. Mouth sticks: their past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Toor nee Bachoo, I K; Tabiat-Pour, S; Critchlow, S B

    2015-09-11

    Patients with physical disabilities precluding functional use of their limbs can benefit enormously from the expertise of the dental profession. The dental clinician is able to not only meet the routine oral health needs of these patients, but possesses the unique skills and knowledge to provide specialised oral prosthetic appliances which can facilitate a range of independent activities. Mouth sticks, as they are commonly known, are dental prostheses that are held intra-orally by the patient and manipulated to perform numerous actions such as drawing, writing and painting. They have been well documented within dental and occupational therapy literature and reports of their fabrication date back over 150 years, albeit in a very rudimentary form. The enduring value of mouth sticks to the physically disabled population is that they can provide a degree of self-reliance which would otherwise not be afforded to them. This article discusses the evolution of mouth sticks, principles of mouth stick design, patient selection criteria and treatment planning considerations. We present two recent clinical cases where mouth sticks have been indicated and have been indispensable to the user, detailing the clinical and laboratory stages involved.

  5. The origin of mouth-exhaled ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Metsälä, M; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L

    2014-09-01

    It is known that the oral cavity is a production site for mouth-exhaled NH3. However, the mechanism of NH3 production in the oral cavity has been unclear. Since bacterial urease in the oral cavity has been found to produce ammonia from oral fluid urea, we hypothesize that oral fluid urea is the origin of mouth-exhaled NH3. Our results show that under certain conditions a strong correlation exists between oral fluid urea and oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) (rs = 0.77, p < 0.001). We also observe a strong correlation between oral fluid NH3 and mouth-exhaled NH3 (rs = 0.81, p < 0.001). We conclude that three main factors affect the mouth-exhaled NH3 concentration: urea concentration, urease activity and oral fluid pH. Bacterial urease catalyses the hydrolysis of oral fluid urea to ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3). Oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) and pH determine the concentration of oral fluid NH3, which evaporates from oral fluid into gas phase and turns to mouth-exhaled NH3.

  6. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  7. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  8. Pediatric Enteral Access Device Management.

    PubMed

    Abdelhadi, Ruba A; Rahe, Katina; Lyman, Beth

    2016-10-13

    Enteral nutrition (EN) support has proven to be a nutrition intervention that can provide full or partial calories to promote growth and development in infants and children. To supply these nutrients, an enteral access device is required, and the use of these devices is growing. Placement of the proper device for the patient need, along with appropriate care and monitoring, is required for individualized patient management. When complications arise, early identification and management can prevent more serious morbidity. Complication management requires a tiered approach starting with staff nurses and ending with a physician expert. In addition to this, each institution needs to have an approach that is coordinated among disciplines and departments to promote consistency of practice. The formation of an enteral access team is a conduit for clinical experts to provide education to families, patients, and healthcare professionals while serving as a platform to address product and practice issues. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Burning mouth syndrome: an enigmatic disorder.

    PubMed

    Javali, M A

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa, often unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and may be accompanied by xerostomia and altered taste. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of mouth. This disorder is one of the most common, encountered in the clinical practice. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin; however the exact underlying etiology remains uncertain. This article discusses several aspects of BMS, updates current knowledge about the etiopathogenesis and describes the clinical features as well as the diagnosis and management of BMS patients.

  10. Red Hill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  11. Cryotherapy for Treatment of Mouth Mucocele

    PubMed Central

    Aulakh, Kamaldeep K; Brar, Ramandeep S; Azad, Anurag; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Jyoti, Bhuvan

    2016-01-01

    A mucocele is a common salivary gland disorder that most commonly affects young adults. A 35-year-old female patient reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, with the chief complaint of swelling on the left side of floor of mouth. The aim of this case report is to present the management of mucocele present in floor of the mouth in a young female patient using liquid nitrogen cryosurgery. The present case report has also discussed mechanism of action, current protocol of cryosurgery with emphasis on clinical pros and cons along with the clinical outcomes. PMID:27843280

  12. Cryotherapy for Treatment of Mouth Mucocele.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Kamaldeep K; Brar, Ramandeep S; Azad, Anurag; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Jyoti, Bhuvan

    2016-01-01

    A mucocele is a common salivary gland disorder that most commonly affects young adults. A 35-year-old female patient reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, with the chief complaint of swelling on the left side of floor of mouth. The aim of this case report is to present the management of mucocele present in floor of the mouth in a young female patient using liquid nitrogen cryosurgery. The present case report has also discussed mechanism of action, current protocol of cryosurgery with emphasis on clinical pros and cons along with the clinical outcomes.

  13. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heir, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.

  14. Enteric viruses of chickens and turkeys

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although enteric disease in commercial poultry operations is common, and often unofficially reported and discussed by field veterinarians as “non-specific enteric disease”, three recognized enteric syndromes do exist in poultry: poult enteritis complex (PEC) and poult enteritis mortality syndrome (P...

  15. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  16. The benefits of planar circular mouths on suction feeding performance.

    PubMed

    Skorczewski, Tyler; Cheer, Angela; Wainwright, Peter C

    2012-08-07

    Suction feeding is the most common form of prey capture across aquatic feeding vertebrates and many adaptations that enhance efficiency and performance are expected. Many suction feeders have mechanisms that allow the mouth to form a planar and near-circular opening that is believed to have beneficial hydrodynamic effects. We explore the effects of the flattened and circular mouth opening through computational fluid dynamics simulations that allow comparisons with other mouth profiles. Compared to mouths with lateral notches, we find that the planar mouth opening results in higher flow rates into the mouth and a region of highest flow that is positioned at the centre of the mouth aperture. Planar mouths provide not only for better total fluid flow rates through the mouth but also through the centre of the mouth near where suction feeders position their prey. Circular mouths are shown to provide the quickest capture times for spherical and elliptical prey because they expose the prey item to a large region of high flow. Planar and circular mouths result in higher flow velocities with peak flow located at the centre of the mouth opening and they maximize the capacity of the suction feeders to exert hydrodynamic forces on the prey.

  17. The benefits of planar circular mouths on suction feeding performance

    PubMed Central

    Skorczewski, Tyler; Cheer, Angela; Wainwright, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Suction feeding is the most common form of prey capture across aquatic feeding vertebrates and many adaptations that enhance efficiency and performance are expected. Many suction feeders have mechanisms that allow the mouth to form a planar and near-circular opening that is believed to have beneficial hydrodynamic effects. We explore the effects of the flattened and circular mouth opening through computational fluid dynamics simulations that allow comparisons with other mouth profiles. Compared to mouths with lateral notches, we find that the planar mouth opening results in higher flow rates into the mouth and a region of highest flow that is positioned at the centre of the mouth aperture. Planar mouths provide not only for better total fluid flow rates through the mouth but also through the centre of the mouth near where suction feeders position their prey. Circular mouths are shown to provide the quickest capture times for spherical and elliptical prey because they expose the prey item to a large region of high flow. Planar and circular mouths result in higher flow velocities with peak flow located at the centre of the mouth opening and they maximize the capacity of the suction feeders to exert hydrodynamic forces on the prey. PMID:22319101

  18. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  19. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  20. Enteric Neurobiology: Discoveries and Directions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jackie D

    Discovery and documentation of noncholinergic-nonadrenergic neurotransmission in the enteric nervous system started a revolution in mechanisms of neural control of the digestive tract that continues into a twenty-first century era of translational gastroenterology, which is now firmly embedded in the term, neurogastroenterology. This chapter, on Enteric Neurobiology: Discoveries and Directions, tracks the step-by-step advances in enteric neuronal electrophysiology and synaptic behavior and progresses to the higher order functions of central pattern generators, hard wired synaptic circuits and libraries of neural programs in the brain-in-the-gut that underlie the several different patterns of motility and secretory behaviors that occur in the specialized, serially-connected compartments extending from the esophagus to the anus.

  1. Zoology: A New Mouth for Amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Vladimir; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-05-09

    Deuterostomes - a key subdivision of animals - are characterized by the mouth developing anteriorly as a rupture between the outer epithelium and the foregut wall. A new study of amphioxus challenges this view and proposes separate evolutionary origins of deuterostome oral openings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. This disease has affected most areas of the world, often causing extensive epizootics in livestock, mostly farmed cattle and swine, although sheep, goats and many wild species are also susceptible...

  3. Mouth Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Mouth Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hmong (Hmoob) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Hmong (Hmoob) ...

  4. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Animal health: foot-and-mouth disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  6. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  7. Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth Main Content Are You ... Problems Too? Remember Are You Being Treated With Radiation for Cancer in Your Head or Neck? If ...

  8. CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTHLINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EXITING FLUME AND BEGINNING EARTH-LINED MAIN SECTION AT MOUTH OF PLATTE RIVER CANYON. VIEW TO WEST - High Line Canal, Mouth of South Platte River to confluence with Second Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  9. Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162649.html Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study Listerine's maker has ... A commercial brand of mouthwash can help control gonorrhea bacteria in the mouth, and daily use may ...

  10. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional support plays an important role in the treatment of patients with burns. Due to the severe hypercatabolism that develops in these patients, oral support is insufficient in most cases, and this makes it essential to initiate artificial nutritional support (either enteral or parenteral). Enteral nutrition is more physiological than parenteral, and data exist which show that in patients with burns, enteral nutrition exercises a protective effect on the intestine and may even reduce the hypermetabolic response in these patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of enteral nutritional support with a hypercaloric, hyperproteic diet with a high content of branched amino acids in the nutritional support of patients suffering from burns. The study included 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), admitted to the Burns Unit. Average age was 35 +/- 17 years (range: 21-85 years). The percentage of body surface affected by the burns was 10% in two cases, between 10-30% in three cases, between 30-50% in five cases and over 50% in two cases. Initiation of the enteral nutrition was between twenty-four hours and seven days after the burn. The patients were kept in the unit until they were discharged, and the average time spent in the unit was 31.5 days (range: 17-63 days). Total energetic requirements were calculated based on Harris-Benedict, with a variable aggression factor depending on the body surface burned, which varied from 2,000 and 4,000 cal day. Nitrogenous balance was determined on a daily basis, and plasmatic levels of total proteins, albumin and prealbumin on a weekly basis. There was a significant difference between the prealbumin values at the initiation and finalization of the enteral nutrition (9.6 +/- 2.24 mg/dl compared with 19.75 +/- 5.48 mg/dl; p < 0.001). The nitrogenous balance improved, changing from -5.4 in the second week to positive values by the fourth and fifth weeks of treatment. Tolerance to the enteral

  11. Indiscretion enteritis. A Rabelaisian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robin, E D; Collins, J; Burke, C

    1986-12-01

    A 76-year-old man had small bowel obstruction and organic small bowel disease following a series of bizarre massive gustatory insults that involved food, medications, and mega-mineral-vitamin supplements. Intestinal obstruction required partial small bowel resection. The dietary indiscretions resulted in severe enteritis (indiscretion enteritis). The sequence has been termed a Rabelaisian syndrome after the great French writer and physician, Francois Rabelais, who vividly described bizarre gustatory habits. Gut injury may result from unwise oral intake of various foods and mineral supplements.

  12. Maximal and submaximal mouth opening with mouth gags in cats: implications for maxillary artery blood flow.

    PubMed

    Martin-Flores, M; Scrivani, P V; Loew, E; Gleed, C A; Ludders, J W

    2014-04-01

    The use of spring-loaded mouth gags in cats can be associated with the development of central neurological deficits, including blindness. In this species, the maxillary arteries are the main source of blood supply to the retinae and brain. Spring-loaded gags generate constant force after placement that could contribute to bulging of the soft tissues between the mandible and the tympanic bulla. Under these circumstances, the maxillary arteries can become compressed as they course between these osseous structures. Smaller gags that might apply less force to the mouth were investigated to determine if they preserved maxillary artery blood flow. Six healthy adult cats were anesthetized. Electroretinography (ERG) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were performed without the use of a mouth gag and during submaximal (plastic mouth gags of 20, 30 and 42 mm in length between canine teeth) and maximal mouth opening. Maximal mouth opening produced alterations in ERG waveforms consistent with circulatory compromise in 1/6 cats and reductions in signal intensity during MRA in 4/6 cats. Placement of a 42 mm plastic gag produced a reduction in MRA signal in 1/6 cats. No changes were observed with smaller gags. The force applied against the mouth was significantly higher with the spring-loaded gag than with any other gags. The use of a smaller mouth gags was associated with fewer alterations of indicators of maxillary artery blood flow. Nevertheless, a 42 mm plastic gag, equivalent to the size of a needle cap, resulted in an abnormal MRA in one cat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Alongshore sediment bypassing as a control on river mouth morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Nardin, William; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    River mouths, shoreline locations where fluvial and coastal sediments are partitioned via erosion, trapping, and redistribution, are responsible for the ultimate sedimentary architecture of deltas and, because of their dynamic nature, also pose great management and engineering challenges. To investigate the interaction between fluvial and littoral processes at wave-dominated river mouths, we modeled their morphologic evolution using the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Model experiments replicate alongshore migration of river mouths, river mouth spit development, and eventual spit breaching, suggesting that these are emergent phenomena that can develop even under constant fluvial and wave conditions. Furthermore, we find that sediment bypassing of a river mouth develops though feedbacks between waves and river mouth morphology, resulting in either continuous bypassing pathways or episodic bar bypassing pathways. Model results demonstrate that waves refracting into the river mouth bar create a zone of low alongshore sediment transport updrift of the river mouth, which reduces sediment bypassing. Sediment bypassing, in turn, controls the river mouth migration rate and the size of the river mouth spit. As a result, an intermediate amount of river discharge maximizes river mouth migration. The fraction of alongshore sediment bypassing can be predicted from the balance between the jet and the wave momentum flux. Quantitative comparisons show a match between our modeled predictions of river mouth bypassing and migration rates observed in natural settings.

  14. Changing the culture of mouth care: mouth care without a battle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Barrick, Ann Louise

    2014-02-01

    Culture change aims to fundamentally improve care provision in a manner consistent with individual preferences. However, few studies of culture change have focused on the quality of daily care, despite the fact that system-wide efforts are important to assure the effectiveness, adoption, and sustainability of person-centered care to meet daily needs. This paper describes a new culture change practice, Mouth Care Without a Battle. The focus on mouth care is predicated on the important association between person-centered support for oral hygiene and quality of life. Mouth Care Without a Battle is a person-centered approach to quality mouth care for persons with cognitive and physical impairment. It was developed by an interdisciplinary team of clinician researchers based on literature review, consultation with experts, environmental scan of existing programs, and testing in nursing homes. Building from the success of Bathing Without a Battle, Mouth Care Without a Battle was evaluated in terms of changed care practices and outcomes, developed into a training program, and packaged for dissemination as a digital video disk (DVD) and website. The development and evaluation of Mouth Care Without a Battle demonstrate attention to the areas necessary to establish the evidence-base for culture change, to ultimately empower and support staff to provide care to achieve quality outcomes. As illustrated in this paper, it is beneficial to build the evidence base for culture change by attending to care processes and outcomes benefiting all residents, ability to implement culture change, and costs of implementation.

  15. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  16. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  17. The structure of vocal sounds produced with the mouth closed or with the mouth open in treefrogs.

    PubMed

    Gridi-Papp, Marcos

    2008-05-01

    Frogs and toads mostly call with their mouths shut, unlike many other vertebrates. Sound is generated when air crosses the larynx, but there is no direct airflow to the external environment and radiation occurs at the skin. This study directly compares the acoustic output obtained from euthanized frogs with the mouth open against the output obtained with the mouth closed during activation of the larynx by airflow. With the mouth closed, the vocal sac was inflated and the acoustic energy was concentrated in the same harmonics as in the advertisement call, whereas with the mouth open, energy was spread in a wide range of harmonics. The acoustic output at the dominant frequency was more intense with the mouth closed than with the mouth open. More sound was radiated through the vocal sac and head than through the rest of the body. The spectral differences between open and closed mouth treatments matched the differences observed between natural advertisement calls, produced with the mouth closed, and distress calls, produced with the mouth open. By calling with the mouth closed, treefrogs can potentially produce advertisement calls with the energy concentrated in a narrower frequency range than with the mouth open.

  18. Caries prevention for patients with dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Su, Nan; Marek, Cindy L; Ching, Victor; Grushka, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Patients with xerostomia, or dry mouth, resulting from various causes, are at higher risk for developing caries because of a loss of saliva and its benefits. A loss of saliva increases the acidity of the mouth, which affects many factors that contribute to the development of caries, such as proliferation of acid-producing bacteria, inability to buffer the acid produced by bacteria or from ingested foods, loss of minerals from tooth surfaces and inability to replenish the lost minerals, and loss of lubrication. Currently, a number of new products that can substitute for these functions of saliva or induce production of saliva are available in Canada. Some of these products are reviewed and a protocol for caries prevention in this high-risk population is proposed.

  19. Pain Part 8: Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beneng, Kiran; Renton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a rare but impactful condition affecting mainly post-menopausal women resulting in constant pain and significant difficulty with eating, drinking and daily function. The aetiology of BMS remains an enigma. Recent evidence suggests it likely to be neuropathic in origin, the cause of which remains unknown. There is no cure for this condition and the unfortunate patients remain managed on a variety of neuropathic pain medication, salivary substitutes and other non-medical interventions that help the patient 'get through the day'. Some simple strategies can assist both clinician and patient to manage this debilitating condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: The dental team will recognize patients presenting with burning mouth syndrome. They are difficult patients to manage and are often referred to secondary care and, ultimately, depend on their general medical practitioners for pain management.

  20. Dry mouth: Xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Frydrych, Agnieszka M

    2016-07-01

    Mouth dryness may present as salivary gland hypofunction (SGH), xerostomia or both. It is considered one of the most underappreciated, underdiagnosed and undermanaged oral health conditions. Despite its common presentation and adverse impact on life quality, it is also generally poorly understood. Increased awareness of the condition is important in addressing these problems. This article discusses SGH and xerostomia, and the associated intra-oral and extra-oral implications. It also summarises currently available management approaches and the evidence behind them. SGH and xerostomia are complex problems. None of the currently available management approaches are entirely satisfactory. Addressing the causative or contributing factors is therefore paramount. While oral health complaints are generally left up to the dental professional to manage, the nature of mouth dryness necessitates increased dialogue between the dental and 
medical professions to ensure optimal patient care.

  1. Mouth Cancer for Clinicians. Part 8: Referral.

    PubMed

    Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Scully, Crispian

    2016-03-01

    A MEDLINE search early in 2015 revealed more than 250,000 papers on head and neck cancer; over 100,000 on oral cancer; and over 60,000 on mouth cancer. Not all publications contain robust evidence. We endeavour to encapsulate the most important of the latest information and advances now employed in practice, in a form comprehensible to healthcare workers, patients and their carers. This series offers the primary care dental team in particular, an overview of the aetiopathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and multidisciplinary care of mouth cancer, the functional and psychosocial implications, and minimization of the impact on the quality of life of patient and family. Clinical Relevance: This article offers the dental team an overview of referral procedures; oral diagnosis is not always simple and a second opinion can be valuable to all concerned in cases of doubt.

  2. Mouth Cancer for Clinicians. Part 1: Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Scully, Crispian

    2015-04-01

    A MEDLINE search early in 2015 revealed more than 250,000 papers on head and neck cancer; over 100,000 on oral cancer; and over 60,000 on mouth cancer. Not all publications contain robust evidence. We endeavour to encapsulate the most important of the latest information and advances now employed in practice, in a form comprehensible to healthcare workers, patients and their carers. This series offers the primary care dental team, in particular, an overview of the aetiopathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and multidisciplinary care of mouth cancer, the functional and psychosocial implications, and minimization of the impact on the quality of life of patient and family. Clinical Relevance: This article offers the dental team a simplified overview of carcinogenesis, and a review of cancers that affect the oral region.

  3. Imaging of pediatric floor of mouth lesions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachael M; Chapman, Teresa; Horn, David L; Paladin, Angelisa M; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2013-03-01

    There is a vast spectrum of pathology that afflicts the floor of mouth in children. These span inflammatory conditions, vascular malformations, developmental anomalies, benign tumors and malignancies. While this area is readily evaluated on clinical exam, imaging is often performed to better characterize the disorder prior to management. The imaging modalities most frequently utilized are US, CT and MR. The purpose of this article is to describe the primary conditions that occur in this location in children so that radiologists may provide an appropriate differential diagnosis. These include ranula, venolymphatic malformation, dermoid, teratoma, foregut duplication cyst, hairy polyp, thyroglossal duct cyst and rhabdomyosarcoma. For each pathological condition, there will be a focus on describing its imaging manifestation. Floor of mouth anatomy, imaging approach during both prenatal and postnatal life and etiologies will be discussed. Surgical considerations and operative photographs will also be presented.

  4. Social media: the word of mouth revolution.

    PubMed

    Garven, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Many dental practices today find themselves uncertain about the new social media universe, and in particular with how to relate to younger patients. The power of social networking is its immediate access to the word of mouth exchange of information, and the word of mouth avenue itself is recognized as the single most effective form of advertising. To tap into that phenomenon, begin by investing a small amount of time and effort to understand the basics of social networking. Sign up for Facebook and Twitter. First-hand experience interacting in a social network is the vital first step. The bottom line is simply this: To begin to understand this new arena of communication, you first have to join the conversation.

  5. Methamphetamine abuse and "meth mouth" in Europe.

    PubMed

    De-Carolis, Carlo; Boyd, Geraldine-A; Mancinelli, Luca; Pagano, Stefano; Eramo, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    With easy chemical synthesis from its precursor, methamphetamine (MA) is now widespread in many countries. The abuse of methamphetamine is associated with several negative effects on health, because MA is a neurotoxin and a dangerous central nervous system stimulant. It changes levels of neurotransmitters in the brain, releasing dopamine and inhibiting nor epinephrine uptake which increases sympathetic nervous system activity and can lead to cardiac arrhythmia, hypertension and tachypnea. The consequences of MA abuse are clearly manifested in oral diseases (like "meth mouth") which is characterised by extensive caries, teeth grinding with ensuing dental wear and trismus. The present review was designed to fill the gap in knowledge about methamphetamine abuse in the European Union (EU) and to illustrate the main clinical effects of prolonged use. After describing the pharmacology and systemic effects of methamphetamine and concentrating on its effects on the mouth, the present review compares the epidemiology and incidence of abuse in the world, particularly the USA and the EU.

  6. Psychological profile in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al Quran, Firas A M

    2004-03-01

    Thirty-two patients with burning mouth syndrome and 32 matched control subjects were evaluated for their personality profile using a comprehensive, reliable, and validated inventory. All subjects were requested to complete the Neo PI-R questionnaire that measures the 5 dimensions of personality and their facets. A t-test and univariate correlations (Pearson's correlation coefficient) were used to compare the 2 groups. Results show high significant differences in some personality factors. Neuroticism and all its facets, which include anxiety, angry hostility, depression, self-consciousness, impulsiveness and vulnerability, were significant at P<.001. Other domains like extraversion, openness, and conscientiousness showed significant differences also (P<.05). Many personality characteristics differentiate burning mouth syndrome patients from controllers according to the Neo PI-R and this should affect the treatment plan according to the identified characteristics.

  7. Burning mouth syndrome and secondary oral burning.

    PubMed

    Minor, Jacob S; Epstein, Joel B

    2011-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex disorder of unclear etiology that is most prevalent in perimenopausal women. It is often accompanied by dysguesia and subjective xerostomia. Recent evidence implicates both central and peripheral neuropathies, possibly representing a phantom pain syndrome in some patients. Ensuring that the patient's oral burning is not secondary to some other local or systemic factor is central to appropriate management. Current standard therapies include clonazepam, paroxetine, and cognitive behavioral therapy, and several promising new alternatives are described.

  8. Connective tissue disorders and the mouth.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen; Scully, Crispian

    2008-06-01

    The connective tissue disorders frequently give rise to orofacial manifestations, especially dry mouth because of Sjögren's syndrome. In addition, the systemic complications of such diseases may impact upon the provision of oral health care. The present article reviews the consequences of connective tissue disorders of relevance to oral health care providers. Connective tissue disorders can give rise to oral manifestations and systemic complications that may occasionally compromise primary oral health care.

  9. Canine viral enteritis. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R V; Carmichael, L

    1979-05-01

    Two apparently novel viral gastroenteritides of dogs were recognized in 1978: one caused by a parvo-like virus (CPV) and one by a corona-like virus (CCV). A rotavirus has also been tentatively associated with neonatal pup enteritis. Canine viral enteritis is characterized by a sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea, rapid spread and high morbidity. Treatment is only supportive but must be initiated promptly. Infected animals should be isolated immediately; the extremely contagious nature of these diseases makes them difficult to contain. Feces from infected dogs appear to be the primary means of transmission. Sodium hypochlorite solutions (eg, Clorox) are recommended for disinfection. The development of effective vaccines is an immediate and pressing problem.

  10. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  11. Enteric viruses in molluscan shellfish.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, Rosanna; Macaluso, Alessia; Lanni, Luigi; Saccares, Stefano; Di Giamberardino, Fabiola; Cencioni, Barbara; Petrinca, Anna Rita; Divizia, Maurizio

    2007-10-01

    One hundred and thirty-seven bivalves were collected for environmental monitoring and the market; all the samples were analysed by RT-PCR test. Bacteriological counts meeting the European Union shellfish criteria were reached by 69.5% of all the samples, whereas the overall positive values for enteric virus presence were: 25.5%, 18.2%, 8.0% and 2.1% for Rotavirus, Astrovirus, Enteroviruses, Norovirus, respectively. Mussels appear to be the most contaminated bivalves, with 64.8% of positive samples, 55.7% and 22.7% respectively for clams and oysters, whereas in the bivalves collected for human consumption 50.7% were enteric virus positive, as compared to 56.4% of the samples collected for growing-area classification. The overall positive sample was 54.0%.

  12. Enteral Nutrition in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Seron-Arbeloa, Carlos; Zamora-Elson, Monica; Labarta-Monzon, Lorenzo; Mallor-Bonet, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    There is a consensus that nutritional support, which must be provided to patients in intensive care, influences their clinical outcome. Malnutrition is associated in critically ill patients with impaired immune function and impaired ventilator drive, leading to prolonged ventilator dependence and increased infectious morbidity and mortality. Enteral nutrition is an active therapy that attenuates the metabolic response of the organism to stress and favorably modulates the immune system. It is less expensive than parenteral nutrition and is preferred in most cases because of less severe complications and better patient outcomes, including infections, and hospital cost and length of stay. The aim of this work was to perform a review of the use of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. PMID:23390469

  13. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.; Eng, K.; Engler, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  14. Walking in Balance on the Red Road.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thin Elk, Gene

    1993-01-01

    Native American who entered treatment for alcohol abuse and found that conventional cures did not address cultural clash of being Indian in Eurocentric society describes alcohol prevention and treatment program rooted in traditional Indian values and ceremonies. Describes "The Red Road," holistic approach which uses culture as therapy and…

  15. Walking in Balance on the Red Road.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thin Elk, Gene

    1993-01-01

    Native American who entered treatment for alcohol abuse and found that conventional cures did not address cultural clash of being Indian in Eurocentric society describes alcohol prevention and treatment program rooted in traditional Indian values and ceremonies. Describes "The Red Road," holistic approach which uses culture as therapy and…

  16. Gross Anatomy of Pampas Deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, Linnaeus 1758) Mouth and Pharynx.

    PubMed

    Pérez, W; Vazquez, N; Ungerfeld, R

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the anatomy of the mouth and pharynx of the pampas deer, and to consider its evolutionary feeding niche according to those characteristics. Gross dissections of the mouth and pharynx were performed in 15 animals, 10 adult females and five young animals under 1 year (three males and two females), all dead by causes unrelated to this anatomical region. The upper lip entered in the constitution of a pigmented nasolabial plane. The masseter muscles weighed 43.8 ± 3.5 g and represented 0.23% of body weight, which corresponds to ruminants of feeders intermediate to grazers and browsers. Parotid glands represented 0.08% of the body weight, characteristic that also categorize the pampas deer as belonging to the intermediate feeding group. The dental formula was the same of the domestic ruminants. The upper incisors and canines were absent, and instead of them, there was a dental pad (Pulvinus dentalis). The upper canine teeth were present only in the deciduous dentition. The existence of a brachydont dentition turns Ozotoceros very vulnerable to continuous use as there is no compensatory teeth growth. The particular anatomy of the mouth and lips of this animal was adapted to a very selective feeding, taking highly nutritious sprouts beyond plant category. In conclusion and in addition to previous studies of anatomy of the digestive organs in this species, pampas deer may be categorized as belonging to the intermediate type of feeding.

  17. Bats adjust their mouth gape to zoom their biosonar field of view

    PubMed Central

    Rydell, Jens; Amichai, Eran; Boonman, Arjan; Eitan, Ofri; Weiss, Anthony J.; Yovel, Yossi

    2015-01-01

    Active sensing, where sensory acquisition is actively modulated, is an inherent component of almost all sensory systems. Echolocating bats are a prime example of active sensing. They can rapidly adjust many of their biosonar parameters to optimize sensory acquisition. They dynamically adjust pulse design, pulse duration, and pulse rate within dozens of milliseconds according to the sensory information that is required for the task that they are performing. The least studied and least understood degree of freedom in echolocation is emission beamforming—the ability to change the shape of the sonar sound beam in a functional way. Such an ability could have a great impact on the bat’s control over its sensory perception. On the one hand, the bat could direct more energy into a narrow sector to zoom its biosonar field of view, and on the other hand, it could widen the beam to increase the space that it senses. We show that freely behaving bats constantly control their biosonar field of view in natural situations by rapidly adjusting their emitter aperture—the mouth gape. The bats dramatically narrowed the beam when entering a confined space, and they dramatically widened it within dozens of milliseconds when flying toward open space. Hence, mouth-emitting bats dynamically adjust their mouth gape to optimize the area that they sense with their echolocation system. PMID:25941395

  18. Bats adjust their mouth gape to zoom their biosonar field of view.

    PubMed

    Kounitsky, Pavel; Rydell, Jens; Amichai, Eran; Boonman, Arjan; Eitan, Ofri; Weiss, Anthony J; Yovel, Yossi

    2015-05-26

    Active sensing, where sensory acquisition is actively modulated, is an inherent component of almost all sensory systems. Echolocating bats are a prime example of active sensing. They can rapidly adjust many of their biosonar parameters to optimize sensory acquisition. They dynamically adjust pulse design, pulse duration, and pulse rate within dozens of milliseconds according to the sensory information that is required for the task that they are performing. The least studied and least understood degree of freedom in echolocation is emission beamforming--the ability to change the shape of the sonar sound beam in a functional way. Such an ability could have a great impact on the bat's control over its sensory perception. On the one hand, the bat could direct more energy into a narrow sector to zoom its biosonar field of view, and on the other hand, it could widen the beam to increase the space that it senses. We show that freely behaving bats constantly control their biosonar field of view in natural situations by rapidly adjusting their emitter aperture--the mouth gape. The bats dramatically narrowed the beam when entering a confined space, and they dramatically widened it within dozens of milliseconds when flying toward open space. Hence, mouth-emitting bats dynamically adjust their mouth gape to optimize the area that they sense with their echolocation system.

  19. Cyclophosphamide-associated enteritis: A rare association with severe enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linda S; Cameron, Karla; Papaluca, Tim; Basnayake, Chamara; Jackett, Louise; McKelvie, Penelope; Goodman, David; Demediuk, Barbara; Bell, Sally J; Thompson, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is a potent cytotoxic agent used in many clinical settings. The main risks of cyclophosphamide therapy include hematological disorders, infertility, hemorrhagic cystitis and malignancies. Gastrointestinal side effects reported to date are often non-specific and not severe. We present the first case of a fatal small bowel enteritis and pan-colitis which appears to be associated with cyclophosphamide. We aim to raise the readers’ awareness of this significant adverse event to facilitate clinical suspicion and early recognition in potential future cases. PMID:27818600

  20. Effect of enteral feeding on gallbladder function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Psáder, Roland; Sterczer, Agnes; Pápa, Kinga; Harnos, Andrea; Szilvási, Viktória; Pap, Akos

    2012-06-01

    Nutritional support in critically ill patients is a fundamental principle of patient care. Little is known about gallbladder motility during the interdigestive phase and in response to enteral feeding. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of enteral feeding on gallbladder function in dogs. The cholagogue meal (Lipofundin infusion) was applied in four anatomical positions (jejunum, duodenojejunal junction, descending duodenum, stomach) in five healthy Beagle dogs. Gallbladder volume (GBV) was monitored by ultrasonography. Lipofundin infusion given through the feeding tube caused a maximal gallbladder contraction of 9.2% (range 3.7-13.9%) in the jejunum, 16.5% (9.1-22.1%) at the duodenojejunal junction and 26.3% (22.8-29.5%) in the descending duodenum. When the cholagogue meal was given through the mouth, it caused a mean 33.8% (28.6-46.5%) maximum gallbladder contraction in the same animals. In conclusion, we can establish that the ultrasound-guided gallbladder emptying method proved to be a useful technique for monitoring the cholagogue effect of Lipofundin meal applied in different anatomical positions of the intestine. The deeper the position of application, the smaller and shorter gallbladder contraction was evoked.

  1. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior.

    PubMed

    Huete-Alcocer, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM): electronic word of mouth (eWOM), considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contributing to a better understanding of the potential of both.

  2. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huete-Alcocer, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM): electronic word of mouth (eWOM), considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contributing to a better understanding of the potential of both. PMID:28790950

  3. Glenn Enters his Mercury Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. enters his Mercury capsule, 'Friendship 7' as he prepares for launch of the Mercury-Atlas rocket. On February 20, 1962 Glenn lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas 6 (MA-6) rocket and became the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds later, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown.

  4. The ascidian mouth opening is derived from the anterior neuropore: reassessing the mouth/neural tube relationship in chordate evolution.

    PubMed

    Veeman, Michael T; Newman-Smith, Erin; El-Nachef, Danny; Smith, William C

    2010-08-01

    The relative positions of the brain and mouth are of central importance for models of chordate evolution. The dorsal hollow neural tube and the mouth have often been thought of as developmentally distinct structures that may have followed independent evolutionary paths. In most chordates however, including vertebrates and ascidians, the mouth primordia have been shown to fate to the anterior neural boundary. In ascidians such as Ciona there is a particularly intimate relationship between brain and mouth development, with a thin canal connecting the neural tube lumen to the mouth primordium at larval stages. This so-called neurohypophyseal canal was previously thought to be a secondary connection that formed relatively late, after the independent formation of the mouth primordium and the neural tube. Here we show that the Ciona neurohypophyseal canal is present from the end of neurulation and represents the anteriormost neural tube, and that the future mouth opening is actually derived from the anterior neuropore. The mouth thus forms at the anterior midline transition between neural tube and surface ectoderm. In the vertebrate Xenopus, we find that although the mouth primordium is not topologically continuous with the neural tube lumen, it nonetheless forms at this same transition point. This close association between the mouth primordium and the anterior neural tube in both ascidians and amphibians suggests that the evolution of these two structures may be more closely linked than previously appreciated. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between halitosis and mouth breathing in children

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Lara Jansiski; Bachiega, Joanna Carolina; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Laranja, Lorena Tristão; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a correlation between halitosis and mouth breathing in children. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-five children between 3 and 14 years of age were divided into two groups (nasal and mouth breathing) for the assessment of halitosis. A descriptive analysis was conducted on the degree of halitosis in each group. The chi-square test was used for comparison between groups, with a 5% level of significance. RESULTS: There was a significantly greater number of boys with the mouth-breathing pattern than girls. A total of 23.6% of the participants had no mouth odor, 12.7% had mild odor, 12.7% had moderate odor and 50.9% had strong odor. There was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of halitosis was high among the children evaluated, and there was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. PMID:21808855

  6. Association between halitosis and mouth breathing in children.

    PubMed

    Motta, Lara Jansiski; Bachiega, Joanna Carolina; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Laranja, Lorena Tristão; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between halitosis and mouth breathing in children. Fifty-five children between 3 and 14 years of age were divided into two groups (nasal and mouth breathing) for the assessment of halitosis. A descriptive analysis was conducted on the degree of halitosis in each group. The chi-square test was used for comparison between groups, with a 5% level of significance. There was a significantly greater number of boys with the mouth-breathing pattern than girls. A total of 23.6% of the participants had no mouth odor, 12.7% had mild odor, 12.7% had moderate odor and 50.9% had strong odor. There was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing. The occurrence of halitosis was high among the children evaluated, and there was a statistically significant association between halitosis and mouth breathing.

  7. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preliminary Program Now Available! View Now ASPEN Enteral Nutrition by the Numbers ASPEN’s new report is a ... large, complex Enteral Nutrition Market. Learn More Parenteral Nutrition: Back to the Basics Join us October 10 ...

  8. Novel sensors for the Artificial Mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeghlaf, Lyes; Mielle, Patrick; Maratray, Jacques; Launay, Jérôme; Temple-Boyer, Pierre; Salles, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Similarly to human chewing, tasty compounds are released in saliva during the food piece mastication in the `Artificial Mouth', and so, are available continuously. Glutamate is present in numerous food, as taste enhancer, has a nice and sought "umami" taste, specific receptors and different inter individual sensitivities, and is a fair marker of the release of tasty compounds. The three sensors (for pH, salt, or glutamate concentration) have the same size, so they are easily interchangeable. Up to now, only one kind of parameter may be analysed at a time by the different sensors. Nevertheless, combined electrodes may be developed in the future.

  9. Osteolipoma of floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Raghunath, Vandana; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumours composed mainly of mature adipose tissue. Histological variants of lipomas have been named according to the type of tissue present and they include fibrolipoma, angiolipoma, osteolipoma, chondrolipoma and others. Osteolipoma, a classic lipoma with osseous metaplasia, is a very rare histological variant. Owing to the rarity of oral osteolipomas, we report an uncommon case of osteolipoma located on the floor of the mouth of a 20-year-old female patient and include a review of the literature. PMID:26113591

  10. Osteolipoma of floor of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Vandana; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha

    2015-06-25

    Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumours composed mainly of mature adipose tissue. Histological variants of lipomas have been named according to the type of tissue present and they include fibrolipoma, angiolipoma, osteolipoma, chondrolipoma and others. Osteolipoma, a classic lipoma with osseous metaplasia, is a very rare histological variant. Owing to the rarity of oral osteolipomas, we report an uncommon case of osteolipoma located on the floor of the mouth of a 20-year-old female patient and include a review of the literature. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. [Burning mouth syndrome - a joint biopsychosocial approach].

    PubMed

    Arpone, Francesca; Combremont, Florian; Weber, Kerstin; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2016-02-10

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a medical condition that is often refractory to conventional diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Patients suffering from BMS can benefit from a biopsychosocial approach in a joint, medical-psychological consultation model. Such a consultation exists at Geneva University Hospitals, involving the collaboration of the maxillo-facial and oral surgery division and the division of liaison psychiatry and crisis intervention, in order to take into account the multiple factors involved in BMS onset and persistence. This article will describe BMS clinical presentation, and present an integrate approach to treat these patients.

  12. A flipped spoon and chin prompt to increase mouth clean.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jack; Piazza, Cathleen C; Groff, Rebecca A; Kozisek, Jennifer M

    2011-01-01

    We treated the liquid refusal of a 15-month-old girl using 2 antecedent manipulations: flipped spoon and chin prompt. Use of the chin prompt in the absence of the flipped spoon failed to produce increases in mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing). By contrast, modest increases in mouth clean resulted from the implementation of the flipped spoon alone. The greatest increases in mouth clean resulted from the combination of the 2 manipulations.

  13. Mouth breathing, another risk factor for asthma: the Nagahama Study.

    PubMed

    Izuhara, Y; Matsumoto, H; Nagasaki, T; Kanemitsu, Y; Murase, K; Ito, I; Oguma, T; Muro, S; Asai, K; Tabara, Y; Takahashi, K; Bessho, K; Sekine, A; Kosugi, S; Yamada, R; Nakayama, T; Matsuda, F; Niimi, A; Chin, K; Mishima, M

    2016-07-01

    Allergic rhinitis, a known risk factor for asthma onset, often accompanies mouth breathing. Mouth breathing may bypass the protective function of the nose and is anecdotally considered to increase asthma morbidity. However, there is no epidemiological evidence that mouth breathing is independently associated with asthma morbidity and sensitization to allergens. In this study, we aimed to clarify the association between mouth breathing and asthma morbidity and allergic/eosinophilic inflammation, while considering the effect of allergic rhinitis. This community-based cohort study, the Nagahama Study, contained a self-reporting questionnaire on mouth breathing and medical history, blood tests, and pulmonary function testing. We enrolled 9804 general citizens of Nagahama City in the Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Mouth breathing was reported by 17% of the population and was independently associated with asthma morbidity. The odds ratio for asthma morbidity was 1.85 (95% CI, 1.27-2.62) and 2.20 (95% CI, 1.72-2.80) in subjects with mouth breathing alone and allergic rhinitis alone, which additively increased to 4.09 (95% CI, 3.01-5.52) when mouth breathing and allergic rhinitis coexisted. Mouth breathing in nonasthmatics was a risk for house dust mite sensitization, higher blood eosinophil counts, and lower pulmonary function after adjusting for allergic rhinitis. Mouth breathing may increase asthma morbidity, potentially through increased sensitization to inhaled allergens, which highlights the risk of mouth-bypass breathing in the 'one airway, one disease' concept. The risk of mouth breathing should be well recognized in subjects with allergic rhinitis and in the general population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths ...study wave-current interaction, and contribute to a comprehensive community data set of coastal inlet and river mouth processes, 2) better understand...Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  15. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    unlimited. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths Tim T. Janssen Theiss Research, El Granada, CA 94018 t: 415 609 5359 ; e...river mouth processes, 2) better understand the role of current shear, wave inhomogeneity and nonlinearity in wave-current interaction through...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  16. Extreme Wave Statistics within the Mouth of the Columbia River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS EXTREME WAVE STATISTICS WITIDN THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER Thesis Advisor: Co...Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS EXTREME WAVE STATISTICS WITHIN THE MOUTH OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER 6. AUTHOR: Calter L. Johnston 7...in the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) dming the peak of ebb tide in May and June of2013. Over three separate collection days, effects of opposing

  17. The effect of mouth breathing on chewing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagaiwa, Miho; Gunjigake, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effect of mouth breathing on chewing efficiency by evaluating masticatory variables. Ten adult nasal breathers with normal occlusion and no temporomandibular dysfunction were selected. Subjects were instructed to bite the chewing gum on the habitual side. While breathing through the mouth and nose, the glucide elution from the chewing gum, number of chewing strokes, duration of chewing, and electromyography (EMG) activity of the masseter muscle were evaluated as variables of masticatory efficiency. The durations required for the chewing of 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 250 strokes were significantly (P < .05) longer while breathing through the mouth. There was no significant difference in the glucide elution rate (%) for each chewing stroke between nose and mouth breathings. The glucide elution rates for 1- and 3-minute chewing were significantly (P < .05) lower while breathing through the mouth. However, there was no significant difference in the glucide elution rate for 5-minute chewing between nose and mouth breathings. While chewing for 1, 3, and 5 minutes, the chewing stroke and EMG activity of the masseter muscle were significantly (P < .05) lower during mouth breathing. It takes a longer amount of time to complete chewing to obtain higher masticatory efficiency when breathing through the mouth. Therefore, mouth breathing will decrease the masticatory efficiency if the duration of chewing is restricted in everyday life.

  18. Using acoustic sensors to discriminate between nasal and mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2012-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing.

  19. [A study of urease activity of mouth cavity microflora].

    PubMed

    Bykov, S É; Bykov, A S

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the prevalence of mouth cavity urealytic microflora and determination of the level of its enzymatic activity depending on concentration and amount of urea solution taken as a substrate. 62 randomly chosen patients at the age of 5-64 took part in the study. Each of them rinsed the mouth with 50 ml of 1% urea solution. Before and after rinsing the concentration of ammonia in the mouth cavity air was measured. In patients with highest and lowest activity of mouth cavity urealytic microflora a series of tests was carried out including mouth rinsing with urea solution in various concentrations and amounts and measuring ammonia concentration before and after rinsing. Obtained results were analyzed using mathematical statistics methods. It was found that in 91% ± 1.8% of randomly chosen patients (p < 0.05) mouth cavity microflora showed apparent urease activity. The lowest concentration (0.0625% in 50 ml) and volume (0.5 ml of 1% solution) levels of urea solution were obtained that can exert negative influence on the results of helicobacteriosis diagnosis by means of mouth cavity air analysis. Urealytic microflora in the mouth cavity is very common and may constitute a factor that decreases the specificity of helicobacteriosis diagnosis by means of the methods based on detection of indicators of gas metabolites resulting from the enzymatic reaction in air samples taken from the mouth cavity after oral administration of urea.

  20. Full mouth versus quadrant treatment in chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Anjana

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the management of chronic periodontitis, including methods of non-surgical therapy such as full mouth disinfection, full mouth debridement and conventional quadrant-by-quadrant therapy. Manual searches of Medline and Embase databases provided the relevant studies. Multiple randomised controlled trials (RCTs) selected for the paper failed to show any significant differences between the quadrant-wise treatment and full mouth debridement and modalities. This review demonstrates that there is no known difference in treatment outcomes between full mouth debridement and traditional quadrant therapy. Further RCTs are necessary to assess clinical effectiveness of chemical adjunct use.

  1. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Francisco J; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; López-Jornet, Pía

    2015-05-16

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is mainly found in middle aged or elderly women and is characterized by intense burning or itching sensation of the tongue or other regions of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by xerostomia and dysgeusia. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during the evening and at night. Although BMS classically has been attributed to a range of factors, in recent years evidence has been obtained relating it peripheral (sensory C and/or trigeminal nerve fibers) or central neuropathic disturbances (involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system). The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Patient management is based on the avoidance of causes of oral irritation and the provision of psychological support. Drug treatment for burning sensation in primary BMS of peripheral origin can consist of topical clonazepam, while central type BMS appears to improve with the use of antidepressants such as duloxetine, antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin, or amisulpride.

  2. Treatment of Burning Mouth Syndrome With Amisulpride

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cerdeira, Carmen; Sanchez-Blanco, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a frequently occurring disease characterized by a burning or painful sensation in the tongue and/or other oral sites without clinical mucosal abnormalities or lesions. Its etiopathology is unknown, although local, systemic, and psychological factors have been associated with BMS. The syndrome is multifactorial, and its management remains unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study was to obtain preliminary data regarding the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride in BMS treatment. Methods The subjects were treated with amisulpride (50 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Efficacy assessment included a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HASM-A), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Efficacy Index (CGI-EI). Results The treatment regimens resulted in a significant improvement in burning mouth symptoms from baseline at week 24, as indicated by the quantitative mean illness duration VAS score, HAM-D, and HAM-A. Amisulpride appears to be effective and patients show a rapid response to treatment. No serious adverse effects were encountered in these patients. Conclusions Amisulpride is effective and well tolerated as a short-term treatment. It is particularly efficacious at the start of treatment and has shorter response latency. Double-blind placebo-controlled trials are needed for further assessment of the efficacy of amisulpride in BMS treatment. PMID:22719802

  3. Nonsyndromic palate Synechia with floor of mouth

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Sharan; Bütow, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the embryological basis, sequela and management of intraoral synechia, and to report on the incidence of this condition at a facial cleft deformity clinic (FCDC), with specific attention to two rare cases of mucosal bands involving the floor of the mouth and palate. Review of the literature and a retrospective analysis of FCDC and case report of two cases. During the period of 30 years (1983–2013), the FCDC - University of Pretoria has managed in excess of 4000 cases. A review of the clinic statistics revealed only six cases in which intraoral synechiae occurred. The rarity of this condition at the FCDC is in keeping with the rare incidence in the international literature. Four syndromic cases were identified. Three cases were cleft palate lateral synechia syndrome, and one was an orofacial digital syndrome. Two nonsyndromic cases were identified, and both cases involved the floor of the mouth and palate. The attending physicians and surgeons should be aware of the most appropriate timing for management of this condition, in order to avoid unwanted sequelae. Supportive care should be provided, and emergency airway protocol should be available for all cases. A differential diagnosis should be considered which includes syndromic conditions. PMID:26389045

  4. Assessment and treatment of chronic hand mouthing.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Eileen M; Iwata, Brian A; Zhou, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Hand mouthing (HM) is a chronic problem in many individuals with intellectual disabilities. Although the prevalence of mouthing has been estimated, data on the frequency, severity, or functions of the behavior were not included. In Study 1, we examined the prevalence and risk of HM. Results obtained from interviews showed that the prevalence of HM in two institutional samples (N = 802) was 12.7%, whereas direct observation yielded a lower estimate of prevalence (8%). Moreover, a large proportion of observed HM (39.1%) was self-injurious in nature. In Study 2, we used modified functional analyses (FAs) to examine the HM of 64 individuals. Results indicated that maintenance by automatic reinforcement accounted for 98.4% of the cases (all but one case). In Study 3, we implemented a progressive series of interventions for HM exhibited by 14 individuals. The following interventions were implemented in sequential order: (a) noncontingent reinforcement (NCR, effective with 6 subjects), (b) either NCR plus differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) plus response blocking (effective with 5 subjects) or NCR plus response blocking only (effective with 2 subjects), and (c) NCR plus brief manual restraint (effective with 1 subject). © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  5. Enteric diseases of homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Baker, R W; Peppercorn, M A

    1982-01-01

    Certain enteric ailments are particularly common among homosexual men. They are primarily infectious diseases and include not only such common venereal diseases as gonorrhea and syphilis but also infections not usually regarded as being sexually transmitted. Among the latter are shigellosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, and amebiasis. Patients' symptoms are non-specific and seldom helpful in diagnosing particular diseases. The practitioner must be prepared to identify a number of infections with similar presentations that may occur singly or together in gay men. Gonorrhea is probably the most common bacterial infection in gay men. Carriage rates as high as 50% have been reported, and extra-genital carriage is common; this necessitates culturing the urethra, rectum, and pharynx. Procaine penicillin G is the treatment of choice for most patients; spectinomycin is probably the drug of choice in penicillin-sensitive patients. In contrast to other venereal diseases, syphilis may have a characteristic protoscopic presentation. Benzathine penicillin G is the treatment of choice for most patients. Lymphogranuloma venereum causes penile lesions and inguinal lymphadenitis in heterosexual men, whereas homosexual men are more prone to proctitis. The disease may mimic Crohn's disease. Recommended treatment includes tetracycline or sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. Shigellosis usually presents as an acute diarrheal illness. Patients generally require only supportive treatment with fluids. Herpes simplex viral infection is difficult to diagnose and has several different presentations, including lumbosacral radiculomyelopathy. Symptomatic treatment with sitz baths, anesthetic ointment, and analgesics is recommended. Venereal warts are believed to be caused by the same virus that causes verrucous warts; they are usually found in the anal canal or around the anal orifice. They are commonly treated with 25% podophyllin solution. Parasitic infections include giardiasis, amebiasis, and

  6. Enteral Feeding Set Handling Techniques.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Beth; Williams, Maria; Sollazzo, Janet; Hayden, Ashley; Hensley, Pam; Dai, Hongying; Roberts, Cristine

    2017-04-01

    Enteral nutrition therapy is common practice in pediatric clinical settings. Often patients will receive a pump-assisted bolus feeding over 30 minutes several times per day using the same enteral feeding set (EFS). This study aims to determine the safest and most efficacious way to handle the EFS between feedings. Three EFS handling techniques were compared through simulation for bacterial growth, nursing time, and supply costs: (1) rinsing the EFS with sterile water after each feeding, (2) refrigerating the EFS between feedings, and (3) using a ready-to-hang (RTH) product maintained at room temperature. Cultures were obtained at baseline, hour 12, and hour 21 of the 24-hour cycle. A time-in-motion analysis was conducted and reported in average number of seconds to complete each procedure. Supply costs were inventoried for 1 month comparing the actual usage to our estimated usage. Of 1080 cultures obtained, the overall bacterial growth rate was 8.7%. The rinse and refrigeration techniques displayed similar bacterial growth (11.4% vs 10.3%, P = .63). The RTH technique displayed the least bacterial growth of any method (4.4%, P = .002). The time analysis in minutes showed the rinse method was the most time-consuming (44.8 ± 2.7) vs refrigeration (35.8 ± 2.6) and RTH (31.08 ± 0.6) ( P < .0001). All 3 EFS handling techniques displayed low bacterial growth. RTH was superior in bacterial growth, nursing time, and supply costs. Since not all pediatric formulas are available in RTH, we conclude that refrigerating the EFS between uses is the next most efficacious method for handling the EFS between bolus feeds.

  7. Mouth and Teeth: How To Keep Them Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for regular check-ups and cleanings.AdultsContinuing good mouth and tooth care as an adult can help you avoid tooth ... to considerWhen you do not regularly take good care of you teeth and mouth, you could experience these problems:Cavities. Cavities are ...

  8. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Mouth and Throat Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cold foods Take these steps: Clean your mouth with care. ● ● Brush your teeth and tongue after each meal and before you go to bed. Use a very soft toothbrush or cotton swabs. ● ● Use toothpaste or gel that has fluoride in it. ● ● Rinse your mouth with the baking soda, salt, and water mix ...

  9. A Coat Reduces Mouthing: It Worked in My Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Annette M.

    1988-01-01

    A coat was adapted for a 20-year-old severely handicapped woman to control her practice of "mouthing" her hands and clothing. Velcro strips attached to the coat held the student's arms down long enough to allow for differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior, which successfully reduced the rate of mouthing. (JDD)

  10. A Coat Reduces Mouthing: It Worked in My Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Annette M.

    1988-01-01

    A coat was adapted for a 20-year-old severely handicapped woman to control her practice of "mouthing" her hands and clothing. Velcro strips attached to the coat held the student's arms down long enough to allow for differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior, which successfully reduced the rate of mouthing. (JDD)

  11. A Flipped Spoon and Chin Prompt to Increase Mouth Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Jack; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Groff, Rebecca A.; Kozisek, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    We treated the liquid refusal of a 15-month-old girl using 2 antecedent manipulations: flipped spoon and chin prompt. Use of the chin prompt in the absence of the flipped spoon failed to produce increases in mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing). By contrast, modest increases in mouth clean resulted from the implementation of the flipped…

  12. 4. LIGHTHOUSE SITE OFFSHORE AT MOUTH OF FEDERAL CHANNEL, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. LIGHTHOUSE SITE OFFSHORE AT MOUTH OF FEDERAL CHANNEL, AND WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE WATER TOWARD THE BUILDINGS OF THE FORMER ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION, ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  14. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  15. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength in Mouth Breathers: Clinical Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Andrade da Cunha, Renata; Andrade da Cunha, Daniele; Assis, Roberta Borba; Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo; Justino da Silva, Hilton

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The child who chronically breathes through the mouth may develop a weakness of the respiratory muscles. Researchers and clinical are seeking for methods of instrumental evaluation to gather complementary data to clinical evaluations. With this in mind, it is important to evaluate breathing muscles in the child with Mouth Breathing. Objective To develop a review to investigate studies that used evaluation methods of respiratory muscle strength in mouth breathers. Data Synthesis  The authors were unanimous in relation to manovacuometry method as a way to evaluate respiratory pressures in Mouth Breathing children. Two of them performed with an analog manovacuometer and the other one, digital. The studies were not evaluated with regard to the method efficacy neither the used instruments. Conclusion There are few studies evaluating respiratory muscle strength in Mouth Breathing people through manovacuometry and the low methodological rigor of the analyzed studies hindered a reliable result to support or refuse the use of this technique. PMID:25992108

  16. An overview of burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Carmen; Di Stasio, Dario; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Gentile, Enrica; Guida, Agostino; Maio, Claudio; Tammaro, Mariasofia; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterised by the presence of a burning sensation in the oral mucosa in the absence of any clinically apparent mucosal sign. It occurs more commonly in older women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palates. Besides the burning sensation, patients with BMS may complain of unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. The exact pathophysiology of primary BMS remains unknown. A major challenge for the clinician is the treatment of BMS: identifying possible causative factors is the first step, but BMS is often idiopathic. Drug therapy, in addition to behavioural therapy and psychotherapy, may help to eliminate the symptoms. Considering the growing incidence of BMS in older people, further research is required to determine the true efficacy of current management strategies for patients with this disorder.

  17. Genomics and outbreaks: foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Freimanis, G L; Di Nardo, A; Bankowska, K; King, D J; Wadsworth, J; Knowles, N J; King, D P

    2016-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an animal pathogen of global economic significance. Identifying the sources of outbreaks plays an important role in disease control; however, this can be confounded by the ease with which FMDV can spread via movement of infected livestock and animal products, aerosols or fomites, e.g. contaminated persons and objects. As sequencing technologies have advanced, this review highlights the uses of viral genomic data in helping to understand the global distribution and transboundary movements of FMDV, and the role that these approaches have played in control and surveillance programmes. The recent application of next-generation sequencing platforms to address important epidemiological and evolutionary challenges is discussed with particular reference to the advent of 'omics' technologies.

  18. Lupus enteritis during pregnancy: A case-based review.

    PubMed

    Nagakawa, Asuka; Arata, Naoko; Mito, Asako; Kaneshige, Terumi; Kitami, Masahiro; Sago, Haruhiko; Murashima, Atsuko

    2015-05-26

    Although the symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) worsen during pregnancy, few previous studies have reported lupus enteritis in pregnant women with SLE. A 29-year-old pregnant Japanese woman presented with acute abdomen. Six years before pain onset, she developed pure red cell aplasia and tested positive for anti-Ro (SS-A) and anti-La (SS-B) antibodies. Anti-DNA antibodies were detected two and a half years later. The patient remained asymptomatic until she developed acute abdomen. A mild increase in anti-DNA antibody levels and a mild decrease in complement levels were observed, and abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of large-volume ascites and edematous thickening of the small intestinal wall. These findings established the diagnosis of lupus enteritis. Her condition improved after treatment with prednisolone 50 mg/day, and she delivered a female infant weighing approximately 1810 g at 37 weeks of gestation. Our study suggests that lupus enteritis should be suspected in female patients with autoimmune disease who develop acute abdomen during pregnancy, and that magnetic resonance imaging is useful in its diagnosis.

  19. Genomic diversification of giant enteric symbionts reflects host dietary lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Miyake, Sou; Cahill, Matt; Vinu, Manikandan; Hackmann, Timothy J; Blom, Jochen; Tietbohl, Matthew D; Berumen, Michael L; Stingl, Ulrich

    2017-09-05

    Herbivorous surgeonfishes are an ecologically successful group of reef fish that rely on marine algae as their principal food source. Here, we elucidated the significance of giant enteric symbionts colonizing these fishes regarding their roles in the digestive processes of hosts feeding predominantly on polysiphonous red algae and brown Turbinaria algae, which contain different polysaccharide constituents. Using metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and metatranscriptomic analyses, we provide evidence of metabolic diversification of enteric microbiota involved in the degradation of algal biomass in these fishes. The enteric microbiota is also phylogenetically and functionally simple relative to the complex lignocellulose-degrading microbiota of terrestrial herbivores. Over 90% of the enzymes for deconstructing algal polysaccharides emanate from members of a single bacterial lineage, "Candidatus Epulopiscium" and related giant bacteria. These symbionts lack cellulases but encode a distinctive and lineage-specific array of mostly intracellular carbohydrases concurrent with the unique and tractable dietary resources of their hosts. Importantly, enzymes initiating the breakdown of the abundant and complex algal polysaccharides also originate from these symbionts. These are also highly transcribed and peak according to the diel lifestyle of their host, further supporting their importance and host-symbiont cospeciation. Because of their distinctive genomic blueprint, we propose the classification of these giant bacteria into three candidate genera. Collectively, our findings show that the acquisition of metabolically distinct "Epulopiscium" symbionts in hosts feeding on compositionally varied algal diets is a key niche-partitioning driver in the nutritional ecology of herbivorous surgeonfishes.

  20. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  1. Entering China: an unconventional approach.

    PubMed

    Vanhonacker, W

    1997-01-01

    Conventional wisdom has it that the best way to do business in China is through an equity joint venture (EJV) with a well-connected Chinese partner. But pioneering companies are starting a trend toward a new way to enter that market: as a wholly foreign-owned enterprise, or WFOE. Increasingly, says the author, joint ventures do not offer foreign companies what they need to succeed in China. For example, many companies want to do business nationally, but the prospects for finding a Chinese partner with national scope are poor. Moreover, there are often conflicting perceptions between partners about how to operate an EJV: Chinese companies, for example, typically have a more immediate interest in profits than foreign investors do. By contrast, the author asserts, WFOEs are faster to set up and easier to manage; and they allow managers to expand operations more rapidly. That makes them the perfect solution, right? The answer is a qualified yes. First, foreign companies will still need sources of guanxi, or social and political connections. Second, managers must take steps to avoid trampling on China's cultural or economic sovereignty. Third and perhaps most important, foreign companies must be prepared to bring something of value to China-usually in the form of jobs or new technology that can help the country develop. Companies willing to make the effort, says the author, can reap the rewards of China's burgeoning marketplace.

  2. [Secondary aorto-enteric fistula].

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, F; Boneschi, M; Miani, S; Erba, M; Beretta, L

    1998-01-01

    Aortic graft fistula is a rare and life-threatening complication after aortic reconstruction. The incidence ranges from 0.5 to 4%, and even if the diagnosis and treatment is appropriate, the results of surgery are poor: mortality rate ranges from 14 to 70%. The optimal method of treatment is still controversial; prosthetic removal and extra-anatomic bypass has been advocated as the standard method, but more recently, because the high mortality rate associated with this procedure, some have prompted to recommend in situ aortic graft replacement as a more successful treatment. Personal experience with incidence (0.7%) outcome and mortality (57%) in 7 patients treated over a period of 6 years (1990-1996) is reported. Results from this group are compared with another group (6 patients) previously treated (1975-1982) for the same pathology. Our results after 10 years, show the same incidence (0.7 vs 0.6%) and an elevated and unchanged mortality (57 vs 66%). Better results in the management of aorto-enteric fistulas could be achieved with the removal of infected infrarenal aortic prosthetic grafts and in situ homografts replacement.

  3. Computed tomographic evaluation of mouth breathers among paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Farid, MM; Metwalli, N

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Mouth breathing causes many serious problems in the paediatric population. It has been maintained that enlarged adenoids are principally responsible for mouth breathing. This study was designed to evaluate whether other mechanical obstacles might predispose the child to mouth breathing. Methods 67 children with ages ranging from 10 to 15 years were studied and grouped into mouth-breathers and nose-breathers. The children first underwent axial CT scans of the brain for which they were originally referred. In addition, they were subjected to a limited coronal CT examination of the paranasal sinuses. Congenital anatomical variations as well as inflammatory changes were assessed. Results 87% of mouth-breathing children had hypertrophied adenoids, 77% had maxillary sinusitis, 74% had pneumatized middle concha, 55% had a deviated nasal septum, 55% had hypertrophied inferior conchae, 45% had ethmoidal sinusitis and 23% showed frontal sinusitis. Such changes were significantly less prevalent in nose-breathers. 12.9% of mouth-breathing children did not have adenoids. Of these children, only 3.3% had one or more congenital or inflammatory change whereas the other 9.6% showed a completely normal CT scan signifying the incidence of habitual non-obstructive mouth breathing. Conclusions It is clear that adenoids have a dominant role in causing mouth breathing. Yet, we recommend that paediatricians should assess other mechanical obstacles if mouth breathing was not corrected after adenoidectomy. Further research should be performed to test the validity of correction of such factors in improving the quality of life of mouth-breathing children. PMID:20089737

  4. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  5. Tooth staining potential of experimental amine fluoride/stannous fluoride mouth rinse formulations-a randomized crossover forced staining study.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Katrin; Noack, Barbara; Herrmann, Nancy; Hoffmann, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    It was the aim to investigate experimental mouth rinses concerning their tooth and tongue staining potential using the standardized short-term forced staining model. A single centre, clinically controlled, randomized, investigator-blinded study was conducted in a crossover design. In healthy dental students, three experimental AmF/SnF2 (A, B, C) mouth rinses and a phenolic/essential oil rinse (D) were compared to a water control (E). Four treatment days consisted of eight hourly rinses with mouth rinse and black tea. Mechanical oral hygiene was ceased. At the fifth day, tooth and tongue staining indices were recorded. Between treatment periods, a 10-day washout phase was performed. Twenty-eight participants entered and completed the study. All mouth rinses including the water control led to tooth and tongue staining. Most tooth staining occurred after rinsing with test rinse A, followed by B, D, C and E. Statistically significant differences existed between products A and C, D, and E. Most tongue staining happened in group B, followed by A, D, C and E (not statistically significant). Within the limitations of the model, mouth rinse C has a promising potential of causing less tooth discoloration than other AmF/SnF2 rinses. C is highly recommended to be investigated in further long-term clinical studies on its in vivo staining potential and antiplaque efficacy. This forced staining study has proven that one of the experimental AmF/SnF2 rinses leads to less staining than the other experimental AmF/SnF2 rinses. These experimental results have to be confirmed by further clinical investigations.

  6. One-leg standing time with eyes open: comparison between the mouth-opened and mouth-closed conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi; Kanehisa, Yayoi; Ozaki, Yoshie; Iwasa, Yasuyuki; Fukuizumi, Takaki; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Many studies report a significant relationship between the one-leg standing time with the eyes open and the occlusal relationship. To determine the association between proprioception (the periodontal membrane vs muscle spindle) to the one-leg standing time, the authors compared the one-leg standing time with eyes open between mouth-opened and mouth-closed conditions. The study participants were 107 healthy, elderly patients. The authors measured the one-leg standing time with eyes open between mouth-opened and mouth-closed conditions. The one-leg standing time was significantly shorter with the mouth opened (21·1±19·1 seconds) than with the mouth closed (25·1±21·4 seconds). Patients whose one-leg standing time was equal or shorter with the mouth opened than with the mouth closed were not different from the other patients with regard to age, handgrip strength, BMI, and the number of remaining teeth. The vertical mandibular position may affect body balance.

  7. Mouth-watering words: Articulatory inductions of eating-like mouth movements increase perceived food palatability.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Boecker, Lea

    2016-04-01

    We explored the impact of consonantal articulation direction of names for foods on expected palatability for these foods (total N = 256). Dishes (Experiments 1-2) and food items (Experiment 3) were labeled with names whose consonants either wandered from the front to the back of the mouth (inward, e.g., PASOKI) or from the back to the front of the mouth (outward; e.g., KASOPI). Because inward (outward) wandering consonant sequences trigger eating-like (expectoration-like) mouth movements, dishes and foods were rated higher in palatability when they bore an inward compared to an outward wandering name. This effect occurred already under silent reading and for hungry and satiated participants alike. As a boundary condition, this articulation effect did occur when also additional visual information on the product was given (Experiment 3), but vanished when this visual information was too vivid and rich in competing palatability cues (Experiment 2). Future marketing can exploit this effect by increasing the appeal of food products by using inward wandering brand names, that is, names that start with the lips and end in the throat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  9. Environmental enteric dysfunction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Crane, Rosie J; Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2015-03-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966-June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings.

  10. Application and Preparation of Enteric Coating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. M.; Wang, L.; Zhang, X. L.; Zhou, H. J.; Chen, X. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Yang, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, polymethacrylate enteric coated materials based on the equal mass of methyl acrylic acid and ethyl acrylate as the main raw materials were synthesized through emulsion polymerization. Omeprazole Enteric-coated Capsules were prepared by the fluidized bed coating technology using above materials as enteric layer and in vitro enteric test was considered according to standard. The results showed that the material had good coverage in the surface of omeprazole isolated pellets, excellent acid resistance in artificial gastric acid environment, and reached the disintegration effect in the buffer solution of 20min. Moreover the drug release reached 88.2% and had excellent long-term storage.

  11. Enteric pathogens and soil: a short review.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Johanna; Toranzos, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    It is known that soil is a recipient of solid wastes able to contain enteric pathogens in high concentrations. Although the role of soil as a reservoir of certain bacterial pathogens is not in question, recent findings show that soil may have a larger role in the transmission of enteric diseases than previously thought. Many of the diseases caused by agents from soil have been well characterized, although enteric diseases and their link to soil have not been so well studied. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common diseases caused by enteric bacteria. Some examples are salmonellosis ( Salmonella sp.), cholera ( Vibrio cholerae), dysentery ( Shigella sp.) and other infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia sp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and many other strains. Viruses are the most hazardous and have some of the lowest infectious doses of any of the enteric pathogens. Hepatitis A, hepatitis E, enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus types 1 and 2, multiple strains of echoviruses and coxsackievirus are enteric viruses associated with human wastewater. Among the most commonly detected protozoa in sewage are Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium parvum. This article reviews the existing literature of more than two decades on waste disposal practices that favor the entry of enteric pathogens to soil and the possible consequent role of the soil as a vector and reservoir of enteric pathogens.

  12. Endoscopic jejunal access for enteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Coates, N E; MacFadyen, B V

    1995-06-01

    Enteral (gut) alimentation appears to offer greater benefit for patients than calories delivered via a parenteral (intravenous) route. Enteral alimentation prevents mucosal atrophy, maintains normal gut flora, decreases bacterial translocation, and enhances enteral immunological competence. Reliable delivery into the jejunum without the placement of an operative feeding tube is difficult, however. We have been interested for some time in endoscopically placing a jejunal tube for enteral nutrition early (within 24 hours) after trauma resuscitation or operation. A simplified technique is described for the endoscopic placement of a jejunal feeding tube, with or without a concomitant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  13. [New home enteral nutrition via jejunostomy using semi-solid enteral formula].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Mihoko; Makishima, Junko; Maruyama, Makishima Michio

    2014-12-01

    Home enteral nutrition via jejunostomy requires considerable time for infusion to the patients. A new method using semisolid enteral formula dramatically reduces the time of infusion. This method makes use of pectin and liquid enteral formula. The authors applied this method in two patients with total gastrectomy being given enteral nutrition at home. There were no complications such as diarrhea or abdominal pain. This new method of home enteral nutrition could enhance the patients' quality of life (QOL) by reducing the time of infusion of enteral nutrition.

  14. Respiratory volume perception through the nose and mouth determined noninvasively.

    PubMed

    Fox, J; Kreisman, H; Colacone, A; Wolkove, N

    1986-08-01

    The relative importance of the nose vs. the mouth in the perception of respiratory volumes has never been assessed, nor have previous respiratory perception studies been performed noninvasively. Using respiratory inductive plethysmography, we monitored 12 normal subjects noninvasively when breathing either exclusively through the nose or mouth. The sensation of inspired volume mouth breathing was compared with that of nose breathing over a wide range of the inspiratory capacity. The psychophysical techniques of tidal volume duplication, tidal volume doubling, and magnitude estimation were utilized. A just noticeable difference was calculated from the constant error of the tidal volume duplication trials. The exponents for magnitude estimation were 1.06 and 1.07 for nose and mouth breathing, respectively. The other psychophysical techniques also revealed no differences in nose and mouth volume perception. These results suggest that tidal volume changes are perceived equally well through the nose and mouth. Furthermore, the location of the receptors, important in volume perception, is probably at a distal point common to the nose and mouth.

  15. On the Conventionalization of Mouth Actions in Australian Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Trevor; van Roekel, Jane; Schembri, Adam

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the conventionalization of mouth actions in Australian Sign Language. Signed languages were once thought of as simply manual languages because the hands produce the signs which individually and in groups are the symbolic units most easily equated with the words, phrases and clauses of spoken languages. However, it has long been acknowledged that non-manual activity, such as movements of the body, head and the face play a very important role. In this context, mouth actions that occur while communicating in signed languages have posed a number of questions for linguists: are the silent mouthings of spoken language words simply borrowings from the respective majority community spoken language(s)? Are those mouth actions that are not silent mouthings of spoken words conventionalized linguistic units proper to each signed language, culturally linked semi-conventional gestural units shared by signers with members of the majority speaking community, or even gestures and expressions common to all humans? We use a corpus-based approach to gather evidence of the extent of the use of mouth actions in naturalistic Australian Sign Language-making comparisons with other signed languages where data is available--and the form/meaning pairings that these mouth actions instantiate.

  16. Hedgehog activity controls opening of the primary mouth.

    PubMed

    Tabler, Jacqueline M; Bolger, Trióna G; Wallingford, John; Liu, Karen J

    2014-12-01

    To feed or breathe, the oral opening must connect with the gut. The foregut and oral tissues converge at the primary mouth, forming the buccopharyngeal membrane (BPM), a bilayer epithelium. Failure to form the opening between gut and mouth has significant ramifications, and many craniofacial disorders have been associated with defects in this process. Oral perforation is characterized by dissolution of the BPM, but little is known about this process. In humans, failure to form a continuous mouth opening is associated with mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway members; however, the role of Hh in primary mouth development is untested. Here, we show, using Xenopus, that Hh signaling is necessary and sufficient to initiate mouth formation, and that Hh activation is required in a dose-dependent fashion to determine the size of the mouth. This activity lies upstream of the previously demonstrated role for Wnt signal inhibition in oral perforation. We then turn to mouse mutants to establish that SHH and Gli3 are indeed necessary for mammalian mouth development. Our data suggest that Hh-mediated BPM persistence may underlie oral defects in human craniofacial syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hedgehog activity controls opening of the primary mouth

    PubMed Central

    Tabler, Jacqueline M.; Bolger, Trióna G.; Wallingford, John; Liu, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    To feed or breathe, the oral opening must connect with the gut. The foregut and oral tissues converge at the primary mouth, forming the buccopharyngeal membrane (BPM), a bilayer epithelium. Failure to form the opening between gut and mouth has significant ramifications, and many craniofacial disorders have been associated with defects in this process. Oral perforation is characterized by dissolution of the BPM, but little is known about this process. In humans, failure to form a continuous mouth opening is associated with mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway members; however, the role of Hh in primary mouth development is untested. Here, we show, using Xenopus, that Hh signaling is necessary and sufficient to initiate mouth formation, and that Hh activation is required in a dose-dependent fashion to determine the size of the mouth. This activity lies upstream of the previously demonstrated role for Wnt signal inhibition in oral perforation. We then turn to mouse mutants to establish that SHH and Gli3 are indeed necessary for mammalian mouth development. Our data suggest that Hh-mediated BPM persistence may underlie oral defects in human craniofacial syndromes. PMID:25300580

  18. Extended anaesthesia and nasotracheal intubation of a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Bauquier, S H; Golder, F J

    2010-11-01

    Anaesthesia requires maintenance of a patent airway. Nasotracheal intubation of a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was performed when the inability to open the animal’s mouth prevented orotracheal intubation. Nasotracheal intubation was easy to perform, secured the airway and permitted delivery of supplemental oxygen, isoflurane and intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

  19. Factors associated with dry mouth in dependent Japanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Kakudate, Naoki; Muramatsu, Tsukasa; Endoh, Mami; Satomura, Kazuhito; Koseki, Takeyoshi; Sato, Yuji; Ito, Kayoko; Ogasawara, Tadashi; Nakamura, Seiji; Kishimoto, Etsuo; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Uchiyama, Kimio; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kakinoki, Yasuaki

    2014-03-01

    To identify factors associated with dry mouth. Dry mouth adversely affects oropharyngeal health, particularly in elderly, and can lead to pneumonia. A better understanding of the epidemiology of dry mouth is therefore important in improving treatment strategies and oral health in high-risk elderly patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study involving 383 dependent Japanese elderly individuals (65-84 [n = 167] and ≥85 [n = 216] years) at eight long-term care facilities and hospitals. Thirty-four potential factors associated with dry mouth were examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. The primary outcome was dry mouth, as diagnosed by tongue dorsum moisture. We identified that body mass index and severity of physical disability were identified as a potential factors associated with dry mouth in the super-elderly (≥85 years) group, whereas severity of physical disability, outcome measurement time, high daily water consumption, mouth breathing, use of antidepressants and diuretics, and high frequency of daily brushing (≥2 times per day; Odds ratio: 5.56; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.52-20.00) were associated with dry mouth in the 65- to 84-year-old group. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a link between frequency of daily brushing and dry mouth and suggests that tooth brushing should be encouraged in high-risk dependent Japanese elderly (65-84 years), particularly those taking antidepressants and/or diuretics. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Dry mouth: a critical topic for older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Phuu; Suarez-Durall, Piedad; Mulligan, Roseann

    2015-01-01

    Diminished salivary flow, or dry mouth impacts the oral health of many older adults, dentate and edentulous. As a result typical oral conditions can prove more challenging to both the patient's comfort and home care and the treatment selected by the clinician. This paper will review issues of dry mouth from a clinical and symptomatic perspective and will include the condition's causes, treatment and prevention. We performed a review of PubMed using the words: older adults, dry mouth, xerostomia, radiation-induced xerostomia, and salivary gland hypofunction. We selected 90 articles with a clinical application perspective. When it comes to treatment of dry mouth conditions, either objective or subjective, there are no easy answers as to the best course of action for a specific individual. While most of the cited studies have examined the most difficult cases of dry mouth (e.g., Sjögren's syndrome, and that seen during and post head and neck cancer treatments), there are many older adults who demonstrate dry mouth from the use of multiple medications. This paper presents a summary of the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of dry mouth (salivary hypofunction and xerostomia in older adults). It is important to understand the causes of dry mouth and to educate our patients. Starting a prevention program as early as possible considering the most practical, cost effective and efficient treatments with the best risk-benefit ratio will help to diminish dry mouth symptoms and sequelae. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mouth breathing, "nasal disuse," and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seo-Young; Guilleminault, Christian; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Sullivan, Shannon S

    2015-12-01

    Adenotonsillectomy (T&A) may not completely eliminate sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), and residual SDB can result in progressive worsening of abnormal breathing during sleep. Persistence of mouth breathing post-T&As plays a role in progressive worsening through an increase of upper airway resistance during sleep with secondary impact on orofacial growth. Retrospective study on non-overweight and non-syndromic prepubertal children with SDB treated by T&A with pre- and post-surgery clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) evaluations including systematic monitoring of mouth breathing (initial cohort). All children with mouth breathing were then referred for myofunctional treatment (MFT), with clinical follow-up 6 months later and PSG 1 year post-surgery. Only a limited subgroup followed the recommendations to undergo MFT with subsequent PSG (follow-up subgroup). Sixty-four prepubertal children meeting inclusion criteria for the initial cohort were investigated. There was significant symptomatic improvement in all children post-T&A, but 26 children had residual SDB with an AHI > 1.5 events/hour and 35 children (including the previous 26) had evidence of "mouth breathing" during sleep as defined [minimum of 44 % and a maximum of 100 % of total sleep time, mean 69 ± 11 % "mouth breather" subgroup and mean 4 ± 3.9 %, range 0 and 10.3 % "non-mouth breathers"]. Eighteen children (follow-up cohort), all in the "mouth breathing" group, were investigated at 1 year follow-up with only nine having undergone 6 months of MFT. The non- MFT subjects were significantly worse than the MFT-treated cohort. MFT led to normalization of clinical and PSG findings. Assessment of mouth breathing during sleep should be systematically performed post-T&A and the persistence of mouth breathing should be treated with MFT.

  2. Efficacy of mouth opening exercises in treating trismus after maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-hong; Ao, Hong-wei; Lin, Qing; Xu, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Patients with maxillary tumor often suffer from trismus after maxillectomy, which could turn out to be a permanent sequela without proper intervention. In this study, the efficacy of mouth opening exercises in preventing and treating trismus was observed in patients with maxillary tumor early after their operations. At the same time, radiotherapy as an influencing factor for the mouth opening exercises was evaluated. In this study, 22 patients with maxillary oncology began their mouth opening exercises at an early stage (1-2 weeks) after maxillectomy. They were divided into two groups based on the principle of voluntariness: 11 patients in group 1 chose TheraBites as their instruments of mouth opening exercises, and the other 11 in group 2 chose stacked tongue depressors to help their exercises. All participants were trained to exercise 3-5 times a day, 30-40 oscillations at one time, with a 2-second pause at their maximum possible mouth open position. The maximal interincisor distances (MID) of patients were measured and recorded by a single investigator every week after the beginning of the mouth opening exercises. Medical information and the responses of patients were also recorded. Initial and final MIDs were calculated by SPSS 13.0. The changes of the mouth aperture every week during exercises in both groups were described in figures, and there were statistical increases in the final MIDs compared with the initial ones. However, no significant differences were achieved between groups 1 and 2 (P > 0.05). Radiotherapy seemed to have no negative impact on the mouth opening results during the exercises. Physical mouth opening exercises should be executed early after maxillectomy for the prevention and treatment of trismus, especially for those who had radiotherapy as part of antitumor treatments.

  3. Development of prenatal lateralization: evidence from fetal mouth movements.

    PubMed

    Reissland, N; Francis, B; Aydin, E; Mason, J; Exley, K

    2014-05-28

    Human lateralized behaviors relate to the asymmetric development of the brain. Research of the prenatal origins of laterality is equivocal with some studies suggesting that fetuses exhibit lateralized behavior and other not finding such laterality. Given that by around 22weeks of gestation the left cerebral hemisphere compared to the right is significantly larger in both male and female fetuses we expected that the right side of the fetal face would show more movement with increased gestation. This longitudinal study investigated whether fetuses from 24 to 36weeks of gestation showed increasing lateralized behaviors during mouth opening and whether lateralized mouth movements are related to fetal age, gender and maternal self-reported prenatal stress. Following ethical approval, fifteen healthy fetuses (8 girls) of primagravid mothers were scanned four times from 24 to 36-gestation. Two types of mouth opening movements - upper lip raiser and mouth stretch - were coded in 60 scans for 10min. We modeled the proportion of right mouth opening for each fetal scan using a generalized linear mixed model, which takes account of the repeated measures design. There was a significant increase in the proportion of lateralized mouth openings over the period increasing by 11% for each week of gestational age (LRT change in deviance=10.92, 1df; p<0.001). No gender differences were found nor was there any effect of maternally reported stress on fetal lateralized mouth movements. There was also evidence of left lateralization preference in mouth movement, although no evidence of changes in lateralization bias over time. This longitudinal study provides important new insights into the development of lateralized mouth movements from 24 to 36 weeks of gestation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Statens Serum Institut Enteric Medium for Detection of Enteric Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Marianne; Meyer, Aase; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Gaarslev, Knud; Espersen, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of the Statens Serum Institut (SSI) enteric medium for isolation and direct identification of enteric pathogens was evaluated. Six different biochemical reactions can be read by using the SSI enteric medium, allowing direct identification of a range of enteric pathogens. All 248 gram-negative bacterial species that were tested grew on the SSI enteric medium. Only 10 of 248 bacteria (4%) showed discrepant results in the biochemical reactions, and none of these were enteric pathogens. Forty-three of 47 enteric pathogens (92%) produced identical rates of semiquantitative growth on the SSI enteric medium and 5% blood agar, whereas three Vibrio spp. and one Aeromonas spp. showed reduced growth. Gram-positive bacteria did not grow on the SSI enteric medium. Most enteric pathogens had a detection limit of 50 bacteria per ml of feces, but higher numbers of Vibrio spp. and some Shigella spp. were required for detection. The growth rates of 125 enteric pathogens and 12 Yersinia spp. on the SSI enteric medium, xylose lysine deoxycholate (XLD), Hektoen enteric (HE), Salmonella-Shigella (SS), and cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin (CIN) agar were compared. Detection rates after application of 200 CFU were 99% for SSI enteric medium, 92% for XLD, 88% for HE, and 82% for SS agar. The 12 Yersinia spp. grew excellently on both the SSI enteric medium and CIN agar. We conclude that the performance of the SSI enteric medium compares favorably to those of other media tested. Its ability to detect Yersinia spp. may limit the number of media needed in the typical laboratory. The direct identification of enteric pathogens on the medium may also provide a more rapid diagnosis. PMID:10364603

  5. Enteric hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, Nathalie; Issa, Zaina; Crott, Ralph; Morelle, Johann; Danse, Etienne; Wallemacq, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Deprez, Pierre H

    2017-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis may lead to steatorrhea, enteric hyperoxaluria, and kidney damage. However, the prevalence and determinants of hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis patients as well as its association with renal function decline have not been investigated.We performed an observational study. Urine oxalate to creatinine ratio was assessed on 2 independent random urine samples in consecutive adult patients with chronic pancreatitis followed at the outpatient clinic from March 1 to October 31, 2012. Baseline characteristics and annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change during follow-up were compared between patients with hyper- and normo-oxaluria.A total of 48 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. The etiology of the disease was toxic (52%), idiopathic (27%), obstructive (11%), autoimmune (6%), or genetic (4%). Hyperoxaluria (defined as urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g) was found in 23% of patients. Multivariate regression analysis identified clinical steatorrhea, high fecal acid steatocrit, and pancreatic atrophy as independent predictors of hyperoxaluria. Taken together, a combination of clinical steatorrhea, steatocrit level >31%, and pancreatic atrophy was associated with a positive predictive value of 100% for hyperoxaluria. On the contrary, none of the patients with a fecal elastase-1 level >100 μg/g had hyperoxaluria. Longitudinal evolution of eGFR was available in 71% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 904 days. After adjustment for established determinants of renal function decline (gender, diabetes, bicarbonate level, baseline eGFR, and proteinuria), a urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g was associated with a higher risk of eGFR decline.Hyperoxaluria is highly prevalent in patients with chronic pancreatitis and associated with faster decline in renal function. A high urine oxalate to creatinine ratio in patients with chronic pancreatitis is best predicted by clinical steatorrhea, a high acid

  6. Enteric hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Demoulin, Nathalie; Issa, Zaina; Crott, Ralph; Morelle, Johann; Danse, Etienne; Wallemacq, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Deprez, Pierre H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pancreatitis may lead to steatorrhea, enteric hyperoxaluria, and kidney damage. However, the prevalence and determinants of hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis patients as well as its association with renal function decline have not been investigated. We performed an observational study. Urine oxalate to creatinine ratio was assessed on 2 independent random urine samples in consecutive adult patients with chronic pancreatitis followed at the outpatient clinic from March 1 to October 31, 2012. Baseline characteristics and annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change during follow-up were compared between patients with hyper- and normo-oxaluria. A total of 48 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. The etiology of the disease was toxic (52%), idiopathic (27%), obstructive (11%), autoimmune (6%), or genetic (4%). Hyperoxaluria (defined as urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g) was found in 23% of patients. Multivariate regression analysis identified clinical steatorrhea, high fecal acid steatocrit, and pancreatic atrophy as independent predictors of hyperoxaluria. Taken together, a combination of clinical steatorrhea, steatocrit level >31%, and pancreatic atrophy was associated with a positive predictive value of 100% for hyperoxaluria. On the contrary, none of the patients with a fecal elastase-1 level >100 μg/g had hyperoxaluria. Longitudinal evolution of eGFR was available in 71% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 904 days. After adjustment for established determinants of renal function decline (gender, diabetes, bicarbonate level, baseline eGFR, and proteinuria), a urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g was associated with a higher risk of eGFR decline. Hyperoxaluria is highly prevalent in patients with chronic pancreatitis and associated with faster decline in renal function. A high urine oxalate to creatinine ratio in patients with chronic pancreatitis is best predicted by clinical steatorrhea, a

  7. [Viral hepatitis of enteric origin].

    PubMed

    Debord, T; Buisson, Y

    1998-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses of oral-fecal origin are responsible for a high morbidity and mortality throughout the world, even if they never result in chronic hepatitis. Two viruses, the virus of hepatitis A (VHA) and of hepatitis E (VHE) are at present the cause of severe viral hepatitis of enteric origin. Water is the principle vector in the spread of these viruses. However, the epidemiological aspects vary according to the pathogenic agent. VHA is excreted in a highly concentrated form in the feces for a relatively short period of time. Since it resists in an exterior environment, the virus remains infectious for a long time. VHE is excreted for a short period of time and in low concentrations. The viral particles are fragile in vitro and their variability in the environment is little known. The possible reservoir role of certain animals has been envisaged. Epidemics arise especially in countries suffering from poor hygiene and massive water pollution. Hepatitis A should no longer be considered a benign disease of childhood. The progress made in hygiene and economic development in industrialized countries have made contacts with this virus scarce, rendering the populations more receptive to it and epidemics more widespread. When the sickness occurs later in life, infection is more often symptomatic and can be serious, resulting sometimes long-term indisposition. Hepatitis E has a vast distribution throughout the world and manifests itself either in epidemic or endemic-sporadic form in many poor countries. In developed countries, it comes about mostly as a result of imported pathology, even if there exists a "substratum" of infection in these areas. The main clinical aspects, such as we were able to study them in 39 cases of military men from Tchad, Guyana and Somalia, are comparable to those of hepatitis A. The reasons for the particular gravity of symptoms in pregnant women are unknown. These affections have no specific treatment. In the field of prevention, vaccination

  8. Phonological similarity effect is abolished by a silent mouthing task.

    PubMed

    Saito, S

    1993-04-01

    This experiment was designed to examine the effect of silent mouthing on the phonological similarity effect. 16 undergraduates were tested for serial recall of visually presented letter sequences that were either phonologically similar or dissimilar. The letter sequences had to be remembered under two conditions, a control condition and a silent mouthing condition in which subjects had to articulate irrelevant words silently during the study period. Analysis showed the clear advantage of the dissimilar sequence over the similar one in the control condition. In contrast, this phonological similarity effect disappeared in the silent mouthing condition. This result is consistent with the working memory model.

  9. Burning mouth syndrome: a discussion of a complex pathology.

    PubMed

    Zur, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex pathology for which there is very little information about the etiology and pathogenesis. This lack of knowledge leaves patients with suboptimal treatments. This article discusses the existing scientific evidence about this disease. Since topical oral use of clonazepam have been shown to be effective and safe to treat some patients suffering with burning mouth syndrome, formulations including clonazepam are included with this article. Compounding topical preparations of clonazepam offers opportunities for compounding pharmacists to be more involved in improving the quality of life of burning mouth syndrome patients.

  10. Vaccination against enteric septicaemia of catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causative agent of enteric septicemia (ESC) of catfish, is one of the most economically important diseases of cultured channel catfish. In 2002, Wagner and coworkers reported that enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and columnaris (Flavobacterium columnaris) were the two m...

  11. Complications in pediatric enteral and vascular access.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, James S; Stitelman, David H

    2016-12-01

    Obtaining reliable enteral and vascular access constitutes a significant fraction of a pediatric surgeon׳s job. Multiple approaches are available. Given the complicated nature of this patient population multiple complications can also occur. This article discusses the various techniques and potential complications associated with short- and long-term enteral and vascular access. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Water quality indicators: bacteria, coliphages, enteric viruses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Johnson; Ganesh, Atheesha

    2013-12-01

    Water quality through the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms may affect human health. Coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and coliphages are normally used as indicators of water quality. However, the presence of above-mentioned indicators do not always suggest the presence of human enteric viruses. It is important to study human enteric viruses in water. Human enteric viruses can tolerate fluctuating environmental conditions and survive in the environment for long periods of time becoming causal agents of diarrhoeal diseases. Therefore, the potential of human pathogenic viruses as significant indicators of water quality is emerging. Human Adenoviruses and other viruses have been proposed as suitable indices for the effective identification of such organisms of human origin contaminating water systems. This article reports on the recent developments in the management of water quality specifically focusing on human enteric viruses as indicators.

  13. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Wu, Kai-Ming; Wang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Hung-Pin; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2013-10-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of clinically apparent mucosal alterations. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palate. In addition to a burning sensation, the patients with BMS may also complain unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms: primary and secondary BMS. The primary BMS is essential or idiopathic, in which the organic local/systemic causes cannot be identified and a neuropathological cause is likely. The diagnosis of primary BMS depends mainly on exclusion of etiological factors. The secondary BMS is caused by local, systemic, and/or psychological factors; thus, its diagnosis depends on identification of the exact causative factor. When local, systemic or psychological factors are present, treatment or elimination of these factors usually results in a significant clinical improvement of BMS symptoms. Vitamin, zinc, or hormone replacement therapy has been found to be effective for reducing the oral burning or pain symptom in some BMS patients with deficiency of the corresponding factor. If patients still have the symptoms after the removal of potential causes, drug therapy should be instituted. Previous randomized controlled clinical trials found that drug therapy with capsaicin, alpha-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and antidepressants may provide relief of oral burning or pain symptom. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms.

  14. The Asian free-reed mouth organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottingham, James P.

    2002-11-01

    Mouth-blown instruments employing a free reed coupled to a pipe resonator have long been known and used throughout East and Southeast Asia. Details of the origin and development of these instruments are not known, but are closely connected with the history and prehistory of a multitude of ethnic groups. These instruments exemplify a pipe-resonator coupling significantly different from the standard wind instruments of European origin. The free reed used is approximately symmetric, often operating on both directions of air flow. In some cases the reed is at or near one end of a closed pipe, but in other examples the reed is mounted in the side of a resonator open at both ends. The instruments can be either multiple pipe instruments with one pipe per note, or a pipe with a single reed and tone holes. A number of experimental studies have been conducted on examples of Asian free-reed instruments, primarily the khaen, bawu, and sheng. These include studies of reed vibration, measurements of sound spectra, and impedance measurements of the pipes. Comparisons have been made between experimental results and theoretical work on the coupling of reed vibration with the pipe resonator.

  15. Preventing root caries development under oral biofilm challenge in an artificial mouth

    PubMed Central

    Mei, May L.; Lo, Edward CM.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To study the preventive effects of chlorhexidine against root caries under oral biofilm in an artificial mouth. Study Design: Sixteen human tooth-root disks were inoculated with a salivary sample that was produced by mixing the unstimulated saliva of three adults who had no untreated caries. The disks were incubated in an artificial mouth fed with a 5% sucrose solution three times daily for one week. Eight disks received a twice daily rinse of 0.12% chlorhexidine (test group). The other eight disks were rinsed in distilled water (control). The biofilm was then studied with three techniques: colony forming unit (CFU) counting, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The changes in the chemical structure of the root surface were studied using Fourier transform infra-Red spectroscopy. Type-I collagen and proteoglycans on the root surface were quantified using immunocytochemical staining. Results: The log CFU for the test and control groups were 4.21 and 8.27, respectively (p<0.001). The CFU count of Streptococci and Lactobacilli were negligible. Both the SEM and the CLSM showed suppressed bacteria growth in the test group. The log [amide-I: HPO42-] of the test and control groups were 1.11 and 1.93, respectively (p=0.02). The mean counts of sound type-I collagen in the test and control groups were 16.8/?m2 and 13.0/?m2, respectively (p<0.001), whereas the mean counts of intact proteoglycans were 5.6/?m2 and 3.5/?m2, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusions: Chlorhexidine suppressed the growth of selected cariogenic bacteria in oral biofilm on the root surface and thus protected tooth-root from cariogenic challenge. Key words:Chlorhexidine, biofilm, caries risk, root, caries, artificial mouth, demineralization, streptococci, lactobacilli, proteoglycans, collagen I. PMID:23524434

  16. Sedona Red Rock Cam footage of fireball on June 2, 2016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This footage from the Sedona Red Rock Cam (part of the EarthCam network) shows how brightly the ground was illuminated during the fireball, which entered the atmosphere over Arizona shortly before ...

  17. Oropharyngeal Control of Hand-Mouth Coordination in Newborn Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochat, Philippe; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Identifies a coordinative structure of action that integrates hand and mouth activities within hours after birth. Found that presenting neonates with a sucrose solution focused gross motor patterns of hand movement on the oral and perioral regions. (SKC)

  18. Hardness and shock absorption of silicone rubber for mouth guards.

    PubMed

    Auroy, P; Duchatelard, P; Zmantar, N E; Hennequin, M

    1996-04-01

    Silicone rubbers have general properties that make them suitable for the fabrication of custom-made mouth guards. This study evaluated the shock absorption properties and Shore A hardness of several silicone rubbers and derived products, compared their values with those of materials commonly used for the manufacture of mouth guards, and correlated the shock absorption and transmission abilities of these different materials with their Shore hardness. Silicone rubbers absorb shock better than the materials currently used for custom-made mouth guards. In addition, to adapt mouth guards to particular sports, the properties of the silicone rubbers can be appropriately modified by the addition of oils or glass fiber reinforcement. Statistical analysis of hardness values and transmitted forces for the 27 materials tested indicates that the maximum transmitted force increases with hardness. However, this relationship is not linear, and departure from linearity is greatest for minimal and maximal hardness values.

  19. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER MOUTH OF FISH LADDER AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER MOUTH OF FISH LADDER AT ROCK OUTCROPPING, SHOWING NATURAL CARVED ROCK POOLS, UPPER PORTION OF FISH LADDER VISIBLE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST (UPSTREAM) - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  20. Efficient approach to Chinese phoneme mouth-shape recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiao; Ma, Shaoping; Zhang, Bo

    2001-09-01

    Recent research results show the recognition rates of all kinds mouth-shape recognition systems are not high enough because of the improper feature selection and extraction for mouth-shape images and the false classification for those features on the boundary of different categories. This paper presents a statistical approach, called CPMSR, for mouth-shape recognition at the phoneme level. The feature-extracting module for this approach is based on research results of phonetics and personal investigation at a deaf school. The analyzing module employs Support Vector Machine (SVM) technique, which is a useful tool dealing with boundary points problem. With these improvements our experiment achieved the satisfactory recognition rate of over 90% for 5 vowels and 24 consonants' mouth-shapes.

  1. 10. General oblique view of steel pedestrian bridge spanning mouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. General oblique view of steel pedestrian bridge spanning mouth of raceway; view to northwest. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  2. Factors affecting institutionalized older peoples' self-perceived dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chia; Chu, Chiao-Lee; Ho, Ching-Sung; Lan, Shou-Jen; Chen, Wen-Yi; Liang, Yia-Wung; Hsieh, Yen-Ping

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting institutionalized older peoples' self-perceived dry mouth. This cross-sectional study was conducted on elderly residents at 22 long-term care facilities. A total of 165 questionnaires were returned from 13 senior citizen welfare institutions (SCWIs) and nine nursing homes. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data obtained. The results showed that the type of long-term care (LTC) facility, regular oral examinations, wearing dentures, and the ability to chew sticky foods affected self-perceived dry mouth. This study determined an association between the type of LTC facility where the participants lived and self-perceived dry mouth. The results indicated the importance of providing oral care in order to improve and prevent dry mouth among institutionalized older people living in SCWIs who do not undergo regular oral examinations, wear dentures, and have difficulty chewing sticky foods.

  3. Correct Diagnosis Provides Relief for Those with Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... issue of AGD Impact , the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) monthly newsmagazine. Dry mouth, also known as ...

  4. 21. DETAILED FRONTAL VIEW WEST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING MOUTHS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAILED FRONTAL VIEW WEST OF FURNACE 2, SHOWING MOUTHS WITH ROLLERS FOR MOVING TRAYS IN AND OUT OF THE OVENS. - Vulcan Crucible Steel Company, Building No. 3, 100 First Street, Aliquippa, Beaver County, PA

  5. Novel mouth-exercising device for oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Patil, Smita P

    2012-10-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in progressive juxtaepithelial fibrosis of the oral soft tissues and can cause increasing difficulty in mastication, swallowing, speaking, and mouth opening. The treatment of severe trismus requires a combination of surgical release and physiotherapy. Often physiotherapy alone can modify tissue remodeling in OSMF to increase oral opening. This article describes the fabrication and use of a new mouth-exercising device that helps the patient to squeeze/stretch the cheek mucosa to increase elasticity. The device can be used as a sole treatment modality or can be used in association with pharmacological and surgical treatment modalities for OSMF. Improvement in mouth opening was observed in four OSMF patients treated with a mouth-exercising device for 6 months as a sole treatment modality. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease virus L peptidase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) comprise the genus Aphthovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Seven genera within this family, Aphthoviruses, Cardioviruses, Erboviruses (ERBV), Kobuviruses, Senecaviruses, Sapeloviruses, and Tescho...

  7. 2. Photocopy of 1827 map of mouth of Cuyahoga River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of 1827 map of mouth of Cuyahoga River from Corps of Engineers files, Buffalo District. This is the earliest map of the Cleveland Harbor in the Corps' files. - Cleveland Breakwater at Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. Enteritis cystica profunda presenting as ileoileal intussusception in a child: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Hiroki; Kinjyou, Tsukasa; Nagahama, Masayoshi; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Nakayama, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a 3-month-old male infant with small bowel intussusception caused by enteritis cystica profunda (ECP). The baby was admitted because he was refusing to feed, and was passing "red-currant jelly"-like stools. A palpable mass was identified, and abdominal ultrasonography showed a mass with a lumen and lumen appearance. We performed laparotomy and resected the segment of bowel containing the mass. The resected segment had enteritis cystica profunda, which was considered to have precipitated the intussusception. A review of the English medical literature revealed only three other cases of children with similar symptoms in the last 30 years.

  9. Development and evolution of the vertebrate primary mouth

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Vladimír; Horácek, Ivan; Cerny, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate oral region represents a key interface between outer and inner environments, and its structural and functional design is among the limiting factors for survival of its owners. Both formation of the respective oral opening (primary mouth) and establishment of the food-processing apparatus (secondary mouth) require interplay between several embryonic tissues and complex embryonic rearrangements. Although many aspects of the secondary mouth formation, including development of the jaws, teeth or taste buds, are known in considerable detail, general knowledge about primary mouth formation is regrettably low. In this paper, primary mouth formation is reviewed from a comparative point of view in order to reveal its underestimated morphogenetic diversity among, and also within, particular vertebrate clades. In general, three main developmental modes were identified. The most common is characterized by primary mouth formation via a deeply invaginated ectodermal stomodeum and subsequent rupture of the bilaminar oral membrane. However, in salamander, lungfish and also in some frog species, the mouth develops alternatively via stomodeal collar formation contributed both by the ecto- and endoderm. In ray-finned fishes, on the other hand, the mouth forms via an ectoderm wedge and later horizontal detachment of the initially compressed oral epithelia with probably a mixed germ-layer derivation. A very intriguing situation can be seen in agnathan fishes: whereas lampreys develop their primary mouth in a manner similar to the most common gnathostome pattern, hagfishes seem to undergo a unique oropharyngeal morphogenesis when compared with other vertebrates. In discussing the early formative embryonic correlates of primary mouth formation likely to be responsible for evolutionary–developmental modifications of this area, we stress an essential role of four factors: first, positioning and amount of yolk tissue; closely related to, second, endoderm formation during

  10. Development and evolution of the vertebrate primary mouth.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Vladimír; Horácek, Ivan; Cerny, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate oral region represents a key interface between outer and inner environments, and its structural and functional design is among the limiting factors for survival of its owners. Both formation of the respective oral opening (primary mouth) and establishment of the food-processing apparatus (secondary mouth) require interplay between several embryonic tissues and complex embryonic rearrangements. Although many aspects of the secondary mouth formation, including development of the jaws, teeth or taste buds, are known in considerable detail, general knowledge about primary mouth formation is regrettably low. In this paper, primary mouth formation is reviewed from a comparative point of view in order to reveal its underestimated morphogenetic diversity among, and also within, particular vertebrate clades. In general, three main developmental modes were identified. The most common is characterized by primary mouth formation via a deeply invaginated ectodermal stomodeum and subsequent rupture of the bilaminar oral membrane. However, in salamander, lungfish and also in some frog species, the mouth develops alternatively via stomodeal collar formation contributed both by the ecto- and endoderm. In ray-finned fishes, on the other hand, the mouth forms via an ectoderm wedge and later horizontal detachment of the initially compressed oral epithelia with probably a mixed germ-layer derivation. A very intriguing situation can be seen in agnathan fishes: whereas lampreys develop their primary mouth in a manner similar to the most common gnathostome pattern, hagfishes seem to undergo a unique oropharyngeal morphogenesis when compared with other vertebrates. In discussing the early formative embryonic correlates of primary mouth formation likely to be responsible for evolutionary-developmental modifications of this area, we stress an essential role of four factors: first, positioning and amount of yolk tissue; closely related to, second, endoderm formation during

  11. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later.

  12. Occlusal concepts in full mouth rehabilitation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Bhawana; Ladha, Komal; Lalit, Aaruti; Dwarakananda Naik, B

    2014-12-01

    Restoration of occlusion in patients with severely worn dentition is a challenging situation as every case is unique in itself. There is great apprehension involved in reconstructing debilitated dentition due to widely divergent views concerning the choice of an appropriate occlusal scheme for successful full mouth rehabilitation. This article is an overview of the various occlusal concepts/philosophies in full mouth rehabilitation which will help the clinician select an appropriate occlusal scheme for an individual case.

  13. Management of antithrombotic therapy before full-mouth extraction.

    PubMed

    Powless, R Andrew; Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2013-06-01

    The management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy before full-mouth extraction is a major concern for dentists. Approach should vary depending on the risk of bleeding and adverse cardiac events. We have adapted a more conservative approach with continuation of antiplatelet therapy in the majority of patients while implementing local hemostatic measures with good outcomes. Specific recommendations are provided for antiplatelet therapy before mouth extraction.

  14. 33. NEARLY VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. NEARLY VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE FEDERAL CHANNEL, LOOKING TO THE NORTHWEST. NEITHER ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION NOR OAKLAND NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER HAVE BEEN BUILT. No date, probably mid-1930's. U.S. Navy photograph. Original print on file at the National Archives, San Bruno, California. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  15. 30. VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE FEDERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VERTICAL AERIAL VIEW OF THE MOUTH OF THE FEDERAL CHANNEL, SCALE 1:14,400. TO THE SOUTH OF THE CHANNEL ARE THE RUNWAYS OF THE FORMER ALAMEDA NAVAL AIR STATION; TO THE NORTH ARE THE BERTHS AND BUILDINGS OF THE FORMER NAVAL SUPPLY CENTER, OAKLAND. Date and time of photography '12-9-98 10:51." - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  16. Enteral nutrition after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, A; MacDonald, A; Williams, M; Darbyshire, P; Booth, I

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 16 April 1997
 Nutritional insult after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is complex and its nutritional management challenging. Enteral nutrition is cheaper and easier to provide than parenteral nutrition, but its tolerance and effectiveness in reversing nutritional depletion after BMT is poorly defined. Nutritional status, wellbeing, and nutritional biochemistry were prospectively assessed in 21 children (mean age 7.5 years; 14 boys) who received nasogastric feeding after BMT (mean duration 17 days) and in eight children (mean age 8 years, four boys) who refused enteral nutrition and who received dietetic advice only.
 Enteral nutrition was stopped prematurely in eight patients. Greater changes in weight and mid upper arm circumference were observed in the enteral nutrition group, while positive correlations were found between the duration of feeds and increase in weight and in mid upper arm circumference. Vomiting and diarrhoea had a similar incidence in the two groups, while fever and positive blood cultures occurred more frequently in the dietetic advice group. Diarrhoea occurring during enteral nutrition was not associated with fat malabsorption, while carbohydrate malabsorption was associated with rotavirus infection only. Enteral feeding did not, however, affect bone marrow recovery, hospital stay, general wellbeing, or serum albumin concentrations. Hypomagnesaemia, hypophosphataemia, zinc and selenium deficiency were common in both groups. In conclusion, enteral nutrition, when tolerated, is effective in limiting nutritional insult after BMT. With existing regimens nutritional biochemistry should be closely monitored in order to provide supplements when required.

 PMID:9301351

  17. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E. )

    1989-08-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis.

  18. Home Enteral Nutrition: Updates, Trends, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Martin, Karen; Gardner, Gabriela

    2017-04-01

    The true prevalence of home enteral nutrition (HEN) utilization is unclear and requires further study. HEN therapy has remained virtually unchanged for several decades. However, new trends in HEN are evolving; enteral nutrition is undergoing changes ranging from enteral feeding devices, ingredients used, practice innovations, and challenges with reimbursement. A 2006 Joint Commission call to action that reported 2 sentinel events related to misconnections set things into motion for the transition of enteral device connectors to become specific for enteral nutrition use, which will affect patients who receive HEN. Nutrition support clinicians are realizing that people fed enterally may also enjoy incorporating blended foods into their diets and may benefit from different nutrients and components (ie, phytonutrients, fiber, and prebiotics) present in natural foods, thereby resulting in the renaissance of food-based blenderized tube feedings. This article reviews HEN therapy data or the lack thereof, current practices, risks and benefits, future trends, and challenges with access devices, enteral feedings, and reimbursement. It also highlights areas where more research is needed, and it urges clinicians to get involved in legislative action or committees to facilitate improved processes and reimbursement for HEN.

  19. Cough gastric pressure and maximum expiratory mouth pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Man, William D-C; Kyroussis, Dimitris; Fleming, Tracey A; Chetta, Alfredo; Harraf, Farzaneh; Mustfa, Naveed; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John

    2003-09-15

    Maximal expiratory mouth pressure is a well established test that is used to assess expiratory muscle strength. However, low values are difficult to interpret, as they may result from technical difficulties in performing the test, particularly in patients with facial muscle weakness or bulbar dysfunction. We hypothesized that measuring the gastric pressure during a cough, a natural maneuver recruiting the expiratory muscles, might prove to be a useful additional test in the assessment of expiratory muscle function. Mouth expiratory and cough gastric pressures were measured in 99 healthy volunteers to obtain normal values and in 293 patients referred for respiratory muscle assessment to compare the two measurements. Between-occasion within-subject coefficient of variation, assessed in 24 healthy volunteers, was 10.3% for mouth pressure and 6.9% for cough. Mean +/- SD cough gastric pressure for normal males was 214.4 +/- 42.2 and 165.1 +/- 34.8 cm H2O for females. In 171 patients deemed weak by a low mouth expiratory pressure, 42% had a normal cough gastric pressure. In 105 patients deemed weak by a low cough gastric pressure, 5.7% had a normal expiratory mouth pressure. Low maximal expiratory mouth pressures do not always indicate expiratory muscle weakness. Cough gastric pressure provides a useful complementary test for the assessment of expiratory muscle strength.

  20. Postural alterations and pulmonary function of mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Waleska da; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Guimarães, Fernando Silva; Menezes, Sara Lucia Siveira de

    2010-01-01

    Mouth-breathing children have changes in their stomatognathic system, which result in head projection, stress increase in the scapular belt muscles and postural adaptations. Although thoracic shape and posture can influence ventilatory dynamics, we didn't find studies addressing pulmonary function of mouth-breathing children. this study aimed at analyzing the posture of mouth-breathing children, and studying the existence of correlations between posture and pulmonary volumes. prospective, observational and cross-sectional study, where the posture and pulmonary function of 17 mouth-breathing children and of 17 nasal-breathing children were evaluated by means of photogrammetry and forced spirometry. when compared to nasal-breathing, mouth-breathing subjects presented an increment in head projection and cervical lordosis, forwarded gravity center and reduced pulmonary volumes. There was an association between head projection and forced vital capacity, and between postural alterations and age. mouth-breathing children have postural alterations which increases with age and also reduced spirometry values. The vital capacity reduction correlates negatively with head projection.

  1. [Prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school].

    PubMed

    Felcar, Josiane Marques; Bueno, Izabele Rafael; Massan, Ana Carolina Silva; Torezan, Roberta Pereira; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article is to identify the prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school. 496 questionnaires were answered by 1st and 4th grade children's parents or sponsors in order to identify mouth-breathing. There were questions about habits, sleeping, behavior, eating, personal care and breathing. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between mouth-breathing and nose-breathing among the groups. To measure the exposure effect of the explanatory variables on mouth breathing, the test of logistic regression was used and its magnitude was calculated through Odds Ratio. The statistical significance was set at 5%, and the rate of returned questionnaires was 84.5%. The prevalence of the mouthbreathing over this population was 56.8%. The average age was 7 years old (6-9). There was no significant statistical difference between genders, considering 49.1% male and 50.9% female. The final model of logistic regression identified the variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores as factors that predict the occurrence of the mouth-breathing. The prevalence of mouthbreathing was similar to related in the literature. The variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores may be factors that predict the occurrence of mouth-breathing.

  2. Predicting enteric fever without bacteriological culture results.

    PubMed

    Ross, I N; Abraham, T

    1987-01-01

    We used Bayes' theorem to calculate the probability of enteric fever in 260 patients presenting with undiagnosed fever, without recourse to blood or stool culture results. These individuals were divided into 110 patients with enteric fever (63 culture positive, 47 culture negative) and 150 patients with other causes of fever. Comparison of the frequencies of occurrence of 19 clinical and laboratory events, said to be helpful in the diagnosis of enteric fever, in the two groups revealed that only 8 events were significantly more frequent in enteric fever. These were: a positive Widal test at a screening dilution of 1:40; a peak temperature greater than = 39 degrees C; previous treatment for the fever; a white blood cell count less than 9 X 10(6)/litre; a polymorphonuclear leucocyte count less than 3.5 X 10(6)/litre; splenomegaly; fever duration greater than 7 d; and hepatomegaly. When the probability of enteric fever was determined prospectively in 110 patients, using only 6 of these discriminating events, the probability of patients with a positive prediction having enteric fever (diagnostic specificity) was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.68 to 0.91) and the probability of those with a negative prediction not having enteric fever (diagnostic sensitivity) was 0.92 (0.85 to 0.99). Using all 19 events did not alter the diagnostic specificity or diagnostic sensitivity. This study shows that a small number of clinical and laboratory features can objectively discriminate enteric fever from other causes of fever in the majority of patients. Calculating the probability of enteric fever can aid in diagnosis, when culturing for salmonella is either unavailable or is negative.

  3. Willingness to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation by health care providers: a survey.

    PubMed

    Boucek, Charles D; Phrampus, Paul; Lutz, John; Dongilli, Thomas; Bircher, Nicholas G

    2009-08-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mouth-to-mouth ventilation (MTM) is only effective if rescuers are willing to perform it. To assess the degree of willingness or reluctance in performing MTM, a survey including 17 hypothetical scenarios was created. In each scenario health hazards for the rescuer needed to be balanced against the patient's need for MTM. Respondents were recruited from health care workers attending courses at a medical simulation center. Respondents reported their willingness or reluctance to perform MTM for each scenario using a 4 point scale. The questionnaire had responses by 560 health care workers. Reluctance to perform MTM varied with the scenario. Some health care workers refused to ventilate patients who could benefit from MTM. In all scenarios even when resuscitation was both futile and potentially hazardous, some health care workers were willing to perform MTM. Age and level of experience tend to reduce the propensity to engage in MTM. Parental propensity to ventilate one's own child was stronger than any other motivator. HIV infection is not the only condition for which rescuers hesitate to perform MTM. Bag-valve-mask devices for mechanical ventilation should be available in all locations where health care workers may be called upon to resuscitate apneic patients making the decision to perform MTM moot.

  4. [Enteric nervous system and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Paillusson, S; Lebouvier, T; Pouclet, H; Coron, E; Bruley des Varannes, S; Damier, P; Neunlist, M; Derkinderen, P

    2012-06-01

    It has become increasingly evident over the last years that Parkinson's disease is a multicentric neurodegenerative disease that affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. The aims of the present article are to discuss the role of the enteric nervous system lesions in pathology spreading (Braak's hypothesis) and in the gastrointestinal dysfunction encountered in Parkinson's disease. Owing to its accessibility to biopsies, we further discuss the use of the enteric nervous system as an original source of biomarker in Parkinson's disease.

  5. [Therapy of radiation enteritis--current challenges].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Sinkó, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Zaránd, Attila; Teknos, Dániel

    2011-07-10

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most feared complications after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy. The incidence varies from 0.5 to 5%. It is not rare that the slowly progressing condition will be fatal. During a period of 13 years 24 patients were operated due to the complication of radiation enteritis. Despite different types of surgery repeated operation was required in 25% of cases and finally 4 patients died. Analyzing these cases predisposing factors and different therapeutic options of this condition are discussed. Treatment options of radiation induced enteritis are limited; however, targeted therapy significantly improves the outcome. Cooperation between oncologist, gastroenterologist and surgeon is required to establish adequate therapeutic plan.

  6. Probiotics: health benefits in the mouth.

    PubMed

    Stamatova, Iva; Meurman, Jukka H

    2009-12-01

    Probiotics or health-beneficial bacteria have only recently been introduced in dentistry and oral medicine after years of successful use in mainly gastro-intestinal disorders. The concept of bacteriotherapy and use of health-beneficial micro-organisms to heal diseases or support immune function was first introduced in the beginning of the 20th century. Later the concept lead to the development of modem dairy industry and even today most probiotic strains are lactobacilli or bifidobacteria used in milk fermentation. The mechanisms of probiotic action are mainly unknown but the inter-microbial species interactions are supposed to play a key role in this together with their immuno-stimulatory effects. The introduction of probiotic bacteria in the mouth calls for ascertainment of their particular safety. Since acid production from sugar is detrimental to teeth, care must be taken not to select strains with high fermentation capacity. The first randomized controlled trials have nevertheless shown that probiotics may control dental caries in children due to their inhibitory action against cariogenic streptococci. Less evidence exists on their role in periodontal disease or oral yeast infections. Furthermore the best vehicles for oral probiotic applications need to be assessed. So far mainly dairy products have been investigated but other means such as probiotics in chewing gums or lozenges have also been studied. From the clinical practitioner's point of view direct recommendations for the use of probiotics cannot yet be given. However, scientific evidence so far indicates that probiotic therapy may be a reality also in dentistry and oral medicine in the future.

  7. Mouth of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Mouth of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. [Burning mouth syndrome: pathogenic and therapeutic concepts].

    PubMed

    Ferensztajn, Ewa; Łojko, Dorota; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition characterized by pain, burning sensations and dryness within an oral mucosa, without any clinical changes of the latter. It occurs approximately seven times more frequently in women, mostly in perimenopausal age. The psychiatric aspect of BMS is significant: the most frequent co-morbidities are depression and anxiety disorders, and a number of psychotropic drugs play an essential role in its treatment. In the present review, the most important pathogenic and treatment concepts of BMS have been discussed. The BMS may be similar to neuropathic pain and has some related pathogenic elements with fibromyalgia and the restless leg syndrome. In primary BMS, the features of presynaptic dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons and deficiency of endogenous dopamine levels have been demonstrated. Other neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenaline, histamine as well as hormonal and inflammatory factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of BMS. In the pharmacological treatment of BMS a variety of drugs have been used including benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic drugs. In the final part of the paper, the possibility of using atypical antipsychotic drug, olanzapine, in the treatment of BMS has been discussed. In the context of the recent studies on this topic, a case of female patient with the BMS lasting more than ten years has been mentioned, in whom the treatment with olanzapine brought about a rapid and significant reduction of symptoms. The probable mechanism of the therapeutic effect of olanzapine in BMS can include its effect on dopaminergic receptors and probably also on histaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic ones.

  10. Sensory properties of wine tannin fractions: implications for in-mouth sensory properties.

    PubMed

    McRae, Jacqui M; Schulkin, Alex; Kassara, Stella; Holt, Helen E; Smith, Paul A

    2013-01-23

    Different molecular structures of grape tannins have been shown to influence astringency, however, the in-mouth sensory effects of different molecular structures in red wine tannins remains to be established. The objective of this research was to assess the impact of wine tannin structure on in-mouth sensory properties. Wine tannin was isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon wines of two vintages (3 and 7 years old) and separated into two structurally distinct subfractions with liquid-liquid fractionation using butanol and water. The aqueous subfractions had greater mean degree of polymerization (mDp) and contained a higher proportion of epigallocatechin subunits than the butanol-soluble subfractions, while the older wine tannin fractions showed fewer epicatechin gallate subunits than the younger tannin fractions. The red wine had approximately 3:1 mass ratio of the aqueous and butanol tannin subfractions which approximated an equimolar ratio of tannin in each subfraction. Descriptive sensory analysis of the tannin subfractions in model wine at equimolar concentrations revealed that the larger, more water-soluble wine tannin subfractions from both wines were perceived as more astringent than the smaller, more hydrophobic and more highly pigmented butanol-soluble subfractions, which were perceived as hotter and more bitter. Partial least squares analysis indicated that the greater hydrophobicity and color incorporation in the butanol fractions was negatively associated with astringency, and these characteristics are also associated with aged wine tannins. As the larger, water-soluble tannins had a greater impact on the overall wine astringency, winemaking processes that modulate concentrations of these are likely to most significantly influence astringency.

  11. Opposition of carbohydrate in a mouth-rinse solution to the detrimental effect of mouth rinsing during cycling time trials.

    PubMed

    Gam, Sharon; Guelfi, Kym J; Fournier, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    Studies have reported that rinsing the mouth with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution improves cycling time-trial performance compared with rinsing with a placebo solution. However, no studies have compared the effect of mouth rinsing with a no-mouth-rinse control condition. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a CHO mouth rinse with those of a placebo rinse and a no-rinse condition. Ten male cyclists completed three 1,000-kJ cycling time trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. At every 12.5% of the time trial completed, participants were required to rinse their mouths for 5 s with either a 6.4% maltodextrin solution (CHO), water (WA), or no solution (CON). Heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded every 25% of the time trial completed. Time to completion was faster in both CHO (65.7 ± 11.07 min) and CON (67.6 ± 12.68 min) than in WA (69.4 ± 13.81 min; p = .013 and p = .042, respectively). The difference between CHO and CON approached significance (p = .086). There were no differences in heart rate or RPE between any conditions. In summary, repeated mouth rinsing with water results in decreased performance relative to not rinsing at all. Adding CHO to the rinse solution appears to oppose this fall in performance, possibly providing additional benefits to performance compared with not rinsing the mouth at all. This brings into question the magnitude of the effect of CHO mouth rinsing reported in previous studies that did not include a no-rinse condition.

  12. Voyager 1 Entering Interstellar Space Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-12

    This artist concept depicts NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft entering interstellar space. Interstellar space is dominated by the plasma, or ionized gas, that was ejected by the death of nearby giant stars millions of years ago.

  13. Pettit enters data in a laptop computer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-13

    ISS030-E-142862 (13 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Expedition 30 flight engineer, enters data in a computer while working with Robonaut 2 humanoid robot in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  14. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, B. W. M.; Bruno, M. J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English language literature between 1999–2009. Results. Nasogastric tube feeding appears to be safe and well tolerated in the majority of patients with severe AP, rendering the concept of pancreatic rest less probable. Enteral nutrition has a beneficial influence on the outcome of AP and should probably be initiated as early as possible (within 48 hours). Supplementation of enteral formulas with glutamine or prebiotics and probiotics cannot routinely be recommended. Conclusions. Nutrition therapy in patients with AP emerged from supportive adjunctive therapy to a proactive primary intervention. Large multicentre studies are needed to confirm the safety and effectiveness of nasogastric feeding and to investigate the role of early nutrition support. PMID:20811543

  15. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet, but other members of the enterovi...

  16. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  17. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet, but other members of the enterovi...

  18. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  19. [Indications and practice of enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Hallay, Judit; Nagy, Dániel; Fülesdi, Béla

    2014-12-21

    Malnutrition in hospitalised patients has a significant and disadvantageous impact on treatment outcome. If possible, enteral nutrition with an energy/protein-balanced nutrient should be preferred depending on the patient's condition, type of illness and risk factors. The aim of the nutrition therapy is to increase the efficacy of treatment and shorten the length of hospital stay in order to ensure rapid rehabilitation. In the present review the authors summarize the most important clinical and practical aspects of enteral nutrition therapy.

  20. The effects of enteric coating of aspirin tablets on occult gastrointestinal blood loss.

    PubMed

    Howe, G B; Champion, G D; Corrigan, A B; Hewson, J; Haski, A; Day, R O; Paull, P D; Graham, G G

    1977-12-01

    The effect of enteric coating of aspirin tablets on the gastrointestinal blood loss associated with high dose aspirin therapy was investigated in 12 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Occult blood loss was measured after labelling the patients' red blood cells with Cr51. Three salicylate preparations were used: enteric coated tablets of aspirin ("Rhusal", G.P. Laboratories, 7 x 650 mg per day), uncoated tablet cores of aspirin from the same batch (7 x 650 mg per day) and enteric coated tablets of sodium salicylate (7 x 600 mg and 1 x 300 mg per day). Daily blood loss during a salicylate-free period was (0.7 +/- 0.15 ml, mean +/- SE). Blood loss was significantly increased during dosage with all three salicylate preparations. Daily blood loss during dosage with the uncoated tablets of aspirin (5.3 +/- 0.3 ml) was significantly greater than during dosage with the enteric coated tablets of aspirin (2.3 +/- 0.3 ml) and enteric coated tablets of sodium salicylate (2.1 +/- 0.4 ml). The bioavailability of the salicylate preparations was studied in seven of the 12 patients. Mean plasma salicylate concentration two hours after the second daily dose during dosage with the enteric coated tablets of aspirin was 118 +/- 15 microgram/ml compared to 131 +/- 16 microgram/ml during dosage with the uncoated tablets. Urinary recoveries of the daily dosage of aspirin in the two formulations were also similar.

  1. Correlates of protection for enteric vaccines.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Jan; Parashar, Umesh D; Plotkin, Stanley; Louis, Jacques; Ng, Su-Peing; Desauziers, Eric; Picot, Valentina; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra

    2017-06-08

    An immunological Correlate of Protection (CoP) is an immune response that is statistically interrelated with protection. Identification of CoPs for enteric vaccines would help design studies to improve vaccine performance of licensed vaccines in low income settings, and would facilitate the testing of future vaccines in development that might be more affordable. CoPs are lacking today for most existing and investigational enteric vaccines. In order to share the latest information on CoPs for enteric vaccines and to discuss novel approaches to correlate mucosal immune responses in humans with protection, the Foundation Mérieux organized an international conference of experts where potential CoPs for vaccines were examined using case-studies for both bacterial and viral enteric pathogens. Experts on the panel concluded that to date, all established enteric vaccine CoPs, such as those for hepatitis A, Vi typhoid and poliovirus vaccines, are based on serological immune responses even though these may poorly reflect the relevant gut immune responses or predict protective efficacy. Known CoPs for cholera, norovirus and rotavirus could be considered as acceptable for comparisons of similarly composed vaccines while more work is still needed to establish CoPs for the remaining enteric pathogens and their candidate vaccines. Novel approaches to correlate human mucosal immune responses with protection include the investigation of gut-originating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs), B memory cells and follicular helper T cells from samples of peripheral blood during their recirculation. Copyright © 2017.

  2. Pathology Report: Presacral Noncommunicating Enteric Duplication Cyst.

    PubMed

    Seydafkan, Shabnam; Shibata, David; Sanchez, Julian; Tran, Nam D; Leon, Marino; Coppola, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract duplication cysts or enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital malformations sometimes found on the mesenteric aspect of segments of the alimentary tract. Enteric duplication cysts are lined by normal GI epithelium and may be classified as foregut, mid-gut, and hindgut cysts. Except in very rare cases of retroperitoneal enteric duplication cysts, these cysts communicate with the GI tract and share a common blood supply. Concurrent congenital malformations are not uncommon and malignant transformation within enteric duplication cysts has also been reported. We describe a case of a noncommunicating enteric duplication cyst in a 52-year-old woman. The patient presented with a presacral cystic mass requiring frequent drainage procedures that was primarily believed to be of neural origin. Upon resection, the lesion contained heterotopic tissue, including ciliated bronchial epithelium, squamous and transitional epithelia, and pancreatic and gastric tissue. Focal, low-grade intestinal adenoma was present, but malignancy was not detected in this case. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of a noncommunicating enteric duplication cyst in the English medical literature.

  3. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  4. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Anna M; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts.

  5. Inhalability of micron particles through the nose and mouth.

    PubMed

    Se, Camby Mei King; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2010-03-01

    Aspiration efficiencies from nose and mouth inhalations are investigated at low and high inhalation rates by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software CFX 11. A realistic human head with detailed facial features was constructed. Facial features were matched to represent the 50th percentile of a human male, aged between 20 and 65 years old, based on anthropometric data. The constant freestream velocity was 0.2 ms(-1), normal to the face, and inhalation rates through the mouth and nose were 15 liters per minute (LPM) for light breathing and 40 LPM for heavy breathing. It was found that the flow field in the near breathing region exhibited vertical direction caused by the presence of the torso where the airstream diverges as it flows around and over the body. The critical area concept was used as a tool to determine the aspiration efficiency of particles. Comparisons between critical areas for the nose and mouth inhalations show similar geometric properties such as the area's shape, and its vertical distance location on the x-z plane located at y = 80 cm upstream. The critical area sizes were found to be slightly larger for the mouth inhalation mainly due to the larger mouth area and also the aligned orientation of the mouth to the upstream flow, whereas the nose is perpendicular to the upstream flow. This study was undertaken to establish the flow field in the near breathing region that will help to characterize the flow and particle field for initial boundary conditions leading to a more holistic modeling approach of respiration through the internal nasal cavity and mouth.

  6. CHO Mouth Rinsing Improves Neuromuscular Performance During Isokinetic Fatiguing Exercise.

    PubMed

    Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Patrizio, Federica; Felici, Francesco; Nicolò, Andrea; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2016-12-14

    To determine whether repeated CHO mouth rinsing would improve neuromuscular performance during high intensity fatiguing contractions. 18 young men (26.1±5.0 yr; 22.9±1,9 BMI) performed 3 maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICPRE). Immediately after, they completed 10 s mouth rinse with either 6.4% maltodextrine solution [MAL] or 7.1% glucose solution [GLU] or water [W] or artificially sweetened solution [PLA] or a control trial with no rinse [CON] in a cross over protocol. 5 sets of 30 isokinetic fatiguing contractions at 180°s(-1) and a MVICPOST with their elbow flexors were performed after each mouth rinse. Mechanical and electromyographic signals (EMG) were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle and parameters of interest analyzed. 1) When rinsing the mouth with a solution containing CHO, independently of the sweetness, isokinetic performance was enhanced as shown by the greater total work achieved in comparison with CON; 2) the decay of torque and mean fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) recorded at the end of the fatiguing task was lower when rinsing the mouth with GLU compared to CON; 3) the torque recorded during the MVICPOST was greater with CHO with respect to CON and this was associated to a lower decay of MFCV. CHO mouth rinse counteracts the fatigue-induced decline in neuromuscular performance, supporting the notion that CHO rinse may activate positive afferent signals able to modify the motor output. Repeated mouth rinsing with sweet and non-sweet CHO-containing solutions can improve neuromuscular performance during an isokinetic intermittent fatiguing task.

  7. A randomised crossover comparison of mouth-to-face-shield ventilation and mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation by surf lifeguards in a manikin.

    PubMed

    Adelborg, K; Bjørnshave, K; Mortensen, M B; Espeseth, E; Wolff, A; Løfgren, B

    2014-07-01

    Thirty surf lifeguards (mean (SD) age: 25.1 (4.8) years; 21 male, 9 female) were randomly assigned to perform 2 × 3 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin using mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (AMBU LifeKey) and mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (Laerdal Pocket Mask). Interruptions in chest compressions, effective ventilation (visible chest rise) ratio, tidal volume and inspiratory time were recorded. Interruptions in chest compressions per cycle were increased with mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (mean (SD) 8.6 (1.7) s) compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (6.9 (1.2) s, p < 0.0001). The proportion of effective ventilations was less using mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (199/242 (82%)) compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (239/240 (100%), p = 0.0002). Tidal volume was lower using mouth-to-face-shield ventilation (mean (SD) 0.36 (0.20) l) compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation (0.45 (0.20) l, p = 0.006). No differences in inspiratory times were observed between mouth-to-face-shield ventilation and mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation. In conclusion, mouth-to-face-shield ventilation increases interruptions in chest compressions, reduces the proportion of effective ventilations and decreases delivered tidal volumes compared with mouth-to-pocket-mask ventilation. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  9. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  10. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  11. Red alder kitchen cabinets—How does application of commercial stains influence customer choice?

    Treesearch

    David Nicholls; Joseph. Roos

    2007-01-01

    A better understanding of consumer reaction and preferences for red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) secondary products will help Alaska producers in entering new markets. In this study, red alder kitchen cabinets were commercially stained to six different levels and displayed at home shows in Portland, Oregon, and Anchorage, Alaska. The stains simulated...

  12. Surfing for mouth guards: assessing quality of online information.

    PubMed

    Magunacelaya, Macarena B; Glendor, Ulf

    2011-10-01

    The Internet is an easily accessible and commonly used source of health-related information, but evaluations of the quality of this information within the dental trauma field are still lacking. The aims of this study are (i) to present the most current scientific knowledge regarding mouth guards used in sport activities, (ii) to suggest a scoring system to evaluate the quality of information pertaining to mouth guard protection related to World Wide Web sites and (iii) to employ this scoring system when seeking reliable mouth guard-related websites. First, an Internet search using the keywords 'athletic injuries/prevention and control' and 'mouth protector' or 'mouth guards' in English was performed on PubMed, Cochrane, SvedMed+ and Web of Science to identify scientific knowledge about mouth guards. Second, an Internet search using the keywords 'consumer health information Internet', 'Internet information public health' and 'web usage-seeking behaviour' was performed on PubMed and Web of Science to obtain scientific articles seeking to evaluate the quality of health information on the Web. Based on the articles found in the second search, two scoring systems were selected. Then, an Internet search using the keywords 'mouth protector', 'mouth guards' and 'gum shields' in English was performed on the search engines Google, MSN and Yahoo. The websites selected were evaluated for reliability and accuracy. Of the 223 websites retrieved, 39 were designated valid and evaluated. Nine sites scored 22 or higher. The mean total score of the 39 websites was 14.2. Fourteen websites scored higher than the mean total score, and 25 websites scored less. The highest total score, presented by a Public Institution Web site (Health Canada), was 31 from a maximum possible score of 34, and the lowest score was 0. This study shows that there is a high amount of information about mouth guards on the Internet but that the quality of this information varies. It should be the responsibility

  13. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth in sign language*

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Current conceptions of human language include a gestural component in the communicative event. However, determining how the linguistic and gestural signals are distinguished, how each is structured, and how they interact still poses a challenge for the construction of a comprehensive model of language. This study attempts to advance our understanding of these issues with evidence from sign language. The study adopts McNeill’s criteria for distinguishing gestures from the linguistically organized signal, and provides a brief description of the linguistic organization of sign languages. Focusing on the subcategory of iconic gestures, the paper shows that signers create iconic gestures with the mouth, an articulator that acts symbiotically with the hands to complement the linguistic description of objects and events. A new distinction between the mimetic replica and the iconic symbol accounts for the nature and distribution of iconic mouth gestures and distinguishes them from mimetic uses of the mouth. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth is a salient feature of human language, regardless of whether the primary linguistic modality is oral or manual. Speakers gesture with their hands, and signers gesture with their mouths. PMID:20445832

  14. Association between oral habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Grippaudo, C; Paolantonio, E G; Antonini, G; Saulle, R; La Torre, G; Deli, R

    2016-10-01

    The ratio of bad habits, mouth breathing and malocclusion is an important issue in view of prevention and early treatment of disorders of the craniofacial growth. While bad habits can interfere with the position of the teeth and normal pattern of skeletal growth, on the other hand obstruction of the upper airway, resulting in mouth breathing, changes the pattern of craniofacial growth causing malocclusion. Our crosssectional study, carried out on 3017 children using the ROMA index, was developed to verify if there was a significant correlation between bad habits/mouth breathing and malocclusion. The results showed that an increase in the degree of the index increases the prevalence of bad habits and mouth breathing, meaning that these factors are associated with more severe malocclusions. Moreover, we found a significant association of bad habits with increased overjet and openbite, while no association was found with crossbite. Additionally, we found that mouth breathing is closely related to increased overjet, reduced overjet, anterior or posterior crossbite, openbite and displacement of contact points. Therefore, it is necessary to intervene early on these aetiological factors of malocclusion to prevent its development or worsening and, if already developed, correct it by early orthodontic treatment to promote eugnatic skeletal growth.

  15. Split-mouth design in Paediatric Dentistry clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pozos-Guillén, A; Chavarría-Bolaños, D; Garrocho-Rangel, A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the essential concepts of the split-mouth design, its underlying assumptions, advantages, limitations, statistical considerations, and possible applications in Paediatric Dentistry clinical investigation. In Paediatric Dentistry clinical investigation, and as part of randomised controlled trials, the split-mouth design is commonly used. The design is characterised by subdividing the child's dentition into halves (right and left), where two different treatment modalities are assigned to one side randomly, in order to allow further outcome evaluation. Each participant acts as their own control by making within- patient rather than between-patient comparisons, thus diminishing inter-subject variability and increasing study accuracy and power. However, the main problem with this design comprises the potential contamination of the treatment effect from one side to the other, or the "carry-across effect"; likewise, this design is not indicated when the oral disease to be treated is not symmetrically distributed (e.g. severity) in the mouth of children. Thus, in spite of its advantages, the split-mouth design can only be applied in a limited number of strictly selected cases. In order to obtain valid and reliable data from split mouth design studies, it is necessary to evaluate the risk of carry-across effect as well as to carefully analise and select adequate inclusion criteria, sample-size calculation and method of statistical analysis.

  16. Burning mouth syndrome: the role of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Virgili, A; Corazza, M; Trombelli, L; Arcidiacono, A

    1996-11-01

    The burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an unpleasant sensation of burning in the oral cavity, without clinical signs. Causal factors may be psychogenic, systemic or local. The aim of the study was to determine the significance of contact allergy in the pathogenesis of burning mouth syndrome. Fifteen patients with burning mouth syndrome were studied through anamnesis and laboratory analysis. Epicutaneous patch tests were performed with the Italian standard series (GIRDCA - Gruppo Italiano di Ricerca Dermatiti da Contatto ed Ambientali), preservative and dental series. The same tests were carried out in 12 healthy age- and sex-matched subjects. The number of patients affected by burning mouth syndrome with a positive reaction to patchtesting was 6 out of 15, while the number of allergic patients in the control group was 3 out of 12. No association could be found between positive reaction at patchtesting and exposure to allergens. Contact allergy in burning mouth syndrome seems not to play a primary role; nevertheless, it is advisable to perform patch tests in selected patients to identify a possible aetiological agent.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in mouth breathing children.

    PubMed

    Izu, Suemy Cioffi; Itamoto, Caroline Harumi; Pradella-Hallinan, Márcia; Pizarro, Gilberto Ulson; Tufik, Sérgio; Pignatari, Shirley; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mouth breathing is associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy - which is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea among children. Despite the importance of this matter, there are only a handful of studies showing the relationship between OSAS and mouth breathing. to determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep disorders in mouth breathing children and study its correlation with otorhinolaryngological findings. Retrospective cohort study. Data analysis from 248 medical charts of mouth breathing children seen at the Pediatric Otolaryngologic Division of a large medical institution between the years of 2000 and 2006. All patients had nasofibroscopy and or Cavum radiographs and polysomnographic exams. According to the Apnea index, patients were classified as primary snorers (AI<1); and as OSAS (>1). From 248 patients included in the study, 144 (58%) were primary snorers and 104 (42%) had OSAS. The most prevalent otorhinolaryngological findings were adenotonsillar hypertrophy (n=152; 61.2%), tonsilar hypertrophy (n=17; 6.8%), adenoid hypertrophy (n=37; 14.9%), rhinitis (n=155; 62.5%) and secretory otitis (n=36; 14.5%). primary snoring and OSAS are frequent findings in mouth breathing children. The most frequent otorhinolaryngological disorder in children with OSAS is adenotonsillar hypertrophy with or without rhinitis.

  18. Electromyographic muscle EMG activity in mouth and nasal breathing children.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Eliane C; Marchiori, Susana C; da Silva, Ana Maria T

    2004-04-01

    Mouth breathing may cause changes in muscle activity, because an upper airway obstruction leads may cause a person to extend his/her head forward, demanding a higher inspiratory effort on the accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoids). This purpose of this study is to compare, using electromyography (EMG), the activity pattern the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius muscles in mouth breathing children and nasal breathing children. Forty-six children, ages 8-12 years, 33 male and 13 female were included. The selected children were divided into two groups: Group I consisted of 26 mouth breathing children, and Group II, 20 nasal breathing children. EMG recordings were made using surface electrodes bilaterally in the areas of the sternocleidomastoideus and upper trapezius muscles, while relaxed and during maximal voluntary contraction. The data were analyzed using the Kruskall-Wallis statistical test. The results indicated higher activity during relaxation and lower activity during maximal voluntary contraction in mouth breathers when compared to the nasal breathers. It is suggested that the activity pattern of the sternocleidomastoid and upper trapezius muscles differs between mouth breathing children and nasal breathing children. This may be attributed to changes in body posture which causes muscular imbalance. Because of the limitations of surface EMG, the results need to be confirmed by adding force measurements and repeating the experiments with matched subjects.

  19. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth in sign language.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Wendy

    2009-04-01

    Current conceptions of human language include a gestural component in the communicative event. However, determining how the linguistic and gestural signals are distinguished, how each is structured, and how they interact still poses a challenge for the construction of a comprehensive model of language. This study attempts to advance our understanding of these issues with evidence from sign language. The study adopts McNeill's criteria for distinguishing gestures from the linguistically organized signal, and provides a brief description of the linguistic organization of sign languages. Focusing on the subcategory of iconic gestures, the paper shows that signers create iconic gestures with the mouth, an articulator that acts symbiotically with the hands to complement the linguistic description of objects and events. A new distinction between the mimetic replica and the iconic symbol accounts for the nature and distribution of iconic mouth gestures and distinguishes them from mimetic uses of the mouth. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth is a salient feature of human language, regardless of whether the primary linguistic modality is oral or manual. Speakers gesture with their hands, and signers gesture with their mouths.

  20. Mouthing activity data for children aged 7 to 35 months old in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Ming-Chien; Özkaynak, Halûk; Beamer, Paloma; Dang, Winston; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Jiang, Chuen-Bin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Young children’s mouthing activities thought to be among the most important exposure pathways. Unfortunately, mouthing activity studies have only been conducted in a few countries. In the current study, we used videotaping and computer-based translating method to obtain mouthing activity data for 66 children aged 7 to 35 months old in Taiwan. The median indoor hand-to-mouth and object-to-mouth frequencies were 8.91 and 11.39 contacts h−1, respectively. The median indoor hand-to-mouth and object-to-mouth hourly contact durations were 0.34 and 0.46 min h−1, respectively. The indoor object-to-mouth activities were significantly and negatively correlated with age. Children aged 12 to <24 months in the current study had lower indoor hand-to-mouth and object-to-mouth frequencies than children of same age group in the United States. We also found that indoor mouthing duration with pacifier was significantly and negatively correlated with indoor mouthing duration with other non-dietary objects. The results of the current study indicate that the mouthing behaviors might be different between different countries or populations with different ethnic or lifestyle characteristics. We conclude that using hand-to-mouth frequency values from the current literature may not be most reliable for estimating non-dietary exposures of young children living in Taiwan or even in other similar Asian countries. PMID:25027450

  1. Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease in fish.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; Saleh, Mona; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-09-24

    Enteric redmouth disease (ERM) is a serious septicemic bacterial disease of salmonid fish species. It is caused by Yersinia ruckeri, a Gram-negative rod-shaped enterobacterium. It has a wide host range, broad geographical distribution, and causes significant economic losses in the fish aquaculture industry. The disease gets its name from the subcutaneous hemorrhages, it can cause at the corners of the mouth and in gums and tongue. Other clinical signs include exophthalmia, darkening of the skin, splenomegaly and inflammation of the lower intestine with accumulation of thick yellow fluid. The bacterium enters the fish via the secondary gill lamellae and from there it spreads to the blood and internal organs. Y. ruckeri can be detected by conventional biochemical, serological and molecular methods. Its genome is 3.7 Mb with 3406-3530 coding sequences. Several important virulence factors of Y. ruckeri have been discovered, including haemolyin YhlA and metalloprotease Yrp1. Both non-specific and specific immune responses of fish during the course of Y. ruckeri infection have been well characterized. Several methods of vaccination have been developed for controlling both biotype 1 and biotype 2 Y. ruckeri strains in fish. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding enteric redmouth disease and Y. ruckeri: diagnosis, genome, virulence factors, interaction with the host immune responses, and the development of vaccines against this pathogen.

  2. Toward a better understanding of enteric gliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Baptiste; Pilon, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Most of gastrointestinal functions are controlled by the enteric nervous system (ENS), which contains a vast diversity of neurons and glial cells. In accordance with its key role, defective ENS formation is the cause of several diseases that affect quality of life and can even be life-threatening. Treatment of these diseases would greatly benefit from a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying ENS formation. In this regard, although several important discoveries have been made over the years, how the full spectrum of enteric neuronal and glial cell subtypes is generated from neural crest cells during development still remains enigmatic. Because they also have stem cell properties, such knowledge would be especially important for the enteric glial cell lineage. In a recent study, we identified the NR2F1 transcription factor as a new key regulator of enteric gliogenesis. Here we discuss our recent findings and briefly review what is already known about the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in enteric gliogenesis, with an emphasis on Hedgehog and Notch signaling.

  3. Hypophosphatemia associated with enteral alimentation in cats.

    PubMed

    Justin, R B; Hohenhaus, A E

    1995-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is uncommon in cats, but it has been reported in association with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis, where it can cause hemolysis, rhabdomyopathy, depression, seizures, and coma. The purpose of this article is to describe 9 cats that developed low serum phosphorus concentrations (< 2.5 mg/dL) subsequent to enteral alimentation. Serum biochemical analyses from more than 6,000 cats were reviewed. The medical records of all cats with hypophosphatemia were examined for history of enteral alimentation; diabetic cats were excluded from the study. Nine cats, ranging in age from 3 to 17 years, were identified. All cats had normal serum phosphorus concentrations before tube feeding began. Onset of hypophosphatemia occurred 12 to 72 hours after initiation of enteral alimentation, and the nadir for phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mg/dL. Hemolysis occurred in 6 of the 9 cats. Hypophosphatemia secondary to enteral alimentation is an uncommon clinical finding in cats. Cats with high alanine aminotransferase activity, hyperbilirubinemia, and weight loss should be closely monitored for hypophosphatemia during the first 72 hours of enteral alimentation.

  4. Conspicuous, ultraviolet-rich mouth colours in begging chicks.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sarah; Kilner, Rebecca M; Langmore, Naomi E; Bennett, Andrew T D

    2003-01-01

    There is as yet no clear consensus on the function of vivid mouth colours in begging chicks. A major obstacle to our understanding has been that no studies have measured gape colours independently of human colour perception. Here, we present the first study, to our knowledge, to use UV-VIS spectrometry to quantify the gape colour, background nest colour and nest light environment of eight European passerines. Both mouths and the surrounding flanges show striking and previously unreported peaks of reflectance in the ultraviolet, coupled with high long-wavelength reflectance responsible for the human-visible appearance of the gape. High ultraviolet reflectance is likely to have an important effect on the conspicuousness of nestling mouths, since contrast with the nest background is maximal in the ultraviolet. Furthermore, the dual-peak nature of the spectra suggests that gapes are avian non-spectral colours analogous to human purple. PMID:12952627

  5. Potential revenue impact of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Paarlberg, Philip L; Lee, John G; Seitzinger, Ann H

    2002-04-01

    To estimate potential revenue impacts of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the United States similar to the outbreak in the United Kingdom during 2001. Economic analysis successively incorporating quarantine and slaughter of animals, an export ban, and consumer fears about the disease were used to determine the combined impact. Secondary data for cattle, swine, lambs, poultry, and products of these animals. Data for 1999 were used to calibrate a model for the US agricultural sector. Removal of animals, similar to that observed in the United Kingdom, was introduced, along with a ban on exportation of livestock, red meat, and dairy products and a reduction and shift in consumption of red meat in the United States. The largest impacts on farm income of an FMD outbreak were from the loss of export markets and reductions in domestic demand arising from consumer fears, not from removal of infected animals. These elements could cause an estimated decrease of $14 billion (9.5%) in US farm income. Losses in gross revenue for each sector were estimated to be the following: live swine, -34%; pork, -24%; live cattle -17%; beef, -20%; milk, -16%; live lambs and sheep, -14%; lamb and sheep meat, -10%; forage, -15%; and soybean meal, -7%. Procedures to contain an outbreak of FMD to specific regions and allow maintenance of FMD-free exports and efforts to educate consumers about health risks are critical to mitigating adverse economic impacts of an FMD outbreak.

  6. Molecular survey of enteric viruses in commercial chicken farms in Korea with a history of enteritis.

    PubMed

    Koo, B S; Lee, H R; Jeon, E O; Han, M S; Min, K C; Lee, S B; Mo, I P

    2013-11-01

    Several enteric viruses have increasingly received attention as potential causative agents of runting-stunting syndrome (RSS) in chickens. A molecular survey was performed to determine the presence of a broad range of enteric viruses, namely chicken astrovirus (CAstV), avian nephritis virus (ANV), chicken parvovirus (ChPV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), avian rotavirus (AvRV), avian reovirus (ARV), and fowl adenovirus (FAdV), in intestinal samples derived from 34 commercial chicken flocks that experienced enteritis outbreaks between 2010 and 2012. Using techniques such as PCR and reverse-transcription PCR, enteric viruses were identified in a total of 85.3% of investigated commercial chicken flocks in Korea. Furthermore, diverse combinations of 2 or more enteric viruses were simultaneously identified in 51.7% of chicken farms positive for enteric viruses. The rank order of positivity for enteric viruses was as follows: ANV (44.1%), CAstV (38.2%), ChPV (26.5%), IBV (20.6%), ARV (8.8%), AvRV (5.9%), and FAdV (2.9%). Additionally, other pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Eimeria spp., and FAdV were detected in 79% of chicken flocks positive for enteric viruses using PCR, bacterial isolation, and microscopic examination. The results of our study indicate the presence of several enteric viruses with various combinations in commercial chicken farms that experienced enteritis outbreaks. Experimental studies are required to further understand the roles of enteric viruses in RSS in commercial chickens.

  7. Effects of Mouth Rinses on Color Stability of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Erkut, Selim; Yamanel, Kıvanc

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3 commercially available mouth rinses on the color stability of 4 different resin-based composite restorative materials. Methods Forty disc-shaped specimens (10x2 mm) were prepared from each of the following materials: A nanofill composite Filtek Supreme XT (3M/Espe, St. Paul, MN, USA); a packable low-shrinkage composite, AeliteLS Packable (BISCO, Inc, Shaumburg, IL, USA); nanoceramic composite resin Ceram-X (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany); a microhybrid composite, and Aelite All-Purpose Body (BISCO). The specimens were then incubated in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The baseline color values (L*, a*, b*) of each specimen were measured with a colorimeter according to the CIELAB color scale. After baseline color measurements, 10 randomly selected specimens from each group were immersed in 1 of the 3 mouth rinses and distilled water as control. The specimens were stored in 20 mL of each mouth rinse (Oral B Alcohol-free, Listerine Tooth Defense Anti-cavity Fluoride Rinse and Klorhex) for 12 hours. After immersion, the color values of all specimens were remeasured, and the color change value ΔE*ab was calculated. Data were analyzed using a 2-way analysis of variance at a significance level of .05. Results All specimens displayed color changes after immersion, and there was a statistically significant difference among restorative materials and mouth rinses (P<.05); however, the change was not visually perceptible (ΔE*ab<3.3). The interaction between the effect of mouth rinses and type of restorative materials was not statistically significant (P>.05). Conclusions It may be concluded that although visually nonperceptible, all resin restorative materials tested showed a color difference after immersion in different mouth rinses. PMID:19212530

  8. Evaluation of an enteric coated aspirin preparation.

    PubMed

    Day, R O; Paull, P D; Champion, G D; Graham, G G

    1976-02-01

    The bioavailability and gastrointestinal site of release of enteric coated aspirin tablets ("Rhusal", G.P. Laboratories) were investigated following dosage with single tablets. A delay of one to more than eight hours was observed between dosage and the appearance of salicylate in plasma or saliva. This delay was decreased by pretreatment with metoclopramide. No aspirin or salicylate was detected in gastric aspirates. The mean urinary recovery of salicylate was equivalent to 92% of the administered dose. All these tests were consistent with the designed function of the enteric coating. The time course of concentrations of salicylate in saliva rather than in plasma was confirmed as a useful technique for the evaluation of different formulations of aspirin. The acceleration of gastric emptying by metoclopramide is a useful technique for the evaluation of enteric coated tablets.

  9. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2015-04-09

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 13 February 2015.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 13 February 2015. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. The searches identified 38 trials; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status necessitates it.

  10. Enteral tube feeding for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Morton, Alison; Wolfe, Susan

    2012-12-12

    Enteral tube feeding is routinely used in many cystic fibrosis centres when oral dietary and supplement intake has failed to achieve an adequate nutritional status. The use of this method of feeding is assessed on an individual basis taking into consideration the patients age and clinical status. To examine the evidence that in people with cystic fibrosis, supplemental enteral tube feeding improves nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life without significant adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted the companies that market enteral feeds and reviewed their databases.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 03 September 2012.Date of the most recent hand search of PubMed and conference abstract books: 15 June 2012. All randomised controlled trials comparing supplemental enteral tube feeding for one month or longer with no specific intervention in people with cystic fibrosis. Thirty-one trials were identified by the searches; however, none were eligible for inclusion in this review. There are no trials included in this review. Supplemental enteral tube feeding is widely used throughout the world to improve nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. The methods mostly used, nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, are expensive and may have a negative effect on self-esteem and body image. Reported use of enteral tube feeding suggests that it results in nutritional and respiratory improvement; but, efficacy has not been fully assessed by randomised controlled trials. It is acknowledged, however, that performing a randomised controlled trial would be difficult due to the ethics of withholding an intervention in a group of patients whose nutritional status

  11. [Electrostimulation for the treatment of a dry mouth feeling].

    PubMed

    Janssen, M J E J; Bots, C P; Brand, H S

    2015-10-01

    A 67-year-old woman suffered from a burning mouth feeling for 1.5 years and was referred by her dentist to a saliva clinic. At the clinic persistent xerostomia was diagnosed, and Sjögren's syndrome was suspected. After 1 year, a new measurement of the saliva secretion was carried out, which revealed a further decline in saliva secretion rate. The patient was consequently treated with an intra-oral electrostimulating device in order to stimulate the saliva secretion rate and reduce the feeling of a dry mouth. After 2 weeks, the patient experienced a considerable improvement of the subjective oral dryness.

  12. [Artificial nutrition in children (I): enteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate nutritional support is crucial in the therapeutic approach of multiple conditions, which justifies the frequent and increasing use of specific access routes for enteral and parenteral nutrition. This article reviews the relevant literature concerning indications, procedures, effectiveness and complications of enteral access routes in children. The decision between gastric and postpyloric access, and between nasogastric tube and gastrostomy is thoroughly discussed. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is the most commonly used technique when a long-term gastric access is required, given its efficacy and safety although the associated morbidity is not negligible;laparoscopic gastrostomy emerges as a potentially advantageous alternative.

  13. Gastritis, Enteritis, and Colitis in Horses.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Diab, Santiago S

    2015-08-01

    The gastrointestinal system of horses is affected by a large variety of inflammatory infectious and noninfectious conditions. The most prevalent form of gastritis is associated with ulceration of the pars esophagea. Although the diagnostic techniques for alimentary diseases of horses have improved significantly over the past few years, difficulties still exist in establishing the causes of a significant number of enteric diseases in this species. This problem is compounded by several agents of enteric disease also being found in the intestine of clinically normal horses, which questions the validity of the mere detection of these agents in the intestine.

  14. Investigating turkey enteric picornavirus and its association with enteric disease in poults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our previous research into the dynamic viral community in the turkey gastrointestinal tract revealed a number of novel enteric viruses. Of particular note in this previous metagenomic investigation was the observation of a number of novel avian enteric picornaviruses, in addition to numerous other ...

  15. Thermal inactivation of enteric viruses and bioaccumulation of enteric foodborne viruses in live oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human enteric viruses are one of the main causative agents of shellfish associated outbreaks. In this study, the kinetics of viral bioaccumulation in live oysters and the heat stability of the most predominant enteric viruses were determined in both tissue culture and in oyster tissues. A human nor...

  16. Interventions for treating burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Roddy; Forssell, Heli; Buchanan, John Ag; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Weldon, Jo C; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2016-11-18

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a term used for oral mucosal pain (burning pain or discomfort in the tongue, lips or entire oral cavity) without identifiable cause. General population prevalence varies from 0.1% to 3.9%. Many BMS patients indicate anxiety, depression, personality disorders and impaired quality of life (QoL). This review updates the previous versions published in 2000 and 2005. To determine the effectiveness and safety of any intervention versus placebo for symptom relief and changes in QoL, taste, and feeling of dryness in people with BMS. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 31 December 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 11) in the Cochrane Library (searched 31 December 2015), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 31 December 2015), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 31 December 2015). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any treatment against placebo in people with BMS. The primary outcomes were symptom relief (pain/burning) and change in QoL. Secondary outcomes included change in taste, feeling of dryness, and adverse effects. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Outcome data were analysed as short-term (up to three months) or long-term (three to six months). We included 23 RCTs (1121 analysed participants; 83% female). Interventions were categorised as: antidepressants and antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, cholinergics, dietary supplements, electromagnetic radiation, physical barriers, psychological therapies, and topical treatments.Only one RCT was assessed at low risk of bias overall, four RCTs' risk of bias was unclear, and 18

  17. Gluten-free diet normalizes mouth-to-cecum transit of a caloric meal in adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Chiarioni, G; Bassotti, G; Germani, U; Battaglia, E; Brentegani, M T; Morelli, A; Vantini, I

    1997-10-01

    The mechanisms responsible for bowel disturbances in celiac disease are still relatively unknown. Recent reports suggested that small bowel motor abnormalities may be involved in this pathological condition; however, there are no studies addressing small bowel transit in celiac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. We studied the mouth-to-cecum transit time of a caloric liquid meal in a homogeneous group of celiac patients presenting with clinical and biochemical evidence of malabsorption and complaining of diarrhea. Sixteen patients were recruited and investigated by means of hydrogen breath test through ingestion of 20 g lactulose together with an enteral gluten-free diet formula. A urinary D-xylose test was also done in each patient. Both breath tests and D-xylose tests were carried out basally and after a period of gluten-free diet. Twenty healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group and underwent the same breath testing. At the time of the diagnosis, mouth-to-cecum transit time was significantly prolonged in celiacs with respect to controls (243 +/- 10 vs 117 +/- 6 min, P = 0.0001). The D-xylose test was also abnormal (average urinary concentration 2.8 +/- 0.25 g, normal values >4.5). No correlation was found in patients between mouth-to-cecum transit time and urinary D-xylose output (r = 0.22). After the gluten-free diet period, mouth-to-cecum transit time in celiacs was significantly reduced compared to prediet transit (134 +/- 8 vs 243 +/- 10 min, P = 0.0001) and did not show statistical difference when compared to that found in controls (P = 0.1). The D-xylose test reverted to normal in all but two subjects, who were found to be noncompliant with the diet. Mouth-to-cecum transit time is significantly prolonged in patients affected by untreated celiac disease when compared to healthy controls. This alteration might not be correlated to intestinal malabsorption, and the prolonged orocecal transit could be due to impaired small bowel function

  18. Astronaut John Glenn Enters Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn enters the Mercury spacecraft, Friendship 7, prior to the launch of MA-6 on February 20, 1961 and became the first American who orbited the Earth. The MA-6 mission was the first manned orbital flight boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile), lasted for five hours, and orbited the Earth three times.

  19. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  20. An algorithm for pediatric enteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S E; Dietz, W H; Grand, R J

    1987-03-01

    Many of the metabolic and gastrointestinal complications that occur when patients receive tube feedings result from improper selection or administration of the formula. An algorithm, available tables of formula composition, and adequate flowsheets for recording clinical information that can be adapted to individual institutions will provide simple and practical guidelines for the selection, administration, and management of enteral feeding programs in pediatric patients.

  1. Fetal Cyst Reveling Retroperitoneal Enteric Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Bezzine, Ahlem; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Retroperitoneum is a very uncommon site of enteric duplication (ED). We report a new case of retroperitoneal ED cyst suspected in utero. Prenatal ultrasound showed an abdominal cystic mass. Noncommunicating retroperitoneal ED cyst measuring 70 mm × 30 mm was resected. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:28082784

  2. Oral Vaccine for Immunization against Enteric Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The oral vaccine can provide protection against both typhoid fever and at least one other enteric disease. A bivalent oral vaccine is described...against typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery caused by S. sonnei. The mutated galactose epimeraseless S. typhi strain such as S. typhi Ty21a strain can be utilized as a carrier strain for other protective antigens. (Patents).

  3. Enteric bacterial growth rates in river water.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, C W

    1972-08-01

    Enteric bacteria, including stocked strains of pathogenic species and organisms naturally present in the stream, were capable of growth in a chemostat with autoclaved river water taken 750 m below a sewage outfall. Maximal specific growth rates for all organisms occurred at 30 C, whereas culture generation times ranged between 33.3 and 116 hr. Of the six laboratory strains of enteric species used, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes grew at generation times of 34.5 and 33.3 hr, respectively, while the remaining Proteus, Arizona, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. reproduced at a rate two to three times slower than the coliforms. Little or no growth occurred in the water at incubation temperatures of 20 and 5 C, and death was observed for Salmonella senftenberg at 20 and 5 C and for E. aerogenes and Proteus rettgeri at 5 C. When enteric bacteria naturally present in the river water were employed in similar experiments, coliform bacteria demonstrated a generation time of approximately 116 hr, whereas fecal coliforms failed to grow. Growth of the bacteria from the river demonstrated a periodicity of approximately 100 hr, which suggests that much of the growth of these organisms in the chemostat may be on the glass surfaces. This phenomenon, however, was not observed with any of the stocked enteric species. Neither the stock cultures nor the aquatic strains were capable of growth in autoclaved river water taken above the sewage outfall at the three temperatures tested.

  4. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  5. Postoperative bezoar ileus after early enteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Dedes, Konstantin J; Schiesser, Marc; Schäfer, Markus; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-01-01

    Postoperative enteral nutrition is a widely accepted route of application for nutrition formulas due to a low complication rate, a good acceptance by patients. and a favorable cost-effectiveness. We report three cases of bezoar ileus after early postoperative enteral nutrition, using a fine needle jejunostomy (FNJ) in two cases and a nasoduodenal tube in one case. A male patient who underwent gastric resection for a gastrointestinal stroma tumor and was nourished through an fine needle jejunostomy developed an acute abdomen on the seventh postoperative day. Surgical exploration revealed a mechanical ileus caused by denaturated nutrition formula distal to the catheter tip. The second case, a female patient, underwent gastric resection for a gastric cancer and on the fourth postoperative day developed acute onset of abdominal pain. Intraoperative findings were the same as described in the first case. The third case, a male patient with necrotizing cholecystitis, underwent open cholecystectomy. Postoperative enteral feeding was performed using a nasoduodenal tube. He developed a small bowel obstruction on the 17th postoperative day that was caused by an intraluminal bezoar. In conclusion, bezoar formation represents an underestimated complication of postoperative enteral feeding. Acute onset of abdominal pain and the development of small bowel obstruction are the main clinical symptoms of this severe complication. The pathogenesis of bezoar formation remains unclear.

  6. New insights into environmental enteric dysfunction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) has been recognised as an important contributing factor to physical and cognitive stunting, poor response to oral vaccines, limited resilience to acute infections and ultimately global childhood mortality. The aetiology of EED remains poorly defined but the ep...

  7. [Enteral alimentation at home: why PEG now?].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Hanyu, N; Kashiwagi, H; Kubo, T; Aoki, T

    1996-12-01

    The history of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is relatively short. In 1980, a report entitled "Gastrostomy without laparotomy: A percutaneous endoscopic technique" by Ponsky and Gaudere was first published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Thereafter, PEG soon saw widespread use in Western countries because of its clinical efficacy and economy. It has been performed in about 170,000 cases annually in the US. In contrast, its spread in Japan has been extremely slow: only about 10,000 cases have undergone this procedure annually, and this number accounted for less than 5% of patients receiving enteral alimentation. The reason why PEG has not spread may be the medical insurance system in Japan and the local distaste for operation scarring. However, in consideration of the unprecedented ageing of society that is surely coming in the near future, the role of PEG in Japan must be reexamined. In this report, we presented the methodology of enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG, giving special consideration to: (1) "What points are improved by using enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG in various diseases; (2) dysphagia due to cerebral angiopathy; (3) terminal cancer; (4) otolaryngological diseases; and (5) Crohn disease. We also discussed "Why PEG is important now?" in performing enteral alimentation at home.

  8. Neonatal enteral feeding tubes as loci for colonisation by members of the Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine whether neonatal nasogastric enteral feeding tubes are colonised by the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii) and other Enterobacteriaceae, and whether their presence was influenced by the feeding regime. Methods One hundred and twenty-nine tubes were collected from two neonatal intensive care units (NICU). A questionnaire on feeding regime was completed with each sample. Enterobacteriaceae present in the tubes were identified using conventional and molecular methods, and their antibiograms determined. Results The neonates were fed breast milk (16%), fortified breast milk (28%), ready to feed formula (20%), reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF, 6%), or a mixture of these (21%). Eight percent of tubes were received from neonates who were 'nil by mouth'. Organisms were isolated from 76% of enteral feeding tubes as a biofilm (up to 107 cfu/tube from neonates fed fortified breast milk and reconstituted PIF) and in the residual lumen liquid (up to 107 Enterobacteriaceae cfu/ml, average volume 250 μl). The most common isolates were Enterobacter cancerogenus (41%), Serratia marcescens (36%), E. hormaechei (33%), Escherichia coli (29%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (25%), Raoultella terrigena (10%), and S. liquefaciens (12%). Other organisms isolated included C. sakazakii (2%),Yersinia enterocolitica (1%),Citrobacter freundii (1%), E. vulneris (1%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (1%), and P. luteola (1%). The enteral feeding tubes were in place between < 6 h (22%) to > 48 h (13%). All the S. marcescens isolates from the enteral feeding tubes were resistant to amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav. Of additional importance was that a quarter of E. hormaechei isolates were resistant to the 3rd generation cephalosporins ceftazidime and cefotaxime. During the period of the study, K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens caused infections in the two NICUs. Conclusion This study shows that neonatal enteral feeding tubes

  9. [Enteral nutrition in the multiple trauma patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    The hypermetabolism that develops in patients with severe polytraumatism has led to the need for an aggressive metabolic-nutritional support from the start. Parenteral Nutrition is the preferred technique in many instances, due to the doubts on the effectiveness of enteral nutrition in the control of the metabolic response and to problems of gastrointestinal tolerance derived from its administration. However, the role of enteral nutrition as an important factor which limits the development of bacterial translocation and the chain of events leading to multiorganic failure appears to be more and more well-established and is an important argument for justifying the early administration of enteral nutrition in these patients. In accordance with the accumulated experience of several authors over the past few years, enteral nutrition may be administered early in polytraumatized patients. This is not only accompanied by the evidence of acceptable gastrointestinal tolerance to the diet, but also by additional advantages compared to parenteral nutrition, such as the maintenance of trophism and immunocompetence of the digestive mucosa, the reduction of septic complications and also greater nutritional effectiveness which can be evaluated by the behaviour of the seric proteins used as nutritional evolution markers. The interest of the different diet formulae which exist at present, for example diets enriched with branched-chain amino acids, diets with added fibre, peptidic diets, specific pulmonary diets or "euglycaemic diets" is evaluated in this review. All these diets may mean an increase in the effectiveness and/or tolerance of enteral nutrition in polytraumatized patients, and also contribute to the handling of specific problems such as "stress" hyperglycaemia or the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation support. The use of specific nutrients for the digestive mucosa, such as glutamine or short chain fatty acids seems to be an important factor in the reduction of

  10. Dopa responsive burning mouth syndrome: restless mouth syndrome or oral variant of restless legs syndrome?

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sanjay; Ahuja, Sunil; Rathod, Chirag

    2012-09-15

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an oral dysesthesia presenting as a burning sensation of the tongue and other oral and perioral mucosae. A painful symptomatology in different bodily regions (extraoral) may also be a common feature in patient with BMS. The management of BMS is challenging and there is no clear guideline for the management of idiopathic BMS. Herein, we describe a group of patients (5 patients) in whom symptoms of BMS responded to levodopa. In parallel, four patients fulfilled the criteria for restless legs syndrome (RLS). Family history of RLS was positive in two patients. We reviewed the literature and noted a marked overlap between BMS and RLS. Overlaps were noted in epidemiological profiles, pattern of clinical features and even in neurophysiological observations (alterations in the striatal dopaminergic system). We suggest that a subset of patients with BMS may be a phenotypic variant of RLS and a trial of dopaminergic drugs should be given in patients with BMS who has a history suggestive of RLS or in a patient who do not show a response to usual therapies for BMS.

  11. Aquaporin-4 Water Channels in Enteric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thi, Mia M.; Spray, David C.; Hanani, Menachem

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 is a water channel predominantly found in astrocytes in the central nervous system and is believed to play a critical role in the formation and maintenance of the blood–brain barrier and in water secretion from the brain. As enteric glial cells were found to share several similarities with astrocytes, we hypothesized that enteric glia might also contain aquaporin-4. We used immunohistochemistry to identify aquaporin-4 in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the mouse and the rat colon. We found that sub-populations of neurons in both enteric plexuses were positively labeled for human aquaporin-4. Double staining of the enteric ganglia with antibodies to the neuronal marker neurofilament–heavy chain 100 and to aquaporin-4 showed that a minority of myenteric neurons were aquaporin-4 positive (about 12% in the mouse and 13% in the rat). In contrast, in the submucosal plexus significant numbers of neurons were positive for aquaporin-4 (about 79% in both the mouse and the rat). Double labeling for aquaporin-4 and for the glial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein verified that glial cells were not immunoreactive to aquaporin-4. We further confirmed our findings with additional aquaporin-4 antibodies and Western blot analysis. We found that, in addition to expressing aquaporin-4, the myenteric plexus and, to a greater extent, the submucosal plexus both expressed aquaporin-1. We conclude that neurons rather than glial cells contain aquaporin-4 in the colonic enteric plexuses. It is known that submucosal neurons control transport processes in the intestinal mucosa, and the high percentage of aquaporin-4-postive sub-mucosal neurons suggests that aquaporin-4 contributes to this function. PMID:17893913

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease: global status and Indian perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and transboundary viral disease of domesticated and wild cloven-hoofed animals. Wide prevalence of the disease in Asia and Africa associated with huge economic loss to the livestock farming and industry has increased the concern worldwide. The di...

  13. Acoustic rhinometry in mouth breathing patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira de Camargo; Cavalcanti, Arlene Santos; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2015-01-01

    When there is a change in the physiological pattern of nasal breathing, mouth breathing may already be present. The diagnosis of mouth breathing is related to nasal patency. One way to access nasal patency is by acoustic rhinometry. To systematically review the effectiveness of acoustic rhinometry for the diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. Electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed and Bireme, SciELO, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Science Direct, from August to December 2013, were consulted. 11,439 articles were found: 30 from LILACS, 54 from MEDLINE via Bireme, 5558 from MEDLINE via PubMed, 11 from SciELO, 2056 from Web of Science, 1734 from Scopus, 13 from PsycInfo, 1108 from CINAHL, and 875 from Science Direct. Of these, two articles were selected. The heterogeneity in the use of equipment and materials for the assessment of respiratory mode in these studies reveals that there is not yet consensus in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. According to the articles, acoustic rhinometry has been used for almost twenty years, but controlled studies attesting to the efficacy of measuring the geometry of nasal cavities for complementary diagnosis of respiratory mode are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. An overview of burning mouth syndrome for the dermatologist.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A K; Prime, S S; Cohen, S N

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an idiopathic burning pain affecting the oral mucosa, with no clinically apparent changes. It can present to a variety of health professionals including dermatologists. This article summarizes the important aspects of the condition, including theories of pathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

  15. 4. General view of mouth of headworks and walkway to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. General view of mouth of headworks and walkway to headgate house, looking west. Tramway car, used for repairing dam, is to the right. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  16. 3. General view from mouth of raceway showing east and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view from mouth of raceway showing east and north facades of Wilder Mill, Building No. 6, with pedestrian bridge in foreground; view to west. - Champion-International Paper Company, Wilder Mill, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  17. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Preliminarily Diagnosed as Hypochondriasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Michael Jay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A case in which a dental student with hand, foot, and mouth disease was told he had "medical student disease" (MSD), or hypochondriasis, is related; literature pertaining to the occurrence and treatment of MSD is reviewed, and the importance of care in approaches to both students and patients are discussed. (MSE)

  18. Study of Airflow Out of the Mouth During Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catford, J.C.; And Others

    Airflow outside the mouth is diagnostic of articulatory activities in the vocal tract, both total volume-velocity and the distribution of particle velocities over the flow-front being useful for this purpose. A system for recording and displaying both these types of information is described. This consists of a matrix of l6 hot-wire anemometer flow…

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease in tropical wildlife.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2004-10-01

    This review of foot-and-mouth disease in cloven-hoofed, free-living animals, describes the disease, the wide range of the hosts, the carrier state, and the interrelationship between disease in domestic livestock and wildlife. This information becomes even more crucial to the development of control strategies when linked to the process of pathogenesis and the epidemiology of the disease.

  20. Coxsackievirus A6 and hand, foot, and mouth disease, Finland.

    PubMed

    Osterback, Riikka; Vuorinen, Tytti; Linna, Mervi; Susi, Petri; Hyypiä, Timo; Waris, Matti

    2009-09-01

    During fall 2008, an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with onychomadesis (nail shedding) as a common feature occurred in Finland. We identified an unusual enterovirus type, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6), as the causative agent. CVA6 infections may be emerging as a new and major cause of epidemic HFMD.

  1. Coxsackievirus A6 and Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Österback, Riikka; Vuorinen, Tytti; Linna, Mervi; Susi, Petri; Hyypiä, Timo

    2009-01-01

    During fall 2008, an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with onychomadesis (nail shedding) as a common feature occurred in Finland. We identified an unusual enterovirus type, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6), as the causative agent. CVA6 infections may be emerging as a new and major cause of epidemic HFMD. PMID:19788821

  2. Children's exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) through mouthing toys.

    PubMed

    Ionas, Alin C; Ulevicus, Jocelyn; Gómez, Ana Ballesteros; Brandsma, Sicco H; Leonards, Pim E G; van de Bor, Margot; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have previously been detected in children toys, yet the risk of child exposure to these chemicals through the mouthing of toys or other items is still unknown. We aimed to expand on the current knowledge by investigating the impact of infants' mouthing activities on exposure to PBDEs present in toys. This was established by a leaching model for determining the amount PBDEs that can leach from toys into saliva in simulated conditions. The PBDE migration rate was at its highest for the 15 min low-exposure scenario incubations (198 pg/cm(2) × min) with the ERM EC-591 certified reference material (CRM) (0.17% w/w PBDEs). The leaching process was congener-dependent, since the percentage of lower brominated PBDE congeners that leached out was up to 4.5 times higher than for the heavier PBDEs. To study the scenario in which a child would mouth on a toy flame retarded with BDE 209 alone, a plastic item containing 7% BDE 209 (w/w) was also tested. The BDE 209 amounts leached out in only 15 min were higher than the amounts leached from the CRM after the 16 h incubation. For the Belgian population, the exposure scenario from mouthing on toys containing PBDEs in amounts similar to the REACH threshold was found to be lower than the exposure from mother's milk, but higher than the exposure through diet or even dust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 1. Aerial view, looking east towards Rose Island and mouth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial view, looking east towards Rose Island and mouth of Narraganset Bay. Fort Adams is in background. The "dumplings" are to the right. Fort Wolcott was to the left. These four sites worked together to guard the entrance to Narraganset Bay and Newport Harbor. - Fort Hamilton, Rose Island, Newport, Newport County, RI

  4. Oral manifestations of "meth mouth": a case report.

    PubMed

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the documentation of this clinical case is to make clinicians aware of "meth mouth" and the medical risks associated with this serious condition. Methamphetamine is a very addictive, powerful stimulant that increases wakefulness and physical activity and can produce other effects such as cardiac dysrhythmias, hypertension, hallucinations, and violent behavior. Dental patients abusing methamphetamine can present with poor oral hygiene, xerostomia, rampant caries ("meth mouth"), and excessive tooth wear. Oral rehabilitation of patients using methamphetamine can be challenging. A 30-year-old Caucasian woman presented with dental pain, bad breath, and self-reported poor esthetics. A comprehensive examination including her medical history, panoramic radiograph, and intraoral examination revealed 19 carious lesions, which is not very common for a healthy adult. She reported her use of methamphetamine for five years and had not experienced any major carious episodes before she started using the drug. The patient's medical and dental histories along with radiographic and clinical findings lead to a diagnosis of "meth mouth." Although three different dental treatment modalities (either conventional or implant-supported) have been offered to the patient since August 2007, the patient has yet to initiate any treatment. This clinical case showing oral manifestations of meth mouth was presented to help dental practitioners recognize and manage patients who may be abusing methamphetamines. Dental practitioners also may be skeptical about the reliability of appointment keeping by these patients, as they frequently miss their appointments without reasonable justification.

  5. 2. Detail gate spanning mouth of dry dock between Piers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Detail gate spanning mouth of dry dock between Piers 10 and 11, view is to southwest, with Pier 10 in distance left. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  6. 7. View from gate spanning mouth of Dry Dock 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View from gate spanning mouth of Dry Dock 5, showing (1-r) north wall of Pier 10 and south wall of Pier 11. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. Hand to Mouth: Automatic Imitation across Effector Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jane; Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    The effector dependence of automatic imitation was investigated using a stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) procedure during which participants were required to make an open or closed response with their hand or their mouth. The correct response for each trial was indicated by a pair of letters in Experiments 1 and 2 and by a colored square in…

  8. Oral pain perception and taste in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Just, T; Steiner, S; Pau, H W

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of idiopathic burning mouth syndrome (BMS) on both, the pain perception within trigeminal lingual nerve distribution and gustatory sensitivity using capsaicin threshold test, and regional taste tests, respectively. Pain thresholds for capsaicin were assessed using capsaicin-impregnated filter-paper strips. The strips were placed midline on the tongue tip for whole mouth testing with the mouth closed, and on the left or right edge of the extended anterior tongue for lateralized testing. Measures of gustatory function were obtained by validated "taste strips" test kit and electrogustometry. The tests were applied to 13 patients with BMS. Results were compared with those from 28 healthy subjects. Patients with BMS exhibited a decreased gustatory and somatosensory perception compared with healthy controls. These changes were found for lateralized tests but not for the whole mouth test procedure. Duration of disorder showed an effect on the capsaicin threshold, with patients being less sensitive to capsaicin exhibiting an increased duration of disorder. Both pain-related and gustatory sensitivies of the tongue are found to be decreased in BMS.

  9. Keep Kids' Mouths Healthy: Brush 2min2X

    MedlinePlus

    ... your kids brush for 2 minutes, twice a day. En Español facebook twitter Kids’ Healthy Mouths ... about dental visits Floss Every Day Floss Every Day As soon as two teeth touch each other ( ...

  10. Stomatal Patterning: SERKs Put the Mouths in Their Right Place.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alice Y; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-10-05

    Plants have stomata, mouth-like pores on their surface, to adjust to environmental changes such as temperature and humidity to ensure optimum physiology and metabolism. A new study adds a key player, SERK, to the signal-sensing apparatus to inform where stomata are to be formed on the leaf. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Nick J; Wadsworth, Jemma; Reid, Scott M; Swabey, Katherine G; El-Kholy, Alaa A; Abd El-Rahman, Adel Omar; Soliman, Hatem M; Ebert, Katja; Ferris, Nigel P; Hutchings, Geoffrey H; Statham, Robert J; King, Donald P; Paton, David J

    2007-10-01

    We describe the characterization of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) serotype A virus responsible for recent outbreaks of disease in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 nucleotide sequences demonstrated a close relationship to recent FMD virus isolates from East Africa, rather than to viruses currently circulating in the Middle East.

  12. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype A in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Jemma; Reid, Scott M.; Swabey, Katherine G.; El-Kholy, Alaa A.; El-Rahman, Adel Omar Abd; Soliman, Hatem M.; Ebert, Katja; Ferris, Nigel P.; Hutchings, Geoffrey H.; Statham, Robert J.; King, Donald P.; Paton, David J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) serotype A virus responsible for recent outbreaks of disease in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 nucleotide sequences demonstrated a close relationship to recent FMD virus isolates from East Africa, rather than to viruses currently circulating in the Middle East. PMID:18258017

  13. A foreign body in the floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Ehab; Moussa, Kholoud; Al-Gorashi, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    A case of unusual presentation of foreign body in the floor of mouth is reported. The patient presented with a history and clinical findings of sublingual ranula. Marsupialisation and sublingual sialadenectomy was planned. After marsupialisation, a foreign body (spray cover) was found between the lumen of the submandibular duct and the ranula. PMID:23960490

  14. Mouth of the Amazon River as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A near-nadir view of the mouth of the Amazon River, that shows all signs of being a relatively healthy system, breathing and exhaling. The well-developed cumulus field over the forested areas on both the north and south sides of the river (the view is slightly to the west) shows that good evapotranspiration is underway.

  15. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...

  16. The pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The greatest segment of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies that are specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental invest...

  17. Estimation of hand-to-mouth transfer efficiency of lead.

    PubMed

    Sahmel, Jennifer; Hsu, Elleen I; Avens, Heather J; Beckett, Evan M; Devlin, Kathryn D

    2015-03-01

    There are currently no published empirical data that characterize hand-to-mouth transfer efficiencies for metallic lead. The purpose of this study was to quantify the hand-to-mouth transfer efficiency of lead in adult volunteers (n = 6) using human saliva as a surrogate for the mouth and commercially available, 100% lead fishing weights as the source of lead for dermal loading. Study volunteers' saliva was collected and subsequently poured onto a sheet of wax paper placed on a balance scale. The volunteers handled lead fishing weights with both hands for approximately 15 s and then pressed three fingers from the right hand (test hand) into their saliva 10 times, with ~0.45kg of pressure. The left hand (control hand) was used as a comparison for dermal loading of lead and had no contact with saliva. SKC Full Disclosure® wipes were used to collect lead from the saliva and skin surfaces. Samples were analyzed using the NIOSH 7300 method, which was modified for wipes. The mean lead skin-to-saliva transfer efficiency was 24% (range: 12-34%). These data will be useful for more accurately characterizing lead hand-to-mouth transfer efficiencies and are likely to be helpful in exposure assessments or human health risk assessments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  18. Hand to Mouth: Automatic Imitation across Effector Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jane; Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    The effector dependence of automatic imitation was investigated using a stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) procedure during which participants were required to make an open or closed response with their hand or their mouth. The correct response for each trial was indicated by a pair of letters in Experiments 1 and 2 and by a colored square in…

  19. GT-9A - EARTH SKY - BRAZIL - MOUTH OF AMAZON

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-04

    S66-38191 (4 June 1966) --- The mouth of the Amazon River on the northern coast of Brazil, looking southwest, as seen from the Gemini-9A spacecraft during its 18th revolution of Earth. The image was taken with a 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Historic view entitled "FORT PULASKI (/) MOUTH OF SAVANNAH RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic view entitled "FORT PULASKI (/) MOUTH OF SAVANNAH RIVER AND TYBEE ISLAND, GA.," of 48th NY infantry on the south wall looking to the southeast corner (note: cockspur beacon in near background and Tybee Island in far background) - Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  1. Efficacy of a single dose of oral antibiotic given within two hours of birth in preventing watery mouth disease and illthrift in colostrum-deficient lambs.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, J C; Brebner, J; Mckendrick, I J

    1999-07-17

    An antibiotic with a product licence limited to the treatment and control of infectious bacterial enteritis associated with Escherichia coli in piglets was tested for its ability to control watery mouth disease in neonatal lambs. Three groups of lambs were kept in conditions commonly encountered in intensive lambing systems, where high levels of environmental bacterial contamination may be expected. They were allocated at birth to: a control group (group 1) consisting of 18 colostrum-deprived lambs; group 2, consisting of 17 lambs given one feed of colostrum when they were two hours old; and group 3, consisting of 18 colostrum-deprived lambs given spectinomycin orally when they were two hours old. Nine group 1 lambs became diseased and were killed for humane reasons. Blood biochemical changes included hyperglycaemia followed by hypoglycaemia, lactacidaemia, hypoproteinaemia and metabolic acidosis, and postmortem examination of the diseased lambs showed signs consistent with endotoxaemia and a clinical diagnosis of watery mouth disease. Coliforms were isolated from the blood of all group 1 lambs and from half the lambs in groups 2 and 3, but endotoxaemia and watery mouth disease occurred only in group 1 lambs. The results for groups 2 and 3 showed that neither colostrum nor antibiotic at the rates and frequency used prevented bacteraemia, although consecutive samples were positive only on three occasions. Group 3 lambs consistently grew more rapidly than the surviving group 1 lambs and as rapidly as group 2 lambs. There was no evidence that male lambs were more prone to watery mouth disease than female lambs. The results indicated that the antibiotic spectinomycin did not induce endotoxaemia during low-grade bacteraemia and that a single oral dose given within two hours of birth protected colostrum-deprived lambs delivered into a contaminated indoor environment against watery mouth disease.

  2. Preventing root caries development under oral biofilm challenge in an artificial mouth.

    PubMed

    Mei, May-Lei; Chu, Chun-Hung; Lo, Edward-Chin-Man; Samaranayake, Lakshman-Perera

    2013-07-01

    To study the preventive effects of chlorhexidine against root caries under oral biofilm in an artificial mouth. Sixteen human tooth-root disks were inoculated with a salivary sample that was produced by mixing the unstimulated saliva of three adults who had no untreated caries. The disks were incubated in an artificial mouth fed with a 5% sucrose solution three times daily for one week. Eight disks received a twice daily rinse of 0.12% chlorhexidine (test group). The other eight disks were rinsed in distilled water (control). The biofilm was then studied with three techniques: colony forming unit (CFU) counting, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The changes in the chemical structure of the root surface were studied using Fourier transform infra-Red spectroscopy. Type-I collagen and proteoglycans on the root surface were quantified using immunocytochemical staining. The log CFU for the test and control groups were 4.21 and 8.27, respectively (p<0.001). The CFU count of Streptococci and Lactobacilli were negligible. Both the SEM and the CLSM showed suppressed bacteria growth in the test group. The log [amide-I: HPO(4)(2-)] of the test and control groups were 1.11 and 1.93, respectively (p=0.02). The mean counts of sound type-I collagen in the test and control groups were 16.8/μm(2) and 13.0/μm(2), respectively (p<0.001), whereas the mean counts of intact proteoglycans were 5.6/μm(2) and 3.5/μm(2), respectively (P<0.001). Chlorhexidine suppressed the growth of selected cariogenic bacteria in oral biofilm on the root surface and thus protected tooth-root from cariogenic challenge.

  3. Interventions for the management of dry mouth: topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Furness, Susan; Worthington, Helen V; Bryan, Gemma; Birchenough, Sarah; McMillan, Roddy

    2011-12-07

    Xerostomia (the feeling of dry mouth) is a common symptom especially in older adults. Causes of dry mouth include medications, autoimmune disease (Sjögren's Syndrome), radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer, hormone disorders and infections. To determine which topical treatments for dry mouth are effective in reducing this symptom. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (28 October 2011), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4 2011), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 28 October 2011), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 28 October 2011), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 28 October 2011), AMED via OVID (1985 to 28 October 2011), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 28 October 2011). We included randomised controlled trials of topical interventions such as lozenges, sprays, mouthrinses, gels, oils, chewing gum or toothpastes for the treatment of dry mouth symptom. We classified interventions into two broad categories, saliva stimulants and saliva substitutes, and these were compared with either placebo or another intervention. We included both parallel group and crossover trials. Two or more review authors independently carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. Trial authors were contacted for additional information as required. Thirty-six randomised controlled trials involving 1597 participants met the inclusion criteria. Two trials compared saliva stimulants to placebo, nine trials compared saliva substitutes to placebo, five trials compared saliva stimulants directly with saliva substitutes, 18 trials directly compared two or more saliva substitutes, and two trials directly compared two or more saliva stimulants. Only one trial was at low risk of bias and 17 were at high risk of bias. Due to the range of interventions, comparisons and outcome measures in the trials, meta-analysis was possible for only a few comparisons. Oxygenated glycerol triester (OGT) saliva substitute

  4. Postural disorders in mouth breathing children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neiva, Patricia Dayrell; Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Mendes, Polyana Leite; Zabjek, Karl; Becker, Helena Gonçalves; Mathur, Sunita

    2017-07-05

    Mouth breathing syndrome can cause sleep disturbances that compromise the performance of children in school. It might also cause postural abnormalities involving the head and cervical spine; however, the association between postural abnormalities and mouth breathing in children is unclear. To assess the methodological quality of studies and determine if there is an association between mouth breathing and postural disorders in children. Databases comprised MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, LILACS, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Registrar of Controlled Trials. Searches were until March 2016 and included studies that evaluated postural disorders in children diagnosed with mouth breathing. The Downs and Black checklist was used to evaluate the quality of the evidences. Ten studies were included totaling 417 children from 5 to 14 years. Two studies used the New York State Postural Rating Scale, seven used photography and one used motion capture to measure posture. The methods used to analyze the data included the Postural Analysis Software (SAPO), Fisiometer, ALCimagem and routines in MATLAB program. Quality assessment resulted in low scores (<14) for all the studies. The main areas of weakness were a clear description of the participants, of the methods used to access posture, of the principal confounders and lack of power analysis. External and internal validity were also threatened by the lack of a representative sample and blinding of the participants and assessors, respectively. The review provides low evidence that mouth-breathing pattern in children between the ages 5-14 years is associated with postural deviations. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro effect of chlorhexidine mouth rinses on polyspecies biofilms.

    PubMed

    Guggenheim, Bernhard; Meier, Andräé

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Zurich polyspecies biofilm model to compare the antimicrobial effects of chlorhexidine mouth rinses available on the Swiss market. As positive and negative controls, aqueous 0.15% CHX solution and water were used, respectively. In addition, Listerine® without CHX was tested. Biofilms in batch culture were grown in 24- well polystyrene tissue culture plates on hydroxyapatite discs in 70% mixed (1:1 diluted) unstimulated saliva and 30% complex culture medium. During the 64.5-hour culturing period, the biofilms were exposed to the test solutions for 1 minute twice a day on two subsequent days. Thereafter, the biofilms were dip-washed 3 times in physiological NaCl. Following the last exposure, the incubation of biofilms was continued for another 16 h. They were then harvested at 64.5 h. The dispersed biofilms were plated on 2 agar media. After incubation, colonies (CFU) were counted. All solutions containing CHX as well as Listerine ® significantly reduced the number of microorganisms in biofilms. According to their efficacy, the mouth rinses were classified into 2 groups. The two Curasept ADS solutions, Parodentosan, and the Listerine® mouth rinse reduced the number of total CFU by 3 log10 steps. This seems sufficient for a long-lasting prophylactic application. The two PlakOut® mouth rinses and the CHX control fell into the other group, where the number of CFU was reduced by 7 log10 steps. These mouth rinses are predestined for short-term therapeutic use. However, reversible side effects must be taken into account. It has thus far not been possible to formulate CHX products with effective ADS (Anti Discoloration System) additives without reducing antimicrobial activity.

  6. Carbohydrate mouth rinse enhances time to exhaustion during treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Cindy; Velasques, Bruna; Koch, Alexander J; Machado, Marco; Paulucio, Dailson; Ribeiro, Pedro; Pompeu, Fernando Augusto Monteiro Saboia

    2017-01-01

    Mouth rinsing with a CHO solution has been suggested to improve short (<1 h) endurance performance through central effect. We examined the effects of mouth rinsing with a CHO solution on running time to exhaustion on a treadmill. Six well-trained subjects ran to exhaustion at 85% VO2max , on three separate occasions. Subjects received either an 8% CHO solution or a placebo (PLA) every 15 min to mouth rinse (MR) or a 6% CHO solution to ingest (ING). Treatments were assigned in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion, with the mouth-rinsing treatments double-blinded. Blood samples were taken to assess glucose (Glu) and lactate (Lac), as well as the perceived exertion (RPE). Gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were collected during all trials. Subjects ran longer (P = 0·038) in both the MR (2583 ± 686 s) and ING (2625 ± 804 s) trials, compared to PLA (1935 ± 809 s), covering a greater distance (MR 9685 ± 3511·62 m; ING 9855 ± 4118·62; PLA 7295 ± 3727 m). RER was significantly higher in both ING and MR versus PLA. No difference among trials was observed for other metabolic or cardiovascular variables (VO2 , Lac, Glu, HR), nor for RPE. Endurance capacity, based on time to exhaustion on a treadmill, was improved when either mouth rinsing or ingesting a CHO solution, compared to PLA.

  7. Classification of mouth movements using 7 T fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleichner, M. G.; Jansma, J. M.; Salari, E.; Freudenburg, Z. V.; Raemaekers, M.; Ramsey, N. F.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. A brain-computer interface (BCI) is an interface that uses signals from the brain to control a computer. BCIs will likely become important tools for severely paralyzed patients to restore interaction with the environment. The sensorimotor cortex is a promising target brain region for a BCI due to the detailed topography and minimal functional interference with other important brain processes. Previous studies have shown that attempted movements in paralyzed people generate neural activity that strongly resembles actual movements. Hence decodability for BCI applications can be studied in able-bodied volunteers with actual movements. Approach. In this study we tested whether mouth movements provide adequate signals in the sensorimotor cortex for a BCI. The study was executed using fMRI at 7 T to ensure relevance for BCI with cortical electrodes, as 7 T measurements have been shown to correlate well with electrocortical measurements. Twelve healthy volunteers executed four mouth movements (lip protrusion, tongue movement, teeth clenching, and the production of a larynx activating sound) while in the scanner. Subjects performed a training and a test run. Single trials were classified based on the Pearson correlation values between the activation patterns per trial type in the training run and single trials in the test run in a ‘winner-takes-all’ design. Main results. Single trial mouth movements could be classified with 90% accuracy. The classification was based on an area with a volume of about 0.5 cc, located on the sensorimotor cortex. If voxels were limited to the surface, which is accessible for electrode grids, classification accuracy was still very high (82%). Voxels located on the precentral cortex performed better (87%) than the postcentral cortex (72%). Significance. The high reliability of decoding mouth movements suggests that attempted mouth movements are a promising candidate for BCI in paralyzed people.

  8. Classification of mouth movements using 7 T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bleichner, M G; Jansma, J M; Salari, E; Freudenburg, Z V; Raemaekers, M; Ramsey, N F

    2015-12-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is an interface that uses signals from the brain to control a computer. BCIs will likely become important tools for severely paralyzed patients to restore interaction with the environment. The sensorimotor cortex is a promising target brain region for a BCI due to the detailed topography and minimal functional interference with other important brain processes. Previous studies have shown that attempted movements in paralyzed people generate neural activity that strongly resembles actual movements. Hence decodability for BCI applications can be studied in able-bodied volunteers with actual movements. In this study we tested whether mouth movements provide adequate signals in the sensorimotor cortex for a BCI. The study was executed using fMRI at 7 T to ensure relevance for BCI with cortical electrodes, as 7 T measurements have been shown to correlate well with electrocortical measurements. Twelve healthy volunteers executed four mouth movements (lip protrusion, tongue movement, teeth clenching, and the production of a larynx activating sound) while in the scanner. Subjects performed a training and a test run. Single trials were classified based on the Pearson correlation values between the activation patterns per trial type in the training run and single trials in the test run in a 'winner-takes-all' design. Single trial mouth movements could be classified with 90% accuracy. The classification was based on an area with a volume of about 0.5 cc, located on the sensorimotor cortex. If voxels were limited to the surface, which is accessible for electrode grids, classification accuracy was still very high (82%). Voxels located on the precentral cortex performed better (87%) than the postcentral cortex (72%). The high reliability of decoding mouth movements suggests that attempted mouth movements are a promising candidate for BCI in paralyzed people.

  9. 46 CFR 111.81-3 - Cables entering boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cables entering boxes. 111.81-3 Section 111.81-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Outlet Boxes and Junction Boxes § 111.81-3 Cables entering boxes. Each cable entering... through which a conductor enters must be closed. (b) Cable armor must be secured to the box or fitting. (c...

  10. 46 CFR 111.81-3 - Cables entering boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cables entering boxes. 111.81-3 Section 111.81-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Outlet Boxes and Junction Boxes § 111.81-3 Cables entering boxes. Each cable entering... through which a conductor enters must be closed. (b) Cable armor must be secured to the box or fitting. (c...

  11. 46 CFR 111.81-3 - Cables entering boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cables entering boxes. 111.81-3 Section 111.81-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Outlet Boxes and Junction Boxes § 111.81-3 Cables entering boxes. Each cable entering... through which a conductor enters must be closed. (b) Cable armor must be secured to the box or fitting. (c...

  12. 46 CFR 111.81-3 - Cables entering boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cables entering boxes. 111.81-3 Section 111.81-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Outlet Boxes and Junction Boxes § 111.81-3 Cables entering boxes. Each cable entering... through which a conductor enters must be closed. (b) Cable armor must be secured to the box or fitting. (c...

  13. 46 CFR 111.81-3 - Cables entering boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cables entering boxes. 111.81-3 Section 111.81-3...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Outlet Boxes and Junction Boxes § 111.81-3 Cables entering boxes. Each cable entering... through which a conductor enters must be closed. (b) Cable armor must be secured to the box or fitting. (c...

  14. Meth mouth severity in response to drug-use patterns and dental access in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronni E; Morisky, Donald E; Silverstein, Steven J

    2013-06-01

    Meth mouth is the rapid development of tooth decay in methamphetamine users. Our study questioned whether drug-use patterns and dental care access are risk factors affecting the severity of meth mouth. Participants received dental examinations, and the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) were counted and used to measure meth mouth severity.

  15. The Effects of Hunger on Hand-Mouth Coordination in Newborn Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Adina R.; Butterworth, George

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects of hunger on the hand-mouth (HM) behavior of a group of newborn infants. Found that significantly more mouth opening before contacts to the mouth than those to the face occurred before but not after feeding, suggesting some link between HM behavior and hunger state. (MDM)

  16. The Effects of Hunger on Hand-Mouth Coordination in Newborn Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Adina R.; Butterworth, George

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects of hunger on the hand-mouth (HM) behavior of a group of newborn infants. Found that significantly more mouth opening before contacts to the mouth than those to the face occurred before but not after feeding, suggesting some link between HM behavior and hunger state. (MDM)

  17. 33 CFR 207.270 - Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. 207.270 Section 207.270 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. (a) The floating of “sack”, rafts, or of... River, Miss., between Batesville, Panola County, Miss., and the mouth. ...

  18. 33 CFR 207.270 - Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. 207.270 Section 207.270 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. (a) The floating of “sack”, rafts, or of... River, Miss., between Batesville, Panola County, Miss., and the mouth. ...

  19. 33 CFR 207.270 - Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. 207.270 Section 207.270 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. (a) The floating of “sack”, rafts, or of... River, Miss., between Batesville, Panola County, Miss., and the mouth. ...

  20. 33 CFR 207.270 - Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. 207.270 Section 207.270 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. (a) The floating of “sack”, rafts, or of... River, Miss., between Batesville, Panola County, Miss., and the mouth. ...

  1. 33 CFR 207.270 - Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. 207.270 Section 207.270 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Tallahatchie River, Miss., between Batesville and the mouth; logging. (a) The floating of “sack”, rafts, or of... River, Miss., between Batesville, Panola County, Miss., and the mouth. ...

  2. Clinical evaluation of the effect of a hydrogen peroxide mouth rinse, sodium bicarbonate dentifrice, and mouth moisturizer on oral health.

    PubMed

    Shibly, O; Ciancio, S G; Kazmierczak, M; Cohen, R E; Mather, M L; Ho, A; Bessinger, M

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this 60-day single-blind, parallel trial, using 150 subjects, was to evaluate the effect of a 20% sodium bicarbonate dentifrice, a 1.5% hydrogen peroxide solution and a mouth moisturizer on oral tissues and microflora. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups. The treatments were: 1) Sage dentifrice (sodium bicarbonate). Toothette Plus containing baking soda saturated with the hydrogen peroxide solution and use of a mouth moisturizer, 2) Crest dentifrice, Toothette Plus containing baking soda saturated with the hydrogen peroxide solution and use of a mouth moisturizer, 3) Crest dentifrice, Toothette Plus containing baking soda with a control solution and no mouth moisturizer, 4) Crest dentifrice, Toothette (without baking soda), saturated with a control solution and no mouth moisturizer, and 5) Crest dentifrice, Toothette saturated with 1.5% flavored H2O2 and no mouth moisturizer. From a subgroup of 35 patients (seven from each group) buccal smears for exfoliative cytology were taken as were supragingival microbiological samples from the mesial aspect of first molars (pooled). Buccal smears were evaluated for signs of histopathological changes. Microbiological samples from supra- and subgingival plaque for P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, A. actinomycetemcomitans. A viscosus, F. nucleatum, F. sanguis and C. albicans were evaluated. Clinical parameters measured were a stain index (SI), the modified gingival index (MGI), and a plaque index (PI). There were no adverse changes in the oral microflora and no anaplastic or other pathological changes in any subjects. Clinical parameters showed a statistically significant reduction in the MGI ranging from 26.7-29.9% with no significant differences among the groups (p > 0.05). The PI showed small reductions in all groups except group 2, but the differences were not statistically significant from each other or baseline (p > 0.05). The SI revealed slight increases in all groups and no differences

  3. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  4. Jupiter Great Red Spot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-09-07

    This view of Jupiter Great Red Spot is a mosaic of two images taken by NASA Galileo spacecraft. The Great Red Spot is a storm in Jupiter atmosphere and is at least 300 years-old. The image was taken on June 26, 1996. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00296

  5. Jupiter Great Red Spot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-01

    This dramatic view of Jupiter Great Red Spot and its surroundings was obtained by NASA Voyager 1 on Feb. 25, 1979. The colorful, wavy cloud pattern to the left of the Red Spot is a region of extraordinarily complex end variable wave motion. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00014

  6. The pediatric red eye.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa M; Anninger, William

    2014-06-01

    There is a broad differential for the pediatric red eye, which may range from benign conditions to vision- and/or life-threatening conditions. This article presents a systematic differential, red flags for referral, and treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [The red eye].

    PubMed

    Alami, A; Gérard, P; Bremer, F

    2014-09-01

    The red eye is a frequent symptom in emergency consultation. The general practitioner should be aware about the sample of possible etiologies. The diseases causing redness are various, sometimes benign but sometimes threatening vision. The most frequent diagnostic hypotheses will be summarized here, as well as the practical methodological elements allowing gross differential diagnosis in the absence of specific instrumentation.

  8. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  9. Red Pine Shoot Moth

    Treesearch

    John Hainze; David Hall

    The red pine shoot moth recently caused significant damage to red pine plantations in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Trees of all ages have been attacked, but the most severe damage has occurred in 20-40 year old plantations growing on sandy soils.

  10. Clinical and nutritional implications of radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, W.H.; Fan, A.; Halsted, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and nutritional significance of radiation enteritis was assessed in eight patients with chronic diarrhea which followed curative doses of radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Steatorrhea, found in seven malnourished patients, was ascribed to ileal disease or previous surgery, or to bacterial contamination of the small intestine. Lactose intolerance, assessed by breath hydrogen excretion after oral lactose and by jejunal lactase levels, was found in six patients. In a subgroup of five patients, the administration of two different defined formula liquid diets by nasoduodenal infusion decreased fecal fluid and energy losses by about one-half. Compared to Vivonex-HN, the infusion of Criticare-HN was associated with greater likelihood of intestinal gas production but a three-fold greater utilization of protein. Intestinal malabsorption and malnutrition in radiation enteritis has diverse etiologies. Whereas nutritional support by liquid diet limits fecal fluid and energy losses, these diets differ significantly in clinical tolerance and biologic value.

  11. Dietary and enteral interventions for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takayuki; Shimoyama, Takahiro; Kuriyama, Moeko

    2017-04-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that the intestinal bacterial flora together with genetic predisposing factors significantly contribute to the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as reflected by mucosal immune dysregulation. Recently, there has been an increased interest in nutraceutical therapies, including probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics. Other dietary interventions with low carbohydrate diet, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and glutamine have been attempted to downregulate the gut inflammatory response and thereby alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms. Enteral nutrition has been widely used as induction and maintenance therapies in the management of Crohn's disease (CD). In this review, a critical assessment of the results of clinical trial outcomes and meta-analyses was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of dietary and enteral interventions for CD.

  12. Enteric viral infections in lambs or kids.

    PubMed

    Martella, V; Decaro, N; Buonavoglia, C

    2015-12-14

    Diarrhoea in lambs and kids is often a complex, multi-factorial syndrome. Common infectious causes of diarrhoea in lambs and kids during the first month of life are of bacterial or parasite nature. However, despite appreciable improvements in management practices and prevention and treatment strategies over the last decades, diarrhoea is still a common and costly syndrome affecting newborn small ruminants. Recent advances in the diagnostics and metagenomic investigations of the enteric environment have allowed discovering a number of novel viruses, although their pathobiological properties remain largely unknown. Assessing more in depth the impact of these viruses on the health and productions of these livestock animals is necessary and requires the development of accurate diagnostic tools and updating of the diagnostic algorithms of enteric pathological conditions.

  13. HIV, opiates, and enteric neuron dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Galligan, J J

    2015-04-01

    Human immune deficient virus (HIV) is an immunosuppressive virus that targets CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. HIV infections cause increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. HIV infection can also alter central nervous system (CNS) function causing cognitive impairment. HIV does not infect neurons but it does infect astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. HIV can also infect enteric glia initiating an intestinal inflammatory response which causes enteric neural injury and gut dysfunction. Part of the inflammatory response is HIV induced production of proteins including, Transactivator of transcription (Tat) which contribute to neuronal injury after release from HIV infected glial cells. A risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use with contaminated needles and chronic opiate use can exacerbate neural injury in the nervous system. While most research focuses on the actions of Tat and other HIV related proteins and opiates on the brain, recent data indicate that Tat can cause intestinal inflammation and disruption of enteric neuron function, including alteration of Na(+) channel activity and action potential generation. A paper published in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility extends these findings by identifying an interaction between Tat and morphine on enteric neuron Na(+) channels and on intestinal motility in vivo using a Tat expressing transgenic mouse model. These new data show that Tat protein can enhance the inhibitory actions of morphine on action potential generation and propulsive motility. These findings are important to our understanding of how HIV causes diarrhea in infected patients and for the use of opioid drugs to treat HIV-induced diarrhea.

  14. Routes of early enteral nutrition following oesophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Elshaer, M; Gravante, G; White, J; Livingstone, J; Riaz, A; Al-Bahrani, A

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Oesophagectomy for cancer is a challenging procedure with a five-year overall survival rate of 15-20%. Early enteral nutrition following oesophagectomy is a crucial component of the postoperative recovery and carries a significant impact on the outcome. Different methods of enteral feeding were conducted in our unit. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of nasojejunal tube (NJT), jejunostomy tube (JT) and pharyngostomy tube (PT) feeding after oesophagectomy. Methods A retrospective review was carried out of prospectively collected data on patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent an oesophagectomy between 2011 and 2014. The primary outcome was feeding tube related complications such as occlusion, dislocation and leak. The secondary outcomes were length of stay and 30-day morbidity. Results A total of 90 oesophagectomies were included in the study. A NJT was inserted in 41 patients (45.6%), a JT was used in 14 patients (15.5%) and a PT was the route for enteral nutrition in 35 patients (38.9%). In total, five patients (5.5%) developed tube related complications. There were no tube related complications in the NJT group but one JT patient (7.1%) developed tube related cellulitis (p=0.189) and four PT patients (11.4%) developed tube related haemorrhage (p=0.544), tube dislocation (p=0.544) or cellulitis (p=0.189). The median length of stay and 30-day postoperative morbidity were similar between the groups. Conclusions NJT feeding is a less invasive, feasible route for early enteral nutrition following oesophagectomy. A randomised controlled trial is recommended to verify these findings.

  15. Molecular Basis of Pathogenicity in Enteric Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    rapid development of antibiotic resistance in enteric bacteria important in human disease. The recognition that this resitance was largely due to the...case for human diarrheal disease. We were then able to exploit our expertise learned from our study of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance (R...examination of the determinants of bacterial enterotoxigenicity, adherence and the mechanisms by which antibiotic resistance genes could be disseminated among

  16. Routes of early enteral nutrition following oesophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gravante, G; White, J; Livingstone, J; Riaz, A; Al-Bahrani, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oesophagectomy for cancer is a challenging procedure with a five-year overall survival rate of 15-20%. Early enteral nutrition following oesophagectomy is a crucial component of the postoperative recovery and carries a significant impact on the outcome. Different methods of enteral feeding were conducted in our unit. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of nasojejunal tube (NJT), jejunostomy tube (JT) and pharyngostomy tube (PT) feeding after oesophagectomy. Methods A retrospective review was carried out of prospectively collected data on patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent an oesophagectomy between 2011 and 2014. The primary outcome was feeding tube related complications such as occlusion, dislocation and leak. The secondary outcomes were length of stay and 30-day morbidity. Results A total of 90 oesophagectomies were included in the study. A NJT was inserted in 41 patients (45.6%), a JT was used in 14 patients (15.5%) and a PT was the route for enteral nutrition in 35 patients (38.9%). In total, five patients (5.5%) developed tube related complications. There were no tube related complications in the NJT group but one JT patient (7.1%) developed tube related cellulitis (p=0.189) and four PT patients (11.4%) developed tube related haemorrhage (p=0.544), tube dislocation (p=0.544) or cellulitis (p=0.189). The median length of stay and 30-day postoperative morbidity were similar between the groups. Conclusions NJT feeding is a less invasive, feasible route for early enteral nutrition following oesophagectomy. A randomised controlled trial is recommended to verify these findings. PMID:27388543

  17. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life. PMID:25854831

  18. Enteral nutrition in dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-04-03

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  19. Developing a formulary for enteral nutrition products.

    PubMed

    Hopefl, A W; Herrmann, V M

    1982-09-01

    A formulary for enteral nutrition products was developed at a university hospital. Advice was solicited from clinical dietetics and the medical staff. Reported important product variables were osmolality, caloric density, protein content and source, fat content and source, freedom from lactose, and, for oral supplements, available flavors. Data were also obtained from manufacturers regarding the composition of their products. Products were categorized as follows: liquid supplemental feedings, high calorie supplemental feedings, isotonic tube feedings, high caloric/high nitrogen tube feedings, high nitrogen tube feedings, and blenderized tube feedings. Bids were solicited in April 1981 (and annually thereafter) from manufacturers of the classified enteral nutrition products, and a contract was signed with the manufacturer in each category submitting the lowest bid. In contrast with previous experience, there was no loss from outdated products during the first year of the formulary. Categorizing enteral nutrition products into therapeutic categories appears to be a workable method to limit the number of products used in a hospital, thereby potentially decreasing inventory, waste, and hospital costs. The descriptive category titles also may encourage rational use of these products without promoting allegiance to a particular company or product.

  20. [Assessing nutritional status before introducing enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Leandro-Merhi, Vânia Aparecida; Morete, Juliana Luisi; Oliveira, Maria Rita Marques de

    2009-01-01

    A proper diagnosis of the nutritional status is of the utmost importance for prescribing enteral nutrition therapy in the hospital environment. To assess nutritional status indicators of patients about to receive enteral nutrition therapy in a hospital unit. This cross-sectional study examined the nutritional status of 100 adult patients before they were introduced to enteral nutrition therapy by calculating their body mass index . Their height and weight were estimated by prediction formulas and laboratory indicators of nutritional and metabolic statuses. Almost one-third (29%) of the patients were classified as malnourished according to their body mass index, while 80% of them had low albumin values (<3.2 g/dL). When patients were grouped according to body mass index, the distribution of the reasons for hospitalization did not differ between the groups. Cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases prevailed as the main reasons for hospitalization. When patients were grouped according to body mass index and diagnosis upon admission, the rates of low albumin concentration, i.e., concentration below the reference value, did not differ between the groups. The estimated body mass index was a specific indicator of nutritional status but lacked sensitivity. Meanwhile, albumin was more sensitive, demonstrating that it is necessary to use many indicators in combination to diagnose nutritional status properly.

  1. An Exposome Perspective on Environmental Enteric Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mapesa, Job O.; Maxwell, Amy L.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposures to chemicals have been shown to influence gastrointestinal function, yet little is known regarding whether chemical mixtures may be involved in the development of a subclinical enteric dysfunction found in infants and children born into poor hygiene and sanitation. Advances in gastrointestinal and immunotoxicology fields merit inclusion in complex discussions of environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) that severely affects children in developing countries. Objective: We aimed to highlight exposome approaches for investigating the potential influence of environmental chemical exposures on EED development, including a role for toxicant modulation of gut immune system and microbiome function. Discussion: A major focus on fecal–oral contamination in impoverished living conditions already exists for EED, and should now expand to include environmental chemicals such as pesticides and heavy metals that may be anthropogenic or dietary or from microbial sources. A comprehensive characterization of environmental chemical exposures prenatally and occurring in infants and young children will enhance our knowledge of any associated risks for EED and stunting. Conclusions: Integrating EED, chemical exposure, and stunting at various ages during childhood will enhance our apparent limited view when evaluating EED. Etiology and intervention studies should evaluate the suite of environmental chemical exposures as candidates in the composite of EED biomarkers. Citation: Mapesa JO, Maxwell AL, Ryan EP. 2016. An exposome perspective on environmental enteric dysfunction. Environ Health Perspect 124:1121–1126; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510459 PMID:26713888

  2. Pediatric enteric neuropathies: diagnosis and current management.

    PubMed

    Westfal, Maggie L; Goldstein, Allan M

    2017-06-01

    Neurointestinal diseases are increasingly recognized as causes of significant gastrointestinal morbidity in children. This review highlights the most common pediatric enteric neuropathies and their diagnosis and management, emphasizing insights and discoveries from the most recent literature available. The embryologic and histopathologic causes of enteric neuropathies are varied. They range from congenital aganglionosis in Hirschsprung disease, to autoimmune-mediated loss of neuronal subtypes in esophageal achalasia and Chagas disease, to degenerative neuropathies in some cases of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and gastroparesis. Increased awareness of the clinical presentation and diagnostic evaluation of these conditions is essential as it allows for earlier initiation of treatment and improved outcomes. Most current therapies, which include medical management, neurostimulation, and operative intervention, aim to minimize the symptoms caused by these conditions. The evidence base for many of these treatments in children is poor, and multiinstitutional prospective studies are needed. An innovative therapy on the horizon involves using neuronal stem cell transplantation to treat the underlying disorder by replacing the missing or damaged neurons in these diseases. Although recent advances in basic and clinical neurogastroenterology have significantly improved our awareness and understanding of enteric neuropathies, the efficacy of current treatment approaches is limited. The development of novel therapies, including pharmacologic modulators of neurointestinal function, neurostimulation to enhance gut motility, and neuronal cell-based therapies, is essential to improve the long-term outcomes in children with these disorders.

  3. Study of red tide prediction model for the Changjiang Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-Fang; Lu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Yong; Zeng, Jiang-Ning; Zhou, Qing-Song

    2000-12-01

    This paper based on field data (on red tide water quality monitoring at the Chaggjiang River mouth and Hutoudu mariculture area in Zhejiang Province from May to August in 1995, and May to September in 1996) presents an effective model for short term prediction of red tide in the Changjiang Estuary. The measured parameters include: depth, temperature, color diaphaneity, density, DO, COD and nutrients (PO4-P, NO2-N, NO3-N, NH4-N). The model was checked by field-test data, and compared with other related models. The model: Z=SAL-3.95 DO-2.974 PH-5.421 PO4-P is suitable for application to the Shengsi aquiculture area near the Changjiang Estuary.

  4. Concentrations and loads of polychlorinated biphenyls in major tributaries entering Green Bay, Lake Michigan, 1989-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, L.B.; Hughes, P.E.; Waschbusch, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected water samples from the five major tributaries to Green Bay, Lake Michigan, to determine the load of total polychlorinated biphenyls (RGB's) entering the bay. These samples were collected from January 1989 through early May 1990 from the Escanaba, Menominee, Peshtigo, Oconto, and Fox Rivers. Sampling sites were located near the mouth of each river and also just upstream of De Pere dam on the Fox River. Water samples were collected for analysis of total, dissolved, and particulate concentrations of PCB's at the nanogram-per-liter level. Loads of PCB's entering Green Bay were computed using a total-integration method. The methods used to collect water samples and compute the loads of total PCB's entering the bay are described in this report. Graphs showing total PCB's concentrations and loads are presented for each site, along with the corresponding data tables. These data indicate that the amount of total PCB's entering the bay from the Fox River is greater than from all other major tributaries combined.

  5. The efficacy of antimicrobial mouth rinses in oral health care.

    PubMed

    Okuda, K; Adachi, M; Iijima, K

    1998-02-01

    There is growing public recognition of the importance of oral health, as symbolized by the theme. "Oral Health for a Healthy Life" proposed for the 1994 World Health Day. In this report, the efficacy of antimicrobial mouth rinses, mainly Listerine, was reviewed by three investigators who are working as a microbiologist, a microbiologist, a dentist, and a dental hygienist participating in oral health care. Listerine, an antimicrobial mouth rinse, completely killed microorganisms in 10 to 30 seconds; the microbes includes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Helicobacter pylori, Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Listerine was also weakly effective in inactivating human immunodeficiency viruses. Bacteria in samples collected from human dental plaque and saliva were completely killed within 30 seconds when exposed to Listerine. When saliva samples were collected from subjects who had rinsed their mouths with 20 ml of Listerine or 1:50 diluted povidone-iodine, levels of viable anaerobic bacteria in the samples were reduced to 1%. When Listerine was used for oral surgery such as tooth extraction and periodontal surgery, the agent was effective in relieving toothache. This was probably due to a decrease in oral bacteria by the antimicrobial action of Listerine, leading to lowering the inflammatory response of the host. The use of antimicrobial mouth rinse during dental treatments such as endodontic treatment proved effective for more reliable infection control. In Japan, there are an increasing number of elderly and medically compromised hosts who are potentially at risk for developing pneumonia due to silent aspiration of microbes in the oral cavity and throat. For the aged with such potential risk, using of antimicrobial mouth rinse may be effective in preventing dental plaque accumulation when used in addition to the

  6. Burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson's disease: dopamine as cure or cause?

    PubMed

    Coon, Elizabeth A; Laughlin, Ruple S

    2012-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome has been reported as being more common in Parkinson's disease patients than the general population. While the pathophysiology is unclear, decreased dopamine levels and dopamine dysregulation are hypothesized to play a role. We report a patient with Parkinson's disease who developed burning mouth syndrome with carbidopa/levodopa. Our patient had resolution of burning mouth symptoms when carbidopa/levodopa was replaced with a dopamine agonist. Based on our patient's clinical course, in conjunction with earlier studies assessing the relationship between burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson's disease, we discuss a potential role for dopamine in burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Why are enteric ganglia so small? Role of differential adhesion of enteric neurons and enteric neural crest cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, Benjamin N.; Zhang, Dongcheng; Simkin, Johanna E.; Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; Newgreen, Donald F.

    2015-01-01

    The avian enteric nervous system (ENS) consists of a vast number of unusually small ganglia compared to other peripheral ganglia. Each ENS ganglion at mid-gestation has a core of neurons and a shell of mesenchymal precursor/glia-like enteric neural crest (ENC) cells. To study ENS cell ganglionation we isolated midgut ENS cells by HNK-1 fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from E5 and E8 quail embryos, and from E9 chick embryos. We performed cell-cell aggregation assays which revealed a developmentally regulated functional increase in ENS cell adhesive function, requiring both Ca 2+ -dependent and independent adhesion. This was consistent with N-cadherin and NCAM labelling. Neurons sorted to the core of aggregates, surrounded by outer ENC cells, showing that neurons had higher adhesion than ENC cells. The outer surface of aggregates became relatively non-adhesive, correlating with low levels of NCAM and N-cadherin on this surface of the outer non-neuronal ENC cells. Aggregation assays showed that ENS cells FACS selected for NCAM-high and enriched for enteric neurons formed larger and more coherent aggregates than unsorted ENS cells. In contrast, ENS cells of the NCAM-low FACS fraction formed small, disorganised aggregates.  This suggests a novel mechanism for control of ENS ganglion morphogenesis where i) differential adhesion of ENS neurons and ENC cells controls the core/shell ganglionic structure and ii) the ratio of neurons to ENC cells dictates the equilibrium ganglion size by generation of an outer non-adhesive surface. PMID:26064478

  8. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  9. EV71 vaccine, a new tool to control outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD).

    PubMed

    Mao, Qun-ying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-05-01

    On December 3rd 2015, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) approved the first inactivated Enterovirus 71 (EV71) whole virus vaccine for preventing severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). As one of the few preventive vaccines for children's infectious diseases generated by the developing countries in recent years, EV71 vaccine is a blessing to children's health in China and worldwide. However, there are still a few challenges facing the worldwide use of EV71 vaccine, including the applicability against various EV71 pandemic strains in other countries, international requirements on vaccine production and quality control, standardization and harmonization on different pathogen monitoring and detecting methods, etc. In addition, the affordability of EV71 vaccine in other countries is a factor to be considered in HFMD prevention. Therefore, with EV71 vaccine commercially available, there is still a long way to go before reaching effective protection against severe HFMD after EV71 vaccines enter the market. In this paper, the bottlenecks and prospects for the wide use of EV71 vaccine after its approval are evaluated.

  10. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with Tc-99m

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1988-07-05

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available for the reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  11. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with TC-99M

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for the reduction of technetium.

  12. [A mouth cavity mucosa membrane illnesses and haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Gvazava, T; Abashidze, M

    2006-12-01

    To reveal the frequency of parodontitis, parodontosis and gingivitis among patients with haemophilia the structure of inflammatory diseases of mouth cavity mucosa was investigated. 224 patients (aged 2-64 years old) with the various forms of haemophilia were examined. The investigation showed that the occurrence of parodontitis, parodontosis and gingivitis in patients with haemophilia was significantly higher than in control group. In case of haemophilia relative and attributic risk of inflammatory diseases of mouth cavity mucosa rises: parodontitis (RR=2,15; 95%CI: 1,75-2,63; AR=0,48; 95%CI: 0,39-1,04); parodontosis (RR=1,41; 95%CI: 1,251,60; AR=0,26; 95%CI: 0,17-0,85) and gingivitis (RR=2,26; 95%CI: 1,86-2,74; AR=0,53; 95%CI: 0,44-0,96), but they do not correlate with the severity of illness.

  13. Bactericidal effects of mouth rinses on oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Y; Ikenoya, H; Okuda, K

    1997-11-01

    The bactericidal efficacy of two types of Listerine; Listerine and Cool Mint Listerine, and povidone iodine on oral microorganisms, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Streptococcus pyogenes, Helicobacter pylori and Candida albicans were examined. Most of the oral bacteria were killed completely by a 10-sec exposure to Listerine or Cool Mint Listerine. H. pylori, MRSA and C. albicans were also reduced by a 30-sec exposure to the Listerine mouth rinse. Bacteria in dental plaque were decreased by exposure to Listerine, Cool Mint Listerine, and povidone iodine for 30 seconds. Mouthwashing with Listerine for 30 seconds resulted in a decrease to approximately 1/100 of the viable bacterial counts in saliva. These bactericidal effects against bacteria in saliva and dental plaque indicated that Listerine and Cool Mint Listerine antiseptic are useful in oral cavity as antiseptic mouth rinses.

  14. Sand waves at the mouth of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.

    2006-01-01

    A multibeam bathymetric survey that produced unprecedented high resolution images of the mouth of San Francisco Bay was conducted in 2004 and 2005. The survey, performed over forty-four days by the Seafloor Mapping Lab at California State University, Monterey Bay, consisted of 1,138 track lines, 1.1 billion soundings, and covered an area of 154 km2 (60 mi2). The goals of this survey were to analyze sediment transport pathways at the mouth of San Francisco Bay and to calculate bathymetric change since the last survey was completed in 1956. The survey showed that significant bathymetric changes have occurred over the past 50 years. It also revealed that the study area contains sand waves that are among the largest and bedform morphologies that are among the most varied in the world. This set of five sheets shows views of the sand waves on the seafloor from different perspectives along with descriptive text.

  15. Mouth Cancer for Clinicians Part 5: Risk Factors (Other).

    PubMed

    Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Scully, Crispian

    2015-10-01

    A MEDLINE search early in 2015 revealed more than 250,000 papers on head and neck cancer; over 100,000 on oral cancer; and over 60,000 on mouth cancer. Not all publications contain robust evidence. We endeavour to encapsulate the most important of the latest information and advances now employed in practice, in a form comprehensible to healthcare workers, patients and their carers. This series offers the primary care dental team, in particular, an overview of the aetiopathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and multidisciplinary care of mouth cancer, the functional and psychosocial implications, and minimization of the impact on the quality of life of patient and family. Clinical Relevance: This article offers the dental team an overview of other cancer risk factors agents, such as human papilloma viruses (HPV) and irradiation.

  16. Financial Stylized Facts in the Word of Mouth Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tadanobu; Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimokawa, Tetsuya

    Recently, we proposed an agent-based model called the word of mouth model to analyze the influence of an information transmission process to price formation in financial markets. Especially, the short-term predictability of asset return was focused on and an explanation in the view of information transmission was provided to the question why the predictability was much clearly observed in the small-sized stocks. This paper, to extend the previous study, demonstrates that the word of mouth model also has a consistency with other important financial stylized facts. This strengthens the possibility that the information transmission among investors plays a crucial role in price formation. Concretely, this paper addresses two famous statistical features of returns; the leptokurtic distribution of return and the autocorrelation of return volatility. The reasons why these statistical facts receive especial attentions of researchers among financial stylized facts are their statistical robustness and practical importance, such as the applications to the derivative pricing problems.

  17. Restricted mouth opening and trismus in oral oncology.

    PubMed

    Satheeshkumar, P S; Mohan, Minu P; Jacob, Jayan

    2014-06-01

    Restricted mouth opening (RMO) and trismus are terms commonly used in oral oncology in instances where there is difficulty in mouth opening. The term trismus in oral oncology is mainly used to indicate the radiation-induced fibrosis of the muscles of mastication. The treatment given for RMO as reported in the literature is given for muscular dysfunction trismus, whereas RMO in oral oncology can occur owing to various reasons other than muscular dysfunction. RMO occurs in various conditions of the oral cavity; in posterior pharyngeal infection, where it is termed reflectory trismus; in oral submucous fibrosis; in oral mucosal disorders; in the use of certain drugs; and in minor dental procedures of the posterior oral cavity. The usage of the term trismus in all RMO cases would complicate the treatment; thus, the word should not be used in all RMO cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictable prosthetic space maintenance during staged complete-mouth rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Bukhari, Sarah; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Jekki, Rami; Dahiya, Ankur

    2017-05-26

    Staged complete-mouth rehabilitation to accommodate a patient's financial constraints during the course of treatment is presented. Clear acrylic resin added to the anterior cameo surface of the maxillary fixed complete denture (FCD) served as a space maintainer. The restoration of the maxillary FCD addressed the patient's chief complaint. By adding the space maintainer, supraeruption of mandibular anterior teeth and encroachment of the prosthetic space, which could have resulted in additional treatment, was avoided. During the second stage of the complete-mouth rehabilitation, zirconia restorations were used to restore the mandibular arch to the maxillary FCD after straightforward removal of the space maintainer. This allowed a smooth transition after a delay in treatment without having to modify the previous treatment. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure in Japanese elite male athletes.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Chino, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) is a common measurement of inspiratory muscle strength, which is often used in a variety of exercises to evaluate the effects of inspiratory muscle training. An understanding of elite athletes' MIP characteristics is needed to guide sport-specific inspiratory muscle training programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate and better understand the MIP characteristics of elite athletes from a variety of sports. A total of 301 Japanese elite male athletes participated in this study. MIP was assessed using a portable autospirometer with a handheld mouth pressure meter. Athletes with higher body mass tended to have stronger MIP values, in absolute terms. In relative terms, however, athletes who regularly experienced exercise-induced inspiratory muscle fatigue tended to have stronger MIP values. Our findings suggest that athletes could benefit from prescribed, sport-specific, inspiratory muscle training or warm-ups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome and mast cell activation disorder.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2011-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic diffuse oral pain syndrome affecting ∼1% of the general population, is diagnosed when explanatory oral pathology and other identifiable causes are absent. BMS has been recognized for decades, but its etiology remains unknown and has not previously been attributed to mast cell disease. Three cases of BMS are reported in which evidence of an underlying mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) was found; all 3 patients' oral pain responded well to MCAD-directed therapy. Mediators released from mast cells have a wide range of local and remote effects and potentially may cause the neuropathic changes and/or inflammation thought to lead to the symptoms of BMS. Mast cell disease either in oral tissue or at sites remote from the mouth should be considered in the differential diagnosis of BMS.

  1. Imaging the floor of the mouth and the sublingual space.

    PubMed

    La'porte, Sarah J; Juttla, Jaspal K; Lingam, Ravi K

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of pathologic processes may involve the floor of the mouth, the part of the oral cavity that is located beneath the tongue. They include lesions that arise uniquely in this location (eg, ranula, submandibular duct obstruction) as well as various malignancies, inflammatory processes, and vascular abnormalities that may also occur elsewhere in the head and neck. Some lesions that arise in superficial tissues such as the mucosa may be easily diagnosed at physical examination. However, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or ultrasonography may be necessary for a reliable assessment of lesion extension to deeper structures. In such cases, knowledge of the complex muscular, vascular, glandular, ductal, and neural anatomy of the region is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Familiarity with the radiologic imaging appearances of the floor of the mouth and recognition of anatomic landmarks such as the mylohyoid and hyoglossus muscles are especially useful for localizing disease within this region.

  2. Eye-Hand-Mouth Coordination in the Human Newborn.

    PubMed

    Futagi, Yasuyuki

    2017-10-01

    There have been several studies concerning rudimentary coordination of the eyes, hands, and mouth in the human newborn. The author attempted to clarify the ontogenetic significance of the coordination during the earliest period of human life through a systematic review. The neural mechanism underlying the coordination was also discussed based on the current knowledge of cognitive neuroscience. Searches were conducted on PubMed and Google Scholar from their inception through March 2017. Studies have demonstrated that the coordination is a visually guided goal-directed motor behavior with intension and emotion. Current cognitive research has proved that feeding requires a large-scale neural network extending over several cortices. The eye-hand-mouth coordination in the newborn can be regarded as a precursor of subsequent self-feeding, and the coordination is very likely mediated through the underdeveloped but essentially the same network interconnecting cortices as in the adult. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention: From Reducing Threat to Relationship-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A; Kolanowski, Ann M; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adults with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention, with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents' behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Ocular Emergencies: Red Eye.

    PubMed

    Tarff, Andreina; Behrens, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    "Red eye" is used as a general term to describe irritated or bloodshot eyes. It is a recognizable sign of an acute/chronic, localized/systemic underlying inflammatory condition. Conjunctival injection is most commonly caused by dryness, allergy, visual fatigue, contact lens overwear, and local infections. In some instances, red eye can represent a true ocular emergency that should be treated by an ophthalmologist. A comprehensive assessment of red eye conditions is required to preserve the patients visual function. Severe ocular pain, significant photophobia, decreased vision, and history of ocular trauma are warning signs demanding immediate ophthalmological consultation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, T.B.; Paplanus, S.H.; Chernin, M.M.; Coulthard, S.W.

    1983-12-01

    Dermoid cysts are a rare cause of head and neck masses; those arising in this region account for only 7% of all dermoid cysts. Because of their rarity, they are unfamiliar to most radiologists and are not well covered in the radiologic literature. The authors recently saw a patient with a large dermoid cyst arising from the floor of the mouth and extending into the left neck. the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the lesion was most striking and may be typical.

  6. Mouth care to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Booker, Staja; Murff, Sharon; Kitko, Lisa; Jablonski, Rita

    2013-10-01

    Despite the well-established association between good oral hygiene and the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), the importance of mouth care in infection control is seldom recognized. The authors discuss the pathophysiology of VAP and why oral care is crucial to its prevention. They also provide an evidence-based, step-by-step guide to providing optimal oral care for intubated patients.

  7. Multiple bony overgrowths in the mouth - report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sathya; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar; Muthu, Kavitha; Sidhu, Preena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tori and exostoses are benign bony protuberances that arise from bone surfaces in the oral cavity. The etiology of these growths has been implicated as multifactorial, but no consensus has been reached so far. These painless overgrowths seldom present as a complaint in the dental office unless functional or esthetic complications set in, and there is a fear for cancer. Here we discuss two rare cases where bony overgrowths present in the mouth were extensive and multiple. PMID:26811708

  8. Efficacy of mouth rinses and toothpaste on tooth whitening.

    PubMed

    Torres, C R G; Perote, L C C C; Gutierrez, N C; Pucci, C R; Borges, A B

    2013-01-01

    People increasingly desire tooth whitening. Considering the wide range of whitening products on the market, this study evaluated the efficacy of whitening toothpastes and mouth rinses compared with the 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) whitening gel. We obtained 120 cylindrical specimens from bovine teeth, which were darkened for 24 hours in a coffee solution. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b* system, and specimens were divided into six groups according to the use of the following agents: group 1, conventional fluoridated toothpaste; group 2, Close Up White Now; group 3, Listerine Whitening; group 4, Colgate Plax Whitening; group 5, experimental mouth rinse with Plasdone; and group 6, 10% CP Whiteness Perfect. After the simulation of 12 weeks of treatment for groups 1 to 5 and 14 days of treatment for group 6, the specimens were subjected to a new color reading. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (α=0.05), which showed significant differences among groups after 12 weeks for ΔE (p=0.001). Results of the Tukey test revealed that groups 3, 4, and 6 presented significantly higher color alteration than groups 1, 2, and 5. The whitening toothpaste Close Up White Now and the experimental mouth rinse with Plasdone showed similar color alteration as conventional toothpaste after a 12-week treatment simulation. These groups presented significantly lower color alteration compared with whitening mouth rinses Listerine and Colgate Plax Whitening, which showed similar results to those observed after 14 days of bleaching with 10% CP treatment.

  9. Mexican blind cavefish use mouth suction to detect obstacles.

    PubMed

    Holzman, Roi; Perkol-Finkel, Shimrit; Zilman, Gregory

    2014-06-01

    Fish commonly use their lateral line system to detect moving bodies such as prey and predators. A remarkable case is the Mexican blind cavefish Astyanax fasciatus, which evolved the ability to detect non-moving obstacles. The swimming body of A. fasciatus generates fluid disturbances, the alteration of which by an obstacle can be sensed by the fish's lateral line system. It is generally accepted that these alterations can provide information on the distance to the obstacle. We observed that A. fasciatus swimming in an unfamiliar environment open and close their mouths at high frequency (0.7-4.5 Hz) in order to generate suction flows. We hypothesized that repeated mouth suction generates a hydrodynamic velocity field, which is altered by an obstacle, inducing pressure gradients in the neuromasts of the lateral line and corresponding strong lateral line stimuli. We observed that the frequency and rate of mouth-opening events varied with the fish's distance to obstacles, a hallmark of pulse-based navigation mechanisms such as echolocation. We formulated a mathematical model of this hitherto unrecognized mechanism of obstacle detection and parameterized it experimentally. This model suggests that suction flows induce lateral line stimuli that are weakly dependent on the fish's speed, and may be an order of magnitude stronger than the correspondent stimuli induced by the fish's gliding body. We illustrate that A. fasciatus can navigate non-visually using a combination of two deeply ancestral and highly conserved mechanisms of ray-finned fishes: the mechanism of sensing water motion by the lateral line system and the mechanism of generating water motion by mouth suction. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Mandibular fracture with a mouth formed mouthguard in kickboxing.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Tetsuo; Masuda, Issei; Numa, Takehiro; Horie, Norio

    2009-04-01

    Reports of injuries caused by kickboxing, one of the contact sports that potentially causes a large number of injuries, are relatively rare. Wearing a mouthguard is obligatory in kickboxing, but the association between maxillofacial injuries and the quality of mouthguards has not been described thus far. In this article, we present a case of mandibular fracture in a 25-year-old male, who was injured during kickboxing despite wearing a mouth formed mouthguard.

  11. DETAIL VIEW OF BALL MILL FEED SYSTEM, MOUTH OF CLASSIFIER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BALL MILL FEED SYSTEM, MOUTH OF CLASSIFIER, AND ORE BIN CHUTE, LOOKING EAST NORTHEAST. CRUSHED ORE FROM THE SECONDARY ORE BIN WAS INTRODUCED INTO THE FEED TROUGH VIA A CHUTE. AS THE BALL MILL TURNED, THE ROUND SCOOP ALSO TURNED IN THE TROUGH TO CHANNEL ORE INTO THE BALL MILL. SEE CA-292-20 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  12. DETAIL VIEW OF BALL MILL FEED SYSTEM, MOUTH OF CLASSIFIER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BALL MILL FEED SYSTEM, MOUTH OF CLASSIFIER, AND ORE BIN CHUTE, LOOKING EAST NORTHEAST. CRUSHED ORE FROM THE SECONDARY ORE BIN WAS INTRODUCED INTO THE FEED TROUGH VIA A CHUTE. AS THE BALL MILL TURNED, THE ROUND SCOOP ALSO TURNED IN THE TROUGH TO CHANNEL ORE INTO THE BALL MILL. SEE CA-292-14 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  13. Mouths of the Amazon River, Brazil, South America

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-08-11

    Huge sediment loads from the interior of the country flow through the Mouths of the Amazon River, Brazil (0.5S, 50.0W). The river current carries hundreds of tons of sediment through the multiple outlets of the great river over 100 miles from shore before it is carried northward by oceanic currents. The characteristic "fair weather cumulus" pattern of low clouds over the land but not over water may be observed in this scene.

  14. Mouths of the Amazon River, Brazil, South America

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-08-08

    STS046-80-009 (31 July-8 Aug. 1992) --- A view of the mouth of the Amazon River and the Amazon Delta shows a large sediment plume expanding outward into the Atlantic Ocean. The sediment plume can be seen hugging the coast north of the Delta. This is caused by the west-northwest flowing Guyana Current. The large island of Marajo is partially visible through the clouds.

  15. Epidemiological and etiological aspects of burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coculescu, E C; Tovaru, S; Coculescu, B I

    2014-09-15

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as a chronic pain condition characterized by a burning sensation in clinically healthy oral mucosa. Incidence BMS diagnosed in the Department of Oral Medicine - Oral Pathology Dental Faculty of Medicine, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy Bucharest is 16,23%. The etiology of BMS remains far less known. This article makes an overview of the latest theories about possible etiopathogenic factors involved in the occurrence of BMS.

  16. Burning mouth syndrome: a review on diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Coculescu, E C; Radu, A; Coculescu, B I

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as a chronic pain condition characterized by a burning sensation in the clinically healthy oral mucosa. It is difficult to diagnose BMS because there is a discrepancy between the severity, extensive objective pain felt by the patient and the absence of any clinical changes of the oral mucosa. This review presents some aspects of BMS, including its clinical diagnosis, classification, differential diagnosis, general treatment, evolution and prognosis.

  17. [Mouth-rinsing with chlorhexidine for prevention of pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Løkken, Per; Olsen, Ingar; Spigset, Olav

    2010-09-23

    Oral decontamination with chlorhexidine prevents accumulation of pathogens in the oral cavity, and can thereby reduce the risk of translocation to and colonization of the lungs. The antiseptic agent chlorhexidine has been widely used in dentistry, it has an excellent record of safety and efficacy and a broad antimicrobial spectrum. Mouth-rinsing with chlorhexidine may result in 90 % reduction of oral microbes. Cooperation between physicians and dentists is important in this area on the borderline between the two professions.

  18. Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

    2008-09-04

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

  19. [Glossodynia or burning mouth syndrome: equivalence or difference].

    PubMed

    Redinova, T L; Redinov, I S; Val'kov, V A; Zlobina, O A; Kozhevnikov, S V

    2014-01-01

    The term "Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS)" is being used much more often than "Glossodynia", complicating diagnostic and treatment tactic choice. The aim of the study was to determine the difference between "Glossodynia" and "BMS" considering absence or presence of intraoral metal prosthetic devices and burning sensation in the mouth. To establish the frequency of glossodynia and BMS 2355 patient records were analyzed admitting consultation for oral diseases for the last 10 years. Clinically we examined 408 patients aged 40 to 70. The research results showed that 17% of patients complained of "burning mouth": 10.2% of them had these symptoms due to oral mucosa diseases; 58.0% had glossodynia, 27.4% had discomfort because of intolerance to metal prosthodontic materials and 4.4% had combined pathology. Glossodynia and intolerance to metal prosthodontic materials had much in common in terms of clinical features, but the last one may be specified by changes in saliva composition. BMS thus proved to be the common definition corresponding to various diseases of oral mucosa and intolerance to intraoral metal appliances, while glossoldynia is a distinct neurogenic disease which is difficult to treat and requires comprehensive approach involving neurologist and physician.

  20. A bulky dermoid cyst of the floor of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Boko, E; Amaglo, K; Kpemissi, E

    2014-04-01

    Bulky dermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth are very rare and may pose a problem of diagnosis. They also raise problems for the anesthesiologist and surgeon. We report the first case to be described in Togo. A 23-year-old man was admitted for a submental submandibular sublingual mass. It was soft, depressable, painless, without adenopathies, raising the tongue against the palate and creating a "second tongue-like" aspect. Resection on intra-oral route removed an intact cyst of 13cm long axis. Histology diagnosed dermoid cyst. Dermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth present as a submental sublingual mass, which may cause dyspnea and disorders of swallowing, chewing and/or vocal function. Differential diagnosis concerns sublingual, submental and cervical masses. Definitive diagnosis is founded on the histology specimen. Imaging may assist diagnosis. Intubation may be problematic. The resection approach may be intra-oral or cervical. Dermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth are rare. They may induce functional disorder. An intra-oral approach is preferable when possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors associated with mouth breathing in children with -developmental -disabilities.

    PubMed

    de Castilho, Lia Silva; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; de Oliveira, Renata Batista; Souza E Silva, Maria Elisa; Resende, Vera Lúcia Silva

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and factors associated with mouth breathing among patients with developmental disabilities of a dental service. We analyzed 408 dental records. Mouth breathing was reported by the patients' parents and from direct observation. Other variables were as -follows: history of asthma, bronchitis, palate shape, pacifier use, thumb -sucking, nail biting, use of medications, gastroesophageal reflux, bruxism, gender, age, and diagnosis of the patient. Statistical analysis included descriptive analysis with ratio calculation and multiple logistic regression. Variables with p < 0.25 were included in the model to estimate the adjusted OR (95% CI), calculated by the forward stepwise method. Variables with p ​​< 0.05 were kept in the model. Being male (p = 0.016) and use of centrally acting drugs (p = 0.001) were the variables that remained in the model. Among patients with -developmental disabilities, boys and psychotropic drug users had a greater chance of being mouth breathers. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Full Mouth Rehabilitation in a Medically Compromised Patient with Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun

    2014-01-01

    Severely worn out dentition needs to be given definite attention as it not only affects aesthetics but can also cause psychological distress to the affected individual. It can cause chewing difficulty, temporomandibular joint problems, headaches, pain and facial collapse. Before any attempt to restore severely worn dentition, aetiology of excessive tooth wear should be established. Severe wear can result from chemical cause, mechanical cause or a combination of various causes. Dental fluorosis can also result in severe wear of teeth. Teeth sometimes become extremely porous and friable with a mottled appearance ranging from yellow to brown-black. There occurs loss of tooth substance and anatomic dental deformities resulting in un-aesthetic dentition requiring full mouth rehabilitation. Here a similar case of full mouth rehabilitation of severely worn dentition due to dental fluorosis in a 27-year-old patient is presented. This case report conjointly presents the uncommon association of diabetes insipidus with dental fluorosis. Diabetes insipidus through its characteristic symptom of polydipsia can result in intake of more than permitted dose of fluoride thus causing dental fluorosis. In literature only few cases have been reported of dental fluorosis in association of diabetes insipidus. Full mouth rehabilitation of the patient was successfully accomplished through well-planned systematic approach to simultaneously fulfill aesthetic, occlusal and functional parameters. PMID:25177654

  3. Full mouth rehabilitation in a medically compromised patient with fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun

    2014-07-01

    Severely worn out dentition needs to be given definite attention as it not only affects aesthetics but can also cause psychological distress to the affected individual. It can cause chewing difficulty, temporomandibular joint problems, headaches, pain and facial collapse. Before any attempt to restore severely worn dentition, aetiology of excessive tooth wear should be established. Severe wear can result from chemical cause, mechanical cause or a combination of various causes. Dental fluorosis can also result in severe wear of teeth. Teeth sometimes become extremely porous and friable with a mottled appearance ranging from yellow to brown-black. There occurs loss of tooth substance and anatomic dental deformities resulting in un-aesthetic dentition requiring full mouth rehabilitation. Here a similar case of full mouth rehabilitation of severely worn dentition due to dental fluorosis in a 27-year-old patient is presented. This case report conjointly presents the uncommon association of diabetes insipidus with dental fluorosis. Diabetes insipidus through its characteristic symptom of polydipsia can result in intake of more than permitted dose of fluoride thus causing dental fluorosis. In literature only few cases have been reported of dental fluorosis in association of diabetes insipidus. Full mouth rehabilitation of the patient was successfully accomplished through well-planned systematic approach to simultaneously fulfill aesthetic, occlusal and functional parameters.

  4. From Human to Artificial Mouth, From Basics to Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielle, Patrick; Tarrega, Amparo; Gorria, Patrick; Liodenot, Jean Jacques; Liaboeuf, Joël; Andrejewski, Jean-Luc; Salles, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Sensory perception of the flavor release during the eating of a food piece is highly dependent upon mouth parameters. Major limitations have been reported during in-vivo flavor release studies, such as marked intra- and inter-individual variability. To overcome these limitations, a chewing simulator has been developed to mimic the human mastication of food samples. The device faithfully reproduces most of the functions of the human mouth. The active cell comprises several mobile parts that can accurately reproduce shear and compression strengths and tongue functions in real-time, according to data previously collected in-vivo. The mechanical functionalities of the system were validated using peanuts, with a fair agreement with the human data. Flavor release can be monitored on-line using either API-MS or chemical sensors, or off-line using HPLC for non-volatile compounds. Couplings with API-MS detectors have shown differences in the kinetics of flavour release, as a function of the cheeses composition. Data were also collected for the analysis of taste compounds released during the human chewing but are not available yet for the Artificial Mouth.

  5. Guidelines proposal for clinical recognition of mouth breathing children

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria Christina Thomé; Casagrande, Camila Ferreira; Teixeira, Lícia Pacheco; Finck, Nathalia Silveira; de Araújo, Maria Teresa Martins

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mouth breathing (MB) is an etiological factor for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) during childhood. The habit of breathing through the mouth may be perpetuated even after airway clearance. Both habit and obstruction may cause facial muscle imbalance and craniofacial changes. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to propose and test guidelines for clinical recognition of MB and some predisposing factors for SDB in children. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 110 orthodontists regarding their procedures for clinical evaluation of MB and their knowledge about SDB during childhood. Thereafter, based on their answers, guidelines were developed and tested in 687 children aged between 6 and 12 years old and attending elementary schools. RESULTS: There was no standardization for clinical recognition of MB among orthodontists. The most common procedures performed were inefficient to recognize differences between MB by habit or obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines proposed herein facilitate clinical recognition of MB, help clinicians to differentiate between habit and obstruction, suggest the most appropriate treatment for each case, and avoid maintenance of mouth breathing patterns during adulthood. PMID:26352843

  6. Guidelines proposal for clinical recognition of mouth breathing children.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Maria Christina Thomé; Casagrande, Camila Ferreira; Teixeira, Lícia Pacheco; Finck, Nathalia Silveira; de Araújo, Maria Teresa Martins

    2015-01-01

    Mouth breathing (MB) is an etiological factor for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) during childhood. The habit of breathing through the mouth may be perpetuated even after airway clearance. Both habit and obstruction may cause facial muscle imbalance and craniofacial changes. The aim of this paper is to propose and test guidelines for clinical recognition of MB and some predisposing factors for SDB in children. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 110 orthodontists regarding their procedures for clinical evaluation of MB and their knowledge about SDB during childhood. Thereafter, based on their answers, guidelines were developed and tested in 687 children aged between 6 and 12 years old and attending elementary schools. There was no standardization for clinical recognition of MB among orthodontists. The most common procedures performed were inefficient to recognize differences between MB by habit or obstruction. The guidelines proposed herein facilitate clinical recognition of MB, help clinicians to differentiate between habit and obstruction, suggest the most appropriate treatment for each case, and avoid maintenance of mouth breathing patterns during adulthood.

  7. From Human to Artificial Mouth, From Basics to Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mielle, Patrick; Tarrega, Amparo; Salles, Christian; Gorria, Patrick; Liodenot, Jean Jacques; Liaboeuf, Joeel; Andrejewski, Jean-Luc

    2009-05-23

    Sensory perception of the flavor release during the eating of a food piece is highly dependent upon mouth parameters. Major limitations have been reported during in-vivo flavor release studies, such as marked intra- and inter-individual variability. To overcome these limitations, a chewing simulator has been developed to mimic the human mastication of food samples. The device faithfully reproduces most of the functions of the human mouth. The active cell comprises several mobile parts that can accurately reproduce shear and compression strengths and tongue functions in real-time, according to data previously collected in-vivo. The mechanical functionalities of the system were validated using peanuts, with a fair agreement with the human data. Flavor release can be monitored on-line using either API-MS or chemical sensors, or off-line using HPLC for non-volatile compounds. Couplings with API-MS detectors have shown differences in the kinetics of flavour release, as a function of the cheeses composition. Data were also collected for the analysis of taste compounds released during the human chewing but are not available yet for the Artificial Mouth.

  8. Reaching for the red planet

    PubMed

    David, L

    1996-05-01

    The distant shores of Mars were reached by numerous U.S. and Russian spacecraft throughout the 1960s to mid 1970s. Nearly 20 years have passed since those successful missions which orbited and landed on the Martian surface. Two Soviet probes headed for the planet in July, 1988, but later failed. In August 1993, the U.S. Mars Observer suddenly went silent just three days before it was to enter orbit around the planet and was never heard from again. In late 1996, there will be renewed activity on the launch pads with three probes departing for the red planet: 1) The U.S. Mars Global Surveyor will be launched in November on a Delta II rocket and will orbit the planet for global mapping purposes; 2) Russia's Mars '96 mission, scheduled to fly in November on a Proton launcher, consists of an orbiter, two small stations which will land on the Martian surface, and two penetrators that will plow into the terrain; and finally, 3) a U.S. Discovery-class spacecraft, the Mars Pathfinder, has a December launch date atop a Delta II booster. The mission features a lander and a microrover that will travel short distances over Martian territory. These missions usher in a new phase of Mars exploration, setting the stage for an unprecedented volley of spacecraft that will orbit around, land on, drive across, and perhaps fly at low altitudes over the planet.

  9. Role of triamcinolone in radiation enteritis management

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Eren; Ozturk, Aysen Sevgi; Orhun, Haluk; Ulger, Sukran

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of triamcinolone in the management of acute and chronic enteritis caused by pelvic radiotherapy. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with rectum adenocarcinoma or endometrium adenocarcinoma were studied. We compared the results of 14 patients treated with injected triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with those of 14 patients who were not treated with TA. For the TA group, 40 mg of TA was injected intramuscularly on the 1st, 11th and 21st d of radiotherapy; the control group received no injections. All of the study participants had a median age of 65 years, had undergone postoperative radiotherapy and were evaluated weekly using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Acute Morbidity Score Criteria, and complete blood counts for every 10 d. RESULTS: Triamcinolone was found to effectively prevent and treat radiation-induced acute gastrointestinal (enteritis) and genitourinary (cystitis) side effects (P = 0.022 and P = 0.023). For the lower GI side effect follow up, 11 patients in the control group had Grade 2 toxicity and 3 patients had Grade 1 toxicity. In the TA group, 5 patients had Grade 2 toxicity and 9 patients had Grade 1 toxicity. For the genitourinary system side effect follow up, 4 patients had Grade 2 toxicity and 6 patients had Grade 1 toxicity. Additionally, 2 patients had Grade 2 toxicity and 2 patients had Grade 1 toxicity. The neutrophil counts did not differ between the TA group and the control group. There was no meaningful difference between age groups and primary cancers. At the 12th mo of follow up, there were no differences between groups for chronic side effects. CONCLUSION: Triamcinolone is a moderately potent steroid, that is inexpensive and has a good safety profile. It would be beneficial for reducing medical expenses related to treatment of radiation induced enteritis. PMID:24764671

  10. Prediction of enteric methane emissions from cattle.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Luis E; Strathe, Anders B; Fadel, James G; Casper, David P; Kebreab, Ermias

    2014-07-01

    Agriculture has a key role in food production worldwide and it is a major component of the gross domestic product of several countries. Livestock production is essential for the generation of high quality protein foods and the delivery of foods in regions where animal products are the main food source. Environmental impacts of livestock production have been examined for decades, but recently emission of methane from enteric fermentation has been targeted as a substantial greenhouse gas source. The quantification of methane emissions from livestock on a global scale relies on prediction models because measurements require specialized equipment and may be expensive. The predictive ability of current methane emission models remains poor. Moreover, the availability of information on livestock production systems has increased substantially over the years enabling the development of more detailed methane prediction models. In this study, we have developed and evaluated prediction models based on a large database of enteric methane emissions from North American dairy and beef cattle. Most probable models of various complexity levels were identified using a Bayesian model selection procedure and were fitted under a hierarchical setting. Energy intake, dietary fiber and lipid proportions, animal body weight and milk fat proportion were identified as key explanatory variables for predicting emissions. Models here developed substantially outperformed models currently used in national greenhouse gas inventories. Additionally, estimates of repeatability of methane emissions were lower than the ones from the literature and multicollinearity diagnostics suggested that prediction models are stable. In this context, we propose various enteric methane prediction models which require different levels of information availability and can be readily implemented in national greenhouse gas inventories of different complexity levels. The utilization of such models may reduce errors

  11. Gibson, Solovyev, Budarin and Precourt enter Astrovan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Mission Commander Robert L. 'Hoot' Gibson; Mir 19 Mission Commander Anatoly Y. Solovyev and Flight Engineer Nikolai M. Budarin; and STS-71 Pilot Charles J. Precourt get ready to enter the Astrovan parked outside the Operations and Checkout Building. The seven-member STS-71 crew is headed for the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, destined for an historic rendezvous and docking with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis is scheduled to lift off during a 10-minute window opening at 4:43:02 p.m. EDT on 6/24/95.

  12. Oral Vaccine for Immunization against Enteric Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    typhoid fever and/or at least one other enterically acquired disease. A bivalent oral vaccine is described wherein the non-typhoid protective antigen is the plasmid-encoded form I antigen of Shigella sonnei. A protective antigen from Shitella sonnei was transferred to a streptomycin resistant mutant of S. typhi strain Ty21a. The transconjugant S. typhi strain expressed both S. typhi and S. sonnei antigens and protected experimental animals against lethal infections with either S. typhi and S. sonnei. This strain is considered to be useful as a vaccine against typhoid

  13. S-IB Stage Entering Point Barrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The Saturn 1B first stage (S-IB) enters the NASA barge Point Barrow, in March 1968. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) utilized a number of water transportation craft to transport the Saturn stages to-and-from the manufacturing facilities and test sites, as well as delivery to the Kennedy Space Center for launch. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized the eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  14. S-IB Stage Entering Point Barrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The Saturn 1B first stage (S-IB) enters the NASA barge Point Barrow, in March 1968. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) utilized a number of water transportation craft to transport the Saturn stages to-and-from the manufacturing facilities and test sites, as well as delivery to the Kennedy Space Center for launch. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized the eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  15. Enteric Viral Surrogate Reduction by Chitosan.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert; Zivanovic, Svetlana; Davidson, P Michael; D'Souza, Doris H

    2015-12-01

    Enteric viruses are a major problem in the food industry, especially as human noroviruses are the leading cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Chitosan is known to be effective against some enteric viral surrogates, but more detailed studies are needed to determine the precise application variables. The main objective of this work was to determine the effect of increasing chitosan concentration (0.7-1.5% w/v) on the cultivable enteric viral surrogates, feline calicivirus (FCV-F9), murine norovirus (MNV-1), and bacteriophages (MS2 and phiX174) at 37 °C. Two chitosans (53 and 222 kDa) were dissolved in water (53 kDa) or 1% acetic acid (222 KDa) at 0.7-1.5%, and were then mixed with each virus to obtain a titer of ~5 log plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL. These mixtures were incubated for 3 h at 37 °C. Controls included untreated viruses in phosphate-buffered saline and viruses were enumerated by plaque assays. The 53 kDa chitosan at the concentrations tested reduced FCV-F9, MNV-1, MS2, and phi X174 by 2.6-2.9, 0.1-0.4, 2.6-2.8, and 0.7-0.9 log PFU/mL, respectively, while reduction by 222 kDa chitosan was 2.2-2.4, 0.8-1.0, 2.6-5.2, and 0.5-0.8 log PFU/mL, respectively. The 222 kDa chitosan at 1 and 0.7% w/v in acetic acid (pH 4.5) caused the greatest reductions of MS2 by 5.2 logs and 2.6 logs, respectively. Overall, chitosan treatments showed the greatest reduction of MS2, followed by FCV-F9, phi X174, and MNV-1. These two chitosans may contribute to the reduction of enteric viruses at the concentrations tested but would require use of other hurdles to eliminate food borne viruses.

  16. In vivo-in vitro comparison of deposition in three mouth-throat models with Qvar and Turbuhaler inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Gilbertson, Kyle; Finlay, Warren H

    2007-01-01

    In vitro polydisperse aerosol deposition in three mouth-throat models, namely, the USP (United States Pharmacopeia) mouth-throat (induction port), idealized mouth-throat, and highly idealized mouth-throat, was investigated experimentally. Aerosol particles emitted from two commercial inhalers, Qvar (pMDI) and Turbuhaler (DPI), were used. The in vitro deposition results in these three mouth-throat models were compared with in vivo data available from the literature. For the DPI, mouth-throat deposition was 57.3 +/- 4.5% for the USP mouth-throat, 67.8 +/- 2.2% for the idealized mouth-throat, and 69.3 +/- 1.1% for the highly idealized mouth-throat, which are all relatively close to the in vivo value of 65.8 +/- 10.1%. In contrast, for the pMDI, aerosol deposition in the idealized mouth-throat (25.8 +/- 4.2%) and the highly idealized mouth-throat (24.9 +/- 2.8%) agrees with the in vivo data (29.0 +/- 18.0%) reported in the literature better than that for the USP mouth-throat (12.2 +/- 2.7%). In both cases, the USP mouth-throat gives the lowest deposition among the three mouth-throat models studied. In summary, both the idealized mouth-throat and highly idealized mouth-throat improve the accuracy of predicted mean in vivo deposition in the mouth-throat region. This result hints at the potential applicability of either the idealized mouth-throat or highly idealized mouth-throat as a future USP mouth-throat standard to provide mean value prediction of in vivo mouth-throat deposition.

  17. Red Bull Stratos Presentation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Red Bull Stratos High Performance Director Andy Walshe & Technical Project Director Art Thompson share the Stratos story with JSC. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner reached 128,100 ...

  18. American Red Cross

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Resources Connect with Us Careers Career Opportunities Culture & Values Benefits University Programs Get Help Disaster Relief & ... Join the Home Fire campaign and help solve America's biggest disaster threat. JOIN US Shop the Red ...

  19. Red Hill Updates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  20. 9 CFR 94.1 - Regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.1 Section 94.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY...-mouth disease exists; importations prohibited. (a) APHIS considers rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease...