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Sample records for enterica serotypes westhampton

  1. Development of a rapid serotyping method for Salmonella enterica using serotype-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteriditis (S. Enteriditis) is the leading cause of salmonellosis worldwide, including the USA. Many S. enterica serotypes known to cause foodborne disease are associated with broiler meat contamination. While some serotypes are specific to birds (S. e...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Saintpaul Strain S-70, Isolated from an Aquatic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Acosta, Mitzi; Medrano-Félix, Andrés; Jiménez, Maribel; Gómez-Gil, Bruno; León-Félix, Josefina; Amarillas, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is a pathogen of worldwide importance, causing disease in a vast range of hosts, including humans. We report the genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Saintpaul strain S-70, isolated from an aquatic environment. PMID:24336367

  3. Salmonella enterica prevalence and serotype distribution in swine at slaughter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyze data available from multiple studies conducted by our research team estimating the prevalence of S. enterica, and the serotype distribution in swine at slaughter, based on different sample types. A total of 1,110 pigs from three large capaci...

  4. Rapid molecular pathotyping of major salmonella enterica serotypes based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the adenylate cyclase (cyaA) gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteriditis (S. Enteriditis) is the leading cause of salmonellosis worldwide, including the USA. Many S. enterica serotypes known to cause foodborne disease are associated with broiler meat contamination. While some serotypes are specific...

  5. Salmonella enterica Serotype Arizonae Meningitis in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    Lakew, Wubishet; Girma, Abayneh; Triche, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Typhoidal and nontyphoidal salmonella infections are common causes of gastroenteritis in the community. However, salmonella only rarely causes invasive infections like meningitis. We report a 13-day-old female neonate with signs and symptoms of meningitis whose cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture showed Salmonella enterica serotype Arizonae that was sensitive to ceftriaxone. She presented with fever and failure to feed for 2 days. Despite prompt treatment with ampicillin, gentamicin, and ceftriaxone, she developed communicating hydrocephalus, frequent seizures, and coma that progressed to death after 2 weeks of hospitalization. Salmonella enterica serotype Arizonae is a rare cause of human infection known to leading to meningitis symptoms similar to those caused by other salmonella species. This is the first report of it as a cause of meningitis in a child under one month of age. Therefore, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of Gram-negative bacillary meningitis in immunocompromised children, neonates, and those with contacts with reptiles.

  6. Food poisoning due to Salmonella enterica serotype weltevreden in Mangalore.

    PubMed

    Antony, B; Dias, M; Shetty, A K; Rekha, B

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak of food poisoning due to Salmonella enterica serotype Weltevreden ( S.weltevreden ) involving 34 students has been reported from a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore. The symptoms developed 8-10 hours, after consuming a non- vegetarian dish, probably fish, from an outside caterer. The identity of the organism was confirmed at Central Research Institute, Kasauli. This report emphasizes the geographical distribution of this organism in the Coastal Karnataka region. S.Weltevreden may be overlooked due to the biochemical similarity to S. Paratyphi B & S. Typhimurium.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Oranienburg Strain S-76, Isolated from an Aquatic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Félix, Andrés; Estrada-Acosta, Mitzi; Jiménez, Maribel; Gómez-Gil, Bruno; León-Félix, Josefina; Amarillas, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is a widespread microorganism and a common causative agent of food-borne illnesses. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Oranienburg is highly prevalent in surface water from tropical ecosystems and is not commonly related to illnesses. Here, we report the first genome sequence of Salmonella Oranienburg strain S-76, isolated from an aquatic environment. PMID:24336368

  8. Development and application of novel SNP-based serotyping assays in targeting Salmonella enterica within the poultry production and processing continuum.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteriditis (S. Enteriditis) is the leading cause of salmonellosis worldwide. While some S. enterica serotypes are specific to birds, many represent human zoonotic pathogens, thus their presence and survival throughout the continuum of poultry production...

  9. Results of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype identification by Salmonella Check&Trace microarray in international External Quality Assurance Systems.

    PubMed

    Madaczak, Grzegorz; Szych, Jolanta; Wasiak, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes are identified by slide agglutination with specific antisera for somatic, flagellar and sometimes capsular antigens. An alternative way is genoserotyping using for example a microarray, eg. commercially available test Check&Trace Salmonella. The goal of this study was to evaluate the Check&Trace Salmonella microarray for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype identification, using Salmonella strains provided by reference laboratories during External Quality Assurance Systems organized for national reference laboratories by ECDC and WHO GFN. 80 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica have been tested using Check & Trace Salmonella (Check-Points BC, Netherlands). Also classical slide agglutination was performed according to EN ISO 6579:2003/Al:2007 norm, used as reference method. In the group of 80 tested strains, 66% were identified correctly, 4% gave uncertain results and 29% showed "Salmonella, genovar" without a serotype, of which 69% were not included in the CTS list of serotypes. Finally one strain has been recognized incorrectly. Because of IVD certification lack, the CTS test could not be recommended to clinical laboratories. AOAC-RI and OIE certification for test cause, that CTS could be used in most food, environmental and veterinary laboratories with the condition, that all unrecognized strains should be sent to a reference laboratory, to type according to EN ISO 6579:2003/Al:2007 norm, by KWM serotyping or other equal alternative methods.

  10. Specific discrimination of three pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes by carB-based oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-01-01

    It is important to rapidly and selectively detect and analyze pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica in contaminated food to reduce the morbidity and mortality of Salmonella infection and to guarantee food safety. In the present work, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing duplicate specific capture probes based on the carB gene, which encodes the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase large subunit, as a competent biomarker evaluated by genetic analysis to selectively and efficiently detect and discriminate three S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes: Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, and Typhimurium. Using the developed microarray system, three serotype targets were successfully analyzed in a range as low as 1.6 to 3.1 nM and were specifically discriminated from each other without nonspecific signals. In addition, the constructed microarray did not have cross-reactivity with other common pathogenic bacteria and even enabled the clear discrimination of the target Salmonella serotype from a bacterial mixture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that our novel carB-based oligonucleotide microarray can be used as an effective and specific detection system for S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes.

  11. Specific Discrimination of Three Pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes by carB-Based Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Seo, Jeong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    It is important to rapidly and selectively detect and analyze pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica in contaminated food to reduce the morbidity and mortality of Salmonella infection and to guarantee food safety. In the present work, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing duplicate specific capture probes based on the carB gene, which encodes the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase large subunit, as a competent biomarker evaluated by genetic analysis to selectively and efficiently detect and discriminate three S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes: Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, and Typhimurium. Using the developed microarray system, three serotype targets were successfully analyzed in a range as low as 1.6 to 3.1 nM and were specifically discriminated from each other without nonspecific signals. In addition, the constructed microarray did not have cross-reactivity with other common pathogenic bacteria and even enabled the clear discrimination of the target Salmonella serotype from a bacterial mixture. Therefore, these results demonstrated that our novel carB-based oligonucleotide microarray can be used as an effective and specific detection system for S. enterica subsp. enterica serotypes. PMID:24185846

  12. Complete Sequences of Six IncA/C Plasmids of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Newport.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria; Monday, Steven R; Muruvanda, Tim; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Rump, Lydia; Meng, Kevin; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Meng, Jianghong

    2015-02-26

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport has been a long-standing public health concern in the United States. We present the complete sequences of six IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived MDR S. Newport ranging from 80.1 to 158.5 kb. They shared a genetic backbone with S. Newport IncA/C plasmids pSN254 and pAM04528.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Subtyping Methods against a Whole- Genome-Sequencing Standard for Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    is to target hypervariable regions (i.e., regions of the bacterial chromosome with less genetic stability) in the bacterial genome to produce...related bacterial strains. Most S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates have been shown to be genetically homogeneous, making it difficult for...homogenous bacterial pathogens such as S. enterica serotype Enteritidis (14, 15). A recent WGS- based survey of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates

  14. Assignment of serotype to Salmonella enterica isolates obtained from poultry and their environment in Southern Brazil.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To assess diversity of Salmonella enterica serotypes present in poultry and their environment from Southern Brazil, the Kauffman-White-LeMinor (KWL) scheme was used to serotype a total of 155 isolates. Isolates were then re-examined with nested PCR and sequencing of the dkgB-linked Intergenic Sequ...

  15. Identification and molecular characterization of Salmonella spp. from unpasteurized orange juices and identification of new serotype Salmonella strain S. enterica serovar Tempe.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ashraf A; Melvin, Cathy D; Dagdag, Elsie B

    2007-08-01

    Several Salmonella enterica serotypes were isolated from unpasteurized orange juice samples analysed as a follow-up to an outbreak in 1999 of S. enterica serotype Muenchen in the Pacific Northwest regions of United States. Eleven S. enterica strains were serotyped and identified as S. enterica serotype Muenchen (2), S. enterica serotype Hidalgo (2), S. enterica serotype Alamo (1), S. enterica serotype Gaminera (2), S. enterica serotype Javiana (2) and a new serotyped strain S. enterica serotype Tempe (2). The identity of the new serotype S. enterica serovar Tempe serotype 30:b:1,7:z33 was confirmed by the National Salmonella Reference Laboratory at NCID/CDC, Atlanta. These strains were sensitive to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, tetracycline, streptomycin and sulfisoxazole antibiotics. Isolates were screened for invasion (invA) and virulence (spvC) genes using specific primers for these two genes by polymerase chain reaction. All strains were positive for invA gene giving 321-bp fragment, however negative to virulence spvC gene. For pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, Salmonella strain plugs were made and digested with XbaI and subjected to 18-h electrophoresis. The PFGE patterns were different for each S. enterica serotypes suggesting the several origins of contamination in outbreak. S. enterica serotype.

  16. Identification and characterization of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Albert isolates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Folster, Jason P; Campbell, Davina; Grass, Julian; Brown, Allison C; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Joseph, Lavin A; Plumblee, Jodie R; Walker, Carrie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Whichard, Jean M

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment of invasive salmonellosis is critical. The primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and resistance to these antimicrobial drugs may complicate treatment. At present, S. enterica is composed of more than 2,600 unique serotypes, which vary greatly in geographic prevalence, ecological niche, and the ability to cause human disease, and it is important to understand and mitigate the source of human infection, particularly when antimicrobial resistance is found. In this study, we identified and characterized 19 S. enterica serotype Albert isolates collected from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States during 2005 to 2013. All five isolates from nonhuman sources were obtained from turkeys or ground turkey, and epidemiologic data suggest poultry consumption or live-poultry exposure as the probable source of infection. S. enterica serotype Albert also appears to be geographically localized to the midwestern United States. All 19 isolates displayed multidrug resistance, including decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Turkeys are a likely source of multidrug-resistant S. enterica serotype Albert, and circulation of resistance plasmids, as opposed to the expansion of a single resistant strain, is playing a role. More work is needed to understand why these resistance plasmids spread and how their presence and the serotype they reside in contribute to human disease.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Albert Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Davina; Grass, Julian; Brown, Allison C.; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Joseph, Lavin A.; Plumblee, Jodie R.; Walker, Carrie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Whichard, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment of invasive salmonellosis is critical. The primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and resistance to these antimicrobial drugs may complicate treatment. At present, S. enterica is composed of more than 2,600 unique serotypes, which vary greatly in geographic prevalence, ecological niche, and the ability to cause human disease, and it is important to understand and mitigate the source of human infection, particularly when antimicrobial resistance is found. In this study, we identified and characterized 19 S. enterica serotype Albert isolates collected from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States during 2005 to 2013. All five isolates from nonhuman sources were obtained from turkeys or ground turkey, and epidemiologic data suggest poultry consumption or live-poultry exposure as the probable source of infection. S. enterica serotype Albert also appears to be geographically localized to the midwestern United States. All 19 isolates displayed multidrug resistance, including decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Turkeys are a likely source of multidrug-resistant S. enterica serotype Albert, and circulation of resistance plasmids, as opposed to the expansion of a single resistant strain, is playing a role. More work is needed to understand why these resistance plasmids spread and how their presence and the serotype they reside in contribute to human disease. PMID:25733501

  18. Development of a Rapid Multiplex PCR Technique for Determination of Salmonella enterica Serotypes Isolated from Pork and Poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: A multiplex PCR technique to discriminate Salmonella enterica serotypes was adapted to a high-throughput, automated assay. Methods: Fifteen target genes were chosen that varied in distribution among common Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from various hosts. These targets were dete...

  19. Assignment of serotype to Salmonella enterica isolates obtained from poultry and their environment in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pulido-Landínez, M; Sánchez-Ingunza, R; Guard, J; do Nascimento, V Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    To assess diversity of Salmonella enterica serotypes present in poultry and their environment from southern Brazil, the Kauffmann–White–Le Minor (KWL) scheme was used to serotype a total of 155 isolates. Isolates were then re-examined with nested PCR and sequencing of the dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR) region that assesses single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring around a 5S ribosomal gene. Serotypes identified were Heidelberg (40·6%), Enteritidis (34·2%), Hadar (8·4%), Typhimurium (3·9%), Gallinarum (3·2%), Agona (1·3%), Cerro (1·3%), Livingstone (1·3%), Infantis (0·6%), Isangi (0·6%), Mbandaka (0·6%), Montevideo (0·6%) and Senftenberg (0·6%). Three unique ISRs were detected from four strains. Day old chicks yielded only S. Enteritidis, whereas S. Heidelberg was most often associated with poultry carcasses. Overall agreement between KWL and ISR was 85·2%, with disagreement possibly due to the ability of ISR to detect mixtures of serotypes in culture. Overall, ISR provided more information than did KWL about the ecology of Salm. enterica on-farm. The O-antigen group D Salm. enterica serovars such as Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis appear susceptible to overgrowth by other serotypes. Significance and Impact of the Study Single nucleotide polymorphisms found in a group of poultry-associated Salmonella isolates from southern Brazil provided evidence of mixtures of serovar group D serotypes on-farm and in single samples from birds. This finding suggests that co-infection and interserotype competition of Salmonella enterica in poultry could impact the incidence of disease in animals or humans. In addition, unique serotypes were identified on-farm that escaped characterization by antibody typing. Application of cost-efficient and highly discriminatory genomic methods for assigning serotype may alter concepts about the epidemiology of Salm. enterica on-farm and in foods. PMID:23734786

  20. Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis based on Population Structure of Prevalent Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Prerak T.; den Bakker, Henk C.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tolar, Beth; Trees, Eija; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Frye, Jonathan G.; Porwollik, Steffen; Weimer, Bart C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Weinstock, George M.; Fields, Patricia I.; McClelland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. Its low genetic diversity, measured by fingerprinting methods, has made subtyping a challenge. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 125 S. enterica Enteritidis and 3 S. enterica serotype Nitra strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were filtered to identify 4,887 reliable loci that distinguished all isolates from each other. Our whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism typing approach was robust for S. enterica Enteritidis subtyping with combined data for different strains from 2 different sequencing platforms. Five major genetic lineages were recognized, which revealed possible patterns of geographic and epidemiologic distribution. Analyses on the population dynamics and evolutionary history estimated that major lineages emerged during the 17th–18th centuries and diversified during the 1920s and 1950s. PMID:25147968

  1. Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica serotypes and food Commodities, United States, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brendan R; Griffin, Patricia M; Cole, Dana; Walsh, Kelly A; Chai, Shua J

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are transmitted not only by animal-derived foods but also by vegetables, fruits, and other plant products. To clarify links between Salmonella serotypes and specific foods, we examined the diversity and predominance of food commodities implicated in outbreaks of salmonellosis during 1998-2008. More than 80% of outbreaks caused by serotypes Enteritidis, Heidelberg, and Hadar were attributed to eggs or poultry, whereas >50% of outbreaks caused by serotypes Javiana, Litchfield, Mbandaka, Muenchen, Poona, and Senftenberg were attributed to plant commodities. Serotypes Typhimurium and Newport were associated with a wide variety of food commodities. Knowledge about these associations can help guide outbreak investigations and control measures.

  2. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance of Human Nontyphoidal Isolates of Salmonella enterica from Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns to 20 different antimicrobials of 150 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from stools of diarrhoeal patients on the island of Crete over the period January 2011-December 2012. Among the S. enterica serotypes recovered, Enteritidis was the most prevalent (37.3%), followed by Typhimurium (28.7%) and Newport (8.7%). No resistance was detected to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and cotrimoxazole were 9.3%, 4%, 2%, 15.3%, and 8.7%, respectively. Resistance to ≥4 antibiotics was primarily observed for serotypes Typhimurium and Hadar. Enteritidis remains the predominant serotype in Crete. Although low resistance to most antimicrobials was detected, continued surveillance of susceptibility is needed due to the risk of resistance.

  3. Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi, United States, 1999–2008

    PubMed Central

    Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Shin, Sanghyuk; Harvey, Emily; Joyce, Kevin; Theobald, Lisa; Nygren, Benjamin L.; Pecic, Gary; Gay, Kathryn; Austin, Jana; Stuart, Andrew; Blanton, Elizabeth; Mintz, Eric D.; Whichard, Jean M.; Barzilay, Ezra J.

    2011-01-01

    We report 9 ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi isolates submitted to the US National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System during 1999–2008. The first 2 had indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and identical gyrA and parC mutations. Eight of the 9 patients had traveled to India within 30 days before illness onset. PMID:21749779

  4. Kinetics of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104 growth and inactivation in pasteurised liquid egg products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential impact of intentional post-pasteurisation contamination of liquid egg products with the multi-antibiotic resistant pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) was assessed by determining the viability of this bacterium in whole egg, albumen and 10% sug...

  5. Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008–2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible. PMID:25988406

  6. Invasive Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Infections, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2007–2011

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Benedikt; Le Hello, Simon; Lunguya, Octavie; Lejon, Veerle; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 is associated with high rates of drug resistance, bloodstream infections, and death. To determine whether ST313 is dominant in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we studied 180 isolates collected during 2007–2011; 96% belonged to CRISPOL type CT28, which is associated with ST313. PMID:24655438

  7. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  8. Quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with international travel.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Allison T; Vieira, Antonio R; Huang, Jennifer Y; Whichard, Jean; Cole, Dana; Karp, Beth E

    2014-11-01

    We found a strong association between nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections in the United States and recent international travel by linking Salmonella Enteritidis data from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System and the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network.

  9. Prevalence of ColE1-like plasmids and kanamycinr resistance genes in Salmonella enterica serotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multi-antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes are increasing in prevalence and concern in human and animal health. Many strains carry resistance determinants on plasmids; current practices focus heavily on large plasmids, and the role that small plasmids play in resistance gene transfer ...

  10. Genomic epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis based on population structure of prevalent lineages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. The low genetic diversity of SE measured by fingerprinting methods has made subtyping a challenge. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing to characterize a total of 125 SE and Sa...

  11. Rapid Molecular Determination of Serotype from Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: The conventional serotyping of Salmonella Enterica is time consuming, costly, and requires highly skilled staff. In the present study, we report a multiplex PCR typing method using capillary electrophoresis for fragment analysis that allows for the identification of the 30 most common h...

  12. Complete closed genome sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium and Newport, isolated from beef, cattle, and humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica are a versatile group of bacteria with a wide range in virulence potential. To facilitate genome comparisons across this virulence spectrum, we present eight complete closed genome sequences of four S. enterica serotypes (Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium, and Newport) isolated fro...

  13. DNA Sequence-Based Subtyping and Evolutionary Analysis of Selected Salmonella enterica Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sukhnanand, Sharinne; Alcaine, Sam; Warnick, Lorin D.; Su, Wan-Lin; Hof, Jessica; Craver, Mary Pat J.; McDonough, Patrick; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    While serotyping and phage typing have been used widely to characterize Salmonella isolates, sensitive subtyping methods that allow for evolutionary analyses are essential for examining Salmonella transmission, ecology, and evolution. A set of 25 Salmonella enterica isolates, representing five clinically relevant serotypes (serotypes Agona, Heidelberg, Schwarzengrund, Typhimurium, and Typhimurium var. Copenhagen) was initially used to develop a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for Salmonella targeting seven housekeeping and virulence genes (panB, fimA, aceK, mdh, icdA, manB, and spaN). A total of eight MLST types were found among the 25 isolates sequenced. A good correlation between MLST types and Salmonella serotypes was observed; only one serotype Typhimurium var. Copenhagen isolate displayed an MLST type otherwise typical for serotype Typhimurium isolates. Since manB, fimA, and mdh allowed for the highest subtype discrimination among the initial 25 isolates, we chose these three genes to perform DNA sequencing of an additional 41 Salmonella isolates representing a larger diversity of serotypes. This “three-gene sequence typing scheme” allowed discrimination of 25 sequence types (STs) among a total of 66 isolates; STs correlated well with serotypes and allowed within-serotype differentiation for 9 of the 12 serotypes characterized. Phylogenetic analyses showed that serotypes Kentucky and Newport could each be separated into two distinct, statistically well supported evolutionary lineages. Our results show that a three-gene sequence typing scheme allows for accurate serotype prediction and for limited subtype discrimination among clinically relevant serotypes of Salmonella. Three-gene sequence typing also supports the notion that Salmonella serotypes represent both monophyletic and polyphyletic lineages. PMID:16081897

  14. Chromosomal Rearrangements in Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Affecting Molecular Typing in Outbreak Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Echeita, M. A.; Usera, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi strains belonging to eight different outbreaks of typhoid fever that occurred in Spain between 1989 and 1994 were analyzed by ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. For three outbreaks, two different patterns were detected for each outbreak. The partial digestion analysis by the intron-encoded endonuclease I-CeuI of the two different strains from each outbreak provided an excellent tool for examining the organization of the genomes of epidemiologically related strains. S. enterica serotype Typhi seems to be more susceptible than other serotypes to genetic rearrangements produced by homologous recombinations between rrn operons; these rearrangements do not substantially alter the stability or survival of the bacterium. We conclude that genetic rearrangements can occur during the emergence of an outbreak. PMID:9650981

  15. Analysis of Molecular Epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Isolates by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Bacteriophage Typing

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  16. Isolation of Salmonella enterica Serotype Newport from a Partly Ruptured Splenic Abscess in a Traveler Returning from Zanzibar▿

    PubMed Central

    Tappe, Dennis; Müller, Andreas; Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Frosch, Matthias; Stich, August

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport is a pathogen of growing importance because of its epidemic spread in dairy cattle and increasing rate of antimicrobial resistance. Human infections, however, are rare. We report a case of a splenic abscess in a young traveler returning from East Africa. PMID:17634302

  17. Plasmid profiles as an epidemiological marker for Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis foodborne outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Luján, R; Echeita, A; Usera, M A; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Alonso, R; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1990-06-01

    The incidence of enteritidis serotype of Salmonella enterica in salmonellae infections has steadily increased in Spain from 27.1% in 1982 up to 63.4% in 1987. Given this high incidence, we have studied the plasmid profiles of Enteritidis isolates to subclassify them. Different profiles were observed in 50 isolates. In 13 Enteritidis serotype outbreaks, up to 5 different plasmid profiles were found. Each outbreak correlated with a single plasmid profile except in one case where plasmids of two different profiles were observed in strains from the same outbreak.

  18. Tigecycline therapy for bacteremia and aortitis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Chi-Chung; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2016-02-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella species represent a significant cause of aortitis. Few antimicrobial agents can be used when the patient is allergic or intolerable to cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones. Here, we report a case of bacteremia and aortitis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis. This patient was cured by initial parenteral tigecycline and subsequent oral ciprofloxacin without surgical intervention. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi, Gulf of Guinea Region, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Baltazar, Murielle; Ngandjio, Antoinette; Holt, Kathryn Elizabeth; Lepillet, Elodie; Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Collard, Jean-Marc; Bercion, Raymond; Nzouankeu, Ariane; Le Hello, Simon; Dougan, Gordon; Fonkoua, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    We identified 3 lineages among multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi isolates in the Gulf of Guinea region in Africa during the 2000s. However, the MDR H58 haplotype, which predominates in southern Asia and Kenya, was not identified. MDR quinolone-susceptible isolates contained a 190-kb incHI1 pST2 plasmid or a 50-kb incN pST3 plasmid. PMID:25811307

  20. Multiple Clones within Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Phage Type DT104

    PubMed Central

    Markogiannakis, Antonis; Tassios, Panayotis T.; Lambiri, Maria; Ward, Linda R.; Kourea-Kremastinou, Jenny; Legakis, Nicholas J.; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis C.

    2000-01-01

    Six distinct clones were present among Greek multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium phage type DT104, since isolates belonging to resistance phenotypes including the ACSSuT (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline) core could be distinguished with respect to their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, int1 integron structures, and presence or absence of antibiotic resistance genes ant(3")-Ia, pse-1, and tem-1. PMID:10699039

  1. Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Bacteremia Complicating Pregnancy in the Third Trimester

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krunal; Gittens-Williams, Lisa; Apuzzio, Joseph J.; Martimucci, Kristina; Williams, Shauna F.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is an anaerobic gram-negative enteric rod that causes infection when contaminated food or water is ingested and may cause illness in pregnancy. Case. This is a patient who presented at 31 weeks' gestation with abdominal pain and fever and was diagnosed with S. Typhi bacteremia. Conclusion. S. Typhi should be considered in febrile patients with recent travel presenting with abdominal discomfort with or without elevated liver enzymes. PMID:28203469

  2. Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research identified that the 5S ribosomal (rrn) gene and associated flanking sequences that are closely linked to the dkgB gene of Salmonella enterica were highly variable between serotypes, but not between subpopulations within the same serotype (PMID: 17005008). The degree of variability ...

  3. Predicting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes by Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic Sequence-Based PCR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The DiversiLabTM System, which employs repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) to genotype microorganisms, was evaluated as a method to predict the serotype of Salmonella isolates. Two hundred and thirty-three Salmonella isolates belonging to 14 frequently isolated serotypes f...

  4. Multilocus Sequence Typing as a Replacement for Serotyping in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhemin; Sangal, Vartul; Krauland, Mary G.; Hale, James L.; Harbottle, Heather; Uesbeck, Alexandra; Dougan, Gordon; Harrison, Lee H.; Brisse, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica is traditionally subdivided into serovars by serological and nutritional characteristics. We used Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) to assign 4,257 isolates from 554 serovars to 1092 sequence types (STs). The majority of the isolates and many STs were grouped into 138 genetically closely related clusters called eBurstGroups (eBGs). Many eBGs correspond to a serovar, for example most Typhimurium are in eBG1 and most Enteritidis are in eBG4, but many eBGs contained more than one serovar. Furthermore, most serovars were polyphyletic and are distributed across multiple unrelated eBGs. Thus, serovar designations confounded genetically unrelated isolates and failed to recognize natural evolutionary groupings. An inability of serotyping to correctly group isolates was most apparent for Paratyphi B and its variant Java. Most Paratyphi B were included within a sub-cluster of STs belonging to eBG5, which also encompasses a separate sub-cluster of Java STs. However, diphasic Java variants were also found in two other eBGs and monophasic Java variants were in four other eBGs or STs, one of which is in subspecies salamae and a second of which includes isolates assigned to Enteritidis, Dublin and monophasic Paratyphi B. Similarly, Choleraesuis was found in eBG6 and is closely related to Paratyphi C, which is in eBG20. However, Choleraesuis var. Decatur consists of isolates from seven other, unrelated eBGs or STs. The serological assignment of these Decatur isolates to Choleraesuis likely reflects lateral gene transfer of flagellar genes between unrelated bacteria plus purifying selection. By confounding multiple evolutionary groups, serotyping can be misleading about the disease potential of S. enterica. Unlike serotyping, MLST recognizes evolutionary groupings and we recommend that Salmonella classification by serotyping should be replaced by MLST or its equivalents. PMID:22737074

  5. Genetic Diversity of Clinical and Environmental Strains of Salmonella enterica Serotype Weltevreden Isolated in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Thong, K. L.; Goh, Y. L.; Radu, S.; Noorzaleha, S.; Yasin, R.; Koh, Y. T.; Lim, V. K. E.; Rusul, G.; Puthucheary, S. D.

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of food-borne salmonellosis due to Salmonella enterica serotype Weltevreden is reported to be on the increase in Malaysia. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping method was used to assess the extent of genetic diversity and clonality of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden strains from humans and the environment. PFGE of XbaI-digested chromosomal DNA from 95 strains of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden gave 39 distinct profiles with a wide range of Dice coefficients (0.27 to 1.00), indicating that PFGE is very discriminative and that multiple clones of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden exist among clinical and environmental isolates. Strains of one dominant pulsotype (pulsotype X1/X2) appeared to be endemic in this region, as they were consistently recovered from humans with salmonellosis between 1996 and 2001 and from raw vegetables. In addition, the sharing of similar PFGE profiles among isolates from humans, vegetables, and beef provides indirect evidence of the possible transmission of salmonellosis from contaminated raw vegetables and meat to humans. Furthermore, the recurrence of PFGE profile X21 among isolates found in samples of vegetables from one wet market indicated the persistence of this clone. The environment in the wet markets may represent a major source of cross-contamination of vegetables with Salmonella serotype Weltevreden. Antibiotic sensitivity tests showed that the clinical isolates of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden remained drug sensitive but that the vegetable isolates were resistant to at least two antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to compare clinical and environmental isolates of Salmonella serotype Weltevreden in Malaysia. PMID:12089269

  6. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-09-20

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis.

  7. Heterogeneity of Persistence of Salmonella enterica Serotype Senftenberg Strains Could Explain the Emergence of this Serotype in Poultry Flocks

    PubMed Central

    Boumart, Zineb; Roche, Sylvie M.; Lalande, Françoise; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Menanteau, Pierrette; Gabriel, Irène; Weill, François-Xavier; Velge, Philippe; Chemaly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Senftenberg (S. Senftenberg) has recently become more frequent in poultry flocks. Moreover some strains have been implicated in severe clinical cases. To explain the causes of this emergence in farm animals, 134 S. Senftenberg isolates from hatcheries, poultry farms and human clinical cases were analyzed. Persistent and non-persistent strains were identified in chicks. The non-persistent strains disappeared from ceca a few weeks post inoculation. This lack of persistence could be related to the disappearance of this serotype from poultry farms in the past. In contrast, persistent S. Senftenberg strains induced an intestinal asymptomatic carrier state in chicks similar to S. Enteritidis, but a weaker systemic infection than S. Enteritidis in chicks and mice. An in vitro analysis showed that the low infectivity of S. Senftenberg is in part related to its low capacity to invade enterocytes and thus to translocate the intestinal barrier. The higher capacity of persistent than non-persistent strains to colonize and persist in the ceca of chickens could explain the increased persistence of S. Senftenberg in poultry flocks. This trait might thus present a human health risk as these bacteria could be present in animals before slaughter and during food processing. PMID:22545136

  8. Contribution of Flagellin Pattern Recognition to Intestinal Inflammation during Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Sebastian E.; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Haneda, Takeshi; Winter, Maria G.; Wilson, R. Paul; Russell, Joseph M.; Henry, Thomas; Tran, Quynh T.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Gomez, Gabriel; Bevins, Charles L.; Rüssmann, Holger; Monack, Denise M.; Adams, L. Garry; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium causes acute inflammatory diarrhea in humans. Flagella contribute to intestinal inflammation, but the mechanism remains unclear since most mutations abrogating pattern recognition of flagellin also prevent motility and reduce bacterial invasion. To determine the contribution of flagellin pattern recognition to the generation of innate immune responses, we compared in two animal models a nonmotile, but flagellin-expressing and -secreting serotype Typhimurium strain (flgK mutant) to a nonmotile, non-flagellin-expressing strain (flgK fliC fljB mutant). In vitro, caspase-1 can be activated by cytosolic delivery of flagellin, resulting in release of the interferon gamma inducing factor interleukin-18 (IL-18). Experiments with streptomycin-pretreated caspase-1-deficient mice suggested that induction of gamma interferon expression in the murine cecum early (12 h) after serotype Typhimurium infection was caspase-1 dependent but independent of flagellin pattern recognition. In addition, mRNA levels of the CXC chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine were markedly increased early after serotype Typhimurium infection of streptomycin-pretreated wild-type mice regardless of flagellin expression. In contrast, in bovine ligated ileal loops, flagellin pattern recognition contributed to increased mRNA levels of macrophage inflammatory protein 3α and more fluid accumulation at 2 h after infection. Collectively, our data suggest that pattern recognition of flagellin contributes to early innate host responses in the bovine ileal mucosa but not in the murine cecal mucosa. PMID:19237529

  9. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium fimbrial proteins serve as antigens during infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Andrea; Deridder, Sandra; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2005-09-01

    The Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium genome contains 13 operons with homology to fimbrial gene sequences. Here we investigated the role of 11 serotype Typhimurium fimbrial proteins, including FimA, AgfA (CsgA), BcfA, StbA, SthA, LpfA, PefA, StdA, StcA, StiA, and StfA, as antigens during the infection of genetically resistant mice (CBA). Upon the growth of serotype Typhimurium in standard laboratory broth culture, only the expression of FimA could be detected by Western blot analysis. The infection of mice with serotype Typhimurium grown in broth culture, followed by at least one subsequent infection, resulted in seroconversion of animals to FimA, AgfA, BcfA, StbA, SthA, LpfA, PefA, StdA, StcA, StiA, and StfA positivity. Most animals seroconverted to only a subset of these fimbrial antigens. The immunization of mice with glutathione S-transferase (GST)-FimA, GST-AgfA, GST-BcfA, GST-StbA, GST-SthA, GST-LpfA, GST-PefA, GST-StdA, GST-StcA, GST-StiA, and GST-StfA fusion proteins resulted in reduced fecal shedding of serotype Typhimurium during a challenge compared to that by a control group immunized with purified GST protein. Collectively, these data suggest that the expression of serotype Typhimurium fimbrial antigens is induced during the infection of mice.

  10. Comparison of dkgB-linked Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping to DNA Microarray Hydridization for Assigning Serotype to Salmonella Enterica.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Kauffman-White scheme has been used for decades to serotype Salmonella enterica, which is a pervasive and persistent cause of food-borne illness. Analysis of whole genomes of the bacterium has revealed that it is unlikely that the Kauffman-White scheme provides the level of discrimination requir...

  11. Typing and characterization of ColE1-like plasmids conferring kanamycin resistance in Salmonella enterica serotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Multi-antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes are increasing in prevalence and concern in human and animal health. Many strains carry resistance determinants on plasmids; current practices focus heavily on large plasmids and the role small plasmids play in resistance gene tra...

  12. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  13. Serotypes of Salmonella enterica Present in the Internal Organs of Mice Caught On-farm From 1995 – 1998.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    : Salmonella enterica is a persistent and pervasive pathogen that impacts the safety of the food supply, especially in regards to poultry and poultry products. The house mouse Mus musculus is a recognized risk factor for introduction on-farm. More information is needed about Salmonella serotypes tha...

  14. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Is Defined by Targeting to Compartments Lacking Lysosomal Membrane Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Jungnitz, Heidrun; Rohde, Manfred; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the generation of acquired immunity to infections by pathogenic microorganisms. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is known to survive and proliferate intracellularly within macrophages and nonphagocytic cells, but no data exist on how this pathogen interacts with DCs. In this report, we show the capacity of serotype Typhimurium to survive within the established mouse DC line CB1. In contrast to the case for the macrophage model, the compartments of DCs containing serotype Typhimurium are devoid of lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and the PhoPQ two-component regulatory system is not essential for pathogen intracellular survival. PMID:10768999

  15. Salmonella enterica Serotype 4,5,12:i:−, an Emerging Salmonella Serotype That Represents Multiple Distinct Clones ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Y.; Moreno Switt, A.; Davis, M. A.; Maurer, J.; McDonough, P. L.; Schoonmaker-Bopp, D. J.; Dumas, N. B.; Root, T.; Warnick, L. D.; Gröhn, Y. T.; Wiedmann, M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence, among human clinical cases, of Salmonella enterica serotype 4,5,12:i:−, a serotype antigenically similar to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium but lacking second-phase flagellar antigens, has increased considerably over the last 10 years. To probe the evolution and ecology of this emerging serotype, we characterized 190 Salmonella isolates initially classified as Salmonella serotypes 4,5,12:i:− (n = 90) and Typhimurium (n = 100) and obtained from various sources in the United States and Spain. These isolates were characterized into six sequence types (determined by multilocus sequence typing [MLST]) and 79 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types. The majority of Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− and Typhimurium isolates (85 and 84 isolates, respectively) represented a single MLST type. Existing genome information revealed different genome deletions (which included genes responsible for phase 2 flagellum expression) in four Spanish Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− isolates and one U.S. Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− isolate. Fifty-nine isolates of both serotypes, representing different sources and geographical locations as well as different molecular subtypes, were thus screened for the presence of six genes and one specific region, all of which were previously found to show variable presence among Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− and Typhimurium strains. All Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− isolates lacked the phase 2 flagella genes fljA and fljB, which were present in all Salmonella serotype Typhimurium isolates. While all Spanish Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− isolates carried the same deletion surrounding fljAB, all but two U.S. isolates showed a different genomic deletion; the two atypical U.S. isolates represented the “Spanish” deletion genotype and a unique deletion genotype. Salmonella serotype 4,5,12:i:− thus appears to represent at least two common clones, which cannot easily be differentiated with standard diagnostic

  16. Acquisition of extended-spectrum cephalosporin- and colistin-resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport by pilgrims during Hajj.

    PubMed

    Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Dia, Ndèye Méry; Gautret, Philippe; Benkouiten, Samir; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Drali, Tassadit; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Memish, Ziad; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Gatherings like the Hajj involving many people who travel from different parts of the world represent a risk for the acquisition and dissemination of infectious diseases. In this study, acquisition of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. in 2013 Hajj pilgrims from Marseille, France, was investigated. In total, 267 rectal swabs were collected from 129 participants before their departure and after their return from the pilgrimage as well as during the pilgrimage from patients with diarrhoea. Samples were screened for the presence of Salmonella using quantitative real-time PCR and culture. Whole-genome sequencing was performed to characterise one of the isolates, and the mechanism leading to colistin resistance was investigated. Six post-Hajj samples and one sample collected during a diarrhoea episode in Hajj were positive for Salmonella by real-time PCR, with five Salmonella enterica belonging to several serotypes recovered by culture, whereas no pre-Hajj sample was positive. Two of the isolates belonged to the epidemic Newport serotype, were resistant to cephalosporins, gentamicin and colistin, and harboured the bla(CTX-M-2) gene and a 12-nucleotide deletion in the pmrB gene leading to colistin resistance. This study shows that pilgrims acquired Salmonella bacteria, including a novel MDR clone, during the Hajj pilgrimage. This calls for more improved public health surveillance during Hajj because Salmonella is one of the most common diarrhoea-causing bacteria worldwide. Therefore, returning pilgrims could disseminate MDR bacteria worldwide upon returning to their home countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidemiological tracing of Salmonella enterica serotype Abortusovis from Spanish ovine flocks by PFGE fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Valdezate, S; Astorga, R; Herrera-León, S; Perea, A; Usera, M A; Huerta, B; Echeita, A

    2007-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Abortusovis, an ovine host-specific serotype, rare in most countries, is responsible for epidemic abortion episodes in Spain. With the aim of surveillance and detection of the spread of specific clones, 55 Abortusovis isolates collected during 1996-2001 from flocks in 11 provinces, were studied using XbaI-PFGE. Despite the fact that the strains were geographically and spatially related, PFGE demonstrated an epidemiologically acceptable discriminating power, identifying 20 clones (similarity, 52-96%). Clones Sabv6, 1, 5 were disseminated in seven, five and two areas respectively, while another 17 clones appeared in single places. Clones from nearby geographic regions showed a high relatedness (one band of difference in the PFGE profile) Sabv1-2-3, Sabv5-6, Sabv7-8, and Sabv13-14, suggesting a common ancestor. Co-isolation in the same flock (Sabv5-6, Sabv1-3, Sabv1-6) was detected. PFGE surveillance detected the predominance and widespread distribution of clone Sabv6 in 21 out of the 55 Abortusovis serotype episodes studied in Spain.

  18. International spread of an epidemic population of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198 resistant to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Hendriksen, Rene S; Doublet, Benoît; Fisher, Ian; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Whichard, Jean M; Bouchrif, Brahim; Fashae, Kayode; Granier, Sophie A; Jourdan-Da Silva, Nathalie; Cloeckaert, Axel; Threlfall, E John; Angulo, Frederick J; Aarestrup, Frank M; Wain, John; Weill, François-Xavier

    2011-09-01

    National Salmonella surveillance systems from France, England and Wales, Denmark, and the United States identified the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky displaying high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin. A total of 489 human cases were identified during the period from 2002 (3 cases) to 2008 (174 cases). These isolates belonged to a single clone defined by the multilocus sequence type ST198, the XbaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis cluster X1, and the presence of the Salmonella genomic island 1 variant SGI1-K. This clone was probably selected in 3 steps in Egypt during the 1990s and the early 2000s and has now spread to several countries in Africa and, more recently, in the Middle East. Poultry has been identified as a potential major vehicle for infection by this clone. Continued surveillance and appropriate control measures should be implemented by national and international authorities to limit the spread of this strain.

  19. DNA Sequence Analysis of Plasmids from Multidrug Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Heidelberg Isolates

    PubMed Central

    David, Donna E.; Tang, Hailin; Xu, Joshua; Nayak, Rajesh; Kaldhone, Pravin; Logue, Catherine M.; Foley, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc) A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations. PMID:23251446

  20. Generation and selection of anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies useful for serotyping Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Hiriart, Yanina; Serradell, Maria; Martínez, Araci; Sampaolesi, Sofia; Maciel, Dolores Gonzalez; Chabalgoity, Jose Alejandro; Yim, Lucía; Algorta, Gabriela; Rumbo, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In developing countries, bacterial acute gastroenteritis continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality among young children. Salmonellosis constitutes a major cause of infectious enteritis worldwide, most of them associated to the consumption of contaminated food products. Traditionally, Salmonella has been classified in serovars based on varieties of O and H surface antigens. In the present work we generated and characterized a panel of anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in order to select antibodies useful for detecting the H surface antigen. Four different MAbs were obtained by somatic hybridization of splenocytes. We found two MAbs that recognised regions of flagellin conserved among different Salmonella serovars. Other two MAbs recognised structures restricted to Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium, being one of them suitable for agglutination tests. Using a diverse panel of S. enterica serovars with different H antigen varieties we confirmed that this MAb agglutinates specifically S. Typhimurium (antigenic formula: 4,12:i:1,2) or other serovars expressing flagellar factor i. In conclusion, we generated a valuable immunochemical tool to be used in simple assays for serotyping of epidemiologically relevant strains. The capacity to characterize specific strains and determine the primary sources of Salmonella contamination generate valuable information of the epidemiology of this microorganism, contributing to the improvement of public health.

  1. Highly drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198-X1: a microbiological study.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Harrois, Dorothée; Bouchrif, Brahim; Sontag, Lucile; Elhani, Dalèle; Guibert, Véronique; Zerouali, Khalid; Weill, François-Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella enterica is a major global food-borne pathogen, causing life-threatening infections. Ciprofloxacin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) are the drugs of choice for severe infections. We previously reported a ciprofloxacin-resistant S. enterica serotype Kentucky (S Kentucky) ST198-X1 strain that emerged in Egypt and spread throughout Africa and the Middle East from 2002 to 2008. We aimed to monitor recent trends in the location of transmission and antimicrobial resistance of this strain. We analysed isolates of S Kentucky collected by the French national surveillance system for salmonellosis in France from Jan 1, 2000, to Dec 31, 2011, and at two sites in Casablanca, Morocco, between Jan 1, 2003, and Dec 31, 2011. We analysed patterns of travel of patients infected with a ciprofloxacin-resistant strain of S Kentucky. We identified isolates showing resistance to ESCs or decreased susceptibility to carbapenems, characterised isolates by XbaI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, and assessed mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs. 954 (1%) of 128,836 serotyped Salmonella spp isolates in France were identified as S Kentucky, as were 30 (13%) of 226 Salmonella spp isolates from Morocco. During 2000-08, 200 (40%) of 497 subculturable isolates of S Kentucky obtained in France were resistant to ciprofloxacin, compared with 376 (83%) of 455 isolates in 2009-11, suggesting a recent increase in ciprofloxacin resistance in France. Travel histories suggested S Kentucky infections originated predominantly in east Africa, north Africa, west Africa, and the Middle East, but also arose in India. We report several occurrences of acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15), plasmid-encoded cephalosporinase (CMY-2), or carbapenemase (OXA-48, VIM-2) genes by ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates of S Kentucky ST198-X1 from the Mediterranean area since 2009. Many of these highly drug-resistant isolates were

  2. Trends in Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Isolates from Humans in Belgium, 2009 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Mattheus, Wesley; Vanhoof, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    The Belgian National Reference Centre for Salmonella received 16,544 human isolates of Salmonella enterica between January 2009 and December 2013. Although 377 different serotypes were identified, the landscape is dominated by S. enterica serovars Typhimurium (55%) and Enteritidis (19%) in a ratio which is inverse to European Union averages. With outbreaks of Salmonella serotypes Ohio, Stanley, and Paratyphi B variant Java as prime examples, 20 serotypes displayed significant fluctuations in this 5-year period. Typhoid strains account for 1.2% of Belgian salmonellosis cases. Large-scale antibiotic susceptibility analyses (n = 4,561; panel of 12 antibiotics) showed declining resistance levels in S. Enteritis and Typhimurium isolates for 8 and 3 tested agents, respectively. Despite low overall resistance to ciprofloxacin (4.4%) and cefotaxime (1.6%), we identified clonal lineages of Salmonella serotypes Kentucky and Infantis displaying rising resistance against these clinically important drugs. Quinolone resistance is mainly mediated by serotype-specific mutations in GyrA residues Ser83 and Asp87 (92.2% not wild type), while an additional ParC_Ser80Ile mutation leads to ciprofloxacin resistance in 95.5% S. Kentucky isolates, which exceeds European averages. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) alleles qnrA1 (n = 1), qnrS (n = 9), qnrD1 (n = 4), and qnrB (n = 4) were found in only 3.0% of 533 isolates resistant to nalidixic acid. In cefotaxime-resistant isolates, we identified a broad range of Ambler class A and C β-lactamase genes (e.g., blaSHV-12, blaTEM-52, blaCTX-M-14, and blaCTX-M-15) commonly associated with members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. In conclusion, resistance to fluoroquinolones and cefotaxime remains rare in human S. enterica, but clonal resistant serotypes arise, and continued (inter)national surveillance is mandatory to understand the origin and routes of dissemination thereof. PMID:25385108

  3. Hemorrhagic colitis associated with Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis infection in a captive western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Tatiane A; Malta, Marcelo C C; Soave, Semíramis A; Tinoco, Herlandes P; Costa, Maria E L T; Pessanha, Angela T; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Coura, Fernanda M; Costa, Luciana F; Turchetti, Andreia P; Lobato, Francisco C F; Melo, Marilia M; Heinemann, Marcos B; Santos, Renato L

    2014-04-01

    Enteric diseases are among the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in gorillas, and it is often caused by bacteria. A thirteen-year-old captive female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) developed hemorrhagic diarrhea. Despite the treatment, the animal died 7 days after the onset of clinical signs. The animal was submitted to a thorough pathological and microbiological evaluation. Pathologic examination revealed a severe acute hemorrhagic colitis, neutrophilic splenitis, glomerulitis, and interstitial pneumonia. Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis was isolated from a mesenteric lymph node. A diagnosis of hemorrhagic colitis associated with Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis was established. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Diagnostic and Public Health Dilemma of Lactose-Fermenting Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium in Cattle in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Patrick L.; Shin, Sang J.; Lein, Donald H.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of lactose-fermenting Salmonella strains in clinical case materials presented to microbiology laboratories presents problems in detection and identification. Failure to detect these strains also presents a public health problem. The laboratory methods used in detecting lactose-fermenting Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium from six outbreaks of salmonellosis in veal calves are described. Each outbreak was caused by a multiply-resistant and lactose-fermenting strain of S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. The use of Levine eosin-methylene blue agar in combination with screening of suspect colonies for C8 esterase enzyme and inoculation of colonies into sulfide-indole-motility medium for hydrogen sulfide production was particularly effective for their detection. A hypothesis for the creation of lactose-fermenting salmonellae in the environment is presented. It is proposed that the environment and husbandry practices of veal-raising barns provide a unique niche in which lactose-fermenting salmonellae may arise. PMID:10699026

  5. Bedrock geologic map of the Westhampton Quadrangle, Hampshire County, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Westhampton Quadrangle lies on the east flank of the Precambrian Berkshire Massif between the Goshen Dome to the north, the Woronoco Dome to the south, and the Mesozoic Hartford Basin to the east. The area is underlain almost entirely by metasedimentary rocks of Early Devonian age. The quadrangle offers a comparison of strikingly different map patterns of the Goshen and Waits River formations and contains several excellent exposures that straddle the contact between them.

  6. Rapid Emergence and Clonal Dissemination of CTX-M-15-Producing Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Yun, Young-Sun; Kim, Soo Jin; Jeon, Se-Eun; Lee, Deog-Yong; Chung, Gyung Tae; Yoo, Cheon-Kwon; Kim, Junyoung

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cefotaxime-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow has dramatically increased in South Korea since the first isolation in 2011. Of 68 isolates collected over 10 years, 28 cefotaxime-resistant isolates harbored the bla(CTX-M-15) extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene and were closely related genetically, demonstrating the clonal dissemination of CTX-M-15-producing Salmonella Virchow in South Korea.

  7. Ingestion of Salmonella enterica serotype Poona by a free-living mematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and protection against inactivation by produce sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Krishaun N; Adler, Barbara B; Anderson, Gary L; Williams, Phillip L; Beuchat, Larry R

    2003-07-01

    Free-living nematodes are known to ingest food-borne pathogens and may serve as vectors to contaminate preharvest fruits and vegetables. Caenorhabditis elegans was selected as a model to study the effectiveness of sanitizers in killing Salmonella enterica serotype Poona ingested by free-living nematodes. Aqueous suspensions of adult worms that had fed on S. enterica serotype Poona were treated with produce sanitizers. Treatment with 20 microg of free chlorine/ml significantly (alpha = 0.05) reduced the population of S. enterica serotype Poona compared to results for treating worms with water (control). However, there was no significant difference in the number of S. enterica serotype Poona cells surviving treatments with 20 to 500 microg of chlorine/ml, suggesting that reductions caused by treatment with 20 microg of chlorine/ml resulted from inactivation of S. enterica serotype Poona on the surface of C. elegans but not cells protected by the worm cuticle after ingestion. Treatment with Sanova (850 or 1,200 microg/ml), an acidified sodium chlorite sanitizer, caused reductions of 5.74 and 6.34 log(10) CFU/worm, respectively, compared to reductions from treating worms with water. Treatment with 20 or 40 microg of Tsunami 200/ml, a peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizer, resulted in reductions of 4.83 and 5.34 log(10) CFU/worm, respectively, compared to numbers detected on or in worms treated with water. Among the organic acids evaluated at a concentration of 2%, acetic acid was the least effective in killing S. enterica serotype Poona and lactic acid was the most effective. Treatment with up to 500 microg of chlorine/ml, 1% hydrogen peroxide, 2,550 microg of Sanova/ml, 40 microg of Tsunami 200/ml, or 2% acetic, citric, or lactic acid had no effect on the viability or reproductive behavior of C. elegans. Treatments were also applied to cantaloupe rind and lettuce inoculated with S. enterica serotype Poona or C. elegans that had ingested S. enterica serotype Poona

  8. CRISPR Is an Optimal Target for the Design of Specific PCR Assays for Salmonella enterica Serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Laetitia; Le Hello, Simon; Roux, Chrystelle; Issenhuth-Jeanjean, Sylvie; Weill, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background Serotype-specific PCR assays targeting Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A, the causal agents of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, are required to accelerate formal diagnosis and to overcome the lack of typing sera and, in some situations, the need for culture. However, the sensitivity and specificity of such assays must be demonstrated on large collections of strains representative of the targeted serotypes and all other bacterial populations producing similar clinical symptoms. Methodology Using a new family of repeated DNA sequences, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), as a serotype-specific target, we developed a conventional multiplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A from cultured isolates. We also developed EvaGreen-based real-time singleplex PCR assays with the same two sets of primers. Principal findings We achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity for each protocol after validation of the assays on 188 serotype Typhi and 74 serotype Paratyphi A strains from diverse genetic groups, geographic origins and time periods and on 70 strains of bacteria frequently encountered in bloodstream infections, including 29 other Salmonella serotypes and 42 strains from 38 other bacterial species. Conclusions The performance and convenience of our serotype-specific PCR assays should facilitate the rapid and accurate identification of these two major serotypes in a large range of clinical and public health laboratories with access to PCR technology. These assays were developed for use with DNA from cultured isolates, but with modifications to the assay, the CRISPR targets could be used in the development of assays for use with clinical and other samples. PMID:24498453

  9. A comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice

    PubMed Central

    Sivula, Christine P; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial food borne illnesses worldwide. A major source of infection for humans is consumption of chicken or egg products that have been contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, however our knowledge regarding colonization and persistence factors in the chicken is small. Results We compared intestinal and systemic colonization of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant CBA/J mice during infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028, one of the most commonly studied isolates. We also studied the distribution of wild type serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028 and an isogenic invA mutant during competitive infection in the cecum of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and 8-week-old CBA/J mice. We found that although the systemic levels of serotype Typhimurium in both infected animal models are low, infected mice have significant splenomegaly beginning at 15 days post infection. In the intestinal tract itself, the cecal contents are the major site for recovery of serotype Typhimurium in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. Additionally we show that only a small minority of Salmonellae are intracellular in the cecal epithelium of both infected animal models, and while SPI-1 is important for successful infection in the murine model, it is important for association with the cecal epithelium of 1-week-old chicks. Finally, we show that in chicks infected with serotype Typhimurium at 1 week of age, the level of fecal shedding of this organism does not reflect the level of cecal colonization as it does in murine models. Conclusion In our study, we highlight important differences in systemic and intestinal colonization levels between chick and murine serotype Typhimurium infections, and provide evidence that suggests that the role of SPI-1 may not be the same during colonization of both animal models. PMID:18922185

  10. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pei Pei; Kurupatham, Lalitha; Foong, Bok Huay; Ooi, Peng Lim; James, Lyn; Phua, Leslie; Tan, Ai Ling; Koh, Diana; Goh, Kee Tai

    2011-01-01

    Introduction This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore. Methods A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping. Results There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10). More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection. Discussion The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have contributed to the outbreak. PMID:23908880

  11. The distribution of serotype-specific plasmids among different subgroups of strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis: characterization of molecular variants by restriction enzyme fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, S. C.; Benson, C. E.; Platt, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty-four isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis were studied. They were grouped into five subsets defined by either the collection criteria or the parameter which formed the basis for subsequent analysis. Seventy-seven per cent harboured the serotype-specific plasmid (SSP). In 55% of the isolates this was the sole plasmid. Molecular variation in the SSP was detected in 17 (5%) of the isolates on the basis of restriction enzyme fragmentation pattern (REFP) analysis using Pst I and Sma I. The SSP variants were further characterized using additional restriction enzymes chosen to optimize the information content and analysed using a coefficient of similarity. A variant SSP designated pOG690 showed greater resemblance to the SSP of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium than Enteritidis; 89% and 68% respectively for Pst I and 79% and 55% respectively for Sma I. In respect of the Pst I data pOG690 shared at least 55 kb of DNA with the Typhimurium SSP and 37 kb with the SSP of Enteritidis. This variant was associated with poultry (duck, goose, chicken) and all isolates belonged to phage type 9b. Other variants were associated with phage types 4, 6, 6a, 9a, 11, 15 and 24. The epidemiological implications of these results are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7867741

  12. Specific detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K. A.; Keasler, S. P.; Hanes, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    An assay was developed for the specific detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, using a novel application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This PCR assay is based on the mismatch amplification mutation assay, an allele-specific reaction, and can discriminate Enteritidis from all other salmonella. PCR primers were selected to amplify a 351-base pair (bp) DNA fragment from the salmonella plasmid virulence A (spv A) gene of Enteritidis. A single base difference at position 272 is present between the nucleotide sequence of the spvA gene of Enteritidis and other salmonellae. The downstream PCR primer, that encompasses position 272 of the Enteritidis spvA gene, was designed to contain a single base mismatch at the penultimate position, resulting in a 1-base mismatch with Enteritidis and a 2-base mismatch with other salmonellae that harbour the virulence plasmid. The upstream primer was completely homologous with the region immediately 5' to the spvA gene. When these primers were used and the annealing and extension reactions were performed at the same temperature, the PCR assay was specific for Enteritidis; no PCR product was detected for 40 other serotypes and 28 different genera examined. In pure culture, 120 colony forming units (c.f.u.) could be detected; a PCR product was observed from template derived from a 5 h enrichment broth culture of chicken seeded with 1 c.f.u. per gram of Enteritidis. This PCR assay is specific, reproducible, and less time consuming than the standard bacteriological methods used to detect Enteritidis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8620904

  13. Differential induction of total IgE by two Salmonella enterica serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna A.; Mkrtchyan, Mkhitar S.; Zakharyan, Magdalina K.; Mnatsakanyan, Armine A.; Arakelova, Karine A.; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi U.; Ktsoyan, Lusntag A.; Sedrakyan, Anahit Ì.; Hovhannisyan, Alvard I.; Ghazaryan1, Karine A.; Boyajyan, Anna S.; Aminov, Rustam I.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to establish how the inflammation caused by infection with two different Salmonella enterica serotypes, S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, may lead to the predisposition to allergy as measured by total IgE level in the blood. Infection by S. Typhimurium did not affect the systemic IgE concentration while in S. Enteritidis-infected patients there was a significant 3.5-fold increase. This effect was especially profound in patients >4 years old, with up to the 8-fold increase above the norm. The degree of dysbiosis in these two infections measured with the comparative counts of cultivated bacteria showed an inverse relationship with the IgE concentration. Earlier we reported the elevated level of IL-17 in patients infected by S. Enteritidis. In the current study a significant correlation was found between the concentrations of IL-17 and IgE suggesting a possible role played by this cytokine in triggering the production of IgE in response to S. Enteritidis infection. PMID:26075186

  14. Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Manhattan infection associated with meat products, France, 2005.

    PubMed

    Noël, H; Dominguez, M; Weill, F X; Brisabois, A; Duchazeaubeneix, C; Kerouanton, A; Delmas, G; Pihier, N; Couturier, E

    2006-01-01

    Between August 2005 and March 2006 in France, 69 cases of Salmonella enterica serotype Manhattan (Salmonella Manhattan) were reported, 51 (74%) of them from southeastern France. At the time of the alert (November 2005), 13 cases and 33 controls were interviewed. Cases were more likely than controls to have eaten pork sausages (OR=5.9, confidence interval CI [1.3; 26.9]) and beef (OR=9.3, CI [1.3; 68.6]). At the same time, 19 strains of Salmonella Manhattan isolated from meat products in southeastern France, reported to the French food safety agency (Afssa, Agence francaise de securite sanitaire des aliments) in September and November 2005, had an indistinguishable PFGE profile to the 7 human isolates of Salmonella Manhattan from the outbreak in southeastern France. Trace-back investigations revealed that pork samples came from one wholesaler whose pork products had tested positive for S. Manhattan during routine food testing in August 2005. This wholesaler supplied retail outlets in southeastern France. Additionally, a slaughterhouse supplying the wholesaler was inspected and widespread contamination with Salmonella spp. and S. Manhattan was found. Cooperation between the national agencies in charge of human health (Institut de veille sanitaire, InVS) and food safety (Afssa) allowed us to determine the most probable source of contamination and to take appropriate control measures.

  15. Seroprevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of serotypes of Salmonella enterica in Greek pig herds.

    PubMed

    Grafanakis, E; Leontides, L; Genigeorgis, C

    2001-03-31

    Blood samples were taken from 50 pigs in each of 59 farrow-to-finish production herds and from 40 pigs in each of four of five registered multiplying herds. Samples of feed and faeces were also collected from 17 of the production herds and from the four multiplying herds. The sera were tested for antibodies to Salmonella enterica by the Danish mix-ELISA, and the organisms were isolated, serotyped and sensitivity tested by standard techniques. The average within-herd seroprevalence was 3.4 per cent and at least one pig tested seropositive in 21 of the 59 herds. In the multiplying herds, only a single seroreactor was detected. Salmonellae were isolated from only five of 95 feed samples, from two of the 17 herds sampled, Salmonella tennessee in four of five samples from one herd and an untypable strain in one of five samples from another. Four infected faecal samples were detected in four herds; they harboured Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella bredeney or Salmonella london. No salmonellae were isolated from the samples of feed and faeces taken from the multiplying herds. The S london and S typhimurium had a low sensitivity to streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin, and the S typhimurium also had low sensitivity to amoxycillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, amoxycillin + clavulanic acid, cefalotin and cefoperazone. The other isolates were sensitive to all the antimicrobial agents tested.

  16. Novel determinants of intestinal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium identified in bovine enteric infection.

    PubMed

    Elfenbein, Johanna R; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Porwollik, Steffen; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Cheng, Pui; Guo, Jinbai; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Talamantes, Marissa; Shields, Christine; Maple, Aimee; Ragoza, Yury; DeAtley, Kimberly; Tatsch, Tyler; Cui, Ping; Andrews, Katharine D; McClelland, Michael; Lawhon, Sara D; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    2013-11-01

    Cattle are naturally infected with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and exhibit pathological features of enteric salmonellosis that closely resemble those in humans. Cattle are the most relevant model of gastrointestinal disease resulting from nontyphoidal Salmonella infection in an animal with an intact microbiota. We utilized this model to screen a library of targeted single-gene deletion mutants to identify novel genes of Salmonella Typhimurium required for survival during enteric infection. Fifty-four candidate mutants were strongly selected, including numerous mutations in genes known to be important for gastrointestinal survival of salmonellae. Three genes with previously unproven phenotypes in gastrointestinal infection were tested in bovine ligated ileal loops. Two of these mutants, STM3602 and STM3846, recapitulated the phenotype observed in the mutant pool. Complementation experiments successfully reversed the observed phenotypes, directly linking these genes to the colonization defects of the corresponding mutant strains. STM3602 encodes a putative transcriptional regulator that may be involved in phosphonate utilization, and STM3846 encodes a retron reverse transcriptase that produces a unique RNA-DNA hybrid molecule called multicopy single-stranded DNA. The genes identified in this study represent an exciting new class of virulence determinants for further mechanistic study to elucidate the strategies employed by Salmonella to survive within the small intestines of cattle.

  17. Identification of novel factors involved in modulating motility of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Aldrich, Lindsay; Ragoza, Yuri; Talamantes, Marissa; Andrews, Katharine D; McClelland, Michael; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium can move through liquid using swimming motility, and across a surface by swarming motility. We generated a library of targeted deletion mutants in Salmonella Typhimurium strain ATCC14028, primarily in genes specific to Salmonella, that we have previously described. In the work presented here, we screened each individual mutant from this library for the ability to move away from the site of inoculation on swimming and swarming motility agar. Mutants in genes previously described as important for motility, such as flgF, motA, cheY are do not move away from the site of inoculation on plates in our screens, validating our approach. Mutants in 130 genes, not previously known to be involved in motility, had altered movement of at least one type, 9 mutants were severely impaired for both types of motility, while 33 mutants appeared defective on swimming motility plates but not swarming motility plates, and 49 mutants had reduced ability to move on swarming agar but not swimming agar. Finally, 39 mutants were determined to be hypermotile in at least one of the types of motility tested. Both mutants that appeared non-motile and hypermotile on plates were assayed for expression levels of FliC and FljB on the bacterial surface and many of them had altered levels of these proteins. The phenotypes we report are the first phenotypes ever assigned to 74 of these open reading frames, as they are annotated as 'hypothetical genes' in the Typhimurium genome.

  18. Proteome of Salmonella enterica serotype Tyhimurium Grown in Low Mg2+/pH Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Ansong, Charles; Smallwood, Heather S.; Rommereim, Leah M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Gustin, Jean K.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-09-04

    To determine the impact of a low Mg2+/pH defined growth medium (MgM) on the proteome of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, we cultured S. Typhimurium cells in the medium under two different conditions termed MgM Shock and MgM Dilution and then comparatively analyzed the bacterial cells harvested from these conditions by a global proteomic approach. Proteomic results showed that MgM Shock and MgM Dilution differentially affected the S. Typhimurium proteome. MgM Shock induced a group of proteins whose induction usually occurred at low O2 level, while MgM Dilution induced those related to the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) and those involved in thiamine or biotin biosynthesis. The metabolic state of the S. Typhimurium cells grown under MgM Shock condition also differed significantly from that under MgM Dilution condition. Western blot analysis not only confirmed the proteomic results, but also showed that the abundances of SPI2-T3SS proteins SsaQ and SseE and biotin biosynthesis proteins BioB and BioD increased after S. Typhimurium infection of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Deletion of the gene encoding BioB reduced the bacterial ability to replicate inside the macrophages, suggesting a biotin-limited environment encountered by S. Typhimurium within RAW 264.7 macrophages.

  19. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans.

  20. Genome Scanning for Conditionally Essential Genes in Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwara, Anita; Jiang, Tieshan; Sung, Sam-Sun; Dawoud, Turki; Kim, Jeong Nam; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Kim, Hee-Bal; Ricke, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    As more whole-genome sequences become available, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput methods that link genes to phenotypes, facilitating discovery of new gene functions. In this study, we describe a new version of the Tn-seq method involving a modified EZ:Tn5 transposon for genome-wide and quantitative mapping of all insertions in a complex mutant library utilizing massively parallel Illumina sequencing. This Tn-seq method was applied to a genome-saturating Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium mutant library recovered from selection under 3 different in vitro growth conditions (diluted Luria-Bertani [LB] medium, LB medium plus bile acid, and LB medium at 42°C), mimicking some aspects of host stressors. We identified an overlapping set of 105 protein-coding genes in S. Typhimurium that are conditionally essential under at least one of the above selective conditions. Competition assays using 4 deletion mutants (pyrD, glnL, recD, and STM14_5307) confirmed the phenotypes predicted by Tn-seq data, validating the utility of this approach in discovering new gene functions. With continuously increasing sequencing capacity of next generation sequencing technologies, this robust Tn-seq method will aid in revealing unexplored genetic determinants and the underlying mechanisms of various biological processes in Salmonella and the other approximately 70 bacterial species for which EZ:Tn5 mutagenesis has been established. PMID:22367088

  1. RosE represses Std fimbrial expression in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Chessa, Daniela; Winter, Maria G; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Tükel, Çagla; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2008-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) genome contains a large repertoire of putative fimbrial operons that remain poorly characterized because they are not expressed in vitro. In this study, insertions that induced expression of the putative stdABCD fimbrial operon were identified from a random bank of transposon mutants by screening with immuno-magnetic particles for ligand expression (SIMPLE). Transposon insertions upstream of csgC and lrhA or within dam, setB and STM4463 (renamed rosE) resulted in expression of StdA and its assembly into fimbrial filaments on the cell surface. RosE is a novel negative regulator of Std fimbrial expression as indicated by its repression of a std::lacZ reporter construct and by binding of the purified protein to a DNA region upstream of the stdA start codon. Expression of Std fimbriae in the rosE mutant resulted in increased attachment of S. typhimurium to human colonic epithelial cell lines (T-84 and CaCo-2). A rosE mutant exhibited a reduced ability to compete with virulent S. typhimurium for colonization of murine organs, while no defect was observed when both competing strains carried a stdAB deletion. These data suggest that a tight control of Std fimbrial expression mediated by RosE is required during host pathogen interaction. PMID:18331470

  2. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  3. Comparison of a PCR serotyping assay, Check&Trace assay for Salmonella, and Luminex Salmonella serotyping assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica identified from fresh and naturally contaminated cilantro.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Ewing, L; Jarvis, K; Dudley, K; Grim, C; Gopinath, G; Flamer, M-L; Auguste, W; Jayaram, A; Elmore, J; Lamont, M; McGrath, T; Hanes, D E

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica isolated from fresh cilantro samples collected through the USDA/AMS Microbiological Data Program (MDP) were used to compare a PCR serotyping assay against the Check&Trace assay and the Luminex (BioPlex) Salmonella serotyping assay. The study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the three methods for serotyping Salmonella from both enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures. In this investigation, Salmonella spp. serotyping was conducted using 24 h enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures from cilantro samples, with the PCR serotyping assay. Conversely, the Check&Trace and Luminex for Salmonella assays required pure cultures for Salmonella serotyping. The cilantro samples contained S. enterica serovar Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Tennessee, identified by the PCR serotyping assay and Check&Trace for Salmonella, but the Luminex assay only identified two of the four serotypes of the cilantro samples. The anticipated impact from this study is that the PCR serotyping assay provides a time- and cost-effective means for screening, identifying and serotyping Salmonella using DNA extracted from 24 h enrichment cilantro samples.

  4. Comparative analysis of twenty-four complete aenome aequences of Salmonella enterica Serotypes Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium and Newport isolated from ground beef or asymptomatic cattle on farm or at harvest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica are a versatile group of bacteria with a wide range of variation in virulence potential. Complete S. enterica genome sequences available to date are primarily of strains isolated from humans or of serotypes that commonly cause human disease. To facilitate genomic ...

  5. Neural Network Model for Survival and Growth of Salmonella enterica Serotype 8,20:-:z6 in Ground Chicken Thigh Meat during Cold Storage: Extrapolation to Other Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Oscar, T P

    2015-10-01

    Mathematical models that predict the behavior of human bacterial pathogens in food are valuable tools for assessing and managing this risk to public health. A study was undertaken to develop a model for predicting the behavior of Salmonella enterica serotype 8,20:-:z6 in chicken meat during cold storage and to determine how well the model would predict the behavior of other serotypes of Salmonella stored under the same conditions. To develop the model, ground chicken thigh meat (0.75 cm(3)) was inoculated with 1.7 log Salmonella 8,20:-:z6 and then stored for 0 to 8 -8 to 16°C. An automated miniaturized most-probable-number (MPN) method was developed and used for the enumeration of Salmonella. Commercial software (Excel and the add-in program NeuralTools) was used to develop a multilayer feedforward neural network model with one hidden layer of two nodes. The performance of the model was evaluated using the acceptable prediction zone (APZ) method. The number of Salmonella in ground chicken thigh meat stayed the same (P > 0.05) during 8 days of storage at -8 to 8°C but increased (P < 0.05) during storage at 9°C (+0.6 log) to 16°C (+5.1 log). The proportion of residual values (observed minus predicted values) in an APZ (pAPZ) from -1 log (fail-safe) to 0.5 log (fail-dangerous) was 0.939 for the data (n = 426 log MPN values) used in the development of the model. The model had a pAPZ of 0.944 or 0.954 when it was extrapolated to test data (n = 108 log MPN per serotype) for other serotypes (S. enterica serotype Typhimurium var 5-, Kentucky, Typhimurium, and Thompson) of Salmonella in ground chicken thigh meat stored for 0 to 8 days at -4, 4, 12, or 16°C under the same experimental conditions. A pAPZ of ≥0.7 indicates that a model provides predictions with acceptable bias and accuracy. Thus, the results indicated that the model provided valid predictions of the survival and growth of Salmonella 8,20:-:z6 in ground chicken thigh meat stored for 0 to 8 days at -8 to

  6. Trends in serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility in Salmonella enterica isolates from humans in Belgium, 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Mattheus, Wesley; Vanhoof, Raymond; Bertrand, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The Belgian National Reference Centre for Salmonella received 16,544 human isolates of Salmonella enterica between January 2009 and December 2013. Although 377 different serotypes were identified, the landscape is dominated by S. enterica serovars Typhimurium (55%) and Enteritidis (19%) in a ratio which is inverse to European Union averages. With outbreaks of Salmonella serotypes Ohio, Stanley, and Paratyphi B variant Java as prime examples, 20 serotypes displayed significant fluctuations in this 5-year period. Typhoid strains account for 1.2% of Belgian salmonellosis cases. Large-scale antibiotic susceptibility analyses (n = 4,561; panel of 12 antibiotics) showed declining resistance levels in S. Enteritis and Typhimurium isolates for 8 and 3 tested agents, respectively. Despite low overall resistance to ciprofloxacin (4.4%) and cefotaxime (1.6%), we identified clonal lineages of Salmonella serotypes Kentucky and Infantis displaying rising resistance against these clinically important drugs. Quinolone resistance is mainly mediated by serotype-specific mutations in GyrA residues Ser83 and Asp87 (92.2% not wild type), while an additional ParC_Ser80Ile mutation leads to ciprofloxacin resistance in 95.5% S. Kentucky isolates, which exceeds European averages. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) alleles qnrA1 (n = 1), qnrS (n = 9), qnrD1 (n = 4), and qnrB (n = 4) were found in only 3.0% of 533 isolates resistant to nalidixic acid. In cefotaxime-resistant isolates, we identified a broad range of Ambler class A and C β-lactamase genes (e.g., bla(SHV-12), blaTEM-52, bla(CTX-M-14), and bla(CTX-M-15)) commonly associated with members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. In conclusion, resistance to fluoroquinolones and cefotaxime remains rare in human S. enterica, but clonal resistant serotypes arise, and continued (inter)national surveillance is mandatory to understand the origin and routes of dissemination thereof. Copyright © 2015, American Society for

  7. The global establishment of a highly-fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198 strain

    PubMed Central

    Le Hello, Simon; Bekhit, Amany; Granier, Sophie A.; Barua, Himel; Beutlich, Janine; Zając, Magdalena; Münch, Sebastian; Sintchenko, Vitali; Bouchrif, Brahim; Fashae, Kayode; Pinsard, Jean-Louis; Sontag, Lucile; Fabre, Laetitia; Garnier, Martine; Guibert, Véronique; Howard, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Christensen, Jens P.; Biswas, Paritosh K.; Cloeckaert, Axel; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Wasyl, Dariusz; Doublet, Benoit; Weill, François-Xavier

    2013-01-01

    While the spread of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky resistant to ciprofloxacin across Africa and the Middle-East has been described recently, the presence of this strain in humans, food, various animal species (livestock, pets, and wildlife) and in environment is suspected in other countries of different continents. Here, we report results of an in-depth molecular epidemiological study on a global human and non-human collection of S. Kentucky (n = 70). We performed XbaI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, assessed mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions, detected β-lactam resistance mechanisms, and screened the presence of the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). In this study, we highlight the rapid and extensive worldwide dissemination of the ciprofloxacin-resistant S. Kentucky ST198-X1-SGI1 strain since the mid-2000s in an increasingly large number of contaminated sources, including the environment. This strain has accumulated an increasing number of chromosomal and plasmid resistance determinants and has been identified in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and Europe since 2010. The second substitution at position 87 in GyrA (replacing the amino acid Asp) appeared helpful for epidemiological studies to track the origin of contamination. This global study provides evidence leading to the conclusion that high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin in S. Kentucky is a simple microbiological trait that facilitates the identification of the epidemic clone of interest, ST198-X1-SGI1. Taking this into account is essential in order to detect and monitor it easily and to take rapid measures in livestock to ensure control of this infection. PMID:24385975

  8. Genomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A during an outbreak in Cambodia, 2013–2015

    PubMed Central

    Fawal, Nizar; Fabre, Laetitia; Tourdjman, Mathieu; Dufour, Muriel; Sar, Dara; Kham, Chun; Phe, Thong; Vlieghe, Erika; Bouchier, Christiane; Jacobs, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, an unusual increase in the number of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A (Salmonella Paratyphi A) infections was reported in patients in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and in European, American and Japanese travellers returning from Cambodia. Epidemiological investigations did not identify a common source of exposure. To analyse the population structure and genetic diversity of these Salmonella Paratyphi A isolates, we used whole-genome sequencing on 65 isolates collected from 1999 to 2014: 55 from infections acquired in Cambodia and 10 from infections acquired in other countries in Asia, Africa and Europe. Short-read sequences from 80 published genomes from around the world and from 13 published genomes associated with an outbreak in China were also included. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on a subset of isolates. Genomic analyses were found to provide much more accurate information for tracking the individual strains than PFGE. All but 2 of the 36 isolates acquired in Cambodia during 2013–2014 belonged to the same clade, C5, of lineage C. This clade has been isolated in Cambodia since at least 1999. The Chinese outbreak isolates belonged to a different clade (C4) and were resistant to nalidixic acid, whereas the Cambodian outbreak isolates displayed pan-susceptibility to antibiotics. Since 2014, the total number of cases has decreased, but there has been an increase in the frequency with which nalidixic acid-resistant C5 isolates are isolated. The frequency of these isolates should be monitored over time, because they display decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, the first-choice antibiotic for treating paratyphoid fever. PMID:28348832

  9. The global establishment of a highly-fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198 strain.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Bekhit, Amany; Granier, Sophie A; Barua, Himel; Beutlich, Janine; Zając, Magdalena; Münch, Sebastian; Sintchenko, Vitali; Bouchrif, Brahim; Fashae, Kayode; Pinsard, Jean-Louis; Sontag, Lucile; Fabre, Laetitia; Garnier, Martine; Guibert, Véronique; Howard, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S; Christensen, Jens P; Biswas, Paritosh K; Cloeckaert, Axel; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Wasyl, Dariusz; Doublet, Benoit; Weill, François-Xavier

    2013-01-01

    While the spread of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky resistant to ciprofloxacin across Africa and the Middle-East has been described recently, the presence of this strain in humans, food, various animal species (livestock, pets, and wildlife) and in environment is suspected in other countries of different continents. Here, we report results of an in-depth molecular epidemiological study on a global human and non-human collection of S. Kentucky (n = 70). We performed XbaI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, assessed mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions, detected β-lactam resistance mechanisms, and screened the presence of the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). In this study, we highlight the rapid and extensive worldwide dissemination of the ciprofloxacin-resistant S. Kentucky ST198-X1-SGI1 strain since the mid-2000s in an increasingly large number of contaminated sources, including the environment. This strain has accumulated an increasing number of chromosomal and plasmid resistance determinants and has been identified in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and Europe since 2010. The second substitution at position 87 in GyrA (replacing the amino acid Asp) appeared helpful for epidemiological studies to track the origin of contamination. This global study provides evidence leading to the conclusion that high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin in S. Kentucky is a simple microbiological trait that facilitates the identification of the epidemic clone of interest, ST198-X1-SGI1. Taking this into account is essential in order to detect and monitor it easily and to take rapid measures in livestock to ensure control of this infection.

  10. Development of ceftriaxone resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype Oranienburg during therapy for bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Chiun; Chan, Oi-Wa; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-02-01

    The majority of nontyphoid Salmonella infection is identified in children. When an invasive or severe Salmonella infection is encountered, ceftriaxone is recommended for such patients. A 2-year-old girl was hospitalized for the treatment of Salmonella bacteremia and discharged with standard ceftriaxone treatment. She was readmitted to the hospital after 2 days due to the recurrence of the Salmonella bacteremia. The study aimed to unveil the mechanism for the relapse. Six isolates (4 blood and 2 stool) were recovered from the patient, with the last two blood isolates being ceftriaxone-resistant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used for genotyping. Ceftriaxone resistance genes and transferability of the resistance plasmid were examined by molecular methods. All isolates were identified as Salmonella enterica serotype Oranienburg. Five isolates demonstrated almost identical electrophoresis patterns, except that in the two ceftriaxone-resistant isolates an extra band (>100 kb) was noted. A blaCMY-2 gene, carried by a 120-kb conjugative IncI1 plasmid of the sequence type 53, was identified in the two ceftriaxone-resistant isolates. Transfer of the resistance plasmid from one blood isolate to Escherichia coli J53 resulted in the increase of ceftriaxone minimum inhibitory concentration from 0.125 μg/mL to 32 μg/mL in the recipient. Ceftriaxone is the standard therapeutic choice for invasive or serious Salmonella infections in children. Pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of resistance development during therapy, especially in areas with a widespread of ceftriaxone resistance genes that are carried by a self-transferrable plasmid, such as the blaCMY-2-carrying IncI1 plasmid identified herein. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Identification of Novel Factors Involved in Modulating Motility of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Aldrich, Lindsay; Ragoza, Yuri; Talamantes, Marissa; Andrews, Katharine D.; McClelland, Michael; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium can move through liquid using swimming motility, and across a surface by swarming motility. We generated a library of targeted deletion mutants in Salmonella Typhimurium strain ATCC14028, primarily in genes specific to Salmonella, that we have previously described. In the work presented here, we screened each individual mutant from this library for the ability to move away from the site of inoculation on swimming and swarming motility agar. Mutants in genes previously described as important for motility, such as flgF, motA, cheY are do not move away from the site of inoculation on plates in our screens, validating our approach. Mutants in 130 genes, not previously known to be involved in motility, had altered movement of at least one type, 9 mutants were severely impaired for both types of motility, while 33 mutants appeared defective on swimming motility plates but not swarming motility plates, and 49 mutants had reduced ability to move on swarming agar but not swimming agar. Finally, 39 mutants were determined to be hypermotile in at least one of the types of motility tested. Both mutants that appeared non-motile and hypermotile on plates were assayed for expression levels of FliC and FljB on the bacterial surface and many of them had altered levels of these proteins. The phenotypes we report are the first phenotypes ever assigned to 74 of these open reading frames, as they are annotated as ‘hypothetical genes’ in the Typhimurium genome. PMID:25369209

  12. CTX-M-27 Producing Salmonella enterica Serotypes Typhimurium and Indiana Are Prevalent among Food-Producing Animals in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Xiang-Yan; Xu, Liang; Gu, Xi-Xi; Yang, Ling; Li, Wan; Ren, Si-Qi; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. is one of the most important food-borne pathogens causing digestive tract and invasive infections in both humans and animals. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) especially the CTX-M-type ESBLs are increasingly being reported worldwide and in China. These studies seldom focused on Salmonella isolates from food-producing animals. The aim of this study was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles, serotypes and ESBLs and in particular, CTX-M producing Salmonella isolates from chickens and pigs in China. Salmonella isolates were identified by API20E system and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay; serotypes were determined using slide agglutination with hyperimmune sera; antimicrobial susceptibility was tested using the ager dilution method; the prevalence of ESBLs and PMQR genes were screened by PCR; CTX-M-producing isolates were further characterized by conjugation along with genetic relatedness and plasmid replicon type. In total, 159 Salmonella strains were identified, among which 95 strains were Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, 63 strains were S. enterica serovar Indiana, and 1 strain was S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. All of these isolates presented multi-drug resistant phenotypes. Forty-five isolates carried bla CTX-M genes, the most common subtype was CTX-M-27(34), followed by CTX-M-65(7) and CTX-M-14(4). Most bla CTX-M genes were transmitted by non-typeable or IncN/IncFIB/IncP/IncA/C/IncHI2 plasmids with sizes ranging from 80 to 280 kb. In particular, all the 14 non-typeable plasmids were carrying bla CTX-M-27 gene and had a similar size. PFGE profiles indicated that CTX-M-positive isolates were clonally related among the same serotype, whilst the isolates of different serotypes were genetically divergent. This suggested that both clonal spread of resistant strains and horizontal transmission of the resistance plasmids contributed to the dissemination of bla CTX-M-9G-positive Salmonella isolates. The presence and

  13. CTX-M-27 Producing Salmonella enterica Serotypes Typhimurium and Indiana Are Prevalent among Food-Producing Animals in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Xiang-Yan; Xu, Liang; Gu, Xi-Xi; Yang, Ling; Li, Wan; Ren, Si-Qi; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella spp. is one of the most important food-borne pathogens causing digestive tract and invasive infections in both humans and animals. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) especially the CTX-M-type ESBLs are increasingly being reported worldwide and in China. These studies seldom focused on Salmonella isolates from food-producing animals. The aim of this study was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles, serotypes and ESBLs and in particular, CTX-M producing Salmonella isolates from chickens and pigs in China. Salmonella isolates were identified by API20E system and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay; serotypes were determined using slide agglutination with hyperimmune sera; antimicrobial susceptibility was tested using the ager dilution method; the prevalence of ESBLs and PMQR genes were screened by PCR; CTX-M-producing isolates were further characterized by conjugation along with genetic relatedness and plasmid replicon type. In total, 159 Salmonella strains were identified, among which 95 strains were Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, 63 strains were S. enterica serovar Indiana, and 1 strain was S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. All of these isolates presented multi-drug resistant phenotypes. Forty-five isolates carried blaCTX-M genes, the most common subtype was CTX-M-27(34), followed by CTX-M-65(7) and CTX-M-14(4). Most blaCTX-M genes were transmitted by non-typeable or IncN/IncFIB/IncP/IncA/C/IncHI2 plasmids with sizes ranging from 80 to 280 kb. In particular, all the 14 non-typeable plasmids were carrying blaCTX-M-27 gene and had a similar size. PFGE profiles indicated that CTX-M-positive isolates were clonally related among the same serotype, whilst the isolates of different serotypes were genetically divergent. This suggested that both clonal spread of resistant strains and horizontal transmission of the resistance plasmids contributed to the dissemination of blaCTX-M-9G-positive Salmonella isolates. The presence and spread

  14. First Human Isolate of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Harboring blaCTX-M-14 in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bado, Inés; García-Fulgueiras, Virginia; Cordeiro, Nicolás F.; Betancor, Laura; Caiata, Leticia; Seija, Verónica; Robino, Luciana; Algorta, Gabriela; Chabalgoity, José A.; Ayala, Juan A.; Gutkind, Gabriel O.

    2012-01-01

    We studied a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis showing resistance to oxyiminocephalosporins. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of blaCTX-M-14 linked to IS903 in a 95-kb IncI1 conjugative plasmid. Such a plasmid is maintained on account of the presence of a pndAC addiction system. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis indicated that the strain belongs to ST11. This is the first report of blaCTX-M-14 in Salmonella Enteritidis of human origin in South America. PMID:22290976

  15. Multiplex PCR-Based Serogrouping and Serotyping of Salmonella enterica from Tonsil and Jejunum with Jejunal Lymph Nodes of Slaughtered Swine in Metro Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kamela Charmaine S; Rivera, Windell L

    2015-05-01

    Food poisoning outbreaks and livestock mortalities caused by Salmonella enterica are widespread in the Philippines, with hogs being the most commonly recognized carriers of the pathogen. To prevent and control the occurrence of S. enterica infection in the country, methods were used in this study to isolate and rapidly detect, differentiate, and characterize S. enterica in tonsils and jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes of swine slaughtered in four locally registered meat establishments (LRMEs) and four meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services in Metro Manila. A total of 480 samples were collected from 240 animals (120 pigs from each type of meat establishment). A significantly higher proportion of pigs were positive for S. enterica in LRMEs (60 of 120) compared with meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services (38 of 120). More S. enterica-positive samples were found in tonsils compared with jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes in LRMEs, but this difference was not significant. A PCR assay targeting the invA gene had sensitivity that was statistically similar to that of the culture method, detecting 93 of 98 culture-confirmed samples. Multiplex PCR-based O-serogrouping and H/Sdf I typing revealed four S. enterica serogroups (B, C1, D, and E) and six serotypes (Agona, Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Typhimurium, and Weltevreden), respectively, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the PCR products. This study was the first to report detection of S. enterica serotype Agona in the country.

  16. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella enterica Recovered from Clinical Samples from Cattle and Swine in Minnesota, 2006 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Hong, Samuel; Rovira, Albert; Davies, Peter; Ahlstrom, Christina; Muellner, Petra; Rendahl, Aaron; Olsen, Karen; Bender, Jeff B; Wells, Scott; Perez, Andres; Alvarez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis remains one of the leading causes of foodborne disease worldwide despite preventive efforts at various stages of the food production chain. The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica represents an additional challenge for public health authorities. Food animals are considered a major reservoir and potential source of foodborne salmonellosis; thus, monitoring of Salmonella strains in livestock may help to detect emergence of new serotypes/MDR phenotypes and to gain a better understanding of Salmonella epidemiology. For this reason, we analyzed trends over a nine-year period in serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance, of Salmonella isolates recovered at the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (MVDL) from swine (n = 2,537) and cattle (n = 1,028) samples. Prevalence of predominant serotypes changed over time; in swine, S. Typhimurium and S. Derby decreased and S. Agona and S. 4,5,12:i:- increased throughout the study period. In cattle, S. Dublin, S. Montevideo and S. Cerro increased and S. Muenster became less frequent. Median minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates were higher for those recovered from swine compared with cattle, and were particularly high for certain antibiotic-serotype combinations. The proportion of resistant swine isolates was also higher than observed in the NARMS data, probably due to the different cohort of animals represented in each dataset. Results provide insight into the dynamics of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in livestock in Minnesota, and can help to monitor emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella enterica Recovered from Clinical Samples from Cattle and Swine in Minnesota, 2006 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Samuel; Rovira, Albert; Davies, Peter; Ahlstrom, Christina; Muellner, Petra; Rendahl, Aaron; Olsen, Karen; Bender, Jeff B.; Wells, Scott; Perez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis remains one of the leading causes of foodborne disease worldwide despite preventive efforts at various stages of the food production chain. The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica represents an additional challenge for public health authorities. Food animals are considered a major reservoir and potential source of foodborne salmonellosis; thus, monitoring of Salmonella strains in livestock may help to detect emergence of new serotypes/MDR phenotypes and to gain a better understanding of Salmonella epidemiology. For this reason, we analyzed trends over a nine-year period in serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance, of Salmonella isolates recovered at the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (MVDL) from swine (n = 2,537) and cattle (n = 1,028) samples. Prevalence of predominant serotypes changed over time; in swine, S. Typhimurium and S. Derby decreased and S. Agona and S. 4,5,12:i:- increased throughout the study period. In cattle, S. Dublin, S. Montevideo and S. Cerro increased and S. Muenster became less frequent. Median minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates were higher for those recovered from swine compared with cattle, and were particularly high for certain antibiotic-serotype combinations. The proportion of resistant swine isolates was also higher than observed in the NARMS data, probably due to the different cohort of animals represented in each dataset. Results provide insight into the dynamics of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in livestock in Minnesota, and can help to monitor emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27936204

  18. The shdA Gene Is Restricted to Serotypes of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I and Contributes to Efficient and Prolonged Fecal Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Robert A.; van Amsterdam, Karin; Kramer, Naomi; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about factors which enable Salmonella serotypes to circulate within populations of livestock and domestic fowl. We have identified a DNA region which is present in Salmonella serotypes commonly isolated from livestock and domestic fowl (S. enterica subspecies I) but absent from reptile-associated Salmonella serotypes (S. bongori and S. enterica subspecies II to VII). This DNA region was cloned from Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and sequence analysis revealed the presence of a 6,105-bp open reading frame, designated shdA, whose product's deduced amino acid sequence displayed homology to that of AIDA-I from diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, MisL of serotype Typhimurium, and IcsA of Shigella flexneri. The shdA gene was located adjacent to xseA at 52 min, in a 30-kb DNA region which is not present in Escherichia coli K-12. A serotype Typhimurium shdA mutant was shed with the feces in reduced numbers and for a shorter period of time compared to its isogenic parent. A possible role for the shdA gene during the expansion in host range of S. enterica subspecies I to include warm-blooded vertebrates is discussed. PMID:10768965

  19. An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutrosa subgutrosa) and a Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus).

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tiffany M; Wünschmann, Arno; Morningstar-Shaw, Brenda; Pantlin, Gayle C; Rasmussen, James M; Thompson, Rachel L

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis enteritis occurred in two juvenile goitered gazelles and an adult Malayan tapir over a period of 5 wk at the Minnesota Zoo. Diagnosis was made postmortem on one gazelle and one tapir, and a second gazelle was diagnosed via fecal culture. The death of the tapir was attributed to S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis septicemia, while salmonellosis was considered to be a contributing factor besides ostertagiasis for the death of one goitered gazelle and for the diarrhea of another goitered gazelle. A third gazelle became ill in the same time period, but Salmonella infection was not confirmed by culture. All exhibited the clinical signs of profuse, watery diarrhea. The gazelles developed a protein-losing enteropathy, and the tapir showed signs of sepsis and endotoxemia. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed the Salmonella isolates to be indistinguishable from each other. One year prior to this outbreak, Salmonella sp. was cultured from a Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) housed in the same building as the tapir. After further investigation into the outbreak, spread of this pathogen was speculated to be associated with human movement across animal areas.

  20. Application of molecular methods for identification of strains classified as Salmonella enterica serovar 6, 7:-:- by conventional serotyping.

    PubMed

    Chadfield, M S; Christensen, J P; Madsen, M; Sonne-Hansen, J; Bisgaard, M

    2002-06-01

    An increased prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee (6, 7: z(29):-) was observed in broiler flocks in Denmark in 1994 and a parallel increase in the prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar 6, 7:-:- was demonstrated, albeit at a lower level. Plasmid profiling and ribotyping revealed similar genotypes and it was speculated that serovar 6, 7:-:- could represent a non-motile variant of Salmonella Tennessee. Re-testing of the Salmonella 6, 7:-:- isolates demonstrated the presence of flagella through positive motility. All isolates but one demonstrated motility using both tube tests and light microscopy of overnight broth cultures. Molecular characterization indicated that all but two isolates previously classified as Salmonella 6, 7:-:, were isolates of Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Infantis, exhibiting reduced motility. Re-serotyping and multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis for the phase 2 gene fljB demonstrated variants of Salmonella Infantis (6, 7: r: z(49)) expressing the R-phase antigen (Rz(49)) and possessing the gene for normal phase 2 antigen H: 1, 5. One of the two undefined strains demonstrated genotypic identity with a Salmonella Livingstone reference strain. The remaining putative 6, 7:-:- strain could not be identified and was genuinely non-motile. Diagnostic procedures performed initially were thus insufficient to differentiate between the different levels of motility and also resulted in mis-serotyping. As similar observations were made with two of 14 isolates received from a foreign laboratory, this may represent a general diagnostic problem.

  1. PCR Detection of Salmonella enterica Serotype Montevideo in and on Raw Tomatoes Using Primers Derived from hilA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jinru; Beuchat, Larry R.; Brackett, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonellae have been some of the most frequently reported etiological agents in fresh-produce-associated outbreaks of human infections in recent years. PCR assays using four innovative pairs of primers derived from hilA and sirA, positive regulators of Salmonella invasive genes, were developed to identify Salmonella enterica serotype Montevideo on and in tomatoes. Based on examination of 83 Salmonella strains and 22 non-Salmonella strains, we concluded that a pair of hilA primers detects Salmonella specifically. The detection limits of the PCR assay were 101 and 100 CFU/ml after enrichment at 37°C for 6 and 9 h, respectively. When the assay was validated by detecting S. enterica serotype Montevideo in and on artificially inoculated tomatoes, 102 and 101 CFU/g were detected, respectively, after enrichment for 6 h at 37°C. Our results suggest that the hilA-based PCR assay is sensitive and specific, and can be used for rapid detection of Salmonellae in or on fresh produce. PMID:11097898

  2. Evaluation of IS200-PCR and Comparison with Other Molecular Markers To Trace Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Typhimurium Bovine Isolates from Farm to Meat

    PubMed Central

    Millemann, Yves; Gaubert, Stéphane; Remy, Dominique; Colmin, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    A procedure that uses an original molecular marker (IS200-PCR) and that is based on the amplification of DNA with outward-facing primers complementary to each end of IS200 has been evaluated with a collection of 85 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates. These strains were isolated from a group of 10 cows at different stages: during transportation between the farm and the slaughterhouse, on the slaughter line, from the environment, and from the final product (ground beef). The 85 isolates were characterized by their antibiotic resistance patterns and were compared by IS200-PCR and by use of four other genotypic markers. Those markers included restriction profiles for 16S and 23S rRNA (ribotypes) and amplification profiles obtained by different approaches: random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, and PCR ribotyping. The results of the IS200-PCR were in accordance with those of other molecular typing methods for this collection of isolates. Five different genotypes were found, which made it possible to refine the hypotheses on transmission obtained from phenotypic results. The genotyping results indicated the massive contamination of the whole group of animals and of the environment by one clonal strain originally recovered from one cow that excreted the strain. On the other hand, a few animals and their environment appeared to be simultaneously contaminated with genetically different strains. PMID:10834977

  3. Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Presenting as a Primary Psoas Abscess: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, William A.; Davie, Daniel; Tonnerre, Claude; Rubin, Michael A.; Strong, Michael; Petti, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess. The isolate tested susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to nalidixic acid in vitro, a pattern associated with fluoroquinolone therapeutic failures. We review the literature for serovar Typhi psoas abscess in the absence of bacteremia and discuss the importance of identifying isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMID:15695728

  4. Characterization of Anti-Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Antibody Responses in Bacteremic Bangladeshi Patients by an Immuno-affinity Proteomic-based Technology (IPT)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever and a human-restricted pathogen. Currently available typhoid vaccines provide only 50-75% protection for 2-5 years, and available diagnostic assays to identify individuals with typhoid fever lack both sensitivity and specif...

  5. Characterization of Anti-Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Antibody Responses in Bacteremic Bangladeshi Patients Using Immuno-affinity Proteomic-based Technology (IPT)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever and a human-restricted pathogen. Currently available typhoid vaccines provide only 50-75% protection for 2-5 years, and available diagnostic assays to identify individuals with typhoid fever lack both sensitivity and specifi...

  6. Development of a High-Throughput Multiplex PCR and Capillary Electrophoresis Technique for Serotype Determination of Salmonella Enterica Food Animal Isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Previously, a multiplex PCR technique was developed to identify the top 30 human clinical serotypes of Salmonella enterica. To improve the speed, ease of use, utility and discriminatory ability of the technique, additional primers were added and the PCR product discrimination and analysi...

  7. Failure of oral antibiotic therapy, including azithromycin, in the treatment of a recurrent breast abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Shelanah; Molland, Janice Gail; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent, multifocal Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A breast abscesses, resistant to ciprofloxacin, which relapsed despite surgery, aspiration and multiple courses of antibiotics, including co-trimoxazole and azithromycin. The patient was cured after a prolonged course of intravenous ceftriaxone. PMID:23182142

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile, treatment outcome and serotype distribution of clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica: a 2-year study from Kerala, South India

    PubMed Central

    Harichandran, Deepa; Dinesh, Kavitha Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Background/purpose Typhoid and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death in parts of Asia, being associated with poor sanitation and consumption of unsafe food and water. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged to traditional first-line drugs, namely, the fluoroquinolones, as well as to third-generation cephalosporins, posing challenges to treatment. Azithromycin has proven to be an effective alternative for treatment of uncomplicated typhoid fever. The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, clinical outcome and serotype distribution pattern of clinical isolates belonging to Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica. Methodology All clinical isolates of S. enterica obtained from blood, sterile body fluids, as well as stool and urine samples at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kerala, India, between August 2011 and July 2013 were included in the study and processed based on standard microbiology protocols. Results A total of 118 isolates of Salmonella were obtained during the study period. Out of these, 79 were of S. Typhi (66.95%), followed by isolates of S. Paratyphi A (22; 18.64%) and S. Typhimurium 12 (10.17%). Five isolates could not be identified further. There was 100% susceptibility to ceftriaxone in all S. enterica subspecies. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was 32.91% for S. Typhi and 40.90% for S. Paratyphi A as determined by the disk diffusion method. The susceptibility profile of S. Typhi isolates to different antimicrobials was as follows: chloramphenicol (94.93%), ampicillin (77.21%), cotrimoxazole (75.94%) and azithromycin (78.48%). For S. Typhi, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin required to inhibit the growth of 50% of organisms was 0.5 μg/mL (intermediate) and MIC required to inhibit the growth of 90% of organisms was 1 μg/mL (resistant). S. Typhimurium was 100% susceptible to cotrimoxazole, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ofloxacin

  9. Identification and characterization of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Albert isolates in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment is critical for invasive salmonellosis. Primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extende...

  10. Prevalence, Enumeration, Serotypes, and Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Carcasses at Two Large United States Pork Processing Plants

    PubMed Central

    Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M.; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize Salmonella enterica contamination on carcasses in two large U.S. commercial pork processing plants. The carcasses were sampled at three points, before scalding (prescald), after dehairing/polishing but before evisceration (preevisceration), and after chilling (chilled final). The overall prevalences of Salmonella on carcasses at these three sampling points, prescald, preevisceration, and after chilling, were 91.2%, 19.1%, and 3.7%, respectively. At one of the two plants, the prevalence of Salmonella was significantly higher (P < 0.01) for each of the carcass sampling points. The prevalences of carcasses with enumerable Salmonella at prescald, preevisceration, and after chilling were 37.7%, 4.8%, and 0.6%, respectively. A total of 294 prescald carcasses had Salmonella loads of >1.9 log CFU/100 cm2, but these carcasses were not equally distributed between the two plants, as 234 occurred at the plant with higher Salmonella prevalences. Forty-one serotypes were identified on prescald carcasses with Salmonella enterica serotypes Derby, Typhimurium, and Anatum predominating. S. enterica serotypes Typhimurium and London were the most common of the 24 serotypes isolated from preevisceration carcasses. The Salmonella serotypes Johannesburg and Typhimurium were the most frequently isolated serotypes of the 9 serotypes identified from chilled final carcasses. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined for selected isolates from each carcass sampling point. Multiple drug resistance (MDR), defined as resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents, was identified for 71.2%, 47.8%, and 77.5% of the tested isolates from prescald, preevisceration, and chilled final carcasses, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the interventions used by pork processing plants greatly reduce the prevalence of Salmonella on carcasses, but MDR Salmonella was isolated from 3.2% of the final carcasses sampled. PMID:22327585

  11. Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serotype Tennessee Strain CDC07-0191, Implicated in the 2006-2007 Multistate Food-Borne Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter in the United States.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiangyu; Salazar, Joelle K; Frezet, Stephanie; Maccannell, Duncan; Ribot, Efrain M; Fields, Patricia I; Fricke, W Florian; Zhang, Wei

    2013-05-23

    Salmonella enterica serotype Tennessee strain CDC07-0191 was isolated from the 2006-2007 multistate food-borne outbreak linked to peanut butter in the United States. Here we report a high-quality draft assembly of the genome sequence of this strain, derived from a patient. This is the first reported high-quality draft genome sequence for S. enterica serotype Tennessee, which will enable in-depth studies of its transmission and virulence.

  12. In vitro synergism of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime against nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes Paratyphi A and Paratyphi B.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Ganesh Prasad; Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Bok Kwon

    2010-09-01

    Paratyphoid fever is considered an emerging systemic intracellular infection caused by Salmonella enterica serotypes Paratyphi A, B, and C. We performed in vitro time-kill studies on three clinical isolates of nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella serotype Paratyphi (NARSP) with different concentrations of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime to identify combinations of antibiotics with synergistic activity against paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, we identify the frequency of mutations to ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, and rifampin resistance and also sequenced the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes to identify the cause of resistance in NARSP. When the activity of ciprofloxacin at 0.75x MIC (0.012 to 0.38 microg/ml) with cefotaxime at the MIC (0.125 to 0.25 microg/ml) against all three NARSP isolates was investigated, synergy was observed at 24 h, and the bacterial counts were reduced by >3 log(10) CFU/ml. This synergy was elongated for up to 72 h in two out of three isolates. When ciprofloxacin at 0.75x MIC (0.012 to 0.38 microg/ml) was combined with cefotaxime at 2x MIC (0.25 to 0.50 microg/ml), synergy was prolonged for up to 72 h in all three isolates. Both Salmonella serotype Paratyphi A isolates carried single mutations in codon 83 of the gyrA gene and codon 84 of the parC gene that were responsible for their reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, while no mutations were found in the gyrB or parE gene. The ciprofloxacin-plus-cefotaxime regimen was very effective in reducing the bacterial counts at 24 h for all three isolates, and this combination therapy may be helpful in reducing the chance of the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants in patients with severe paratyphoid fever.

  13. What’s in a Name? Species-Wide Whole-Genome Sequencing Resolves Invasive and Noninvasive Lineages of Salmonella enterica Serotype Paratyphi B

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Sian V.; Langridge, Gemma; Connell, Steve; Nair, Satheesh; Reuter, Sandra; Dallman, Timothy J.; Corander, Jukka; Tabing, Kristine C.; Le Hello, Simon; Fookes, Maria; Doublet, Benoît; Zhou, Zhemin; Feltwell, Theresa; Ellington, Matthew J.; Herrera, Silvia; Gilmour, Matthew; Cloeckaert, Axel; Achtman, Mark; Wain, John; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Weill, François-Xavier; Peters, Tansy; Thomson, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For 100 years, it has been obvious that Salmonella enterica strains sharing the serotype with the formula 1,4,[5],12:b:1,2—now known as Paratyphi B—can cause diseases ranging from serious systemic infections to self-limiting gastroenteritis. Despite considerable predicted diversity between strains carrying the common Paratyphi B serotype, there remain few methods that subdivide the group into groups that are congruent with their disease phenotypes. Paratyphi B therefore represents one of the canonical examples in Salmonella where serotyping combined with classical microbiological tests fails to provide clinically informative information. Here, we use genomics to provide the first high-resolution view of this serotype, placing it into a wider genomic context of the Salmonella enterica species. These analyses reveal why it has been impossible to subdivide this serotype based upon phenotypic and limited molecular approaches. By examining the genomic data in detail, we are able to identify common features that correlate with strains of clinical importance. The results presented here provide new diagnostic targets, as well as posing important new questions about the basis for the invasive disease phenotype observed in a subset of strains. PMID:27555304

  14. Direct and indirect transmission of four Salmonella enterica serotypes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, Julia; Lewerin, Susanna Sternberg; Wallgren, Per

    2010-05-10

    Feed-borne spread of Salmonella spp. to pigs has been documented several times in recent years in Sweden. Experiences from the field suggest that feed-associated serotypes might be less transmittable and subsequently easier to eradicate from pig herds than other serotypes more commonly associated to pigs. Four Salmonella serotypes were selected for experimental studies in pigs in order to study transmissibility and compare possible differences between feed-associated (S Cubana and S Yoruba) and pig-associated serotypes (S Derby and S Typhimurium). Direct contact transmission was studied in four groups of pigs formed by six 10-week-old salmonella negative pigs commingled with two fatteners excreting one of the four salmonella serotypes. Indirect transmission was studied by putting six 10-week-old salmonella negative pigs in each of four salmonella contaminated rooms. Each room had previously housed a group of pigs, excreting one of the four selected serotypes.All pigs were monitored for two weeks with respect to the faecal excretion of salmonella and the presence of serum antibodies. At the end of the trial, eight samples from inner tissues and organs were collected from each pig at necropsy. In the four direct transmission groups, one pig shed Salmonella (Cubana) at one occasion. At necropsy, S Typhimurium was isolated from one pig.In the indirect transmission groups, two pigs in the Yoruba room and one pig in each of the other rooms were excreting detectable levels of Salmonella once during the study period of two weeks. At necropsy, S Derby was isolated from one of six pigs in the Derby room and S Typhimurium was isolated from four of the six pigs in the Typhimurium room.No significant serological response could be detected in any of the 48 pigs. These results show that all four selected serotypes were able to be transmitted in at least one of these field-like trials, but the transmission rate was low in all groups and no obvious differences between feed

  15. Direct and indirect transmission of four Salmonella enterica serotypes in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feed-borne spread of Salmonella spp. to pigs has been documented several times in recent years in Sweden. Experiences from the field suggest that feed-associated serotypes might be less transmittable and subsequently easier to eradicate from pig herds than other serotypes more commonly associated to pigs. Four Salmonella serotypes were selected for experimental studies in pigs in order to study transmissibility and compare possible differences between feed-assoociated (S Cubana and S Yoruba) and pig-associated serotypes (S Derby and S Typhimurium). Methods Direct contact transmission was studied in four groups of pigs formed by six 10-week-old salmonella negative pigs commingled with two fatteners excreting one of the four salmonella serotypes. Indirect transmission was studied by putting six 10-week-old salmonella negative pigs in each of four salmonella contaminated rooms. Each room had previously housed a group of pigs, excreting one of the four selected serotypes. All pigs were monitored for two weeks with respect to the faecal excretion of salmonella and the presence of serum antibodies. At the end of the trial, eight samples from inner tissues and organs were collected from each pig at necropsy. Results In the four direct transmission groups, one pig shed Salmonella (Cubana) at one occasion. At necropsy, S Typhimurium was isolated from one pig. In the indirect transmission groups, two pigs in the Yoruba room and one pig in each of the other rooms were excreting detectable levels of Salmonella once during the study period of two weeks. At necropsy, S Derby was isolated from one of six pigs in the Derby room and S Typhimurium was isolated from four of the six pigs in the Typhimurium room. No significant serological response could be detected in any of the 48 pigs. Conclusions These results show that all four selected serotypes were able to be transmitted in at least one of these field-like trials, but the transmission rate was low in all groups and

  16. Quantitative comparison of intestinal invasion of zoonotic serotypes of Salmonella enterica in poultry.

    PubMed

    Aabo, S; Christensen, J P; Chadfield, M S; Carstensen, B; Olsen, J E; Bisgaard, M

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the invasion of selected zoonotic Salmonella serotypes of poultry in an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model and also in vitro in epithelial cell cultures. Invasion was measured relative to a reference strain, Salmonella Typhimurium 4/74 invH201::TnphoA. Two serotypes demonstrated intracellular log(10) counts that differed significantly from all other serotypes tested: Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 being 1.5 log(10) colony forming units (CFU) (31-fold) higher, and Salmonella Tennessee being 0.7 log(10) CFU (fivefold) lower than the reference strain (P < or = 0.0001). A group of serotypes, which can be vertically transmitted, showed significantly higher intracellular counts (fourfold to eightfold) than the reference strain. The group included S. Typhimurium 4/74, S. Typhimurium DT104 (poultry and porcine isolates), S. Enteritidis PT1, S. Enteritidis PT6, S. Enteritidis PT8, and Salmonella Berta. The serotypes Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella Virchow, S. 4,12:b:-, S. Typhimurium DT41, and Salmonella Infantis, most of which are considered horizontally transmitted, did not show significantly different intracellular counts from the reference strain. Results from the cell culture invasion studies agreed with the in vivo data, with the exception of S. Berta and the poultry isolate of S. Typhimurium DT104.

  17. Interpretations of antibody responses to Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis gm flagellin in poultry flocks are enhanced by a kinetics-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P L; Jacobson, R H; Timoney, J F; Mutalib, A; Kradel, D C; Chang, Y F; Shin, S J; Lein, D H; Trock, S; Wheeler, K

    1998-07-01

    Many regulatory and diagnostic programs for the detection of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infection in commercial poultry flocks have relied on rapid Pullorum agglutination tests to screen birds because of the shared antigens of S. enterica Enteritidis and S. enterica Pullorum and Gallinarum; however, the use of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format affords better analytical sensitivity than crude agglutination tests. In this study, we adapted our earlier conventional indirect ELISA, using gm flagellin as the antigen, to a kinetics-based, computer-controlled ELISA (KELA). The KELA was used to screen for flagellin antibody from three commercial flocks: (i) a large flock involved in a U.S. Department of Agriculture trace back from a human S. enterica Enteritidis foodborne outbreak (n = 3,209), (ii) a flock infected with the endemic S. enterica Enteritidis serotype but which also had multiple other Salmonella serotypes (n = 65), and (iii) an S. enterica Pullorum-infected flock (n = 12). The first flock (S. enterica Enteritidis prevalence of 2.45% based on culture) provided a field test of the KELA and allowed the calculation of diagnostic sensitivity (D-Sn) and diagnostic specificity (D-Sp). With a cutoff of 10 (used for screening flocks [i.e., high sensitivity]), the KELA has a D-Sn of 95.2% and a D-Sp of 18.5%; with a cutoff of 140 (used in confirmatory flock testing [i.e., high specificity]), the KELA has a D-Sn of 28.0% and a D-Sp of 99.1%. We found that with a cutoff of 60 (D-Sn = 63.1%; D-Sp = 91.6%), we could eliminate reactions in the KELA caused by other non-S. enterica Enteritidis salmonellae. The KELA was also compared to two commercial rapid Pullorum tests, the Solvay (D-Sn = 94.9%; D-Sp = 55.5%) and the Vineland (D-Sn = 62.0%; D-Sp = 75.3%).

  18. Emergence of Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase (CTX-M-9)-Producing Multiresistant Strains of Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow in Poultry and Humans in France

    PubMed Central

    Weill, François-Xavier; Lailler, Renaud; Praud, Karine; Kérouanton, Annaëlle; Fabre, Laëtitia; Brisabois, Anne; Grimont, Patrick A. D.; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2004-01-01

    During 2002 to 2003, eight Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow poultry and poultry product isolates from various sources (chicken farms, poultry slaughterhouse, or retail store) and one S. enterica rough strain isolated from human feces were found to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M-9. Poultry and poultry product isolates were recovered from different locations in the southwest of France. The human rough isolate had sequences of flagellin genes (fliC and fljB) typical of serotype Virchow and ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns closely similar to those of serotype Virchow strains. PFGE confirmed the clonal relationship between the poultry isolates, while the human isolate displayed a pattern with 94% homology. The blaCTX-M-9 gene was located on a conjugative plasmid and was shown to be linked to orf513. Plasmid profiling found a very similar EcoRI restriction pattern in six transconjugants studied, including transconjugants obtained from the human isolate. A single hatchery, supplying chicks to the six farms, was identified. Emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing S. enterica strains in food animals is a major concern, as such strains could disseminate on a large scale and lead to antibiotic therapy difficulties. PMID:15583311

  19. Classification of Salmonella Enterica serotypes with selective bands using visible/NIR hyperspectral imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Optical detection of foodborne bacteria such as Salmonella classifies bacteria by analyzing spectral data, and has potential for rapid detection. In this experiment hyperspectral microscopy is explored as a means for classifying five Salmonella serotypes. Initially, the microscope collects 89 spect...

  20. Presence and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium in the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of spray-irrigated parsley.

    PubMed

    Kisluk, Guy; Yaron, Sima

    2012-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the major food-borne pathogens associated with ready-to-eat fresh foods. Although polluted water might be a significant source of contamination in the field, factors that influence the transfer of Salmonella from water to the crops are not well understood, especially under conditions of low pathogen levels in water. The aim of this study was to investigate the short- and long-term (1 h to 28 days) persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of parsley following spray irrigation with contaminated water. Plate counting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based methods were implemented for the quantification. By applying qRT-PCR with enrichment, we were able to show that even irrigation with water containing as little as ∼300 CFU/ml resulted in the persistence of S. Typhimurium on the plants for 48 h. Irrigation with water containing 8.5 log CFU/ml resulted in persistence of the bacteria in the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere for at least 4 weeks, but the population steadily declined with a major reduction in bacterial counts, of ∼2 log CFU/g, during the first 2 days. Higher levels of Salmonella were detected in the phyllosphere when plants were irrigated during the night compared to irrigation during the morning and during winter compared to the other seasons. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transfer of Salmonella from contaminated water to crops, as well as its persistence over time, will enable the implementation of effective irrigation and control strategies.

  1. Presence and Persistence of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium in the Phyllosphere and Rhizosphere of Spray-Irrigated Parsley

    PubMed Central

    Kisluk, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the major food-borne pathogens associated with ready-to-eat fresh foods. Although polluted water might be a significant source of contamination in the field, factors that influence the transfer of Salmonella from water to the crops are not well understood, especially under conditions of low pathogen levels in water. The aim of this study was to investigate the short- and long-term (1 h to 28 days) persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of parsley following spray irrigation with contaminated water. Plate counting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based methods were implemented for the quantification. By applying qRT-PCR with enrichment, we were able to show that even irrigation with water containing as little as ∼300 CFU/ml resulted in the persistence of S. Typhimurium on the plants for 48 h. Irrigation with water containing 8.5 log CFU/ml resulted in persistence of the bacteria in the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere for at least 4 weeks, but the population steadily declined with a major reduction in bacterial counts, of ∼2 log CFU/g, during the first 2 days. Higher levels of Salmonella were detected in the phyllosphere when plants were irrigated during the night compared to irrigation during the morning and during winter compared to the other seasons. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transfer of Salmonella from contaminated water to crops, as well as its persistence over time, will enable the implementation of effective irrigation and control strategies. PMID:22447598

  2. Classification of Salmonella enterica serotypes with selective bands using visible/NIR hyperspectral microscope images.

    PubMed

    Eady, M; Park, B

    2016-07-01

    Optical detection of foodborne bacteria such as Salmonella classifies bacteria by analysing spectral data, and has potential for rapid detection. In this experiment hyperspectral microscopy is explored as a means for classifying five Salmonella serotypes. Initially, the microscope collects 89 spectral measurements between 450 and 800 nm. Here, the objective was to develop correct classification of five serotypes with optimal spectral bands selected through multivariate data analysis (MVDA), thus reducing the data processing and storage requirement necessary for practical application in the food industry. An upright digital microscope is equipped with an acousto-optical tuneable filter, electron multiplying charge-coupled device, and metal halide lighting source. Images for each of the five serotypes were collected, and informative bands were identified through a principal component analysis, for four abbreviated spectral ranges containing 3, 7, 12 and 20 spectral bands. The experiment was repeated with an independent repetition and images were collected at each of the reduced band sets, identified by the first repetition. A support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify serotypes. Results showed that with the first repetition, classification accuracy decreased from 99.5% (89 bands) to 84.5% (3 bands), whereas the second repetition showed classification accuracies of 100%, possibly due to a reduction in spectral noise. The support vector machine regression (SVMR) was applied with cross-validation, and had R(2) calibration and validation values >0.922. Although classification accuracies through SVM classification showed that as little as 3 bands were able to classify 100% of the samples, the SVMR shows that the smallest root-mean squared-error values were 0.001 and 0.002 for 20 and 12 bands, respectively, suggesting that the 12 band range collected between 586 and 630 nm is optimal for classifying bacterial serotypes, with only the informative HMI bands selected.

  3. Laboratory-acquired infections of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in South Africa: phenotypic and genotypic analysis of isolates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony Marius; Smouse, Shannon Lucrecia; Tau, Nomsa Pauline; Bamford, Colleen; Moodley, Vineshree Mischka; Jacobs, Charlene; McCarthy, Kerrigan Mary; Lourens, Adré; Keddy, Karen Helena

    2017-09-29

    Workers in clinical microbiology laboratories are exposed to a variety of pathogenic microorganisms. Salmonella species is among the most commonly reported bacterial causes of laboratory-acquired infections. We report on three cases of laboratory-acquired Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (Salmonella Typhi) infection which occurred over the period 2012 to 2016 in South Africa. Laboratory investigation included phenotypic and genotypic characterization of isolates. Phenotypic analysis included standard microbiological identification techniques, serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Genotypic analysis included the molecular subtyping methodologies of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, multilocus sequence typing and whole-genome sequencing (WGS); with WGS data analysis including phylogenetic analysis based upon comparison of single nucleotide polymorphism profiles of isolates. All cases of laboratory-acquired infection were most likely the result of lapses in good laboratory practice and laboratory safety. The following critical issues were highlighted. There was misdiagnosis and misreporting of Salmonella Typhi as nontyphoidal Salmonella by a diagnostic laboratory, with associated public health implications. We highlight issues concerning the importance of accurate fluoroquinolone susceptibility testing and interpretation of results according to updated guidelines. We describe potential shortcomings of a single disk susceptibility screening test for fluoroquinolone susceptibility and suggest that confirmatory minimum inhibitory concentration testing should always be performed in cases of invasive Salmonella infections. These antimicrobial susceptibility testing issues resulted in inappropriate ciprofloxacin therapy which may have been responsible for failure in clearance of pathogen from patients. Salmonella Typhi capsular polysaccharide vaccine was not protective in one case, possibly secondarily to a faulty vaccine. Molecular subtyping of

  4. Antimicrobial drug resistance and genetic properties of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis circulating in chicken farms in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Rakia; Abbassi, Mohamed S; García, Vanesa; García-Fierro, Raquel; Fernández, Javier; Kilani, Hajer; Jaouani, Imen; Khayeche, Monia; Messadi, Lilia; Rodicio, María Rosario

    2017-02-16

    This study focused on 77 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis collected during 2009 to 2013 from healthy and sick chickens and environmental farm samples in Tunisia. Resistance to 14 antimicrobials and the encoding genes were analyzed. 66, 26, 6.5, 3.9 and 1.3% were pan-susceptible or showed resistance to nalidixic acid (Asp87 to Tyr and Asp87 to Asn substitutions in GyrA), ampicillin (blaTEM-1-like and blaSHV), sulfonamides (sul1and sul3) and streptomycin (strB), respectively. A single isolate with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was positive for qnrB, whereas qnrA, qnrS or aac(6')-Ib-cr were not detected. The virulotype of the isolates was established by testing ten virulence genes. The orgA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB genes, located on Salmonella pathogenicity islands, and spvC of the serotype-specific virulence plasmid, were common to all isolates. In contrast, the prophage-associated sopE-1, sodC1 and gipA genes and the fimbrial bcfC gene were variably represented. All isolates except one contained the virulence plasmid, which appeared either alone or together with one or more additional plasmids. One isolate carried a single plasmid of ca. 90Kb which may be derived from the virulence plasmid (60Kb). Overall, seven resistotypes, six virulotypes and six plasmid profiles were identified. XbaI-PFGE revealed four related pulsotypes (X1-X4), with 80% of the isolates sharing the X1 pattern. The latter isolates exhibited different resistance, virulence and plasmid profiles, suggesting that mobile genetic elements, particularly prophages and plasmids, are of central importance for the evolution and adaptation of S. Enteritidis circulating in chicken farms in Tunisia.

  5. Studies on the effects of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in culture medium and in black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Castro, M F P M; Rezende, A C B; Benato, E A; Valentini, S R T; Furlani, R P Z; Tfouni, S A V

    2011-04-01

    The effect of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis inoculated in culture medium and in black pepper grains (Piper nigrum), as well as on the reduction of the microbial load of the dried and moisturized product, was verified. The postfumigation effect was verified in inoculated samples with 0.92 and 0.97 water activity (a(w)) exposed to 6 g/m(3) phosphine for 72 h, dried to 0.67 a(w), and stored for 24, 48, and 72 h. No decreases were observed in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in culture medium when fumigant concentrations up to 6 g/m(3) were applied for 48 h at 35°C. However, the colonies showed reductions in size and atypical coloration as the phosphine concentration increased. No reduction in Salmonella counts occurred on the inoculated dried samples after fumigation. On the other hand, when phosphine at concentrations of 6 g/m(3) was applied on moisturized black pepper for 72 h, decreases in Salmonella counts of around 80% were observed. The counts of total aerobic mesophilic bacterium populations of the dried and moisturized black pepper were not affected by the fumigant treatment. The results of the postfumigation studies indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis was absent in the fumigated grains after drying and storage for 72 h, indicating a promising application for this technique. It was concluded that for Salmonella Enteritidis control, phosphine fumigation could be applied to black pepper grains before drying and the producers should rigidly follow good agricultural practices, mainly during the drying process, in order to avoid product recontamination. Additional work is needed to confirm the findings with more Salmonella serotypes and strains.

  6. Salmonella enterica Serotype Napoli is the First Cause of Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis in Lombardy, Italy (2010-2014), and Belongs to Typhi Subclade.

    PubMed

    Huedo, Pol; Gori, Maria; Zolin, Anna; Amato, Ettore; Ciceri, Giulia; Bossi, Anna; Pontello, Mirella

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Napoli (S. Napoli) is currently emerging in Europe and particularly in Italy, where in 2014 it caused a large outbreak associated with elevated rates of bacteremia. However, no study has yet investigated its invasive ability and phylogenetic classification. Here, we show that between 2010 and 2014, S. Napoli was the first cause of invasive salmonellosis affecting 40 cases out of 687 (invasive index: 5.8%), which is significantly higher than the invasive index of all the other nontyphoidal serotypes (2.0%, p < 0.05). Genomic and phylogenetic analyses of an invasive isolate revealed that S. Napoli belongs to Typhi subclade in clade A, Paratyphi A being the most related serotype and carrying almost identical pattern of typhoid-associated genes. This work presents evidence of invasive capacity of S. Napoli and argues for reconsideration of its nontyphoidal category.

  7. Population dynamics of Salmonella enterica serotypes in commercial egg and poultry production.

    PubMed

    Foley, Steven L; Nayak, Rajesh; Hanning, Irene B; Johnson, Timothy J; Han, Jing; Ricke, Steven C

    2011-07-01

    Fresh and processed poultry have been frequently implicated in cases of human salmonellosis. Furthermore, increased consumption of meat and poultry has increased the potential for exposure to Salmonella enterica. While advances have been made in reducing the prevalence and frequency of Salmonella contamination in processed poultry, there is mounting pressure on commercial growers to prevent and/or eliminate these human pathogens in preharvest production facilities. Several factors contribute to Salmonella colonization in commercial poultry, including the serovar and the infectious dose. In the early 1900s, Salmonella enterica serovars Pullorum and Gallinarum caused widespread diseases in poultry, but vaccination and other voluntary programs helped eradicate pullorum disease and fowl typhoid from commercial flocks. However, the niche created by the eradication of these serovars was likely filled by S. Enteritidis, which proliferated in the bird populations. While this pathogen remains a significant problem in commercial egg and poultry production, its prevalence among poultry has been declining since the 1990s. Coinciding with the decrease of S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg and S. Kentucky have emerged as the predominant serovars in commercial broilers. In this review, we have highlighted bacterial genetic and host-related factors that may contribute to such shifts in Salmonella populations in commercial poultry and intervention strategies that could limit their colonization.

  8. Utilization of a molecular serotyping method for Salmonella enterica in a routine laboratory in Alberta Canada.

    PubMed

    Ferrato, Christina; Chui, Linda; King, Robin; Louie, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common enteric pathogens related to foodborne illness. Alberta's Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (ProvLab) provides Outbreak and Surveillance support by performing serotyping. The Check&Trace Salmonella™ (CTS) assay (Check-Points, Netherlands), a commercial DNA microarray system, can determine the serotype designation of a Salmonella isolate with automated interpretation. Here we evaluate 1028 Salmonella isolates of human clinical or environmental sources in Alberta, Canada with the CTS assay. CTS was able to assign a serovar to 98.7% of the most frequently occurring human clinical strains in Alberta (82.5% overall), and 71.7% of isolates which were inconclusive by conventional methods. There was 99.7% concordance in environmental isolates. The CTS database has potential to expand to identify rare serovars. With the anticipated shift to molecular methods for identification, CTS provides an easy transition and demonstrates ease-of-use and reduces the turn-around-time of a reported result significantly compared to classical serotyping.

  9. Survival of Salmonella enterica serotype Tennessee during simulated gastric passage is improved by low water activity and high fat content.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Bryan; Klotz, Courtney; Smith, Twyla; Williams, Robert; Ponder, Monica

    2013-02-01

    The low water activity (a(w) 0.3) of peanut butter prohibits the growth of Salmonella in a product; however, illnesses are reported from peanut butter contaminated with very small doses, suggesting the food matrix itself influences the infectious dose of Salmonella, potentially by improving Salmonella's survival in the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of our study was to quantify the survival of a peanut butter outbreak-associated strain of Salmonella enterica serotype Tennessee when inoculated into peanut butters with different fat contents and a(w) (high fat, high a(w); high fat, low a(w); low fat, high a(w); low fat, low a(w)) and then challenged with a simulated gastrointestinal system. Exposures to increased fat content and decreased a(w) both were associated with a protective effect on the survival of Salmonella Tennessee in the simulated gastric fluid compared with control cells. After a simulated intestinal phase, the populations of Salmonella Tennessee in the control and low-fat formulations were not significantly different; however, a 2-log CFU/g increase occurred in high-fat formulations. This study demonstrates that cross-protection from low-a(w) stress and the presence of high fat results in improved survival in the low pH of the stomach. The potential for interaction of food matrix and stress adaptations could influence the virulence of Salmonella and should be considered for risk analysis.

  10. A multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium infection linked to raw milk consumption--Ohio, 2003.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Jacek; Salehi, Ellen; Propes, Dennis; Holt, Jo; Bannerman, Tammy; Nicholson, Lisa M; Bundesen, Mark; Duffy, Rosemary; Moolenaar, Ronald L

    2004-10-01

    In December 2002, the Ohio Department of Health was notified of two children with Salmonella infection. Both had a history of drinking raw milk from a combination dairy-restaurant-petting zoo (dairy). The dairy was the only establishment in Ohio licensed to sell raw milk and reported 1.35 million visitors annually. We investigated to determine the extent of the outbreak and identify illness risk factors. A case patient was any person with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-matched Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium from 30 November 2002 to 18 February 2003. Sixty-two met the confirmed case definition. Forty dairy case patient patrons were included in a case-control study; 56 controls were their well meal companions. Consumption of raw milk was found to be associated with illness (odds ratio, 45.1; 95% confidence interval, 8.8 to 311.9). The dairy discontinued selling raw milk. Because 27 other states still allow the sale of raw milk, awareness of the hazards of its consumption should be raised and relevant regulations carefully reviewed.

  11. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium, Enteritidis and Infantis from human infections, foodstuffs and farm animals in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Busani, L.; Graziani, C.; Battisti, A.; Franco, A.; Ricci, A.; Vio, D.; Digiannatale, E.; Paterlini, F.; D'Incau, M.; Owczarek, S.; Caprioli, A.; Luzzi, I.

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates of Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Infantis isolated from humans, foodstuffs and farm animals in Italy between 1999 and 2001 was examined. All the isolates were susceptible to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin, but high rates of resistance were observed for several other drugs, especially for S. Typhimurium. The rates of resistance and multiresistance were generally higher among animal and food isolates than in human strains; conversely, no significant difference was observed between animal and food isolates. Among S. Typhimurium, multiresistance was more common in bovine, poultry and rabbit strains than in swine isolates, and was rare in strains from pigeon. Resistance to trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole was mainly found in isolates of swine and human origin. This study confirms the role of livestock as a reservoir of drug-resistant Salmonella spp. and underlines the need for integrated surveillance systems of antibiotic resistance that consider isolates not only from human disease but also from the animal reservoirs and the food vehicles. PMID:15061499

  12. Genetically Similar Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Persistent in China for a Long-Term Period.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Shen, Xuanyi; Yang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Danyang; Gao, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is an important causative agent of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in human populations. In this study, we collected 72 S. Enteritidis strains from 2004 to 2014 in Ningbo, mid-east China. Of the 72 strains, we identified a dominant clone of 58 strains recovered from patient's feces (n = 48), blood (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), chickens (n = 3), and dessert cakes (n = 5) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). The profile arrangements of MLVA were SE1-SE2-SE3-SE5-SE6-SE8-SE9: 4-4-3-11-10-1-3. These dominant strains were susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and resistant to nalidixic acid. Additionally, all isolates harboured virulence genes invA, sipA, sopE, and spvB when tested by PCR. Our results reveal that genetically similar S. Enteritidis strains which accounted for several outbreaks as well as blood infection and pleural cavity infection are prevalent in China for a long-term period. This situation calls for further attention in the prevention and control of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella species.

  13. Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana infections associated with amphibian contact, Mississippi, 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Srikantiah, P.; Lay, J. C.; Hand, S.; Crump, J. A.; Campbell, J.; Van Duyne, M. S.; Bishop, R.; Middendor, R.; Currier, M.; Mead, P. S.; Mølbak, K.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella Javiana is a Salmonella serotype that is restricted geographically in the United States to the Southeast. During the summer of 2001, the number of reported S. Javiana infections in Mississippi increased sevenfold. To identify sources of infection, we conducted a case-control study, defining a case as an infection with S. Javiana between August and September in a Mississippi resident. We enrolled 55 cases and 109 controls. Thirty (55%) case patients reported exposure to amphibians, defined as owning, touching, or seeing an amphibian on one's property, compared with 30 (29%) controls (matched odds ratio 2.8, P=0.006). Contact with amphibians and their environments may be a risk factor for human infection with S. Javiana. The geographic pattern of S. Javiana infections in the United States mimics the distribution of certain amphibian species in the Southeast. Public health officials should consider amphibians as potential sources of salmonellosis, and promote hand washing after contact with amphibians. PMID:15061502

  14. Investigation of Salmonella enterica in Sardinian slaughter pigs: prevalence, serotype and genotype characterization.

    PubMed

    Piras, Francesca; Brown, Derek J; Meloni, Domenico; Mureddu, Anna; Mazzette, Rina

    2011-12-02

    In order to improve the knowledge about the presence of Salmonella in pork meat in Sardinia (Italy), the prevalence and the sources of Salmonella at 5 pig slaughterhouses (slaughtered pigs and environment) were investigated and the isolates were characterised. A total of 462 samples were collected, 425 from pigs at slaughter and 41 from the slaughterhouse environment. Salmonella was isolated from 26/85 (30.5%) mesenteric lymph nodes, 14/85 (16.4%) colon contents, and from 12/85 (14.1%) carcasses and livers. Salmonella prevalence was 38% (8/21) in samples from surfaces not in contact with meat, and 35% (7/20) in those from surfaces in contact with meat. Thirty-one pigs were identified as carriers of Salmonella in lymph nodes and/or colon content, but of these, only 8 carcasses were positive. A total of 103 Salmonella isolates were serotyped and genotyped. Eight different serotypes were detected; the most common were S. Derby (44/103, 42.7%) and S. Typhimurium (24/103, 23.3%). The most prevalent S. Typhimurium phage type was DT193. Thirty-two isolates were found to be resistant to more than one antimicrobial (MDR). Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) permitted the resolution of XbaI macrorestriction fragments of the Salmonella strains into 20 distinct pulsotypes. Combined application of a plasmid profiling assay (PPA) and PFGE gave useful additional information to assist in tracing the routes of Salmonella contamination in abattoirs. To reduce Salmonella prevalence some preventive measures should be encouraged: the origin of infected slaughter animals should be identified and direct and cross-contamination of carcasses should be avoided by adhering to HACCP principles in association with good hygiene procedures (GHP). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Whole Genome DNA Sequence Analysis of Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee obtained from related peanut butter foodborne outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark R; Brown, Eric; Keys, Chris; Strain, Errol; Luo, Yan; Muruvanda, Tim; Grim, Christopher; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Jarvis, Karen; Ewing, Laura; Gopinath, Gopal; Hanes, Darcy; Allard, Marc W; Musser, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an association between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires discriminating the suspected pathogen from an environmental background, and distinguishing it from other closely-related foodborne pathogens. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee (S. Tennessee) to describe genomic diversity across the serovar as well as among and within outbreak clades of strains associated with contaminated peanut butter. We analyzed 71 isolates of S. Tennessee from disparate food, environmental, and clinical sources and 2 other closely-related Salmonella serovars as outgroups (S. Kentucky and S. Cubana), which were also shot-gun sequenced. A whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed using a maximum likelihood approach to infer phylogenetic relationships. Several monophyletic lineages of S. Tennessee with limited SNP variability were identified that recapitulated several food contamination events. S. Tennessee clades were separated from outgroup salmonellae by more than sixteen thousand SNPs. Intra-serovar diversity of S. Tennessee was small compared to the chosen outgroups (1,153 SNPs), suggesting recent divergence of some S. Tennessee clades. Analysis of all 1,153 SNPs structuring an S. Tennessee peanut butter outbreak cluster revealed that isolates from several food, plant, and clinical isolates were very closely related, as they had only a few SNP differences between them. SNP-based cluster analyses linked specific food sources to several clinical S. Tennessee strains isolated in separate contamination events. Environmental and clinical isolates had very similar whole genome sequences; no markers were found that could be used to discriminate between these sources. Finally, we identified SNPs within variable S. Tennessee genes that may be useful markers for the development of rapid surveillance and typing methods, potentially aiding in traceback efforts during future

  16. Whole Genome DNA Sequence Analysis of Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee obtained from related peanut butter foodborne outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark R.; Brown, Eric; Keys, Chris; Strain, Errol; Luo, Yan; Muruvanda, Tim; Grim, Christopher; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Jarvis, Karen; Ewing, Laura; Gopinath, Gopal; Hanes, Darcy; Allard, Marc W.; Musser, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an association between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires discriminating the suspected pathogen from an environmental background, and distinguishing it from other closely-related foodborne pathogens. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee (S. Tennessee) to describe genomic diversity across the serovar as well as among and within outbreak clades of strains associated with contaminated peanut butter. We analyzed 71 isolates of S. Tennessee from disparate food, environmental, and clinical sources and 2 other closely-related Salmonella serovars as outgroups (S. Kentucky and S. Cubana), which were also shot-gun sequenced. A whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed using a maximum likelihood approach to infer phylogenetic relationships. Several monophyletic lineages of S. Tennessee with limited SNP variability were identified that recapitulated several food contamination events. S. Tennessee clades were separated from outgroup salmonellae by more than sixteen thousand SNPs. Intra-serovar diversity of S. Tennessee was small compared to the chosen outgroups (1,153 SNPs), suggesting recent divergence of some S. Tennessee clades. Analysis of all 1,153 SNPs structuring an S. Tennessee peanut butter outbreak cluster revealed that isolates from several food, plant, and clinical isolates were very closely related, as they had only a few SNP differences between them. SNP-based cluster analyses linked specific food sources to several clinical S. Tennessee strains isolated in separate contamination events. Environmental and clinical isolates had very similar whole genome sequences; no markers were found that could be used to discriminate between these sources. Finally, we identified SNPs within variable S. Tennessee genes that may be useful markers for the development of rapid surveillance and typing methods, potentially aiding in traceback efforts during future

  17. Kinetics of growth and inactivation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104 in pasteurised liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    McQuestin, Olivia J; Musgrove, Michael T; Tamplin, Mark L

    2010-05-01

    The potential impact of post-pasteurisation contamination of liquid egg products with the multi-antibiotic resistant pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) was assessed by determining the viability of this bacterium in whole egg, albumen and 10% w/w sugared and salted yolk incubated at 4-42 degrees C. Results indicated that populations of S. Typhimurium DT104 were slowly inactivated in all four products when stored at 4 degrees C. However, based on the typical shelf-lives of cold-stored liquid egg, less than 0.6 log-kill would be achieved in those products prior to their use. Incubation at temperatures pertaining to abuse situations (10, 15, 20 and 25 degrees C) revealed an increasing potential for growth of S. Typhimurium DT104 in whole egg, albumen and sugared yolk, as indicated by trends in growth rate, lag duration and maximum population density. At even higher temperatures (30, 37 and 42 degrees C), growth rates of S. Typhimurium DT104 in whole egg and sugared yolk continued to increase. The same was true for S. Typhimurium DT104 in albumen except that growth was not observed at 42 degrees C and instead populations were inactivated within 30 h. At no temperature tested was S. Typhimurium DT104 able to grow in salted yolk. The influence of these growth and inactivation patterns on the risk of salmonellosis in relation to product type and storage temperature is discussed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Longitudinal Study of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Infection in Three Danish Farrow-to-Finish Swine Herds

    PubMed Central

    Kranker, Søren; Alban, Lis; Boes, Jaap; Dahl, Jan

    2003-01-01

    A longitudinal study of the infection dynamics of Salmonella enterica was carried out with three Danish farrow-to-finish swine herds. To account for variations in Salmonella shedding over time, litters from each herd were divided into two cohorts. Each cohort consisted of 30 pigs, for a total of 180 pigs. Pigs were individually monitored by monthly bacteriologic and serologic examinations from weaning to slaughter. At weaning, individual sows were examined bacteriologically and serologically. At slaughter, cecal contents, ileocecal lymph nodes, and carcass swab samples were obtained from 131 pigs. A total of 88 pigs were found to be shedding Salmonella on one or more occasions. Only the Salmonella serotype Typhimurium was detected during the study period. At weaning, no sows or piglets were found to be shedding, but a serological reaction was detected in 11 sows. The prevalence in culture peaked in the nursery and subsequently declined to undetectable levels before slaughter. The seroprevalence peaked approximately 60 days after the peak prevalence in culture. Salmonella was detected in individual fecal samples at least once in 53% of the pigs, and 62% of the pigs were seropositive more than once. Only 3.7% of all pigs were found to be culture positive on more than one occasion. Piglets from seroreacting sows had a significantly (P = 0.0339) lower probability of shedding in the nursery. Under the assumption that shedding lasted at least 1 or 2 weeks, the average shedding time was estimated to have been 18 or 26 days. An association between serology, on-farm bacteriology, and Salmonella prevalence in culture at slaughter was shown. Marked differences in prevalence in sera and prevalence in culture between cohorts and within herds were observed. These differences emphasize the need for caution when using point estimates in on-farm interventions and surveillance in subclinically infected swine herds. PMID:12791837

  19. Postharvest transfer and survival of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis on living lettuce.

    PubMed

    Waitt, J A; Kuhn, D D; Welbaum, G E; Ponder, M A

    2014-02-01

    The potential for postharvest transfer of Salmonella to 'living lettuce' is not well understood. In this study, the transfer of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (6 log CFU g(-1) ) from worker hands or contaminated roots to leaves of living lettuce was quantified. Transfer rates of Salmonella from contaminated gloves to sequentially handled lettuce heads ranged from 94% to head 1, 82% to head 2 and 69% to head 3. On average, 2.9 ± 0.1 log CFU g(-1) (64%) Salmonella was transferred from inoculated roots to leaves resulting from typical postharvest handling activities for living lettuce. Salmonella persisted on leaves stored at recommended storage temperatures (4°C) and increased 0.5 log CFU g(-1) when stored at temperature abuse conditions (12°C). Salmonella increased 1.6 log CFU g(-1) on roots after 18-day storage at 12°C, emphasizing the need to maintain temperature control to reduce the risk of human illness. Hydroponically grown lettuce packaged in plastic clamshells with intact roots, marketed as 'living lettuce', is increasing in popularity due to its extended shelf life. This study demonstrates the transfer of Salmonella from contaminated worker hands and contaminated roots to leaves where it persisted at 4°C for 18 day. Temperature abuse (12°C) increased Salmonella on roots and leaves. These findings suggest that failure to maintain temperatures below 12°C can pose a risk for consumers purchasing living lettuce at markets where recommended storage temperatures are not maintained. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. An Outbreak of Food-Borne Typhoid Fever Due to Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi in Japan Reported for the First Time in 16 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio; Uryu, Hideko; Yamada, Ritsuko; Kashiwa, Naoyuki; Nei, Takahito; Ehara, Akihito; Takei, Reiko; Mori, Nobuaki; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Hayasaka, Tomomi; Kagawa, Narito; Sugawara, Momoko; Suzaki, Ai; Takahashi, Yuno; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masatomo; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in 16 years, a food-borne outbreak of typhoid fever due to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi was reported in Japan. Seven patients consumed food in an Indian buffet at a restaurant in the center of Tokyo, while one was a Nepali chef in the restaurant, an asymptomatic carrier and the implicated source of this outbreak. The multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis showed 100% consistency in the genomic sequence for five of the eight cases. PMID:26621565

  1. Case Report: An Outbreak of Food-Borne Typhoid Fever Due to Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi in Japan Reported for the First Time in 16 Years.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio; Uryu, Hideko; Yamada, Ritsuko; Kashiwa, Naoyuki; Nei, Takahito; Ehara, Akihito; Takei, Reiko; Mori, Nobuaki; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Hayasaka, Tomomi; Kagawa, Narito; Sugawara, Momoko; Suzaki, Ai; Takahashi, Yuno; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masatomo; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    For the first time in 16 years, a food-borne outbreak of typhoid fever due to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi was reported in Japan. Seven patients consumed food in an Indian buffet at a restaurant in the center of Tokyo, while one was a Nepali chef in the restaurant, an asymptomatic carrier and the implicated source of this outbreak. The multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis showed 100% consistency in the genomic sequence for five of the eight cases. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. A case report of thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure secondary to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi infection in a pediatric patient: successful treatment with plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Inci; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Bayrakci, Benan; Uysal, Mutlu; Kuskonmaz, Baris; Ozaltin, Fatih

    2010-04-01

    A high proportion of the patients with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi infection develop severe sepsis. The mortality rate is high despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy in these patients. The case of a 10-year-old boy who developed thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure (TAMOF) secondary to S. typhi infection is reported. The patient did not respond to antimicrobial treatment, including ciprofloxacin, in addition to conventional supportive measures, so plasma exchange was performed. The thrombocytopenia and organ failure had resolved after 3 days of plasma exchange therapy. Plasma exchange is suggested to be a life-saving intervention in a child with TAMOF secondary to S. typhi infection.

  3. Multidrug Resistance Is Mediated by Large Plasmids Carrying a Class 1 Integron in the Emergent Salmonella enterica Serotype [4,5,12:i:−

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Beatriz; Soto, Sara M.; Argüelles, Jose M.; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    2001-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype [4,5,12:i:−] clone carried a class 1 integron harboring dfrA12 and aadA2 gene cassettes and blaTEM-1, aac(3)-IV, cmlA1, and tetA genes located in large plasmids of about 140 kb (carrying spv) or 120 kb (lacking spv). Several segregants, lacking multidrug resistance, contained a plasmid smaller than the parental one and no longer hybridized with probes for the lost resistances. The genes mediating resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline in the [4,5,12:i:−] clone are different from those found in the pentadrug-resistant serotype Typhimurium DT104 clone. PMID:11257054

  4. Analysis of Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi A gene expression in the blood of bacteremic patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Charles, Richelle C; Rollins, Sean M; Harris, Jason B; Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Khanam, Farhana; Bukka, Archana; Kalsy, Anuj; Porwollik, Steffen; Brooks, W Abdullah; LaRocque, Regina C; Hohmann, Elizabeth L; Cravioto, Alejandro; Logvinenko, Tanya; Calderwood, Stephen B; McClelland, Michael; Graham, James E; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2010-12-07

    Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A is a human-restricted cause of paratyphoid fever, accounting for up to a fifth of all cases of enteric fever in Asia. In this work, we applied an RNA analysis method, Selective Capture of Transcribed Sequences (SCOTS), and cDNA hybridization-microarray technology to identify S. Paratyphi A transcripts expressed by bacteria in the blood of three patients in Bangladesh. In total, we detected 1,798 S. Paratyphi A mRNAs expressed in the blood of infected humans (43.9% of the ORFeome). Of these, we identified 868 in at least two patients, and 315 in all three patients. S. Paratyphi A transcripts identified in at least two patients encode proteins involved in energy metabolism, nutrient and iron acquisition, vitamin biosynthesis, stress responses, oxidative stress resistance, and pathogenesis. A number of detected transcripts are expressed from PhoP and SlyA-regulated genes associated with intra-macrophage survival, genes contained within Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs) 1-4, 6, 10, 13, and 16, as well as RpoS-regulated genes. The largest category of identified transcripts is that of encoding proteins with unknown function. When comparing levels of bacterial mRNA using in vivo samples collected from infected patients to samples from in vitro grown organisms, we found significant differences for 347, 391, and 456 S. Paratyphi A transcripts in each of three individual patients (approximately 9.7% of the ORFeome). Of these, expression of 194 transcripts (4.7% of ORFs) was concordant in two or more patients, and 41 in all patients. Genes encoding these transcripts are contained within SPI-1, 3, 6 and 10, PhoP-regulated genes, involved in energy metabolism, nutrient acquisition, drug resistance, or uncharacterized genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed increased gene expression in vivo for a subset of these genes. To our knowledge, we describe the first microarray-based transcriptional analysis of a pathogen in the blood

  5. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serotype Poona and background microbiota on fresh-cut cantaloupe by electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Palekar, Mangesh P; Taylor, T Matthew; Maxim, Joseph E; Castillo, Alejandro

    2015-06-02

    The efficacy of electron beam (e-beam) irradiation processing to reduce Salmonella enterica serotype Poona on surfaces of fresh-cut cantaloupe, and the impact of e-beam irradiation processing on the numbers of indigenous microorganisms were determined. Additionally, the D10-value for S. Poona reduction on the cut cantaloupe was also determined. Fresh-cut cantaloupe pieces, inoculated with S. Poona to 7.8 log10 CFU/g, were exposed to 0.0, 0.7, or 1.5 kGy. Surviving S. Poona, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and fungi (yeasts, molds) were periodically enumerated on appropriate media over 21 days of storage at 5 °C. Cantaloupe surface pH was measured for irradiated cantaloupe across the 21 day storage period. To determine the D10-value of S. Poona, cantaloupe discs were inoculated and exposed to increasing radiation dosages between 0 and 1.06 kGy; surviving pathogen cells were selectively enumerated. S. Poona was significantly reduced by irradiation; immediate reductions following exposure to 0.7 and 1.5 kGy were 1.1 and 3.6 log10 CFU/g, respectively. After 21 days, S. Poona numbers were between 4.0 and 5.0 log10 CFU/g less than untreated samples at zero-time. Yeasts were not reduced significantly (p ≥ 0.05) by e-beam irradiation and grew slowly but steadily during storage. Counts of LAB and molds were initially reduced with 1.5 kGy (p<0.05) but then LAB recovered grew to high numbers, whereas molds slowly declined for irradiated and control samples. Cantaloupe pH declined during storage, with the greatest decrease in untreated control cantaloupe (p<0.05). The D10-value for S. Poona was determined to be 0.211 kGy, and this difference from the reductions observed in the cut cantaloupe studies may be due to the more precise dose distribution obtained in the thin and flat cantaloupe pieces used for the D10-value experiments. The effect of e-beam irradiation at the same doses used in this study was determined in previous studies to have no negative effect in the quality of

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Salmonella enterica Serotype Infantis Strains Isolated from a Captive Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a Cohabitant Black and White Tegu (Tupinambis merianae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Tatiane A; Coura, Fernanda M; Malta, Marcelo C C; Tinoco, Herlandes P; Pessanha, Angela T; Pereira, Felipe L; Leal, Carlos A G; Heinemann, Marcos B; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Santos, Renato L

    2016-01-21

    The draft genome sequences of two Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis isolates are reported here. One of the strains was isolated from a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with colitis. The second strain was isolated from a reptile that inhabited the same premises. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated that these isolates were not clonal. Copyright © 2016 Paixão et al.

  7. Relative survival of four serotypes of Salmonella enterica in low-water activity whey protein powder held at 36 and 70°C at various water activity levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of health burdens in the United States. Although the pathogen is not able to grow at aw levels below 0.94, it can survive in low-moisture foods for long periods of time. Temperature, aw, substrate and serotype affect its persistence. The aim of this study was...

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Salmonella enterica Serotype Infantis Strains Isolated from a Captive Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a Cohabitant Black and White Tegu (Tupinambis merianae) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Tatiane A.; Coura, Fernanda M.; Malta, Marcelo C. C.; Tinoco, Herlandes P.; Pessanha, Angela T.; Pereira, Felipe L.; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Heinemann, Marcos B.; Figueiredo, Henrique C. P.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis isolates are reported here. One of the strains was isolated from a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with colitis. The second strain was isolated from a reptile that inhabited the same premises. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated that these isolates were not clonal. PMID:26798099

  9. Prevalence, serotyping and antimicrobials resistance mechanism of Salmonella enterica isolated from clinical and environmental samples in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Tayeb, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Abdelnasser S S; Al-Salamah, Ali A; Almaary, Khalid S; Elbadawi, Yahya B

    2017-02-14

    Salmonella is recognized as a common foodborne pathogen, causing major health problems in Saudi Arabia. Herein, we report epidemiology, antimicrobial susceptibility and the genetic basis of resistance among S. enterica strains isolated in Saudi Arabia. Isolation of Salmonella spp. from clinical and environmental samples resulted in isolation of 33 strains identified as S. enterica based on their biochemical characteristics and 16S-rDNA sequences. S. enterica serovar Enteritidis showed highest prevalence (39.4%), followed by S. Paratyphi (21.2%), S. Typhimurium (15.2%), S. Typhi and S. Arizona (12.1%), respectively. Most isolates were resistant to 1st and 2nd generation cephalosporin; and aminoglycosides. Moreover, several S. enterica isolates exhibited resistance to the first-line antibiotics used for Salmonellosis treatment including ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol. In addition, the results revealed the emergence of two S. enterica isolates showing resistance to third-generation cephalosporin. Analysis of resistance determinants in S. enterica strains (n=33) revealed that the resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline, was attributed to the presence of carb-like, dfrA1, floR, tetA gene, respectively. On the other hand, fluoroquinolone resistance was related to the presence of mutations in gyrA and parC genes. These findings improve the information about foodborne Salmonella in Saudi Arabia, alarming the emergence of multi-drug resistant S. enterica strains, and provide useful data about the resistance mechanisms.

  10. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods for Use in Combination with SYBR Green I Real-Time PCR To Detect Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    De Medici, Dario; Croci, Luciana; Delibato, Elisabetta; Di Pasquale, Simona; Filetici, Emma; Toti, Laura

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, reproducible, and robust method for detecting Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. First, for the extraction and purification of DNA from the preenrichment culture, four methods (boiling, alkaline lysis, Nucleospin, and Dynabeads DNA Direct System I) were compared. The most effective method was then combined with a real-time PCR method based on the double-stranded DNA binding dye SYBR Green I used with the ABI Prism 7700 system. The specificity of the reaction was determined by the melting temperature (Tm) of the amplicon obtained. The experiments were conducted both on samples of chicken experimentally contaminated with serotype Enteritidis and on commercially available poultry samples, which were also used for comparisons with the standard cultural method (i.e., ISO 6579/2001). The results of comparisons among the four DNA extraction methods showed significant differences except for the results from the boiling and Nucleospin methods (the two methods that produced the lowest threshold cycles). Boiling was selected as the preferred extraction method because it is the simplest and most rapid. This method was then combined with SYBR Green I real-time PCR, using primers SEFA-1 and SEFA-2. The specificity of the reaction was confirmed by the Tm, which was consistently specific for the amplicon obtained; the mean peak Tm obtained with curves specific for serotype Enteritidis was 82.56 ± 0.22°C. The standard curve constructed using the mean threshold cycle and various concentrations of serotype Enteritidis (ranging from 103 to 108 CFU/ml) showed good linearity (R2 = 0.9767) and a sensitivity limit of less than 103 CFU/ml. The results of this study demonstrate that the SYBR Green I real-time PCR constitutes an effective and easy-to-perform method for detecting serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. PMID:12788750

  11. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for use in combination with SYBR green I real-time PCR to detect Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in poultry.

    PubMed

    De Medici, Dario; Croci, Luciana; Delibato, Elisabetta; Di Pasquale, Simona; Filetici, Emma; Toti, Laura

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, reproducible, and robust method for detecting Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. First, for the extraction and purification of DNA from the preenrichment culture, four methods (boiling, alkaline lysis, Nucleospin, and Dynabeads DNA Direct System I) were compared. The most effective method was then combined with a real-time PCR method based on the double-stranded DNA binding dye SYBR Green I used with the ABI Prism 7700 system. The specificity of the reaction was determined by the melting temperature (T(m)) of the amplicon obtained. The experiments were conducted both on samples of chicken experimentally contaminated with serotype Enteritidis and on commercially available poultry samples, which were also used for comparisons with the standard cultural method (i.e., ISO 6579/2001). The results of comparisons among the four DNA extraction methods showed significant differences except for the results from the boiling and Nucleospin methods (the two methods that produced the lowest threshold cycles). Boiling was selected as the preferred extraction method because it is the simplest and most rapid. This method was then combined with SYBR Green I real-time PCR, using primers SEFA-1 and SEFA-2. The specificity of the reaction was confirmed by the T(m), which was consistently specific for the amplicon obtained; the mean peak T(m) obtained with curves specific for serotype Enteritidis was 82.56 +/- 0.22 degrees C. The standard curve constructed using the mean threshold cycle and various concentrations of serotype Enteritidis (ranging from 10(3) to 10(8) CFU/ml) showed good linearity (R(2) = 0.9767) and a sensitivity limit of less than 10(3) CFU/ml. The results of this study demonstrate that the SYBR Green I real-time PCR constitutes an effective and easy-to-perform method for detecting serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples.

  12. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  13. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    PubMed

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-03-17

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

  14. Genomic characterization of an extensively-drug resistance Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana strain harboring blaNDM-1 gene isolated from a chicken carcass in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Zixin; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Hu, Yujie; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenhui; Fanning, Séamus; Li, Fengqin

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to genetically characterize the antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 isolated from a chicken carcass in China in 2014. Antimicrobial susceptibility against a panel of 23 antimicrobial agents was carried out on Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 and assessed according to CLSI standards. Whole-genome sequencing of this isolate was conducted to obtain the complete genome of S. Indiana. Salmonella Indiana C629 expressed an XDR phenotype being resistant to more than 20 antimicrobial agents, including imipenem and meropenem. From the analysis of the resistance mechanisms, two mutations were identified in subunit A of DNA gyrase within the quinolone resistance determining region, in addition to the acquisition of mobile efflux pumps encoding oqxA/B/R. Additionally, four beta-lactamases resistance genes (blaCTX-M-65, blaTEM-1, blaOXA-1, and blaNDM-1), five aminoglycosides resistance genes (aac(3)-IV, aac(6')-Ib-cr, aadA2, aadA5, and aph(4)-Ia), two phenicol resistance genes (catB3 and floR), and five trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes (sul1/2/3 and dfrA12/17) were also identified. A total of 191 virulence genes were identified. Among them, 57 belonged to type-three secretion system (T3SS) encoding genes, 55 belonged to fimbrial adherence encoding genes, and 39 belonged to flagella-encoding genes CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that multi-resistance mechanisms consistent with an XDR-phenotype, along with various virulence encoding genes of a S. Indiana strain in China These findings highlight the importance of cooperation among different sectors in order to monitor the spread of resistant pathogens among food animal, foods of animal origin and human beings that might further take measures to protect consumers' health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamases of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from livestock and processed food in Portugal: an update.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Rui; Henriques, Ana; Sereno, Rui; Mendonça, Nuno; da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2015-02-01

    As Salmonella is a common foodborne pathogen, the present study aimed to determine the distribution of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated during 2011-2012 from poultry, swine, cattle, and processed food in Portugal, and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility and the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Results were also compared with data obtained before the implementation of the National Control Program in Poultry and the ban of antimicrobial agents in animal feed in the European Union (EU). A total of 14 serotypes were identified, from 258 isolates recovered, with Salmonella Typhimurium (32.6%, n=84) and Salmonella Enteritidis (10.1%, n=26) being the most common. Salmonella Enteritidis in poultry was less frequent than in previous studies, which might be associated with the implementation of the National Control Program for Salmonella in poultry. Nevertheless, other serotypes seem to occupy this biological niche, and may be more common in human salmonellosis in the future. The majority of isolates (70.2%, n=181) were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobial agent and exhibited higher frequency of resistance to tetracycline (47.7%, n=123) and ampicillin (36.0%, n=93), with Salmonella Typhimurium being the more resistant serotype. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was shown in 8% (n=21) of isolates, a lower value compared to data obtained before 2004. ESBLs producers Salmonella Typhimurium bla(CTX-M-1) and Salmonella Enteritidis bla(SHV-12) were isolated from swine and poultry, respectively. The bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(SHV-12) genes were carried on conjugative plasmids of IncHI2replicon types and IncI1, respectively. This was the first report of a bla(CTX-M-1) in Salmonella Typhimurium in Portugal. Overall, the results revealed changes in animal origin Salmonella serotypes, mainly emerging serotypes, in frequency of resistance, and in occurrence of ESBLs-producing Salmonella. The control measures taken by the EU seem to have some impact on the

  16. Identification of a Putative Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Host Range Factor with Homology to IpaH and YopM by Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsolis, Renée M.; Townsend, Stacy M.; Miao, Edward A.; Miller, Samuel I.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Adams, L. Garry; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    1999-01-01

    The genetic basis for the host adaptation of Salmonella serotypes is currently unknown. We have explored a new strategy to identify Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) genes involved in host adaptation, by comparing the virulence of 260 randomly generated signature-tagged mutants during the oral infection of mice and calves. This screen identified four mutants, which were defective for colonization of only one of the two host species tested. One mutant, which only displayed a colonization defect during the infection of mice, was further characterized. During competitive infection experiments performed with the S. typhimurium wild type, the mutant was defective for colonization of murine Peyer's patches but colonized bovine Peyer's patches at the wild-type level. No difference in virulence between wild type and mutant was observed when calves were infected orally with 1010 CFU/animal. In contrast, the mutant possessed a sixfold increase in 50% lethal morbidity dose when mice were infected orally. The transposon in this mutant was inserted in a 2.9-kb pathogenicity islet, which is located between uvrB and yphK on the S. typhimurium chromosome. This pathogenicity islet contained a single gene, termed slrP, with homology to ipaH of Shigella flexneri and yopM of Yersinia pestis. These data show that comparative screening of signature-tagged mutants in two animal species can be used for scanning the S. typhimurium genome for genes involved in host adaptation. PMID:10569754

  17. Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty six (36) unique sequences which varied in length from 258bp to 530bp were found for Salmonella enterica strains and isolates that are not present in public databases following BLAST analysis searches for similarity. The sequences were found by application of Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping (IS...

  18. Differences in the carriage and the ability to utilize the serotype associated virulence plasmid in strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium investigated by use of a self-transferable virulence plasmid, pOG669.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John E; Brown, Derek J; Thomsen, Line E; Platt, David J; Chadfield, Mark S

    2004-06-01

    Most strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype typhimurium (S. typhimurium) naturally harbour a virulence plasmid which carries the salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) genes. However, isolates belonging to certain phage types are generally found without the plasmid. We have utilized a self-transferable virulence plasmid, pOG669 to investigate the effect of introduction of spv genes into strains of such phage types. The use of the co-integrate plasmid, pOG669, was validated on a diverse collection of strains. pOG669 was transferred into strains of serotypes that are normally associated with the possession of virulence plasmids. All strains maintained the wild type level of virulence in a mouse model, except that introduction of pOG669 restored normal virulence levels in an avirulent, plasmid free strain of S. dublin and resulted in a decrease in virulence in a strain of S. dublin from clonal line Du3. S. gallinarum did not become virulent in mice, but pOG669 was functionally interchangeable with the wild type plasmid when strains were tested in a chicken model. Strains of serotypes not normally associated with the carriage of a virulence plasmid did not increase in virulence upon the introduction of pOG669. An IncX plasmid pOG670 that was included as control was incompatible with the virulence plasmid in a strain of S. dublin, demonstrating that the common virulence plasmid of this serotype is of a different incompatibility group than other virulence plasmids. Strains of S. typhimurium from phage types that do not normally carry a virulence plasmid responded differently to attempts to introduce pOG669. No transconjugants were observed with the strains of DT5 and DT21. The introduction of pOG669 did not alter the virulence of JEO3942(DT10), DT35 and JEO3949(DT66) significantly, while DT1 and DT27 became more virulent. DT27 became as virulent as wild type C5, while logVC(10) of DT1 only increased from 4.1 to 5.7. The ability to express spv-genes was

  19. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a dimeric single-chain variable fragment (scfv) antibody against Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi B.

    PubMed

    Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; McLean, Michael D; Hirama, Tomoko; Almquist, Kurt C; Mackenzie, C Roger; Hall, J Christopher

    2005-10-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were produced that express an anti-Salmonella enterica single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody that binds to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. enterica Paratyphi B. The coding sequence of this scFv was optimized for expression in tobacco, synthesized and subsequently placed behind three different promoters: an enhanced tobacco constitutive ubiquitous promoter (EntCUP4), and single- and double-enhancer versions of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter (CaMV 35S). These chimeric genes were introduced into Nicotiana tabacum cv. 81V9 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and 50 primary transgenic (T(0)) plants per construct were produced. Among these plants, 23 were selected for the ability to express active scFv as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using S. enterica LPS as antigen. Expanded bed adsorption-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (EBA-IMAC) was used to purify 41.7 mug of scFv/g from leaf tissue. Gel filtration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses demonstrated that the purified scFv was active as a dimer or higher-order multimer. In order to identify T(1) plants suitable for development of homozygous lines with heritable scFv expression, kanamycin-resistance segregation analyses were performed to determine the number of T-DNA loci in each T(0) plant, and quantitative ELISA and immunoblot analyses were used to compare expression of active and total anti-Salmonella scFv, respectively, in the T(1) generation. As S. enterica causes millions of enteric fevers and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year, large-scale production and purification of this scFv will have potential for uses in diagnosis and detection, as a therapeutic agent, and in applications such as water system purification.

  20. Characterization of blaCMY plasmids and their possible role in source attribution of salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, identifying the source of these infections can be difficult. This is especially true for Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, which is found in diverse agricultural niches. Cephalosporins are one of the primary treatment choices for complic...

  1. SEROTYPES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA ISOLATED FROM PORK, CHICKEN MEAT AND LETTUCE, BANGKOK AND CENTRAL THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Niyomdecha, Nattamon; Mungkornkaew, Narissara; Samosornsuk, Worada

    2016-01-01

    Food of animal origins, particularly pork and chicken meat, has long been recognized as major sources of human salmonellosis. There have been recent reports of human salmonellosis outbreaks due to consumption of leafy green vegetables such as lettuce. In this study, 120 (40 pork, 40 chicken meat and 40 lettuce) samples were randomly collected from retail markets in Bangkok and central Thailand during June to August 2015 for Salmonella serotype identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Salmonella was found in 82%, 62% and 20% of pork, chicken meat and lettuce samples, respectively. The top 5 most common Salmonella serotypes were Panama (15%), Schwarzengrund (12%), Rissen, Anatum, and Stanley (11% each), Albany (9%), and Indiana (8%). A high percentage of Salmonella isolated from food of animal origin were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs, including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. From antibiogram pattern analysis, the most common serotypes constituted isolates that were multidrug resistant. The study indicates that Salmonella was still present in various kinds of food and that certain serotypes have become predominant, a phenomenon not previously reported in Thailand.

  2. Characterization of anti-Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi antibody responses in bacteremic Bangladeshi patients by an immunoaffinity proteomics-based technology.

    PubMed

    Charles, Richelle C; Sheikh, Alaullah; Krastins, Bryan; Harris, Jason B; Bhuiyan, M Saruar; LaRocque, Regina C; Logvinenko, Tanya; Sarracino, David A; Kudva, Indira T; Eisenstein, Jana; Podolsky, Michael J; Kalsy, Anuj; Brooks, W Abdullah; Ludwig, Albrecht; John, Manohar; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi is the cause of typhoid fever and a human-restricted pathogen. Currently available typhoid vaccines provide 50 to 90% protection for 2 to 5 years, and available practical diagnostic assays to identify individuals with typhoid fever lack sensitivity and/or specificity. Identifying immunogenic S. Typhi antigens expressed during human infection could lead to improved diagnostic assays and vaccines. Here we describe a platform immunoaffinity proteomics-based technology (IPT) that involves the use of columns charged with IgG, IgM, or IgA antibody fractions recovered from humans bacteremic with S. Typhi to capture S. Typhi proteins that were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. This screening tool identifies immunogenic proteins recognized by antibodies from infected hosts. Using this technology and the plasma of patients with S. Typhi bacteremia in Bangladesh, we identified 57 proteins of S. Typhi, including proteins known to be immunogenic (PagC, HlyE, OmpA, and GroEL) and a number of proteins present in the human-restricted serotypes S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A but rarely found in broader-host-range Salmonella spp. (HlyE, CdtB, PltA, and STY1364). We categorized identified proteins into a number of major groupings, including those involved in energy metabolism, protein synthesis, iron homeostasis, and biosynthetic and metabolic functions and those predicted to localize to the outer membrane. We assessed systemic and mucosal anti-HlyE responses in S. Typhi-infected patients and detected anti-HlyE responses at the time of clinical presentation in patients but not in controls. These findings could assist in the development of improved diagnostic assays.

  3. Relative survival of four serotypes of Salmonella enterica in low-water activity whey protein powder held at 36 and 70°C at various water activity levels.

    PubMed

    Farakos, S M Santillana; Hicks, J W; Frye, J G; Frank, J F

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is not able to grow at water activity (aw) levels below 0.94, but it can survive in low-aw foods for long periods of time. Temperature, aw, substrate, and serotype affect its persistence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of temperature and aw on the relative persistence among four serotypes of Salmonella enterica in low-aw whey protein powder. Whey protein powder was equilibrated to aws 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.54 ± 0.03, inoculated with a cocktail of Salmonella serovars (Agona, Tennessee, Montevideo, and Typhimurium), vacuum sealed, and stored at 36°C for 6 months and at 70°C for 48 h. Presumptive Salmonella colonies (30 to 32) were randomly picked from each plate at the end of each survival study. PCR multiplex serotyping was used to identify the isolates. A multinomial mixed logistic model with Salmonella Tennessee as a reference was used to test for significant differences in frequency distribution of the surviving serotypes. Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Agona were the most prevalent surviving serotypes, followed in decreasing order by Salmonella Montevideo and Salmonella Typhimurium. Statistical analysis indicated that temperature (P = 0.003) and aw (P = 0.012) influenced the relative prevalence of the Salmonella serotypes. If other environmental conditions are equal, Salmonella Tennessee is better able to survive than Salmonella Montevideo and Salmonella Typhimurium at higher temperatures and higher aw levels in low-aw whey protein powder held at 36 and 70°C. The relative prevalence of Salmonella Agona to Salmonella Tennessee did not change with increasing temperature (P = 0.211) or aw (P = 0.453). These results should be considered in risk assessment and when developing predictive models for survival of Salmonella in low-aw foods.

  4. A community--wide outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium infection associated with eating a raw milk soft cheese in France.

    PubMed Central

    De Valk, H.; Delarocque-Astagneau, E.; Colomb, G.; Ple, S.; Godard, E.; Vaillant, V.; Haeghebaert, S.; Bouvet, P. H.; Grimont, F.; Grimont, P.; Desenclos, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, a community-wide outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection occurred in France. The investigation included case searching and a case-control study. A case was defined as a resident of the Jura district with fever or diarrhoea between 12 May and 8 July 1997, from whom S. typhimurium was isolated in stool or blood. One hundred and thirteen cases were identified. Thirty-three (83 %) of 40 cases but only 23 (55 %) of 42 community controls, matched for age and area of residence, reported eating Morbier cheese (Odds ratio: 6.5; 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.4-28.8). Morbier cheese samples taken from the refrigerators of two case-patients and one symptom-free neighbour cultured positive for S. typhimurium of the same phage type as the human isolates. The analysis of distribution channels incriminated one batch from a single processing plant. These findings show that an unpasteurized soft cheese is an effective vehicle of S. typhimurium transmission. PMID:10722123

  5. Development of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) - Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) Assay for the Detection of Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    As a major foodborne pathogen, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is increasingly rising as a global health concern. Here, we developed an integrated assay that combines loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for DNA detection of S. Enteritidis using specifically designed Raman active Au-nanoprobes. The target DNA was amplified by LAMP and then labeled with Au-nanoprobes comprised of gold nanoparticle-modified with specific cy5/DNA probes to allow the detection by SERS. The sensitivity of the developed LAMP-SERS detection assay (66 CFU/mL) was ~100-fold higher than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Significantly, this technique allowed highly specific detection of the target DNA of S. Enteritidis and could differentiate it from the DNA of closely related bacterial species or non-specific contamination, making it more accurate and reliable than the standard LAMP technique. The applicability of detection of S. Enteritidis in milk samples using LAMP-SERS assay was validated as well. In sum, the developed LAMP-SERS assay is highly specific and sensitive, and has the potential to be applied for rapid detection of different foodborne pathogens and other microbial contaminants. PMID:26941845

  6. Persistence of a Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium clone in Danish pig production units and farmhouse environment studied by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE)

    PubMed

    Sandvang, D; Jensen, L B; Baggesen, D L; Baloda, S B

    2000-06-01

    The clonal relationship among Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates from selected pig production units in Denmark was investigated by the pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing method to determine environmental survival and spread of Salmonella in different herds. Thirty-four Typhimurium isolated during 1996-1998 from porcine faeces and environmental samples from three pig farms designated 1, 3 and 5 were characterised by PFGE using two restriction enzymes. Farm 5 supplied piglets to farm 1 and the herds were located close to each other. Results of PFGE analysis showed both intra- and inter-relationships, i.e. identical PFGE patterns among the faecal and environmental isolates from farm 1 and farm 5. All the isolates from farm 3 irrespective of the source showed identical PFGE patterns, but were different from samples from farms 1 and 5. This study indicates spread between farms and survival of a farm-specific clone. Furthermore, identical PFGE patterns of isolates from piglet supplier and finisher herds indicate that the farrow-to-grower herd of farm 5 was sub-clinically infected prior to delivery to farm 1 and thereby caused the transmission of Salmonella.

  7. Immediate Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Viability via Membrane Destabilization following Exposure to Multiple-Hurdle Treatments with Heated, Acidified Organic Acid Salt Solutions▿†

    PubMed Central

    Milillo, S. R.; Martin, E.; Muthaiyan, A.; Ricke, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of organic acids in combination with nonchemical treatments was evaluated for inactivation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium within 1 min. It was observed that the effectiveness of the multiple-hurdle treatments was temperature (P ≤ 0.05) and pH (P ≤ 0.05) dependent and corresponded to the degree of organic acid lipophilicity (sodium acetate being least effective and sodium propionate being the most effective). This led to the hypothesis that the loss in viability was due at least in part to cell membrane disruption. Evaluation of osmotic response, potassium ion leakage, and transmission electron micrographs confirmed treatment effects on the cell membrane. Interestingly, all treatments, even those with no effect on viability, such as with sodium acetate, resulted in measurable cellular stress. Microarray experiments explored the specific response of S. Typhimurium to sodium acetate and sodium propionate, the most similar of the tested treatments in terms of pKa and ionic strength, and found little difference in the changes in gene expression following exposure to either, despite their very different effects on viability. Taken together, the results reported support our hypothesis that treatment with heated, acidified, organic acid salt solutions for 1 min causes loss of S. Typhimurium viability at least in part by membrane damage and that the degree of effectiveness can be correlated with lipophilicity of the organic acid. Overall, the data presented here indicate that a combined thermal, acidified sodium propionate treatment can provide an effective antimicrobial treatment against Salmonella. PMID:21478311

  8. In vitro anaerobic incubation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and laying hen cecal bacteria in poultry feed substrates and a fructooligosaccharide prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Donalson, L M; Kim, Woo-Kyun; Chalova, V I; Herrera, P; Woodward, C L; McReynolds, J L; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of combining a prebiotic with poultry feeds on the growth of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST) in an in vitro cecal fermentation system. Cecal contents from three laying hens were pooled and diluted to a 1:3000 concentration in an anaerobic dilution solution. The cecal dilution was added to sterile test tubes filled with alfalfa and layer ration with and without fructooligosaccharide (FOS). Two controls containing cecal dilutions and anaerobic dilution solution were used. The samples were processed in the anaerobic hood and incubated at 37 degrees C. Samples were inoculated with Salmonella at 0 and 24h after in vitro cecal fermentation and plated at 0 and 24h after inoculation with ST. Plates were incubated for 24h and colony forming units (CFU) enumerated. The samples immediately inoculated with ST without prior cecal fermentation did not significantly lower ST counts 24h later. However, samples pre-incubated for 24h with cecal microflora prior to ST inoculation exhibited reduced ST CFU by approximately 2 logarithms, with the most dramatic decreases seen in alfalfa and layer ration combined with FOS. The addition of FOS to feed substrate diets in combination with cecal contents acted in a synergistic manner to decrease ST growth only after ST was introduced to 24h cecal incubations.

  9. Use of random forest to estimate population attributable fractions from a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Gu, W; Vieira, A R; Hoekstra, R M; Griffin, P M; Cole, D

    2015-10-01

    To design effective food safety programmes we need to estimate how many sporadic foodborne illnesses are caused by specific food sources based on case-control studies. Logistic regression has substantive limitations for analysing structured questionnaire data with numerous exposures and missing values. We adapted random forest to analyse data of a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis illness for source attribution. For estimation of summary population attributable fractions (PAFs) of exposures grouped into transmission routes, we devised a counterfactual estimator to predict reductions in illness associated with removing grouped exposures. For the purpose of comparison, we fitted the data using logistic regression models with stepwise forward and backward variable selection. Our results show that the forward and backward variable selection of logistic regression models were not consistent for parameter estimation, with different significant exposures identified. By contrast, the random forest model produced estimated PAFs of grouped exposures consistent in rank order with results obtained from outbreak data, with egg-related exposures having the highest estimated PAF (22·1%, 95% confidence interval 8·5-31·8). Random forest might be structurally more coherent and efficient than logistic regression models for attributing Salmonella illnesses to sources involving many causal pathways.

  10. Descriptive study of California egg layer premises and analysis of risk factors for Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis as characterized by manure drag swabs.

    PubMed

    Castellan, David M; Kinde, Hailu; Kass, Philip H; Cutler, Gregg; Breitmeyer, Richard E; Bell, Donald D; Ernst, Ralph A; Kerr, David C; Little, Herbert E; Willoughby, David; Riemann, Hans P; Ardans, Alex; Snowdon, Jill A; Kuney, Douglas R

    2004-09-01

    This cross-sectional, double-blind study reports the prevalence of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis (SE) on California egg layer premises using single vs. pooled manure drag swabs and presents a description of egg production and management systems in the state and an initial analysis of risk factors for SE. The study included 91% of all known eligible egg premises in California, representing the majority of eggs produced in the state. The overall prevalence of SE on California egg layer premises was 10.5%, while 1.1% of all rows sampled were positive for SE. The percentage of positive rows for SE on any premises never exceeded 25% of the 16 swabs collected per premises. A description of egg production and management on California egg layer premises is presented. Statistically significant associations for SE were not evident and were limited because of sample size and the low prevalence of SE on California egg layer premises. Several biological and management factors, such as flock health, stage of production, manure management, ventilation, and watering systems, show trend associations with premises positive for SE and require further investigation. Manure drag swabs serve as a useful tool to validate the core components of an egg quality assurance program for SE based on process control principles.

  11. An evaluation of the effect of sodium bisulfate as a feed additive on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in experimentally infected broilers.

    PubMed

    Kassem, I I; Sanad, Y M; Stonerock, R; Rajashekara, G

    2012-04-01

    The colonization of broiler chickens with Salmonella can pose serious health and economic risks for both consumers and the poultry industry. Because colonization with Salmonella can lead to subsequent contamination of chicken carcasses during processing, preemptive control measures should include the reduction of this pathogen in chickens before slaughter. In this study, we evaluated the effect of sodium bisulfate, a potential antimicrobial feed additive, on Salmonella colonization of experimentally infected broiler chickens. Two hundred and forty 1-d-old chickens were infected orally with Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis and divided into 4 groups (each comprised of 60 chickens). Three groups received different concentrations of sodium bisulfate integrated into their feed, while the feed of the fourth group (positive control) was not treated. At time points before the broilers' slaughter age, different organs/tissues (liver, spleen, cecum, and bone marrow) and feces were aseptically collected and tested for the occurrence and density of Salmonella Enteritidis. Our results show that at 3 d postinfection, high colonization with Salmonella Enteritidis was detected and affected all tested tissues and fecal samples. Although colonization decreased across time, Salmonella Enteritidis persisted in the cecum, feces, spleen, and bone marrow, but not in the liver, until slaughter age. Furthermore, the addition of sodium bisulfate to the feed did not significantly reduce Salmonella Enteritidis numbers in infected chickens or affect the shedding of the pathogen.

  12. Development of a Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) - Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) Assay for the Detection of Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-01-01

    As a major foodborne pathogen, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is increasingly rising as a global health concern. Here, we developed an integrated assay that combines loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for DNA detection of S. Enteritidis using specifically designed Raman active Au-nanoprobes. The target DNA was amplified by LAMP and then labeled with Au-nanoprobes comprised of gold nanoparticle-modified with specific cy5/DNA probes to allow the detection by SERS. The sensitivity of the developed LAMP-SERS detection assay (66 CFU/mL) was ~100-fold higher than the conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Significantly, this technique allowed highly specific detection of the target DNA of S. Enteritidis and could differentiate it from the DNA of closely related bacterial species or non-specific contamination, making it more accurate and reliable than the standard LAMP technique. The applicability of detection of S. Enteritidis in milk samples using LAMP-SERS assay was validated as well. In sum, the developed LAMP-SERS assay is highly specific and sensitive, and has the potential to be applied for rapid detection of different foodborne pathogens and other microbial contaminants.

  13. Antimicrobial profile of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis from free-range swine in Kakamega fish market, western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onyango, David M; Ndeda, Violet Mmbone; Wandili, Sarah A; Wawire, Sifuna A; Ochieng, Phillip

    2014-11-13

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Choleraesuis is a host-adapted, facultative, intracellular pathogen that causes swine paratyphoid. Its antimicrobial resistance presents a challenge to feed manufacturing industries. However, stopping antibiotics in animal feed would have economic implications for the industry. Conventional microbial methods for isolation and identification of S. Choleraesuis were employed. The isolates were subjected to screening against 17 antimicrobial agents and genotyping of resistance markers by PCR. The data were then analyzed and presented in percentages. Phenotypically, 43 out of 95 isolates showed multidrug resistance. Among the 17 antibiotics tested, resistance was observed as follows: sulphonamides (45.2%), nalidixic acid (44.25%), tetracycline (42%), ampicillin (36.8%), erythromycin (34.7%), carbenicillin (31.5%), chrolamphenical (28.4%), gentamicin (27.3%), kanamycin (24.2%), spectinomycin (21%), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (16.8%), streptomycin (12.6%), cephalothion (8.4%), ofloxacin (5.2%), ciprofloxacin (4.2%), and norfloxacin (4.2%). Fifty-two isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobial agents tested. A total of 3.1% of the isolates had the integron gene pattern combination of dfrA2-aadA2 (2100 bp), dfrA12 (2100 bp); 4.2% had dfrA12-aadA2-sulI (2100 bp); 2.1% had dfrA12-aadA2 (2100 bp); and 1% had dfrA2-aadA2-sulI (2100 bp), oxa1-aadA2 (1500 bp), dfrA12-aadA2-sulI, and blaPSE (2100 bp). The isolated S. Choleraesuis were resistant to more than 10% of the antimicrobial agents used in this study. Appropriate surveillance is warranted to gain more information about the epidemiology, as stopping antibiotics in animal feed would have economic implications for the industry.

  14. Comparative Genomic Analysis and Virulence Differences in Closely Related Salmonella enterica Serotype Heidelberg Isolates from Humans, Retail Meats, and Animals

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maria; Zhao, Shaohua; Pettengill, James; Luo, Yan; Monday, Steven R.; Abbott, Jason; Ayers, Sherry L.; Cinar, Hediye N.; Muruvanda, Tim; Li, Cong; Allard, Marc W.; Whichard, Jean; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W.; McDermott, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. Recently, an antibiotic-resistant strain of this serovar was implicated in a large 2011 multistate outbreak resulting from consumption of contaminated ground turkey that involved 136 confirmed cases, with one death. In this study, we assessed the evolutionary diversity of 44 S. Heidelberg isolates using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) generated by the 454 GS FLX (Roche) platform. The isolates, including 30 with nearly indistinguishable (one band difference) Xbal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns (JF6X01.0032, JF6X01.0058), were collected from various sources between 1982 and 2011 and included nine isolates associated with the 2011 outbreak. Additionally, we determined the complete sequence for the chromosome and three plasmids from a clinical isolate associated with the 2011 outbreak using the Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) system. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, we were able to distinguish highly clonal isolates, including strains isolated at different times in the same year. The isolates from the recent 2011 outbreak clustered together with a mean SNP variation of only 17 SNPs. The S. Heidelberg isolates carried a variety of phages, such as prophage P22, P4, lambda-like prophage Gifsy-2, and the P2-like phage which carries the sopE1 gene, virulence genes including 62 pathogenicity, and 13 fimbrial markers and resistance plasmids of the incompatibility (Inc)I1, IncA/C, and IncHI2 groups. Twenty-one strains contained an IncX plasmid carrying a type IV secretion system. On the basis of the recent and historical isolates used in this study, our results demonstrated that, in addition to providing detailed genetic information for the isolates, WGS can identify SNP targets that can be utilized for differentiating highly clonal S. Heidelberg isolates. PMID:24732280

  15. Comparative genomic analysis and virulence differences in closely related salmonella enterica serotype heidelberg isolates from humans, retail meats, and animals.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Maria; Zhao, Shaohua; Pettengill, James; Luo, Yan; Monday, Steven R; Abbott, Jason; Ayers, Sherry L; Cinar, Hediye N; Muruvanda, Tim; Li, Cong; Allard, Marc W; Whichard, Jean; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W; McDermott, Patrick F

    2014-05-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. Recently, an antibiotic-resistant strain of this serovar was implicated in a large 2011 multistate outbreak resulting from consumption of contaminated ground turkey that involved 136 confirmed cases, with one death. In this study, we assessed the evolutionary diversity of 44 S. Heidelberg isolates using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) generated by the 454 GS FLX (Roche) platform. The isolates, including 30 with nearly indistinguishable (one band difference) Xbal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns (JF6X01.0032, JF6X01.0058), were collected from various sources between 1982 and 2011 and included nine isolates associated with the 2011 outbreak. Additionally, we determined the complete sequence for the chromosome and three plasmids from a clinical isolate associated with the 2011 outbreak using the Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) system. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, we were able to distinguish highly clonal isolates, including strains isolated at different times in the same year. The isolates from the recent 2011 outbreak clustered together with a mean SNP variation of only 17 SNPs. The S. Heidelberg isolates carried a variety of phages, such as prophage P22, P4, lambda-like prophage Gifsy-2, and the P2-like phage which carries the sopE1 gene, virulence genes including 62 pathogenicity, and 13 fimbrial markers and resistance plasmids of the incompatibility (Inc)I1, IncA/C, and IncHI2 groups. Twenty-one strains contained an IncX plasmid carrying a type IV secretion system. On the basis of the recent and historical isolates used in this study, our results demonstrated that, in addition to providing detailed genetic information for the isolates, WGS can identify SNP targets that can be utilized for differentiating highly clonal S. Heidelberg isolates.

  16. A Multistate Investigation of Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- Infections as Part of an International Outbreak Associated with Frozen Feeder Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, E. J.; Nguyen, T.; Melluso, C.; Ayers, T.; Lane, C.; Hodges, A.; Li, X.; Quammen, J.; Yendell, S. J.; Adams, J.; Mitchell, J.; Rickert, R.; Klos, R.; Williams, I. T.; Behravesh, C. Barton; Wright, J.

    2015-01-01

    While most human Salmonella infections result from exposure to contaminated foods, an estimated 11% of all Salmonella infections are attributed to animal exposures, including both direct animal handling and indirect exposures such as cleaning cages and handling contaminated pet food. This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental and laboratory investigations conducted in the United States as part of the response to an international outbreak of tetracycline-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- infections with over 500 illnesses occurring from 2008 to 2010. This investigation found that illness due to the outbreak strain was significantly associated with exposure to pet reptiles and frozen feeder rodents used as food for pet reptiles. Salmonella isolates indistinguishable from the outbreak strain were isolated from a frozen feeder mice-fed reptile owned by a case patient, as well as from frozen feeder mice and environmental samples collected from a rodent producing facility (Company A). An international voluntary recall of all Company A produced frozen feeder animals sold between May 2009 and July 2010 occurred. Only 13% of cases in our investigation were aware of the association between Salmonella infection and mice or rats. Consumers, the pet industry, healthcare providers and veterinarians need to be aware of the potential health risk posed by feeder rodents, whether live or frozen. Frozen feeder rodent producers, suppliers and distributors should follow the animal food labelling requirements as described in 21 CFR §501.5, and all packages of frozen feeder rodents should include safe handling instructions. Persons should wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling live or frozen feeder rodents, as well as reptiles or anything in the area where the animals live. Continued opportunities exist for public health officials, the pet industry, veterinarians and consumers to work together to prevent salmonellosis associated

  17. The Type VI Secretion System Encoded in Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 19 Is Required for Salmonella enterica Serotype Gallinarum Survival within Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Carlos J.; Jiménez, Juan C.; Leiva, Lorenzo E.; Álvarez, Sergio A.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Contreras, Francisca; Pezoa, David; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum is the causative agent of fowl typhoid, a disease characterized by high morbidity and mortality that causes major economic losses in poultry production. We have reported that S. Gallinarum harbors a type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 19 (SPI-19) that is required for efficient colonization of chicks. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the SPI-19 T6SS functionality and to investigate the mechanisms behind the phenotypes previously observed in vivo. Expression analyses revealed that SPI-19 T6SS core components are expressed and produced under in vitro bacterial growth conditions. However, secretion of the structural/secreted components Hcp1, Hcp2, and VgrG to the culture medium could not be determined, suggesting that additional signals are required for T6SS-dependent secretion of these proteins. In vitro bacterial competition assays failed to demonstrate a role for SPI-19 T6SS in interbacterial killing. In contrast, cell culture experiments with murine and avian macrophages (RAW264.7 and HD11, respectively) revealed production of a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of VgrG soon after Salmonella uptake. Furthermore, infection of RAW264.7 and HD11 macrophages with deletion mutants of SPI-19 or strains with genes encoding specific T6SS core components (clpV and vgrG) revealed that SPI-19 T6SS contributes to S. Gallinarum survival within macrophages at 20 h postuptake. SPI-19 T6SS function was not linked to Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity or cell death of infected macrophages, as has been described for other T6SS. Our data indicate that SPI-19 T6SS corresponds to a novel tool used by Salmonella to survive within host cells. PMID:23357385

  18. Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis infection in humans linked to dry dog food in the United States and Canada, 2012.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Maho; Rotstein, David S; Reimschuessel, Renate; Schwensohn, Colin A; Woody, Dillard H; Davis, Samuel W; Hunt, April D; Arends, Katherine D; Achen, Maya; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Denny, Lynn F; Phan, Quyen N; Joseph, Lavin A; Tuite, Carla C; Tataryn, Joanne R; Behravesh, Casey Barton

    2014-03-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION--In April 2012, Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis was detected in an unopened bag of dry dog food collected during routine retail surveillance. PulseNet, a national bacterial subtyping network, identified humans with Salmonella Infantis infection with the same genetic fingerprint as the dog food sample. CLINICAL FINDINGS--An outbreak investigation identified 53 ill humans infected with the outbreak strain during January 1 to July 5, 2012, in 21 states and 2 provinces in Canada; 20 (38%) were children ≤ 2 years old, and 12 of 37 (32%) were hospitalized. Of 21 ill people who remembered the dog food brand, 12 (57%) reported a brand produced at a plant in Gaston, SC. Traceback investigations also identified that plant. The outbreak strain was isolated from bags of dry dog food and fecal specimens obtained from dogs that lived with ill people and that ate the implicated dry dog food. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME--The plant was closed temporarily for cleaning and disinfection. Sixteen brands involving > 27,000 metric tons (> 30,000 tons) of dry dog and cat food were recalled. Thirty-one ill dogs linked to recalled products were reported through the FDA consumer complaint system. CLINICAL RELEVANCE-- A one-health collaborative effort on epidemiological, laboratory, and traceback investigations linked dry dog foods produced at a plant to illnesses in dogs and humans. More efforts are needed to increase awareness among pet owners, health-care professionals, and the pet food industry on the risk of illness in pets and their owners associated with dry pet foods and treats.

  19. A Multistate Investigation of Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- Infections as Part of an International Outbreak Associated with Frozen Feeder Rodents.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, E J; Nguyen, T; Melluso, C; Ayers, T; Lane, C; Hodges, A; Li, X; Quammen, J; Yendell, S J; Adams, J; Mitchell, J; Rickert, R; Klos, R; Williams, I T; Barton Behravesh, C; Wright, J

    2016-02-01

    While most human Salmonella infections result from exposure to contaminated foods, an estimated 11% of all Salmonella infections are attributed to animal exposures, including both direct animal handling and indirect exposures such as cleaning cages and handling contaminated pet food. This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental and laboratory investigations conducted in the United States as part of the response to an international outbreak of tetracycline-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- infections with over 500 illnesses occurring from 2008 to 2010. This investigation found that illness due to the outbreak strain was significantly associated with exposure to pet reptiles and frozen feeder rodents used as food for pet reptiles. Salmonella isolates indistinguishable from the outbreak strain were isolated from a frozen feeder mice-fed reptile owned by a case patient, as well as from frozen feeder mice and environmental samples collected from a rodent producing facility (Company A). An international voluntary recall of all Company A produced frozen feeder animals sold between May 2009 and July 2010 occurred. Only 13% of cases in our investigation were aware of the association between Salmonella infection and mice or rats. Consumers, the pet industry, healthcare providers and veterinarians need to be aware of the potential health risk posed by feeder rodents, whether live or frozen. Frozen feeder rodent producers, suppliers and distributors should follow the animal food labelling requirements as described in 21 CFR §501.5, and all packages of frozen feeder rodents should include safe handling instructions. Persons should wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling live or frozen feeder rodents, as well as reptiles or anything in the area where the animals live. Continued opportunities exist for public health officials, the pet industry, veterinarians and consumers to work together to prevent salmonellosis associated

  20. Proteome of Salmonella Enterica SerotypeTyphimurium Grown in a Low Mg2+/pH Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Ansong, Charles; Smallwood, Heather S.; Rommereim, Leah M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Gustin, Jean K.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-09-01

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) must replicate within host macrophages in order to establish systemic infection in susceptible mice. In an effort to identify new STM proteins that help the bacterium colonize macrophages, we have cultured STM cells with a low pH/low magnesium medium (MgM) under two different conditions termed MgM-Shock and MgM-Dilution and investigated the impacts of these culturing conditions on the STM proteome by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. LC-MS/MS results showed that alteration of culturing conditions affected a group of STM proteins differently. Compared to MgM-Shock, MgM-Dilution induced more proteins of the Salmonella-pathogenecity island 2-type III secretion system (SPI2-T3SS). The abundances of the proteins used for cobalamin biosynthesis increased under MgM-Shock condition but decreased under MgM-Dilution condition, while those proteins used for thiamine or biotin biosynthesis were not affected under the former condition but increased under the latter condition. Western-blot (WB) analysis confirmed the LC-MS/MS results. Because cobalamin, thiamine and biotin play different roles in STM metabolism, differential induction of the proteins involved in their biosyntheses suggests that the metabolic states of STM cells under these conditions differ considerably. WB analysis also showed that the abundances of SPI2-T3SS proteins SsaQ and SseE and biotin biosynthesis proteins BioB and BioD increased after STM infection of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Deletion of the gene encoding BioB reduced the ability of STM to replicate inside the macrophages, demonstrating for the first time the involvement of a biotin synthesis protein in STM colonization of macrophages.

  1. Characterization of blaCMY plasmids and their possible role in source attribution of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium infections.

    PubMed

    Folster, Jason P; Tolar, Beth; Pecic, Gary; Sheehan, Deborah; Rickert, Regan; Hise, Kelley; Zhao, Shaohua; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; McDermott, Patrick; Whichard, Jean M

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, identifying the source of these infections can be difficult. This is especially true for Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, which is found in diverse agricultural niches. Extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) are one of the primary treatment choices for complicated Salmonella infections. In Salmonella, ESC resistance in the United States is mainly mediated by blaCMY genes carried on various plasmids. In this study, we examined whether the characterization of blaCMY plasmids, along with additional information, can help us identify potential sources of infection by Salmonella, and used serotype Typhimurium as a model. In the United States, monitoring of retail meat, food animals, and ill persons for antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella is conducted by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. In 2008, 70 isolates (70/581; 12.0%) (34 isolates from retail meat, 23 food animal, and 13 human) were resistant to ceftriaxone and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. All were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for blaCMY and 59/70 (84.3%) of these genes were plasmid encoded. PCR-based replicon typing identified 42/59 (71.2%) IncI1-blaCMY plasmids and 17/59 (28.8%) IncA/C-blaCMY plasmids. Isolates from chickens or chicken products with blaCMY plasmids primarily had IncI1-blaCMY plasmids (37/40; 92.5%), while all isolates from cattle had IncA/C-blaCMY plasmids. Isolates from humans had either IncA/C- blaCMY (n=8/12; [66.7%]) or IncI1- blaCMY (n=4/12 [33.3%]) plasmids. All of the IncI1-blaCMY plasmids were ST12 or were closely related to ST12. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns (AST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the isolates were also compared and differences were identified between isolate sources. When the source of a Typhimurium outbreak or sporadic illness is unknown, characterizing the outbreak isolate's blaCMY plasmids, AST, and PFGE patterns may help identify it.

  2. Spread of a Major Clone of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry and in Salmonellosis Outbreaks in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borges, Karen Apellanis; Furian, Thales Quedi; de Souza, Sara Neves; Tondo, Eduardo César; Streck, André Felipe; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; de Souza Moraes, Hamilton Luiz; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are among the most important agents of foodborne diseases all over the world. Human Salmonella outbreaks are often associated with the consumption of poultry products (meat and eggs), and one of the most prevalent serotypes associated with these products is Salmonella Enteritidis. Brazil is one of the most important poultry exporters in the world. In southern Brazil, three closely related clones of Salmonella Enteritidis have been responsible for the majority of foodborne Salmonella outbreaks over the past decade. However, until now, there has been little information regarding the clonal relationship among the Brazilian Salmonella strains of avian origin and those involved in foodborne outbreaks. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to complete the molecular characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry and food sources involved in Salmonella outbreaks. PCR ribotyping was performed to discriminate the strains into different ribotype profiles according to the banding pattern amplification. This technique was able to differentiate the Salmonella Enteritidis strains into two banding patterns: R2 and R4. R2 accounted for 98.7% of the strains. DNA sequencing of the 600-bp fragment, present in all ribotypes, was applied to confirm this result. The sequences generated showed high levels of similarity, ranging from 99.7 to 100%, and were grouped into a single cluster. These results suggest that there is a clonal relationship among the Salmonella Enteritidis strains responsible for several salmonellosis outbreaks and the strains collected from poultry sources.

  3. In vitro efficacy of the combination of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime against nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Neupane, Ganesh Prasad; Jang, Sook Jin; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Bok Kwon

    2010-08-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic intracellular infection caused by Salmonellaenterica serotype Typhi. The emergence and spread of nalidixic acid-resistant S. Typhi (NARST) is challenging for clinicians in many countries owing to the lack of suitable treatment options. The aim of this study was to identify in vitro synergistic combinations of antibiotics against S. Typhi. In vitro time-kill studies were performed on three clinical NARST isolates and one type strain of nalidixic acid-susceptible S. Typhi (NASST) ATCC 9992 with ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and azithromycin in various combinations. The combination of ciprofloxacin (0.012-0.375 microg/mL) and cefotaxime (0.063-0.125 microg/mL) against all three NARST strains and the NASST strain was significantly more effective in vitro in reducing bacterial counts by >or=3log(10) colony-forming units at 24h and showed synergistic effects. Combination therapy with ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime might be the treatment of choice for patients with typhoid fever. The combination of a fluoroquinolone and a beta-lactam, which are directed against different targets, may improve efficacy compared with a fluoroquinolone alone and may reduce the chance of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants emerging in patients with severe typhoid fever. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmid replicon typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates recovered from broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States, Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky has become the predominate serotype recovered from broiler slaughter samples and the prevalence of resistance to streptomycin and tetracycline has increased dramatically in this serotype. To characterize the relationships between antimicro...

  5. Effect of dietary mannanoligosaccharide and sodium chlorate on the growth performance, acute-phase response, and bacterial shedding of weaned pigs challenged with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Burkey, T E; Dritz, S S; Nietfeld, J C; Johnson, B J; Minton, J E

    2004-02-01

    A 28-d experiment evaluated the growth, acute-phase response, and bacterial shedding patterns in pigs (n = 96; initially 6.8 +/- 1.3 kg) fed mannanoligosaccharides (MANNAN) and sodium chlorate (CHLORATE) before and after oral challenge with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST). The negative control diet contained no antimicrobial (CON), and the positive control contained carbadox (CARB; 55 ppm). Test diets contained (as-fed basis) MANNAN (1,500 ppm) or CHLORATE (800 ppm). Pigs were fed diets for 14 d and then given ST orally. Pigs fed CARB had greater ADG over the entire study than pigs from other treatments (P < 0.05). During wk 1 to 2, before ST challenge, feed intake (as-fed basis) was lower for pigs fed MANNAN and CHLORATE than pigs fed CARB (P < 0.05). During the final 2 wk, pigs fed CARB had greater feed intake than pigs on other treatments (P < 0.05). Gain/feed was greater for pigs fed CARB in the 2 wk before ST (P < 0.05); however, in wk 3 to 4 after ST, gain/feed was reduced for CON pigs compared to pigs on other treatments (P < 0.05). Serum IGF-I was decreased at 2 and 4 d after ST (P < 0.001), and, overall, IGF-I was greater in pigs fed CARB than CON or CHLORATE (P < 0.05). Serum haptoglobin concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) for all treatments at d 6 compared with d 13 after ST. Overall, haptoglobin was greater for MANNAN than for CARB and CHLORATE (P < 0.05) and tended to be increased (P < 0.06) relative to CON. Interleukin-6 was not affected by treatment or day post-ST challenge. Fecal shedding of salmonellae organisms was less for CHLORATE (P < 0.05) than all other treatments at 7 d after ST. Shedding scores decreased from d 7 to 14 after ST (P < 0.05) for the CON, CARB, and MANNAN treatments. We conclude that feeding MANNAN and CHLORATE before acute enteric disease challenge may support improved gut function as evidenced by improved gain/feed, and that CHLORATE may decrease bacterial shedding. But neither MANNAN nor CHLORATE enhanced

  6. Interferon-γ and proliferation responses to Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi proteins in patients with S. Typhi Bacteremia in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Khanam, Farhana; Sayeed, Md Abu; Rahman, Taibur; Pacek, Marcin; Hu, Yanhui; Rollins, Andrea; Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Rollins, Sean; Kalsy, Anuj; Arifuzzaman, Mohammad; Leung, Daniel T; Sarracino, David A; Krastins, Bryan; Charles, Richelle C; Larocque, Regina C; Cravioto, Alejandro; Calderwood, Stephen B; Brooks, W Abdullah; Harris, Jason B; Labaer, Joshua; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi is a human-restricted intracellular pathogen and the cause of typhoid fever. Cellular immune responses are required to control and clear Salmonella infection. Despite this, there are limited data on cellular immune responses in humans infected with wild type S. Typhi. For this work, we used an automated approach to purify a subset of S. Typhi proteins identified in previous antibody-based immuno-affinity screens and antigens known to be expressed in vivo, including StaF-putative fimbrial protein-STY0202, StbB-fimbrial chaperone-STY0372, CsgF-involved in curli production-STY1177, CsgD- putative regulatory protein-STY1179, OppA-periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein precursor-STY1304, PagC-outer membrane invasion protein-STY1878, and conserved hypothetical protein-STY2195; we also generated and analyzed a crude membrane preparation of S. Typhi (MP). In comparison to samples collected from uninfected Bangladeshi and North American participants, we detected significant interferon-γ responses in PBMCs stimulated with MP, StaF, StbB, CsgF, CsgD, OppA, STY2195, and PagC in patients bacteremic with S. Typhi in Bangladesh. The majority of interferon-γ expressing T cells were CD4 cells, although CD8 responses also occurred. We also assessed cellular proliferation responses in bacteremic patients, and confirmed increased responses in infected individuals to MP, StaF, STY2195, and PagC in convalescent compared to acute phase samples and compared to controls. StaF is a fimbrial protein homologous to E. coli YadK, and contains a Pfam motif thought to be involved in cellular adhesion. PagC is expressed in vivo under the control of the virulence-associated PhoP-regulon required for intra-macrophage survival of Salmonella. STY2195 is a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function. This is the first analysis of cellular immune responses to purified S. Typhi antigens in patients with typhoid fever. These results indicate that patients

  7. Plane of nutrition influences the performance, innate leukocyte responses, and resistance to an oral Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium challenge in Jersey calves.

    PubMed

    Ballou, M A; Hanson, D L; Cobb, C J; Obeidat, B S; Sellers, M D; Pepper-Yowell, A R; Carroll, J A; Earleywine, T J; Lawhon, S D

    2015-03-01

    Two experiments investigated how plane of nutrition influences performance, leukocyte responses, and resistance to an oral Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium challenge. In experiment 1, 46 (2±1 d of age) calves were randomly assigned to 2 diets: a low (LPN; n=23) and high plane of nutrition (HPN; n=23). The LPN calves were fed 409 g/d of dry matter (DM) of a 20% crude protein and 20% fat milk replacer, whereas HPN calves were fed 610 and 735 g/d of DM of a 28% crude protein and 25% fat milk replacer during wk 1 and 2 to 6, respectively. In experiment 2, 20 bull calves (LPN; n=11 and HPN; n=9) were orally challenged on d 80 with 1.5×10(7) cfu of Salmonella Typhimurium (ATCC #14028). The HPN calves had a greater incidence (87.5 vs. 45.5%) and duration of days with high fecal scores (5.5 vs. 3.5 d). The LPN calves had greater neutrophil surface expression of L-selectin on d 7, 21, and 42. Following the Salmonella Typhimurium challenge, calf starter DM intake was greater among the HPN calves. The percentage of neutrophils producing an oxidative burst was also greater among HPN calves on d 1 to 5 after the challenge. Similarly, the intensity of the oxidative burst tended to be greater among the HPN calves on d 2 and 3 postchallenge. The secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α from whole-blood cultures stimulated with lipopolysaccharide tended to be greater on d 1 and was greater on d 5 and 6 among HPN calves. The median ranks of haptoglobin concentrations were greater and plasma zinc concentrations tended to be decreased among LPN calves. These data indicate that feeding a HPN to Jersey calves improved average daily gain and feed efficiency, but increased the incidence of high fecal scores during the first few weeks of life; however, the HPN Jersey calves may be more resistant to Salmonella Typhimurium after weaning.

  8. Salmonella enterica Infections in the United States and Assessment of Coefficients of Variation: A Novel Approach to Identify Epidemiologic Characteristics of Individual Serotypes, 1996–2011

    PubMed Central

    Boore, Amy L.; Hoekstra, R. Michael; Iwamoto, Martha; Fields, Patricia I.; Bishop, Richard D.; Swerdlow, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite control efforts, salmonellosis continues to cause an estimated 1.2 million infections in the United States (US) annually. We describe the incidence of salmonellosis in the US and introduce a novel approach to examine the epidemiologic similarities and differences of individual serotypes. Methods Cases of salmonellosis in humans reported to the laboratory-based National Salmonella Surveillance System during 1996–2011 from US states were included. Coefficients of variation were used to describe distribution of incidence rates of common Salmonella serotypes by geographic region, age group and sex of patient, and month of sample isolation. Results During 1996–2011, more than 600,000 Salmonella isolates from humans were reported, with an average annual incidence of 13.1 cases/100,000 persons. The annual reported rate of Salmonella infections did not decrease during the study period. The top five most commonly reported serotypes, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Newport, Heidelberg, and Javiana, accounted for 62% of fully serotyped isolates. Coefficients of variation showed the most geographically concentrated serotypes were often clustered in Gulf Coast states and were also more frequently found to be increasing in incidence. Serotypes clustered in particular months, age groups, and sex were also identified and described. Conclusions Although overall incidence rates of Salmonella did not change over time, trends and epidemiological factors differed remarkably by serotype. A better understanding of Salmonella, facilitated by this comprehensive description of overall trends and unique characteristics of individual serotypes, will assist in responding to this disease and in planning and implementing prevention activities. PMID:26701276

  9. Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis producing ArmA 16S RNA methylase and CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase in a neonatology ward in Constantine, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Naas, Thierry; Bentchouala, Chafia; Cuzon, Gaelle; Yaou, Sanàa; Lezzar, Abdesselam; Smati, Farida; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-08-01

    Plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methylases such as ArmA, which confer high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides, are increasingly reported in Enterobacteriaceae. This study investigated the molecular mechanism of β-lactam and aminoglycoside resistance in extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis isolated at the 53-bed neonatology ward of University Hospital Benabib in Constantine, Algeria. From September 2008 to January 2009, 200 S. enterica isolates were obtained from 138 patients (age range 8-80 months) hospitalised in the neonatology ward. Most isolates were from stool cultures, but also from two blood cultures and one gastric fluid. The isolates were multidrug-resistant and produced TEM-1 and CTX-M-15 enzymes as well as the 16S RNA methylase ArmA. The armA, bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(TEM-1) genes were located on the same 140-kb self-transferable plasmid belonging to the IncL/M incompatibility group. All of the S. Infantis isolates belonged to a single clone. Increased infection control measures and thorough biodecontamination of the rooms led to control of the outbreak but did not eradicate the epidemic strain. This study further illustrates the global emergence of ArmA methylase and its frequent association with bla(CTX-M) genes. Spread of 16S RNA methylase determinants at the same level as bla(CTX-M) genes in Enterobacteriaceae may seriously compromise the efficacy of aminoglycosides for treating Gram-negative infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Only one of the two type VI secretion systems encoded in the Salmonella enterica serotype Dublin genome is involved in colonization of the avian and murine hosts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a virulence factor for many Gram-negative bacteria. Salmonella genus harbors five phylogenetically distinct T6SS loci encoded in Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs) SPI-6, SPI-19, SPI-20, SPI-21 and SPI-22, which are differentially distributed among serotypes. The T6SSs encoded in SPI-6 and SPI-19 contribute to pathogenesis of serotypes Typhimurium and Gallinarum in mice and chickens, respectively. Salmonella Dublin is a pathogen restricted to cattle where it causes a systemic disease. Also, it can colonize other hosts such as chickens and mice, which can act as reservoirs of this serotype. Salmonella Dublin harbors the genes for both T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19. This study has determined the contribution of T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 to host-colonization by Salmonella Dublin using avian and murine models of infection. Competitive index experiments showed that, a mutant strain lacking both T6SSs (∆T6SSSPI-6/∆T6SSSPI-19) presents a strong colonization defect in cecum of chickens, similar to the defect observed for the ∆T6SSSPI-6 mutant, suggesting that this serotype requires a functional T6SSSPI-6 for efficient colonization of the avian gastrointestinal tract. Colonization of mice was also defective, although to a lesser extent than in chickens. In contrast, the T6SSSPI-19 was not necessary for colonization of either chickens or mice. Transfer of T6SSSPI-6, but not T6SSSPI-19, restored the ability of the double mutant to colonize both animal hosts. Our data indicate that Salmonella Dublin requires only the T6SSSPI-6 for efficient colonization of mice and chickens, and that the T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 are not functionally redundant. PMID:24405577

  11. Multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis of Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi A from Yuxi and comparison with isolates from the Chinese Medical Culture Collection Center.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yingbo; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Qingshan; Huang, Xinrong; Elmore, Bradley; Pan, Qing; Wang, Shukun; Liu, Jie

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to genotype Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi A (SPA) isolated from Yuxi, China, in a multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) analysis (MLVA) and to compare them with isolates from the Chinese Medical Culture Collection Center (CMCC). Potential VNTRs were screened from the genomes of ATCC9150 and AKU_12601 using the Tandem Repeats Finder program. Nine VNTRs were established for MLVA typing of 195 SPA isolates from Yuxi and 20 isolates from CMCC. The dendogram for MLVA profiles and minimum spanning tree (MST) were drawn using the categorical coefficient calculated by BioNumerics software. A total of 23 MLVA types were identified in 215 SPA isolates and were grouped into six distinct cluster groups A, B, C, D, E and F. A total of 195 Yuxi SPA isolates were exclusively grouped into cluster C with nine MLVA genotypes. A total of 20 CMCC isolates were grouped in clusters A B, D, E and F with the other 14 MLVA types. The MLVA with nine VNTR loci, which was exploited in the present study, represents a successful strategy for genotyping SPA. Furthermore, the 195 Yuxi isolates appear to be closely related to each other and distinct from the 20 CMCC strains.

  12. Ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium sequence type 313 from Kenyan patients is associated with the blaCTX-M-15 gene on a novel IncHI2 plasmid.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Samuel; Okoro, Chinyere; Kiiru, John; Njoroge, Samuel; Omuse, Geoffrey; Langridge, Gemma; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon; Revathi, Gunturu

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria pose a major challenge to the clinical management of infections in resource-poor settings. Although nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) bacteria cause predominantly enteric self-limiting illness in developed countries, NTS is responsible for a huge burden of life-threatening bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, we characterized nine S. Typhimurium isolates from an outbreak involving patients who initially failed to respond to ceftriaxone treatment at a referral hospital in Kenya. These Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, aztreonam, cefepime, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and cefpodoxime. Resistance to β-lactams, including to ceftriaxone, was associated with carriage of a combination of blaCTX-M-15, blaOXA-1, and blaTEM-1 genes. The genes encoding resistance to heavy-metal ions were borne on the novel IncHI2 plasmid pKST313, which also carried a pair of class 1 integrons. All nine isolates formed a single clade within S. Typhimurium ST313, the major clone of an ongoing invasive NTS epidemic in the region. This emerging ceftriaxone-resistant clone may pose a major challenge in the management of invasive NTS in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Ceftriaxone-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Sequence Type 313 from Kenyan Patients Is Associated with the blaCTX-M-15 Gene on a Novel IncHI2 Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Okoro, Chinyere; Kiiru, John; Omuse, Geoffrey; Langridge, Gemma; Kingsley, Robert A.; Dougan, Gordon; Revathi, Gunturu

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria pose a major challenge to the clinical management of infections in resource-poor settings. Although nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) bacteria cause predominantly enteric self-limiting illness in developed countries, NTS is responsible for a huge burden of life-threatening bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, we characterized nine S. Typhimurium isolates from an outbreak involving patients who initially failed to respond to ceftriaxone treatment at a referral hospital in Kenya. These Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, aztreonam, cefepime, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and cefpodoxime. Resistance to β-lactams, including to ceftriaxone, was associated with carriage of a combination of blaCTX-M-15, blaOXA-1, and blaTEM-1 genes. The genes encoding resistance to heavy-metal ions were borne on the novel IncHI2 plasmid pKST313, which also carried a pair of class 1 integrons. All nine isolates formed a single clade within S. Typhimurium ST313, the major clone of an ongoing invasive NTS epidemic in the region. This emerging ceftriaxone-resistant clone may pose a major challenge in the management of invasive NTS in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25779570

  14. Only one of the two type VI secretion systems encoded in the Salmonella enterica serotype Dublin genome is involved in colonization of the avian and murine hosts.

    PubMed

    Pezoa, David; Blondel, Carlos J; Silva, Cecilia A; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Santiviago, Carlos A; Contreras, Inés

    2014-01-09

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a virulence factor for many Gram-negative bacteria. Salmonella genus harbors five phylogenetically distinct T6SS loci encoded in Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs) SPI-6, SPI-19, SPI-20, SPI-21 and SPI-22, which are differentially distributed among serotypes. The T6SSs encoded in SPI-6 and SPI-19 contribute to pathogenesis of serotypes Typhimurium and Gallinarum in mice and chickens, respectively. Salmonella Dublin is a pathogen restricted to cattle where it causes a systemic disease. Also, it can colonize other hosts such as chickens and mice, which can act as reservoirs of this serotype. Salmonella Dublin harbors the genes for both T6SS(SPI-6) and T6SS(SPI-19). This study has determined the contribution of T6SS(SPI-6) and T6SS(SPI-19) to host-colonization by Salmonella Dublin using avian and murine models of infection. Competitive index experiments showed that, a mutant strain lacking both T6SSs (∆T6SS(SPI-6)/∆T6SS(SPI-19)) presents a strong colonization defect in cecum of chickens, similar to the defect observed for the ∆T6SS(SPI-6) mutant, suggesting that this serotype requires a functional T6SS(SPI-6) for efficient colonization of the avian gastrointestinal tract. Colonization of mice was also defective, although to a lesser extent than in chickens. In contrast, the T6SS(SPI-19) was not necessary for colonization of either chickens or mice. Transfer of T6SS(SPI-6), but not T6SS(SPI-19), restored the ability of the double mutant to colonize both animal hosts. Our data indicate that Salmonella Dublin requires only the T6SS(SPI-6) for efficient colonization of mice and chickens, and that the T6SS(SPI-6) and T6SS(SPI-19) are not functionally redundant.

  15. Genomic investigation of Salmonella enterica sequences associated with long-term colonization of the bovine gut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is a leading cause of food and waterborne infections globally in both humans and livestock with an estimated 93 million annual human infections caused by nontyphoidal S. enterica alone. However, some serotypes within this species are known to cause mild infection...

  16. Comparison of a real-time PCR method with a culture method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in naturally contaminated environmental samples from integrated poultry houses.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Bwalya; Waltman, W Douglas; Berghaus, Roy D; Hofacre, Charles L

    2012-04-01

    Conventional culture methods have traditionally been considered the "gold standard" for the isolation and identification of foodborne bacterial pathogens. However, culture methods are labor-intensive and time-consuming. A Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis-specific real-time PCR assay that recently received interim approval by the National Poultry Improvement Plan for the detection of Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated against a culture method that had also received interim National Poultry Improvement Plan approval for the analysis of environmental samples from integrated poultry houses. The method was validated with 422 field samples collected by either the boot sock or drag swab method. The samples were cultured by selective enrichment in tetrathionate broth followed by transfer onto a modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis medium and then plating onto brilliant green with novobiocin and xylose lysine brilliant Tergitol 4 plates. One-milliliter aliquots of the selective enrichment broths from each sample were collected for DNA extraction by the commercial PrepSEQ nucleic acid extraction assay and analysis by the Salmonella Enteritidis-specific real-time PCR assay. The real-time PCR assay detected no significant differences between the boot sock and drag swab samples. In contrast, the culture method detected a significantly higher number of positive samples from boot socks. The diagnostic sensitivity of the real-time PCR assay for the field samples was significantly higher than that of the culture method. The kappa value obtained was 0.46, indicating moderate agreement between the real-time PCR assay and the culture method. In addition, the real-time PCR method had a turnaround time of 2 days compared with 4 to 8 days for the culture method. The higher sensitivity as well as the reduction in time and labor makes this real-time PCR assay an excellent alternative to conventional culture methods for diagnostic purposes, surveillance, and research studies

  17. Use of a LightCycler gyrA Mutation Assay for Rapid Identification of Mutations Conferring Decreased Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin in Multiresistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium DT104 Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Walker, R. A.; Saunders, N.; Lawson, A. J.; Lindsay, E. A.; Dassama, M.; Ward, L. R.; Woodward, M. J.; Davies, R. H.; Liebana, E.; Threlfall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    A LightCycler-based PCR-hybridization gyrA mutation assay (GAMA) was developed to rapidly detect gyrA point mutations in multiresistant (MR) Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104 with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.25 to 1.0 mg/liter). Ninety-two isolates (49 human, 43 animal) were tested with three individual oligonucleotide probes directed against an Asp-87-to-Asn (GAC→AAC) mutation, an Asp-87-to-Gly (GAC→GGC) mutation, and a Ser-83-to-Phe (TCC→TTC) mutation. Strains homologous to the probes could be distinguished from strains that had different mutations by their probe-target melting temperatures. Thirty-seven human and 30 animal isolates had an Asp-87-to-Asn substitution, 6 human and 6 animal isolates had a Ser-83-to-Phe substitution, and 5 human and 2 animal isolates had an Asp-87-to-Gly substitution. The remaining six strains all had mismatches with the three probes and therefore different gyrA mutations. The sequencing of gyrA from these six isolates showed that one human strain and two animal strains had an Asp-87-to-Tyr (GAC→TAC) substitution and two animal strains had a Ser-83-to-Tyr (TCC→TAC) substitution. One animal strain had no gyrA mutation, suggesting that this isolate had a different mechanism of resistance. Fifty-eight of the strains tested were indistinguishable by several different typing methods including antibiograms, pulsed-field gel gel electrophoresis, and plasmid profiling, although they could be further subdivided according to gyrA mutation. This study confirmed that MR DT104 with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin from humans and food animals in England and Wales may have arisen independently against a background of clonal spread of MR DT104. PMID:11283069

  18. An outbreak due to peanuts in their shell caused by Salmonella enterica serotypes Stanley and Newport--sharing molecular information to solve international outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, M. D.; Little, C. L.; Lem, M.; Fyfe, M.; Genobile, D.; Tan, A.; Threlfall, J.; Paccagnella, A.; Lightfoot, D.; Lyi, H.; McIntyre, L.; Ward, L.; Brown, D. J.; Surnam, S.; Fisher, I. S. T.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonellosis is a global problem caused by the international movement of foods and high incidence in exporting countries. In September 2001, in an outbreak investigation Australia isolated Salmonella Stanley from imported peanuts, which resulted in a wider investigation in Canada, England & Wales and Scotland. Patients infected with Salmonella serotypes known to be isolated from peanuts and reported to surveillance systems were interviewed to determine exposure histories. Tagged image file format (TIFF) images of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of Salmonella isolates were shared electronically amongst laboratories. Laboratories tested packets of 'Brand X' peanuts from various lots and product lines. In total, 97 cases of S. Stanley and 12 cases of S. Newport infection were found. Seventy-three per cent (71/97) of S. Stanley cases were in persons of Asian ethnicity. Twenty-eight per cent of cases recalled eating Brand X peanuts and a further 13% had peanuts in their house in the previous month or had eaten Asian-style peanuts. Laboratories isolated S. Stanley, S. Newport, S. Kottbus, S. Lexington and S. Unnamed from Brand X peanuts. Isolates of S. Stanley from peanuts and human patients were indistinguishable by PFGE. This international outbreak resulted from a product originating from one country affecting several others. Rapid sharing of electronic DNA images was a crucial factor in delineating the outbreak; multinational investigations would benefit from a harmonized approach. PMID:15310157

  19. An outbreak due to peanuts in their shell caused by Salmonella enterica serotypes Stanley and Newport--sharing molecular information to solve international outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Kirk, M D; Little, C L; Lem, M; Fyfe, M; Genobile, D; Tan, A; Threlfall, J; Paccagnella, A; Lightfoot, D; Lyi, H; McIntyre, L; Ward, L; Brown, D J; Surnam, S; Fisher, I S T

    2004-08-01

    Salmonellosis is a global problem caused by the international movement of foods and high incidence in exporting countries. In September 2001, in an outbreak investigation Australia isolated Salmonella Stanley from imported peanuts, which resulted in a wider investigation in Canada, England & Wales and Scotland. Patients infected with Salmonella serotypes known to be isolated from peanuts and reported to surveillance systems were interviewed to determine exposure histories. Tagged image file format (TIFF) images of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of Salmonella isolates were shared electronically amongst laboratories. Laboratories tested packets of 'Brand X' peanuts from various lots and product lines. In total, 97 cases of S. Stanley and 12 cases of S. Newport infection were found. Seventy-three per cent (71/97) of S. Stanley cases were in persons of Asian ethnicity. Twenty-eight per cent of cases recalled eating Brand X peanuts and a further 13% had peanuts in their house in the previous month or had eaten Asian-style peanuts. Laboratories isolated S. Stanley, S. Newport, S. Kottbus, S. Lexington and S. Unnamed from Brand X peanuts. Isolates of S. Stanley from peanuts and human patients were indistinguishable by PFGE. This international outbreak resulted from a product originating from one country affecting several others. Rapid sharing of electronic DNA images was a crucial factor in delineating the outbreak; multinational investigations would benefit from a harmonized approach.

  20. Effect of probiotic-, bacteriophage-, or organic acid-supplemented feeds or fermented soybean meal on the growth performance, acute-phase response, and bacterial shedding of grower pigs challenged with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Gebru, E; Lee, J S; Son, J C; Yang, S Y; Shin, S A; Kim, B; Kim, M K; Park, S C

    2010-12-01

    A 28-d experiment evaluated the growth performance, acute-phase response, and bacterial shedding patterns in pigs (n = 108; initially, 38.7 ± 6.7 kg) fed 6 treatment diets, including a control diet with no antimicrobial agents (CON), a positive control diet containing chlortetracycline, 100 mg/kg (CT), a diet containing anti-Salmonella Typhimurium bacteriophage, 3 × 10(9) plaque-forming units/kg of feed (ASB), Lactobacillus plantarum CJLP56, 6.5 × 10(8) cfu/kg of feed (LP), 0.2% microencapsulated organic acids (MOA), or 5% fermented soybean meal (FSM). Pigs were fed the diets for 2 wk before and 2 wk after challenging orally with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (SalT). Before bacterial challenge, ADFI was similar in all groups. After SalT challenge, ADFI of CON pigs was less (P < 0.05) than all other groups. Before challenge, pigs on MOA, FSM, and CT diets had greater (P < 0.05) ADG and G:F than CON pigs. After challenge (wk 3 to 4) and during the overall experimental period (wk 1 to 4), ADG of all treatment groups and G:F of all treatment groups except the LP group were greater (P < 0.05) than those of CON pigs. Relative to all other treatments, CON and LP pigs had greater (P < 0.05) bacterial shedding scores on d 7 after SalT challenge. At d 14 postchallenge, shedding scores declined (P < 0.05) in all treatment groups compared with CON pigs. Serum haptoglobin for all treatment groups increased from d 0 concentrations on d 6 postchallenge and declined to prechallenge concentrations on d 13 (P < 0.05). Circulating IGF-I concentrations declined from 2 to 6 d postchallenge and increased again by d 13 in ASB and LP groups, did not decline in FSM and CT groups, and continuously declined through d 13 in CON and LP groups (P < 0.05). However, in MOA group, IGF-I concentrations declined from preinfection concentrations on d 2, increased on d 4, and declined again until d 13 (P < 0.05). The serum concentrations of the cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β were not

  1. Salmonella enterica.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian Salmonella infections are important as both a cause of clinical disease in poultry and as a source of food-borne transmission of disease to humans. Host-adapted salmonellae (Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum and Gallinarum) are responsible for severe systemic diseases, whereas numerous sero...

  2. transcriptional response of pigs to Salmonella infection: Comparison of responses to infection with Salmonella eimerica serotype Typhimurium as that observed in S. choleraesuis infection.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine responses to, and control of, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST) infection have been compared to S. enterica serotype Choleraesuis (SC) infection. Using subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH), long oligonucleotide Qiagen and Affymetrix porcine GeneChip® arrays, and real time ge...

  3. Genome sequences of ten Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from a single dairy farm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we report draft genomes of twenty-seven isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica representing the seven serotypes isolated from cows in a Pennsylvania dairy herd, the farm on which they were reared, and the associated off-site heifer-raising facility over an eight year sampling period. ...

  4. Influence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products, SmartCare in milk replacer and Original XPC in calf starter, on the performance and health of preweaned Holstein calves challenged with Salmonella enterica serotype

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of supplementing SmartCare™ (SC) in milk replacer and Original XPC™(XPC) in calf starter on performance and health of preweaned calves following an oral challenge with Salmonella enterica. The study was performed in two 35-d periods with 30 Holstein...

  5. Methodologies for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Subtyping: Gold Standards and Alternatives▿

    PubMed Central

    Wattiau, Pierre; Boland, Cécile; Bertrand, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    For more than 80 years, subtyping of Salmonella enterica has been routinely performed by serotyping, a method in which surface antigens are identified based on agglutination reactions with specific antibodies. The serotyping scheme, which is continuously updated as new serovars are discovered, has generated over time a data set of the utmost significance, allowing long-term epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella in the food chain and in public health control. Conceptually, serotyping provides no information regarding the phyletic relationships inside the different Salmonella enterica subspecies. In epidemiological investigations, identification and tracking of salmonellosis outbreaks require the use of methods that can fingerprint the causative strains at a taxonomic level far more specific than the one achieved by serotyping. During the last 2 decades, alternative methods that could successfully identify the serovar of a given strain by probing its DNA have emerged, and molecular biology-based methods have been made available to address phylogeny and fingerprinting issues. At the same time, accredited diagnostics have become increasingly generalized, imposing stringent methodological requirements in terms of traceability and measurability. In these new contexts, the hand-crafted character of classical serotyping is being challenged, although it is widely accepted that classification into serovars should be maintained. This review summarizes and discusses modern typing methods, with a particular focus on those having potential as alternatives for classical serotyping or for subtyping Salmonella strains at a deeper level. PMID:21856826

  6. Draft Whole-Genome Sequences of 25 Salmonella enterica Strains Representing 24 Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Brumwell, Stephanie L.; Lingohr, Erika J.; Ahmad, Aaminah; Blimkie, Travis M.; Kogan, Benjamin A.; Pilsworth, Jessica; Rehman, Muhammad A.; Schleicher, Krista L.; Shanmugaraj, Jenitta; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Nash, John H. E.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequences of 25 Salmonella enterica strains representing 24 different serotypes, many of which were not available in public repositories during our selection process. These draft genomes will provide useful reference for the genetic variation between serotypes and aid in the development of molecular typing tools. PMID:26941156

  7. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  8. Foodborne Outbreak and Nonmotile Salmonella enterica Variant, France

    PubMed Central

    Brisabois, Anne; Accou-Demartin, Marie; Josse, Adeline; Marault, Muriel; Francart, Sylvie; Da Silva, Nathalie Jourdan; Weill, François-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    We report a food-related outbreak of salmonellosis in humans caused by a nonmotile variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in France in 2009. This nonmotile variant had been circulating in laying hens but was not considered as Typhimurium and consequently escaped European poultry flock regulations. PMID:22257550

  9. Foodborne outbreak and nonmotile Salmonella enterica variant, France.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Accou-Demartin, Marie; Josse, Adeline; Marault, Muriel; Francart, Sylvie; Da Silva, Nathalie Jourdan; Weill, François-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    We report a food-related outbreak of salmonellosis in humans caused by a nonmotile variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in France in 2009. This nonmotile variant had been circulating in laying hens but was not considered as Typhimurium and consequently escaped European poultry flock regulations.

  10. Effects of integrated treatment of nonthermal UV-C light and different antimicrobial wash on Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Produce contamination by foodborne pathogens remains a serious threat. This study investigated synergistic effects of ultraviolet-C and various active sanitizers’ washes against Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes. A bacterial cocktail containing three serotypes of Salmonella enterica (S. Newport H...

  11. Development of an oligonucleotide microarray method for Salmonella serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Tankouo‐Sandjong, B.; Sessitsch, A.; Stralis‐Pavese, N.; Liebana, E.; Kornschober, C.; Allerberger, F.; Hächler, H.; Bodrossy, L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Adequate identification of Salmonella enterica serovars is a prerequisite for any epidemiological investigation. This is traditionally obtained via a combination of biochemical and serological typing. However, primary strain isolation and traditional serotyping is time‐consuming and faster methods would be desirable. A microarray, based on two housekeeping and two virulence marker genes (atpD, gyrB, fliC and fljB), has been developed for the detection and identification of the two species of Salmonella (S. enterica and S. bongori), the five subspecies of S. enterica (II, IIIa, IIIb, IV, VI) and 43 S. enterica ssp. enterica serovars (covering the most prevalent ones in Austria and the UK). A comprehensive set of probes (n = 240), forming 119 probe units, was developed based on the corresponding sequences of 148 Salmonella strains, successfully validated with 57 Salmonella strains and subsequently evaluated with 35 blind samples including isolated serotypes and mixtures of different serotypes. Results demonstrated a strong discriminatory ability of the microarray among Salmonella serovars. Threshold for detection was 1 colony forming unit per 25 g of food sample following overnight (14 h) enrichment. PMID:21261872

  12. High-throughput Molecular Determination of Salmonella enterica Serovars Use of Multiplex PCR and Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen and is a leading cause of food-borne illness worldwide. There are over 2,500 serotypes of Salmonella reported. Identification of the serotype is key in defining the etiological agent during an outbreak investigation. In the current study, a high-throughput ...

  13. Development of Microarray and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Identification of Serovars and Virulence Genes in Salmonella enterica of Human or Animal Origin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen consisting of many serotypes that can cause severe clinical diseases in animals and humans. Rapid identification of Salmonella isolates is especially important for epidemiological monitoring and controlling outbreaks of disease. Although immunolo...

  14. Prevalence and Characteristics of Salmonella Serotypes Isolated from Fresh Produce Marketed in the United States.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Shanker P; Wang, Hua; Adams, Jennifer K; Feng, Peter C H

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella continues to rank as one of the most costly foodborne pathogens, and more illnesses are now associated with the consumption of fresh produce. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Microbiological Data Program (MDP) sampled select commodities of fresh fruit and vegetables and tested them for Salmonella, pathogenic Escherichia coli, and Listeria. The Salmonella strains isolated were further characterized by serotype, antimicrobial resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile. This article summarizes the Salmonella data collected by the MDP between 2002 and 2012. The results show that the rates of Salmonella prevalence ranged from absent to 0.34% in cilantro. A total of 152 isolates consisting of over 50 different serotypes were isolated from the various produce types, and the top five were Salmonella enterica serotype Cubana, S. enterica subspecies arizonae (subsp. IIIa) and diarizonae (subsp. IIIb), and S. enterica serotypes Newport, Javiana, and Infantis. Among these, Salmonella serotypes Newport and Javiana are also listed among the top five Salmonella serotypes that caused most foodborne outbreaks. Other serotypes that are frequent causes of infection, such as S. enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis, were also found in fresh produce but were not prevalent. About 25% of the MDP samples were imported produce, including 65% of green onions, 44% of tomatoes, 42% of hot peppers, and 41% of cantaloupes. However, imported produce did not show higher numbers of Salmonella-positive samples, and in some products, like cilantro, all of the Salmonella isolates were from domestic samples. About 6.5% of the Salmonella isolates were resistant to the antimicrobial compounds tested, but no single commodity or serotype was found to be the most common carrier of resistant strains or of resistance. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of the produce isolates showed similarities with Salmonella isolates from meat samples and from outbreaks, but

  15. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil.

  16. Increased Water Activity Reduces the Thermal Resistance of Salmonella enterica in Peanut Butter

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K.; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90°C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126°C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil. PMID:23728806

  17. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in zoo animals from Chile

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Paulina; Hidalgo-Hermoso, Ezequiel; Espinoza, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella (S.) enterica and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are foodborne pathogens. Here, we report the prevalence of S. enterica and STEC in feces of 316 zoo animals belonging to 61 species from Chile. S. enterica and STEC strains were detected in 7.5% and 4.4% of animals, respectively. All Salmonella isolates corresponded to the serotype Enteritidis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of S. Enteritidis in the culpeo fox (Lycalopex culpaeus), black-capped capuchin (Sapajus apella) and Peruvian pelican (Pelecanus thagus) and the first STEC report in Thomson's gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii). PMID:27030195

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in zoo animals from Chile.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Paulina; Hidalgo-Hermoso, Ezequiel; Espinoza, Karen; Retamal, Patricio

    2016-12-30

    Salmonella (S.) enterica and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are foodborne pathogens. Here, we report the prevalence of S. enterica and STEC in feces of 316 zoo animals belonging to 61 species from Chile. S. enterica and STEC strains were detected in 7.5% and 4.4% of animals, respectively. All Salmonella isolates corresponded to the serotype Enteritidis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of S. Enteritidis in the culpeo fox (Lycalopex culpaeus), black-capped capuchin (Sapajus apella) and Peruvian pelican (Pelecanus thagus) and the first STEC report in Thomson's gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii).

  19. Pangenome and taxonomic analysis of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (S. enterica ssp. I) contains almost all the major pathogens in this genus. We sequenced 354 new S. enterica ssp. I genomes using paired end 100 base reads to ~80-fold coverage. These genomes were chosen to maximize genetic diversity, representing at least 100...

  20. Serotype and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolates from commercial birds and poultry environment in Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Landínez, Martha; Washington, Paul; Thornton, Jay Kay; Zhang, Yi; Sánchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Banda, Alejandro; Guard, Jean; Nascimento, Vladimir P; Magee, Danny L; Mauel, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    To obtain information about Salmonella from commercial birds and poultry environments within Mississippi, 50 Salmonella enterica isolates were collected and characterized by intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR) serotyping and by determining antimicrobial resistance. ISR assigned serotype to all 50 Salmonella enterica isolates whereas the Kauffman-White-LeMinor antibody-based scheme assigned serotype to 48. Agreement between both methods was K = 89.58. Within the set, 12 serotypes were detected. The antimicrobial resistance patterns (ARP) of 12 serotypes, namely Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Kentucky, Bredeney, Mbandaka, Saintpaul, Montevideo, Cubana, Lille, Senftenberg, Johannesburg, and one serotype UN0094, were determined using minimum inhibitory concentration values. The antibiograms demonstrated differences between Salmonella serotypes and among isolates of the same serotype. All isolates were 100% susceptible to enrofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The number of antimicrobials to which the isolates were resistant ranged from two to nine. Twenty-two different ARPs were identified and ARP1, with resistance to spectinomycin and sulfadimethoxine, was most frequently observed. Forty isolates (80%) were resistant to three or more antimicrobials and were thus designated multidrug resistant. Detection of a unique serotype, and variation in antibiograms within the set, demonstrates that it is important to survey isolates periodically from a region to follow epidemiologic trends.

  1. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica Cells in Deli-Type Salad by Enterocin AS-48 in Combination with Other Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Cobo Molinos, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario; Abriouel, Hikmate; Ben Omar, Nabil; Valdivia, Eva; Gálvez, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    The cyclic antibacterial peptide enterocin AS-48 acted synergistically with p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl ester (PHBME) and with 2-nitropropanol against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis CECT 4300 in Russian salad. In challenge tests on a cocktail of Salmonella strains (S. enterica ssp. enterica serotype Typhi CECT 409, S. enterica ssp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis CECT 915, S. enterica ssp. enterica serovar Enteritidis CECT 4300, S. enterica ssp. arizonae serovar Arizonae CECT 4395, and S. enterica ssp. salamae CECT 4000) in salad at 10°C, the combinations of PHBME and AS-48 (80 μg/g) or 2-nitropropanol and AS-48 (40 μg/g) reduced the concentrations of viable Salmonella from 4.27 to 4.75 log CFU/g down to the limit of detection for 7 days. Salmonella populations did not increase in control samples (without any antimicrobials or in the presence of AS-48 alone) probably due to the low pH of this type of salad and low temperature of incubation, but retained over 85% viability after 1 week. This work opens new possibilities to expand the spectrum of inhibition of enterocin AS-48 against Salmonella enterica.

  2. Recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from hens initially infected with serovar Kentucky

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Kentucky differ greatly in epidemiology. We wanted to know if the non-pathogenic serotype Kentucky impacted the recovery of the pathogen Enteritidis from chickens. To explore this issue, 4 groups of hens were treated as follows: i) hens were inoculated or...

  3. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates associated with starling-livestock interactions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, James C; Hyatt, Doreene R; Bentler, Kevin; Mangan, Anna M; Russell, Michael; Piaggio, Antoinette J; Linz, George M

    2015-08-31

    Bird-livestock interactions have been implicated as potential sources for bacteria within concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO). In this study we characterized XbaI-digested genomic DNA from Salmonella enterica using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The PFGE analysis was conducted using 182 S. enterica isolates collected from a single CAFO between 2009 and 2012. Samples collected in 2012 were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The analysis was limited to S. enterica serotypes, with at least 10 isolates, known to occur in both European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and cattle (Bos taurus) within this CAFO. A total of five different serotypes were screened; S. Anatum, S. Kentucky, S. Meleagridis, S. Montevideo, S. Muenchen. These samples were recovered from five different sample types; starling gastrointestinal tracts (GI), starling external wash, cattle feces, cattle feed and cattle water troughs. Indistinguishable S. enterica PFGE profiles were recovered from isolates originating in all sample types. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was also associated with indistinguishable S. enterica isolates recovered from all samples types. These data suggests that AMR S. enterica is transmitted between cattle and starlings and that shared feed sources are likely contributing to infections within both species. Moreover we isolated indistinguishable PFGE profiles across all years of data collection, suggesting long-term environmental persistence may be mediated by starling visits to CAFO. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Evaluation of the association between feeding raw meat and Salmonella enterica infections at a Greyhound breeding facility.

    PubMed

    Morley, Paul S; Strohmeyer, Rachel A; Tankson, Jeanetta D; Hyatt, Doreene R; Dargatz, David A; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2006-05-15

    To investigate Salmonella enterica infections at a Greyhound breeding facility. Cross-sectional study. ANIMAL AND SAMPLE POPULATIONS: 138 adult and juvenile dogs and S. enterica isolates recovered from the dogs and their environment. The investigation was conducted at the request of a Greyhound breeder. Observations regarding the environment and population of dogs were recorded. Fecal, food, and environmental specimens were collected and submitted for Salmonella culture. Isolates were serotyped and tested for susceptibility to 16 antimicrobials. Isolates underwent genetic analyses by use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping. S. enterica was recovered from 88 of 133 (66%) samples of all types and from 57 of 61 (93%) fecal samples. Eighty-three (94.3%) of the isolates were serotype Newport, 77 (87.5%) of which had identical resistance phenotypes. Genetic evaluations suggested that several strains of S. enterica existed at the facility, but there was a high degree of relatedness among many of the Newport isolates. Multiple strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport were recovered from raw meat fed on 1 day. S. enterica infections and environmental contamination were common at this facility. A portion of the Salmonella strains detected on the premises was likely introduced via raw meat that was the primary dietary constituent. Some strains appeared to be widely disseminated in the population. Feeding meat that had not been cooked properly, particularly meat classified as unfit for human consumption, likely contributed to the infections in these dogs.

  5. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  6. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  7. High prevalence of Salmonella in tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae), and susceptibility of the serotypes to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Maciel, B M; Argôlo Filho, R C; Nogueira, S S C; Dias, J C T; Rezende, R P

    2010-12-01

    Species of tegu (Tupinambis) are the largest lizards in South America. Large numbers of these lizards are hunted; there is a vigorous trade in their skins and the meat is consumed by rural and native peoples. The animals are also bred in captivity, an economic activity for rural populations which can help in the animals' conservation. Faecal samples from 30 captive-born tegus were analysed for the presence of Salmonella in two separate samplings. In the first analysis, samples from 26 animals (87%) yielded Salmonella enterica of which 23% were of Rubislaw serotype; 20% Carrau and Agona serotypes; 7% Infantis and Saint-Paul serotypes; 3% Panama and Brandenburg serotypes; 10% were S. enterica subsp. enterica and 7% were rough form. In the second analysis, four tegus (13%) which had been negative in the first sampling were positive, thus, 100% of the animals studied carried the bacterium. Antibiotic susceptibility showed resistance to sulfonamide in 82% of the isolates, streptomycin in 64%, tetracycline in 6% and Chloramphenicol in 20%. Two animals carried strains of the same serotype with different patterns of antibiotic susceptibility. Although it is well known that reptiles are a significant source of Salmonella, to our knowledge, its prevalence in tegu has not been studied previously.

  8. High prevalence of typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars excreting food handlers in Karachi-Pakistan: a probable factor for regional typhoid endemicity.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Taranum Ruba; Bibi, Safia; Mustufa, Muhammad Ayaz; Ayaz, Sobiya Mohiuddin; Khan, Adnan

    2015-12-08

    Typhoid fever is the persistent cause of morbidity worldwide. Salmonella enterica serovar's carriers among food handlers have the potential to disseminate this infection on large scale in the community. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of typhoidal S. enterica serovars among food handlers of Karachi. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Karachi metropolis. A total of 220 food handlers were recruited on the basis of inclusion criteria from famous food streets of randomly selected five towns of Karachi. Three consecutive stool samples were collected from each food handler in Carry Blair transport media. Culture, biochemical identification, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests for S. enterica serovars were done. Out of 220 food handlers, 209 consented to participate, and among them, 19 (9.1%) were positive for S. enterica serovars. Serotyping of these isolates showed that 9 (4.3%) were typhoidal S. serovars while 10 (4.7%) were non-typhoidal S. serovars. Of the typhoidal S. serovars, 7 were S. enterica serovar Typhi and 1 each of S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A and B. The resistance pattern of these isolates showed that 77.7% were resistant to ampicillin and 11.1% to cotrimoxazole. All typhoidal S. enterica serovar isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, cefixime, nalidixic acid, and ofloxacin. Carrier rate of typhoidal S. enterica serovars in food handlers working in different food streets of Karachi is very high. These food handlers might be contributing to the high endemicity of typhoid fever in Karachi, Pakistan.

  9. Molecular fingerprinting of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, M. D.; Ward, L. R.; Rowe, B.; Threlfall, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    For epidemiologic investigations, the primary subdivision of Salmonella Typhi is vi-phage typing; 106 Vi-phage types are defined. For multidrug-resistant strains the most common types have been M1 (Pakistan) and E1 (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Arabian Gulf); a strain untypable with the Vi phages has been responsible for a major epidemic in Tajikistan. Most often, isolates from the Indian subcontinent have been resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim; but in the 1997 Tajikistan outbreak, the epidemic strain was also resistant to ciprofloxacin. For multidrug-resistant strains, subdivision within phage type can be achieved by plasmid profile typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. PMID:9621206

  10. Identification of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium isolates that have an antibiotic-induced invasion phenotype

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is an important food safety issue in humans and animals. The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) has reported that 27.3% of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates in humans were resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics...

  11. Ferrioxamine-Mediated Iron(III) Utilization by Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Robert A.; Reissbrodt, Rolf; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Ketley, Julian M.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Everest, Paul; Dougan, Gordon; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Roberts, Mark; Williams, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    Utilization of ferrioxamines as sole sources of iron distinguishes Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis from a number of related species, including Escherichia coli. Ferrioxamine supplements have therefore been used in preenrichment and selection media to increase the bacterial growth rate while selectivity is maintained. We characterized the determinants involved in utilization of ferrioxamines B, E, and G by S. enterica serotype Typhimurium by performing siderophore cross-feeding bioassays. Transport of all three ferric siderophores across the outer membrane was dependent on the FoxA receptor encoded by the Fur-repressible foxA gene. However, only the transport of ferrioxamine G was dependent on the energy-transducing protein TonB, since growth stimulation of a tonB strain by ferrioxamines B and E was observed, albeit at lower efficiencies than in the parental strain. Transport across the inner membrane was dependent on the periplasmic binding protein-dependent ABC transporter complex comprising FhuBCD, as has been reported for other hydroxamate siderophores of enteric bacteria. The distribution of the foxA gene in the genus Salmonella, as indicated by DNA hybridization studies and correlated with the ability to utilize ferrioxamine E, was restricted to subspecies I, II, and IIIb, and this gene was absent from subspecies IIIa, IV, VI, and VII (formerly subspecies IV) and Salmonella bongori (formerly subspecies V). S. enterica serotype Typhimurium mutants with either a transposon insertion or a defined nonpolar frameshift (+2) mutation in the foxA gene were not able to utilize any of the three ferrioxamines tested. A strain carrying the nonpolar foxA mutation exhibited a significantly reduced ability to colonize rabbit ileal loops compared to the foxA+ parent. In addition, a foxA mutant was markedly attenuated in mice inoculated by either the intragastric or intravenous route. Mice inoculated with the foxA mutant were protected against

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Tonsil and Jejunum with Lymph Node Tissues of Slaughtered Swine in Metro Manila, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kamela Charmaine S.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2014-01-01

    Due to frequent antibiotic exposure, swine is now recognized as potential risk in disseminating drug-resistant Salmonella enterica strains. This study thus subjected 20 randomly selected S. enterica isolates from tonsil and jejunum with lymph node (JLN) tissues of swine slaughtered in Metro Manila, Philippines, to VITEK 2 antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST). The test revealed all 20 isolates had resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent, in which highest occurrence of resistance was to amikacin (100%), cefazolin (100%), cefuroxime (100%), cefuroxime axetil (100%), cefoxitin (100%), and gentamicin (100%), followed by ampicillin (50%), and then by sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim (30%). Three multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates were detected. The sole S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolate showed resistance to 12 different antibiotics including ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, amikacin, gentamicin, and tigecycline. This study is the first to report worldwide on the novel resistance to tigecycline of MDR S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolated from swine tonsil tissues. This finding poses huge therapeutic challenge since MDR S. enterica infections are associated with increased rate of hospitalization or death. Thus, continual regulation of antimicrobial use in food animals and prediction of resistant serotypes are crucial to limit the spread of MDR S. enterica isolates among hogs and humans. PMID:24724034

  13. The Cytolethal Distending Toxin Produced by Nontyphoidal Salmonella Serotypes Javiana, Montevideo, Oranienburg, and Mississippi Induces DNA Damage in a Manner Similar to That of Serotype Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Select nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) serotypes were recently found to encode the Salmonella cytolethal distending toxin (S-CDT), an important virulence factor for serotype Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever. Using a PCR-based assay, we determined that among 21 NTS serotypes causing the majority of food-borne salmonellosis cases in the United States, genes encoding S-CDT are conserved in isolates representing serotypes Javiana, Montevideo, and Oranienburg but that among serotype Mississippi isolates, the presence of S-CDT-encoding genes is clade associated. HeLa cells infected with representative strains of these S-CDT-positive serotypes had a significantly higher proportion of cells arrested in the G2/M phase than HeLa cells infected with representative strains of S-CDT-negative serotypes Typhimurium, Newport, and Enteritidis. The G2/M cell cycle arrest was dependent on CdtB, the active subunit of S-CDT, as infection with isogenic ΔcdtB mutants abolished their ability to induce a G2/M cell cycle arrest. Infection with S-CDT-encoding serotypes was significantly associated with activation of the host cell’s DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that is important for detecting and repairing damaged DNA. HeLa cell populations infected with S-CDT-positive serotypes had a significantly higher proportion of cells with DDR protein 53BP1 and γH2AX foci than cells infected with either S-CDT-negative serotypes or isogenic ΔcdtB strains. Intoxication with S-CDT occurred via autocrine and paracrine pathways, as uninfected HeLa cells among populations of infected cells also had an activated DDR. Overall, we show that S-CDT plays a significant role in the cellular outcome of infection with NTS serotypes. PMID:27999166

  14. Characterization of class 1 integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates from foodstuff and related sources

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Vinicius B.; Lincopan, Nilton; Landgraf, Mariza; Franco, Bernadete D.G.M.; Destro, Maria T.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, an increase in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among Salmonella enterica has been observed in several countries, which is worrisome because S. enterica is one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The aim of this study was to characterize class 1 integrons and antibiotic resistance genotypes in Salmonella enterica isolates recovered from foodstuff and related sources. Nineteen multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica isolates were recovered. Higher resistance rates to tetracycline (90%), streptomycin (80%), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (80%), ampicillin (60%) and nalidixic acid (70%) were related to the presence of the tetA, aadA, sul1/sul2, blaTEM-1 genes, and a codon mutation at position 83 of the gyrA gene, respectively. Class 1 integrons harboring aadA, blaTEM-1, sul1 or dhfr1 genes were detected in nine (45%) Salmonella enterica strains belonging to serotypes Brandenburg, Panama, Agona, Mbandaka and Alachua. Finally, clonal dissemination of S. Panama, S. Derby and S. Mbandaka was confirmed by PFGE. Detection of clonally related MDR Salmonella enterica suggests that endemic serotypes can be supported by class 1 integron-borne gene cassettes and/or mutations in drug targets. Emergence and dissemination of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica can have a major public health impact in an environment where large-scale suppliers ship their products. PMID:24031680

  15. Substructure within Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolates from Australian Wildlife▿

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sandra K.; Bull, C. Michael; Gordon, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing of 56 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica strains isolated from Australian wildlife hosts was performed. The results of population assignment algorithms revealed that the 56 strains could be subdivided into two distinct clades. Strains belonging to the two clades were further distinguished phenotypically, genotypically, and with respect to host distribution. PMID:21378038

  16. Population structure of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (subspecies 1)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We sequenced and assembled 354 new Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica genomes. These genomes were chosen to maximize genetic diversity, representing at least 100 different serovars and distinct PFGE patterns within these serovars. 119 of the strains were of known antibiotic resistance,...

  17. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of bovine Salmonella enterica isolates submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory: 2006-2015.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, J R; Sethi, A K; Aulik, N A; Poulsen, K P

    2017-02-01

    Salmonellosis on the dairy continues to have a significant effect on animal health and productivity and in the United States. Additionally, Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica causes an estimated 1.2 million cases of human illness annually. Contributing to the morbidity and mortality in both human and domestic animal species is emergence of antimicrobial resistance by Salmonella species and increased incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates. This study describes serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns for various Salmonella serotypes isolated from bovine samples submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (WVDL) over the past 10 yr. Salmonella serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing data were obtained from the laboratory information management system at WVDL. Data from accessions were limited to bovine samples submitted to the WVDL between January 2006 and June 2015 and those that had both a definitive serotype and complete results for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 4,976 isolates were identified. Salmonella enterica ser. Dublin was the most prevalent serotype identified among bovine samples submitted to the WVDL, accounting for a total of 1,153 isolates (23% of total isolates) over the study period. Along with Dublin, Salmonella enterica ser. Cerro (795, 16%), Newport (720, 14%), Montevideo (421, 8%), Kentucky (419, 8%), and Typhimurium (202, 4%) comprised the top 6 most commonly isolated serotypes during that time. Overall, resistance of bovine Salmonella isolates in the study population remained stable, although decreases in resistance were noted for gentamicin, neomycin, and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole during the study period. All isolates remained susceptible to enrofloxacin. These data show that antimicrobial susceptibility for bovine Salmonella has changed in the population served by WVDL in the past 10 yr. This information is important for understanding Salmonella disease ecology in

  18. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of a selection of Salmonella enterica strains of various origins isolated in Spain].

    PubMed

    Cruchaga, S; Echeita, A; Usera, M A

    1999-09-01

    The widespread use of antimicrobials in human and veterinary practice is increasingly causing the emergence of different multidrug-resistant human pathogens. This situation makes treating infections caused by these microorganisms difficult. Salmonella enterica is an ubiquitous organism and may be a good indicator of the influence of the use and abuse of antimicrobials on the appearance of multiresistant strains. One hundred and ninety S. enterica strains of different origins isolated in Spain in 1996 were randomly selected. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was studied using the agar dilution method according to NCCLS criteria in the following antimicrobials: ampicillin, ticarcillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefazolin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, imipenem, gentamicin, apramycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and co-trimoxazole. Sixty-three percent of the S. enterica tested were resistant and 24% were multiresistant. The percentage of resistant and multiresistant strains of S. enterica of human origin was slightly higher than those of nonhuman origin. Statistically, ampicillin, ticarcillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid were significantly more resistant in strains of human origin. Ninety-one percent of the strains of Typhimurium serotype and phagotype 104 were multiresistant. The Salmonella Typhimurium serotype and phagotype 104 ACSTSu-resistant clone, which is widespread in various Western countries, was also isolated in this study. The use of different antimicrobials in human and veterinary practice needs to be rationalized.

  19. Persistence of Salmonella enterica during dehydration and subsequent cold storage.

    PubMed

    Gruzdev, Nadia; Pinto, Riky; Sela Saldinger, Shlomo

    2012-12-01

    Despite the fact that Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium SL 1344 has served as a model pathogen in many studies, information regarding its desiccation response is still scarce. In this study, we investigated environmental conditions that affect Salmonella survival following dehydration and subsequent cold storage, using a 96-well polystyrene plate model. The SL 1344 strain exhibited high survival compared with other Typhimurium isolates and S. enterica serotypes. Further characterization of desiccation tolerance in this strain revealed that temperature, stationary-phase of growth, solid medium, and the presence of increasing NaCl concentrations (0.5-5.0%) in the growth medium enhanced desiccation tolerance. Dehydration at basic pHs (8-10), or in trehalose, sucrose, but not in glycine-betaine, improved bacterial persistence. Dehydrated Salmonella survived over 100 weeks at 4 °C with a ∼5-log reduction in numbers. However, viability staining revealed only a ∼50% reduction in viable cells, suggesting bacterial transition into a viable-but-not-cultivable state (VBNC). Addition of chloramphenicol reduced bacterial survival implying that adaptation to desiccation stress requires de-novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this finding, shortening the dehydration time resulted in lower survival. This study emphasizes the impact of environmental conditions on the fate of dried Salmonella in the food chain and highlights the potential transition of the pathogen to the VBNC state. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Subtyping of Salmonella Food Isolates Suggests the Geographic Clustering of Serotype Telaviv.

    PubMed

    Durul, Bora; Acar, Sinem; Bulut, Ece; Kyere, Emmanuel O; Soyer, Yeşim

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is commonly found in a variety of food products and is a major cause of bacterial foodborne illness throughout the world. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and diversity of Salmonella in eight different food types: sheep ground meat, cow ground meat, chicken meat, cow offal, traditional Sanliurfa cheese, unripened feta cheese, pistachios, and isot (a spice blend of dried red peppers specific to Sanliurfa), traditionally and commonly consumed in Turkey. Among 192 food samples, Salmonella was detected in 59 samples, with the highest prevalence in raw poultry parts (58%) and offal (58%) samples, while Salmonella was not detected in pistachios and dried red pepper. Resultant Salmonella isolates were characterized by serotyping, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ten different serotypes represented 10 MLST sequence types (STs) with 1 novel ST and 17 PFGE types. Antimicrobial resistance profiling revealed that 30.5% of the isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Telaviv, which is rare throughout the world, was the second most common serotype isolated from food samples in this study, suggesting that this serotype might be one of the subtypes that is endemic to Turkey.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  2. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (P<0.05) in aerobiosis than in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis. Cellulose production and RDAR (red, dry, and rough) were expressed only in aerobiosis. In microaerobiosis, the strains expressed the SAW (smooth and white) morphotype, while in anaerobiosis the colonies appeared small and red. The expression of genes involved in cellulose synthesis (csgD and adrA) and quorum sensing (sdiA and luxS) was reduced in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis in all S. enterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres.

  3. Comparative Genomics of 28 Salmonella enterica Isolates: Evidence for CRISPR-Mediated Adaptive Sublineage Evolution ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, W. Florian; Mammel, Mark K.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Tartera, Carmen; White, David G.; LeClerc, J. Eugene; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive surveillance, food-borne Salmonella enterica infections continue to be a significant burden on public health systems worldwide. As the S. enterica species comprises sublineages that differ greatly in antigenic representation, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, a better understanding of the species' evolution is critical for the prediction and prevention of future outbreaks. The roles that virulence and resistance phenotype acquisition, exchange, and loss play in the evolution of S. enterica sublineages, which to a certain extent are represented by serotypes, remains mostly uncharacterized. Here, we compare 17 newly sequenced and phenotypically characterized nontyphoidal S. enterica strains to 11 previously sequenced S. enterica genomes to carry out the most comprehensive comparative analysis of this species so far. These phenotypic and genotypic data comparisons in the phylogenetic species context suggest that the evolution of known S. enterica sublineages is mediated mostly by two mechanisms, (i) the loss of coding sequences with known metabolic functions, which leads to functional reduction, and (ii) the acquisition of horizontally transferred phage and plasmid DNA, which provides virulence and resistance functions and leads to increasing specialization. Matches between S. enterica clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), part of a defense mechanism against invading plasmid and phage DNA, and plasmid and prophage regions suggest that CRISPR-mediated immunity could control short-term phenotype changes and mediate long-term sublineage evolution. CRISPR analysis could therefore be critical in assessing the evolutionary potential of S. enterica sublineages and aid in the prediction and prevention of future S. enterica outbreaks. PMID:21602358

  4. Ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Choleraesuis from Pigs to Humans, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lee-Jene; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Chang, Chao-Fu; Wan, Jen-Hsien; Yan, Jing-Jou; Lee, Chun-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Huang, Wen-Kuei; Yang, Dine; Shyr, Jainn-Ming; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Wang, Li-Shin; Lu, Jang-Jih; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Feng-Yee; Yang, Yi-Chueh; Lau, Yeu-Jun; Liu, Yung-Ching; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the disk susceptibility data of 671 nontyphoid Salmonella isolates collected from different parts of Taiwan from March 2001 to August 2001 and 1,261 nontyphoid Salmonella isolates from the National Taiwan University Hospital from 1996 to 2001. Overall, ciprofloxacn resistance was found in 2.7% (18/671) of all nontyphoid Salmonella isolates, in 1.4% (5/347) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and in 7.5% (8/107) in S. enterica serotype Choleraesuis nationwide. MICs of six newer fluoroquinolones were determined for the following isolates: 37 isolates of ciprofloxacin-resistant (human) S. enterica Typhimurium (N = 26) and Choleraesuis (N = 11), 10 isolates of ciprofloxacin-susceptible (MIC <1 μg/mL) (human) isolates of these two serotypes, and 15 swine isolates from S. enterica Choleraesuis (N = 13) and Typhmurium (N = 2) with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC >0.12 μg/mL). Sequence analysis of the gryA, gyrB, parC, parE, and acrR genes, ciprofloxacin accumulation; and genotypes generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with three restriction enzymes (SpeI, XbaI, and BlnI) were performed. All 26 S. enterica Typhimurium isolates from humans and pigs belonged to genotype I. For S. enterica Choleraesuis isolates, 91% (10/11) of human isolates and 54% (7/13) of swine isolates belonged to genotype B. These two genotypes isolates from humans all exhibited a high-level of resistance to ciprofloxacin (MIC 16–64 μg/mL). They had two-base substitutions in the gyrA gene at codons 83 (Ser83Phe) and 87 (Asp87Gly or Asp87Asn) and in the parC gene at codon 80 (Ser80Arg, Ser80Ile, or Ser84Lys). Our investigation documented that not only did these two S. enterica isolates have a high prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance nationwide but also that some closely related ciprofloxacin-resistant strains are disseminated from pigs to humans. PMID:15078598

  5. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella enterica transmission associated with starling-livestock interactions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, James C; Hyatt, Doreene R; Ellis, Jeremy W; Pipkin, David R; Mangan, Anna M; Russell, Michael; Bolte, Denise S; Engeman, Richard M; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Linz, George M

    2015-08-31

    Bird-livestock interactions have been implicated as potential sources for bacteria within concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO). European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in particular are known to contaminate cattle feed and water with Salmonella enterica through their fecal waste. We propose that fecal waste is not the only mechanisms through which starlings introduce S. enterica to CAFO. The goal of this study was to assess if starlings can mechanically move S. enterica. We define mechanical movement as the transportation of media containing S. enterica, on the exterior of starlings within CAFO. We collected 100 starlings and obtained external wash and gastrointestinal tract (GI) samples. We also collected 100 samples from animal pens. Within each pen we collected one cattle fecal, feed, and water trough sample. Isolates from all S. enterica positive samples were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All sample types, including 17% of external starling wash samples, contained S. enterica. All sample types had at least one antimicrobial resistant (AMR) isolate and starling GI samples harbored multidrug resistant S. enterica. The serotypes isolated from the starling external wash samples were all found in the farm environment and 11.8% (2/17) of isolates from positive starling external wash samples were resistant to at least one class of antibiotics. This study provides evidence of a potential mechanism of wildlife introduced microbial contamination in CAFO. Mechanical movement of microbiological hazards, by starlings, should be considered a potential source of bacteria that is of concern to veterinary, environmental and public health. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates throughout an integrated broiler supply chain in China.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Li, M; Xu, C; Cui, K; Feng, Z; Fu, Y; Zhang, J; Liao, M

    2016-10-01

    A total of 1145 samples were collected from chicken breeder farms, hatcheries, broiler farms, a slaughterhouse and retail refrigerated chicken stores in an integrated broiler supply chain in Guangdong Province, China, in 2013. One-hundred and two Salmonella enterica strains were isolated and subjected to serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, virulence profile determination and molecular subtyping by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The contamination rates in samples from breeder farms, hatcheries, broiler farms, the slaughterhouse and retail stores were 1·46%, 4·31%, 7·00%, 62·86% and 54·67%, respectively. The isolated strains of S. enterica belonged to 10 serotypes; most of them were S. Weltevreden (46·08%, 47/102) and S. Agona (18·63%, 19/102). Isolates were frequently resistant to streptomycin (38·2%), tetracycline (36·3%), sulfisoxazole (35·3%) and gentamicin (34·3%); 31·4% of isolates were multidrug resistant. The isolates were screened for 10 virulence factors. The Salmonella pathogenicity island genes avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, and sopB and the fimbrial gene bcfC were present in 100% of the strains. PFGE genotyping of the 102 S. enterica isolates yielded 24 PFGE types at an 85% similarity threshold. The PFGE patterns show that the genotypes of S. enterica in the production chain are very diverse, but some strains have 100% similarity in different parts of the production chain, which indicates that some S. enterica persist throughout the broiler supply chain.

  7. Diversity of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Strains Associated with Cattle at Harvest in the United States ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M.; Arthur, Terrance M.; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Koohmaraie , Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and diversity of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica strains associated with cattle at harvest in the United States were examined. Hides and carcasses of cattle were sampled at processing plants (n = 6) located in four geographically distant regions from July 2005 to April 2006. The mean prevalences of Salmonella on hides, preevisceration carcasses (immediately after hide removal), and postintervention carcasses (in the chiller and after the full complement of interventions) were 89.6%, 50.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. The values for MDR Salmonella enterica strains (defined as those resistant to two or more antimicrobials) as percentages of Salmonella prevalence were 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.3 to 25.1%; median percent prevalence, 6.9%), 11.7% (95% CI, 4.4 to 19.0%; median, 4.8%), and 0.33% (95% CI, −0.3 to 0.70%; median, 0%), respectively. In this study, 16,218 Salmonella hide and carcass isolates were screened for antimicrobial resistance. Of these, 978 (6.0%) unique MDR S. enterica isolates were identified and serotyped and their XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles determined. The predominant MDR S. enterica serotypes observed were Newport (53.1%), Typhimurium (16.6%), and Uganda (10.9%). Differences in MDR S. enterica prevalence were detected, and PFGE analysis revealed both epidemic clusters (profiles found in plants in multiple regions/seasons) and endemic clusters (profiles observed in plants in limited regions/seasons) within several of the MDR serotypes examined. Despite these differences, multiple-hurdle processing interventions employed at all plants were found to be quite effective and decreased Salmonella carcass contamination by 98.4% (95% CI, 97.6 to 99.7%). PMID:21239549

  8. Comparison of phenotypic traits and genetic relatedness of Salmonella enterica subspecies arizonae isolates from a colony of ridgenose rattlesnakes with osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Owston, Michael A; Lickey, Adrienne L A; Kania, Stephen A; Ebner, Paul; Rohrbach, Barton W; Ramsay, Edward C

    2003-07-01

    Reptiles are well-known sources of human Salmonella infections; however, little is known about the ability of Salmonella to cause disease in reptiles. Thirty-seven isolates of Salmonella enterica subspecies arizonae (S. arizonae) were obtained from retrospective and prospective studies of a closed colony of ridgenose rattlesnakes (Crotalus willardi) with osteomyelitis. All isolates (N = 7) from bone lesions were of a single serotype, 56:z4,z23, and this serotype was found on only 1 occasion among 8 other serotypes isolated from 21 cloacal and intestinal samples. The remainder (N = 7) of serotype 56:z4,z23 isolates were from other extraintestinal sites, including liver, ovary, blood, and testis. S. arizonae isolates were susceptible to most antimicrobials, and plasmid profiles did not correlate with serotype or antimicrobial resistance. Isolates of the 56:z4,z23 serotype (N = 14) formed a tight cluster with 95% similarity by XbaI macrorestriction analysis. Individual isolates of serotypes, 56:z4,z23, 38:(k)-z35, and 48:i-z invaded HeLa cells but an isolate of serotype 50:r-z did not. The same individual isolates of serotype 56:z4,z23 and 48:i-z also invaded viper heart cells. The Salmonella InvA gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in all S. arizonae serotypes tested, including 5 serotype 56:z4,z23 isolates and individual isolates of serotypes 48:i-z and 50:r-z. A source or possible explanation for increased virulence of S. arizonae serotype 56:z4,z23 in this unique host has not been found.

  9. High occurrence and unusual serotype diversity of non-typhoidal Salmonella in non-clinical niches, Angola.

    PubMed

    Antunes, P; Campos, J; Mourão, J; Ribeiro, T G; Novais, C; Peixe, L

    2017-04-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella is an important burden, particularly in developing countries of the African region. We report for the first time in Angola, a sub-Saharan African country with commercial/travel relationships with Europe, an unexpectedly high occurrence of Salmonella (n = 12/63, 19%) from a high diversity of sources, particularly farm and wild animals. The detection of diverse serotypes (n = 12), involving putative new S. enterica subsp. salamae serotypes, is also of note, reinforcing the need for a comprehensive surveillance in Angola critical to identify animal/food/environmental sources of salmonellosis with impact on animal health, local people, tourists and exported products.

  10. Investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport infection.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W N; Gillespie, I A; Smyth, F B; Rooney, P J; McClenaghan, A; Devine, M J; Tohani, V K

    2009-10-01

    A large outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport infection occurred in Northern Ireland during September and October 2004. Typing of isolates from patients confirmed that this strain was indistinguishable from that in concurrent outbreaks in regions of England, in Scotland and in the Isle of Man. A total of 130 cases were distributed unequally across local government district areas in Northern Ireland. The epidemic curve suggested a continued exposure over about 4 weeks. A matched case-control study of 23 cases and 39 controls found a statistically significant association with a history of having eaten lettuce in a meal outside the home and being a case (odds ratio 23.7, 95% confidence interval 1.4-404.3). This exposure was reported by 57% of cases. Although over 300 food samples were tested, none yielded any Salmonella spp. Complexity and limited traceability in salad vegetable distribution hindered further investigation of the ultimate source of the outbreak.

  11. Salmonella enterica isolates from pasture-raised poultry exhibit antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons.

    PubMed

    Melendez, S N; Hanning, I; Han, J; Nayak, R; Clement, A R; Wooming, A; Hererra, P; Jones, F T; Foley, S L; Ricke, S C

    2010-12-01

    While considerable foodborne pathogen research has been conducted on conventionally produced broilers and turkeys, few studies have focused on free-range (organic) or pastured poultry. The current surveillance study was designed to isolate, identify and genetically characterize Salmonella from pastured poultry farm environment and from retail samples. In this study, 59 isolates were collected from two pastured poultry farms (n = 164; pens, feed, water and insect traps) and retail carcasses (n = 36) from a local natural foods store and a local processing plant. All isolates were serotyped and analysed phenotypically (antimicrobial resistance profiles) and genotypically (DNA fingerprints, plasmid profiles and integron analysis). Salmonella enterica was detected using standard microbiological methods. Salmonella Kentucky was the most prevalent serotype detected from the sampled sources (53%), followed by Salmonella Enteritidis (24%), Bareilly (10%), Mbandaka (7%), Montevideo (5%) or Newport (2%). All isolates were resistant to sulfisoxazole and novobiocin, and the majority (40/59) possessed class I integrons shown by PCR detection. Each Salmonella serotype elicited a distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprint profile, and unique differences were observed among the serotypes.  The findings of this study show that Salmonella serotypes isolated from pasture-raised poultry exhibit antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons.  This study demonstrates that despite the cessation of antibiotic usage in poultry production, antibiotic resistant Salmonella may still be recovered from the environment and poultry products. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Optimal Serotype Compositions for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination under Serotype Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nurhonen, Markku; Auranen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination has proved highly effective in eliminating vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage and disease. However, the potential adverse effects of serotype replacement remain a major concern when implementing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccination programmes. Applying a concise predictive model, we present a ready-to-use quantitative tool to investigate the implications of serotype replacement on the net effectiveness of vaccination against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and to guide in the selection of optimal vaccine serotype compositions. We utilise pre-vaccination data on pneumococcal carriage and IPD and assume partial or complete elimination of vaccine-type carriage, its replacement by non-vaccine-type carriage, and stable case-to-carrier ratios (probability of IPD per carriage episode). The model predicts that the post-vaccination IPD incidences in Finland for currently available vaccine serotype compositions can eventually decrease among the target age group of children <5 years of age by 75%. However, due to replacement through herd effects, the decrease among the older population is predicted to be much less (20–40%). We introduce a sequential algorithm for the search of optimal serotype compositions and assess the robustness of inferences to uncertainties in data and assumptions about carriage and IPD. The optimal serotype composition depends on the age group of interest and some serotypes may be highly beneficial vaccine types in one age category (e.g. 6B in children), while being disadvantageous in another. The net effectiveness will be improved only if the added serotype has a higher case-to-carrier ratio than the average case-to-carrier ratio of the current non-vaccine types and the degree of improvement in effectiveness depends on the carriage incidence of the serotype. The serotype compositions of currently available pneumococcal vaccines are not optimal and the effectiveness of vaccination in the

  13. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Saintpaul, and Stanleyville from the SARA/SARB Collection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Roberts, Richard J.; Allard, Marc W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this announcement, we report the complete genome and methylome sequences of three Salmonella enterica strains from the SARA and SARB collection: S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (SARA13), S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Saintpaul (SARA26), and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Stanleyville (SARB61). PMID:28302778

  14. The taxonomic structure of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of food-borne bacterial infection in humans and has a high economic burden in agriculture. Strains differ by sequence additions and losses of up to ~10% of each genome. In the last few decades, some serovars have become more common. Many strains have acquired...

  15. Integrative analysis of Salmonellosis in Israel reveals association of Salmonella enterica Serovar 9,12:l,v:- with extraintestinal infections, dissemination of endemic S. enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104 biotypes, and severe underreporting of outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Marzel, Alex; Desai, Prerak T; Nissan, Israel; Schorr, Yosef Ilan; Suez, Jotham; Valinsky, Lea; Reisfeld, Abraham; Agmon, Vered; Guard, Jean; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading etiologic agent of bacterial food-borne outbreaks worldwide. This ubiquitous species contains more than 2,600 serovars that may differ in their host specificity, clinical manifestations, and epidemiology. To characterize salmonellosis epidemiology in Israel and to study the association of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars with invasive infections, 48,345 Salmonella cases reported and serotyped at the National Salmonella Reference Center between 1995 and 2012 were analyzed. A quasi-Poisson regression was used to identify irregular clusters of illness, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in conjunction with whole-genome sequencing was applied to molecularly characterize strains of interest. Three hundred twenty-nine human salmonellosis clusters were identified, representing an annual average of 23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 20 to 26) potential outbreaks. We show that the previously unsequenced S. enterica serovar 9,12:l,v:- belongs to the B clade of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica, and we show its frequent association with extraintestinal infections, compared to other NTS serovars. Furthermore, we identified the dissemination of two prevalent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 clones in Israel, which are genetically distinct from other global DT104 isolates. Accumulatively, these findings indicate a severe underreporting of Salmonella outbreaks in Israel and provide insights into the epidemiology and genomics of prevalent serovars, responsible for recurring illness.

  16. Impact of commercial preharvest transportation and holding on the prevalence of Salmonella enterica in cull sows.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S T; McKean, J D; Hurd, H S; Rostagno, M H; Griffith, R W; Wesley, I V

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of Salmonella enterica in cull sows at various stages from the farm to the abattoir. Cull sows (n=181) were sampled over 10 weeks. Fecal samples (10 g each) were collected on the farm ca. 24 h before loading and at the live-hog market ca. 3 h before loading. Samples (ileocecal lymph nodes, cecal contents, feces from the transverse colon, ventral thoracic lymph nodes, subiliac lymph nodes, sponge swabs of the left and right carcass sections, and chopped meat) were collected at the abattoir. The percentages of positive fecal samples on the farm and at the live-hog market were 3% (5 of 181 samples) and 2% (3 of 181 samples), respectively. After transport from the live-hog market (10 h) and holding at the abattoir (6 h), 41% (74 of 180) of cull sows yielded S. enterica in one or more sampled tissues. The isolation rate for total cecal contents (33%; 60 of 180 samples) was significantly (P<0.05) higher than those for ileocecal lymph nodes (7%; 12 of 181 samples), feces (11%; 20 of 181 samples), and ventral thoracic and subiliac lymph nodes (2%; 4 of 181 samples). Before a 2% lactic acid carcass wash (lasting 8 to 9 s), 14% (25 of 180) of carcasses were positive, compared with 7% (12 of 179) after the wash (P<0.05). Two S. enterica serotypes, Derby and Infantis, were found on the farm and at the live-hog market. At the abattoir, 12 serotypes that had not previously been found on the farm or at the live-hog market were recovered. The results of this study demonstrate that transport and holding practices may contribute to an increase in S. enterica infection prior to slaughter to levels much higher than those found on the farm.

  17. Enrichment, Amplification, and Sequence-Based Typing of Salmonella enterica and Other Foodborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Edlind, Tom; Brewster, Jeffrey D; Paoli, George C

    2017-01-01

    Detection of Salmonella enterica in foods typically involves microbiological enrichment, molecular-based assay, and subsequent isolation and identification of a pure culture. This is ideally followed by strain typing, which provides information critical to the investigation of outbreaks and the attribution of their sources. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is the "gold standard" for S. enterica strain typing, but its limitations have encouraged the search for alternative methods, including whole genome sequencing. Both methods typically require a pure culture, which adds to the cost and turnaround time. A more rapid and cost-effective method with sufficient discriminatory power would benefit food industries, regulatory agencies, and public health laboratories. To address this need, a novel enrichment, amplification, and sequence-based typing (EAST) approach was developed involving (i) overnight enrichment and total DNA preparation, (ii) amplification of polymorphic tandem repeat-containing loci with electrophoretic detection, and (iii) DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to identify related strains. EAST requires 3 days or less and provides a strain resolution that exceeds serotyping and is comparable to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Evaluation with spiked ground turkey demonstrated its sensitivity (with a starting inoculum of ≤1 CFU/g) and specificity (with unique or nearly unique alleles relative to databases of >1,000 strains). In tests with unspiked retail chicken parts, 3 of 11 samples yielded S. enterica -specific PCR products. Sequence analysis of three distinct typing targets (SeMT1, SeCRISPR1, and SeCRISPR2) revealed consistent similarities to specific serotype Schwarzengrund, Montevideo, and Typhimurium strains. EAST provides a time-saving and cost-effective approach for detecting and typing foodborne S. enterica , and postenrichment steps can be commercially outsourced to facilitate its implementation. Initial studies with Listeria

  18. [Antibiotic resistance and virulence factors in clinical Salmonella enterica isolates].

    PubMed

    de Toro, María; Seral, Cristina; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, F Javier; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    The increase of Salmonella enterica isolates multi-resistant to different antibiotics, including β-lactams and fluoroquinolones, is a problem of clinical importance. The dissemination of Salmonella Typhimurium resistant to ampicillin (AMP)-chloramphenicol (CHL)-streptomycin (STR)-sulphonamides and (SUL)-tetracycline (TET), that harbour the Salmonella Genomic Island type 1 (SGI1), and the acquisition of transferable genetic material have favoured the multi-resistance in this genus. A total of 114 clinical S.enterica isolates were studied (period 2009-2010). The susceptibility to 20 antibiotics was determined by disc diffusion and microdilution. The antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and the integrons were analysed by PCR, and sequencing in the AMP(R) isolates. In all the blaPSE-1-positive isolates, the clonal relationship was determined by PFGE, as well as the presence of SGI1 and 29 virulence genes by PCR. Eighteen different serotypes were found among the 114 isolates studied, Typhimurium (61%) and Enteritidis (16%) being the most prevalent. High percentages of resistance to SUL (68%), TET (58%), AMP (55%) and STR (46%) were observed. The great majority (92%) of 63 AMP(R) isolates were multi-resistant, with the AMP-STR-TET-SUL phenotype (19 isolates) being the most frequent one and associated with the blaTEM-1b+strA-strB+tet(B)+sul2 genotype. Class 1 integrons (7 different structures) were observed in 48% AMP(R) isolates, highlighting the blaOXA-1+aadA1 structure (8 isolates), one empty integron and non-classical integrons (5 isolates). The blaPSE-1 gene was detected inside the classical SGI1 structure in 13 clonally-related isolates that showed the same virulence profile. The high percentage of multi-resistant S.enterica isolates, especially associated to S.Typhimurium, to the AMP, STR, TET and SUL phenotype, and to the blaTEM-1b+strA-strB+tet(B)+sul2 genotype, shows an important risk of possible failures in the treatment of serious infections caused by this

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Bardo Strain CRJJGF_00099 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sushim K.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Charlene R.; Desai, Prerak T.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hiott, Lari M.; Humayoun, Shaheen B.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a 4.87-Mbp draft genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Bardo strain CRJJGF_00099, isolated from dairy cattle in 2005. PMID:27634995

  20. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  1. Biofilm formation of Salmonella serotypes in simulated meat processing environments and its relationship to cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huhu; Ding, Shijie; Dong, Yang; Ye, Keping; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-10-01

    Salmonella attached to meat contact surfaces encountered in meat processing facilities may serve as a source of cross-contamination. In this study, the influence of serotypes and media on biofilm formation of Salmonella was investigated in a simulated meat processing environment, and the relationships between biofilm formation and cell characteristics were also determined. All six serotypes (Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg, Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Indiana, Salmonella Infantis, and Salmonella Typhimurium) can readily form biofilms on stainless steel surfaces, and the amounts of biofilms were significantly influenced by the serotypes, incubation media, and incubation time used in this study. Significant differences in cell surface hydrophobicity, autoaggregation, motility, and growth kinetic parameters were observed between individual serotypes tested. Except for growth kinetic parameters, the cell characteristics were correlated with the ability of biofilm formation incubated in tryptic soy broth, whereas no correlation with biofilm formation incubated in meat thawing-loss broth (an actual meat substrate) was found. Salmonella grown in meat thawing-loss broth showed a "cloud-shaped" morphology in the mature biofilm, whereas when grown in tryptic soy broth it had a "reticulum-shaped" appearance. Our study provides some practical information to understand the process of biofilm formation on meat processing contact surfaces.

  2. Ancient typhoid epidemic reveals possible ancestral strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Papagrigorakis, Manolis J; Synodinos, Philippos N; Yapijakis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to other serotypes of Salmonella enterica, S. Typhi is exclusively adapted to human hosts. Recently, S. Typhi was identified in ancient skeletal material, thereby incriminating typhoid fever for the Plague of Athens. Since, according to Thucydides' report, animals were also affected by the disease, a working hypothesis is constituted that the causative agent of the Plague might be the anticipated original strain of S. Typhi, purportedly capable of infecting animals as well as humans. Possible future sequencing of the discovered ancient strain of S. Typhi may help towards identifying its genomic differences responsible for its modern specification to humans.

  3. Acquisition of Resistance to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Newport and Escherichia coli in the Turkey Poult Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C.; Martin, L. C.; Gyles, C. L.; Reid-Smith, R.; Boerlin, P.; McEwen, S. A.; Prescott, J. F.; Forward, K. R.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Newport resistant to the extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) and other antimicrobials causes septicemic salmonellosis in humans and animals and is increasingly isolated from humans, animals, foods, and environmental sources. Mechanisms whereby serovar Newport bacteria become resistant to ESCs and other classes of antimicrobials while inhabiting the intestinal tract are not well understood. The present study shows that 25.3% of serovar Newport strains isolated from the turkey poult intestinal tract after the animals were dosed with Escherichia coli harboring a large conjugative plasmid encoding the CMY-2 β-lactamase and other drug resistance determinants acquired the plasmid and its associated drug resistance genes. The conjugative plasmid containing the cmy-2 gene was transferred not only from the donor E. coli to Salmonella serovar Newport but also to another E. coli serotype present in the intestinal tract. Laboratory studies showed that the plasmid could be readily transferred between serovar Newport and E. coli intestinal isolates. Administration of a single dose of ceftiofur, used to prevent septicemic colibacillosis, to 1-day-old turkeys did not result in the isolation of ceftiofur-resistant E. coli or Salmonella serovar Newport. There was a remarkable association between serotype, drug resistance, and plasmid profile among the E. coli strains isolated from the poults. This study shows that Salmonella serovar Newport can become resistant to ESCs and other antibiotics by acquiring a conjugative drug resistance plasmid from E. coli in the intestines. PMID:15746317

  4. Household Contamination with Salmonella enterica1

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dale D.; Roozen, Paivi M.; Szymanski, Maryanne H.; Scheenstra, Beth C.; Cady, Kirsten M.; Besser, Thomas E.; Chudek, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Household contamination with Salmonella enterica increases when occupational exposure exists (cattle farms with known salmonellosis in cattle, a salmonella research laboratory, or a veterinary clinic experiencing an outbreak of salmonellosis). Fifteen of 55 (27.2%) vacuum cleaner bags from households with occupational exposure to S. enterica were positive versus 1 of 24 (4.2% without known exposure. Use of a carpet cleaner and several cleaners/disinfectants reduced, but failed to eliminate, S. enterica from artificially contaminated carpet. PMID:12533294

  5. Salmonella enterica isolated from infections in Australian livestock remain susceptible to critical antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sam; Groves, Mitchell D; Trott, Darren J; Chapman, Toni A; Turner, Bernadette; Hornitzky, Michael; Jordan, David

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen causing a variety of diseases in humans and animals. Many countries are reporting an increase in the prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. enterica in food animals. The aim of this study was to determine whether S. enterica isolated from livestock in New South Wales, Australia, have similar resistance traits to those reported internationally. Salmonella enterica (n=165) from clinical infections in food animals between 2007 and 2011 were serotyped and tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. Also, 22 antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), 3 integrons and 18 plasmid replicon types were screened for using PCR. Most isolates (66.1%) remained susceptible to all antimicrobials; 8.5% of the isolates were resistant to four or more antimicrobials. Antimicrobials with the highest prevalence of resistance were sulfafurazole (28.5%), ampicillin (17.0%), tetracycline (15.8%) and trimethoprim (8.5%). There was no resistance to fluoroquinolones or third-generation cephalosporins. The most common ARGs were blaTEM (15.2%), sul2 (10.3%), tetB (9.1%), tetA (5.5%), aphA1 (4.8%) and dhfrV (4.8%). Class 1 integrons (7.9%) and IncFIIA (69.7%) were the most commonly detected integron and plasmid replicon types, respectively. Class 1 integrons were positively associated with MDR phenotypes and ARG carriage (P≤0.001). Internationally prominent MDR serovars associated with severe disease in humans (e.g. AmpC-positive Salmonella Newport) were not detected. Overall, the comparatively favourable resistance status of S. enterica in Australian livestock represents minimal public health risk associated with MDR strains and supports a conservative approach to the registration of antimicrobial drug classes in food-producing animals. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica isolates from healthy breeder and broiler flocks in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Lurdes; Correia, Ivone; Themudo, Patrícia; Neto, Isabel; Caniça, Manuela; Bernardo, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Three hundred and thirty-three isolates representing 40 different serotypes of Salmonella enterica, recovered from environmental and faecal samples of breeder and broiler flocks from 2009 to 2011, were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration of 11 antimicrobials using the agar dilution method. Salmonella Havana, S. Enteritidis and S. Mbandaka were the most common serotypes isolated from broiler flocks, while S. Enteritidis was the common isolate from breeder flocks. The frequency of non-wild-type Salmonella isolates (those with decreased susceptibility to the different antimicrobials) varied according to serotype. S. Mbandaka in broilers and S. Enteritidis in both breeders and broilers showed higher frequencies of reduced susceptibility to quinolones, but clinical resistance towards ciprofloxacin was not observed. Reduced susceptibility to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ampicillin and streptomycin were common in Salmonella Typhimurium isolates. Two isolates of S. Havana from broilers were resistant to cefotaxime and phenotypically categorised as extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers. The results presented in this study provide useful data on the antimicrobial susceptibility of different Salmonella serotypes and highlight the high diversity of multi-drug resistance patterns present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Human infections due to Salmonella Blockley, a rare serotype in South Africa: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infections due to nontyphoidal Salmonella have increased worldwide over the last couple of decades. Salmonella enterica serotype Blockley (Salmonella Blockley) infections is associated with chickens and is a rarely isolated serotype in human infections in most countries. Case presentation We report a case of human infections due to Salmonella Blockley in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in 2011. Three African males (aged 4, 14 and 16) presented to a clinic with diarrhoea, stomach cramps and headache. They started experiencing signs of illness a day after they consumed a common meal, consisting of meat, rice and potatoes. Stool specimens from the patients cultured Salmonella Blockley. The strains showed an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Conclusion This is the first recorded case of human infections due to Salmonella Blockley in South Africa. PMID:23050633

  8. Adaptive resistance to biocides in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157 and cross-resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Braoudaki, M; Hilton, A C

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which bacteria resist killing by antibiotics and biocides are still poorly defined, although repeated exposure to sublethal concentrations of antibacterial agents undoubtedly contributes to their development. This study aimed both to investigate the potential of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157 for adaptive resistance to commonly used biocides and to determine any cross-resistance to antibiotics. Strains were repeatedly passaged in media containing increasing concentrations of a biocide or antibiotic until adaptive resistance was obtained. A wide panel of antimicrobial agents was then screened by using the adapted strain to determine cross-resistance, if any. Adaptive resistance was readily achieved for both S. enterica and E. coli O157. Cross-resistance in adaptively resistant S. enterica varied with the serotype; Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis expressed cross-resistance to chloramphenicol, whereas Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressed cross-resistance to chlorhexidine. Benzalkonium chloride-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow showed elevated resistance to chlorhexidine; however, chlorhexidine-resistant Salmonella serovar Virchow did not demonstrate reciprocal cross-resistance to benzalkonium chloride, suggesting specific rather than generic resistance mechanisms. E. coli O157 strains acquired high levels of resistance to triclosan after only two sublethal exposures and, when adapted, repeatedly demonstrated decreased susceptibilities to various antimicrobial agents, including chloramphenicol, erythromycin, imipenem, tetracycline, and trimethoprim, as well as to a number of biocides. These observations raise concern over the indiscriminate and often inappropriate use of biocides, especially triclosan, in situations where they are unnecessary, whereby they may contribute to the development of microbial resistance mechanisms.

  9. Colistin resistance in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica strains isolated from swine in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Morales, Adriano Savoia; Fragoso de Araújo, Juliana; de Moura Gomes, Vasco Túlio; Reis Costa, Adrienny Trindade; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dália; Porfida Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana; de Lima Filsner, Pedro Henrique Nogueira; Felizardo, Maria Roberta; Micke Moreno, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Reports about acquired resistance to colistin in different bacteria species are increasing, including E. coli of animal origin, but reports of resistance in wild S. enterica of different serotypes from swine are not found in the literature. Results obtained with one hundred and twenty-six E. coli strains from diseased swine and one hundred and twenty-four S. enterica strains from diseased and carrier swine showed a frequency of 6.3% and 21% of colistin-resistant strains, respectively. When comparing the disk diffusion test with the agar dilution test to evaluate the strains, it was confirmed that the disk diffusion test is not recommended to evaluate colistin resistance as described previously. The colistin MIC 90 and MIC 50 values obtained to E. coli were 0.25 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL, the MIC 90 and MIC 50 to S. enterica were 1 μg/mL and 8 μg/mL. Considering the importance of colistin in control of nosocomial human infections with Gram-negative multiresistant bacteria, and the large use of this drug in animal production, the colistin resistance prevalence in enterobacteriaceae of animal origin must be monitored more closely.

  10. Colistin Resistance in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Swine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Adriano Savoia; Fragoso de Araújo, Juliana; de Moura Gomes, Vasco Túlio; Reis Costa, Adrienny Trindade; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dália; Porfida Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana; de Lima Filsner, Pedro Henrique Nogueira; Felizardo, Maria Roberta; Micke Moreno, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Reports about acquired resistance to colistin in different bacteria species are increasing, including E. coli of animal origin, but reports of resistance in wild S. enterica of different serotypes from swine are not found in the literature. Results obtained with one hundred and twenty-six E. coli strains from diseased swine and one hundred and twenty-four S. enterica strains from diseased and carrier swine showed a frequency of 6.3% and 21% of colistin-resistant strains, respectively. When comparing the disk diffusion test with the agar dilution test to evaluate the strains, it was confirmed that the disk diffusion test is not recommended to evaluate colistin resistance as described previously. The colistin MIC 90 and MIC 50 values obtained to E. coli were 0.25 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL, the MIC 90 and MIC 50 to S. enterica were 1 μg/mL and 8 μg/mL. Considering the importance of colistin in control of nosocomial human infections with Gram-negative multiresistant bacteria, and the large use of this drug in animal production, the colistin resistance prevalence in enterobacteriaceae of animal origin must be monitored more closely. PMID:22973166

  11. Phenotyping and genetic characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates from Turkey revealing arise of different features specific to geography.

    PubMed

    Acar, Sinem; Bulut, Ece; Durul, Bora; Uner, Ilhan; Kur, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, M Dilek; Kirmaci, Hüseyin Avni; Tel, Yasar Osman; Zeyrek, Fadile Y; Soyer, Yesim

    2017-01-16

    192 Food samples (commonly consumed 8 food types), 355 animal samples (animal feces of bovine, ovine, goat and chicken) and 50 samples from clinical human cases in Sanliurfa city, Turkey in a year were collected to determine the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica mosaic in Turkey. 161 Salmonella isolates represented 17 serotypes, 20 sequence types (STs) and 44 PFGE patterns (PTs). 3 serotypes, S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium and S. Kentucky, were recovered from three different hosts. The highest discriminatory power was obtained by PFGE (SID=0.945), followed by MLST (SID=0.902) and serotyping (SID=0.885) for all isolates. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes (aadA1, aadA2, strA, strB, aphA1-Iab, blaTEM-1, blaPSE-1, tetA) was highly correlated with phenotypic profiles of aminoglycoside, ß-lactam and tetracycline groups (kappa >0.85). From our knowledge, this is the first study reporting spatial and temporal distribution of Salmonella species through phenotypic and genetic approaches over farm to fork chain in Turkey. Thus, our data provided further information for evolution, ecology and transmission of Salmonella in Turkey.

  12. Effect of desiccation on tolerance of salmonella enterica to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Gruzdev, Nadia; Pinto, Riky; Sela, Shlomo

    2011-03-01

    Reducing the available water in food is a long-established method for controlling bacterial growth in the food industry. Nevertheless, food-borne outbreaks of salmonellosis due to consumption of dry foods have been continuously reported. Previous studies showed that dried Salmonella cells acquire high tolerance to heat and ethanol. In order to examine if dehydration also induces tolerance to other stressors, dried Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium cells were exposed to multiple stresses, and their viability was assessed. Indeed, desiccated S. Typhimurium acquired higher tolerance to multiple stressors than nondesiccated cells. The dried cells were significantly more resistant to most stressors, including ethanol (10 to 30%, 5 min), sodium hypochlorite (10 to 100 ppm, 10 min), didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (0.05 to 0.25%, 5 min), hydrogen peroxide (0.5 to 2.0%, 30 min), NaCl (0.1 to 1 M, 2 h), bile salts (1 to 10%, 2 h), dry heat (100°C, 1 h), and UV irradiation (125 μW/cm(2), 25 min). In contrast, exposure of Salmonella to acetic and citric acids reduced the survival of the dried cells (1.5 log) compared to that of nondesiccated cells (0.5 log). Three other S. enterica serotypes, S. Enteritidis, S. Newport, and S. Infantis, had similar stress responses as S. Typhimurium, while S. Hadar was much more susceptible and gained tolerance to only a few stressors. Our findings indicate that dehydration induces cross-tolerance to multiple stresses in S. enterica, demonstrating the limitations of current chemical and physical treatments utilized by the food industry to inactivate food-borne pathogens.

  13. Effect of Desiccation on Tolerance of Salmonella enterica to Multiple Stresses▿

    PubMed Central

    Gruzdev, Nadia; Pinto, Riky; Sela, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Reducing the available water in food is a long-established method for controlling bacterial growth in the food industry. Nevertheless, food-borne outbreaks of salmonellosis due to consumption of dry foods have been continuously reported. Previous studies showed that dried Salmonella cells acquire high tolerance to heat and ethanol. In order to examine if dehydration also induces tolerance to other stressors, dried Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium cells were exposed to multiple stresses, and their viability was assessed. Indeed, desiccated S. Typhimurium acquired higher tolerance to multiple stressors than nondesiccated cells. The dried cells were significantly more resistant to most stressors, including ethanol (10 to 30%, 5 min), sodium hypochlorite (10 to 100 ppm, 10 min), didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (0.05 to 0.25%, 5 min), hydrogen peroxide (0.5 to 2.0%, 30 min), NaCl (0.1 to 1 M, 2 h), bile salts (1 to 10%, 2 h), dry heat (100°C, 1 h), and UV irradiation (125 μW/cm2, 25 min). In contrast, exposure of Salmonella to acetic and citric acids reduced the survival of the dried cells (1.5 log) compared to that of nondesiccated cells (0.5 log). Three other S. enterica serotypes, S. Enteritidis, S. Newport, and S. Infantis, had similar stress responses as S. Typhimurium, while S. Hadar was much more susceptible and gained tolerance to only a few stressors. Our findings indicate that dehydration induces cross-tolerance to multiple stresses in S. enterica, demonstrating the limitations of current chemical and physical treatments utilized by the food industry to inactivate food-borne pathogens. PMID:21216905

  14. Prevalence, Distribution, and Diversity of Salmonella enterica in a Major Produce Region of California▿†

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Lisa; Parker, Craig T.; Liang, Anita; Cooley, Michael B.; Jay-Russell, Michele T.; Gordus, Andrew G.; Atwill, E. Robert; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    A survey was initiated to determine the prevalence of Salmonella enterica in the environment in and around Monterey County, CA, a major agriculture region of the United States. Trypticase soy broth enrichment cultures of samples of soil/sediment (n = 617), water (n = 252), wildlife (n = 476), cattle feces (n = 795), and preharvest lettuce and spinach (n = 261) tested originally for the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli were kept in frozen storage and later used to test for the presence of S. enterica. A multipathogen oligonucleotide microarray was employed to identify a subset of samples that might contain Salmonella in order to test various culture methods to survey a larger number of samples. Fifty-five of 2,401 (2.3%) samples yielded Salmonella, representing samples obtained from 20 different locations in Monterey and San Benito Counties. Water had the highest percentage of positives (7.1%) among sample types. Wildlife yielded 20 positive samples, the highest number among sample types, with positive samples from birds (n = 105), coyotes (n = 40), deer (n = 104), elk (n = 39), wild pig (n = 41), and skunk (n = 13). Only 16 (2.6%) of the soil/sediment samples tested positive, and none of the produce samples had detectable Salmonella. Sixteen different serotypes were identified among the isolates, including S. enterica serotypes Give, Typhimurium, Montevideo, and Infantis. Fifty-four strains were sensitive to 12 tested antibiotics; one S. Montevideo strain was resistant to streptomycin and gentamicin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the isolates revealed over 40 different pulsotypes. Several strains were isolated from water, wildlife, or soil over a period of several months, suggesting that they were persistent in this environment. PMID:21378057

  15. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica and the hygienic indicator Escherichia coli in raw meat at markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja; Traoré, Alfred S; Barro, Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the hygienic status and prevalence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli in retail meat sold at open markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 150 samples of beef meat (n = 45), beef intestine (n = 45), mutton (n = 30), and chicken (n = 30) were collected from four local markets for investigation. The prevalence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica was 9.3%, and six serotypes, all previously unreported in Burkina Faso, were identified: Derby, Tilene, Hato, Bredeney, Agona, and Senftenberg. Most of the Salmonella isolates were sensitive to the 12 antimicrobial drugs tested. The prevalence of E. coli was 100% in all the meat types. An assessment of hygiene practices for the production, transportation, display, and vending of the meat revealed unhygienic conditions. Meat sellers had a low education level and poor knowledge of foodborne pathogens and their transmission routes. The findings showed that foodstuff handlers were in dire need of education about safe food handling practices.

  16. Ureaplasma urealyticum serotypes in urinary tract disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hewish, M J; Birch, D F; Fairley, K F

    1986-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum cultures from 124 patients with urinary tract disease were serotyped by indirect immunofluorescence, using antisera to serotypes I to VIII. A similar range of serotypes was recovered from first-voided, midstream, and bladder-aspiration (SPA) urine, upper urinary tract samples, and vaginal swabs. Serotype VI was predominant (44/124) among the samples, whereas serotypes V (1/124 samples) and VII (0/124 samples) were uncommon. Twenty of 124 cultures contained more than one serotype, and three cultures were untypeable. Serotypes cultured from bladder urine were also present in vaginal and urethral samples, although these samples often carried additional serotypes. Consecutive SPA samples from the same patient invariably contained the same serotype, whereas some consecutive midstream urine samples showed a loss or gain of serotypes with time. One patient carried the same serotype in SPA urine over a period of 13 months. The pattern of serotypes recovered from the urinary tract was similar irrespective of the sampling site, the site of infection, the clinical diagnosis and renal function of the patient, and the presence or absence of other microorganisms. Colonization above the urethra and association with urinary tract disease appeared to be serotype independent. PMID:3700599

  17. The Emergence of Reduced Ciprofloxacin Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Causing Bloodstream Infections in Rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Eibach, Daniel; Al-Emran, Hassan M; Dekker, Denise Myriam; Krumkamp, Ralf; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Cruz Espinoza, Ligia Maria; Ehmen, Christa; Boahen, Kennedy; Heisig, Peter; Im, Justin; Jaeger, Anna; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Pak, Gi Deok; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Reinhardt, Alexander; Sarpong, Nimako; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Wierzba, Thomas F; Marks, Florian; May, Jürgen

    2016-03-15

    Salmonella ranks among the leading causes of bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Multidrug resistant typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) isolates have been previously identified in this region. However, resistance to ciprofloxacin has rarely been reported in West Africa. This study aims to assess susceptibility against ciprofloxacin in Salmonella causing invasive bloodstream infections among children in rural Ghana. From May 2007 until May 2012, children attending a rural district hospital in central Ghana were eligible for recruitment. Salmonella enterica isolated from blood cultures were assessed for ciprofloxacin susceptibility by Etest (susceptible minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≤ 0.06 µg/mL). The gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes were sequenced to identify mutations associated with changes in susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Two hundred eighty-five Salmonella enterica isolates from 5211 blood cultures were most commonly identified as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (n = 129 [45%]), Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (n = 89 [31%]), Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (n = 20 [7%]), and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (n = 19 [7%]). All S. Typhi and S. Dublin were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Reduced susceptibility (MIC >0.06 µg/mL) was found in 53% (10/19) of S. Enteritidis and in 2% (3/129) of S. Typhimurium isolates. Sequencing detected a single gyrB mutation (Glu466Asp) and a single gyrA mutation (Ser83Tyr) in all 3 S. Typhimurium isolates, while 9 of 10 S. Enteritidis harbored single gyrA mutations (Asp87Gly, Asp87Asn, or Asp87Tyr). No mutations were found in the parC and parE genes. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility in invasive NTS in rural Ghana is highly dependent on serotype. Although reduced ciprofloxacin susceptibility is low in S. Typhimurium, more than half of all S. Enteritidis isolates are affected. Healthcare practitioners in Ghana should be aware of potential treatment failure in patients with invasive

  18. Occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases among isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from food-producing animals and food products, in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Lurdes; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Correia, Ivone; Themudo, Patrícia; Albuquerque, Teresa; Caniça, Manuela

    2013-10-15

    A total of 1120 Salmonella spp. isolates, recovered from poultry, swine and food products of animal origin (bovine, swine and poultry) over the period of 2009-2011, were investigated in order to determine their serotype, susceptibility to a panel of eleven antimicrobials (A, ampicillin; Ct, cefotaxime; Cp, ciprofloxacin; Tm, trimethoprim; Su, sulfamethoxazole; C, chloramphenicol; S, streptomycin; G, gentamicin; T, tetracycline; NA, nalidixic acid; Fl, florfenicol), and the presence of resistance determinants of extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Overall, Salmonella Enteritidis was the most common serotype in all three animal species. In 618 isolates of poultry, 32.8% comprised S. Enteritidis, 18.3% Salmonella Havana and 16.5% Salmonella Mbandaka; in 101 isolates of pigs, 21.8% comprised Salmonella Rissen and Salmonella Typhimurium, 10.9% Salmonella Derby and Salmonella London. Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- was the most common serotype recovered from pork and beef food products comprising 32.6% and 30% of isolates respectively, followed by S. Rissen (26% and 24%) and S. Typhimurium (18.2% and 19%), respectively. In poultry products, S. Enteritidis was the most frequent serotype (62.7%), followed by S. Mbandaka (10.2%) and S. Derby (8.5%). Susceptibility profiles differed according to the origin of the isolates. Five multidrug resistant isolates (0.45%) were further characterized as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the amplicons confirmed the presence of bla(CTX-M-1) (n = 2), bla(CTX-M-14) (n = 1), bla(CTX-M-15) (n = 1) and bla(CTX-M-32) (n = 1); bla(SHV-12) and bla(TEM-1) genes were also detected in two isolates of S. I 4,[5],12:i:-. Four isolates, two S. Havana and two S. I 4,[5],12:i:-, carried class 1 integrons and in three, two S. I 4,[5],12:i:- and one S. Havana, ISEcp1 was identified associated to bla(CTX-M-1), bla(CTX-M-32) and bla(CTX-M-14) genes. Additionally, in one S. I 4,[5],12:i:- isolate, orf477

  19. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    PubMed

    Roer, Louise; Hendriksen, Rene S; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are highly diverse foodborne pathogens that are subdivided into more than 1,500 serovars. The diversity is believed to result from mutational evolution, as well as intra- and interspecies recombination that potentially could be influenced by restriction-modification (RM) systems. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RM systems were linked to the evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. The study included 221 Salmonella enterica genomes, of which 68 were de novo sequenced and 153 were public available genomes from ENA. The data set covered 97 different serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica and an additional five genomes from four other Salmonella subspecies as an outgroup for constructing the phylogenetic trees. The phylogenetic trees were constructed based on multiple alignment of core genes, as well as the presence or absence of pangenes. The topology of the trees was compared to the presence of RM systems, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes, Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), and plasmid replicons. We did not observe any correlation between evolution and the RM systems in S. enterica subsp. enterica. However, sublineage correlations and serovar-specific patterns were observed. Additionally, we conclude that plasmid replicons, SPIs, and AMR were all better correlated to serovars than to RM systems. This study suggests a limited influence of RM systems on the evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, which could be due to the conjugational mode of horizontal gene transfer in Salmonella. Thus, we conclude that other factors must be involved in shaping the evolution of bacteria. IMPORTANCE The evolution of bacterial pathogens, their plasticity and ability to rapidly change and adapt to new surroundings are crucial for understanding the epidemiology and public health. With the application of genomics, it became clear that horizontal gene transfer played a key role in evolution

  20. Fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis by ribotyping.

    PubMed

    Lippelt, Meike; de Isele, Theresa Sanabria; Kist, Manfred

    1997-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To carry out an epidemiologic evaluation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis outbreaks in households and small communities by means of rRNA gene restriction pattern analysis (ribotyping). METHODS: One hundred Enteritidis isolates dating from 1989 to 1994 which could be allocated epidemiologically to different sources or to small community outbreaks were investigated with ribotyping, a fingerprinting method in which bacterial DNA is hybridized with the biotin-labeled plasmid pKK 3535 containing a ribosomal RNA operon of Escherichia coli to determine the ribosomal RNA gene restriction patterns. RESULTS: Four different ribotyping patterns were found with the restriction endonuclease Smal and nine with Sphl. Ribotypes of isolates which could be allocated epidemiologically to a common source usually corresponded. Almost 60% of the Enteritidis infections had the ribotyping pattern Sphl-A. In contrast, this pattern was not found in any of the five Enteritidis strains isolated in 1989. The suspicion that Enteritidis phage type 4 infections are caused by consumption of insufficiently heated eggs is supported by the fact that the ribotyping pattern Sph1-A was found in isolates from eggs and from human specimens. CONCLUSIONS: As patterns Sphl-A and Smal-J appeared in 58% and 75% of the isolates, respectively, ribotyping cannot be used for the differentiation between various outbreaks with these two patterns. In cases where the Enteritidis strains showed less frequent patterns, ribotyping seems to be a practical tool for the identification of infection chains. In addition newly appearing ribotyping patterns can give information about the epidemiologic development of Enteritidis infection.

  1. Cross-sectional Study Examining Salmonella enterica Carriage in Subiliac Lymph Nodes of Cull and Feedlot Cattle at Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Gragg, Sara E.; Loneragan, Guy H.; Brashears, Mindy M.; Arthur, Terrance M.; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Wang, Rong; Schmidt, John W.; Brooks, J. Chance; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Brown, Tyson R.; Edrington, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bovine peripheral lymph nodes (LNs), including subiliac LNs, have been identified as a potential source of human exposure to Salmonella enterica, when adipose trim containing these nodes is incorporated into ground beef. In order to gain a better understanding of the burden of S. enterica in peripheral LNs of feedlot and cull cattle, a cross-sectional study was undertaken in which 3327 subiliac LNs were collected from cattle at harvest in seven plants, located in three geographically distinct regions of the United States. Samples were collected in three seasons: Fall 2010, Winter/Spring 2011, and Summer/Fall 2011. A convenience sample of 76 LNs per day, 2 days per season (approximately 1 month apart), was collected per plant, from carcasses held in the cooler for no less than 24 h. Every 10th carcass half on a rail was sampled, in an attempt to avoid oversampling any single cohort of cattle. Median point estimates of S. enterica contamination were generally low (1.3%); however, median Salmonella prevalence was found to be greater in subiliac LNs of feedlot cattle (11.8%) compared to those of cull cattle (0.65%). Enumeration analysis of a subset of 618 feedlot cattle LNs showed that 67% of those harboring S. enterica (97 of 144) did so at concentrations ranging from <0.1 to 1.8 log10 CFU/g, while 33% carried a higher burden of S. enterica, with levels ranging from 1.9 to >3.8 log10 CFU/g. Serotyping of S. enterica isolated identified 24 serotypes, with the majority being Montevideo (44.0%) and Anatum (24.8%). Antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes were determined for all isolates, and the majority (86.1%) were pansusceptible; however, multidrug-resistant isolates (8.3%) were also occasionally observed. As Salmonella contained within LNs are protected from carcass interventions, research is needed to define opportunities for mitigating the risk of Salmonella contamination in LNs of apparently healthy cattle. PMID:23566273

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of 16 Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Muhammad A.; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Ross, Ashley; Al-Lami, Mariam; Boerlin, Patrick; Chui, Linda; Devenish, John; Bekal, Sadjia; Graham, Morag; Amoako, Kingsley K.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important zoonotic food-borne pathogen causing serious human illnesses frequently linked to poultry products. Here, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 16 S. Enteritidis strains with common pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage types (8, 13, 13a, and 14b) that predominate in North America. PMID:24762938

  3. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Cerro, a Frequent Dairy Cow Serovar.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Pirone, Cary; Muruvanda, Tim; Brown, Eric; Allard, Marc; Karns, Jeffrey S; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S

    2016-01-28

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro is an infrequent pathogen of humans and other mammals but is frequently isolated from the hindgut of asymptomatic cattle in the United States. To further understand the genomic determinants of S. Cerro specificity for the bovine hindgut, the genome of isolate CFSAN001588 was fully sequenced and deposited in the GenBank database.

  4. Complete Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Java NCTC5706.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Alexander, Sarah; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Parkhill, Julian; Russell, Julie E

    2016-11-03

    Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939.

  5. Complete Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Java NCTC5706

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Russell, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939. PMID:27811100

  6. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Strains Isolated from Agricultural Sources.

    PubMed

    Benahmed, Faiza H; Gopinath, Gopal R; Wang, Hua; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Grim, Christopher; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; McClelland, Michael; Ayers, Sherry; Abbott, Jason; Desai, Prerak; Frye, Jonathan G; Weinstock, George; Hammack, Thomas S; Hanes, Darcy E; Rasmussen, Mark A; Davidson, Maureen K

    2014-01-23

    We report the draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strain CVM42234, isolated from chick feed in 2012, and S. Cubana strain 76814, isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 bp, respectively.

  7. Whole-genome sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strains isolated from agricultural sources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana strain CVM42234 isolated from chick feed in 2012 and Salmonella Cubana strain 76814 isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 base pairs, respectively....

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Strains Isolated from Agricultural Sources

    PubMed Central

    Benahmed, Faiza H.; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Wang, Hua; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Grim, Christopher; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; McClelland, Michael; Ayers, Sherry; Abbott, Jason; Desai, Prerak; Frye, Jonathan G.; Weinstock, George; Hammack, Thomas S.; Hanes, Darcy E.; Rasmussen, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strain CVM42234, isolated from chick feed in 2012, and S. Cubana strain 76814, isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 bp, respectively. PMID:24459266

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Mishmarhaemek Isolated from Bovine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ashley; Lambert, Dominic; Koziol, Adam G.; Seyer, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Mishmarhaemek is a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium implicated in human clinical disease. Here, we report a 4.8-Mbp draft genome sequence of a nalidixic acid-resistant isolate of S. serovar Mishmarhaemek. PMID:26472847

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Mishmarhaemek Isolated from Bovine Feces.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ashley; Lambert, Dominic; Koziol, Adam G; Seyer, Karine; Carrillo, Catherine D

    2015-10-15

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Mishmarhaemek is a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium implicated in human clinical disease. Here, we report a 4.8-Mbp draft genome sequence of a nalidixic acid-resistant isolate of S. serovar Mishmarhaemek. Copyright © 2015 Cooper et al.

  11. Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii: serotypes in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pérez, C; Dolande, M; Moya, M; Roselló, A; de Capriles, Claudia R Hartung; Landaeta, M E; Mata-Essayag, S

    2008-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the medically important yeast-like fungi. C. neoformans var. gatti has been made a species: C. gatti. In our country, there are few studies about these two species and their serotypes. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of C. neoformans and C. gattii, and their serotypes in Venezuelan clinical isolates. One hundred and twenty C. neoformans and 12 C. gattii clinical isolates were identified by L-canavanine, glycine, and bromothymol blue agar media (CGB). These were investigated by agglutination and adsorption studies with anticryptococcal sera, which were produced by rabbit immunization. Of the 132 isolates 59.8% were typed serotype A (C. neoformans), followed by 25.8% serotype D (C. neoformans), 5.3% serotype AD (C. neoformans), and 5.3% were typed serotype C (var. gattii). Additionally 3.8% were serotype B (C. gattii).

  12. Polymerase chain reaction assay based on ratA gene allows differentiation between Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum.

    PubMed

    Batista, Diego Felipe Alves; de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Lopes, Priscila Diniz; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Berchieri, Angelo

    2013-03-01

    Salmonella Pullorum and Salmonella Gallinarum are classified as biovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum. These salmonellae are the causative agents of Pullorum disease and fowl typhoid, respectively, and are widely distributed throughout the world. Although many developed countries have eradicated these diseases from commercial poultry, they are still the cause of significant economic loss in developing countries. When serovar Gallinarum is isolated, it is difficult to immediately differentiate between biovars because they are antigenically identical by serotyping. However, they cause distinct diseases with different epidemiology, and therefore it is important to differentiate them. This may be done biochemically but takes 2 to 3 days. In the present study, S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarum whole genomes were compared, and 1 genomic region of difference, which is part of the ratA gene, was chosen as a molecular marker for a polymerase chain reaction assay to differentiate rapidly between these organisms. In all, 26 strains of S. Gallinarum and 17 S. Pullorum strains were tested and successfully differentiated by the assay.

  13. Ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Choleraesuis from pigs to humans, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Chang, Chao-Fu; Wan, Jen-Hsien; Yan, Jing-Jou; Lee, Chun-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Huang, Wen-Kuei; Yang, Dine; Shyr, Jainn-Ming; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Wang, Li-Shin; Lu, Jang-Jih; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Feng-Yee; Yang, Yi-Chueh; Lau, Yeu-Jun; Liu, Yung-Ching; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the disk susceptibility data of 671 nontyphoid Salmonella isolates collected from different parts of Taiwan from March 2001 to August 2001 and 1,261 nontyphoid Salmonella isolates from the National Taiwan University Hospital from 1996 to 2001. Overall, ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 2.7% (18/671) of all nontyphoid Salmonella isolates, in 1.4% (5/347) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and in 7.5% (8/107) in S. enterica serotype Choleraesuis nationwide. MICs of six newer fluoroquinolones were determined for the following isolates: 37 isolates of ciprofloxacin-resistant (human) S. Typhimurium (N = 26) and Choleraesuis (N = 11), 10 isolates of ciprofloxacin-susceptible (MIC <1 mg/mL) (human) isolates of these two serotypes, and 15 swine isolates from S. Choleraesuis (N = 13) and Typhmurium (N = 2) with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC >0.12 microg/mL). Sequence analysis of the gryA, gyrB, parC, parE, and acrR genes, ciprofloxacin accumulation, and genotypes generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with three restriction enzymes (SpeI, XbaI, and BlnI) were performed. All 26 S. Typhimurium isolates from humans and pigs belonged to genotype I. For S. Choleraesuis isolates, 91% (10/11) of human isolates and 54% (7/13) of swine isolates belonged to genotype B. These two genotypes isolates from humans all exhibited a high-level of resistance to ciprofloxacin (MIC 16-64 mg/mL). They had two-base substitutions in the gyrA gene at codons 83 (Ser83Phe) and 87 (Asp87Gly or Asp87Asn) and in the parC gene at codon 80 (Ser80Arg, Ser80Ile, or Ser84Lys). Our investigation documented that not only did these two S. enterica isolates have a high prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance nationwide but also that some closely related ciprofloxacin-resistant strains are disseminated from pigs to humans.

  14. Lack of evidence of spill-over of Salmonella enterica between cattle and sympatric Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) from a protected area in Catalonia, NE Spain.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Gonzalez, N; Velarde, R; Porrero, M C; Mentaberre, G; Serrano, E; Mateos, A; Domínguez, L; Lavín, S

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic agent of worldwide importance found in a wide range of wild hosts. However, its prevalence in many popular game species has never been assessed. Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) is the main game caprinae of the Iberian Peninsula and around two thousand individuals are hunted every year for trophy or for home consumption. In this work, 313 Iberian ibexes from the Ports de Tortosa i Beseit National Game Reserve (NE Spain) were tested for Salmonella enterica in faeces, and anti microbial susceptibility was determined. The exact location of shooting or capture was recorded with a GPS device to study the links of Salmonella infection with cattle presence and human proximity. Additionally, samples were taken from cattle grazing inside this reserve (n = 73). Only three Iberian ibexes (0.96%, 95% CI 0.2-2.8) were positive to Salmonella (serotype Enteritidis, Bardo and 35:r:z35), while prevalence was moderate in cattle: 21.92% (95% CI 13.10-33.14, serotype Meleagridis, Anatum, Kedougou and Othmarschen). All isolates were susceptible to the anti microbial agents tested. Moreover, a case of fatal septicaemic salmonellosis in an 11-year-old male Iberian ibex is described where Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis was isolated from the lung, liver and spleen samples. The low prevalence of Salmonella in Iberian ibex and the lack of shared serotypes suggest no association to cattle. Despite this, game meat aimed for human consumption should be examined, and it is strongly recommended that hunters and game keepers manipulate animals and carcasses under maximal hygienic conditions to avoid environmental contamination and human contagion.

  15. Evolutionary Genomics of Salmonella enterica Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Prerak T.; Porwollik, Steffen; Long, Fred; Cheng, Pui; Wollam, Aye; Clifton, Sandra W.; Weinstock, George M.; McClelland, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Six subspecies are currently recognized in Salmonella enterica. Subspecies I (subspecies enterica) is responsible for nearly all infections in humans and warm-blooded animals, while five other subspecies are isolated principally from cold-blooded animals. We sequenced 21 phylogenetically diverse strains, including two representatives from each of the previously unsequenced five subspecies and 11 diverse new strains from S. enterica subspecies enterica, to put this species into an evolutionary perspective. The phylogeny of the subspecies was partly obscured by abundant recombination events between lineages and a relatively short period of time within which subspeciation took place. Nevertheless, a variety of different tree-building methods gave congruent evolutionary tree topologies for subspeciation. A total of 285 gene families were identified that were recruited into subspecies enterica, and most of these are of unknown function. At least 2,807 gene families were identified in one or more of the other subspecies that are not found in subspecies I or Salmonella bongori. Among these gene families were 13 new candidate effectors and 7 new candidate fimbrial clusters. A third complete type III secretion system not present in subspecies enterica (I) isolates was found in both strains of subspecies salamae (II). Some gene families had complex taxonomies, such as the type VI secretion systems, which were recruited from four different lineages in five of six subspecies. Analysis of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution rates indicated that the more-recently acquired regions in S. enterica are undergoing faster fixation rates than the rest of the genome. Recently acquired AT-rich regions, which often encode virulence functions, are under ongoing selection to maintain their high AT content. PMID:23462113

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Oranienburg Strains Isolated from Rivers in Northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Casteñeda-Ruelas, Gloria M; Carreón-Gaxiola, César; Castelán-Sánchez, Hugo G; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham; Romero-Martínez, Salvador; García-Molina, Alejandra; Jiménez-Edeza, Maribel

    2017-03-09

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Oranienburg is recognized as a foodborne pathogen widely distributed in the environment. Here, we report 18 draft genomes of S Oranienburg strains isolated from rivers in the northwestern region of Mexico.

  17. Characterization of Chinese Haemophilus parasuis Isolates by Traditional Serotyping and Molecular Serotyping Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lina; Wang, Liyan; Chu, Yuefeng; Li, Xuerui; Cui, Yujun; Chen, Shengli; Zhou, Jianhua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Zhongxin; Liu, Jixing; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is classified mainly through serotyping, but traditional serotyping always yields non-typable (NT) strains and unreliable results via cross-reactions. Here, we surveyed the serotype prevalence of Chinese H. parasuis isolates using traditional serotyping (gel immuno-diffusion test, GID) and molecular serotyping (multiplex PCR, mPCR). We also investigated why discrepant results between these methods were obtained, and investigated mPCR failure through whole-genome sequencing. Of the 100 isolate tested, 73 (73%) and 93 (93%) were serotyped by the GID test and mPCR, respectively, with a concordance rate of 66% (66/100). Additionally, mPCR reduced the number of NT isolates from 27 (27%) for the GID testing, to seven (7%). Eleven isolates were sequenced, including nine serotype-discrepant isolates from mPCR and GID typing (excluding strains that were NT by GID only) and two NT isolates from both methods, and their in silico serotypes were obtained from genome sequencing based on their capsule loci. The mPCR results were supported by the in silico serotyping of the seven serotype-discrepant isolates. The discrepant results and NT isolates determined by mPCR were attributed to deletions and unknown sequences in the serotype-specific region of each capsule locus. Compared with previous investigations, this study found a similar predominant serotype profile, but a different prevalence frequency for H. parasuis, and the five most prevalent serotypes or strain groups were serotypes 5, 4, NT, 7 and 13 for mPCR, and serotypes 5, NT, 4, 7 and 13/10/14 for GID. Additionally, serotype 7 was recognized as a principal serotype in this work. PMID:28005999

  18. Complete, Closed Genome Sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Human and Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Fields, Patricia I.; Dinsmore, Blake A.; Santovenia, Monica; Kelley, Christy M.; Wang, Rong; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Harhay, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of 10 S. Typhimurium strains, 5 each isolated from human and bovine sources. PMID:27811097

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Give, Isolated from an Imported Chili Powder Product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Chen, Yi; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David; Laasri, Anna; Payne, Justin S; Zheng, Jie; Son, Insook; Timme, Ruth; Kastanis, George; Hammack, Thomas S; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W; Evans, Peter S; Brown, Eric W

    2015-07-02

    We report the genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Give (CFSAN012622), isolated from imported chili powder in 2014. This genome contains genes previously reported to be specific only to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. This strain shows a unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern clustering with serovar Enteritidis (JEG X01.0005).

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Outbreak Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Thompson Associated with Cilantro

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Steven; Gorski, Lisa; Cooper, Kerry K.; Miller, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH-99A2345) are associated with a 1999 outbreak in contaminated cilantro. We report here the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson strains. These genomes are distinct and provide additional data for our understanding of S. enterica. PMID:26586897

  1. Influence of serotype on the growth kinetics and the ability to form biofilms of Salmonella isolates from poultry.

    PubMed

    Díez-García, Miryam; Capita, Rosa; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    The influence of the serotype on the growth behaviour and the ability to form biofilms of Salmonella enterica strains was investigated. The relationships between biofilm formation and growth kinetic parameters were also determined. A total of 69 strains (61 isolates from poultry and 8 reference strains from culture collections) belonging to 10 serotypes (S. enterica serotype Typhimurium, S. Newport, S. Paratyphi B, S. Poona, S. Derby, S. Infantis, S. Enteritidis, S. Virchow, S. Agona and S. Typhi) were tested. All Salmonella strains produced biofilms on polystyrene micro-well plates (crystal violet assay). Isolates were classified as weak (35 strains), moderate (22), or strong (12) biofilm producers. S. Agona and S. Typhi produced the most substantial (P < 0.001) biofilms. Growth curves were performed at 37 °C in tryptone soy broth by means of optical density (OD(420-580)) measurements from 0 to 48 h. Growth kinetic parameters (Gompertz model) varied between serotypes. The maximum growth rate (ΔOD(420-580)/h) ranged from 0.030 ± 0.002 (S. Typhi) to 0.114 ± 0.011 (S. Agona). The ability of Salmonella strains to form biofilms was not related to their growth kinetic parameters. The formation of biofilms by Salmonella on polystyrene constitutes an issue of concern because plastic materials are frequently used in food facilities. The findings suggest that special efforts must be made for the effective control of Salmonella in food-processing environments when S. Agona or S. Typhi strains are present. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Xanthomonas perforans Colonization Influences Salmonella enterica in the Tomato Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Potnis, Neha; Soto-Arias, José Pablo; Cowles, Kimberly N.; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica rarely grows on healthy, undamaged plants, but its persistence is influenced by bacterial plant pathogens. The interactions between S. enterica, Xanthomonas perforans (a tomato bacterial spot pathogen), and tomato were characterized. We observed that virulent X. perforans, which establishes disease by suppressing pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity that leads to effector-triggered susceptibility, created a conducive environment for persistence of S. enterica in the tomato phyllosphere, while activation of effector-triggered immunity by avirulent X. perforans resulted in a dramatic reduction in S. enterica populations. S. enterica populations persisted at ∼10 times higher levels in leaves coinoculated with virulent X. perforans than in those where S. enterica was applied alone. In contrast, S. enterica populations were ∼5 times smaller in leaves coinoculated with avirulent X. perforans than in leaves inoculated with S. enterica alone. Coinoculation with virulent X. perforans increased S. enterica aggregate formation; however, S. enterica was not found in mixed aggregates with X. perforans. Increased aggregate formation by S. enterica may serve as the mechanism of persistence on leaves cocolonized by virulent X. perforans. S. enterica association with stomata was altered by X. perforans; however, it did not result in appreciable populations of S. enterica in the apoplast even in the presence of large virulent X. perforans populations. Gene-for-gene resistance against X. perforans successively restricted S. enterica populations. Given the effect of this interaction, breeding for disease-resistant cultivars may be an effective strategy to limit both plant disease and S. enterica populations and, consequently, human illness. PMID:24632252

  3. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Pomona Infection in Farmed Juvenile American Alligators ( Alligator Mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Nevarez, J G; Del Piero, F

    2017-03-01

    A fatal epizootic of salmonellosis occurred in farmed juvenile American alligators in Louisiana. Six animals were examined. Gross lesions included severe fibrinonecrotizing enterocolitis, necrotizing splenitis, coelomic effusion, and perivisceral and pulmonary edema. Microscopic examination revealed severe necrotizing enterocolitis and splenitis with intralesional bacteria and pneumocyte necrosis with fibrin thrombi. Salmonella enterica serovar Pomona was isolated from intestine and lung. Clinical salmonellosis is a rare finding in reptiles and salmonellosis caused by S. Pomona is not previously reported in American alligators. Since S. Pomona is a commonly isolated Salmonella serotype from patients with reptile-associated salmonellosis in the United States, and since alligator meat is consumed and the skin is exported to numerous countries, risk of human and animal infection should be considered.

  4. Poultry as a possible source of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars in humans in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Barua, Himel; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Olsen, Katharina E P; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2014-01-31

    We investigated Salmonella enterica isolates from human clinical cases of gastroenteritis to determine the distribution of non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars in the human population, and compared them to isolates originating from poultry by serotyping, phage typing, plasmid profiling, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to evaluate the potential role of poultry in human non-typhoidal salmonellosis in Bangladesh. Nine different serovars were identified among the human isolates of which Salmonella Paratyphi B var Java (S. Java), S. Kentucky, S. Enteritidis, S. Virchow and S. Weltevreden also were commonly isolated from poultry. The poultry isolates belonging to S. Java, S. Kentucky and S. Enteritidis were indistinguishable from human isolates or genetically closely related, based on PFGE profiles and MLST. S. Kentucky clone ST198 and S. Java clone ST43 both well-known cause of human infections were also isolated from poultry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptation and cross-adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica to poultry decontaminants.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernando, Alicia; Capita, Rosa; Prieto, Miguel; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Information on the potential for acquired reduced susceptibility of bacteria to poultry decontaminants occurring is lacking. Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) were established for assessing the initial susceptibility and the adaptative and cross-adaptative responses of four bacterial strains (Listeria monocytogenes serovar l/2a, L. monocytogenes serovar 4b, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, and S. enterica serotype Enteritidis) to four poultry decontaminants (trisodium phosphate, acidified sodium chlorite -ASC-, citric acid, and peroxyacetic acid). The initial susceptibility was observed to differ among species (all decontaminants) and between Salmonella strains (ASC). These inter- and intra-specific variations highlight (1) the need for strict monitoring of decontaminant concentrations to inactivate all target pathogens of concern, and (2) the importance of selecting adequate test strains in decontamination studies. MICs of ASC (0.17+/-0.02 to 0.21+/-0.02 mg/ml) were higher than the U.S. authorized concentration when applied as a pre-chiller or chiller solution (0.05 to 0.15 mg/ml). Progressively increasing decontaminant concentrations resulted in reduced susceptibility of strains. The highest increase in MIC was 1.88 to 2.71-fold (ASC). All decontaminants were shown to cause cross-adaptation of strains between both related and unrelated compounds, the highest increase in MIC being 1.82-fold (ASC). Our results suggest that the in-use concentrations of ASC could, in certain conditions, be ineffective against Listeria and Salmonella strains. The adaptative and cross-adaptative responses of strains tested to poultry decontaminants are of minor concern. However, the observations being presented here are based on in vitro studies, and further research into practical applications are needed in order to confirm these findings.

  6. Sporadic Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana infections in Georgia and Tennessee: a hypothesis-generating study.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, L S; Tobin-D'Angelo, M; Shuler, C; Hanna, S; Benson, J; Voetsch, A C

    2010-03-01

    From 1996 to 2004, the incidence of Salmonella Javiana infections increased in FoodNet, the U.S. national active foodborne disease surveillance programme. Contact with amphibians and consumption of tomatoes have been associated with outbreaks of S. Javiana infection. To generate and test hypotheses about risk factors associated with sporadic S. Javiana infections, we interviewed patients with laboratory-confirmed S. Javiana infection identified in Georgia and Tennessee during August-October 2004. We collected data on food and water consumption, animal contact, and environmental exposure from cases. Responses were compared with population-based survey exposure data. Seventy-two of 117 identified S. Javiana case-patients were interviewed. Consumption of well water [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-11.2] and reptile or amphibian contact (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 0.9-7.1) were associated with infection. Consumption of tomatoes (aOR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.9) and poultry (aOR 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.0) were protective. Our study suggests that environmental factors are associated with S. Javiana infections in Georgia and Tennessee.

  7. Early diagnosis of typhoid fever by nested PCR for flagellin gene of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Harish, B N; Menezes, G A; Acharya, N S; Parija, S C

    2012-11-01

    Typhoid fever caused by Salmonella Typhi continues to be a major health problem in spite of the use of antibiotics and the development of newer antibacterial drugs. Inability to make an early laboratory diagnosis and resort to empirical therapy, often lead to increased morbidity and mortality in cases of typhoid fever. This study was aimed to optimize a nested PCR for early diagnosis of typhoid fever and using it as a diagnostic tool in culture negative cases of suspected typhoid fever. Eighty patients with clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever and 40 controls were included in the study. The blood samples collected were subjected to culture, Widal and nested PCR targeting the flagellin gene of S. Typhi. The sensitivity of PCR on blood was found to be 100 per cent whereas the specificity was 76.9 per cent. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PCR was calculated to be 76.9 per cent with an accuracy of 86 per cent. None of the 40 control samples gave a positive PCR. Due to its high sensitivity and specificity nested PCR can be used as a useful tool to diagnose clinically suspected, culture negative cases of typhoid fever.

  8. Reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Salmonella enterica serotypes in travelers returning from Southeast Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Hakanen, A.; Kotilainen, P.; Huovinen, P.; Helenius, H.; Siitonen, A.

    2001-01-01

    During 1995 to 1999, we collected 1,210 Salmonella isolates; 629 were from Finnish travelers returning from abroad. These isolates were tested for susceptibility by determining MICs to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and seven additional antimicrobial agents. From 1995 to 1999, the annual proportion of reduced ciprofloxacin susceptibility (MIC > 0.125 microg/mL) among all travelers' isolates increased from 3.9% to 23.5% (p<0.001). The increasing trend was outstanding among the isolates from Southeast Asia; isolates from Thailand alone increased from 5.6% to 50.0% (p<0.001). The reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility was nonclonal in character and significantly associated with multidrug resistance. A point mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA was present in all isolates with reduced susceptibility. These data provide further evidence for the rapid spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens from one continent to another. PMID:11747728

  9. Carriage prevalence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in gallbladders of adult autopsy cases from Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Lovane, Lucilia; Martinez, Miguel J; Massora, Sergio; Mandomando, Inacio; Ussene, Esperança; Jordao, Dercio; Castillo, Paola; Ismail, Mamudo R; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Carrilho, Carla; Bassat, Quique; Menendez, Clara; Ordi, Jaume; Vila, Jordi; Soto, Sara Maria

    2016-04-28

    Typhoid fever is an important public health problem in many low-income countries where asymptomatic carriers play an important role in its dissemination. The bacterium causing typhoid fever can live in the gallstones of asymptomatic persons after the infection. These carriers are reservoirs of S. Typhi, are highly contagious, and spread the disease through the secretion of bacteria in feces and urine. The aim of this study was to determine the carrier rate in an area of Mozambique. The presence of S. Typhi was analyzed in gallbladder samples obtained from 99 adult corpses (in-hospital deaths) from Mozambique by gold-standard culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Only one sample was positive with the culture. However, nine additional samples were positive by PCR and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Thus, the prevalence of S. Typhi was 10.1% (10/99). We report a high prevalence of S. Typhi in gallbladders among adult autopsy cases from Mozambique.

  10. Study of the role of efflux pump in ciprofloxacin resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Dahiya, S; Jangra, P; Das, B K; Kumar, R; Sood, S; Kapil, A

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing reports on failure of clinical response to ciprofloxacin in typhoid fever despite the strain being sensitive to drug in in-vitro using standard guidelines and showing mutations in DNA gyrase. But this increased MIC and clinical failures with ciprofloxacin are not always co-related with mutations presently identified in gyrA and parC genes. This shows that there may be other mechanisms such as an active drug efflux pump responsible as has been shown in other Enterobacteriaceae. This study was carried out to determine the role of efflux pump in Salmonella Typhi isolates. Total 25 already characterized nalidixic acid sensitive and nalidixic acid resistant S. Typhi strains with different range of ciprofloxacin MIC were included to study the role of efflux pump in the presence of CCCP (efflux pump inhibitor). For genotypic characterization, the entire acrR gene was sequenced to confirm the presence of any mutation in the gene. The MIC of ciprofloxacin remained same in the presence and absence of CCCP in the studied strains and no significant mutations were found in the acrR gene in any of the isolates studied. No role of efflux pump in ciprofloxacin resistance was found in strains studied. There is a need to explore further mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in Salmonella Typhi.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Procedure to Clinically Type Prevalent Salmonella enterica Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Nélida; Diaz-Osorio, Miguel; Moreno, Jaime; Sánchez-Jiménez, Miryan; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2010-01-01

    A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure was developed to identify the most prevalent clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. Genes from the rfb, fliC, fljB, and viaB groups that encode the O, H, and Vi antigens were used to design 15 primer pairs and TaqMan probes specific for the genes rfbJ, wzx, fliC, fljB, wcdB, the sdf-l sequence, and invA, which was used as an internal amplification control. The primers and probes were variously combined into six sets. The first round of reactions used two of these sets to detect Salmonella O:4, O:9, O:7, O:8, and O:3,10 serogroups. Once the serogroups were identified, the results of a second round of reactions that used primers and probes for the flagellar antigen l genes, 1,2; e,h; g,m; d; e,n,x; and z10, and the Vi gene were used to identify individual serovars. The procedure was standardized using 18 Salmonella reference strains and other enterobacteria. The procedure's reliability and sensitivity was evaluated using 267 randomly chosen serotyped Salmonella clinical isolates. The procedure had a sensitivity of 95.5% and was 100% specific. Thus, our technique is a quick, sensitive, reliable, and specific means of identifying S. enterica serovars and can be used in conjunction with traditional serotyping. Other primer and probe combinations could be used to increase the number of identifiable serovars. PMID:20110454

  12. Assessment of antibiotic resistance phenotype and integrons in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from swine.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Kang, Sang Gyun; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Hee Soo; Park, Kyung Yoon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2008-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) isolated and identified from swine were subjected for the analysis of antibiotic resistance pattern and clinically important class 1 and 2 integrons. In addition, S. Typhimurium isolates exhibiting ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and florfenicol (ACSSuTF) resistance pattern as described in most Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates were resistant to more than four antibiotics and showed the highest resistance to streptomycin (94.1%), followed by tetracycline (90.1%), ampicillin (64.7%), chloramphenicol (56.8%) and gentamicin (54.9%). MIC value for the ten isolates ranged between 0.125-2 mug/ml for ciprofloxacin. Among the beta-lactams used, only one of the isolate exhibited resistance to ceftiofur (MIC 8 microg/ml). Sixty eight percent of these multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium isolates carried clinically important class 1 integron with 1kb (aadA) and/or 2kb (dhfrXII-orfF-aadA2) resistance gene cassettes. This study reports the increasing trend of multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium with clinically important class 1 integron in pigs. In addition, emergence of the ACSSuTF-type resistance in S. Typhimurium PT other than DT104 may limit the use of resistance gene markers in its detection methods by PCR.

  13. Serotype assignment by sero-agglutination, ELISA, and PCR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For assessing isolates of Listeria monocytogenes serotype designation is the foremost subtyping method used. Traditionally serotyping has been done with agglutination reactions. In the last decade alternative serotyping methods were described using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay(ELISA)and Polymer...

  14. Incidence and growth of Salmonella enterica on the peel and pulp of avocado (Persea americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa).

    PubMed

    Rezende, Ana Carolina B; Crucello, Juliana; Moreira, Rafael C; Silva, Beatriz S; Sant'Ana, Anderson S

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and to estimate the growth kinetic parameters (maximum growth rate, μ; lag time, λ; and maximum population, κ) of Salmonella on the peel and pulp of avocado (Perseaamericana var. americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa L.) as affected by temperature (10-30°C). The incidence of Salmonella was assessed on the peel and pulp of the fruits (n=200 of each fruit), separately, totalizing 800 analyses. Only three samples of custard apple pulp were positive for Salmonella enterica and the three isolates recovered belonged to serotype S. Typhimurium. Salmonella was not recovered from avocado and custard apple peels and from avocado pulp. Generally, the substrate (pulp or peel) of growth did not affect μ values of S. enterica (p>0.05). Very similar μ values were found for S. enterica inoculated in custard apple and avocado. S. enterica presented the highest λ in the peel of the fruits. The growth of S. enterica resulted in larger λ in custard apple in comparison to avocado. For example, the λ of S. enterica in the pulp of custard apple and avocado were 47.0±0.78h and 10.0±3.78h, respectively. The lowest values of κ were obtained at the lower storage temperature conditions (10°C). For instance, κ values of 3.7±0.06log CFU/g and 2.9±0.03log CFU/g were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in avocado and custard apple pulps at 10°C (p<0.05), respectively. On the other hand, at 30°C, κ values were 6.5±0.25log CFU/g and 6.5±0.05log CFU/g, respectively. Significantly higher κ were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in the pulp than in the peel of the fruits (p<0.05). For instance, the growth of S. enterica in the pulp of avocado led to a κ value of 6.5±0.25log CFU/g, while in the peel led to a κ value of 4.6±0.23log CFU/g (p<0.05). In general, growth kinetic parameters indicated that avocado comprises a better substrate than custard apple for the growth of S. enterica. The square root model

  15. Salmonellosis outcomes differ substantially by serotype.

    PubMed

    Jones, Timothy F; Ingram, L Amanda; Cieslak, Paul R; Vugia, Duc J; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Hurd, Sharon; Medus, Carlota; Cronquist, Alicia; Angulo, Frederick J

    2008-07-01

    Most human infections are caused by closely related serotypes within 1 species of Salmonella. Few data are available on differences in severity of disease among common serotypes. We examined data from all cases of Salmonella infection in FoodNet states during 1996-2006. Data included serotype, specimen source, hospitalization, and outcome. Among 46,639 cases, 687 serotypes were identified. Overall, 41,624 isolates (89%) were from stool specimens, 2524 (5%) were from blood, and 1669 (4%) were from urine; 10,393 (22%) cases required hospitalization, and death occurred in 219 (0.5%). The case fatality rate for S. Newport (0.3%) was significantly lower than for Typhimurium (0.6%); Dublin (3.0%) was higher. With respect to invasive disease, 13 serotypes had a significantly higher proportion than Typhimurium (6%), including Enteritidis (7%), Heidelberg (13%), Choleraesuis (57%), and Dublin (64%); 13 serotypes were significantly less likely to be invasive. Twelve serotypes, including Enteritidis (21%) and Javiana (21%), were less likely to cause hospitalization than Typhimurium (24%); Choleraesuis (60%) was significantly more so. Salmonella serotypes are closely related genetically yet differ significantly in their pathogenic potentials. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for this may be key to a more general understanding of the invasiveness of intestinal bacterial infections.

  16. Identification and serotyping of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale.

    PubMed Central

    van Empel, P; van den Bosch, H; Loeffen, P; Storm, P

    1997-01-01

    In the present study 443 strains of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, a causative agent of respiratory disease in fowl, were investigated biochemically and serologically. In both ways O. rhinotracheale could be differentiated from other gram-negative rods and, more particularly, from the Pasteurella-like bacteria potentially pathogenic for fowl. For the biochemical characterization of O. rhinotracheale the API 2ONE identification strip proved to be useful, although O. rhinotracheale is not included in the API system. Serologically, by using monovalent antisera in agar gel precipitation (AGP) tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) of O. rhinotracheale could be discriminated. The AGP test was chosen as the preferred method to be used for serotyping. Isolates of serotype A were found to be the most prevalent, especially in chickens. Isolates from turkeys were more heterogeneously divided over the serotypes. Some strains showed cross-reactivity between serotypes A, B, and E. Five O. rhinotracheale strains could not be serotyped with the available antisera. Relationships between the geographic origin and the serotypes were found. By the ELISA the presence of antibodies against O. rhinotracheale could be detected in 1-day-old birds as well as in birds with clinical signs, and therefore, it might be useful for diagnostic purposes. PMID:9003608

  17. Identification and serotyping of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale.

    PubMed

    van Empel, P; van den Bosch, H; Loeffen, P; Storm, P

    1997-02-01

    In the present study 443 strains of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, a causative agent of respiratory disease in fowl, were investigated biochemically and serologically. In both ways O. rhinotracheale could be differentiated from other gram-negative rods and, more particularly, from the Pasteurella-like bacteria potentially pathogenic for fowl. For the biochemical characterization of O. rhinotracheale the API 2ONE identification strip proved to be useful, although O. rhinotracheale is not included in the API system. Serologically, by using monovalent antisera in agar gel precipitation (AGP) tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) of O. rhinotracheale could be discriminated. The AGP test was chosen as the preferred method to be used for serotyping. Isolates of serotype A were found to be the most prevalent, especially in chickens. Isolates from turkeys were more heterogeneously divided over the serotypes. Some strains showed cross-reactivity between serotypes A, B, and E. Five O. rhinotracheale strains could not be serotyped with the available antisera. Relationships between the geographic origin and the serotypes were found. By the ELISA the presence of antibodies against O. rhinotracheale could be detected in 1-day-old birds as well as in birds with clinical signs, and therefore, it might be useful for diagnostic purposes.

  18. Comparative analysis of acid resistance in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains before and after exposure to poultry decontaminants. Role of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) system.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernando, Alicia; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2009-12-01

    Data on the ability of chemical poultry decontaminants to induce an acid stress response in pathogenic bacteria are lacking. This study was undertaken in order to compare the survival rates in acid broths of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains, both exposed to and not exposed to decontaminants. The contribution of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) acid resistance system to the survival of bacteria in acid media was also examined. Four strains (L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2, L. monocytogenes serovar 4b, S. enterica serotype Typhymurium and S. enterica serotype Enteritidis) were tested before (control) and after exposure to trisodium phosphate, acidified sodium chlorite, citric acid, chlorine dioxide and peroxyacids (strains were repeatedly passed through media containing increasing concentrations of a compound). Stationary-phase cells (10(8) cfu/ml) were inoculated into tryptic soy broth (TSB) acidified with citric acid (pH 2.7 and 5.0) with or without glutamate (10 mM) added, and incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min. Survival percentages (calculated from viable colonies) varied from 2.47 +/- 0.67% to 91.93 +/- 5.83%. L. monocytogenes cells previously exposed to acid decontaminants (citric acid and peroxyacids) showed, when placed in acid TSB, a higher (P < 0.05) percentage of survival (average 38.80 +/- 30.52%) than control and pre-exposed to non-acidic decontaminants strains (22.82 +/- 23.80%). Similar (P > 0.05) survival percentages were observed in previously exposed to different decontaminants and control Salmonella strains. The GAD acid resistance system did not apparently play any role in the survival of L. monocytogenes or S. enterica at a low pH. This study demonstrates for the first time that prior exposure to acidic poultry decontaminants increases the percentage of survival of L. monocytogenes exposed to severe acid stress. These results have important implications for the meat industry when considering which decontaminant treatment to

  19. Acid exposure induces multiplication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Suneel Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Shukla, Vijay K; Singh, Indarjeet Gambhir; Mishra, Om Prakash; Kumar, Kailash; Singh, Tej Bali; Nath, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi faces several environmental stresses while going through the stomach (acidic pH) to the small intestine (basic pH) and intracellularly in macrophages (acidic pH) in humans. The acidic pH followed by alkaline pH in the small intestine might be responsible for expression of certain stress-induced genes, resulting in not only better survival but also induction of multiplication and invasion of the bacterium in the small intestine. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a process wherein we exposed the blood, urine, and stool specimens from 90 acute typhoid fever patients and 36 chronic typhoid carriers to acidic pH to see the effect on isolation rate of S. Typhi. About 5 g of freshly passed unpreserved stool, a centrifuged deposit of 15 ml of urine, and 5 ml of blood clot were subjected to 5 ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (pH 3.5) for 20 min, followed by enrichment in bile broth-selenite F broth. When the combined isolation from all 3 specimens, i.e., blood, urine, and stool, after acid exposure was considered, a total of 77.7% of the acute typhoid patients were observed to be positive for the isolation of the S. Typhi serotype, compared to 8.8% by the conventional method. Similarly, 42% (15/36) of chronic carriers yielded positive for S. Typhi growth after acid exposure, compared to 5.5% (2/36) by the conventional method. It therefore can be concluded that acid shock triggers the multiplication of the bacteria, resulting in better isolation rates from blood clot, stool, and urine specimens.

  20. Sensitive and rapid molecular detection assays for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Heidelberg

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is a significant cause of gastroenteritis worldwide, with S. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Heidelberg being particularly prevalent. S. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Heidelberg have broad host ranges infecting poultry, dairy animals and humans. Traditional methods used fo...

  1. Two draft genome sequences of a new serovar of Salmonella enterica, serovar Lubbock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is principally a foodborne pathogen that shows considerable serovar diversity. In this report, we present two draft genome sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock, a novel serovar....

  2. Two Draft Genome Sequences of a New Serovar of Salmonella enterica, Serovar Lubbock

    PubMed Central

    den Bakker, Henk C.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M.; Edrington, Thomas S.; Loneragan, Guy H.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is principally a foodborne pathogen that shows considerable serovar diversity. In this report, we present two draft genome sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock, a novel serovar. PMID:25883279

  3. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Miyamoto, A.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 × 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  4. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Smith, Susan R.; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 × 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  5. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Smith, Susan R; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 x 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  6. Detection of Salmonella enterica in pigs at slaughter and comparison with human isolates in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, Silvia; Alpigiani, Irene; Bruini, Ilaria; Barilli, Elena; Brindani, Franco; Morganti, Marina; Cavallini, Pierugo; Bolzoni, Luca; Pongolini, Stefano

    2016-02-02

    In 2013-2014, 201 pigs belonging to 67 batches were tested for Salmonella in their mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) in one abattoir of Northern Italy. For each batch, faecal material was collected at lairage by swabbing the pen floor for approximately 1600 cm(2). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella in MLN of pigs at slaughter, to assess Salmonella contamination at lairage and to evaluate the effect of lairage duration on its prevalence. Serotyping, XbaI PFGE typing and antimicrobial testing of the isolates were performed. Pig and human Salmonella isolates of the same region of Italy were compared to evaluate possible correlations. Salmonella enterica was isolated from 19.9% of the MLN and 49.3% of the environmental faecal samples. Nine different serovars were identified among 75 S. enterica isolates. In MLN Salmonella Derby was the most common (52.5%), followed by S. enterica 4,[5],12:i:- (17.5%) and Salmonella Rissen (10.0%). In faecal samples S. Derby was prevalent (51.4%), followed by S. enterica 4,[5], 12:i:- (20.0%) and Salmonella Brandenburg (14.3%). Lairage holding varied between 1 and ≥ 12 h (median value: 2.5h). In pigs held for 1-3h, 14.1% were positive for Salmonella in MLN but the prevalence reached 31.8% when they were held for ≥ 12 h. The contamination of MLN was statistically different (p=0.0045) between the two groups, thus confirming the role of long-lasting lairage in Salmonella contamination of pigs. XbaI PFGE typing detected 36 PFGE types. Twenty-three PFGE types were identified among the 40 MLN isolates and 22 PFGE types among the 35 faecal isolates. A total of 11 PFGE types were shared between the MLN of pigs and the lairage environment. Among S. Derby, 6 shared PFGE types between MLN and faeces were found and among S. enterica 4,[5],12:i:- one PFGE type was common between MLN and the faecal samples. Shared profiles between human and swine isolates of S. Derby, S. enterica 4,[5],12:i:-, S. Rissen, Salmonella

  7. Outbreak of Salmonella serotype Hartford infections associated with unpasteurized orange juice.

    PubMed

    Cook, K A; Dobbs, T E; Hlady, W G; Wells, J G; Barrett, T J; Puhr, N D; Lancette, G A; Bodager, D W; Toth, B L; Genese, C A; Highsmith, A K; Pilot, K E; Finelli, L; Swerdlow, D L

    1998-11-04

    Acidic foods such as orange juice have been thought to be unlikely vehicles of foodborne illness. To investigate an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Hartford (Salmonella Hartford) infections among persons visiting a theme park in Orlando, Fla, in 1995. Review of surveillance data, matched case-control study, laboratory investigation, and environmental studies. General community. The surveillance case definition was Salmonella Hartford or Salmonella serogroup C1 infection in a resident of or a visitor to Orlando in May or June 1995. In the case-control study, case patients were limited to theme park hotel visitors and controls were matched to case patients by age group and hotel check-in date. Risk factors for infection and source of implicated food. Sixty-two case patients from 21 states were identified. Both Salmonella Hartford and Salmonella enterica serotype Gaminara (Salmonella Gaminara) were isolated from stool samples of 1 ill person. Thirty-two case patients and 83 controls were enrolled in the case-control study. Ninety-seven percent of case patients had drunk orange juice in the theme park vs 54% of controls (matched odds ratio, undefined; 95% confidence interval, 5.2 to undefined). The orange juice was unpasteurized and locally produced. Salmonella Gaminara was isolated from 10 of 12 containers of orange juice produced during May and July, indicating ongoing contamination of juice probably because of inadequately sanitized processing equipment. Unpasteurized orange juice caused an outbreak of salmonellosis in a large Florida theme park. All orange juice was recalled and the processing plant closed. Pasteurization or other equally effective risk-management strategies should be used in the production of all juices.

  8. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA). We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested. PMID:24031771

  9. Diversity of rotavirus serotypes in Mexican infants with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Noriega, L; Arias, C F; López, S; Puerto, F; Snodgrass, D R; Taniguchi, K; Greenberg, H B

    1990-01-01

    One hundred thirty-two stool specimens from infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalized in two Mexican cities (Mexico City and Mérida) were examined by serotype- and subgroup-specific enzyme immunoassays. Among them, 38 (29%) were serotype 1, 15 (11%) were serotype 2, 13 (10%) were serotype 3, 22 (17%) were serotype 4, none was serotype 5 or 6, and 44 (33%) could not be serotyped. By subgrouping, 121 specimens were characterized as follows: 24 (18%) were subgroup 1, 97 (74%) were subgroup 2, and none had both subgroup specificities. While serotype 1 rotavirus predominated in the Mexico City area for 4 consecutive years (1984 to 1987), serotype 4 predominated in Mérida during the single epidemic season studied (1985). These data demonstrate that all four primary human rotavirus serotypes circulated in Mexico, with serotype 1 being the most prevalent. The seroneutralization responses of 14 of the 22 patients infected with serotype 4 strains had been previously studied. Of these 14 infants, 11 appeared to have primary infections, as indicated by absence of neutralizing antibodies in the acute-phase sera and their young age (8 months on average) at the time of illness. Seven patients seroresponded to serotypes 1 and 4; two seroresponded to serotypes 1, 3, and 4; three seroresponded to serotype 1; and two had low-level seroresponses to serotype 3 or 4. These data indicate that heterotypic neutralizing antibody responses occur frequently following infection with serotype 4 rotaviruses. PMID:2166073

  10. Evaluation of cross-protection of bluetongue virus serotype 4 with other serotypes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Zulu, Gcwalisile B; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-10-16

    Bluetongue (BT) is a non-contagious disease of sheep and other domestic and wild ruminants caused by the bluetongue virus (BTV). Currently 26 serotypes of the virus have been identified. In South Africa, 22 serotypes have been identified and BT is controlled mainly by annual vaccinations using a freeze-dried live attenuated polyvalent BTV vaccine. The vaccine is constituted of 15 BTV serotypes divided into three separate bottles and the aim is to develop a vaccine using fewer serotypes without compromising the immunity against the disease. This study is based on previously reported cross-neutralisation of specific BTV serotypes in in vitro studies. Bluetongue virus serotype 4 was selected for this trial and was tested for cross-protection against serotype 4 (control), 1 (unrelated serotype), 9, 10 and 11 in sheep using the serum neutralisation test. The purpose of the study was to determine possible cross-protection of different serotypes in sheep. Of those vaccinated with BTV-4 and challenged with BTV-1, which is not directly related to BTV-4, 20% were completely protected and 80% showed clinical signs, but the reaction was not as severe as amongst the unvaccinated animals. In the group challenged with BTV-10, some showed good protection and some became very sick. Those challenged with BTV-9 and BTV-11 had good protection. The results showed that BTV-4 does not only elicit a specific immune response but can also protect against other serotypes.

  11. The cps locus of Streptococcus suis serotype 16: development of a serotype-specific PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaicheng; Fan, Weixing; Wisselink, Henk; Lu, Chengping

    2011-12-15

    Streptococcus suis serotype 16 can infect pigs and humans. We describe the identification and the characterization of the capsular polysaccharides synthesis locus of S. suis serotype 16. Using PCR primers flanking the capsular polysaccharides synthesis locus, a 30,101-bp fragment was amplified. Twenty-nine open reading frames related to transcriptional regulation, glycosyl transfer, oligosaccharide repeat unit polymerization, polysaccharide transport, sialic acid synthesis and modification were identified. The data suggests that the serotype 16 capsule is synthesized by a Wzy-dependent pathway. So far, no rapid and sensitive diagnostic method is available for detection of serotype 16 isolates. A serotype specific PCR test for the rapid and sensitive detection of S. suis serotype 16 was developed. Cross hybridization experiments of individual cps genes with chromosomal DNAs of 33 serotypes showed that the cps16G and cps16K genes hybridized with serotype 16 only. Primers based on cps16G were used to develop a serotype 16 specific PCR. The PCR assay was successfully used to identify S. suis serotype 16 in the 99 Chinese S. suis clinical isolates and 8 European isolates.

  12. Pediatric Pneumococcal Serotypes in 4 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, Esther; Fenoll, Asuncion; George, Robert; Lepoutre, Agnes; Lernout, Tinne; Tarragó, David; Varon, Emmanuelle; Verhaegen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    After heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was marketed in France, Spain, Belgium, and England and Wales (United Kingdom), invasive disease from non-PCV7 serotypes (NVT) increased. Adjusted serotype-specific incidences among children <15 years of age were compared between 1999–2002 (prevaccine) and 2005–2006 (postmarketing). Vaccine coverage increased to ≈32%–48% in France, Spain, and Belgium but remained <1% in England and Wales. Serotype 1 incidence rose in all age groups and countries (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.3–4.2; p<0.004), independently of PCV7 use, but incidence of serotypes 7F and 19A increased most in France, Spain, and Belgium (IRR 1.9–16.9 in children <5 years; p<0.001), where PCV7 coverage was greater. Vaccine-induced replacement of PCV7 serotypes possibly contributed to NVT increases, as did secular trends. New vaccines targeting these serotypes are available, but serotype dynamics needs further exploration that accounts for underreporting and prevaccine trends. PMID:20735928

  13. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella serotype typhimurium infections associated with drinking unpasteurized milk--Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Tennessee, 2002-2003.

    PubMed

    2003-07-04

    On December 10, 2002, the Clark County Combined Health District and the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) were notified of two hospitalized children infected with Salmonella Enterica serotype Typhimurium. Initial investigation implicated consumption of raw, unpasteurized milk purchased at a local combination dairy-restaurant (dairy) during November 27-December 13, 2002, as the cause. This report summarizes the subsequent investigation. Because 27 states still allow the sale of raw milk, and organizations continue their efforts to allow marketing and sale of raw milk to the public directly from the farm, consumer education about the hazards of raw milk and a careful review of existing policies are needed.

  14. [Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella strains isolated from food in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Puig Peña, Yamila; Espino Hernández, María; Leyva Castillo, Virginia; Aportela López, Neibys; Machín Díaz, Mayrin; Soto Rodríguez, Perla

    2011-12-01

    The serotypes of 178 isolates of Salmonella enterica taken from food in different regions of Cuba between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of 100 selected isolates was determined by strata sampling. A total of 20 Salmonella serotypes were identified, with a predominance of S. Enteritidis (23%), S. Agona (13.5%), and S. London (11.2%). Of all the strains, 75% were resistant or presented intermediate resistance to at least one of the drugs tested, in the following order: tetracycline (70.7%), ampicillin (22.7%), and nalidixic acid (14.7%). Ten different resistance patterns were identified. The most frequent patterns corresponded to strains that were either drug-resistant or had intermediate resistance (89.3%). Three strains (identified as S. Infantis, S. Derby, and S. Enteritidis) were multiresistant, and one of them, S. Enteritidis, was not sensitive to either nalidixic acid or ciprofloxacin. To control salmonellosis, the importance of maximizing integrated health surveillance is emphasized.

  15. Blind comparison of traditional serotyping with three multiplex PCRs for the identification of Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed

    Herrera-León, Silvia; Ramiro, Raquel; Arroyo, Margarita; Díez, Rosa; Usera, Miguel Angel; Echeita, Maria Aurora

    2007-03-01

    Salmonella serotypes are defined on the basis of somatic (O) antigens which define the serogroup and flagellar (H) factor antigens, both of which are present in the cell wall of Salmonella. Most Salmonella organisms alternatively express phase-1 or phase-2 flagellar antigens encoded by fliC and fljB genes, respectively. Our group previously published two multiplex PCRs for distinguishing the most common first- and second-phase antigens. In this paper we describe a third multiplex PCR to identify the most common serogroups (O:B; O:C1; O:C2; O:D and O:E). The combination of these three PCRs enabled us to completely serotype organisms belonging to the Salmonella species. This multiplex PCR includes 10 primers. A total of 67 Salmonella strains belonging to 32 different serotypes were tested. Each strain generated one serogroup-specific fragment ranging between 162 and 615bp. Twenty-eight strains belonging to 21 serotypes, with a serogroup different from those tested in this work, did not generate any fragments. To compare molecular serotyping with traditional serotyping, 500 strains, received according to the order of arrival in the laboratory, were serotyped using both methods. The three multiplex PCRs were able to serotype 84.6% of the tested strains. This method was found to be very helpful in our laboratory as an alternative method for typing strains causing outbreaks, and it can be used to supplement conventional serotyping, since it is also applicable to motionless and rough strains.

  16. [A possible fifth dengue virus serotype].

    PubMed

    da Silva Voorham, Júlia M

    2014-01-01

    Sylvatic dengue viruses are both evolutionarily and ecologically distinguishable from the human dengue virus (DENV). Sporadic episodes of sylvatic human infections in West Africa and Southeast Asia suggest that sylvatic DENV regularly come into contact with human beings. Following a study on the sylvatic transmission cycle in Malaysia in 2007, researchers announced that a new DENV serotype, DENV-5, had been discovered. Scientists are still sceptical about these new findings, and indicate that more data is necessary to determine whether this 'new' virus really is a different serotype or whether it is a variant of one of the four DENV serotypes already known. The good news is that this new variant has not yet established itself in the human transmission cycle. However, if it really is a new serotype this will have implications for the long-term control of dengue using vaccines currently under development.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to serotype 2 and serotype 15 outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis and their use in serotyping.

    PubMed Central

    Zollinger, W D; Moran, E E; Connelly, H; Mandrell, R E; Brandt, B

    1984-01-01

    A series of murine monoclonal antibodies to serotype 2 and serotype 15 strains of Neisseria meningitidis were produced which were specific for outer membrane proteins of classes 1, 2, 3, and 5. A panel of eight monoclonal antibodies that exhibited a high degree of serotype specificity when reacted with prototype strains of known serotype were selected for study. Each of the corresponding epitopes was localized on a specific outer membrane protein by means of immunoprecipitation, electroblotting, or both. The serotype 2a-, 2b-, and 2c-specific antibodies bound to the class 2 protein, the serotype 15-specific antibody bound to the class 3 protein, two antibodies (3-1-P1.2 and 3-1-P1.16) bound to class 1 proteins, and two antibodies (1-1-P5.1 and 3-1-P5.2) bound to class 5 proteins. Six of these monoclonal antibodies were used in a spot-blot procedure to survey 122 case isolates (groups B, C, Y, and W135) and 363 carrier isolates (all serogroups) for the presence of the 2a, 2b, 2c, 15, P1.2, and P1.16 epitopes. A total of 66% of the case isolates and 30% of the carrier isolates reacted with one or more of the monoclonal antibodies. The use of monoclonal antibodies for serotyping of meningococci appears to be feasible and easy and appears to have significant advantages over the use of polyclonal typing sera. Images PMID:6434428

  18. Transmission and Retention of Salmonella enterica by Phytophagous Hemipteran Insects

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Arias, José Pablo; Groves, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Several pest insects of human and livestock habitations are known as vectors of Salmonella enterica; however, the role of plant-feeding insects as vectors of S. enterica to agricultural crops remains unexamined. Using a hemipteran insect pest-lettuce system, we investigated the potential for transmission and retention of S. enterica. Specifically, Macrosteles quadrilineatus and Myzus persicae insects were fed S. enterica-inoculated lettuce leaf discs or artificial liquid diets confined in Parafilm sachets to allow physical contact or exclusively oral ingestion of the pathogen, respectively. After a 24-h acquisition access period, insects were moved onto two consecutive noninoculated leaf discs or liquid diets and allowed a 24-h inoculation access period on each of the two discs or sachets. Similar proportions of individuals from both species ingested S. enterica after a 24-h acquisition access period from inoculated leaf discs, but a significantly higher proportion of M. quadrilineatus retained the pathogen internally after a 48-h inoculation access period. S. enterica was also recovered from the honeydew of both species. After a 48-h inoculation access period, bacteria were recovered from a significantly higher proportion of honeydew samples from M. quadrilineatus than from M. persicae insects. The recovery of S. enterica from leaf discs and liquid diets postfeeding demonstrated that both species of insects were capable of transmitting the bacteria in ways that are not limited to mechanical transmission. Overall, these results suggest that phytophagous insects may serve as potential vectors of S. enterica in association with plants. PMID:24973069

  19. Variation in Salmonella resistance to poultry chemical decontaminants, based on serotype, phage type, and antibiotic resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    Capita, Rosa

    2007-08-01

    Chemical decontaminants are currently under review for final approval by the European Union authorities with the aim of reducing the number and/or prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms on poultry. The purpose of the research being reported here was to determine the association, if any, of decontaminant resistance with the serotype, phage type, and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella strains. Sixty poultry isolates of Salmonella enterica (serotypes Enteritidis: phage types 1, 4, 4b, 6a, 14b, and 35; Typhimurium; Newport; Infantis; Poona; Virchow; Agona; Derby; and Paratyphi B) showing resistance to none (sensitive), one (resistant), two, three, four, five, six, seven, or nine (multiresistant) antibiotics were screened for resistance to 1,000 ppm acidified sodium chlorite, 1.2% trisodium phosphate, or 25% citric acid. D-values (seconds required for 1-log reduction in the number of bacteria) in peptone water, using a linear regression, of Salmonella in the presence of acidified sodium chlorite varied widely with serotype (the highest resistance levels were shown by serotypes Typhimurium, Newport, and Derby) and antibiotic resistance pattern (average values of 8.37 +/- 1.69 s for multiresistant strains as compared with 5.96 +/- 0.54 s for sensitive, P < 0.05). A positive relationship (0.775, P < 0.001) was found between acidified sodium chlorite D-values and the number of antibiotics to which strains were resistant. Both serotype and antibiotic resistance had only a slight influence over Salmonella resistance to trisodium phosphate, with average D-values from 12.44 +/- 0.91 s (sensitive strains) to 13.28 +/- 0.77 s (multiresistant) (P < 0.05). Neither serotype nor antibiotic profile was associated with Salmonella resistance to citric acid (average D-value of 12.20 +/- 0.81 s). Minimal differences in resistance to decontaminants were found among Salmonella Enteritidis phage types. Results in the present study highlight the importance of selecting an adequate strain

  20. Detection of Salmonella enterica in Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) of Chilean Patagonia: evidences of inter-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Dougnac, C; Pardo, C; Meza, K; Arredondo, C; Blank, O; Abalos, P; Vidal, R; Fernandez, A; Fredes, F; Retamal, P

    2015-04-01

    Patagonia in southern South America is among the few world regions where direct human impact is still limited but progressively increasing, mainly represented by tourism, farming, fishing and mining activities. The sanitary condition of Patagonian wildlife is unknown, in spite of being critical for the assessment of anthropogenic effects there. The aim of this study was the characterization of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from wild colonies of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) located in Magdalena Island and Otway Sound, in Chilean Patagonia. Eight isolates of Salmonella were found, belonging to Agona and Enteritidis serotypes, with an infection rate of 0·38%. Resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftiofur and tetracycline antimicrobials were detected, and some of these strains showed genotypic similarity with Salmonella strains isolated from humans and gulls, suggesting inter-species transmission cycles and strengthening the role of penguins as sanitary sentinels in the Patagonian ecosystem.

  1. IS200 and multilocus sequence typing for the identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Silva, Claudia; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Wiesner, Magdalena; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Calva, Edmundo

    2015-06-01

    In this work, IS200 and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze 19 strains previously serotyped as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and isolated in Indonesia (16 strains), Mexico (2 strains), and Switzerland (1 strain). Most of the strains showed the most common Typhi sequence types, ST1 and ST2, and a new Typhi genotype (ST1856) was described. However, one isolate from Mexico and another from Indonesia were of the ST365 and ST426 sequence types, indicating that they belonged to serovars Weltevreden and Aberdeen, respectively. These results were supported by the amplification of IS200 fragments, which rapidly distinguish Typhi from other serovars. Our results demonstrate the utility of IS200 and MLST in the classification of Salmonella strains into serovars. These methods provide information on the clonal relatedness of strains isolated worldwide.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Oranienburg Strains Isolated from Rivers in Northwestern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Casteñeda-Ruelas, Gloria M.; Carreón-Gaxiola, César; Castelán-Sánchez, Hugo G.; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham; Romero-Martínez, Salvador; García-Molina, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Oranienburg is recognized as a foodborne pathogen widely distributed in the environment. Here, we report 18 draft genomes of S. Oranienburg strains isolated from rivers in the northwestern region of Mexico. PMID:28280020

  3. Complete, closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from human and bovine sources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica are a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of ten S. Typhimurium strains, five each...

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Canadian Isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Heidelberg from Human, Animal, and Food Sources

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Bekal, Sadjia; Parmley, E. Jane; Agunos, Agnes; Desruisseau, Andrea; Daignault, Danielle; Slavic, Durda; Hoang, Linda; Ramsay, Danielle; Pollari, Frank; Robertson, James; Nash, John H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg is a highly clonal serovar frequently associated with foodborne illness. To facilitate subtyping efforts, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 17 Canadian S. Heidelberg isolates including six pairs of epidemiologically related strains. The plasmid sequences of eight isolates contain several drug resistance genes. PMID:27635008

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strain SPE101, Isolated from a Chronic Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Iriarte, Andrés; Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Betancor, Laura; Astocondor, Lizeth; Cestero, Juan J.; Ochoa, Theresa; García, Coralith; Puente, José L.; Chabalgoity, José A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a 4.99-Mb draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis strain SPE101, isolated from feces of a 5-month-old breast-fed female showing diarrhea associated with severe dehydration and malnutrition. The infection prolonged for 6 months despite antibiotic treatment. PMID:28729277

  6. Complete genomic sequences of two outbreak strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson associated with cilantro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH -99A2345) are clinical isolates from 1999, putatively related to an outbreak in California from contaminated cilantro. We report the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson...

  7. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Hungary Representing Two Peak Incidence Periods in Three Decades.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János; Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Béla

    2017-03-02

    Four strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolated from humans (1980 to 1982) and broiler chickens (2016) have been sequenced. They represent the early and recent peak incidences of this serovar in Hungary. Genome sequences of these isolates provide comparative data on the evolution and rise of an endemic S Infantis clone in Hungary.

  8. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Hungary Representing Two Peak Incidence Periods in Three Decades

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Four strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolated from humans (1980 to 1982) and broiler chickens (2016) have been sequenced. They represent the early and recent peak incidences of this serovar in Hungary. Genome sequences of these isolates provide comparative data on the evolution and rise of an endemic S. Infantis clone in Hungary. PMID:28254986

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strain SPE101, Isolated from a Chronic Human Infection.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Andrés; Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Silva, Claudia; Betancor, Laura; Astocondor, Lizeth; Cestero, Juan J; Ochoa, Theresa; García, Coralith; Puente, José L; Chabalgoity, José A; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2017-07-20

    We report a 4.99-Mb draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis strain SPE101, isolated from feces of a 5-month-old breast-fed female showing diarrhea associated with severe dehydration and malnutrition. The infection prolonged for 6 months despite antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Iriarte et al.

  10. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Lubbock Strains Isolated from Liver Abscesses of Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Thomas, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequencing of 13 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock strains isolated from liver abscesses of feedlot cattle is reported here. The availability of these genomes will help to further understand the etiologic role of Salmonella strains in liver abscesses of cattle and will serve as references in microbial trace-back studies to improve food safety. PMID:27151794

  11. First Fully Closed Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Associated with a Food-Borne Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Maria; Muruvanda, Tim; Pirone, Cary; Korlach, Jonas; Timme, Ruth; Payne, Justin; Evans, Peter; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W; Allard, Marc W

    2014-10-30

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana (Salmonella serovar Cubana) is associated with human and animal disease. Here, we used third-generation, single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing to determine the first complete genome sequence of Salmonella serovar Cubana CFSAN002050, which was isolated from fresh alfalfa sprouts during a multistate outbreak in 2012. Copyright © 2014 Hoffmann et al.

  12. First Fully Closed Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana Associated with a Food-Borne Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Muruvanda, Tim; Pirone, Cary; Korlach, Jonas; Timme, Ruth; Payne, Justin; Evans, Peter; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W.; Allard, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana (Salmonella serovar Cubana) is associated with human and animal disease. Here, we used third-generation, single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing to determine the first complete genome sequence of Salmonella serovar Cubana CFSAN002050, which was isolated from fresh alfalfa sprouts during a multistate outbreak in 2012. PMID:25359917

  13. Whole-Genome Sequence and Annotation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 8 Strain EN1660

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Benjamin J.; Fitzgerald, Stephen F.; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 strain EN1660, isolated from an outbreak in Thunder Bay, Canada, was sequenced to 46-fold coverage using an Illumina MiSeq with 300-bp paired-end sequencing chemistry to produce 28 contigs with an N50 value of 490,721 bp. PMID:28126943

  14. The complete genome sequence and methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro, a frequent dairy cow strain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro is an infrequent pathogen of humans and other mammals, but is frequently isolated from the hindgut of asymptomatic cattle in the United States. To further understand the genomic determinants of S. Cerro specificity for the bovine hindgut, the genome ...

  15. Genomic Characterization of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Serotypes and Development of a Multiplex PCR-Based Serotyping Scheme.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Tatiana; Fujiwara-Nagata, Erina; Calvez, Ségolène; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Calteau, Alexandra; Lunazzi, Aurélie; Nicolas, Pierre; Wiklund, Tom; Bernardet, Jean-François; Duchaud, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a devastating bacterial pathogen of salmonids reared in freshwater worldwide. So far, serological diversity between isolates has been described but the underlying molecular factors remain unknown. By combining complete genome sequence analysis and the serotyping method proposed by Lorenzen and Olesen (1997) for a set of 34 strains, we identified key molecular determinants of the serotypes. This knowledge allowed us to develop a robust multiplex PCR-based serotyping scheme, which was applied to 244 bacterial isolates. The results revealed a striking association between PCR-serotype and fish host species and illustrate the use of this approach as a simple and cost-effective method for the determination of F. psychrophilum serogroups. PCR-based serotyping could be a useful tool in a range of applications such as disease surveillance, selection of salmonids for bacterial coldwater disease resistance and future vaccine formulation.

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus mutans: Comparison of Serotype Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Little, Wayne A.; Thomson, Lynn A.; Bowen, William H.

    1979-01-01

    A total of 82 strains of Streptococcus mutans representing serotypes a through g were tested for susceptibility to erythromycin, penicillin, methicillin, lincomycin, tetracycline, vancomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, neomycin, kanamycin, bacitracin, and polymyxin B. Strains included stock cultures and isolates from human and animal dental plaque. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by a broth-microdilution procedure. The major differences in antibiotic susceptibility observed among the serotypes resulted with antibiotics which act on the cell surface. Bacitracin was most active against serotype a strains and polymyxin B against serotype b strains. Serotypes a, d, and g were less susceptible than the other serotypes to methicillin. PMID:464571

  17. Serotypes in Saccharomyces telluris: Their relation to source of isolation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasenclever, H.F.; Kocan, R.M.

    1973-01-01

    Three serotypes have been characterized with three reference strains of Saccharomyces telluris and designated as A, B, and C. One reference strain of Torpulopsis bovina, the imperfect form of S. telluris, belonged to serotype B. Strains of S. telluris isolated from four columbid species were serotyped. All 98 strains of this yeast isolated from Columba livia belonged to serotype B. Three other columbid species, C. leucocephala, C. fasciata, and Zenaidura macroura harbored strains of serotype C only. Serotype A was not isolated from any of the avian species.

  18. Improved detection of nasopharyngeal cocolonization by multiple pneumococcal serotypes by use of latex agglutination or molecular serotyping by microarray.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul; Hinds, Jason; Turner, Claudia; Jankhot, Auscharee; Gould, Katherine; Bentley, Stephen D; Nosten, François; Goldblatt, David

    2011-05-01

    Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx is critical for an understanding of transmission, estimates of vaccine efficacy, and possible replacement disease. Conventional nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) culture and serotyping (the WHO protocol) is likely to underestimate multiple-serotype carriage. We compared the WHO protocol with methods aimed at improving cocolonization detection. One hundred twenty-five NPSs from an infant pneumococcal-carriage study, containing ≥ 1 serotype by WHO culture, were recultured in duplicate. A sweep of colonies from one plate culture was serotyped by latex agglutination. DNA extracted from the second plate was analyzed by S. pneumoniae molecular-serotyping microarray. Multiple serotypes were detected in 11.2% of the swabs by WHO culture, 43.2% by sweep serotyping, and 48.8% by microarray. Sweep and microarray were more likely to detect multiple serotypes than WHO culture (P < 0.0001). Cocolonization detection rates were similar between microarray and sweep, but the microarray identified the greatest number of serotypes. A common serogroup type was identified in 95.2% of swabs by all methods. WHO methodology significantly underestimates multiple-serotype carriage compared to these alternate methods. Sweep serotyping is cost-effective and field deployable but may fail to detect serotypes at low abundance, whereas microarray serotyping is more costly and technology dependent but may detect these additional minor carried serotypes.

  19. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Salmonella enterica in Captive Wildlife and Exotic Animal Species in Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Farias, L F P; Oliveira, C J B; Medardus, J J; Molla, B Z; Wolfe, B A; Gebreyes, W A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence, antimicrobial resistance patterns, phenotypic and genotypic relatedness of Salmonella enterica recovered from captive wildlife host species and in the environment in Ohio, USA. A total of 319 samples including faecal (n = 225), feed (n = 38) and environmental (n = 56) were collected from 32 different wild and exotic animal species in captivity and their environment in Ohio. Salmonellae were isolated using conventional culture methods and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility with the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Salmonella isolates were serotyped, and genotyping was performed using the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Salmonella was detected in 56 of 225 (24.9%) faecal samples; six of 56 (10.7%) environmental samples and six of 38 (15.8%) feed samples. Salmonella was more commonly isolated in faecal samples from giraffes (78.2%; 36/46), cranes (75%; 3/4) and raccoons (75%; 3/4). Salmonella enterica serotypes of known public health significance including S. Typhimurium (64.3%), S. Newport (32.1%) and S. Heidelberg (5.3%) were identified. While the majority of the Salmonella isolates were pan-susceptible (88.2%; 60 of 68), multidrug-resistant strains including penta-resistant type, AmStTeKmGm (8.8%; six of 68) were detected. Genotypic diversity was found among S. Typhimurium isolates. The identification of clonally related Salmonella isolates from environment and faeces suggests that indirect transmission of Salmonella among hosts via environmental contamination is an important concern to workers, visitors and other wildlife. Results of this study show the diversity of Salmonella serovars and public health implications of human exposure from wildlife reservoirs.

  20. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from pig farms in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fashae, Kayode; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2014-01-01

    Animals including food animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of Salmonella enterica. The control requires identification of sources and institution of targeted interventions. This study investigates the diversity of S. enterica serovars, antimicrobial susceptibility, and occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria. Pooled fresh pen floor fecal samples of pigs collected from 31 pig farms were cultured; the Salmonella isolates were serotyped and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined. PMQR genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction. The 229 Salmonella isolates were made of 50 serovars predominated by rare serovars Salmonella Give (n = 36; 15.7 %), Salmonella Brancaster (n = 17; 7.4 %), Salmonella Colindale (n = 15; 6.6 %), Salmonella Elisaberthville (n = 13; 5.7 %), Salmonella Hillingdon (n = 13; 5.7 %), and Salmonella Kingston (n = 13; 5.7 %). The most widely distributed serovars among the farms were Salmonella Give (six farms) and Salmonella Elisaberthville (six farms). Resistance to chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline ranged from 11.6 % (n = 26) to 22.8 % (n = 51). Resistance ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was low (n = 2; 0.9 %). Multiply resistant isolates included Salmonella Kentucky, the most resistant serovar. qnrB19 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Corvallis and one isolate of Salmonella Larochelle, respectively, while qnrS1 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Derby. Other PMQR genes were not detected. Pigs constitute an important source of diverse Salmonella serovars in Ibadan. The isolates were more resistant to old antimicrobials with some multiple resistant. Control measures and regulation of antimicrobials are warranted.

  1. Distribution and Characterization of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Irrigation Ponds in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhiyao; Gu, Ganyu; Ginn, Amber; Giurcanu, Mihai C.; Adams, Paige; Vellidis, George; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.; Danyluk, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Irrigation water has been implicated as a likely source of produce contamination by Salmonella enterica. Therefore, the distribution of S. enterica was surveyed monthly in irrigation ponds (n = 10) located within a prime agricultural region in southern Georgia and northern Florida. All ponds and 28.2% of all samples (n = 635) were positive for Salmonella, with an overall geometric mean concentration (0.26 most probable number [MPN]/liter) that was relatively low compared to prior reports for rivers in this region. Salmonella peaks were seasonal; the levels correlated with increased temperature and rainfall (P < 0.05). The numbers and occurrence were significantly higher in water (0.32 MPN/liter and 37% of samples) than in sediment (0.22 MPN/liter and 17% of samples) but did not vary with depth. Representative isolates (n = 185) from different ponds, sample types, and seasons were examined for resistance to 15 different antibiotics; most strains were resistant to streptomycin (98.9%), while 20% were multidrug resistant (MDR) for 2 to 6 antibiotics. DiversiLab repetitive extragenic palindromic-element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) revealed genetic diversity and showed 43 genotypes among 191 isolates, as defined by >95% similarity. The genotypes did not partition by pond, season, or sample type. Genetic similarity to known serotypes indicated Hadar, Montevideo, and Newport as the most prevalent. All ponds achieved the current safety standards for generic Escherichia coli in agricultural water, and regression modeling showed that the E. coli level was a significant predictor for the probability of Salmonella occurrence. However, persistent populations of Salmonella were widely distributed in irrigation ponds, and the associated risks for produce contamination and subsequent human exposure are unknown, supporting continued surveillance of this pathogen in agricultural settings. PMID:25911476

  2. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Wang, Jinyuan; Liu, Tiantian; Beier, Ross C; Hou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 293 Salmonella strains were isolated from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in Shandong province of China, and 130 (44.4%) were characterized as Salmonella enterica Indiana (chicken farms, n=52 strains; slaughter houses, n=78 strains). All isolate serotypes were tested with the Kauffmann-White classification system and examined for susceptibility to the quinolones: nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance of the Salmonella Indiana strains to nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were 100, 73.1, 71.2, and 82.7%, and 100, 59.0, 79.5, and 80.2%, respectively. Selected quinolone resistant strains were evaluated for mutations in genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, and marA) by DNA sequencing. The gyrA mutation was found in all isolates, the parC mutation was only found in some isolates, and the gyrB and marA mutations were not observed. Quinolone resistance was evaluated in the representative isolates by screening for the quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac (6 ')-Ib-cr using PCR technology. The quinolone resistance determinants in Salmonella, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA were negative by PCR, but aac(6 ')-Ib-cr had high detection rates of 90.4 and 96.2% in chicken farms and slaughterhouses, respectively. Salmonella Indiana containing the gyrA mutation was prevalent in farms and slaughterhouses and possessed a high frequency of the quinolone resistance determinant aac(6 ')-Ib-cr. These bacteria may have originated from the same source.

  3. [Serovars of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica and its antimicrobial resistance in slaughterhouse pigs].

    PubMed

    Ibar, M P; Vigo, G; Piñeyro, P; Caffer, M I; Quiroga, P; Perfumo, C; Centrón, D; Giacoboni, G

    2009-01-01

    A study was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of Salmonella and its serovars among porcine slaughterhouses, to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profiles and to know the presence of class 1 integrons as possible reservoir of resistance. From a total of 386 samples from four porcine slaughterhouses of Buenos Aires and Santa Fe Provinces (Argentina), 93 (24.1%) Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains were identified, 52 (55.9%) from cecal contents and 41 (44.1%) from ileocecal lymph nodes. Thirteen serovars of S. enterica were found, the most prevalent were: S. Schwarzengrund, S. Heidelberg, S. subspecie I 6,8:e,h:-, S. Derby and S. Bredeney. Fifteen antimicrobials by the agar dilution method were tested: amikacin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, cephalotin, cefotaxime, enrofloxacin, fosfomycin, polimixin-B, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, nitrofurantoin, and nalidixic acid. According to the CIM determination, 73% Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains were sensible to all the antimicrobials tested. Antimicrobial resistance was observed to tetracycline in 24 (25.8%) of 93 strains, to chloramphenicol in 22 (23.7%), to streptomycin in 22 (23.7%), to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 20 (21.5%), to ampicillin in 18 (19.4%), to nitrofurantoin in 3 (3.2%) and to nalidixic acid in 3 (3.2%). Some isolates of S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, S. Derby, S. Orion showed multidrug resistance and carried the class 1 integrase gene. The highest percentage of resistance corresponded to the antimicrobials currently used in veterinary and porcine farms.

  4. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Li, Yinghui; Ansari, Hifzur R.; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Ho, Y. S.; Naeem, Raeece; Pickard, Derek; Klena, John D.; Xu, Xuebing; Pain, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species. PMID:27225410

  5. Genetic Evolution of the Spanish Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica 4,5,12:i:- Monophasic Variant ▿

    PubMed Central

    Laorden, Lorena; Herrera-León, Silvia; Martínez, Ilargi; Sanchez, Ainhoa; Kromidas, Lefteris; Bikandi, Joseba; Rementeria, Aitor; Echeita, Aurora; Garaizar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed a collection of 60 Salmonella enterica 4,5,12:i:- phage type U302 multidrug-resistant monophasic variant strains, isolated in Spain between 2000 and 2007. Most strains showed resistance to ampicillin (A), chloramphenicol (C), sulfamethoxazole (Su), gentamicin (G), streptomycin (S), tetracycline (T), and co-trimoxazole (SxT) (an ACSuGSTSxT resistance pattern). Only one pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type was detected, with 19 subtypes (Simpson's index of diversity [SID] = 0.89). Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) showed more variability, with 32 profiles (SID = 0.97), but only showed diversity at the STTR5 and STTR6 loci. PCR and sequencing demonstrated all strains contained the same allantoin-glyoxylate pathway deletion. Four types of deletions were detected in the fljAB operon, all starting at the same position, at the STM2758 gene, and followed by an IS26 insertion. Furthermore, a representative set of strains of the four deletion types harbored plasmids with IS26. We propose that a Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium U302 multidrug-resistant (ACSuGSTSxT) strain, defective for the allantoin-glyoxylate pathway and containing IS26 at plasmid pU302L, could be the ancestor of the variant in Spain. PMID:20943866

  6. Comparing the ability of luminex xMAP(®) salmonella serotyping assay and traditional serotyping method for serotyping salmonella isolated from southern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liang, D W; Lu, J H; Wu, Q; Ke, B X; Jiang, C H; Long, J; Fang, Y P; Lin, L J; Zeng, N Y; Fu, L; Jiang, L X

    2016-06-01

    To investigate whether the Luminex xMAP(®) Salmonella Serotyping Assay (xMAP SSA) is applicable to serotype Salmonella from humans in southern China. Two hundred and five Salmonella isolates from diarrhoea patients were serotyped by xMAP SSA in parallel with the traditional serotyping. Forty serotypes were identified among 205 isolates; the most prevalent serotypes identified were Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Stanley, Salmonella I 4,5,12:i:-, and Salmonella Typhimurium. One hundred and ninety-five (95·1%, 195/205) isolates were serotyped completely by xMAP SSA, while 10 stereotypes were partially detected as they were not included in the assay. The xMAP SSA correctly identified 192 (98·5%, 192/195) isolates. Five nonmotile and three monophasic strains, which possessed flagellar antigen genes that weren't expressed, were completely serotyped by xMAP SSA; however, these isolates were left undetected by the traditional method. The xMAP SSA used in the study is a microsphere-based, molecular assay that could rapidly and accurately serotype Salmonella. It is suitable to identify the serovars of Salmonella in southern China. The xMAP SSA, with high-throughput characteristics, provides an accurate and rapid serotyping system that dramatically strengthens the capability of clinical and public health laboratories for Salmonella serotyping. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhi Isolate B/SF/13/03/195 Associated with a Typhoid Carrier in Pasir Mas, Kelantan, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kee-Shin; Mohd Nor, Fauziah; Mat Hussin, Hani; Hamzah, Wan Mansor; Najimudin, Nazalan

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi B/SF/13/03/195 obtained from a typhoid carrier, who is a food handler in Pasir Mas, Kelantan. PMID:26564035

  8. Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhi Isolate PM016/13 from Untreated Well Water Associated with a Typhoid Outbreak in Pasir Mas, Kelantan, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kee-Shin; Najimudin, Nazalan

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi is a human-restricted pathogen that causes typhoid fever. Even though it is a human-restricted pathogen, the bacterium is also isolated from environments such as groundwater and pond water. Here, we describe the genome sequence of the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi PM016/13 which was isolated from well water during a typhoid outbreak in Kelantan, Malaysia, in 2013. PMID:26564032

  9. Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhi Isolate PM016/13 from Untreated Well Water Associated with a Typhoid Outbreak in Pasir Mas, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhamad Harish, Salwani; Sim, Kee-Shin; Najimudin, Nazalan; Aziah, Ismail

    2015-11-12

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi is a human-restricted pathogen that causes typhoid fever. Even though it is a human-restricted pathogen, the bacterium is also isolated from environments such as groundwater and pond water. Here, we describe the genome sequence of the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi PM016/13 which was isolated from well water during a typhoid outbreak in Kelantan, Malaysia, in 2013. Copyright © 2015 Muhamad Harish et al.

  10. Biological and physicochemical characteristics of four serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Reamer, R H; Affronti, L F; Blankenship, L C; Alford, J A

    1978-07-01

    Four serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis, Anatum ATCC 9270, Newbrunswick ATCC 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, and Pullorum RM, were studied to determine biological, chemical, or physical differences which might explain variations in Salmonella virulence as previously reported by McCullough and Eisele (J. Infect. Dis. 88:278-289, 1951; 89:259-265, 1951). These investigators found that serotype Pullorum was significantly less virulent than serotypes Newport, Derby, Barielly, Meleagridis and Anatum when fed to healthy humans. Results of our own experiments showed that serotype Pullorum RM had a generation time approximately twice that of serotype Anatum 9270. The volume of serotype Pullorum was approximately one-half the volume of the other serotypes used (Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, Cubana 12007, and Meleagridis DR). The number of cells required to yield 1 g dry weight was substantially higher for serotype Pullorum RM than for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E. The yield of endotoxin per gram dry weight for serotype Pullorum RM averaged 22 mg/g, whereas yields of endotoxin for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E averaged 32 to 35 mg/g. The relative abundance of the four major fatty acids (measured by gas chromatography) also showed distinct differences among the serotypes. Pullorum RM contained less lauric and 3-hydroxymyristic acids and more myristic and palmitic acids than the other three serotypes. The identity of 3-hydroxymyristate was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Serotype Pullorum RM required 10 times more lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) to obtain a 50% lethal dose in mice than the other three serotypes. When the lipid part was separated from the polysaccharide and solubilized with bovine serum, the 50% lethal dose of serotype Pullorum RM was equal to that of the other three.

  11. Biological and Physicochemical Characteristics of Four Serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Reamer, R. H.; Affronti, L. F.; Blankenship, L. C.; Alford, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Four serotypes of Salmonella enteritidis, Anatum ATCC 9270, Newbrunswick ATCC 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, and Pullorum RM, were studied to determine biological, chemical, or physical differences which might explain variations in Salmonella virulence as previously reported by McCullough and Eisele (J. Infect. Dis. 88:278-289, 1951; 89:259-265, 1951). These investigators found that serotype Pullorum was significantly less virulent than serotypes Newport, Derby, Barielly, Meleagridis and Anatum when fed to healthy humans. Results of our own experiments showed that serotype Pullorum RM had a generation time approximately twice that of serotype Anatum 9270. The volume of serotype Pullorum was approximately one-half the volume of the other serotypes used (Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, Oranienburg 200 E, Cubana 12007, and Meleagridis DR). The number of cells required to yield 1 g dry weight was substantially higher for serotype Pullorum RM than for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E. The yield of endotoxin per gram dry weight for serotype Pullorum RM averaged 22 mg/g, whereas yields of endotoxin for serotypes Anatum 9270, Newbrunswick 1608, and Oranienburg 200 E averaged 32 to 35 mg/g. The relative abundance of the four major fatty acids (measured by gas chromatography) also showed distinct differences among the serotypes. Pullorum RM contained less lauric and 3-hydroxymyristic acids and more myristic and palmitic acids than the other three serotypes. The identity of 3-hydroxymyristate was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Serotype Pullorum RM required 10 times more lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) to obtain a 50% lethal dose in mice than the other three serotypes. When the lipid part was separated from the polysaccharide and solubilized with bovine serum, the 50% lethal dose of serotype Pullorum RM was equal to that of the other three. PMID:361563

  12. Novel serotype of bluetongue virus, western North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bluetongue virus serotypes 10, 11, 13, and 17 are typically found throughout the United States (US), while serotype 2 was previously only detected in the southeastern US. In 2010, serotype 2 was identified in California for the first time and preliminary sequences analysis indicated that the virus ...

  13. Challenges of Using Molecular Serotyping for Surveillance of Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magomani, Victoria; Tempia, Stefano; du Plessis, Mignon; de Gouveia, Linda; von Gottberg, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the molecular identification and serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae are useful for culture-negative samples; however, there are limitations associated with these methods. We aimed to assess the value of molecular assays for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance in South Africa from 2010 through 2012. Nonviable isolates and culture-negative clinical specimens were tested for the lytA gene and, if positive, were serotyped, using real-time PCRs. Multinomial regression analysis was used to determine the maximum lytA cycle threshold (CT) value useful for predicting the ability to detect a serotype for the sample. The χ2 test was used to compare the prevalence of serotypes between viable/nonviable isolates and culture-negative clinical specimens. Of 11,224 IPD cases reported, 1,091 (10%) were culture-negative samples and 981 (90%) of these were lytA positive. Samples with a lytA CT value of ≥35 were significantly less likely to be serotyped. A serotype/group was determined for 87% (737/844) of samples with a lytA CT value of <35, of which 60% (443/737) were identified as individual serotypes. The serotype prevalence did not differ significantly between isolates and culture-negative specimens. Although molecular serotyping added 7% (737/11,224) serotyping data, the inability to resolve 40% of samples to single serotypes remains a challenge for serotype-specific data analysis. PMID:24958802

  14. Dengue Virus Serotype 4, Northeastern Peru, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Cruz, Cristhopher; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Guevara, Carolina; Camacho, Daria E.; Alava, Araceli; Madrid, César; Beingolea, Luis; Suarez, Víctor; Comach, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) emerged in northeastern Peru, causing a large outbreak and displacing DENV-3, which had predominated for the previous 6 years. Phylogenetic analysis of 2008 and 2009 isolates support their inclusion into DENV-4 genotype II, forming a lineage distinct from strains that had previously circulated in the region. PMID:19891873

  15. Dengue virus serotype 4, northeastern Peru, 2008.

    PubMed

    Forshey, Brett M; Morrison, Amy C; Cruz, Cristhopher; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Guevara, Carolina; Camacho, Daria E; Alava, Araceli; Madrid, César; Beingolea, Luis; Suarez, Victor; Comach, Guillermo; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2009-11-01

    In 2008, dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) emerged in northeastern Peru, causing a large outbreak and displacing DENV-3, which had predominated for the previous 6 years. Phylogenetic analysis of 2008 and 2009 isolates support their inclusion into DENV-4 genotype II, forming a lineage distinct from strains that had previously circulated in the region.

  16. Interaction of Salmonella enterica with Fresh Produce Leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Attachment and colonization of Salmonella enterica serovars to fresh produce leaves was investigated. Biofilm assay and attachment of Salmonella serovars to intact and cut leaves were determined. Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Thompson produced stronger biofilms compared to Salmonella Newpor...

  17. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 isolated from a lesser snow goose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Shadduck, D.J.; Price, J.I.; Cooch, E.G.

    1997-01-01

    Pharyngeal swabs were collected from 298 lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) at Banks Island (Northwest Territories. Canada) in the summer of 1994. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 was isolated from an adult male bird and P. multocida serotype 3 was isolated from an adult female goose. Pathogenicity of the serotype 1 isolate was confirmed by inoculation in Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). The serotype 3 isolate was non-pathogenic in Pekin ducks. This is the first documented isolation of pathogenic P. multocida serotype 1 from apparently healthy wild snow geese.

  18. Novel Temperate Phages of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and subsp. diarizonae and Their Activity against Pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mikalová, Lenka; Bosák, Juraj; Hříbková, Hana; Dědičová, Daniela; Benada, Oldřich; Šmarda, Jan; Šmajs, David

    2017-01-01

    Forty strains of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) subspecies salamae (II), arizonae (IIIa), diarizonae (IIIb), and houtenae (IV) were isolated from human or environmental samples and tested for bacteriophage production. Production of bacteriophages was observed in 15 S. enterica strains (37.5%) belonging to either the subspecies salamae (8 strains) or diarizonae (7 strains). Activity of phages was tested against 52 pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica isolates and showed that phages produced by subsp. salamae had broader activity against pathogenic salmonellae compared to phages from the subsp. diarizonae. All 15 phages were analyzed using PCR amplification of phage-specific regions and 9 different amplification profiles were identified. Five phages (SEN1, SEN4, SEN5, SEN22, and SEN34) were completely sequenced and classified as temperate phages. Phages SEN4 and SEN5 were genetically identical, thus representing a single phage type (i.e. SEN4/5). SEN1 and SEN4/5 fit into the group of P2-like phages, while the SEN22 phage showed sequence relatedness to P22-like phages. Interestingly, while phage SEN34 was genetically distantly related to Lambda-like phages (Siphoviridae), it had the morphology of the Myoviridae family. Based on sequence analysis and electron microscopy, phages SEN1 and SEN4/5 were members of the Myoviridae family and phage SEN22 belonged to the Podoviridae family.

  19. Novel Temperate Phages of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and subsp. diarizonae and Their Activity against Pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hříbková, Hana; Dědičová, Daniela; Benada, Oldřich; Šmarda, Jan; Šmajs, David

    2017-01-01

    Forty strains of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) subspecies salamae (II), arizonae (IIIa), diarizonae (IIIb), and houtenae (IV) were isolated from human or environmental samples and tested for bacteriophage production. Production of bacteriophages was observed in 15 S. enterica strains (37.5%) belonging to either the subspecies salamae (8 strains) or diarizonae (7 strains). Activity of phages was tested against 52 pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica isolates and showed that phages produced by subsp. salamae had broader activity against pathogenic salmonellae compared to phages from the subsp. diarizonae. All 15 phages were analyzed using PCR amplification of phage-specific regions and 9 different amplification profiles were identified. Five phages (SEN1, SEN4, SEN5, SEN22, and SEN34) were completely sequenced and classified as temperate phages. Phages SEN4 and SEN5 were genetically identical, thus representing a single phage type (i.e. SEN4/5). SEN1 and SEN4/5 fit into the group of P2-like phages, while the SEN22 phage showed sequence relatedness to P22-like phages. Interestingly, while phage SEN34 was genetically distantly related to Lambda-like phages (Siphoviridae), it had the morphology of the Myoviridae family. Based on sequence analysis and electron microscopy, phages SEN1 and SEN4/5 were members of the Myoviridae family and phage SEN22 belonged to the Podoviridae family. PMID:28118395

  20. Selective enrichment media bias the types of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella.

  1. Distribution of serotypes of human rotavirus in different populations.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, P A; Gentsch, J; Gouvea, V; Mata, L; Santosham, M; Bai, Z S; Urasawa, S; Glass, R I

    1992-01-01

    Serotyping is a useful tool to study the epidemiologic characteristics of rotaviruses in large populations and to assess the need for a vaccine to protect against all strains. By using an enzyme immunoassay with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies to the four most common rotavirus serotypes, we analyzed 1,183 rotavirus-positive specimens from 16 stool collections in eight countries on four continents that were obtained from 1978 to 1989. Of the 926 strains (78%) that could be serotyped, 48% were serotype 1, 8% were serotype 2, 15% were serotype 3, and 7% were serotype 4. Twenty-two percent had insufficient numbers of double-shelled virus particles to react with the monoclonal antibody of the VP4 rotavirus protein and therefore could not be serotyped. Our results indicate that vaccines being developed must provide the greatest coverage against serotype 1 and that the serotype distribution cannot be predicted currently by the geographic area or prevalence in the preceding year. PMID:1315333

  2. Cattle-derived Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin Infections in Red Foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) in Tyrol, Austria.

    PubMed

    Glawischnig, Walter; Lazar, Judit; Wallner, Alice; Kornschober, Christian

    2017-01-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is endemic in the cattle population in some areas of the Austrian province Tyrol, and each year single dairy farms have experienced clinical infections. To ascertain if Tyrolean red foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) act as a reservoir for Salmonella spp., we tested hepatic tissue and intestinal content from foxes hunted in the years 2015-2016 by using microbiological methods. In addition, we included several fox fecal samples collected on a mountain pasture near chamois carcasses in the investigation. Of 434 foxes tested, nine animals (2.1%) were positive for Salmonella spp. Serotyping revealed five foxes positive with S. Dublin, demonstrating that this serovar exists in the Tyrolean fox population. The fecal samples collected in the area surrounding skeletonized chamois ( Rupicapra rupicapra ) also tested positive for S. Dublin. These chamois were probably victims of a waterborne outbreak caused by S. Dublin-shedding cattle. Our results indicate that the S. Dublin infections in red foxes were primarily acquired through ingestion of infected cattle material such as abortion tissues, but also by feeding on dead chamois. The findings underline the importance of interspecies transmission in this domestic/wildlife interface.

  3. Laboratory surveillance of Salmonella enterica from human clinical cases in Colombia 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Edna Catering; Díaz-Guevara, Paula; Moreno, Jaime; Bautista, Adriana; Montaño, Lucy; Realpe, María Elena; Della Gaspera, Anabella; Wiesner, Magdalena

    Salmonella is an enteropathogen acquired through contaminated food or water. In Colombia, Salmonella spp. is included in the national surveillance of Acute Diarrhoeal Diseases and typhoid fever initiated in 1997. This report shows the phenotype and genotype results obtained from 2005 to 2011. A total of 4010 isolates of Salmonella enterica were analysed by serotyping with Kauffmann-White-LeMinor, antimicrobial resistance patterns, and pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A total of 93 serovars were identified, of which, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Typhi, Dublin, Panama, Derby, Braenderup, Saintpaul, and Uganda were prominent. The highest levels of resistance were found for tetracycline and nalidixic acid. Susceptibility was observed in 52.4% (2101/4010) of the isolates. Multi-resistance was recorded in 54.9% of Typhimurium isolates, with 81 different combinations. Using PFGE, 51.9% (2083/4010) isolates were analysed in 34 serovars, and 828 electrophoretic patterns were obtained. From these, 8 patterns were found in at least two Latin-American countries. The surveillance of Salmonella spp. provides information on the serovar distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and clonal distribution in Colombia, as well as information to treat this disease and control the spread of antimicrobial bacterial resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Genomic fingerprinting and serotyping of Salmonella from Galápagos iguanas demonstrates island differences in strain diversity.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Emily; Cann, Isaac K O; Mackie, Roderick I

    2011-04-01

    Salmonella carriage patterns in wild and captive reptiles suggest that both geographical proximity and host ecological differences may determine bacterial diversity among reptile populations. In this study, we explore the relative importance of these factors on Salmonella diversity in free-living Galápagos iguanas. We isolated Salmonella enterica from marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and land iguanas (Conolophus subcristatus and C. pallidus) living on two islands (Plaza Sur and Santa Fe). We evaluated Salmonella population patterns using genomic fingerprints, sequence typing and serotyping. Rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed significant grouping of isolates by iguana population. Island residence had the strongest effect on isolate similarity, but a smaller divergence among Salmonella isolates from different iguana ecotypes (land versus marine) was detected within each island. In contrast, sequence typing detected a marginal difference in isolate genotypes between islands. Sequence types corresponded strongly to serotype identity, with both islands hosting a unique serovar pool. Our findings suggest that both geographical location and host ecotype differences (either from within host strain selection or from differences in habitat use) contribute to Salmonella population patterns in the Galápagos Islands.

  5. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous

  6. Evaluation of Molecular Methods for Serotyping Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Gentle, Amy; Ashton, Philip M.; Dallman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Shigella flexneri can be phenotypically serotyped using antisera raised to type-specific somatic antigens and group factor antigens and genotypically serotyped using PCR targeting O-antigen synthesis or modification genes. The aim of this study was to evaluate a real-time PCR for serotyping S. flexneri and to use whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic serotype identifications. Of the 244 cultures tested retrospectively, 226 (92.6%) had concordant results between phenotypic serotyping and PCR. Seventy of the 244 isolates (including 15 of the 18 isolates where a serotype-PCR mismatch was identified) were whole-genome sequenced, and the serotype was derived from the genome. Discrepant results between the phenotypic and genotypic tests were attributed to insertions/deletions or point mutations identified in O-antigen synthesis or modification genes, rendering them dysfunctional; inconclusive serotyping results due to nonspecific cross-reactions; or novel genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the WGS data indicated that the serotype, regardless of whether it was phenotypically or genotypically determined, was a weak predictor of phylogenetic relationships between strains of S. flexneri. WGS data provided both genome-derived serotyping, thus supporting backward compatibility with historical data and facilitating data exchange in the community, and more robust and discriminatory typing at the single-nucleotide-polymorphism level. PMID:26984974

  7. Design of Two Multiplex PCR Assays for Serotyping Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Claudia A; Rogé, Ariel D; Bordagorría, Ximena L; de Urquiza, Maria T; Celi Castillo, Ana B; Bruno, Susana B

    2017-10-10

    Shigella flexneri is a major health problem in developing countries. There are 19 serotypes recognized based on O-antigen structure and its typing is important for epidemiological purposes. However, the diversity of serotypes and the difficulties presented by phenotypic serotyping, for example, unavailable antisera for less common antigens, require the implementation of molecular techniques. In this study, we developed two multiplex PCR assays targeting the O-antigen synthesis genes and the O-antigen modification genes, for the rapid identification of S. flexneri serotypes 1/7, 2, 4, 5, and 6 (PCR A) and serotype 7 and group antigenic factors (3,4; 6; 7,8; E1037) (PCR B). A total of 73 S. flexneri strains representing 18 serotypes, except serotype 1d, were used in the study. Specific amplification patterns were obtained for each of the different serotypes. All strains tested had concordant results with phenotypic and genotypic serotyping; therefore, its implementation in the microbiology clinical laboratory will significantly improve S. flexneri serotyping.

  8. Clade Replacements in Dengue Virus Serotypes 1 and 3 Are Associated with Changing Serotype Prevalence†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunlin; Mammen, Mammen P.; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Klungthong, Chonticha; Rodpradit, Prinyada; Monkongdee, Patama; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Holmes, Edward C.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of dengue virus (DENV) is characterized by phylogenetic trees that have a strong temporal structure punctuated by dramatic changes in clade frequency. To determine the cause of these large-scale phylogenetic patterns, we examined the evolutionary history of DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and DENV-3 in Thailand, where gene sequence and epidemiological data are relatively abundant over a 30-year period. We found evidence for the turnover of viral clades in both serotypes, most notably in DENV-1, where a major clade replacement event took place in genotype I during the mid-1990s. Further, when this clade replacement event was placed in the context of changes in serotype prevalence in Thailand, a striking pattern emerged; an increase in DENV-1 clade diversity was associated with an increase in the abundance of this serotype and a concomitant decrease in DENV-4 prevalence, while clade replacement was associated with a decline in DENV-1 prevalence and a rise of DENV-4. We postulate that intraserotypic genetic diversification proceeds at times of relative serotype abundance and that replacement events can result from differential susceptibility to cross-reactive immune responses. PMID:16306584

  9. Diversity of Genome Structure in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Populations†

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Sushma; Nair, Satheesh; Alokam, Suneetha; Pang, Tikki; Khakhria, Rasik; Woodward, David; Johnson, Wendy; Stocker, Bruce A. D.; Sanderson, Kenneth E.; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The genomes of most strains of Salmonella and Escherichia coli are highly conserved. In contrast, all 136 wild-type strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi analyzed by partial digestion with I-CeuI (an endonuclease which cuts within the rrn operons) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and by PCR have rearrangements due to homologous recombination between the rrn operons leading to inversions and translocations. Recombination between rrn operons in culture is known to be equally frequent in S. enterica serovar Typhi and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium; thus, the recombinants in S. enterica serovar Typhi, but not those in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, are able to survive in nature. However, even in S. enterica serovar Typhi the need for genome balance and the need for gene dosage impose limits on rearrangements. Of 100 strains of genome types 1 to 6, 72 were only 25.5 kb off genome balance (the relative lengths of the replichores during bidirectional replication from oriC to the termination of replication [Ter]), while 28 strains were less balanced (41 kb off balance), indicating that the survival of the best-balanced strains was greater. In addition, the need for appropriate gene dosage apparently selected against rearrangements which moved genes from their accustomed distance from oriC. Although rearrangements involving the seven rrn operons are very common in S. enterica serovar Typhi, other duplicated regions, such as the 25 IS200 elements, are very rarely involved in rearrangements. Large deletions and insertions in the genome are uncommon, except for deletions of Salmonella pathogenicity island 7 (usually 134 kb) from fragment I-CeuI-G and 40-kb insertions, possibly a prophage, in fragment I-CeuI-E. The phage types were determined, and the origins of the phage types appeared to be independent of the origins of the genome types. PMID:15805510

  10. Cefotaxime-resistant Salmonella enterica in travelers returning from Thailand to Finland.

    PubMed

    Gunell, Marianne; Aulu, Laura; Jalava, Jari; Lukinmaa-Åberg, Susanna; Osterblad, Monica; Ollgren, Jukka; Huovinen, Pentti; Siitonen, Anja; Hakanen, Antti J

    2014-07-01

    During 1993-2011, cefotaxime resistance among Salmonella enterica isolates from patients in Finland increased substantially. Most of these infections originated in Thailand; many were qnr positive and belonged to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica monophasic serovar 4,[5],12:i:-. Although cefotaxime-resistant salmonellae mainly originate in discrete geographic areas, they represent a global threat.

  11. Cefotaxime-Resistant Salmonella enterica in Travelers Returning from Thailand to Finland

    PubMed Central

    Aulu, Laura; Jalava, Jari; Lukinmaa-Åberg, Susanna; Österblad, Monica; Ollgren, Jukka; Huovinen, Pentti; Siitonen, Anja; Hakanen, Antti J.

    2014-01-01

    During 1993–2011, cefotaxime resistance among Salmonella enterica isolates from patients in Finland increased substantially. Most of these infections originated in Thailand; many were qnr positive and belonged to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica monophasic serovar 4,[5],12:i:-. Although cefotaxime-resistant salmonellae mainly originate in discrete geographic areas, they represent a global threat. PMID:24960266

  12. Emerging Opportunities for Serotypes of Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Peng Chen, Zhongxing; Morris, J. Glenn; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Shukla, Aparna Wagle; Tapia-Núñez, John; Okun, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two decades ago, botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A was introduced to the commercial market. Subsequently, the toxin was approved by the FDA to address several neurological syndromes, involving muscle, nerve, and gland hyperactivity. These syndromes have typically been associated with abnormalities in cholinergic transmission. Despite the multiplicity of botulinal serotypes (designated as types A through G), therapeutic preparations are currently only available for BoNT types A and B. However, other BoNT serotypes are under study for possible clinical use and new clinical indications; Objective: To review the current research on botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A-G, and to analyze potential applications within basic science and clinical settings; Conclusions: The increasing understanding of botulinal neurotoxin pathophysiology, including the neurotoxin’s effects on specific neuronal populations, will help us in tailoring treatments for specific diagnoses, symptoms and patients. Scientists and clinicians should be aware of the full range of available data involving neurotoxin subtypes A-G. PMID:23202312

  13. Ultrasound improves chemical reduction of natural contaminant microbiota and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica on strawberries.

    PubMed

    do Rosário, Denes Kaic Alves; da Silva Mutz, Yhan; Peixoto, Jaqueline Moreira Curtis; Oliveira, Syllas Borburema Silva; de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Carneiro, Joel Camilo Souza; de São José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos

    2017-01-16

    New sanitization methods have been evaluated to improve food safety and food quality and to replace chlorine compounds. However, these new methods can lead to physicochemical and sensory changes in fruits and vegetables. The present study evaluated the effects of acetic acid, peracetic acid, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate isolated or combined with 5min of ultrasound treatment (40kHz, 500W) on strawberry quality over 9days of storage at 8°C. The strawberry natural contaminant microbiota (molds and yeasts, mesophilic aerobic and lactic acid bacteria), physicochemical quality (pH, total titratable acidity, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and color), sensory quality (triangle test) and inactivation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica intentionally inoculated onto strawberries were analyzed. Ultrasound increased the effect of all chemical compounds in the reduction of aerobic mesophilic, molds and yeasts. The best treatment for those groups of microorganisms was ultrasound combined with peracetic acid (US+PA) that reduced 1.8 and 2.0logcfu/g during 9days of storage. Bactericidal effect of peracetic acid was also improved by ultrasound inactivation of S. enterica, reaching a decimal reduction of 2.1logcfu/g. Moreover, synergistic effects were observed in contaminant natural microbiota inactivation for all tested compounds during storage, without any major physicochemical or sensory alteration to the strawberries. Therefore, ultrasound treatment can improve the effect of sanitizers that are substitutes of chlorine compounds without altering the quality of strawberries during storage. Acetic acid (PubChem CID: 176); Peracetic acid (PubChem CID: 6585); Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (PubChem CID: 18372154). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Why are dengue virus serotypes so distantly related? Enhancement and limiting serotype similarity between dengue virus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Isao; Sasaki, Akira; Boots, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus, the causative agent of dengue fever, has four major serotypes characterized by large genetic and immunological distances. We propose that the unusually large distances between the serotypes can be explained in the light of a process of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) leading to increased mortality. Antibody-dependent enhancement results from a new infection with a particular serotype in an individual with acquired immunity to a different serotype. Classical dengue fever causes negligible mortality, but ADE leads to the risk of developing the significantly more dangerous dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). A mathematical model is presented that describes the epidemiological dynamics of two serotypes of a pathogen where there is the possibility of co-infection and reinfection by a different serotype, along with increased mortality as a result of enhancement. We show that if there is no or slightly increased mortality after reinfection (enhancement), serotypes with a small immunological distance can stably coexist. This suggests that a cloud of serotypes with minor serological differences will constitute the viral population. By contrast, if enhancement is sufficiently great, a substantial immunological distance is necessary for two serotypes to stably coexist in the population. Therefore, high mortality owing to enhancement leads to an evolutionarily stable viral community comprising a set of distantly separated serotypes. PMID:14613610

  15. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella serotype Bovismorbificans infections associated with hummus and tahini--United States, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-11-23

    On September 27, 2011, three clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Bovismorbificans with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were identified by the District of Columbia Public Health Laboratory (PHL). Human infection with S. Bovismorbificans is rare in the United States. Through query of PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, six additional cases with indistinguishable PFGE patterns were identified in three states (Maryland, Michigan, and Virginia) during the prior 60 days. All nine patients had eaten at restaurants in the District of Columbia (DC) or northern Virginia <2 weeks before illness onset. This report summarizes the investigation led by the DC Department of Health (DOH), in which 23 cases of S. Bovismorbificans infections were identified among persons from seven states and DC, with illness onset during August 19-November 21, 2011. On May 30, 2012, traceback indicated that contaminated tahini (sesame seed paste) used in hummus prepared at a Mediterranean-style restaurant in DC was a plausible source of Salmonella infections. DOH restricted the sale of hummus and prohibited the use of hummus ingredients in other food items at implicated restaurants to prevent further illness. This investigation also illustrates challenges associated with ingredient-driven outbreaks and the value of PulseNet for identifying clusters of cases that are geographically dispersed.

  16. Systematic Evaluation of Serotypes Causing Invasive Pneumococcal Disease among Children Under Five: The Pneumococcal Global Serotype Project

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope L.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Levine, Orin S.; Stoszek, Sonia K.; Freimanis Hance, Laura; Reithinger, Richard; Muenz, Larry R.; O'Brien, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 800,000 children die each year due to pneumococcal disease and >90% of these deaths occur in developing countries where few children have access to life-saving serotype-based vaccines. Understanding the serotype epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children is necessary for vaccine development and introduction policies. The aim of this study was to systematically estimate the global and regional distributions of serotypes causing IPD in children <5 years of age. Methods and Findings We systematically reviewed studies with IPD serotype data among children <5 years of age from the published literature and unpublished data provided by researchers. Studies conducted prior to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) introduction, from 1980 to 2007, with ≥12 months of surveillance, and reporting ≥20 serotyped isolates were included. Serotype-specific proportions were pooled in a random effects meta-analysis and combined with PD incidence and mortality estimates to infer global and regional serotype-specific PD burden. Of 1,292, studies reviewed, 169 were included comprising 60,090 isolates from 70 countries. Globally and regionally, six to 11 serotypes accounted for ≥70% of IPD. Seven serotypes (1, 5, 6A, 6B, 14, 19F, 23F) were the most common globally; and based on year 2000 incidence and mortality estimates these seven serotypes accounted for >300,000 deaths in Africa and 200,000 deaths in Asia. Serotypes included in both the 10- and 13-valent PCVs accounted for 10 million cases and 600,000 deaths worldwide. Conclusions A limited number of serotypes cause most IPD worldwide. The serotypes included in existing PCV formulations account for 49%–88% of deaths in Africa and Asia where PD morbidity and mortality are the highest, but few children have access to these life-saving vaccines. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20957191

  17. Uptake and Replication of Salmonella enterica in Acanthamoeba rhysodes

    PubMed Central

    Tezcan-Merdol, Dilek; Ljungström, Marianne; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Linder, Ewert; Engstrand, Lars; Rhen, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    The ability of salmonellae to become internalized and to survive and replicate in amoebae was evaluated by using three separate serovars of Salmonella enterica and five different isolates of axenic Acanthamoeba spp. In gentamicin protection assays, Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin was internalized more efficiently than Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis or Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in all of the amoeba isolates tested. The bacteria appeared to be most efficiently internalized by Acanthamoeba rhysodes. Variations in bacterial growth conditions affected internalization efficiency, but this effect was not altered by inactivation of hilA, a key regulator in the expression of the invasion-associated Salmonella pathogenicity island 1. Microscopy of infected A. rhysodes revealed that S. enterica resided within vacuoles. Prolonged incubation resulted in a loss of intracellular bacteria associated with morphological changes and loss of amoebae. In part, these alterations were associated with hilA and the Salmonella virulence plasmid. The data show that Acanthamoeba spp. can differentiate between different serovars of salmonellae and that internalization is associated with cytotoxic effects mediated by defined Salmonella virulence loci. PMID:15184177

  18. Intestinal invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the avian host is dose dependent and does not depend on motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Hoegh-Andersen, Kirsten Hobolt; Rosenkrantz, Jesper Tjørnholt; Schroll, Casper; Casadesús, Josep; Aabo, Søren; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2013-08-30

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) can invade in the intestine of the avian host, and knowledge on the mechanisms that govern this is potentially important for prevention of disease. This study investigated the invasion of S. Typhimurium in the avian host and to which extent it depended on motility and chemotaxis. Wild type and previously well-characterized transposon mutants in flagella genes fliC and fljB and in chemotaxis genes cheA, cheB and cheR were used as challenge strains in intestinal loop experiments. Invasion was shown to be dose dependent, but did not require functional flagella or chemotaxis genes. In support of the results from intestinal loop experiments, flagella and chemotaxis genes were not significantly important to the outcome of an oral infection. The results showed that S. Typhimurium invasion in the avian host was dose dependent and was not affected by the loss of flagella and chemotaxis genes.

  19. Interaction of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium and mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Agarwal, Ravikant

    2005-03-01

    The effect of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium, a zoonotic serovar, on mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) cultivar Pant Mung-3 plants was studied. Inoculation of mung bean seeds with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(5) CFU/ml) reduced sprouting rate (P < 0.07). This effect was more pronounced at higher levels of contamination. In the soil inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium (7.2 x 10(6) CFU/g), germination was retarded and the number of defective sprouts was also significantly higher (P < 0.002). Salmonella Typhimurium grew inside germinating seeds and plant tissues and persisted in seedlings, adult plants, and harvested seedlings dried and stored at room temperature (30 degrees C) up to 45 days. Phaseolus aureus plants grown in sterile soil was resistant to Salmonella Typhimurium infection at 15 days of age and cleared Salmonella from all the aerial parts within 3 h of infection. However, Salmonella Typhimurium could be reisolated from the basal area of the stem and from soil even after 45 days of exposure to the pathogen.

  20. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maria; Pettengill, James B.; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Miller, John; Ayers, Sherry L.; Zhao, Shaohua; Allard, Marc W.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Brown, Eric W.; Monday, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR) are often encoded on mobile elements, such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which have the potential to transfer among foodborne pathogens, as well as to other virulent pathogens, increasing the threats these traits pose to human and veterinary health. Our understanding of MDR among Salmonella has been limited by the lack of closed plasmid genomes for comparisons across resistance phenotypes, due to difficulties in effectively separating the DNA of these high-molecular weight, low-copy-number plasmids from chromosomal DNA. To resolve this problem, we demonstrate an efficient protocol for isolating, sequencing and closing IncA/C plasmids from Salmonella sp. using single molecule real-time sequencing on a Pacific Biosciences (Pacbio) RS II Sequencer. We obtained six Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry, representing six different serovars, each exhibiting the MDR-Ampc resistance profile. Salmonella plasmids were obtained using a modified mini preparation and transformed with Escherichia coli DH10Br. A Qiagen Large-Construct kit™ was used to recover highly concentrated and purified plasmid DNA that was sequenced using PacBio technology. These six closed IncA/C plasmids ranged in size from 104 to 191 kb and shared a stable, conserved backbone containing 98 core genes, with only six differences among those core genes. The plasmids encoded a number of antimicrobial resistance genes, including those for quaternary ammonium compounds and mercury. We then compared our six IncA/C plasmid sequences: first with 14 IncA/C plasmids derived from S. enterica available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and then with an additional 38 IncA/C plasmids derived from different taxa. These comparisons allowed us to build an evolutionary picture of how antimicrobial resistance may be mediated by this common plasmid backbone. Our project provides detailed genetic information about resistance genes in

  1. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Maria; Pettengill, James B; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Miller, John; Ayers, Sherry L; Zhao, Shaohua; Allard, Marc W; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Monday, Steven R

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR) are often encoded on mobile elements, such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which have the potential to transfer among foodborne pathogens, as well as to other virulent pathogens, increasing the threats these traits pose to human and veterinary health. Our understanding of MDR among Salmonella has been limited by the lack of closed plasmid genomes for comparisons across resistance phenotypes, due to difficulties in effectively separating the DNA of these high-molecular weight, low-copy-number plasmids from chromosomal DNA. To resolve this problem, we demonstrate an efficient protocol for isolating, sequencing and closing IncA/C plasmids from Salmonella sp. using single molecule real-time sequencing on a Pacific Biosciences (Pacbio) RS II Sequencer. We obtained six Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry, representing six different serovars, each exhibiting the MDR-Ampc resistance profile. Salmonella plasmids were obtained using a modified mini preparation and transformed with Escherichia coli DH10Br. A Qiagen Large-Construct kit™ was used to recover highly concentrated and purified plasmid DNA that was sequenced using PacBio technology. These six closed IncA/C plasmids ranged in size from 104 to 191 kb and shared a stable, conserved backbone containing 98 core genes, with only six differences among those core genes. The plasmids encoded a number of antimicrobial resistance genes, including those for quaternary ammonium compounds and mercury. We then compared our six IncA/C plasmid sequences: first with 14 IncA/C plasmids derived from S. enterica available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and then with an additional 38 IncA/C plasmids derived from different taxa. These comparisons allowed us to build an evolutionary picture of how antimicrobial resistance may be mediated by this common plasmid backbone. Our project provides detailed genetic information about resistance genes in

  2. Genomic comparison of Salmonella enterica serotypes commonly associated with cattle and beef – Analysis of variation in virulence potential

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Category: Post-Harvest Abstract Published: Unpublished to date Objective: To create a Salmonella genomic DNA sequence resource for the purpose of characterizing differences in gene content and identification of DNA markers for rapid detection of virulent Salmonella strains. Further, to character...

  3. A case of clinical and microbiological failure of azithromycin therapy in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi despite low azithromycin MIC.

    PubMed

    Manesh, Abi; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; Kumar, Devanga Ragupathi Naveen; Rupali, Priscilla

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious problem in many developing countries. Due to resistance to multiple first line drugs, azithromycin has evolved as an important drug in the treatment of typhoid. While therapy with azithromycin is highly effective, no clinically validated mean inhibitory concentration (MIC) break points or disc diffusion cutoff guidelines are available so far. We describe an Indian adult with clinical and microbiological failure to azithromycin despite low azithromycin MIC.

  4. Recombinant plasmid-based quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis of Salmonella enterica serotypes and its application to milk samples.

    PubMed

    Gokduman, Kurtulus; Avsaroglu, M Dilek; Cakiris, Aris; Ustek, Duran; Gurakan, G Candan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to develop, a new, rapid, sensitive and quantitative Salmonella detection method using a Real-Time PCR technique based on an inexpensive, easy to produce, convenient and standardized recombinant plasmid positive control. To achieve this, two recombinant plasmids were constructed as reference molecules by cloning the two most commonly used Salmonella-specific target gene regions, invA and ttrRSBC. The more rapid detection enabled by the developed method (21 h) compared to the traditional culture method (90 h) allows the quantitative evaluation of Salmonella (quantification limits of 10(1)CFU/ml and 10(0)CFU/ml for the invA target and the ttrRSBC target, respectively), as illustrated using milk samples. Three advantages illustrated by the current study demonstrate the potential of the newly developed method to be used in routine analyses in the medical, veterinary, food and water/environmental sectors: I--The method provides fast analyses including the simultaneous detection and determination of correct pathogen counts; II--The method is applicable to challenging samples, such as milk; III--The method's positive controls (recombinant plasmids) are reproducible in large quantities without the need to construct new calibration curves.

  5. A Salmonella Enterica Subsp. Enterica Serovar Enteritidis Foodborne Outbreak after Consumption of Homemade Lasagne

    PubMed Central

    Gariano, Grazia Rosaria; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Zuccon, Fabio; Sommariva, Marco; Nguon, Bovannrith; Malabaila, Aurelio; Gallina, Silvia; Decastelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In the latest year, and also in 2013, Salmonella was the most frequently detected causative agent in foodborne outbreaks (FBOs) reported in Europe. As indicated in EFSA report (2015) the serotypes mostly associated to FBOs are S. Typhimurium and Enteritidis; while Salmonella Typhimurium is generally associated with the consumption of contaminated pork and beef, FBOs due to Salmonella Enteritidis are linked to eggs and poultry meat. In this study it is described the investigation of a domestic FBO involving four adults and linked to homemade lasagne. Investigations were performed to determine the relatedness of Salmonella strains, identify the sources of infection, and trace the routes of Salmonella contamination in this FBO. Salmonella strains were isolated in 3 out of 4 patient stool samples and from lasagne and all of them were serotyped as S. Enteritidis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed the genotypical similarity of all the strains. Although serotyping and PFGE analysis identified the common food source of infection in this FBO, it was not possible to determine how or at what point during food preparation the lasagne became contaminated with Salmonella. PMID:27800418

  6. Characterization of the spv locus in Salmonella enterica serovar Arizona.

    PubMed

    Libby, Stephen J; Lesnick, Marc; Hasegawa, Patricia; Kurth, Michael; Belcher, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua; Guiney, Donald G

    2002-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Arizona (S. enterica subspecies IIIa) is a common Salmonella isolate from reptiles and can cause serious systemic disease in humans. The spv virulence locus, found on large plasmids in Salmonella subspecies I serovars associated with severe infections, was confirmed to be located on the chromosome of serovar Arizona. Sequence analysis revealed that the serovar Arizona spv locus contains homologues of spvRABC but lacks the spvD gene and contains a frameshift in spvA, resulting in a different C terminus. The SpvR protein functions as a transcriptional activator for the spvA promoter, and SpvB and SpvC are highly conserved. The analysis supports the proposal that the chromosomal spv sequence more closely corresponds to the ancestral locus acquired during evolution of S. enterica, with plasmid acquisition of spv genes in the subspecies I strains involving addition of spvD and polymorphisms in spvA.

  7. Salmonella enterica: survival, colonization, and virulence differences among serovars.

    PubMed

    Andino, A; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels.

  8. Salmonella enterica: Survival, Colonization, and Virulence Differences among Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Andino, A.; Hanning, I.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels. PMID:25664339

  9. Comparison of gyrA Mutations, Cyclohexane Resistance, and the Presence of Class I Integrons in Salmonella enterica from Farm Animals in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Liebana, Ernesto; Clouting, Carol; Cassar, Claire A.; Randall, Luke P.; Walker, Rachel A.; Threlfall, E. John; Clifton-Hadley, Felicity A.; Ridley, Anne M.; Davies, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This study is focused on real-time detection of gyrA mutations and of the presence of class I integrons in a panel of 100 veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica from farm animals. The isolates were selected on the basis of resistance to nalidixic acid, representing a variety of the most prevalent serotypes in England and Wales. In addition, organic solvent (cyclohexane) resistance in these isolates was investigated in an attempt to elucidate the presence of efflux pump mechanisms. The most prevalent mutation among the isolates studied was Asp87-Asn (n = 42), followed by Ser83-Phe (n = 38), Ser83-Tyr (n = 12), Asp87-Tyr (n = 4), and Asp87-Gly (n = 3). Two distinct subpopulations were identified, separated at the 1-mg/liter breakpoint for ciprofloxacin: 86% of isolates with mutations in codon 83 showed MICs of ≥1 mg/liter, while 89.8% of isolates with mutations in codon 87 presented MICs of ≤0.5 mg/liter. Cyclohexane resistance was more prevalent among Ser83 mutants than among Asp87 mutants (34.7 and 4%, respectively), and in 79% of isolates that presented both gyrA mutations and cyclohexane resistance, the level of ciprofloxacin resistance was ≥2.0 mg/liter. Thirty-four isolates contained class I integrons, with 71% of the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates and 6.9% of isolates belonging to other serotypes containing such elements. The methods used represent sensitive ways of investigating the presence of gyrA mutations and of detecting class-I integrons in Salmonella isolates. The results can be obtained in less than 1 h from single colonies without the need for purifying DNA. PMID:11923377

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility and oxymino-β-lactam resistance mechanisms in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolates from different animal sources.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Lurdes; Manageiro, Vera; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Correia, Ivone; Themudo, Patricia; Albuquerque, Teresa; Geraldes, Margarida; Matos, Filipa; Almendra, Cláudia; Ferreira, Eugénia; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-09-01

    The impact of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases (PMAβs) of animal origin has been a public health concern. In this study, 562 Salmonella enterica and 598 Escherichia coli isolates recovered from different animal species and food products were tested for antimicrobial resistance. Detection of ESBL-, PMAβ-, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR)-encoding genes and integrons was performed in isolates showing non-wild-type phenotypes. Susceptibility profiles of Salmonella spp. isolates differed according to serotype and origin of the isolates. The occurrence of cefotaxime non-wild-type isolates was higher in pets than in other groups. In nine Salmonella isolates, blaCTX-M (n = 4), blaSHV-12 (n = 1), blaTEM-1 (n = 2) and blaCMY-2 (n = 2) were identified. No PMQR-encoding genes were found. In 47 E. coli isolates, blaCTX-M (n = 15), blaSHV-12 (n = 2), blaCMY-2 (n = 6), blaTEM-type (n = 28) and PMQR-encoding genes qnrB (n = 2), qnrS (n = 1) and aac(6')-Ib-cr (n = 6) were detected. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to describe the presence of blaCMY-2 (n = 2) and blaSHV-12 (n = 1) genes among S. enterica from broilers in Portugal. This study highlights the fact that animals may act as important reservoirs of isolates carrying ESBL-, PMAβ- and PMQR-encoding genes that might be transferred to humans through direct contact or via the food chain. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Colonization and internalization of Salmonella enterica in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Allard, Sarah; Reynolds, Sara; Millner, Patricia; Arce, Gabriela; Blodgett, Robert J; Brown, Eric W

    2013-04-01

    The consumption of fresh tomatoes has been linked to numerous food-borne outbreaks involving various serovars of Salmonella enterica. Recent advances in our understanding of plant-microbe interactions have shown that human enteric pathogenic bacteria, including S. enterica, are adapted to survive in the plant environment. In this study, tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom) grown in sandy loam soil from Virginia's eastern shore (VES) were inoculated with S. enterica serovars to evaluate plausible internalization routes and to determine if there is any niche fitness for certain serovars. Both infested soil and contaminated blossoms can lead to low internal levels of fruit contamination with Salmonella. Salmonella serovars demonstrated a great ability to survive in environments under tomato cultivation, not only in soil but also on different parts of the tomato plant. Of the five serovars investigated, Salmonella enterica serovars Newport and Javiana were dominant in sandy loam soil, while Salmonella enterica serovars Montevideo and Newport were more prevalent on leaves and blossoms. It was also observed that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium had a poor rate of survival in all the plant parts examined here, suggesting that postharvest contamination routes are more likely in S. Typhimurium contamination of tomato fruit. Conversely, S. Newport was the most prevalent serovar recovered in both the tomato rhizosphere and phyllosphere. Plants that were recently transplanted (within 3 days) had an increase in observable internalized bacteria, suggesting that plants were more susceptible to internalization right after transplant. These findings suggest that the particular Salmonella serovar and the growth stage of the plant were important factors for internalization through the root system.

  12. Internal Colonization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ganyu; Hu, Jiahuai; Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M.; Richardson, Susanna M.; Bartz, Jerry A.; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Several Salmonella enterica outbreaks have been traced back to contaminated tomatoes. In this study, the internalization of S. enterica Typhimurium via tomato leaves was investigated as affected by surfactants and bacterial rdar morphotype, which was reported to be important for the environmental persistence and attachment of Salmonella to plants. Surfactants, especially Silwet L-77, promoted ingress and survival of S. enterica Typhimurium in tomato leaves. In each of two experiments, 84 tomato plants were inoculated two to four times before fruiting with GFP-labeled S. enterica Typhimurium strain MAE110 (with rdar morphotype) or MAE119 (without rdar). For each inoculation, single leaflets were dipped in 109 CFU/ml Salmonella suspension with Silwet L-77. Inoculated and adjacent leaflets were tested for Salmonella survival for 3 weeks after each inoculation. The surface and pulp of ripe fruits produced on these plants were also examined for Salmonella. Populations of both Salmonella strains in inoculated leaflets decreased during 2 weeks after inoculation but remained unchanged (at about 104 CFU/g) in week 3. Populations of MAE110 were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of MAE119 from day 3 after inoculation. In the first year, nine fruits collected from one of the 42 MAE119 inoculated plants were positive for S. enterica Typhimurium. In the second year, Salmonella was detected in adjacent non-inoculated leaves of eight tomato plants (five inoculated with strain MAE110). The pulp of 12 fruits from two plants inoculated with MAE110 was Salmonella positive (about 106 CFU/g). Internalization was confirmed by fluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. For the first time, convincing evidence is presented that S. enterica can move inside tomato plants grown in natural field soil and colonize fruits at high levels without inducing any symptoms, except for a slight reduction in plant growth. PMID:22096553

  13. Colonization and Internalization of Salmonella enterica in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Sarah; Reynolds, Sara; Millner, Patricia; Arce, Gabriela; Blodgett, Robert J.; Brown, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of fresh tomatoes has been linked to numerous food-borne outbreaks involving various serovars of Salmonella enterica. Recent advances in our understanding of plant-microbe interactions have shown that human enteric pathogenic bacteria, including S. enterica, are adapted to survive in the plant environment. In this study, tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom) grown in sandy loam soil from Virginia's eastern shore (VES) were inoculated with S. enterica serovars to evaluate plausible internalization routes and to determine if there is any niche fitness for certain serovars. Both infested soil and contaminated blossoms can lead to low internal levels of fruit contamination with Salmonella. Salmonella serovars demonstrated a great ability to survive in environments under tomato cultivation, not only in soil but also on different parts of the tomato plant. Of the five serovars investigated, Salmonella enterica serovars Newport and Javiana were dominant in sandy loam soil, while Salmonella enterica serovars Montevideo and Newport were more prevalent on leaves and blossoms. It was also observed that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium had a poor rate of survival in all the plant parts examined here, suggesting that postharvest contamination routes are more likely in S. Typhimurium contamination of tomato fruit. Conversely, S. Newport was the most prevalent serovar recovered in both the tomato rhizosphere and phyllosphere. Plants that were recently transplanted (within 3 days) had an increase in observable internalized bacteria, suggesting that plants were more susceptible to internalization right after transplant. These findings suggest that the particular Salmonella serovar and the growth stage of the plant were important factors for internalization through the root system. PMID:23377940

  14. Dual Infection with Bluetongue Virus Serotypes and First-Time Isolation of Serotype 5 in India.

    PubMed

    Hemadri, D; Maan, S; Chanda, M M; Rao, P P; Putty, K; Krishnajyothi, Y; Reddy, G H; Kumar, V; Batra, K; Reddy, Y V; Maan, N S; Reddy, Y N; Singh, K P; Shivachandra, S B; Hegde, N R; Rahman, H; Mertens, P P C

    2016-12-21

    Bluetongue is endemic in India and has been reported from most Indian states. Of late, the clinical disease is most frequently seen in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana (erstwhile Andhra Pradesh state), Tamil Nadu and Karnataka. Our analysis of diagnostic samples from bluetongue outbreaks during 2010-2011 from the state of Karnataka identified bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 5 (BTV-5) for the first time in India. One of the diagnostic samples (CH1) and subsequent virus isolate (IND2010/02) contained both BTV-2 and BTV-5. Segment 2 (seg-2) sequence data (400 bp: nucleotides 2538-2921) for IND2010/02-BTV5, showed 94.3% nucleotide identity to BTV-5 from South Africa (Accession no. AJ585126), confirming the virus serotype and also indicating that Seg-2 was derived from a Western topotype, which is in contrast to serotype 2, that belongs to an Eastern topotype. BTV-5 has been recently reported from Africa, China, French islands and the Americas. Although the exact source of the Indian BTV-5 isolate is still to be confirmed, recent identification of additional exotic serotypes in India is of real concern and might add to the severity of the disease seen in these outbreaks.

  15. Draft genome sequences of 21 Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Timme, Ruth E; Allard, Marc W; Luo, Yan; Strain, Errol; Pettengill, James; Wang, Charles; Li, Cong; Keys, Christine E; Zheng, Jie; Stones, Robert; Wilson, Mark R; Musser, Steven M; Brown, Eric W

    2012-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a common food-borne pathogen, often associated with shell eggs and poultry. Here, we report draft genomes of 21 S. Enteritidis strains associated with or related to the U.S.-wide 2010 shell egg recall. Eleven of these genomes were from environmental isolates associated with the egg outbreak, and 10 were reference isolates from previous years, unrelated to the outbreak. The whole-genome sequence data for these 21 human pathogen strains are being released in conjunction with the newly formed 100K Genome Project.

  16. Foodborne Salmonellosis in Italy: Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Monophasic Variant 4,[5],12:i- Isolated from Salami and Human Patients.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Giuseppina; Merla, Cristina; Valle, Claudia Dalla; Corpus, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; D'incau, Mario; Colmegna, Silvia; Marone, Piero; Fabbi, Massimo; Barco, Lisa; Carra, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STm) and its monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- (VMSTm) have been responsible for an increased number of foodborne infections in humans in Europe in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the origin of three foodborne salmonellosis outbreaks that occurred in Pavia Province (Lombardy region, northern Italy) in 2010. Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the STm and VMSTm isolates from patients and from food that were recovered in the framework of the three outbreaks were evaluated through serotyping, phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Salami from three artisan producers, which had all purchased meat from the same slaughterhouse, was the food source of infection in outbreak I. STm isolates were recovered from salami and patients with symptoms of gastroenteritis. These isolates had the same PFGE type and the same rare MLVA profile (3-18-9-NA-211). The same molecular profiles were found in an STm isolate from a salami, which likely was the source of another family outbreak (II). A VMSTm strain with common phenotypic and molecular profiles was isolated from three hospitalized patients and identified as the cause of another putative outbreak (III). During the following 3 years (2011 through 2013), 360 salami produced in Pavia Province were monitored for the presence of S. enterica . In 2011, no STm and VMSTm isolates were recovered from 159 salami tested. During 2012 and 2013, 13.9% of 201 tested salami harbored S. enterica , and half of the isolates were VMSTm, mainly in salami from those artisan producers involved in the previous outbreaks. These isolates were genetically variable, especially in terms of MLVA profiles. The data collected suggest that from 2012, VMSTm has replaced STm in the environments of the salami producers monitored in this study, and these data confirm the dominance of

  17. Elucidation of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles and Genotyping of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Clinical Cases of Salmonellosis in New Mexico in 2008.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; George, Jeffy; Cadle, Kathleen M; Kumar, Sanath; Aragon, Steven J; Hernandez, Ricardo L; Jones, Suzanna E; Floyd, Jody L; Varela, Manuel F

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and the distribution of some well known genetic determinants of virulence in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica from New Mexico. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for various antimicrobials were determined by using the E-test strip method according to CLSI guidelines. Virulence genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for known virulence genes of Salmonella enterica. Of 15 isolates belonging to 11 different serovars analyzed, one isolate of Salmonella Typhimurium was resistant to multiple drugs namely ampicillin, amoxicillin / clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol and tetracycline, that also harbored class 1 intergron, bla(TEM) encoding genes for β-lactamase, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat1), plus floR, tet(C) and tet(G). This strain was phage typed as DT104. PCR analysis revealed the presence of invA, hilA, stn, agfA and spvR virulence genes in all the isolates tested. The plasmid-borne pefA gene was absent in 11 isolates, while 5 isolates lacked sopE. One isolate belonging to serogroup E4 (Salmonella Sombre) was devoid of multiple virulence genes pefA, iroB, shdA and sopE. These results demonstrate that clinical Salmonella serotypes from New Mexico used here are predominantly sensitive to multiple antimicrobial agents, but vary in their virulence genotypes. Information on antimicrobial sensitivity and virulence genotypes will help in understanding the evolution and spread of epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica in the region of study.

  18. Elucidation of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles and Genotyping of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Clinical Cases of Salmonellosis in New Mexico in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.; George, Jeffy; Cadle, Kathleen M.; Kumar, Sanath; Aragon, Steven J.; Hernandez, Ricardo L.; Jones, Suzanna E.; Floyd, Jody L.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and the distribution of some well known genetic determinants of virulence in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica from New Mexico. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for various antimicrobials were determined by using the E-test strip method according to CLSI guidelines. Virulence genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for known virulence genes of Salmonella enterica. Of 15 isolates belonging to 11 different serovars analyzed, one isolate of Salmonella Typhimurium was resistant to multiple drugs namely ampicillin, amoxicillin / clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol and tetracycline, that also harbored class 1 intergron, blaTEM encoding genes for β-lactamase, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat1), plus floR, tet(C) and tet(G). This strain was phage typed as DT104. PCR analysis revealed the presence of invA, hilA, stn, agfA and spvR virulence genes in all the isolates tested. The plasmid-borne pefA gene was absent in 11 isolates, while 5 isolates lacked sopE. One isolate belonging to serogroup E4 (Salmonella Sombre) was devoid of multiple virulence genes pefA, iroB, shdA and sopE. These results demonstrate that clinical Salmonella serotypes from New Mexico used here are predominantly sensitive to multiple antimicrobial agents, but vary in their virulence genotypes. Information on antimicrobial sensitivity and virulence genotypes will help in understanding the evolution and spread of epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica in the region of study. PMID:20514366

  19. Rapid multiplex PCR and real-time TaqMan PCR assays for detection of Salmonella enterica and the highly virulent serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C.

    PubMed

    Woods, David F; Reen, F Jerry; Gilroy, Deirdre; Buckley, Jim; Frye, Jonathan G; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2008-12-01

    Salmonella enterica is a human pathogen with over 2,500 serovars characterized. S. enterica serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C are two globally distributed serovars. We have developed a rapid molecular-typing method to detect serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C in food samples by using a comparative-genomics approach to identify regions unique to each serovar from the sequenced genomes. A Salmonella-specific primer pair based on oriC was designed as an internal control to establish accuracy, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Serovar-specific primer sets based on regions of difference between serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C were designed for real-time PCR assays. Three primer sets were used to screen a collection of over 100 Salmonella strains, and both serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C gave unique amplification patterns. To develop the technique for practical use, its sensitivity for detection of Salmonella spp. in a food matrix was determined by spiking experiments. The technique was also adapted for a real-time PCR rapid-detection assay for both serovars Choleraesuis and Paratyphi C that complements the current procedures for Salmonella sp. isolation and serotyping.

  20. Co-occurrence of ACSSuT and cephalosporin resistance phenotypes is mediated by int1-associated elements in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica from human infections in Spain.

    PubMed

    Campos, Maria Jorge; Palomo, Gonzalo; Hormeño, Lorena; Ugarte, María; Porrero, María Concepción; Herrera-León, Silvia; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    A screening of antimicrobial resistance and its genetic determinants has been performed on 300 Salmonella enterica isolates collected during 2004-2008 from human infections in Spain. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were the major serotypes, which were found with similar frequencies covering 80% of the bacterial collection. Salmonella Typhimurium isolates frequently shared low susceptibility to antimicrobials of the penta-resistance phenotype (ACSSuT) and/or cephalosporin resistance. The ACSSuT profile was found closely linked to int1-associated gene cassettes, with major elements carrying DNA fragments of 1.0 Kb (aadA2 gene) plus 1.2 Kb (blaPSE-1 gene) or 2.0 Kb (aadA1 and blaOXA-1 genes). Among these, ACSSuT and cephalosporin resistances were associated in Salmonella Typhimurium isolates expressing the blaOXA gene. β-lactamase activities were also detected from isolates carrying blaTEM, blaCMY, or blaSHV, although only the two last genes expressed extended-spectrum β-lactamases. The clonal analysis of S. enterica strains suggests that both horizontal and vertical transfer mechanisms are involved in the wide dissemination of their antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Plant pathogen-induced water-soaking promotes Salmonella enterica growth on tomato leaves.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Neha; Colee, James; Jones, Jeffrey B; Barak, Jeri D

    2015-12-01

    Plant pathogen infection is a critical factor for the persistence of Salmonella enterica on plants. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of S. enterica on diseased tomato plants by using four diverse bacterial spot Xanthomonas species that differ in disease severities. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and X. gardneri infection fostered S. enterica growth, while X. perforans infection did not induce growth but supported the persistence of S. enterica. X. vesicatoria-infected leaves harbored S. enterica populations similar to those on healthy leaves. Growth of S. enterica was associated with extensive water-soaking and necrosis in X. euvesicatoria- and X. gardneri-infected plants. The contribution of water-soaking to the growth of S. enterica was corroborated by an increased growth of populations on water-saturated leaves in the absence of a plant pathogen. S. enterica aggregates were observed with bacterial spot lesions caused by either X. euvesicatoria or X. vesicatoria; however, more S. enterica aggregates formed on X. euvesicatoria-infected leaves as a result of larger lesion sizes per leaf area and extensive water-soaking. Sparsely distributed lesions caused by X. vesicatoria infection do not support the overall growth of S. enterica or aggregates in areas without lesions or water-soaking; S. enterica was observed as single cells and not aggregates. Thus, pathogen-induced water-soaking and necrosis allow S. enterica to replicate and proliferate on tomato leaves. The finding that the pathogen-induced virulence phenotype affects the fate of S. enterica populations in diseased plants suggests that targeting of plant pathogen disease is important in controlling S. enterica populations on plants. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Plant Pathogen-Induced Water-Soaking Promotes Salmonella enterica Growth on Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Potnis, Neha; Colee, James; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen infection is a critical factor for the persistence of Salmonella enterica on plants. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of S. enterica on diseased tomato plants by using four diverse bacterial spot Xanthomonas species that differ in disease severities. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and X. gardneri infection fostered S. enterica growth, while X. perforans infection did not induce growth but supported the persistence of S. enterica. X. vesicatoria-infected leaves harbored S. enterica populations similar to those on healthy leaves. Growth of S. enterica was associated with extensive water-soaking and necrosis in X. euvesicatoria- and X. gardneri-infected plants. The contribution of water-soaking to the growth of S. enterica was corroborated by an increased growth of populations on water-saturated leaves in the absence of a plant pathogen. S. enterica aggregates were observed with bacterial spot lesions caused by either X. euvesicatoria or X. vesicatoria; however, more S. enterica aggregates formed on X. euvesicatoria-infected leaves as a result of larger lesion sizes per leaf area and extensive water-soaking. Sparsely distributed lesions caused by X. vesicatoria infection do not support the overall growth of S. enterica or aggregates in areas without lesions or water-soaking; S. enterica was observed as single cells and not aggregates. Thus, pathogen-induced water-soaking and necrosis allow S. enterica to replicate and proliferate on tomato leaves. The finding that the pathogen-induced virulence phenotype affects the fate of S. enterica populations in diseased plants suggests that targeting of plant pathogen disease is important in controlling S. enterica populations on plants. PMID:26386057

  3. Multi-Serotype Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage Prevalence in Vaccine Naïve Nepalese Children, Assessed Using Molecular Serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Rama; Gurung, Meeru; Thapa, Anushil; Ndimah, Susan; Adhikari, Neelam; Murdoch, David R.; Kelly, Dominic F.; Waldron, Denise E.; Gould, Katherine A.; Thorson, Stephen; Shrestha, Shrijana; Hinds, Jason; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is one of the major causes of death in young children in resource poor countries. Nasopharyngeal carriage studies provide insight into the local prevalence of circulating pneumococcal serotypes. There are very few data on the concurrent carriage of multiple pneumococcal serotypes. This study aimed to identify the prevalence and serotype distribution of pneumococci carried in the nasopharynx of young healthy Nepalese children prior to the introduction of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using a microarray-based molecular serotyping method capable of detecting multi-serotype carriage. We conducted a cross-sectional study of healthy children aged 6 weeks to 24 months from the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal between May and October 2012. Nasopharyngeal swabs were frozen and subsequently plated on selective culture media. DNA extracts of plate sweeps of pneumococcal colonies from these cultures were analysed using a molecular serotyping microarray capable of detecting relative abundance of multiple pneumococcal serotypes. 600 children were enrolled into the study: 199 aged 6 weeks to <6 months, 202 aged 6 months to < 12 months, and 199 aged 12 month to 24 months. Typeable pneumococci were identified in 297/600 (49·5%) of samples with more than one serotype being found in 67/297 (20·2%) of these samples. The serotypes covered by the thirteen-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were identified in 44·4% of samples containing typeable pneumococci. Application of a molecular serotyping approach to identification of multiple pneumococcal carriage demonstrates a substantial prevalence of co-colonisation. Continued surveillance utilising this approach following the introduction of routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccinates in infants will provide a more accurate understanding of vaccine efficacy against carriage and a better understanding of the dynamics of subsequent serotype and genotype replacement. PMID:25643355

  4. Serotype sensitivity of a lateral flow immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed

    Gates-Hollingsworth, Marcellene A; Kozel, Thomas R

    2013-04-01

    To meet the needs of a global community, an immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) must have high sensitivity for CrAg of all major serotypes. A new immunoassay for CrAg in lateral flow format was evaluated and found to have a high sensitivity for detection of serotypes A, B, C, and D.

  5. Characterization of neuraminidases produced by various serotypes of Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, D C; Jolley, W L; Purdy, C W

    1993-01-01

    Neuraminidases produced by 16 strains of Pasteurella haemolytica (serotypes 1 to 16) were characterized by molecular weight, antigenic identity, and substrate specificity. After growth in a chemically defined medium, stage I (lyophilized) culture supernatants were assayed for activity with N-acetylneuramin lactose, human alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, fetuin, colominic acid, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Neuraminidase produced by P. haemolytica serotype A1 (Ph A1) was purified by a combination of salt fractionation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. Purified Ph A1 neuraminidase was used to immunize rabbits, and the resultant antiserum reduced the activity of Ph A1 neuraminidase by 46%. This antiserum also reduced the activity of neuraminidase produced by the other serotypes by between 15 and 66%. Molecular weight estimates of the neuraminidases produced by the various serotypes were obtained by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200. Fifteen of the 16 serotypes examined produced a neuraminidase with a molecular weight of approximately 150,000 to 200,000. One serotype (serotype 11) produced no material with neuraminidase activity. In addition, all 15 high-molecular-weight neuraminidases showed similar substrate specificities. That is, they were all most active against N-acetylneuramin lactose and least active against bovine submaxillary mucin. On the basis of these results, it appears that the high-molecular-weight neuraminidases produced by the different P. haemolytica serotypes are quite similar. PMID:8406865

  6. Nomenclature of human rotaviruses: designation of subgroups and serotypes*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Based on the specificity of subgroup antigens and serotype antigens which are situated, respectively, in the major inner and outer capsid polypeptides, a new nomenclature for human rotaviruses is proposed. The subgroups are designated as I and II, and the serotypes as 1, 2, 3, 4. PMID:6088101

  7. Bluetongue Virus Serotypes 1 and 4 in Red Deer, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gortázar, Christian; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José M.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the potential of red deer as bluetongue maintenance hosts and sentinels. Deer maintained detectable bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 4 RNA for 1 year after the virus was cleared from livestock. However, the virus was not transmitted to yearlings. BTV serotype 1 RNA was detected in red deer immediately after its first detection in cattle. PMID:20202435

  8. First Complete Genome Sequence of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Kristy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen that primarily infects small children. In recent years, H. influenzae serotype a has emerged as a significant cause of invasive disease among indigenous populations. Here, we present the first complete whole-genome sequence of H. influenzae serotype a. PMID:28104664

  9. Probability of identifying different salmonella serotypes in poultry samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent work has called attention to the unequal competitive abilities of different Salmonella serotypes in standard broth culture and plating media. Such serotypes include Enteritidis and Typhimurium that are specifically targeted in some regulatory and certification programs because they cause a l...

  10. Salmonella serotypes in reptiles and humans, French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Gay, Noellie; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; de Thoisy, Benoit; Berger, Franck

    2014-05-14

    In French Guiana, a French overseas territory located in the South American northern coast, nearly 50% of Salmonella serotypes isolated from human infections belong to serotypes rarely encountered in metropolitan France. A reptilian source of contamination has been investigated. Between April and June 2011, in the area around Cayenne, 151 reptiles were collected: 38 lizards, 37 snakes, 32 turtles, 23 green iguanas and 21 caimans. Cloacal swab samples were collected and cultured. Isolated Salmonella strains were identified biochemically and serotyped. The overall carriage frequency of carriage was 23.2% (95% confidence interval: 16.7-30.4) with 23 serotyped strains. The frequency of Salmonella carriage was significantly higher for wild reptiles. Near two-thirds of the Salmonella serotypes isolated from reptiles were also isolated from patients in French Guiana. Our results highlight the risk associated with the handling and consumption of reptiles and their role in the spread of Salmonella in the environment.

  11. Cytolysins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, M A; Briaire, J; Jansen, R; Smith, H E; Kamp, E M; Gielkens, A L

    1991-01-01

    Cytolysin I (ClyI) and cytolysin II (ClyII), which are present in the culture supernatant of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9, are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of pig pleuropneumonia. The purpose of this study was to clone and characterize the genetic determinants of these cytolysins. Cloning was accomplished by the screening of DNA libraries for the presence of cytolytic activity and for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to leukotoxin DNA of Pasteurella haemolytica. Both genetic determinants were found to be members of the RTX cytotoxin family. The ClyII determinant was characterized in more detail. It appeared that ClyII more closely resembled the leukotoxin of P. haemolytica than the alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli. The ClyII amino acid sequence was identical to a hemolysin gene sequence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5; this finding indicates that the latter gene also codes for ClyII and not for ClyI, as has previously been suggested. The genetic organization of the ClyII determinant differed from the genetic organization of other RTX determinants. Genes responsible for secretion of ClyII were not contiguous with the toxin gene. Instead, secretion genes were present elsewhere in the genome. These secretion genes, however, belong to the ClyI operon. This indicates that the secretion genes of the ClyI operon are responsible for secretion of ClyI and ClyII. Images PMID:1937809

  12. Prevalence and Characterization of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella Bacteriophages Recovered from Beef Cattle Feedlots in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yicheng; Savell, Jeffrey W; Arnold, Ashley N; Gehring, Kerri B; Gill, Jason J; Taylor, T Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in beef cattle is a food safety concern, and the beef feedlot environment may function as a reservoir of this pathogen. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate Salmonella and Salmonella bacteriophages from beef cattle feedlot environments in order to better understand the microbial ecology of Salmonella and identify phages that might be useful as anti-Salmonella beef safety interventions. Three feedlots in south Texas were visited, and 27 distinct samples from each source were collected from dropped feces, feed from feed bunks, drinking water from troughs, and soil in cattle pens (n = 108 samples). Preenrichment, selective enrichment, and selective/differential isolation of Salmonella were performed on each sample. A representative subset of presumptive Salmonella isolates was prepared for biochemical identification and serotyping. Samples were pooled by feedlot and sample type to create 36 samples and enriched to recover phages. Recovered phages were tested for host range against two panels of Salmonella hosts. Salmonella bacteria were identified in 20 (18.5%) of 108 samples by biochemical and/or serological testing. The serovars recovered included Salmonella enterica serovars Anatum, Muenchen, Altona, Kralingen, Kentucky, and Montevideo; Salmonella Anatum was the most frequently recovered serotype. Phage-positive samples were distributed evenly over the three feedlots, suggesting that phage prevalence is not strongly correlated with the presence of culturable Salmonella. Phages were found more frequently in soil and feces than in feed and water samples. The recovery of bacteriophages in the Salmonella-free feedlot suggests that phages might play a role in suppressing the Salmonella population in a feedlot environment.

  13. Sub-iliac lymph nodes at slaughter lack ability to predict Salmonella enterica prevalence for swine farms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Wesley, Irene V; McKean, James D; O'Connor, Annette M

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of deep systemic sub-iliac lymph nodes collected at slaughter as predictors of Salmonella prevalence in live hogs. An observational study was conducted on 24 farms from September 2006 to February 2009. At least one cohort of market-weight pigs was visited for each farm. Within each cohort, 30 farm fecal samples on farm and 30 sub-iliac lymph nodes from matched pigs at slaughter were collected. Samples were cultured for Salmonella enterica and serotyped by conventional methods. Overall, 3.4% (51 of 1490) of farm feces and 0.06% (1 of 1739) of sub-iliac lymph nodes were Salmonella positive; 71.4% (15 of 21) of farms had at least one positive fecal sample, and 4.2% (1 of 24) had at least one positive sub-iliac lymph node. The median within-farm prevalence of Salmonella in farm fecal samples was 1.7%, ranging from 0% to 38.3%; for sub-iliac lymph nodes the median was 0%, ranging from 0% to 1.1%. The median within-cohort prevalence in farm fecal samples was 0%, ranging from 0% to 43.3%; for sub-iliac lymph nodes the median was 0%, ranging from 0% to 4%. The predominant serotype detected was Derby, followed by Anatum and Typhimurium (Copenhagen). Salmonella Braenderup was recovered from the sub-iliac lymph node. The low detection rate of Salmonella in sub-iliac lymph nodes (0.06%) limits its usefulness as a dependable predictor of Salmonella contamination originating on farm (3.4%).

  14. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Issack, Mohammad I; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Ramsamy, Veemala D; Svendsen, Christina A; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration determination. Forty-nine isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, including 25 stool isolates from foodborne illness outbreaks and sporadic gastroenteritis cases, four blood isolates, one postmortem colon isolate, 14 food isolates, and five poultry isolates. All isolates were pansusceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, except for two isolates that were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Overall characterization of the isolates by PFGE digested with XbaI and BlnI resulted in eight different patterns. The largest of the clusters in the composite dataset consisted of 20 isolates, including two raw chicken isolates, four poultry isolates, and nine human stool isolates from two outbreaks. A second cluster consisted of 18 isolates, of which 12 originated from human blood and stool samples from both sporadic and outbreak cases. Six food isolates were also found in this cluster, including isolates from raw and grilled chicken, marlin mousse, and cooked pork. One poultry isolate had a closely related PFGE pattern. The results indicate that one clone of Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry has been causing outbreaks of foodborne illness in Mauritius and another clone that has caused many cases of gastrointestinal illness and bacteremia in humans could also be linked to poultry. Thus, poultry appears to be a major reservoir for Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius. Initiating on-farm control strategies and measures against future dissemination may

  15. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain Associated with a Songbird Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K.; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G.; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S.; Cottrell, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast. PMID:22885752

  16. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  17. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sonia M; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S; Cottrell, Walter; Maurer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  18. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    DOEpatents

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  19. Non-typhi Salmonella enterica urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Mellon, G; Delanoe, C; Roux, A L; Heym, B; Dubourg, O; Hardy, P; Chevallier, B; Perronne, C; Rouveix, E; Salomon, J

    2017-10-01

    Non-typhi Salmonella enterica urinary tract infections (UTIs) are not frequent and rarely reported in the literature. We aimed to characterize clinical presentations and risk factors for the infection. We performed a retrospective study of non-typhi Salmonella enterica strains isolated from urine cytobacteriological examinations (UCBE) collected between January 1, 1996 and October 30, 2014 and analyzed by the microbiology laboratories of the university hospitals of the western part of Île-de-France and of Paris, France. Twenty UCBEs positive for non-typhi Salmonella enterica were analyzed. The sex ratio was 0.53 and the average age of patients was 57 years. Clinical presentations were acute pyelonephritis, acute cystitis, and prostatitis. Eight cases of bacteremia were identified. Diarrhea was observed in half of patients, either before the UTI or simultaneously. No patient required to be transferred to the intensive care unit. Immunodeficiency and/or diabetes were observed in eight patients. Three patients presented with a uropathy. Prescribed antibiotics were third generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. The average treatment duration was 20 days. A spondylitis and a purulent pleurisy were observed and deemed related to the UTI. Patient outcome was always favorable following treatment prescription. Non-typhi Salmonella enterica UTIs are rare. They are mainly observed in elderly patients presenting with immunodeficiency or an underlying urological disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Bile-induced peptidoglycan remodelling in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sara B; Cava, Felipe; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; de Pedro, Miguel A; Casadesús, Josep

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the peptidoglycan (PG) structure of Salmonella enterica are detected in the presence of a sublethal concentration of sodium deoxycholate (DOC): (i) lower proportions of Braun lipoprotein (Lpp)-bound muropeptides; (ii) reduced levels of muropeptides cross-linked by L(meso)-diaminopimelyl-D(meso)-diaminopimelic acid (L-D) peptide bridges (3-3 cross-links). Similar structural changes are found in S. enterica cultures adapted to grow in the presence of a lethal concentration of DOC, suggesting that reduced anchoring of Braun protein to PG and low occurrence of 3-3 cross-links may increase S. enterica resistance to bile. This view is further supported by additional observations: (i) A triple mutant lacking L,D-transpeptidases YbiS, ErfK, and YcfS, which does not contain Lpp anchored to PG, is hyper-resistant to bile; (ii) enhanced 3-3 cross-linking upon overexpression of YnhG transpeptidase causes a decrease in bile resistance. These observations suggest that remodelling of the cell wall may be added to the list of adaptive responses that permit survival of S. enterica in the presence of bile.

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Infantis, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Valinsky, Lea; Weinberger, Miriam; Guy, Sara; Jaffe, Joseph; Schorr, Yosef Ilan; Raisfeld, Abraham; Agmon, Vered; Nissan, Israel

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether rapid emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis in Israel resulted from an increase in different biotypes or spread of 1 clone, we characterized 87 serovar Infantis isolates on the genotypic and phenotypic levels. The emerging strain comprised 1 genetic clone with a distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile and a common antimicrobial drug resistance pattern. PMID:21029536

  2. Requirement of siderophore biosynthesis for plant colonization by Salmonella enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contaminated fresh produce has become the number one vector of non-typhoidal salmonellosis to humans. However, Salmonella enterica genes essential for the life cycle of this organism outside the mammalian host are for the most part unknown. Screening deletion mutants led to the discovery that an aro...

  3. Effect of residual sanitizers on Salmonella enterica biofilm formation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Salmonella enterica are a diverse group of bacteria that represent a serious risk to public health. Bacterial attachment on food and contact surfaces can lead to biofilm formation, and once in this state, bacteria are more resistant to sanitization and may serve as a continuous contam...

  4. Salmonella enterica Strains with Reduced Susceptibility to Quarternary Ammonium Compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Salmonella spp. are responsible for 76 million illnesses per year in the U.S. Quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) are commonly used antimicrobial agents. Reduced susceptibility to these compounds by a broad spectrum of organisms is a concern. Methods: Salmonella enterica strains with r...

  5. Association of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis YafD with Resistance to Chicken Egg Albumen

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B.; Riley, Lee W.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases in industrialized countries. The incidence of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections has increased substantially in recent decades, and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is now one of the leading serovars of Salmonella in the United States. A unique epidemiological characteristic of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is its association with chicken shell eggs, since approximately 80% of all human gastrointestinal diseases can be traced to contaminated egg products. Eggs are contaminated when bacteria from reproductive tissues of infected hens are packaged into the eggs and persist inside the hostile egg albumen environment. Therefore, resistance to egg albumen is an important aspect in the transmission of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. We identified a gene, yafD from S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, whose overexpression conferred upon S. enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced resistance to egg albumen, while disruption of this gene in S. enterica serovar Enteritidis rendered the organism more susceptible to egg albumen. YafD is homologous to members of an exonuclease-endonuclease-phosphatase family, including some enzymes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we discovered that egg albumen has nuclease activities and uses both circular and linear DNA as substrates. We propose that YafD provides a survival advantage to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis in eggs by repairing DNA damage caused by egg albumen and that it may be one of the biologic determinants that contribute to the epidemiological association of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis with egg products. PMID:14638758

  6. Association of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis yafD with resistance to chicken egg albumen.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B; Riley, Lee W

    2003-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases in industrialized countries. The incidence of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections has increased substantially in recent decades, and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is now one of the leading serovars of Salmonella in the United States. A unique epidemiological characteristic of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is its association with chicken shell eggs, since approximately 80% of all human gastrointestinal diseases can be traced to contaminated egg products. Eggs are contaminated when bacteria from reproductive tissues of infected hens are packaged into the eggs and persist inside the hostile egg albumen environment. Therefore, resistance to egg albumen is an important aspect in the transmission of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. We identified a gene, yafD from S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, whose overexpression conferred upon S. enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced resistance to egg albumen, while disruption of this gene in S. enterica serovar Enteritidis rendered the organism more susceptible to egg albumen. YafD is homologous to members of an exonuclease-endonuclease-phosphatase family, including some enzymes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we discovered that egg albumen has nuclease activities and uses both circular and linear DNA as substrates. We propose that YafD provides a survival advantage to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis in eggs by repairing DNA damage caused by egg albumen and that it may be one of the biologic determinants that contribute to the epidemiological association of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis with egg products.

  7. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core serotypes in chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, M U; Cerino, A; Bono, F; Cividini, A; Maccabruni, A; Aricò, M; Malfitano, A; Barbarini, G; Piazza, V; Minoli, L

    1994-01-01

    Recently, two distinct hepatitis C virus (HCV) serologic types have been identified on the basis of amino acid variations in the core region. The two serologic types can readily discriminate between genotypes I-II-V (serotype 1) and III-IV (serotype 2), according to the Okamoto classification. We compared HCV core serotyping with genotyping with sera from 363 anti-HCV-positive patients (309 HCV RNA positive by PCR) using a synthetic core peptide-based enzyme immunoassay and PCR amplification of core region sequences with type-specific primers, respectively. Serologic responses to HCV serotypes were successfully identified in 164 (45%) patients, of whom 153 were viremic. Eighty-nine patients had evidence of exposure to serotype 1: 8 of these were infected with genotype I, 50 were infected with genotype II, 2 were infected with genotype III, 7 were infected with genotype V, 13 had infections with mixed genotypes, 3 were infected with an indeterminate genotype, and 6 were nonviremic. Seventy-four patients had been exposed to serotype 2: 64 were infected with genotype III, 3 were infected with mixed genotypes, 2 were infected with an indeterminate genotype, and 5 were nonviremic. The serum of one patient, infected with genotype III, showed reactivity to both serotypes. Comparative evaluation of HCV core region serotyping and genotyping with sera from 294 viremic patients infected with a known HCV genotype showed a remarkable concordance between HCV core region genotyping and serotyping, with only 2 apparently discordant serum samples (both from patients with genotype III infection) of 148 (1.4%) successfully serotyped samples. Serotype 1 infection was more frequently observed in patients with overt chronic liver disease and accounted for all successfully serotyped samples from intravenous drug abusers. In contrast, serotype 2 was more prevalent in subjects with biochemically silent HCV infection (alanine aminotransferase, < 45 U/liter), in agreement with previous

  8. In vivo cross-protection to African horse sickness Serotypes 5 and 9 after vaccination with Serotypes 8 and 6.

    PubMed

    von Teichman, Beate F; Dungu, Baptiste; Smit, Theresa K

    2010-09-07

    The polyvalent African horsesickness (AHS) attenuated live virus (AHS-ALV) vaccine produced at Onderstepoort Biological Products incorporates 7 of the 9 known serotypes circulating in southern Africa. Serological cross-reaction has been shown in vitro to Serotypes 5 and 9 by Serotypes 8 and 6 respectively, but the degree of in vivo cross-protection between these serotypes in vaccinated horses has not previously been reported. Due to the increasing incidence of AHS Serotypes 5 and 9 in the field, over the last 3-4 seasons of AHS in South Africa, and the absence of Serotypes 5 and 9 in the AHS-ALV vaccine, it was necessary to conduct a vaccination-challenge study to determine in vivo cross-protection of vaccine-incorporated Serotypes 8 and 6 respectively. Groups of horses were vaccinated with either the polyvalent AHS-ALV vaccine or a monovalent Serotype 6 (vAHSV6) or 8 (vAHSV8) vaccine to determine the cross-protection of vaccinated horses following challenge with virulent AHS virus (AHSV) of either Serotype 5, 6, 8 or 9. Serial vaccination of naive horses with the polyvalent AHS-ALV vaccine generated a broad neutralizing antibody response to all vaccine strains as well as cross-neutralizing antibodies to Serotypes 5 and 9. Booster vaccination of horses with monovalent vaccine vAHSV6 or vAHSV8 induced an adequate protective immune response to challenge with homologous and heterologous virulent virus. In vivo cross-protection between AHSV6 and AHSV9 and AHSV8 and AHSV5 respectively, was demonstrated.

  9. Improved Detection of Nasopharyngeal Cocolonization by Multiple Pneumococcal Serotypes by Use of Latex Agglutination or Molecular Serotyping by Microarray▿†

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul; Hinds, Jason; Turner, Claudia; Jankhot, Auscharee; Gould, Katherine; Bentley, Stephen D.; Nosten, François; Goldblatt, David

    2011-01-01

    Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx is critical for an understanding of transmission, estimates of vaccine efficacy, and possible replacement disease. Conventional nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) culture and serotyping (the WHO protocol) is likely to underestimate multiple-serotype carriage. We compared the WHO protocol with methods aimed at improving cocolonization detection. One hundred twenty-five NPSs from an infant pneumococcal-carriage study, containing ≥1 serotype by WHO culture, were recultured in duplicate. A sweep of colonies from one plate culture was serotyped by latex agglutination. DNA extracted from the second plate was analyzed by S. pneumoniae molecular-serotyping microarray. Multiple serotypes were detected in 11.2% of the swabs by WHO culture, 43.2% by sweep serotyping, and 48.8% by microarray. Sweep and microarray were more likely to detect multiple serotypes than WHO culture (P < 0.0001). Cocolonization detection rates were similar between microarray and sweep, but the microarray identified the greatest number of serotypes. A common serogroup type was identified in 95.2% of swabs by all methods. WHO methodology significantly underestimates multiple-serotype carriage compared to these alternate methods. Sweep serotyping is cost-effective and field deployable but may fail to detect serotypes at low abundance, whereas microarray serotyping is more costly and technology dependent but may detect these additional minor carried serotypes. PMID:21411589

  10. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences of Three Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Belonging to Phage Types 8, 13, and 13a

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Muhammad Attiq; Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a prominent cause of human salmonellosis frequently linked to poultry products. In Canada, S. Enteritidis phage types 8, 13, and 13a predominate among both clinical and poultry isolates. Here, we report the complete genome and plasmid sequences of poultry isolates of these three phage types. PMID:26404595

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Manhattan Strain 111113, from an Outbreak of Human Infections in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Sassera, Davide; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Scaltriti, Erika; Morganti, Marina; Bandi, Claudio; Casadei, Gabriele; Pongolini, Stefano

    2013-08-15

    We announce the draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Manhattan strain 111113, isolated from a patient during an outbreak in northern Italy. The genome, which was obtained with Illumina MiSeq technology, is composed of 21 contigs for a total of 4,684,342 bp, with a G+C content of 52.17%.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence and Annotation of Phyllosphere-Persisting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Livingstone Strain CKY-S4, Isolated from an Urban Lake in Regina, Canada.

    PubMed

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Perry, Benjamin J; Fitzgerald, Stephen F; Cameron, Andrew D S; Yost, Christopher K

    2015-08-13

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Livingstone. This S. Livingstone strain CKY-S4 displayed biofilm formation and cellulose production and could persist on lettuce. This genome may help the study of mechanisms by which enteric pathogens colonize food crops.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhi Isolate B/SF/13/03/195 Associated with a Typhoid Carrier in Pasir Mas, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhamad Harish, Salwani; Sim, Kee-Shin; Mohd Nor, Fauziah; Mat Hussin, Hani; Hamzah, Wan Mansor; Najimudin, Nazalan; Aziah, Ismail

    2015-11-12

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi B/SF/13/03/195 obtained from a typhoid carrier, who is a food handler in Pasir Mas, Kelantan. Copyright © 2015 Muhamad Harish et al.

  14. Genome Sequences of Three Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Healthy Broiler Chicks in Hungary and in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Tibor; Szabó, Móni; Kiss, János; Szmolka, Ama; Barta, Endre; van Tonder, Andries; Thomson, Nicholas; Barrow, Paul; Nagy, Béla

    2015-02-12

    The genome sequences of three strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolated from broiler chickens in 1994 and 2004 in Hungary and in the 1980s in the United Kingdom are reported here. A sequence comparison should improve our understanding of the evolution of the genome and spread of S. Infantis in poultry.

  15. Complete and closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Anatum isolated from human and bovine sources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is an important pathogen transmitted by numerous vectors. Genomic comparisons of Salmonella from disparate hosts have the potential to further our understanding of mechanisms underlying host specificities and virulence. Here, we present closed genome and plasmid sequences of 10...

  16. Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Broiler Chicks in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János; Barta, Endre; Nagy, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Three strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis isolated from healthy broiler chickens from 2012 to 2013 have been sequenced. Comparison of these and previously published S. Infantis genome sequences of broiler origin in 1996 and 2004 will provide new insight into the genome evolution and recent spread of S. Infantis in poultry. PMID:27979950

  17. Phylogenetic Diversity of the Enteric Pathogen Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Inferred from Genome-Wide Reference-Free SNP Characters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella enterica is a major cause of food-borne illness in the US, leading to more deaths than any other food-related pathogen. This is an extremely diverse bacterial species consisting of six subspecies and over 2500 named serovars. Examining the evolutionary history within Salmonella with techn...

  18. The relationship between pneumococcal serotypes and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon; Dagan, Ron; Klugman, Keith P; Fritzell, Bernard

    2012-04-05

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) causes significant burden of disease, including invasive pneumococcal disease and noninvasive diseases such as pneumonia and acute otitis media. SP has at least 93 different capsular serotypes, with the various serotypes having different propensities for producing disease or developing antibiotic resistance. An increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant SP serotypes has been observed globally. The objective of this paper was to examine the relationship between antibiotic resistance and SP serotypes, with a primary focus on studies published in the past 10 years. Changing trends in antibiotic resistance and serotype distribution during this time, including those before and after the introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), were analyzed. Factors that influence the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant serotypes include antibiotic selection pressure, the use of PCV7, and the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant clones. The emergence of multidrug resistant serotype 19A is of particular concern. Antibiotic-resistant SP is a global problem that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including national vaccination programs, antibiotic control programs, and ongoing surveillance.

  19. Antibiofilm Activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 5 Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Karwacki, Michael T.; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Bendaoud, Meriem; Izano, Era A.; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Inzana, Thomas J.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free extracts isolated from colony biofilms of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, but not by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 itself, in a 96-well microtiter plate assay. Physical and chemical analyses indicated that the antibiofilm activity in the extract was due to high-molecular-weight polysaccharide. Extracts isolated from a mutant strain deficient in the production of serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide did not exhibit antibiofilm activity. A plasmid harboring the serotype 5 capsule genes restored the antibiofilm activity in the mutant extract. Purified serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide also exhibited antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts did not inhibit S. aureus growth, but did inhibit S. aureus intercellular adhesion and binding of S. aureus cells to stainless steel surfaces. Furthermore, polystyrene surfaces coated with A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts, but not with capsule-mutant extracts, resisted S. aureus biofilm formation. Our findings suggest that the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsule inhibits cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions of other bacteria. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit broad-spectrum, nonbiocidal antibiofilm activity. Future studies on these antibiofilm polysaccharides may uncover novel functions for bacterial polysaccharides in nature, and may lead to the development of new classes of antibiofilm agents for industrial and clinical applications. PMID:23691104

  20. The Type III Secretion System Effector SeoC of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and S. enterica subsp. arizonae ADP-Ribosylates Src and Inhibits Opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Dominic J; Young, Joanna C; Covarelli, Valentina; Herrera-León, Silvia; Connor, Thomas R; Fookes, Maria; Walker, Danielle; Echeita, Aurora; Thomson, Nicholas R; Berger, Cedric N; Frankel, Gad

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella species utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effectors into the cytosol of mammalian host cells, subverting cell signaling and facilitating the onset of gastroenteritis. In this study, we compared a draft genome assembly of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae strain 3588/07 against the genomes of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and Salmonella bongori strain 12419. S. enterica subsp. salamae encodes the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), SPI-2, and the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) T3SSs. Though several key S Typhimurium effector genes are missing (e.g., avrA, sopB, and sseL), S. enterica subsp. salamae invades HeLa cells and contains homologues of S. bongori sboK and sboC, which we named seoC SboC and SeoC are homologues of EspJ from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively), which inhibit Src kinase-dependent phagocytosis by ADP-ribosylation. By screening 73 clinical and environmental Salmonella isolates, we identified EspJ homologues in S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae The β-lactamase TEM-1 reporter system showed that SeoC is translocated by the SPI-1 T3SS. All the Salmonella SeoC/SboC homologues ADP-ribosylate Src E310 in vitro Ectopic expression of SeoC/SboC inhibited phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized beads into Cos-7 cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FcγRIIa. Concurrently, S. enterica subsp. salamae infection of J774.A1 macrophages inhibited phagocytosis of beads, in a seoC-dependent manner. These results show that S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and S. enterica subsp. arizonae share features of the infection strategy of extracellular pathogens EPEC and EHEC and shed light on the complexities of the T3SS effector repertoires of Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Montevideo and Newport in Free-ranging Sea Turtles and Beach Sand in the Caribbean and Persistence in Sand and Seawater Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ives, A-K; Antaki, E; Stewart, K; Francis, S; Jay-Russell, M T; Sithole, F; Kearney, M T; Griffin, M J; Soto, E

    2016-12-23

    Salmonellae are Gram-negative zoonotic bacteria that are frequently part of the normal reptilian gastrointestinal flora. The main objective of this project was to estimate the prevalence of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica in the nesting and foraging populations of sea turtles on St. Kitts and in sand from known nesting beaches. Results suggest a higher prevalence of Salmonella in nesting leatherback sea turtles compared with foraging green and hawksbill sea turtles. Salmonella was cultured from 2/9 and identified by molecular diagnostic methods in 3/9 leatherback sea turtle samples. Salmonella DNA was detected in one hawksbill turtle, but viable isolates were not recovered from any hawksbill sea turtles. No Salmonella was detected in green sea turtles. In samples collected from nesting beaches, Salmonella was only recovered from a single dry sand sample. All recovered isolates were positive for the wzx gene, consistent with the O:7 serogroup. Further serotyping characterized serovars Montevideo and Newport present in cloacal and sand samples. Repetitive-element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the 2014 isolates from turtles and sand as well as archived Salmonella isolates recovered from leatherback sea turtles in 2012 and 2013, identified two distinct genotypes and four different pulsotypes, respectively. The genotyping and serotyping were directly correlated. To determine the persistence of representative strains of each serotype/genotype in these environments, laboratory-controlled microcosm studies were performed in water and sand (dry and wet) incubated at 25 or 35°C. Isolates persisted for at least 32 days in most microcosms, although there were significant decreases in culturable bacteria in several microcosms, with the greatest reduction in dry sand incubated at 35°C. This information provides a better understanding of the epizootiology of Salmonella in free-ranging marine reptiles and the potential

  2. Modeling Stochastic Variability in the Numbers of Surviving Salmonella enterica, Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes Cells at the Single-Cell Level in a Desiccated Environment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kento; Hokunan, Hidekazu; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2017-02-15

    Despite effective inactivation procedures, small numbers of bacterial cells may still remain in food samples. The risk that bacteria will survive these procedures has not been estimated precisely because deterministic models cannot be used to describe the uncertain behavior of bacterial populations. We used the Poisson distribution as a representative probability distribution to estimate the variability in bacterial numbers during the inactivation process. Strains of four serotypes of Salmonella enterica, three serotypes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and one serotype of Listeria monocytogenes were evaluated for survival. We prepared bacterial cell numbers following a Poisson distribution (indicated by the parameter λ, which was equal to 2) and plated the cells in 96-well microplates, which were stored in a desiccated environment at 10% to 20% relative humidity and at 5, 15, and 25°C. The survival or death of the bacterial cells in each well was confirmed by adding tryptic soy broth as an enrichment culture. Changes in the Poisson distribution parameter during the inactivation process, which represent the variability in the numbers of surviving bacteria, were described by nonlinear regression with an exponential function based on a Weibull distribution. We also examined random changes in the number of surviving bacteria using a random number generator and computer simulations to determine whether the number of surviving bacteria followed a Poisson distribution during the bacterial death process by use of the Poisson process. For small initial cell numbers, more than 80% of the simulated distributions (λ = 2 or 10) followed a Poisson distribution. The results demonstrate that variability in the number of surviving bacteria can be described as a Poisson distribution by use of the model developed by use of the Poisson process.

  3. Infection of chickens with antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium-like variants: an emerging risk to the poultry industry?

    PubMed

    Parsons, B N; Crayford, G; Humphrey, T J; Wigley, P

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica poses a particular risk to public health, and in particular isolates belonging to clonal lineages such as Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 cause epidemics across species including poultry. In recent years, antimicrobial-resistant S. Typhimurium DT193 and specifically the monophasic S. Typhimurium-like variants of this phage type, serotypes 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:-, have become an increasing risk to public health in Europe and the USA and now account for nearly one-half of human S. Typhimurium infections in the UK. Unlike S. Typhimurium that possesses two forms of flagella which can vary between phase 1 and phase 2 during infection, monophasic variants possess only phase 1 flagella. These monophasic antimicrobial-resistant variants have become a major problem in pig production but human cases have also been associated with poultry consumption and have been found in UK flocks through surveillance schemes since 2010. In this study we determined the ability of antimicrobial-resistant DT193 serotype 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:- isolates from pigs to infect chickens. All isolates were found to colonize the caeca and liver. All but one isolate of serotype 4,5,12:i:- also infected the spleen. Levels of infection and pathology were comparable with those found with the virulent S. Typhimurium isolate 4/74. These findings indicate that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants of this phage type usually associated with pigs are capable of colonizing the chicken. This shows that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants represent a significant and potential emerging threat to poultry production from "spill-over" of these isolates from the pig industry or other sources.

  4. Prevalence of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes at public access watershed sites in a California Central Coast agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Michael B.; Quiñones, Beatriz; Oryang, David; Mandrell, Robert E.; Gorski, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Produce contaminated with enteric pathogens is a major source of foodborne illness in the United States. Lakes, streams, rivers, and ponds were sampled with Moore swabs bi-monthly for over 2 years at 30 locations in the vicinity of a leafy green growing region on the Central California Coast and screened for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes to evaluate the prevalence and persistence of pathogen subtypes. The prevalence of STEC from 1386 samples was 11%; 110 samples (8%) contained E. coli O157:H7 with the highest prevalence occurring close to cattle operations. Non-O157 STEC isolates represented major clinical O-types and 57% contained both shiga toxin types 1 and 2 and intimin. Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis of STEC isolates indicated prevalent strains during the period of study. Notably, Salmonella was present at high levels throughout the sampling region with 65% prevalence in 1405 samples resulting in 996 isolates with slightly lower prevalence in late autumn. There were 2, 8, and 14 sites that were Salmonella-positive over 90, 80, and 70% of the time, respectively. The serotypes identified most often were 6,8:d:-, Typhimurium, and Give. Interestingly, analysis by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis indicated persistence and transport of pulsotypes in the region over several years. In this original study of L. monocytogenes in the region prevalence was 43% of 1405 samples resulting in 635 individual isolates. Over 85% of the isolates belonged to serotype 4b with serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 3a, 4d with 4e representing the rest, and there were 12 and 2 sites that were positive over 50 and 80% of the time, respectively. Although surface water is not directly used for irrigation in this region, transport to the produce can occur by other means. This environmental survey assesses initial contamination levels toward an understanding of transport leading to produce recalls or outbreaks. PMID

  5. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  6. Increased secretion of exopolysaccharide and virulence potential of a mucoid variant of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo under environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Tall, Ben D; Flamer, M-L; Patel, I; Gopinath, G; Auguste, Winny; Jean, Catherine; George, Melvin; Tartera, Carmen; Ewing, L; Hanes, D E

    2017-02-01

    During an investigation to increase the recovery of Salmonella enterica from Oregano, an increased expression of exopolysaccharide was induced in Salmonella serovar Montevideo. The atypical mucoid (SAL242S) and the non-mucoid (SAL242) strains of Montevideo were compared and characterized using various methods. Serotyping analysis demonstrated that both strains are the same serovar Montevideo. Electron microscopy (EM) of cultured SAL242S cells revealed the production of a prominent EPS-like structure enveloping aggregates of cells that are composed of cellulose. Mucoid cells possessed a higher binding affinity for Calcofluor than that of the non-mucoid strain. Genotypic analysis revealed no major genomic differences between these morphotypes, while expression analyses using a DNA microarray shows that the mucoid variant exhibited heightened expression of genes encoding proteins produced by the SPI-1 type III secretion system. This increased expression of SPI1 genes may play a role in protecting Salmonella from environmental stressors. Based on these observations, Salmonella serovar Montevideo mucoid variant under stressful or low-nutrient environments presented atypical growth patterns and phenotypic changes, as well as an upregulated expression of virulence factors. These findings are significant in the understanding of survival abilities of Salmonella in a various food matrices.

  7. Public health significance of major genotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis present in both human and chicken isolates in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Su; Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Lee, Deog-Yong; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Choi, Byung-Kook; Youn, So-Youn; Jeon, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hee-Soo

    2017-02-17

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most common serotypes implicated in Salmonella infections in both humans and poultry worldwide. It has been reported that human salmonellosis is mainly associated with the consumption of poultry products contaminated with serovar Enteritidis. The present study was to extensively analyze the public health risk of serovar Enteritidis isolates from chickens in Korea. A total of 127 chicken isolates were collected from clinical cases, on-farm feces, and chicken meat between 1998 and 2012 and 20 human clinical isolates were obtained from patients with diarrhea between 2000 and 2006 in Korea. To characterize the isolates from chickens and humans, we compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles of the isolates. We further characterized representative isolates of different genotypes using a DNA microarray. PFGE revealed 28 patterns and MLVA identified 16 allelic profiles. The DNA microarray showed high genetic variability in plasmid regions and other fimbrial subunits of the isolates although the virulence gene contents of isolates from the same source and/or of the same genotype were unrelated. PFGE and MLVA showed that major genotypes were present in both human and chicken isolates. This result suggests that chickens in Korea pose a significant risk to public health as a source of serovar Enteritidis as has been noted in other countries.

  8. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Albany in captive zoo wild animals in the Culiacán Zoo in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Moreno, Héctor Samuel; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney Francisco; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rendón-Maldonado, José Guadalupe; López-Valenzuela, José Angel; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Juárez-Barranco, Felipe

    2013-03-01

    Salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease but little is known about the role that free-living animals play as carriers of this pathogen. Moreover, the primary route of infection in the wild needs to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the source and the route of transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Albany (S. Albany) infection in captive zoo wild animals in the Culiacán Zoo. A total of 267 samples were analyzed including 220 fecal samples from zoo animals, 15 fecal samples from rodents, 5 pooled samples each of two insects (Musca domestica and Periplaneta americana), and 22 samples of animal feed. We detected S. Albany in 28 (10.5%) of the samples analyzed, including in samples from raw chicken meat. Characterization of isolates was performed by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All isolates shared a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile, indicating a possible common origin. These data suggest that the infected meat consumed by the wild felines was the primary source of infection in this zoo. It is likely that the pathogen was shed in the feces and disseminated by insects and rats to other locations in the zoo.

  9. Roles of diet and the acid tolerance response in survival of common Salmonella serotypes in feces of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Leonard, Nola; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P < 0.1) and increased rates of decline (P < 0.0001) of salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P < 0.1) the duration of survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature.

  10. Roles of Diet and the Acid Tolerance Response in Survival of Common Salmonella Serotypes in Feces of Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P < 0.1) and increased rates of decline (P < 0.0001) of salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P < 0.1) the duration of survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature. PMID:22038599

  11. Field Evaluation of Culture plus Latex Sweep Serotyping for Detection of Multiple Pneumococcal Serotype Colonisation in Infants and Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul; Turner, Claudia; Jankhot, Auscharee; Phakaudom, Kawalee; Nosten, Francois; Goldblatt, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) culture by World Health Organisation (WHO) methodology underestimates multiple pneumococcal serotype colonisation compared to a simple culture and latex sweep method. The impacts of this on descriptions of pneumococcal serotype distributions and colonisation dynamics in infancy are not clear. Methods 8,736 NPS collected from infants enrolled into a longitudinal study were processed to evaluate the field utility of the latex sweep method. 1,107 had previously been cultured by WHO methodology. Additionally, colonisation results were compared in 100 matched pairs of infants, where swabs from an individual were cultured either by WHO or latex sweep method. Results In 1,107 swabs cultured by both methods, the latex sweep method was three times more likely to detect colonisation with multiple pneumococcal serotypes than the WHO method (p<0.001). At least one common serotype was identified in 91.2% of swabs from which typeable pneumococci were detected by both methods. Agreement improved with increasing colonisation density (p = 0.03). Estimates of age at first pneumococcal acquisition and colonisation duration were not affected by culture/serotyping method. However, a greater number of serotype carriage episodes were detected in infants cultured by latex sweep (p = 0.03). The overall rate of non-vaccine type pneumococcal acquisition was also greater in infants cultured by latex sweep (p = 0.04). Conclusions Latex sweep serotyping was feasible to perform on a large specimen collection. Multiple serotype colonisation detection was significantly improved compared with WHO methodology. However, use of the latex sweep method is unlikely to significantly alter colonisation study serotype distribution or colonisation dynamics results. PMID:23844133

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Clinical Isolates of Serotype 6E Streptococcus pneumoniae from Five Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ho; Baek, Jin Yang; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although serotype 6E Streptococcus pneumoniae consistently expresses capsules of either vaccine-serotype 6A or 6B, certain genetic variants of serotype 6E may evade vaccine induced immunity. Thus, draft genome sequences from five clinical isolates of serotype 6E from each of five different Asian countries have been generated to provide insight into the genomic diversity in serotype 6E strains. PMID:28280026

  13. [Investigation of pathogenic phenotypes and virulence determinants of food-borne Salmonella enterica strains in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model].

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Deniz; Şen, Ece

    2015-10-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars with the consumption of contaminated food, is one of the leading food-borne disease that makes microbial food safety an important public health issue. This study was performed in order to determine the antibiotic resistance, serotyping, plasmid profiles and pathogenicity potentials of food-borne Salmonella isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system in Edirne province, located at Thrace region of Turkey. In this study, 32 Salmonella isolates, of which 26 belonged to Infantis, four to Enteritidis, one to Telaviv and one to Kentucky serovars, isolated from chicken carcasses were used. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. A new C.elegans nematode animal model system was used to determine the pathogenicity potential of the isolates. The antibiotic resistance profiles revealed that one (3.1%) isolate was resistant to gentamicin, two (6.2%) to ciprofloxacin, three (9.4%) to ampicillin, 18 (56.3%) to kanamycin, 19 (60.8%) to neomycin, 25 (78.1%) to tetracycline, 25 (78.1%) to trimethoprim, 26 (81.25%) to nalidixic acid, 27 (84.4%) to streptomycin and 32 (100%) to sulfonamide. All of the 32 strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ampicillin/sulbactam. High levels of resistance to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, kanamycin and neomycin was determined. According to the plasmid analysis, six isolates (18.75%) harboured 1-3 plasmids with sizes between 1.2 and 42.4 kb. In C.elegans nematode animal model system, the time (in days) required to kill 50% (TD50) of nematodes was calculated for each experimental group. TD50 values of the nematode group fed with S.Typhimurium ATCC 14028 that was used as the positive control and another group fed with E.coli OP50 as the negative control were 4.2 ± 0.5 days and 8.0 ± 0.02 days, respectively. TD50 of the groups fed with Salmonella isolates ranged

  14. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945–2011

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Christopher R.; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B.; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A.; Adams, Natalie L.; Fisher, Ian S.T.; Grant, Kathie A.; Peters, Tansy M.; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales. PMID:24960614

  15. Quantitative Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Straub, Tim M.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Small, Jack A.; Call, Douglas R.; Daly, Don S.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2004-03-22

    We report on a genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using nucleic acid microarrays for microbial forensics and epidemiology applications. We demonstrate that the microarray method provides high-resolution differentiation between closely related microorganisms using Salmonella enterica strains. In replicate trials we used a simple 192-probe nonamer array to construct a fingerprint library of 25 closely related Salmonella isolates. Controlling false discovery rate for multiple testing at alpha =.05, at least 295 of 300 pairs of S. enterica isolate fingerprints were found to be statistically distinct using a modified Hotelling Tsquared test. Although we find most pairs of Salmonella fingerprints to be distinct, forensic applications will also require a protocol for library construction and reliable microbial classification against a fingerprint library. We outline additional steps required to produce a protocol for library construction and reliable classification of unknown organisms.

  16. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    PubMed

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  17. Genome-Wide Methylation Patterns in Salmonella enterica Subsp. enterica Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Pirone-Davies, Cary; Hoffmann, Maria; Roberts, Richard J.; Muruvanda, Tim; Timme, Ruth E.; Strain, Errol; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Luong, Khai; Song, Yi; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Evans, Peter S.; Allard, Marc W.

    2015-01-01

    The methylation of DNA bases plays an important role in numerous biological processes including development, gene expression, and DNA replication. Salmonella is an important foodborne pathogen, and methylation in Salmonella is implicated in virulence. Using single molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA-sequencing, we sequenced and assembled the complete genomes of eleven Salmonella enterica isolates from nine different serovars, and analysed the whole-genome methylation patterns of each genome. We describe 16 distinct N6-methyladenine (m6A) methylated motifs, one N4-methylcytosine (m4C) motif, and one combined m6A-m4C motif. Eight of these motifs are novel, i.e., they have not been previously described. We also identified the methyltransferases (MTases) associated with 13 of the motifs. Some motifs are conserved across all Salmonella serovars tested, while others were found only in a subset of serovars. Eight of the nine serovars contained a unique methylated motif that was not found in any other serovar (most of these motifs were part of Type I restriction modification systems), indicating the high diversity of methylation patterns present in Salmonella. PMID:25860355

  18. Transcriptional profile of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Weltevreden during alfalfa sprout colonization

    PubMed Central

    Brankatschk, Kerstin; Kamber, Tim; Pothier, Joël F; Duffy, Brion; Smits, Theo H M

    2014-01-01

    Sprouted seeds represent a great risk for infection by human enteric pathogens because of favourable growth conditions for pathogens during their germination. The aim of this study was to identify mechanisms of interactions of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Weltevreden with alfalfa sprouts. RNA-seq analysis of S. Weltevreden grown with sprouts in comparison with M9-glucose medium showed that among a total of 4158 annotated coding sequences, 177 genes (4.3%) and 345 genes (8.3%) were transcribed at higher levels with sprouts and in minimal medium respectively. Genes that were higher transcribed with sprouts are coding for proteins involved in mechanisms known to be important for attachment, motility and biofilm formation. Besides gene expression required for phenotypic adaption, genes involved in sulphate acquisition were higher transcribed, suggesting that the surface on alfalfa sprouts may be poor in sulphate. Genes encoding structural and effector proteins of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2, involved in survival within macrophages during infection of animal tissue, were higher transcribed with sprouts possibly as a response to environmental conditions. This study provides insight on additional mechanisms that may be important for pathogen interactions with sprouts. PMID:24308841

  19. Salmonella serotype distribution in the Dutch broiler supply chain.

    PubMed

    van Asselt, E D; Thissen, J T N M; van der Fels-Klerx, H J

    2009-12-01

    Salmonella serotype distribution can give insight in contamination routes and persistence along a production chain. Therefore, it is important to determine not only Salmonella prevalence but also to specify the serotypes involved at the different stages of the supply chain. For this purpose, data from a national monitoring program in the Netherlands were used to estimate the serotype distribution and to determine whether this distribution differs for the available sampling points in the broiler supply chain. Data covered the period from 2002 to 2005, all slaughterhouses (n = 22), and the following 6 sampling points: departure from hatchery, arrival at the farm, departure from the farm, arrival at the slaughterhouse, departure from the slaughterhouse, and end of processing. Furthermore, retail data for 2005 were used for comparison with slaughterhouse data. The following serotypes were followed throughout the chain: Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Paratyphi B var. Java (Salmonella Java), Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Virchow, and Salmonella Mbandaka. Results showed that serotype distribution varied significantly throughout the supply chain (P < 0.05). Main differences were found at the farm and at the slaughterhouse (within one stage), and least differences were found between departure from one stage and arrival at the next stage. The most prominent result was the increase of Salmonella Java at farm level. This serotype remained the most prominent pathogen throughout the broiler supply chain up to the retail phase.

  20. Impact of pulsed light on cellular activity of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B; Wunderlich, J; Muranyi, P

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was a comprehensive characterization of physiological changes of Salmonella enterica induced by intense broad spectrum pulsed light (PL). After exposing the bacteria to this nonthermal decontamination technology on a gel surface, multiple viability parameters beyond culturability were assessed. By applying flow cytometry, a luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay and a microplate assay to measure the current redox activity, the impact of pulsed light on the membrane potential, membrane integrity, esterase activity, efflux pump activity, expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), respiration activity and ATP-content of Salm. enterica ATCC BAA-1045 was determined. These culture-independent methods for assessing the bacterial activity were compared to the ability to grow on tryptic soy agar. It is shown that this strain is rather sensitive to PL considering colony count reductions, while on the other hand unculturable bacteria still exhibit significant cellular energetic functions. However, this residual activity after PL exposure significantly decreases during sample storage in buffer for 24 h. This study also shows that the GFP expression of PL-treated cells which have rendered unculturable is severely reduced. This study reveals that although not all cellular functions of Salm. enterica are immediately shut down after PL exposure, the synthesis of new GFP is strongly reduced and affected to a similar extent as the culturability. It is shown for the first time, that even there is significant bacterial activity measurable after PL exposure, it is likely that nongrowing pathogenic bacteria like Salm. enterica are unable to express proteins, which is of great importance regarding their pathogenicity. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Test of a novel Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6C type specific polyclonal antiserum (factor antiserum 6d) and characterisation of serotype 6C isolates in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Lambertsen, Lotte; Kerrn, Mette B

    2010-09-24

    In 2007, Park et al. identified a novel serotype among Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup 6 which they named serotype 6C. The aim of this study was to evaluate with the Neufeld test a novel S. pneumoniae serotype 6C type specific polyclonal antiserum. In addition, serotype 6C isolates found in Denmark in 2007 and 2008 as well as eight old original serotype 6A isolates were characterised. In this study, 181 clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Denmark 2007 and 2008 were examined; 96 isolates had previously been typed as serotype 6A and 85 as serotype 6B. In addition, eight older isolates from 1952 to 1987, earlier serotyped as 6A, were examined. Serotype 6C isolates were identified by PCR and serotyping with the Neufeld test using the novel type specific polyclonal antiserum, factor antiserum 6 d, in addition to factor antisera 6b, 6b* (absorbed free for cross-reactions to serotype 6C) and 6c. All antisera are commercially available and antiserum 6b obtained from the supplier after 1 January 2009 is antiserum 6b*. All serotype 6C isolates were further characterised using multi-locus sequence typing. When retesting all 96 original serotype 6A isolates by PCR and the Neufeld test, 29.6% (24 of 81) of the invasive isolates in Denmark from 2007 and 2008 were recognised as serotype 6C. In addition, three of eight old isolates originally serotyped as 6A were identified to be serotype 6C. The oldest serotype 6C isolate was from 1962. The serotype 6C isolates belonged to eleven different sequence types (ST) and nine clonal complexes (CC), ST1692 (CC395), ST386 (CC386) and ST481 (CC460) were the predominant types. We tested a novel polyclonal antiserum 6 d, as well as modified antiserum 6b*, provided a scheme for the serotyping of S. pneumoniae serogroup 6 using the Neufeld test and compared the serotyping method with PCR based methods. The two types of methods provided the same results. In future, it will, therefore, be possible to test also serotype 6C in

  2. Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Guerrero, A L; García, R M; Reyes, M E; de la Garza, M

    1998-07-01

    A high molecular-mass proteolytic enzyme of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, was purified from culture supernatants (CSN) by using DEAE-cellulose and sepharose-4B-gelatin chromatography. In 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with porcine gelatin, the protease showed a single band of activity of > 200 kDa. However, minor molecular-mass proteolytic bands were observed when the protease was electrophoresed in the presence of either 5% beta-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM dithiothreitol, or 0.25 M urea. Furthermore, when the > 200-kDa purified protein was passed through a sucrose gradient, several bands with proteolyt