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Sample records for enterostomy

  1. [Easily closed gun-barrel enterostomy. A new technique].

    PubMed

    Belliard, R; Saric, J; Dost, C; Vergne, P; Perissat, J

    1982-05-15

    The availability of continuous low rate enteral and parenteral feeding has enlarged the indications of enterostomy, notably in patients with multiple operations. However, closing an enterostomy, which may be high up in the small bowel, rises technical problems and is not always without risk. In this study a new technique of gun-barrel enterostomy easily closed with automatic sutures and without reopening of the abdominal wall is presented.

  2. Enterostomy can decrease the mortality of patients with Fournier gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Dong; Zhu, Wei-Fang; Qiao, Jian-Jun; Lin, Jian-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the significance of enterostomy in the emergency management of Fournier gangrene. METHODS: The clinical data of 51 patients (49 men and 2 women) with Fournier gangrene who were treated at our hospital over the past 12 years were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according the surgical technique performed: enterostomy combined with debridement (the enterostomy group, n = 28) or debridement alone (the control group, n = 23). Patients in the enterostomy group received thorough debridement during surgery and adequate local drainage after surgery, as well as administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The clinical data and outcomes in both groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The surgical procedures were successful in both patient groups. In the enterostomy group, 10 (35.8%) patients required skin grafting with a total of six debridement procedures. While in the control group, six (26.1%) patients required four debridement procedures. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Following surgery, the time to normal body temperature (6 d vs 8 d, P < 0.05) and average length of hospital stay (14.3 ± 7.8 d vs 20.1 ± 8.9 d, P < 0.05) were shorter in the enterostomy group. The case fatality rate was lower in the enterostomy group than that in the control group (3.6% vs 21.7%, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Enterostomy can decrease the case fatality rate of patients with Fournier gangrene. PMID:24976731

  3. [Enterostomy: preparation, construction and after care over time].

    PubMed

    Säuberli, H

    1990-12-18

    During the last decade the industry has developed material to improve the quality of life of patients with an enterostomy. Patients are better informed and prepared before operation. Postoperative advising by professional nurses help the patient to maintain an odorless, leak-proof and continent stoma. Most of the patients today with enterostomies are able to have a socially integrated life with minimal psychological and physical handicaps.

  4. Using an indwelled test tube as a good "navigator" during enterostomy closure.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Ryuichiro; Tojigamori, Manabu; Obata, Satoshi; Tatsuta, Kyosuke; Kawakubo, Naonori; Arima, Toru

    2012-11-01

    Surgeons often have difficulty in identifying a suitable incision line to enter the peritoneal cavity for stoma mobilization during enterostomy closure. A mini-size test tube that is preoperatively placed into the stoma can act as an efficient guide in finding a free area to enter the peritoneal cavity, by supplying efficient counter traction and a palpable marker of the intestinal wall.

  5. Determinants of self-efficacy and quality of life in patients with temporary enterostomy: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Su, Xi; Zhen, Li; Zhu, Mulan; Kuang, Yinyi; Qin, Fang; Ye, Xinmei; Yin, Xuexia; Wang, Huizhen

    2017-02-01

    To identify determinants of self-efficacy and quality of life in patients with temporary enterostomy. Anterior resection with temporary enterostomy is the preferred treatment for patients with rectal cancer, which may impair patients' quality of life. So far, most studies have focused on quality of life in patients with permanent enterostomy, but few studies have looked at that in those with temporary enterostomy. Self-efficacy may determine quality of life in these patients, but few studies have identified determinants of self-efficacy and quality of life. Multicentre, cross-sectional survey and regression analysis to identify determinants of self-efficacy and quality of life. A convenience sample of patients undergoing temporary enterostomy at five hospitals in Guangdong Province (China) were surveyed at least four weeks after stoma surgery using validated Chinese versions of internationally recognised questionnaires, including a Stoma Self-Efficacy Scale and the City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy Questionnaire. Backward multiple regression analysis was performed to identify whether quality of life was determined by self-efficacy and other clinico-demographic characteristics. Of the 180 questionnaires distributed, 149 (82·8%) were returned, and 135 (75%) were used in the final analysis. Mean global quality of life was 5·40 ± 1·58, and mean global self-efficacy was 79·59 ± 20·21. Significant determinants of self-efficacy and quality of life were identified (β = 0·62, p < 0·01). Quality of life was determined by type of enterostomy (β = 0·18, p = 0·01) and payment method (β = 0·14, p = 0·03). Quality of life may be determined by self-efficacy, type of enterostomy and payment method, after temporary enterostomy. Promoting stoma-related self-efficacy in patients with temporary enterostomy may improve their quality of life. Healthcare providers should focus on quality of life in those either with temporary loop ileostomy or entirely

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Sodium Hyaluronate Gel and Chitosan in Preventing Postoperative Peristomal Adhesions After Defunctioning Enterostomy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiancong; Fan, Dejun; Lin, Xutao; Wu, Xianrui; He, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaowen; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peristomal adhesions complicate closure of defunctioning enterostomy. The efficacy and safety of sodium hyaluronate gel and chitosan in preventing postoperative adhesion have not been extensively studied. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of sodium hyaluronate gel and chitosan in the prevention of postoperative peristomal adhesions. This was a prospective randomized controlled study. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing defunctioning enterostomy were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive sodium hyaluronate gel (SHG group) or chitosan (CH group) or no antiadhesion treatment (CON group) during defunctioning enterostomy. The safety outcomes included toxicities, stoma-related complications, and short-term and long-term postoperative complications. Eighty-seven (76.3%) of the 114 patients received closure of enterostomy, during which occurrence and severity of intra-abdominal adhesions were visually assessed by a blinded assessor. Incidence of adhesion appears to be lower in patients received sodium hyaluronate gel or chitosan but differences did not reach a significant level (SHG group vs CH group vs CON group: 62.1% vs 62.1% vs 82.8%, P = 0.15). Compared with the CON group, severity of postoperative adhesion was significantly decreased in the SHG and CH group (SHG group vs CH group vs CON group: 31.0% vs 27.6% vs 62.1%; P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the occurrence of postoperative complications and other safety outcomes among the 3 groups. Sodium hyaluronate gel or chitosan smeared around the limbs of a defunctioning enterostomy was safe and effective in the prevention of postoperative peristomal adhesions. PMID:26705233

  7. Parental Perceptions of Quality of Life in Children on Long-Term Ventilation at Home as Compared to Enterostomy Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Redouane, Brahim; Cohen, Eyal; Stephens, Derek; Keilty, Krista; Mouzaki, Marialena; Narayanan, Unni; Moraes, Theo; Amin, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Objective Health related quality of life (HRQL) of children using medical technology at home is largely unknown. Our aim was to examine the HRQL in children on long-term ventilation at home (LTHV) in comparison to a cohort using an enterostomy tube. Study Design Participants were divided into three groups: 1) LTHV without an enterostomy tube (LTHV cohort); 2) Enterostomy tube (GT cohort); 3) LTHV with an enterostomy tube (LTHV+GT cohort). Caregivers of children ≥ 5 years and followed at SickKids, Toronto, Canada, completed three questionnaires: Health Utilities Index 2/3 (HUI2/3), Caregiver Priorities Caregiver Health Index (CPCHILD), and the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). The primary outcome was the difference in utility (HUI2/3) scores between the cohorts. Results One hundred and nineteen children were enrolled; 47 in the LTHV cohort, 44 in the GT cohort, and 28 in the LTHV+GT cohort. In univariate analysis, HUI2 mean (SE) scores were lowest for the GT cohort, 0.4 (0.04) followed by the LTHV+GT, 0.42 (0.05) and then the LTHV cohort, 0.7 (0.04), p = 0.001. A similar trend was seen for the HUI3 mean (SE) scores: GT cohort, 0.1 (0.06), followed by the LTHV +GT cohort, 0.2 (0.08) and then the LTHV cohort, 0.5 (0.06), p = 0.0001. Technology cohort, nursing hours and the severity of health care needs predicted HRQL as measured by the HUI2/3. Conclusion The HRQL of these children is low. Children on LTHV had higher HRQL than children using enterostomy tubes. Further work is needed to identify modifiable factors that can improve HRQL. PMID:26914939

  8. Impact of previous cyst-enterostomy on patients’ outcome following resection of bile duct cysts

    PubMed Central

    Ouaissi, Mehdi; Kianmanesh, Reza; Ragot, Emilia; Belghiti, Jacques; Majno, Pietro; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Dubois, Remi; Revillon, Yann; Cherqui, Daniel; Azoulay, Daniel; Letoublon, Christian; Pruvot, François-René; Paye, François; Rat, Patrick; Boudjema, Karim; Roux, Adeline; Mabrut, Jean-Yves; Gigot, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the impact of previous cyst-enterostomy of patients underwent congenital bile duct cysts (BDC) resection. METHODS: A multicenter European retrospective study between 1974 and 2011 were conducted by the French Surgical Association. Only Todani subtypes I and IVb were included. Diagnostic imaging studies and operative and pathology reports underwent central revision. Patients with and without a previous history of cyst-enterostomy (CE) were compared. RESULTS: Among 243 patients with Todani types I and IVb BDC, 16 had undergone previous CE (6.5%). Patients with a prior history of CE experienced a greater incidence of preoperative cholangitis (75% vs 22.9%, P < 0.0001), had more complicated presentations (75% vs 40.5%, P = 0.007), and were more likely to have synchronous biliary cancer (31.3% vs 6.2%, P = 0.004) than patients without a prior CE. Overall morbidity (75% vs 33.5%; P < 0.0008), severe complications (43.8% vs 11.9%; P = 0.0026) and reoperation rates (37.5% vs 8.8%; P = 0.0032) were also significantly greater in patients with previous CE, and their Mayo Risk Score, during a median follow-up of 37.5 mo (range: 4-372 mo) indicated significantly more patients with fair and poor results (46.1% vs 15.6%; P = 0.0136). CONCLUSION: This is the large series to show that previous CE is associated with poorer short- and long-term results after Todani types I and IVb BDC resection. PMID:27358675

  9. Use of T-Tube Enterostomy in Neonatal Gastro-intestinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaiem, Maher; Al-Garni, Abdulhai F; Al-Maghrebi, Abdulrahman; Asghar, Asim A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the results of the use of the T-tube ileostomy in neonatal intestinal surgery cases. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of sixty two neonates underwent intestinal obstruction surgery by using T-tube ileostomy was conducted between January 1990 and January 2013.The pathologies of the intestinal obstruction were; thirty four of jejunoileal atresia cases, thirteen case meconium ileus, eight cases perforated necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), three cases meconium peritonitis, three cases with bowel resection due to intestinal volvulus, and one case of gastroschisis. Results: Mean duration of T-tube placement was 13 days (range9-20days) and the sites of T-tube insertion closed spontaneously in 2 days (range 1-4 days). The mean duration for starting oral intake postoperatively in these patients was 9 days (6-16 days). All patients well tolerated the procedure and there were no serious complications related to the T-tube insertion. However, four patients died due to other reasons like sepsis, respiratory failure and prematurity. Conclusion: T-tube enterostomy is an effective and safe technique for treatment of selected cases of neonatal intestinal surgery. It showed less morbidity and mortality rates than the conventional stoma. Therefore, it is considered a helpful approach in cases where there is danger of hypoperistaltic dilated bowel proximal to the anastomosis.

  10. Early enteral fat supplement and fish oil increases fat absorption in the premature infant with an enterostomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Ayers, Kathleen; Chen, Yuegang; Helderman, Jennifer; Welch, Cherrie D; O'Shea, T Michael

    2013-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that in the premature infant with an enterostomy, early enteral supplementation with Microlipid (fat supplement) and fish oil increases enteral fat absorption and decreases the requirement for Intralipid (intravenous fat emulsion). Premature infants (<2 months old) with an enterostomy after surgical treatment for necrotizing enterocolitis or spontaneous intestinal perforation and tolerating enteral feeding at 20 mL/kg/day were randomized to usual care (control 18 infants) or early supplementing enteral fat and fish oil (treatment 18 infants). Intravenous fat emulsion was decreased as enteral fat intake was increased. Daily weight, ostomy output, and nutrition data were recorded. Weekly 24-hour ostomy effluent was collected until bowel reanastomosis, and fecal fat, fecal liquid, and dry feces were measured. Fat absorption (g/kg/d) was calculated by subtracting fecal fat from dietary fat. The fecal liquid and dry feces were reported as mg/g wet stool. Date were analyzed by using ANOVA and mixed-effects model. The interval from initial postoperative feeding to bowel reanastomosis varied from 2 to 10 weeks. The treatment group received more dietary fat and less intravenous fat emulsion and had higher enteral fat absorption, less fecal liquid, and drier feces than the control group. These effects were greater among infants with a high ostomy compared with those with a low ostomy. Enteral fat intake was significantly correlated with fat absorption. Early enteral fat supplement and fish oil increases fat absorption and decreases the requirement for intravenous fat emulsion. This approach could be used to promote bowel adaptation and reduce the use of intravenous fat emulsion in the premature infant with an enterostomy. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Randomized controlled trial of early enteral fat supplement and fish oil to promote intestinal adaptation in premature infants with an enterostomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Ayers, Kathleen; Welch, Cherrie D; O'Shea, T Michael

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that early enteral supplementing fat and fish oil decreases the duration of parenteral nutrition (PN) and increases enteral nutrition (EN) before bowel reanastomosis in premature infants with an enterostomy. Premature infants (<2 months old) who had an enterostomy and tolerated enteral feeding at 20 mL/kg/day were randomized to usual care (control=18) or early supplementing enteral fat supplement and fish oil (treatment=18). Intravenous lipid was decreased as enteral fat intake was increased. Daily weight, clinical and nutrition data, and weekly length and head circumference were recorded. The primary outcomes were the duration of PN and volume of EN intake, and the secondary outcomes were weight gain (g/day), ostomy output (mL/kg/d), and serum conjugated bilirubin level (mg/dL) from initiating feeding to reanastomosis. Data were analyzed by Student t test or Wilcoxon rank sum test. There were no differences in the duration of PN, ostomy output, and weight gain between the 2 groups before reanastomosis. However, supplemented infants received less intravenous lipid, had greater EN intake, and lower conjugated bilirubin before reanastomosis, and they also received greater total calorie, had fewer sepsis evaluations and less exposure to antibiotics and central venous catheters before reanastomosis, and had greater weight and length gain after reanastomosis (all P<.05). Early enteral feeding of a fat supplement and fish oil was associated with decreased exposure to intravenous lipid, increased EN intake, and reduced conjugated bilirubin before reanastomosis and improved weight and length gain after reanastomosis in premature infants with an enterostomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of upper gastrointestinal secretions by reinfusion of succus entericus into the distal small bowel. A clinical study of 30 patients with peritonitis and temporary enterostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, E; Palmer, D L; Frileux, P; Parc, R; Huguet, C; Loygue, J

    1983-01-01

    We prospectively studied peritonitis secondary to small bowel leakage in 30 critically ill patients, each of whom had complete diversion of intestinal continuity by stoma, fistula, or both. All patients received total parenteral nutrition during implementation of the protocol. The proximal intestinal effluent was collected and recycled into the distal small bowel. During reinfusion of succus entericus, a significant reduction in the output of the proximal stoma was observed (mean 30.2%, p less than 0.001). The reinfusion also significantly reduced the volume from isolated small bowel loops in six patients (32.6%, p less than 0.001). When isotonic dialysate solution was infused into the distal intestine, a lesser though significant reduction in stoma output occurred (mean 20.3%, p less than 0.001). These findings demonstrate a consistent inhibitory effect upon upper gastrointestinal secretions by reinfusion of succus entericus. Clinical benefits of this technique include simplified control of fluid and electrolyte balance in patients with high output stomas and optimal utilization of remaining absorptive capacity for enteral nutrition. PMID:6416191

  13. [Mechanical anastomosis without purse-string suture in esophageal surgery].

    PubMed

    Liboni, A; Zamboni, P; Occhioni, G; Masia, S; Passerò, G; Trignano, M

    1990-03-01

    A new surgical procedure for oesophago-enterostomy using staplers without purse-string suture is described. This technique is possible only using the CEEAP stapler, thanks to its new technical features.

  14. Chronic biloma after right hepatectomy for stage IV hepatoblastoma managed with roux-en-Y biliary cystenterostomy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew J.; Rauth, Thomas P.; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2012-01-01

    We report the complex case of a 12-month-old female with stage IV hepatoblastoma accompanied by thrombosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, she underwent right hepatectomy, which was complicated by iatrogenic injury of her left hepatic duct, and subsequently developed a postoperative biloma and chronic biliocutaneous fistula. Concomitant with multiple percutaneous interventions to manage the biloma nonoperatively while the child completed her adjuvant chemotherapy, she progressed to develop chronic malnutrition, jaundice, and failure to thrive. Once therapy was completed and the child was deemed free of disease she underwent exploratory laparotomy with roux-en-Y biliary cyst-enterostomy for definitive management, resulting in resolution of her biliary fistula, jaundice, and marked improvement in her nutritional status. Roux-en-Y biliary cyst-enterostomy is a unique and efficacious management option in the highly selected patient population with chronic biliary leak refractory to minimally invasive management. PMID:23164033

  15. Parastomal herniation of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R M; Brody, F; Miller, J; Ponsky, T A

    2005-12-01

    Parastomal hernias can occur in up to 31% of patients following an enterostomy (Cheung in Aust N Z J Surg 65:808-811, 1995). This type of hernia develops through an intentional fascial defect. Commonly, most parastomal hernias involve a reducible segment of omentum, small bowel, or colon. Typically, these hernias are asymptomatic and associated rarely with strangulation or obstruction. Patient preference and clinical scenario may dictate management of these hernias. Non-operative management of parastomal hernias includes abdominal binders and enterostomy belts. Operative management includes a host of options including mesh repair, a new stoma site, or revision. This paper documents the first reported case of a parastomal hernia involving the gallbladder. Optimal technique and site placement of a stoma are also discussed.

  16. Postoperative small bowel fistula: back to basics.

    PubMed

    Bissett, I P

    2000-07-01

    Twenty-one patients presenting between January 1992 and January 1998 with postoperative small bowel fistula were reviewed and their management and outcome were recorded. There were six jejunal and 15 ileal fistulae. Seven fistulae were low output and 14 high output. The management principles included: (i) initial resuscitation and skin care; (ii) early surgery for sepsis, or for a high-output fistula which showed no signs of decrease by 10 days, or total wound breakdown. Surgery involved, where possible, fistula resection with double enterostomy, a feeding gastrostomy and abdominal drainage; and (iii) enteral feeding with refeeding of enterostomy output into the distal stoma if required to correct fluid and electrolyte imbalance and malnutrition. Five patients died and in the other 16 their fistulae closed and they are alive and well.

  17. Worst Prognosis in the “Complex” Jejunoileal Atresia: Is It Real?

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Silvana; Sabatino, Maria Domenica; Domenichelli, Vincenzo; Straziuso, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Objective This report documents the authors' experiences in the management of “complex” jejunoileal atresia (JIA) and provides a review of the recent literature on “simple” and “complex” JIA. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective study of eight cases of “complex” JIA managed at the Pediatric Surgical Unit of Infermi Hospital in Rimini from 2002 to 2012. The inclusion criteria are all cases of JIA associated with distal bowel deformities and Types IIIb or IV. One patient had gastroschisis. Results The authors of this study performed primary anastomosis on three patients and enterostomies on five patients. In one case in which a patient presented with gastroschisis, the V.A.C. Therapy System (KCI Medical Ltd., Langford Locks, Kidlington, UK) was used to close the abdominal defect. All patients needed central venous catheter (CVC). Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was administered for a mean of 12 days. Oral feeding was introduced on mean day 7 (7.71 ± 3.40 standard deviation). Patients with enterostomy began extracorporeal stool transport on mean day 14. No outcomes resulted in short bowel syndrome (SBS). The mortality rate was zero. The authors of this study performed more enterostomies and CVC insertion than other authors in “complex” JIA and reported a percentage of SBS, complications of TPN, and start of oral feeding comparable to “simple” case reported by other authors. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the complexity of JIA alone is not associated to a worsening prognosis than simple atresia if the surgical and clinical approach is as conservative as possible. PMID:26171306

  18. Effects of exchange transfusion on cytokine profiles in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tokio; Kouwaki, Masanori; Goto, Kenji; Endo, Takeshi; Ito, Koichi; Koyama, Norihisa; Togari, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    To study the effect of exchange transfusion on cytokine profiles in a patient with necrotizing enterocolitis, the levels of 12 cytokines and serum calprotectin were measured among exchange transfusion. A male extremely low birth weight infant was in non-compensated shock and diagnosed stage 3 necrotizing enterocolitis. Exchange transfusion was performed for critical condition, refractory hypotension and disseminated intravascular coagulation. After exchange transfusion, the patient's blood pressure increased and stabilized. Then an enterostomy was performed and revealed necrosis of the ascending colon. Of the cytokines examined, interleukin-8 and serum calprotectin were high before exchange transfusion and decreased after exchange transfusion.

  19. Current options for management of biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Amy; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2013-03-01

    It is encouraging that we are improving the technical aspects of treatment modalities for biliary atresia. However, it is clear that more needs to be done to best develop new treatment plans while applying the modalities we have (porto-enterostomy or liver transplantation or both) in a way that will afford the best survival and quality-of-life. This review article will discuss a number of points that are vital to improving care and illustrates the need to further scrutinize treatment decisions.

  20. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  1. Delayed Esophageal Perforation Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Rupture in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man infected with human immunodeficiency virus underwent emergency surgery for rupture of a mycotic descending thoracic aneurysm. The aneurysm was replaced with a prosthetic graft wrapped with omentum. Esophageal perforation occurred 3 weeks after surgery. The patient’s condition remained stable, and we adopted a conservative treatment. The esophageal fistula had not healed completely and a biopsy of the scar revealed gastric cancer. We performed a distal gastrectomy, Roux-Y reconstruction, and enterostomy for enteral feeding. Follow-up endoscopy revealed healing of the fistula, and the patient was eventually discharged. We managed this potentially fatal complication with minimally invasive treatment. PMID:24995070

  2. Conversion of choledochojejunostomy stents to jejunal feeding tubes for postoperative enteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Burke, D R; Torosian, M H; McLean, G K; Meranze, S G; Rosato, E F

    1988-01-01

    The problem of protein calorie malnutrition following major gastrointestinal surgery can be treated with central venous or enteric alimentation, with the latter being preferred. The authors describe a simple technique for the conversion of biliary stents placed after pancreaticoduodenal surgery into jejunal feeding tubes when the stenting function is no longer needed. Three illustrative cases are presented. In each case, the procedure took less than 30 min and had no associated morbidity. This technique allows early conversion from central venous to enteric alimentation without the need to create a second surgical enterostomy.

  3. [Laparoscopic Kasai's operation. Technical details and preliminary results of a promising technique].

    PubMed

    Martínez, M; Questa, H; Gutiérrez, V

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the technical details of laparoscopic porto-enterostomy and comment the identical results using this technique in patients with biliary atresia. METHODS. We analyzed the results of the first three patients with biliary atresia who underwent a laparoscopic surgical approach. There were no complications during surgery or in the postoperative period. The average surgical time was 220 minutes (150-270 minutes). The three patients began oral feedings 12 hours after the procedure and achieved bowel movement after 24 hours. All of them showed signs of adequate bile flow, such as pigmented stools, and disappearance of jaundice. The cosmetic results were excellent. The Kasai porto-enterostomy may be performed by laparoscopy without complications. The initial results were encouraging and the patients recovered promptly after this procedure. The surgical time was significantly diminished, thus in the third case it was similar or less than the required with open surgery. The laparoscopic portoenterostomy is a promising technique and its real role will be known after more number of cases.

  4. Lateral pararectal versus transrectal stoma placement for prevention of parastomal herniation.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Julia; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Herrle, Florian

    2013-11-22

    A parastomal hernia is defined as an incisional hernia related to a stoma and belongs to the most common stoma-related complications. Many factors concerning the operative technique which are considered to influence the incidence of parastomal herniation have been investigated. However, it remains unclear whether the enterostomy should be placed through or lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle in order to prevent parastomal herniation and other important stoma complications for people undergoing abdominal wall enterostomy. To assess if there is a difference regarding the incidence of parastomal herniation and other stomal complications, such as ileus and stenosis, in lateral pararectal versus transrectal stoma placement in people undergoing elective or emergency abdominal wall enterostomy. In October and November 2012 we searched for all types of published and unpublished randomized and non-randomized studies with no restriction on language, date or country (search dates in brackets). We searched the bibliographic databases The Cochrane Library (4 October 2012), MEDLINE (1 October 2012), EMBASE (10 October 2012), LILACS (29 November 2012), and Science Citation Index Expanded (4 October 2012). We also searched the reference lists of all relevant studies and the trial registers ClinicalTrials.gov (9 October 2012), World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) Search Portal (10 October 2012), as well as three additional trial registers not included in the ICTRP (27 November 2012). Randomized and non-randomized studies comparing lateral pararectal versus transrectal stoma placement with regard to parastomal herniation and other stoma-related complications. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Data analyses were conducted according to the recommendations of The Cochrane Collaboration and the Cochrane Colorectal Cancer Group (CCCG). Quality of evidence was rated according to GRADE (Grading of

  5. [The symptoms and surgical tactics for complicated forms of the abdominal cavity tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kosul'nikov, S O; Kravchenko, K V; Tarnopol'skiĭ, S A; Besedin, A M

    2012-01-01

    The results of treatment of 12 patients, suffering complicated forms of abdominal tuberculosis and external intestinal fistulas, were presented. Late diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis in the patients, suffering the complications phase of the disease, is caused by unclear symptoms presence in early stages of the disease. Clinical and laboratory indices in peritonitis of a phthisis origin are nonspeciphic. In 91% of patients, admitted to the hospital for complicated forms of abdominal tuberculosis and external intestinal fistulas, the operative treatment was indicated. Surgical intervention (more frequently right-sided hemicolectomy, enterostomy, the abscesses opening, the caseously-changed lymph nodes excision, formation of anastomosis) was performed in 11 patients for peritonitis and external intestinal fistulas. The method of a secure invagination anastomoses formation was elaborated, permitting to perform primary restoration operations. An early diagnosis, early effective therapy and radical surgical intervention conduction for complicated abdominal tuberculosis promote the patients to survive.

  6. Idiopathic Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Resulting in Small Bowel Ischemia in a Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Lin, Chih-Che; Huang, Wan-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Background. Small bowel ischemia due to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT) is rare during pregnancy. However, additional precipitating factors should usually be identified. Case. A 31-year-old woman, pregnant at 34 weeks, was sent to the emergency department because of acute peritonitis. An emergency exploration revealed a segmental gangrene of the small intestine without any mechanical obstruction. Together with the termination of pregnancy, resection of the damaged small bowel was performed, and an end-to-end enterostomy was followed. Based on the operative and pathological findings, small bowel ischemia might be attributed to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. Conclusion. Hypercoagulation state normally found in pregnant women is believed to lead to this catastrophic condition without other precipitating factors. PMID:22567515

  7. Enteral nutrition by tube.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P J; Hand, M S; Frederick, G S

    1990-01-01

    When oral intake is unsatisfactory or contraindicated, maintenance of nutrition by tube feeding is an alternative to the parenteral route. A large volume of research data supports the decision to use the enteral route whenever possible. Entry of food into the alimentary tract is a stimulus to structural and functional maintenance of that tract. Enteral nutrition can be given via indwelling nasoesophageal, pharyngostomy, esophagostomy, percutaneous or surgical gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube. Use of an appropriate catheter, familiarity with the technique used, and careful patient selection and monitoring are important factors in successful tube feeding. Blenderized pet food diets should be fed whenever possible; commercially available liquid diets provide an alternative when tube caliber or patient factors preclude the use of blenderized foods.

  8. [A case report of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy suspected from seropositive results for anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody].

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Koki; Moribata, Kosaku; Kato, Jun; Murata, Kenya; Fukatsu, Kazuhiro; Tamaki, Hidehiko; Itou, Daisaku; Wada, Yuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman who had previously been diagnosed with idiopathic chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) at another hospital was admitted to our institution with severe abdominal pain. She had a history of several abdominal surgeries to treat ileus at the previous hospital, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography on admission revealed subileus without any apparent causes of obstruction. Total parenteral nutrition, a gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, and opiates reduced persistent pain;however, breakthrough pain continued. A neurologist at our hospital suggested autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) as a potential cause of CIPO. The patient was diagnosed with suspected AAG on the basis of seropositive results for anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody. Intravenous immunoglobulin administration and plasma exchange were performed in combination with immunosuppressive drugs;however, her symptoms barely improved. Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and enterostomy were subsequently performed to reduce internal intestinal pressure, her pain relief was insufficient.

  9. [Congenital chloride diarrhea mimicking meconium ileus in newborn].

    PubMed

    Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhoea is a rare autosomal recessive disease and the diagnosis is frequently delayed. The disease is most common in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1:3200-13 000 births, Finland - 1:30 000-40 000, and in Poland - 1:200 000. Congenital chloride diarrhoea begins in fetal life. The main clinical sign is watery diarrhea that in utero leads to dilated bowel loops, polyhydramnios and often premature birth. Newborns have distended abdomens, absence of meconium, dilated bowel loops in ultrasonography and watery diarrhea which can sometimes be mistaken for urine. The absence of meconium and the distended abdomen suggest meconium ileus or Hirschsprung disease and can lead to unnecessary surgical intervention. The article is a report on a 3-months old boy with the history of dilated bowel loops in prenatal ultrasonograhy, low birth weight and abdominal distention. Because of the suspicion of mechanical bowel obstruction he had laparotomy on the second day of his life. Mechanical obstruction was excluded and enterostomy was performed. Hyponatremia, hypokaliemia and metabolic alkalosis were found in laboratory tests. The electrolyte disturbances were corrected and enterostomy was closed after six weeks. The final diagnosis of congenital chloride diarrhea was established two months later, when the patient was admitted to hospital again with severe watery diarrhea, metabolic alkalosis, hypochloraemia and hypokalemia. The stool chloride concentration was >90 mmol/L. Water and electrolyte deficits had been corrected. The patient was discharged home with supplementation of sodium, potassium and chloride. His follow-up was uneventful. He remains under the care of the pediatric clinic.

  10. Cluster hepaticojejunostomy with radial spreading anchoring traction technique for secure reconstruction of widely opened hilar bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Secure reconstruction of multiple hepatic ducts that are severely damaged by tumor invasion or iatrogenic injury is a challenge. Failure of percutaneous or endoscopic biliary stenting requires lifelong placement of one or more percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tubes. For such difficult situations, we devised a surgical technique termed cluster hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), which can be coupled with palliative bile duct resection. The cluster HJ technique consisted of applying multiple internal biliary stents and a single wide porto-enterostomy to the surrounding connective tissues. The technique is described in detail in the present case report. Performing cluster HJ benefits from three technical tips as follows: making the multiple bile duct openings wide and parallel after sequential side-to-side unification; radially anchoring and traction of the suture materials at the anterior anastomotic suture line; and making multiple segmented continuous sutures at the posterior anastomotic suture line. Thus, cluster HJ with radial spreading anchoring traction technique is a useful surgical method for secure reconstruction of severely damaged hilar bile ducts.

  11. Surgical alternatives in the treatment of intestinal intussusceptions resulting from polyps in adults.

    PubMed

    Arikanoglu, Zulfu; Onder, Akin; Taskesen, Fatih; Aliosmanoglu, Ibrahim; Gul, Mesut; Gumus, Hatice; Tas, Ilhan; Girgin, Sadullah

    2013-09-01

    Adult intussusception is an uncommon disease requiring surgical intervention. The aim of this study is to discuss the surgical alternatives and share our experience in the treatment of adult patients with intussusceptions formed as a result of polyps. The retrospective study included 16 adult patients who underwent surgery after the diagnosis of intestinal invaginations resulting from polyps between the years 2000 and 2011. Sixteen patients (seven males and nine females; mean age, 48.18 years; range, 18 to 76 years) presented with intestinal intussusceptions. Although a preoperative diagnosis was carried out in 11 (68.75%) patients, the diagnosis was made intraoperatively in five patients (31.25%). Among the patients, seven (43.8%) had undergone emergency surgeries and nine (52.8) had elective surgery. The invagination in 12 patients (75%) was located in the small intestine, in two patients (12.5%) in the colon, and in a further two patients (12.5%), it was ileocecally located. Ten patients (62.5%) had segmental resection + anastomosis; three patients underwent (18.8%) segmental resection + enterostomy, and three (18.8%) received hemicolectomies. In adults, surgical treatment is always the primary option in intussusceptions resulting from polyps. Although the surgical method of choice in colonically located ones is en bloc resection without reduction, because the polyps located in the small intestine are usually of a benign nature, segmental resection with reduction should be performed in elective surgery and segmental resection without reduction should be performed in emergency cases.

  12. Gastric bezoar after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ertugrul, Ismail; Tardum Tardu, Ali; Tolan, Kerem; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Karagul, Servet; Kirmizi, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to present a patient with gastric pouch bezoar after having a bariatric surgery. Presentation of case Sixty-three years old morbid obese female had a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery 14 months ago. She has lost 88% of her excess body mass index; but started to suffer from nausea, abdominal distention and vomiting lately, especially for the last two months. The initial evaluation by endoscopy, computed tomography (CT) and an upper gastrointestinal contrast series overlooked the pathology in the gastric pouch and did not display any abnormality. However, a second endoscopy revealed a 5 cm in diameter phytobezoar in the gastric pouch which was later endoscopically removed. After the bezoar removal, her complaints relieved completely. Discussion The gastric bezoars may be confused with the other pathologies because of the dyspeptic complaints of these patients. The patients that had a bariatric surgery; are more prone to bezoar formation due to their potential eating disorders and because of the gastro-enterostomy made to a small gastric pouch after the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Conclusion Possibility of a bezoar formation should be kept in mind in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients who has nausea and vomiting complaints. Removal of the bezoar provides a dramatic improvement in the complaints of these patients. PMID:27107501

  13. Decreased transmission of Enterobacteriaceae with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in an intensive care unit by nursing reorganization.

    PubMed

    Soulier, A; Barbut, F; Ollivier, J M; Petit, J C; Lienhart, A

    1995-10-01

    In our gastrointestinal surgical intensive care unit (SICU), the large number of patients with multiple enterostomies enhances the risk of nosocomial transmission of gut extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLE) by health care workers. A control study performed in our SICU from June-August 1992 showed an ESBLE gut colonization rate of 70%. To reduce this rate, nursing procedures were intensified or modified, particularly handwashing, single-use equipment and waste control. To test the efficiency of these procedures, 64 patients hospitalized for more than two days from September 1992-March 1993 were screened for gut acquisition of ESBLE. Rectal samples were taken within 48 h after admission and then weekly. After nursing reorganization, the ESBLE colonization rate dropped significantly to 40% (P < 0.001). Twenty patients (31.7%) acquired a gut ESBLE, after a mean of 24.3 +/- 13.7 days. Each patient was colonized with one, two or three ESBLE (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes). Baseline characteristics of the 20 colonized and 39 non-colonized patients showed no significant difference (Student's t-test, P > 0.05). The nursing workload, estimated as a omega index, was greater in the colonized group (P < 0.001). These findings show that strict observance of nursing procedures can significantly reduce ESBLE acquisition in a high-risk surgical unit.

  14. Incidence, Risk Factors, Management, and Complications of Rectal Injuries During Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Philipp; Linnemannstöns, Anna; Chun, Felix; Schlomm, Thorsten; Pompe, Raisa; Budäus, Lars; Rosenbaum, Clemens; Ludwig, Tim; Dahlem, Roland; Fisch, Margit; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Tilki, Derya; Steuber, Thomas

    2017-02-07

    Rectal injury (RI) during radical prostatectomy (RP) is a severe complication. So far, only limited data describing the incidence, risk factors, management, and complications of RI are available. In an analysis of data for 24178 patients, we identified 113/24076 patients (0.47%) undergoing open or robotic RP and 7/102 patients (6.86%) after salvage RP who experienced an RI. Besides salvage RP, local tumor stage, Gleason grade, lymph node status, and surgical experience, but not surgical approach (robotic vs open), could be identified as risk factors for RI in univariate and multivariate analysis. Intraoperative management of RI comprised closure with two to three layers. In 13/109 patients (11.9%), a diverting colostomy/ileostomy was carried out. Some 12% of men with closure of an RI developed a recto-anastomosis fistula, and 57% of those who had an additional diverting enterostomy. Thus, the overall incidence of recto-anastomosis fistula after RP was <0.1%. The extent of rectal laceration, prior radiation, and intraoperative signs of rectal infiltration were associated with the development of a subsequent recto-anastomosis fistula. Some 83% of patients with a recto-anastomosis fistula needed further intervention. We analyzed the incidence, risk factors, management, and complications of rectal injury during radical prostatectomy. Overall, the incidence of rectal injury and subsequent development of recto-anastomosis fistulas is low unless the patient has significant risk factors. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent results of laparoscopic surgery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Hermann; Mudter, Jonas; Hohenberger, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are an ideal indication for the laparoscopic surgical approach as they are basically benign diseases not requiring lymphadenectomy and extended mesenteric excision; well-established surgical procedures are available for the conventional approach. Inflammatory alterations and fragility of the bowel and mesentery, however, may demand a high level of laparoscopic experience. A broad spectrum of operations from the rather easy enterostomy formation for anal Crohn’s disease (CD) to restorative proctocolectomies for ulcerative colitis (UC) may be managed laparoscopically. The current evidence base for the use of laparoscopic techniques in the surgical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is presented. CD limited to the terminal ileum has become a common indication for laparoscopic surgical therapy. In severe anal CD, laparoscopic stoma formation is a standard procedure with low morbidity and short operative time. Studies comparing conventional and laparoscopic bowel resections, have found shorter times to first postoperative bowel movements and shorter hospital stays as well as lower complication rates in favour of the laparoscopic approach. Even complicated cases with previous surgery, abscess formation and enteric fistulas may be operated on laparoscopically with a low morbidity. In UC, restorative proctocolectomy is the standard procedure in elective surgery. The demanding laparoscopic approach is increasingly used, however, mainly in major centers; its feasibility has been proven in various studies. An increased body mass index and acute inflammation of the bowel may be relative contraindications. Short and long-term outcomes like quality of life seem to be equivalent for open and laparoscopic surgery. Multiple studies have proven that the laparoscopic approach to CD and UC is a safe and successful alternative for selected patients. The appropriate selection criteria are still under investigation. Technical considerations are playing

  16. Robotic digestive tract reconstruction after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer: a simple way to do it.

    PubMed

    Barchi, Leandro Cardoso; Jacob, Carlos Eduardo; Franciss, Maurice Youssef; Kappaz, Guilherme Tommasi; Rodrigues Filho, Edison Dias; Zilberstein, Bruno

    2016-12-01

    Intracorporeal digestive tract reconstruction after minimally invasive total gastrectomy may be challenging, even when using the da Vinci® Surgical System. This may be due to intrinsic difficulties during oesophago-jejunal anastomosis (EJA). The aim of this study was to describe a simple way to perform digestive tract reconstruction after robotic total gastrectomy (RTG) for gastric cancer and the results of its application in a small series of cases. In the last 2 years, six patients with gastric adenocarcinoma have been treated by RTG, four male and two female, with mean age of 59.8 (range 48-74) years. The tumour was located in the gastric body in three patients, the gastric antrum in two patients and the fundus in one patient with no need of splenectomy. In all cases, D2 lymphadenectomy was completed. A modified robotic reconstruction technique proposed by the authors was used in these operations, which consists in a latero-lateral EJA using a linear stapler. An entero-enterostomy is also performed in the upper abdomen. The mean operative time was 408 (range 340-481) min. The mean time for digestive tract reconstruction was 57 (range 47-68) min. There were no conversions to open or laparoscopic surgery. The number of lymph nodes removed varied in the range 28-52 (average 40). There was no mortality. Postoperative staging showed three T1N0M0s, one T2N0M0, one T3N0M0 and one T3N2M0. This series, which despite being small, demonstrates that this robotic reconstruction technique is safe, with no major complications, demands a relatively short time for its accomplishment, even when dealing with initial experience. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Early Reoperations after Primary Repair of Jejunoileal Atresia in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Fanny; Tam, Yuk Him; Wong, Yuen Shan; Tsui, Siu Yan; Wong, Hei Yi; Pang, Kristine Kit Yi; Houben, Christopher H; Mou, Jennifer Wai Cheung; Chan, Kin Wai; Lee, Kim Hung

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To review nine-year experience in managing jejuno-ileal atresia (JIA) by primary resection and anastomosis and identify factors associated with reoperations. Methods: From April 2006 to May 2015, all consecutive neonates who underwent bowel resection and primary anastomosis for JIA were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with temporary enterostomy were excluded. Patient demographics, types of atresia, surgical techniques, need for reoperations, and long-term outcomes were investigated. Results: A total of forty-three neonates were included, in which nineteen (44.2%) of them were preterm and fourteen (32.6%) were of low birth weight. Thirteen patients (30.2%) had jejunal atresia whereas thirty patients (69.8%) had ileal atresia. Volvulus, intussusception and meconium peritonitis were noted in 12, 8, and13 patients, respectively. Eight patients (18.6%) had short bowel syndrome after operation. Ten patients (23.3%) required reoperations from 18 days to 4 months after the initial surgery due to anastomotic stricture (n=1), adhesive intestinal obstruction (n=1), small bowel perforation (n=2) and functional obstruction (n=6). Prematurity and low birth weight were associated with functional obstruction leading to reoperation (p=0.04 and 0.01 respectively). The overall long-term survival was 97.7%. All surviving patients achieved enteral autonomy and catch-up growth at a median follow-up of 4.7 years. Conclusion: Long-term survival of JIA after primary resection and anastomosis are excellent. However, patients have substantial risk of early reoperations to tackle intraabdominal complications. PMID:27896150

  18. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of delayed gastric emptying and the effects of various surgical modifications on the occurrence of delayed gastric emptying after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Rajesh; Pal, Sujoy

    2017-08-15

    A number of definitions have been used for delayed gastric emptying (DGE) after pancreatoduodenectomy and the reported rates varied widely. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition is the current standard but it is not used universally. In this comprehensive review, we aimed to determine the acceptance rate of ISGPS definition of DGE, the incidence of DGE after pancreatoduodenectomy and the effect of various technical modifications on its incidence. We searched PubMed for studies regarding DGE after pancreatoduodenectomy that were published from 1 January 1980 to 1 July 2015 and extracted data on DGE definition, DGE rates and comparison of DGE rates among different technical modifications from all of the relevant articles. Out of 435 search results, 178 were selected for data extraction. The ISGPS definition was used in 80% of the studies published since 2010 and the average rates of DGE and clinically relevant DGE were 27.7% (range: 0-100%; median: 18.7%) and 14.3% (range: 1.8%-58.2%; median: 13.6%), respectively. Pylorus preservation or retrocolic reconstruction were not associated with increased DGE rates. Although pyloric dilatation, Braun's entero-enterostomy and Billroth II reconstruction were associated with significantly lower DGE rates, pyloric ring resection appears to be most promising with favorable results in 7 out of 10 studies. ISGPS definition of DGE has been used in majority of studies published after 2010. Clinically relevant DGE rates remain high at 14.3% despite a number of proposed surgical modifications. Pyloric ring resection seems to offer the most promising solution to reduce the occurrence of DGE. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. One-stage laparoscopy-assisted endorectal pull-through for late presented Hirschsprung’s disease—Case series

    PubMed Central

    Nam, So Hyun; Cho, Min Jeong; Kim, Dae Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Children with late-presenting Hirschsprung’s disease (HD) are classically treated by a staged operation with enterostomy. An alternative may be one-stage laparoscopy-assisted endorectal pull-through, which has cosmetic advantages. This case-series report describes the outcomes of children with late-presenting HD who underwent this procedure. Presentation of cases Eight older (>3 years) children (five males, three females) underwent one-stage laparoscopy-assisted endorectal pull-through in 2010–2012. A retrospective review revealed their median age was 9.9 (range, 3.4–14) years. The transitional zone was rectosigmoid junction in 4 patients, and was rectum in 4 patients. For bowel preparation, five patients required rectal irrigation under general anesthesia. The median operating time was 263 min. There were no intraoperative or early post-operative complications. Patients started a diet a median of 5 days after the operation and were discharged a median of 11.5 days. During the median follow-up period of 37 months, seven (87.5%) had acquired voluntary bowel movements and 12.5% had grade 1 soiling. However, five (62.5%) of the patients still had constipation. The constipation was manageable with diet or laxatives in four patients but one patient continued to require regular enemas. Discussion One-stage laparoscopy-assisted endorectal pull-through in late-presenting HD was feasible, even in patients with large fecaloma with obstruction. Rectal irrigation under general anesthesia and the use of laparoscopy and a bipolar coagulator help to overcome the technical difficulties of this procedure. Conclusion One-stage laparoscopy-assisted endorectal pull-through in children with late-presenting short segment HD is feasible and safe. PMID:26476054

  20. Early Postoperative Progression to Solid Foods Is Safe After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Caroline M J; Maring, John K; Raeijmaekers, Natascha J C; Martijnse, Ingrid S; Langenhoff, Barbara S

    2016-02-01

    Even though admission time is reduced with the implementation of various enhanced recovery protocols, many clinics still instruct patients after weight loss surgery to maintain a fluid or minced-food diet for at least 2 weeks postoperatively. We reasoned that with adequate preoperative instructions, including adequate chewing of all foods, early progression to solid foods would not increase the risk of (gastro)enterostomy leakage. In December 2010, a new dietary protocol was implemented for all patients undergoing a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, allowing progression to solid foods from 12 h postprocedure onwards. All patients received thorough preoperative eating instructions and eating awareness counselling from a qualified dietician and psychologist. A retrospective study was performed of 936 patients who underwent a primary or redo laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between January 2011 and June 2014 in our hospital. All 30-day complications, readmissions and reoperations were noted. No 30-day loss to follow-up occurred. Overall 30-day complication rate was 9.4%, with gastrointestinal leakage occurring in only 0.6%. A low threshold for readmission was maintained due to the short mean admission time of 1.87 days. Readmission rate was 4.8%--mainly for observation of postoperative pain--and 1.8% of our patients required reoperation within 30 days. Mortality was 0.1%. Our results are comparable to results published by other Dutch centres advocating conventional diets, showing no increase in leakage or other complications. We conclude that early progression to solid foods after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is a feasible alternative as no increase in complications is observed.

  1. Prevention of parastomal hernias with 3D funnel meshes in intraperitoneal onlay position by placement during initial stoma formation.

    PubMed

    Köhler, G; Hofmann, A; Lechner, M; Mayer, F; Wundsam, H; Emmanuel, K; Fortelny, R H

    2016-02-01

    In patients with terminal ostomies, parastomal hernias (PSHs) occur on a frequent basis. They are commonly associated with various degrees of complaints and occasionally lead to life-threatening complications. Various strategies and measures have been tested and evaluated, but to date there is a lack of published evidence with regard to the best surgical technique for the prevention of PSH development. We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of eighty patients, who underwent elective permanent ostomy formation between 2009 and 2014 by means of prophylactic implantation of a three-dimensional (3D) funnel mesh in intraperitoneal onlay (IPOM) position. PSH developed in three patients (3.75%). No mesh-related complications were encountered and none of the implants had to be removed. Ostomy-related complications had to be noted in seven (8.75%) cases. No manifestation of ostomy prolapse occurred. Follow-up time was a median 21 (range 3-47) months. The prophylactical implantation of a specially shaped, 3D mesh implant in IPOM technique during initial formation of a terminal enterostomy is safe, highly efficient and comparatively easy to perform. As opposed to what can be achieved with flat or keyhole meshes, the inner boundary areas of the ostomy itself can be well covered and protected from the surging viscera with the 3D implants. At the same time, the vertical, tunnel-shaped part of the mesh provides sufficient protection from an ostomy prolapse. Further studies will be needed to compare the efficacy of various known approaches to PSH prevention.

  2. Treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis: an American Pediatric Surgical Association Outcomes and Clinical Trials Committee systematic review.

    PubMed

    Downard, Cynthia D; Renaud, Elizabeth; St Peter, Shawn D; Abdullah, Fizan; Islam, Saleem; Saito, Jacqueline M; Blakely, Martin L; Huang, Eunice Y; Arca, Marjorie J; Cassidy, Laura; Aspelund, Gudrun

    2012-11-01

    The optimal treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a common challenge for pediatric surgeons. Although many studies have evaluated prevention and medical therapy for NEC, few guidelines for surgical care exist. The aim of this systematic review is to review and evaluate the currently available evidence for the surgical care of patients with NEC. Data were compiled from a search of PubMed, OVID, the Cochrane Library database, and Web of Science from January 1985 until December 2011. Publications were screened, and their references were hand-searched to identify additional studies. Clinicaltrials.gov was also searched to identify ongoing or unpublished trials. The American Pediatric Surgical Association Outcomes and Clinical Trials Committee proposed six questions deemed pertinent to the surgical treatment of NEC. Recent Cochrane Reviews examined three of these topics; a literature review was performed to address the additional three specific questions. The Cochrane Reviews support the use of prophylactic probiotics in preterm infants less than 2500 grams to reduce the incidence of NEC, as well as the use of human breast milk rather than formula when possible. There is no clear evidence to support delayed initiation or slow advancement of feeds. For surgical treatment of NEC with perforation, there is no clear support of peritoneal drainage versus laparotomy. Similarly, there is a lack of evidence comparing enterostomy versus primary anastomosis after resection at laparotomy. There are little data to determine the length of treatment with antibiotics to prevent recurrence of NEC. Based on available evidence, probiotics are advised to decrease the incidence of NEC, and human milk should be used when possible. The other reviewed questions are clinically relevant, but there is a lack of evidence-based data to support definitive recommendations. These areas of NEC treatment would benefit from future investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Short-term surgical outcomes of preterm infants with necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Qingfeng; Lv, Zhibao; Xu, Weijue; Liu, Jiangbin; Wu, Yibo; Shi, Jingyi; Xi, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to analyze the nature of the disease, the surgical procedures, complications, and survival of preterm infants with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) at our institution. Medical records of 34 preterm (gestational age <37 weeks) infants with surgical NEC were retrospectively analyzed from January 2010 to December 2014. Patients were divided into 2 groups: low birth weight (LBW, <2500 g, n = 27) and normal birth weight (NBW, ≥2500 g, n = 7). The LBW and NBW groups differed dramatically in gestational age (31.2 ± 2.2 vs. 36.3 ± 0.5 weeks), and respiratory support (55.5% vs. 0%). The median age of NEC onset was 12 and 5 postnatal days respectively. There was an inverse association between gestational age and day of NEC onset (r = −0.470). Pneumoperitoneum, positive paracentesis, and progressive clinical deterioration were the indications for laparotomy. There was no difference in the extent of disease, in the bowel involvement, in the surgical procedures, and in the postoperative complication rates between the 2 groups. The choice of procedure has often depended upon the extent of disease (enterostomy was performed in most localized and multifocal infants, simple drainage was used in 83.3% pan-intestinal patients, P < 0.001). Postoperative complications occurred in 70.5% patients. The most common complications were sepsis, intestinal stricture, and short bowel syndrome. The median hospital stay was significantly longer in the LBW group (65 vs. 19 days, P = 0.004). The overall postoperative 180-day survival rate was 70.6% (70.4% vs. 71.5%, P = 0.890, log rank test). The severity of illness was the main risk factor for mortality (8.3% in localized, 18.7% in multifocal, and 100% in pan-intestinal, P < 0.001). The short-term outcomes for surgical NEC are grave. The high mortality and postoperative complications in this study mandate urgent improvements in early recognition, expeditious

  4. Diarrhoea in the ICU: respective contribution of feeding and antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diarrhoea is frequently reported in the ICU. Little is known about diarrhoea incidence and the role of the different risk factors alone or in combination. This prospective observational study aims at determining diarrhoea incidence and risk factors in the first 2 weeks of ICU stay, focusing on the respective contribution of feeding, antibiotics, and antifungal drugs. Methods Out of 422 patients consecutively admitted into a mixed medical–surgical ICU during a 2-month period, 278 patients were included according to the following criteria: ICU stay >24 hours, no admission diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding, and absence of enterostomy or colostomy. Diarrhoea was defined as at least three liquid stools per day. Diarrhoea episodes occurring during the first day in the ICU, related to the use of laxative drugs or Clostridium difficile infection, were not analysed. Multivariate and stratified analyses were performed to determine diarrhoea risk factors, and the impact of the combination of enteral nutrition (EN) with antibiotics or antifungal drugs. Results A total of 1,595 patient-days were analysed. Diarrhoea was observed in 38 patients (14%) and on 83 patient-days (incidence rate: 5.2 per 100 patient-days). The median day of diarrhoea onset was the sixth day, and 89% of patients had ≤4 diarrhoea days. The incidence of C. difficile infection was 0.7%. Diarrhoea risk factors were EN covering >60% of energy target (relative risk = 1.75 (1.02 to 3.01)), antibiotics (relative risk = 3.64 (1.26 to 10.51)) and antifungal drugs (relative risk = 2.79 (1.16 to 6.70)). EN delivery per se was not a diarrhoea risk factor. In patients receiving >60% of energy target by EN, diarrhoea risk was increased by the presence of antibiotics (relative risk = 4.8 (2.1 to 13.7)) or antifungal drugs (relative risk = 5.0 (2.8 to 8.7)). Conclusion Diarrhoea incidence during the first 2 weeks in a mixed population of patients in a tertiary ICU is 14%. Diarrhoea risk factors are

  5. Surgical treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel disease in children.

    PubMed

    Barrena, S; Martínez, L; Hernandez, F; Lassaletta, L; Lopez-Santamaria, M; Prieto, G; Larrauri, J; Tovar, J A

    2011-04-01

    Surgery for chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasingly often necessary in children. This study aimed at assessing the results of these operations in order to facilitate adequate preoperative counseling. We reviewed patients treated from 1992 to 2009. The operations, complications and functional outcome were recorded. For those with preserved rectal defecation, continence (Koivusalo score) and quality of life (standardized questionnaire) were assessed in the long term. Eighty five of 192 patients had Crohn disease (CD), 107 of 192 had ulcerative colitis (UC), and 3 of 192 had indeterminate colitis (IC). 12 of 85 CD patients (15%) aged 14 (12-19) years required 13 resections, 1 stricturoplasty, 1 transplantation and 6 other operations including 3 permanent enterostomies for anorectal involvement. Removal of the involved bowel led to significant improvement of nutritional status, growth and quality of life. The transplanted patient had a striking recovery but eventually died 1 year later of unrelated complications. 29 of 107 UC patients (26%) aged 11 (2-15) years required 87 operations. Nine had emergency colectomy for toxic megacolon (3, one death) or severe hemorrhage (6). 28 had restorative proctocolectomy and ileoanostomy (RPCIA) without (16) or with (12) J-pouch under protective ileostomy. Complications were frequent (40%). Permanent ileostomy was required in five children (17%). Twelve months postoperatively, RPCIA patients had 6.5 (2-13) stools/day; all were continent during daytime, and 25% have nocturnal leaks. Mean Koivusalo score (5-12) was 8.8 ± 2. Quality of life was good in all. All attended normal school and 7 the university, 4 work and 60% of those older than 18 years have sexual partners. Three of 107 children treated as UC with RPCIA had ultimately IC (3%) and were permanently diverted. The nature of IBD involves frustrating surgery. However, it may change life for CD patients and provide a reasonably good quality of life for UC after

  6. Diarrhoea in the ICU: respective contribution of feeding and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Graf, Séverine; Clerc, Aurélie; Delieuvin, Nathalie; Heidegger, Claudia Paula; Pichard, Claude

    2013-07-24

    Diarrhoea is frequently reported in the ICU. Little is known about diarrhoea incidence and the role of the different risk factors alone or in combination. This prospective observational study aims at determining diarrhoea incidence and risk factors in the first 2 weeks of ICU stay, focusing on the respective contribution of feeding, antibiotics, and antifungal drugs. Out of 422 patients consecutively admitted into a mixed medical-surgical ICU during a 2-month period, 278 patients were included according to the following criteria: ICU stay >24 hours, no admission diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding, and absence of enterostomy or colostomy. Diarrhoea was defined as at least three liquid stools per day. Diarrhoea episodes occurring during the first day in the ICU, related to the use of laxative drugs or Clostridium difficile infection, were not analysed. Multivariate and stratified analyses were performed to determine diarrhoea risk factors, and the impact of the combination of enteral nutrition (EN) with antibiotics or antifungal drugs. A total of 1,595 patient-days were analysed. Diarrhoea was observed in 38 patients (14%) and on 83 patient-days (incidence rate: 5.2 per 100 patient-days). The median day of diarrhoea onset was the sixth day, and 89% of patients had ≤4 diarrhoea days. The incidence of C. difficile infection was 0.7%. Diarrhoea risk factors were EN covering >60% of energy target (relative risk = 1.75 (1.02 to 3.01)), antibiotics (relative risk = 3.64 (1.26 to 10.51)) and antifungal drugs (relative risk = 2.79 (1.16 to 6.70)). EN delivery per se was not a diarrhoea risk factor. In patients receiving >60% of energy target by EN, diarrhoea risk was increased by the presence of antibiotics (relative risk = 4.8 (2.1 to 13.7)) or antifungal drugs (relative risk = 5.0 (2.8 to 8.7)). Diarrhoea incidence during the first 2 weeks in a mixed population of patients in a tertiary ICU is 14%. Diarrhoea risk factors are EN covering >60% of energy target, use of

  7. Short-term surgical outcomes of preterm infants with necrotizing enterocolitis: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qingfeng; Lv, Zhibao; Xu, Weijue; Liu, Jiangbin; Wu, Yibo; Shi, Jingyi; Xi, Zhengjun

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the nature of the disease, the surgical procedures, complications, and survival of preterm infants with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) at our institution.Medical records of 34 preterm (gestational age <37 weeks) infants with surgical NEC were retrospectively analyzed from January 2010 to December 2014. Patients were divided into 2 groups: low birth weight (LBW, <2500 g, n = 27) and normal birth weight (NBW, ≥2500 g, n = 7).The LBW and NBW groups differed dramatically in gestational age (31.2 ± 2.2 vs. 36.3 ± 0.5 weeks), and respiratory support (55.5% vs. 0%). The median age of NEC onset was 12 and 5 postnatal days respectively. There was an inverse association between gestational age and day of NEC onset (r = -0.470). Pneumoperitoneum, positive paracentesis, and progressive clinical deterioration were the indications for laparotomy. There was no difference in the extent of disease, in the bowel involvement, in the surgical procedures, and in the postoperative complication rates between the 2 groups. The choice of procedure has often depended upon the extent of disease (enterostomy was performed in most localized and multifocal infants, simple drainage was used in 83.3% pan-intestinal patients, P < 0.001). Postoperative complications occurred in 70.5% patients. The most common complications were sepsis, intestinal stricture, and short bowel syndrome. The median hospital stay was significantly longer in the LBW group (65 vs. 19 days, P = 0.004). The overall postoperative 180-day survival rate was 70.6% (70.4% vs. 71.5%, P = 0.890, log rank test). The severity of illness was the main risk factor for mortality (8.3% in localized, 18.7% in multifocal, and 100% in pan-intestinal, P < 0.001).The short-term outcomes for surgical NEC are grave. The high mortality and postoperative complications in this study mandate urgent improvements in early recognition, expeditious operation, and

  8. [Carbachol improve oxygen dynamic parameters during orally fluid resuscitation of a 50% TBSA full-thickness burn in dogs].

    PubMed

    Hu, Sen; Lin, Kai; Che, Jin-wei; Sheng, Zhi-yong

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effect of carbachol(CAR) on oxygen dynamic parameters and hyperlactacidemia during oral fluid resuscitation of burn shock. Twelve male Beagle dogs were surgically prepared for cannulation of carotid and jugular vein, and enterostomy, 24 hours later they were subjected to a 50% (total body surface area, TBSA) full-thickness flame injury under a 10-15 minute anesthesia by IV injection of propofol. The dogs were randomized to gastric fluid infusion group (GI group)and gastric fluid infusion plus CAR group (GI + CAR). Either a glucose-electrolyte solution(GES) or GES containing CAR (20 microg/kg) were intragastricly given to animals in GI group or GI+ CAR groups. The delivery rate and volume of GES was in accordance with that of Parkland formula. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF) and blood lactic acid were determined, and blood gas analysis evaluated for oxygen delivery (DO2), oxygen consumption (VO2) and oxygen uptake (O2ext) at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 hours after injury. The levels of MAP and IMBF markedly reduced, and LAC obviously increased in both groups after burn. MAP returned to 0 h level at 72 h post burn, while IMBF, and LAC were still higher or lower than 0 h levels. The level of MAP of GI + CAR group was significantly higher than that of GI group at 2 h, and those showed no significant differences between two groups after then. Carbochol administration led to a markedly higher levels of IMBF, and significant lower levels of LAC from 8 h after burn compared with those of GI group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The levels of DO2 VO2 and Oext were reduced markedly after burn in both groups. At 72 h after burn, DOQ returned to 0 h level; while VO2 and Oext though still much lower than 0 h levels. The level of DO2. VO2 and Oext of GI + CAR group were significantly higher than those of GI group from 8 h after burn (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Three of six animals died in GI+ CAR group, which was lower than two of six in

  9. Hepatic abscess: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lardière-Deguelte, S; Ragot, E; Amroun, K; Piardi, T; Dokmak, S; Bruno, O; Appere, F; Sibert, A; Hoeffel, C; Sommacale, D; Kianmanesh, R

    2015-09-01

    enteric biliary contamination (i.e., sphincterotomy, bilio-enterostomy) should be determined before performing radio-frequency ablation and/or chemo-embolization; substantial stenosis of the celiac trunk should be detected before performing pancreatoduodenectomy to help avoid iatrogenic HA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.