Science.gov

Sample records for environment safety quality

  1. Setting quality and safety priorities in a target-rich environment: an academic medical center's challenge.

    PubMed

    Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Marple, Keith B; McCullough, Kathryn Y; Meyer, Gregg S

    2013-08-01

    Hospitals are continually challenged to provide safer and higher-quality patient care despite resource constraints. With an ever-increasing range of quality and safety targets at the national, state, and local levels, prioritization is crucial in effective institutional quality goal setting and resource allocation.Organizational goal-setting theory is a performance improvement methodology with strong results across many industries. The authors describe a structured goal-setting process they have established at Massachusetts General Hospital for setting annual institutional quality and safety goals. Begun in 2008, this process has been conducted on an annual basis. Quality and safety data are gathered from many sources, both internal and external to the hospital. These data are collated and classified, and multiple approaches are used to identify the most pressing quality issues facing the institution. The conclusions are subject to stringent internal review, and then the top quality goals of the institution are chosen. Specific tactical initiatives and executive owners are assigned to each goal, and metrics are selected to track performance. A reporting tool based on these tactics and metrics is used to deliver progress updates to senior hospital leadership.The hospital has experienced excellent results and strong organizational buy-in using this effective, low-cost, and replicable goal-setting process. It has led to improvements in structural, process, and outcomes aspects of quality.

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health: Part 5, Environment, safety, health, and quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Pennell, W.T.; Selby, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    This document summarizes the research programs now underway at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the areas of environmental safety, health, and quality assurance. Topics include internal irradiation, emergency plans, dose equivalents, risk assessment, dose equivalents, surveys, neutron dosimetry, and radiation accidents. (TEM)

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health: Part 5: Environment, safety, health, and quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1987 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, and the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1987. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health - Part 5: Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Doctor, P.G.; Selby, J.M.

    1990-04-01

    Part 5 of the 1989 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1989. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work. 35 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Quality and Safety Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manha, William D.

    2010-09-01

    One to the expressions for the most demanding quality was made by a well-known rocket scientist, for which this center was named, Dr. Wernher Von Braun in the Foreword of a book about the design of rocket engines that was first published by NASA in 1967: “Success in space demands perfection. Many of the brilliant achievements made in this vast, austere environment seem almost miraculous. Behind each apparent miracle, however, stands the flawless performance of numerous highly complex systems. All are important. The failure of only one portion of a launch vehicle or spacecraft may cause failure of an entire mission. But the first to feel this awesome imperative for perfection are the propulsion systems, especially the engines. Unless they operate flawlessly first, none of the other systems will get a chance to perform in space. Perfection begins in the design of space hardware. This book emphasizes quality and reliability in the design of propulsion and engine systems. It draws deeply from the vast know-how and experience which have been the essence of several well-designed, reliable systems of the past and present. And, with a thoroughness and completeness not previously available, it tells how the present high state of reliability, gained through years of research and testing, can be maintained, and perhaps improved, in engines of the future. As man ventures deeper into space to explore the planets, the search for perfection in the design of propulsion systems will continue.” Some catastrophes with losses of life will be compared to show lapses in quality and safety and contrasted with a catastrophe without loss of life because of compliance with safety requirements. 1. October 24, 1960,(USSR) Nedelin Catastrophe, Death on the Steppes, 124 deaths 2. October 25, 1966,(USA) North American Rockwell, Apollo Block I Service Module Service(SM) Propulsion System fuel tank explosion/fire and destruction of SM and test cell, test engineer/conductor/author, Bill Manha

  6. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XIV: The External Environment and Research for Diagnostic Processes.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-09-01

    The work system in which diagnosis takes place is affected by the external environment, which includes requirements such as certification, accreditation, and regulations. How errors are reported, malpractice, and the system for payment are some other aspects of the external environment. Improving the external environment is expected to decrease errors in diagnosis. More research on improving the diagnostic process is needed. PMID:27280903

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Internal Appraisal Program environment, safety, health/quality assurance oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Winner, G.L.; Siegfried, Y.S.; Forst, S.P.; Meshenberg, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Internal Appraisal Program has developed a quality assurance team member training program. This program has been developed to provide training to non-quality assurance professionals. Upon successful completion of this training and approval of the Internal Appraisal Program Manager, these personnel are considered qualified to assist in the conduct of quality assurance assessments. The training program has been incorporated into a self-paced, computerized, training session.

  8. Fire Safety in Extraterrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Despite rigorous fire-safety policies and practices, fire incidents are possible during lunar and Martian missions. Fire behavior and hence preventive and responsive safety actions in the missions are strongly influenced by the low-gravity environments in flight and on the planetary surfaces. This paper reviews the understanding and key issues of fire safety in the missions, stressing flame spread, fire detection, suppression, and combustion performance of propellants produced from Martian resources.

  9. Workplace Safety: Indoor Environmental Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Indoor Environmental Quality Health Hazard Evaluation ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  10. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  11. Safety in Children's Formal Play Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Paul F.; Lockhart, Robert

    This study was designed to examine the issue of the safety of children's formal play environments. Safety was defined in terms of morbidity and mortality data. Protection and safety education were considered the prime factors in accident prevention while the goal of a safety program was considered to be the minimizing of injuries. Several data…

  12. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety. PMID:24574660

  13. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-09-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety.

  14. Quality in virtual education environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbera, Elena

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet has changed the way we teach and learn. This paper provides a general overview of the state of the quality of virtual education environments. First of all, some problems with the quality criteria applied in this field and the need to develop quality seals are presented. Likewise, the dimensions and subdimensions of an…

  15. Monitoring product safety in the postmarketing environment.

    PubMed

    Sharrar, Robert G; Dieck, Gretchen S

    2013-10-01

    The safety profile of a medicinal product may change in the postmarketing environment. Safety issues not identified in clinical development may be seen and need to be evaluated. Methods of evaluating spontaneous adverse experience reports and identifying new safety risks include a review of individual reports, a review of a frequency distribution of a list of the adverse experiences, the development and analysis of a case series, and various ways of examining the database for signals of disproportionality, which may suggest a possible association. Regulatory agencies monitor product safety through a variety of mechanisms including signal detection of the adverse experience safety reports in databases and by requiring and monitoring risk management plans, periodic safety update reports and postauthorization safety studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration is working with public, academic and private entities to develop methods for using large electronic databases to actively monitor product safety. Important identified risks will have to be evaluated through observational studies and registries.

  16. Quality assessment of urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsiannikova, T. Y.; Nikolaenko, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the research applicability of quality management problems of construction products. It is offered to expand quality management borders in construction, transferring its principles to urban systems as economic systems of higher level, which qualitative characteristics are substantially defined by quality of construction product. Buildings and structures form spatial-material basis of cities and the most important component of life sphere - urban environment. Authors justify the need for the assessment of urban environment quality as an important factor of social welfare and life quality in urban areas. The authors suggest definition of a term "urban environment". The methodology of quality assessment of urban environment is based on integrated approach which includes the system analysis of all factors and application of both quantitative methods of assessment (calculation of particular and integrated indicators) and qualitative methods (expert estimates and surveys). The authors propose the system of indicators, characterizing quality of the urban environment. This indicators fall into four classes. The authors show the methodology of their definition. The paper presents results of quality assessment of urban environment for several Siberian regions and comparative analysis of these results.

  17. Pediatric Quality and Safety: A Nursing Perspective.

    PubMed

    Butler, Gabriella A; Hupp, Diane S

    2016-04-01

    Patient safety and quality are 2 of many competing priorities facing health care providers. As safety and quality rise on the agenda of executives, payers, and consumers, competing priorities, such as financial sustainability, patient engagement, regulatory standards, and governmental demands, remain organizational priorities. Nursing represents the largest health care profession in the United States and has the ability to influence the culture of patient safety and quality. It is essential for hospital leadership to provide a culture whereby nurses and staff are actively engaged and feel comfortable speaking up. Transparency is critical in the strategy and implementation of improving quality and safety. PMID:27017039

  18. Pediatric Quality and Safety: A Nursing Perspective.

    PubMed

    Butler, Gabriella A; Hupp, Diane S

    2016-04-01

    Patient safety and quality are 2 of many competing priorities facing health care providers. As safety and quality rise on the agenda of executives, payers, and consumers, competing priorities, such as financial sustainability, patient engagement, regulatory standards, and governmental demands, remain organizational priorities. Nursing represents the largest health care profession in the United States and has the ability to influence the culture of patient safety and quality. It is essential for hospital leadership to provide a culture whereby nurses and staff are actively engaged and feel comfortable speaking up. Transparency is critical in the strategy and implementation of improving quality and safety.

  19. Developing the health, safety and environment excellence instrument

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quality and efficiency are important issues in management systems. To increase quality, to reach best results, to move towards the continuous improvement of system and also to make the internal and external customers satisfied, it is necessary to consider the system performance measurement. In this study the Health, Safety and Environment Excellence Instrument was represented as a performance measurement tool for a wide range of health, safety and environment management systems. In this article the development of the instrument overall structure, its parts, and its test results in three organizations are presented. According to the results, the scores ranking was the managership organization, the manufacturing company and the powerhouse construction project, respectively. The results of the instrument test in three organizations show that, on the whole, the instrument has the ability to measure the performance of health, safety and environment management systems in a wide range of organizations. PMID:23369610

  20. Assuring the quality of safety analyses and safety analysis documentation

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Johnson

    2000-05-03

    Planning, preparation, and submittal of safety analysis reports might be pursued in a manner similar to a quality-related procurement, where customer needs, expectations and acceptance criteria are established in advance. Then the product/service provider, the contractor, should apply various quality control processes to assure the desired characteristics of the product safety analysis documents. Improving the quality and acceptability to DOE of safety documents at first submittal should result in a more expeditious DOE review and approval process, thereby reducing costs of network and recycle through reviews.

  1. Assuring the Quality of Safety Analyses and Safety Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, John Edwin

    2000-05-01

    Planning, preparation, and submittal of safety analysis reports might be pursued in a manner similar to a quality-related procurement, where customer needs, expectations and acceptance criteria are established in advance. Then the product/service provider, the contractor, should apply various quality control processes to assure the desired characteristics of the product safety analysis documents. Improving the quality and acceptability to DOE of safety documents at first submittal should result in a more expeditious DOE review and approval process, thereby reducing costs of network and recycle through reviews.

  2. Approaching Safety through Quality: Factors Influencing College Student Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S K; Mosher, G A

    2016-04-01

    Quality management practices have been identified by previous literature as a factor that could potentially reduce the level of safety incidents and hazards in agricultural work environments. The present study used multivariate analysis to examine the effect of independent variables such as quality and safety awareness, work experience, safety and quality management experience, and the perceived importance of safety and quality on the role of quality management practices as a mitigating factor for safety hazards and incidents in agriculture. Variables were measured on a five-point scale using a survey questionnaire. Data were collected from approximately 900 undergraduates enrolled in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at a large land grant university in the U.S. The level of student work experience and student perceptions of the importance of quality explained a significant amount of the variance in student views of quality management practices as a mitigating factor for safety hazards and incidents. The findings of this study provide further evidence for using quality management practices as a basis for safety interventions targeted at the agricultural workforce. PMID:27373063

  3. Human safety in the lunar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    Any attempt to establish a continuously staffed base or permanent settlement on the Moon must safely meet the challenges posed by the Moon's surface environment. This environment is drastically different from the Earth's, and radiation and meteoroids are significant hazards to human safety. These dangers may be mitigated through the use of underground habitats, the piling up of lunar materials as shielding, and the use of teleoperated devices for surface operations. The lunar environment is detailed along with concepts for survival.

  4. Discharge of swine wastes risks water quality and food safety: Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from swine sources to the receiving environments.

    PubMed

    He, Liang-Ying; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, You-Sheng; Su, Hao-Chang; Chen, Jun; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Swine feedlots are widely considered as a potential hotspot for promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. ARGs could enter the environment via discharge of animal wastes, thus resulting in contamination of soil, water, and food. We investigated the dissemination and diversification of 22 ARGs conferring resistance to sulfonamides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicols, and macrolides as well as the occurrence of 18 corresponding antibiotics from three swine feedlots to the receiving water, soil environments and vegetables. Most ARGs and antibiotics survived the on-farm waste treatment processes in the three swine farms. Elevated diversity of ARGs was observed in the receiving environments including river water and vegetable field soils when compared with respective controls. The variation of ARGs along the vertical soil profiles of vegetable fields indicated enrichment and migration of ARGs. Detection of various ARGs and antibiotic residues in vegetables fertilized by swine wastes could be of great concern to the general public. This research demonstrated the contribution of swine wastes to the occurrence and development of antibiotic resistance determinants in the receiving environments and potential risks to food safety and human health. PMID:27107226

  5. Discharge of swine wastes risks water quality and food safety: Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from swine sources to the receiving environments.

    PubMed

    He, Liang-Ying; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, You-Sheng; Su, Hao-Chang; Chen, Jun; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Swine feedlots are widely considered as a potential hotspot for promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. ARGs could enter the environment via discharge of animal wastes, thus resulting in contamination of soil, water, and food. We investigated the dissemination and diversification of 22 ARGs conferring resistance to sulfonamides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicols, and macrolides as well as the occurrence of 18 corresponding antibiotics from three swine feedlots to the receiving water, soil environments and vegetables. Most ARGs and antibiotics survived the on-farm waste treatment processes in the three swine farms. Elevated diversity of ARGs was observed in the receiving environments including river water and vegetable field soils when compared with respective controls. The variation of ARGs along the vertical soil profiles of vegetable fields indicated enrichment and migration of ARGs. Detection of various ARGs and antibiotic residues in vegetables fertilized by swine wastes could be of great concern to the general public. This research demonstrated the contribution of swine wastes to the occurrence and development of antibiotic resistance determinants in the receiving environments and potential risks to food safety and human health.

  6. [Quality and safety management for radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N; Meyrieux, C; Perrin, B

    2016-09-01

    Quality and safety management have been implemented for many years in healthcare structures (hospitals treating cancer, private radiotherapy centres). Their structure and formalization have improved progressively over time. These recommendations aim at describing the link between quality and safety management through its organization scheme based on quality-safety policy, process approach, document management and quality measurement. Dedicated tools, such as experience feedback, a priori risk mapping, to-do-lists and check-lists are shown as examples and recommended as routine practice. PMID:27523420

  7. System for controlling child safety seat environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Elrod, Susan V. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A system is provided to control the environment experienced by a child in a child safety seat. Each of a plurality of thermoelectric elements is individually controllable to be one of heated and cooled relative to an ambient temperature. A first portion of the thermoelectric elements are positioned on the child safety seat such that a child sitting therein is positioned thereover. A ventilator coupled to the child safety seat moves air past a second portion of the thermoelectric elements and filters the air moved therepast. One or more jets coupled to the ventilator receive the filtered air. Each jet is coupled to the child safety seat and can be positioned to direct the heated/cooled filtered air to the vicinity of the head of the child sitting in the child safety seat.

  8. Monitoring product safety in the postmarketing environment

    PubMed Central

    Dieck, Gretchen S

    2013-01-01

    The safety profile of a medicinal product may change in the postmarketing environment. Safety issues not identified in clinical development may be seen and need to be evaluated. Methods of evaluating spontaneous adverse experience reports and identifying new safety risks include a review of individual reports, a review of a frequency distribution of a list of the adverse experiences, the development and analysis of a case series, and various ways of examining the database for signals of disproportionality, which may suggest a possible association. Regulatory agencies monitor product safety through a variety of mechanisms including signal detection of the adverse experience safety reports in databases and by requiring and monitoring risk management plans, periodic safety update reports and postauthorization safety studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration is working with public, academic and private entities to develop methods for using large electronic databases to actively monitor product safety. Important identified risks will have to be evaluated through observational studies and registries. PMID:25114782

  9. Implementing Software Safety in the NASA Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha S.; Radley, Charles F.

    1994-01-01

    Until recently, NASA did not consider allowing computers total control of flight systems. Human operators, via hardware, have constituted the ultimate safety control. In an attempt to reduce costs, NASA has come to rely more and more heavily on computers and software to control space missions. (For example. software is now planned to control most of the operational functions of the International Space Station.) Thus the need for systematic software safety programs has become crucial for mission success. Concurrent engineering principles dictate that safety should be designed into software up front, not tested into the software after the fact. 'Cost of Quality' studies have statistics and metrics to prove the value of building quality and safety into the development cycle. Unfortunately, most software engineers are not familiar with designing for safety, and most safety engineers are not software experts. Software written to specifications which have not been safety analyzed is a major source of computer related accidents. Safer software is achieved step by step throughout the system and software life cycle. It is a process that includes requirements definition, hazard analyses, formal software inspections, safety analyses, testing, and maintenance. The greatest emphasis is placed on clearly and completely defining system and software requirements, including safety and reliability requirements. Unfortunately, development and review of requirements are the weakest link in the process. While some of the more academic methods, e.g. mathematical models, may help bring about safer software, this paper proposes the use of currently approved software methodologies, and sound software and assurance practices to show how, to a large degree, safety can be designed into software from the start. NASA's approach today is to first conduct a preliminary system hazard analysis (PHA) during the concept and planning phase of a project. This determines the overall hazard potential of

  10. Quality and safety aspects of infant nutrition.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Shamir, Raanan; Ashwell, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Quality and safety aspects of infant nutrition are of key importance for child health, but oftentimes they do not get much attention by health care professionals whose interest tends to focus on functional benefits of early nutrition. Unbalanced diets and harmful food components induce particularly high risks for untoward effects in infants because of their rapid growth, high nutrient needs, and their typical dependence on only one or few foods during the first months of life. The concepts, standards and practices that relate to infant food quality and safety were discussed at a scientific workshop organized by the Child Health Foundation and the Early Nutrition Academy jointly with the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and a summary is provided here. The participants reviewed past and current issues on quality and safety, the role of different stakeholders, and recommendations to avert future issues. It was concluded that a high level of quality and safety is currently achieved, but this is no reason for complacency. The food industry carries the primary responsibility for the safety and suitability of their products, including the quality of composition, raw materials and production processes. Introduction of new or modified products should be preceded by a thorough science based review of suitability and safety by an independent authority. Food safety events should be managed on an international basis. Global collaboration of food producers, food-safety authorities, paediatricians and scientists is needed to efficiently exchange information and to best protect public health.

  11. Firearm safety in the MR imaging environment.

    PubMed

    Kanal, E; Shaibani, A

    1994-12-01

    The safety of small-caliber firearms in a 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment was assessed with six handguns, which were unloaded before testing. Each firearm was withdrawn barrel-first to assess the interaction of the magnetic field with the hammer and/or trigger. Two of the six weapons discharged reproducibly. A firearm in an MR imaging suite should be unloaded before removal or any other manipulation is attempted.

  12. Quality circles promote mine safety

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, S.D.

    1983-04-01

    A ''quality circle'' is a small group of people (usually seven to 10 members), who meet on a regular basis to identify, analyze, and solve work-related problems. It is a means to develop employees rather than simply a technique to increase production or reduce waste. The ''people-oriented'' philosophy underlying quality circles is based on the idea that workers who are involved in decisions that affect their work become more productive. Quality circles are based on the concept of statistical analysis control first introduced in Japan by Dr. W. Edwards Deming. Today, there are more than 8,000,000 industrial workers in Japan participating in quality circles. This article outlines this concept as it evolved in quite a different setting, a surface coal mine in southwestern Illinois, United States.

  13. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 1O-Point Initiative to strengthen environment,safety, and health (ES H) programs, and waste management activities at involved conducting DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points independent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are more focused, concentrating on ES H management, ES H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.'' In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES H areas. This volume contains appendices to the Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment Manual.

  14. Creating and Enriching Quality and Safe Outdoor Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Can teachers of young children create stimulating and enriching outdoor environments that are also safe? This article highlights early childhood outdoor safety standards and presents a framework for creating quality and SAFE™ outdoor environments in early childhood programs that support children's interest and best practice. The outdoor…

  15. Quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Anna M; Rampersad, Sally E; Whitney, Gina M; Flick, Randall P; Anton, Blair; Heitmiller, Eugenie S

    2013-12-01

    Health care quality and value are leading issues in medicine today for patients, health care professionals, and policy makers. Outcome, safety, and service-the components of quality-have been used to define value when placed in the context of cost. Health care organizations and professionals are faced with the challenge of improving quality while reducing health care related costs to improve value. Measurement of quality is essential for assessing what is effective and what is not when working toward improving quality and value. However, there are few tools currently for assessing quality of care, and clinicians often lack the resources and skills required to conduct quality improvement work. In this article, we provide a brief review of quality improvement as a discipline and describe these efforts within pediatric anesthesiology. PMID:24257392

  16. Parents' perceptions of water safety and quality.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Lori; Bicking, Cara; Sekhar, Deepa

    2012-02-01

    Every day parents make choices about the source of water their families consume. There are many contributing factors which could affect decisions about water consumption including taste, smell, color, safety, cost, and convenience. However, few studies have investigated what parents with young children think about water quality and safety in the US and how this affects the choices they are making. This study aimed to describe the perceptions of parents with regard to water quality and safety and to compare bottled water and tap water use, as well as to examine motivation for water choices. We conducted an online questionnaire to survey parents living in Pennsylvania about water quality and safety, and preference for bottled versus tap water. Parents were recruited through child care centers, and 143 surveys were returned. The survey results showed high overall scores for perception of tap water quality and safety, and a preference for tap water over bottled water. We found that parents were concerned for the environmental impact that buying bottled water may have but were also concerned about potential contamination of tap water by natural gas drilling processes and nuclear power plants. These findings regarding parental concerns are critical to inform pediatric health care providers, water sellers, and suppliers in order that they may provide parents with the necessary information to make educated choices for their families.

  17. Assuring fish safety and quality in international fish trade.

    PubMed

    Ababouch, Lahsen

    2006-01-01

    International trade in fishery commodities reached US 58.2 billion dollars in 2002, a 5% improvement relative to 2000 and a 45% increase over 1992 levels. Within this global trade, developing countries registered a net trade surplus of US 17.4 billion dollars in 2002 and accounted for almost 50% by value and 55% of fish exports by volume. This globalization of fish trade, coupled with technological developments in food production, handling, processing and distribution, and the increasing awareness and demand of consumers for safe and high quality food have put food safety and quality assurance high in public awareness and a priority for many governments. Consequently, many countries have tightened food safety controls, imposing additional costs and requirements on imports. As early as 1980, there was an international drive towards adopting preventative HACCP-based safety and quality systems. More recently, there has been a growing awareness of the importance of an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to food safety and quality throughout the entire food chain. Implementation of this approach requires an enabling policy and regulatory environment at national and international levels with clearly defined rules and standards, establishment of appropriate food control systems and programmes at national and local levels, and provision of appropriate training and capacity building. This paper discusses the international framework for fish safety and quality, with particular emphasis on the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) strategy to promote international harmonization and capacity building. PMID:17052733

  18. Assuring fish safety and quality in international fish trade.

    PubMed

    Ababouch, Lahsen

    2006-01-01

    International trade in fishery commodities reached US 58.2 billion dollars in 2002, a 5% improvement relative to 2000 and a 45% increase over 1992 levels. Within this global trade, developing countries registered a net trade surplus of US 17.4 billion dollars in 2002 and accounted for almost 50% by value and 55% of fish exports by volume. This globalization of fish trade, coupled with technological developments in food production, handling, processing and distribution, and the increasing awareness and demand of consumers for safe and high quality food have put food safety and quality assurance high in public awareness and a priority for many governments. Consequently, many countries have tightened food safety controls, imposing additional costs and requirements on imports. As early as 1980, there was an international drive towards adopting preventative HACCP-based safety and quality systems. More recently, there has been a growing awareness of the importance of an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to food safety and quality throughout the entire food chain. Implementation of this approach requires an enabling policy and regulatory environment at national and international levels with clearly defined rules and standards, establishment of appropriate food control systems and programmes at national and local levels, and provision of appropriate training and capacity building. This paper discusses the international framework for fish safety and quality, with particular emphasis on the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) strategy to promote international harmonization and capacity building.

  19. Changing conversations: teaching safety and quality in residency training.

    PubMed

    Voss, John D; May, Natalie B; Schorling, John B; Lyman, Jason A; Schectman, Joel M; Wolf, Andrew M D; Nadkarni, Mohan M; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    Improving patient safety and quality in health care is one of medicine's most pressing challenges. Residency training programs have a unique opportunity to meet this challenge by training physicians in the science and methods of patient safety and quality improvement (QI).With support from the Health Resources and Services Administration, the authors developed an innovative, longitudinal, experiential curriculum in patient safety and QI for internal medicine residents at the University of Virginia. This two-year curriculum teaches the critical concepts and skills of patient safety and QI: systems thinking and human factors analysis, root cause analysis (RCA), and process mapping. Residents apply these skills in a series of QI and patient safety projects. The constructivist educational model creates a learning environment that actively engages residents in improving the quality and safety of their medical practice.Between 2003 and 2005, 38 residents completed RCAs of adverse events. The RCAs identified causes and proposed useful interventions that have produced important care improvements. Qualitative analysis demonstrates that the curriculum shifted residents' thinking about patient safety to a systems-based approach. Residents completed 237 outcome assessments during three years. Results indicate that seminars met predefined learning objectives and were interactive and enjoyable. Residents strongly believe they gained important skills in all domains.The challenge to improve quality and safety in health care requires physicians to learn new knowledge and skills. Graduate medical education can equip new physicians with the skills necessary to lead the movement to safer and better quality of care for all patients.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  20. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P.; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2014-01-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  1. Watershed safety and quality control by safety threshold method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Wei Tsai, David; Mengjung Chou, Caroline; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Honglay Chen, Paris

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan was warned as one of the most dangerous countries by IPCC and the World Bank. In such an exceptional and perilous island, we would like to launch the strategic research of land-use management on the catastrophe prevention and environmental protection. This study used the watershed management by "Safety Threshold Method" to restore and to prevent the disasters and pollution on island. For the deluge prevention, this study applied the restoration strategy to reduce total runoff which was equilibrium to 59.4% of the infiltration each year. For the sediment management, safety threshold management could reduce the sediment below the equilibrium of the natural sediment cycle. In the water quality issues, the best strategies exhibited the significant total load reductions of 10% in carbon (BOD5), 15% in nitrogen (nitrate) and 9% in phosphorus (TP). We found out the water quality could meet the BOD target by the 50% peak reduction with management. All the simulations demonstrated the safety threshold method was helpful to control the loadings within the safe range of disasters and environmental quality. Moreover, from the historical data of whole island, the past deforestation policy and the mistake economic projects were the prime culprits. Consequently, this study showed a practical method to manage both the disasters and pollution in a watershed scale by the land-use management.

  2. Quality of Care is Similar for Safety-Net and Non-Safety-Net Hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Organization (PSO) Program Quality Measure Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Value Surveys on Patient Safety Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey ...

  3. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 10-Point Initiative to strengthen environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs, and waste management activities at DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points involved conducting dent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special independent Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are more focused, concentrating on ES H management, ES H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.'' In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES H areas. This manual documents the processes to be used to perform the ES H Progress Assessments. It was developed based upon the lessons learned from Tiger Team Assessments, the two pilot Progress Assessments, and Progress Assessments that have been completed. The manual will be updated periodically to reflect lessons learned or changes in policy.

  4. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health). The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3 - highest hazard to Nano1 - lowest hazard). Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material) are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal). The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and management are promoting

  5. Nonbibliographic Databases in a Corporate Health, Safety, and Environment Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubillas, Mary M.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the characteristics of TOXIN, CHEMFILE, and the Product Profile Information System (PPIS), nonbibliographic databases used by Shell Oil Company's Health, Safety, and Environment Organization. (FM)

  6. 75 FR 73946 - Worker Safety and Health Program: Safety Conscious Work Environment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... petition for rulemaking, published on October 16, 2009. 74 FR 53190. The vast majority of those comments... Part 851 Worker Safety and Health Program: Safety Conscious Work Environment AGENCY: Office of the... ``Safety-Conscious Work Environment'' guidelines as a model. DOE published this petition and a request...

  7. UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project`s ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors` evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations.

  8. ICD-11 for quality and safety: overview of the WHO Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Ghali, William A; Pincus, Harold A; Southern, Danielle A; Brien, Susan E; Romano, Patrick S; Burnand, Bernard; Drösler, Saskia E; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Moskal, Lori; Forster, Alan J; Gurevich, Yana; Quan, Hude; Colin, Cyrille; Munier, William B; Harrison, James; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Ustün, T Bedirhan

    2013-12-01

    This paper outlines the approach that the WHO's Family of International Classifications (WHO-FIC) network is undertaking to create ICD-11. We also outline the more focused work of the Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group, whose activities include the following: (i) cataloguing existing ICD-9 and ICD-10 quality and safety indicators; (ii) reviewing ICD morbidity coding rules for main condition, diagnosis timing, numbers of diagnosis fields and diagnosis clustering; (iii) substantial restructuring of the health-care related injury concepts coded in the ICD-10 chapters 19/20, (iv) mapping of ICD-11 quality and safety concepts to the information model of the WHO's International Classification for Patient Safety and the AHRQ Common Formats; (v) the review of vertical chapter content in all chapters of the ICD-11 beta version and (vi) downstream field testing of ICD-11 prior to its official 2015 release. The transition from ICD-10 to ICD-11 promises to produce an enhanced classification that will have better potential to capture important concepts relevant to measuring health system safety and quality-an important use case for the classification.

  9. 43 CFR 3162.5 - Environment and safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Environment and safety. 3162.5 Section 3162.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.5 Environment and safety....

  10. 43 CFR 3162.5 - Environment and safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Environment and safety. 3162.5 Section 3162.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.5 Environment and safety....

  11. 43 CFR 3162.5 - Environment and safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Environment and safety. 3162.5 Section 3162.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.5 Environment and safety....

  12. 43 CFR 3162.5 - Environment and safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Environment and safety. 3162.5 Section 3162.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.5 Environment and safety....

  13. Managing safety in a research and development environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, G.E.

    1995-12-22

    A method for managing safety in a research and development environment is described which involves both the subject matter experts and the researchers in development of safety policy and implementation planning. This method has been used effectively at LLNL to maximize safety benefits while minimizing the costs of the safety program and aggravation to the researcher. A product of this effort is the establishment of an effective safety culture as the line organizations work with the subject matter experts to develop and implement the safety program.

  14. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  15. Total Quality Management and the System Safety Secretary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Suzan E.

    1993-01-01

    The system safety secretary is a valuable member of the system safety team. As downsizing occurs to meet economic constraints, the Total Quality Management (TQM) approach is frequently adopted as a formula for success and, in some cases, for survival.

  16. The Impact of Different Housing Systems on Egg Safety and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A move from conventional cages to either an enriched cage or a noncage system may affect the safety and/or quality of the eggs laid by hens raised in this new environment. The safety of the eggs may be altered either microbiologically through contamination of internal contents with Salmonella enteri...

  17. The quality/safety medical index: implementation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2015-02-01

    Medical analytics relating to quality and safety measures have become particularly timely and of high importance in contemporary medical practice. In medical imaging, the dynamic relationship between medical imaging quality and radiation safety creates challenges in quantifying quality or safety independently. By creating a standardized measurement which simultaneously accounts for quality and safety measures (i.e., quality safety index), one can in theory create a standardized method for combined quality and safety analysis, which in turn can be analyzed in the context of individual patient, exam, and clinical profiles. The derived index measures can be entered into a centralized database, which in turn can be used for comparative performance of individual and institutional service providers. In addition, data analytics can be used to create customizable educational resources for providers and patients, clinical decision support tools, technology performance analysis, and clinical/economic outcomes research.

  18. Aviation Safety Program Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies (AEST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Engine Icing: Characterization and Simulation Capability: Develop knowledge bases, analysis methods, and simulation tools needed to address the problem of engine icing; in particular, ice-crystal icing Airframe Icing Simulation and Engineering Tool Capability: Develop and demonstrate 3-D capability to simulate and model airframe ice accretion and related aerodynamic performance degradation for current and future aircraft configurations in an expanded icing environment that includes freezing drizzle/rain Atmospheric Hazard Sensing and Mitigation Technology Capability: Improve and expand remote sensing and mitigation of hazardous atmospheric environments and phenomena

  19. Health, Safety, and Environment Division: Annual progress report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.A.

    1988-04-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems arise occasionally from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices.

  20. Home Safety and Low-Income Urban Housing Quality

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Wendy; McDonald, Eileen; Frattaroli, Shannon; Bishai, David; Ma, Xia

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Living in substandard housing may be one factor that increases the risk of fire and burn injuries in low-income urban environments. The purposes of this study are to (1) describe the frequency and characteristics of substandard housing in urban homes with young children and (2) explore the hypothesis that better housing quality is associated with a greater likelihood of having working smoke alarms and safe hot water temperatures. METHODS: A total 246 caregivers of children ages 0 to 7 years were recruited from a pediatric emergency department and a well-child clinic. In-home observations were completed by using 46 items from the Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Quality Standards. RESULTS: Virtually all homes (99%) failed the housing quality measure. Items with the highest failure rates were those related to heating and cooling; walls, ceilings, and floors; and sanitation and safety domains. One working smoke alarm was observed in 82% of the homes, 42% had 1 on every level, and 62% had safe hot water temperatures. For every increase of 1 item in the number of housing quality items passed, the odds of having any working smoke alarm increased by 10%, the odds of having 1 on every level by 18%, and the odds of having safe hot water temperatures by 8%. CONCLUSIONS: Many children may be at heightened risk for fire and scald burns by virtue of their home environment. Stronger collaboration between housing, health care, and injury prevention professionals is urgently needed to maximize opportunities to improve home safety. PMID:23147973

  1. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  2. Health, Safety, and Environment Division annual report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices. 52 refs.

  3. Health, Safety, and Environment Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C.

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting the responsibilities involves many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in the HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The result of these programs is to help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental sciences.

  4. Safety Considerations in the Ground Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul D.; Palo, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of humankind, every great space adventure has begun on the ground. While this seems to be stating the obvious, mission and spacecraft designers who have overlooked this fact have paid a high price, either in loss or damage to the spacecraft pre-launch, or in mission failure or reduction. Spacecraft personnel may risk not only their flight hardware, but they may also risk their lives, their co-workers lives and even the general public by not heeding safety on the ground. Their eyes may be on the stars but their feet are on the ground! One additional comment: Although the design requirements are very different for human rated and nonhuman rated flight hardware, while on the ground that flight hardware (and its ground support equipment) doesn't care about what it is flying on. On the ground, additional requirements are often levied to protect the work force and general public. (Authors' Note: The source material for this chapter is primarily taken from the Kennedy Space Center Handbook (KHB) 1700.7/45 SW Handbook S-100 Space Shuttle Payload Ground Safety Handbook and the authors' personal experiences.

  5. Microbiological quality and safety of zoo food.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, E R; al-Sheddy, I

    1990-01-01

    Two types of commercial products for feeding zoo animals (a frozen meat product, referred to as zoo food, and a dry product, referred to as dry food) were microbiologically examined for spoilage organisms (aerobic, psychrotrophic, coliform, Escherichia coli, mold, and yeasts) and pathogens (Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter jejuni). Levels of microorganisms in frozen ground zoo food were compared with those in frozen ground beef and frozen ground turkey meat. The level of microbial contaminants in frozen ground zoo meat was found to be similar to that in frozen ground beef and higher than that in frozen ground turkey meat. Sixty percent of the frozen zoo meat samples were Salmonella positive, and all of the samples were L. monocytogenes positive. Dry zoo food was documented to have microbial levels lower than those in frozen zoo meat; the pathogen levels were less than 1/25 g of food. Defrosting zoo meat at 10, 25, and 37 degrees C for 24 h showed that 10 degrees C is the best temperature for defrosting frozen ground zoo meat loaves (length, 9 in. [22.8 cm]; radius, 2 in. [5.1 cm]) without affecting the microbiological quality or safety of the product. PMID:2111115

  6. Process safety improvement--quality and target zero.

    PubMed

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The "plan, do, check, act" improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  7. Process safety improvement--quality and target zero.

    PubMed

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The "plan, do, check, act" improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given. PMID:18374483

  8. Soil quality under mixed grassland - Cropland environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Native grassland environments (i.e. prairies) are typically characterized by soils with high quality. Historical cultivation of prairies has led to soil resources that are now in a compromised state of health. The loss of soil organic matter that led to large biopores and a favorable rooting envir...

  9. The Effect of Line Maintenance Activity on Airline Safety Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoades, Dawna L.; Reynolds, Rosemarie; Waguespack, Blaise, Jr.; Williams, Michael

    2005-01-01

    One of the arguments against deregulation of the airline industry has been the possibility that financially troubled carriers would be tempted to lower line maintenance spending, thus lowering maintenance quality and decreasing the overall safety of the carrier. Given the financial crisis triggered by the events of 9/11: it appears to be a good time to revisit this issue. This paper examines the quality of airline line maintenance activity and examines the impact of maintenance spending on maintenance quality and overall safety. Findings indicate that increased maintenance spending is associated with increased line maintenance activity and increased overall safety quality for the major U.S. carriers.

  10. Healthcare quality and safety: a review of policy, practice and research.

    PubMed

    Waring, Justin; Allen, Davina; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Sandall, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Over the last two decades healthcare quality and safety have risen to the fore of health policy and research. This has largely been informed by theoretical and empirical ideas found in the fields of ergonomics and human factors. These have enabled significant advances in our understanding and management of quality and safety. However, a parallel and at time neglected sociological literature on clinical quality and safety is presented as offering additional, complementary, and at times critical insights on the problems of quality and safety. This review explores the development and contributions of both the mainstream and more sociological approaches to safety. It shows that where mainstream approaches often focus on the influence of human and local environment factors in shaping quality, a sociological perspective can deepen knowledge of the wider social, cultural and political factors that contextualise the clinical micro-system. It suggests these different perspectives can easily complement one another, offering a more developed and layered understanding of quality and safety. It also suggests that the sociological literature can bring to light important questions about the limits of the more mainstream approaches and ask critical questions about the role of social inequality, power and control in the framing of quality and safety.

  11. Evaluation of Safety, Quality and Productivity in Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmen, M. A.; Vilnitis, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the success indicators of construction projects, safety, quality and productivity, in terms of their implications and impacts during and after construction. First safety is considered during construction with a focus on hazard identification and the prevention of occupational accidents and injuries on worksites. The legislation mandating safety programs, training and compliance with safety standards is presented and discussed. Consideration of safety at the design stage is emphasized. Building safety and the roles of building codes in prevention of structural failures are also covered in the paper together with factors affecting building failures and methods for their prevention. Quality is introduced in the paper from the perspective of modern total quality management. Concepts of quality management, quality control, quality assurance and Six Sigma and how they relate to building quality and structural integrity are discussed with examples. Finally, productivity concepts are presented with emphasis on effective project management to minimize loss of productivity, complimented by lean construction and lean Six Sigma principles. The paper concludes by synthesizing the relationships between safety, quality and productivity.

  12. Quality and safety requirements for sustainable phage therapy products.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Blasdel, Bob G; Bretaudeau, Laurent; Buckling, Angus; Chanishvili, Nina; Clark, Jason R; Corte-Real, Sofia; Debarbieux, Laurent; Dublanchet, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Gabard, Jérôme; Garcia, Miguel; Goderdzishvili, Marina; Górski, Andrzej; Hardcastle, John; Huys, Isabelle; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lavigne, Rob; Merabishvili, Maia; Olchawa, Ewa; Parikka, Kaarle J; Patey, Olivier; Pouilot, Flavie; Resch, Gregory; Rohde, Christine; Scheres, Jacques; Skurnik, Mikael; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Van Parys, Luc; Verbeken, Gilbert; Zizi, Martin; Van den Eede, Guy

    2015-07-01

    The worldwide antibiotic crisis has led to a renewed interest in phage therapy. Since time immemorial phages control bacterial populations on Earth. Potent lytic phages against bacterial pathogens can be isolated from the environment or selected from a collection in a matter of days. In addition, phages have the capacity to rapidly overcome bacterial resistances, which will inevitably emerge. To maximally exploit these advantage phages have over conventional drugs such as antibiotics, it is important that sustainable phage products are not submitted to the conventional long medicinal product development and licensing pathway. There is a need for an adapted framework, including realistic production and quality and safety requirements, that allows a timely supplying of phage therapy products for 'personalized therapy' or for public health or medical emergencies. This paper enumerates all phage therapy product related quality and safety risks known to the authors, as well as the tests that can be performed to minimize these risks, only to the extent needed to protect the patients and to allow and advance responsible phage therapy and research.

  13. Safety, health or the environment--which comes first?

    PubMed

    Crawley, F K; Ashton, D

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the development and application of two integrated models which can be used for assessing the life cycle risk (to life) and environmental impact of a number of possible concept options for new offshore oil and gas developments. The two models can also be used for ranking the designs in terms of lowest human risk and environmental impact. The paper also gives values/criteria for both risks to safety, health and the environment by which the total safety, health and environmental assessment/impact may be balanced as a whole. The paper illustrates the use of the models and shows that the pragmatic or cosmetic improvement to safety, health or the environment may not be advantageous to the overall safety, health and environmental objectives. While the models were developed originally for offshore installations, the basic framework can be readily adapted for use on onshore petrochemical processes.

  14. Human factors systems approach to healthcare quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Hoonakker, Peter; Holden, Richard; Gurses, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. PMID:23845724

  15. PETRO-SAFE '91 conference papers: Volume 3 (Drilling and production environment and safety), Volume 4 (Transportation and storage environment and safety) and Volume 5 (Processing and refining environment and safety)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for the oil, gas, and petrochemical industries to discuss state of the art knowledge in those fields. The following topics were addressed: drilling and production environment and safety; transportation and storage environment and safety; and processing and refining environment and safety. Separate papers are processed for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  16. Implementation of Programmatic Quality and the Impact on Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huls, Dale Thomas; Meehan, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation of a programmatic quality assurance discipline within the International Space Station Program and the resulting impact on safety. NASA culture has continued to stress safety at the expense of quality when both are extremely important and both can equally influence the success or failure of a Program or Mission. Although safety was heavily criticized in the media after Colimbiaa, strong case can be made that it was the failure of quality processes and quality assurance in all processes that eventually led to the Columbia accident. Consequently, it is possible to have good quality processes without safety, but it is impossible to have good safety processes without quality. The ISS Program quality assurance function was analyzed as representative of the long-term manned missions that are consistent with the President s Vision for Space Exploration. Background topics are as follows: The quality assurance organizational structure within the ISS Program and the interrelationships between various internal and external organizations. ISS Program quality roles and responsibilities with respect to internal Program Offices and other external organizations such as the Shuttle Program, JSC Directorates, NASA Headquarters, NASA Contractors, other NASA Centers, and International Partner/participants will be addressed. A detailed analysis of implemented quality assurance responsibilities and functions with respect to NASA Headquarters, the JSC S&MA Directorate, and the ISS Program will be presented. Discussions topics are as follows: A comparison of quality and safety resources in terms of staffing, training, experience, and certifications. A benchmark assessment of the lessons learned from the Columbia Accident Investigation (CAB) Report (and follow-up reports and assessments), NASA Benchmarking, and traditional quality assurance activities against ISS quality procedures and practices. The lack of a coherent operational

  17. The Power of Alignment: Educating Nurses in Quality and Safety.

    PubMed

    Drenkard, Karen Neil

    2015-01-01

    The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) grant was launched over 5 years after the Institute of Medicine's report that shared the stark truth about medical errors. The 4 phases of QSEN have provided a roadmap for nursing prelicensure and graduate students to integrate quality improvement and safety content into educational programs. By fully aligning the resources of academic programs with health care organizations, a more robust and comprehensive approach could be taken to ensure that all nurses receive the benefit of the most up-to-date and thorough education about quality and safety.

  18. The Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars program: a model for interprofessional education in quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Patrician, Patricia A; Dolansky, Mary A; Pair, Vincent; Bates, Mekeshia; Moore, Shirley M; Splaine, Mark; Gilman, Stuart C

    2013-01-01

    The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project is enhancing the emphasis on quality care and patient safety content in nursing schools. A partnership between QSEN and the Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars program resulted in a unique experiential, interdisciplinary fellowship for both nurses and physicians. This article introduces the Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars program and provides examples of learning activities and fellows' accomplishments. Interprofessional quality and safety education at the doctoral and postdoctoral levels is germane to improving the quality of health care.

  19. Quality and safety in pediatric hematology/oncology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brigitta U

    2014-06-01

    Many principles of quality of care and patient safety are at the foundation of pediatric hematology/oncology. However, we still see too many errors, continue to have problems with communication, and the culture in many of our areas is still one of worrying about retribution when mentioning a problem. This review explores why specialists in pediatric hematology/oncology should be leaders in the field of quality and safety in healthcare.

  20. Produce safety and quality research at ERRC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many reports of disease due to consumption of fruits and vegetables that were contaminated on the surface with enteric pathogens. Therefore, the safety of fresh-cut melons and other produce available in salad-bar operations and supermarkets is a concern. Physical and chemical treatments ...

  1. Environment quality at Maitri station in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anoop Kumar; Kulkarni, Sunil; Ramteke, D S; Nayak, G N

    2006-07-01

    A comprehensive study of air, water and soil quality was undertaken during the austral summer of 1999-2000 at the Indian Polar Research Station "Maitri" in compliance with the statutory requirements of the article 3 of Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. The main objective of the study was to assess the impacts of various scientific programs and their associated logistic support facilities on the fragile ecosystem of Antarctica. Identification of major sources of pollution and quantification of pollutants in different environmental components were carried out through an extensive environmental monitoring program spread over a period of 5-7 weeks. Preliminary studies reveal that the levels of pollution are not alarming but there is scope for concern looking into the critical aspects of Antarctic environment and the carrying capacity of the environment surrounding Maitri station.

  2. Tank safety screening data quality objective. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.W.

    1995-04-27

    The Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) will be used to classify 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks containing high-level radioactive waste into safety categories for safety issues dealing with the presence of ferrocyanide, organics, flammable gases, and criticality. Decision rules used to classify a tank as ``safe`` or ``not safe`` are presented. Primary and secondary decision variables used for safety status classification are discussed. The number and type of samples required are presented. A tabular identification of each analyte to be measured to support the safety classification, the analytical method to be used, the type of sample, the decision threshold for each analyte that would, if violated, place the tank on the safety issue watch list, and the assumed (desired) analytical uncertainty are provided. This is a living document that should be evaluated for updates on a semiannual basis. Evaluation areas consist of: identification of tanks that have been added or deleted from the specific safety issue watch lists, changes in primary and secondary decision variables, changes in decision rules used for the safety status classification, and changes in analytical requirements. This document directly supports all safety issue specific DQOs and additional characterization DQO efforts associated with pretreatment and retrieval. Additionally, information obtained during implementation can assist in resolving assumptions for revised safety strategies, and in addition, obtaining information which will support the determination of error tolerances, confidence levels, and optimization schemes for later revised safety strategy documentation.

  3. Striving for safety excellence in chemical and glovebox environments

    SciTech Connect

    Montalvo, M. L.; Vigil, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Within Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division provides the foundation for maintaining the nuclear materials mission in support of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Plutonium research and production competencies reside in a suitably skilled and well-trained work force. Due to the unique chemical and physical properties of the actinide elements, specialized training, expert knowledge, and unique safety procedures are essential to the execution of NMT's mission. To ensure the highest degree of safety, NMT Division employs a behavior-based solution (ATOMICS) for assuring operations safety excellence. The subsequent mitigation efforts of the ATOMICS Process to enhance the safety culture of the NMT workforce in chemical and glovebox environments are the primary focus of this paper. The NMT ATOMICS Process demonstrates the application of LANLs first guiding principal of the Integrated Safety Management Program 'management commitment and worker involvement' as an integral element of the process. The vision of ATOMICS is to be the Department of Energy's (DOE) model of excellence in the application of safety performance.

  4. Quality and safety of broiler meat in various chilling systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling is a critical step in poultry processing to attain high quality meat and to meet the USDA-FSIS temperature standards. This study was conducted to determine the effects of commercially available chilling systems on quality and safety of broiler meat. A total of 300 carcasses in two replica...

  5. Architectural approach for quality and safety aware healthcare social networks.

    PubMed

    López, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd; González, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Quality of information and privacy and safety issues are frequently identified as main limitations to make most benefit from social media in healthcare. The objective of the paper is to contribute to the analysis of healthcare social networks (SN), and online healthcare social network services (SNS) by proposing a formal architectural analysis of healthcare SN and SNS, considering the complexity of both systems, but stressing on quality, safety and usability aspects. Quality policies are necessary to control the quality of content published by experts and consumers. Privacy and safety policies protect against inappropriate use of information and users responsibility for sharing information. After the policies are established and documented, a proof of concept online SNS supporting primary healthcare promotion is presented in the paper.

  6. Peer Review in Nursing: Essential Components of a Model Supporting Safety and Quality.

    PubMed

    George, Vicki; Haag-Heitman, Barb

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces an accountability-focused nursing framework to systematically organize and promote quality and safety nursing outcomes. The 4 essential components of this framework include a responsive environment; shared decision making, personal empowerment, and transformational management. These elements promote a professional practice environment that supports clinical nurses to practice at their highest level of autonomy and promotes accountability for patient outcomes. The often-misunderstood concept of peer review is foundational to 2 of the model components. PMID:26153664

  7. Macroergonomic analysis and design for improved safety and quality performance.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, B M

    1999-01-01

    Macroergonomics, which emerged historically after sociotechnical systems theory, quality management, and ergonomics, is presented as the basis for a needed integrative methodology. A macroergonomics methodology was presented in some detail to demonstrate how aspects of microergonomics, total quality management (TQM), and sociotechnical systems (STS) can be triangulated in a common approach. In the context of this methodology, quality and safety were presented as 2 of several important performance criteria. To demonstrate aspects of the methodology, 2 case studies were summarized with safety and quality performance results where available. The first case manipulated both personnel and technical factors to achieve a "safety culture" at a nuclear site. The concept of safety culture is defined in INSAG-4 (International Atomic Energy Agency, 1991). as "that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance." The second case described a tire manufacturing intervention to improve quality (as defined by Sink and Tuttle, 1989) through joint consideration of technical and social factors. It was suggested that macroergonomics can yield greater performance than can be achieved through ergonomic intervention alone. Whereas case studies help to make the case, more rigorous formative and summative research is needed to refine and validate the proposed methodology respectively.

  8. 77 FR 42738 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and... activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:......

  9. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 1O-Point Initiative to strengthen environment,safety, and health (ES&H) programs, and waste management activities at involved conducting DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points independent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are ``more focused, concentrating on ES&H management, ES&H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.`` In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES&H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES&H areas. This volume contains appendices to the Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment Manual.

  10. The impact of different housing systems on egg safety and quality.

    PubMed

    Holt, P S; Davies, R H; Dewulf, J; Gast, R K; Huwe, J K; Jones, D R; Waltman, D; Willian, K R

    2011-01-01

    A move from conventional cages to either an enriched cage or a noncage system may affect the safety or quality, or both, of the eggs laid by hens raised in this new environment. The safety of the eggs may be altered either microbiologically through contamination of internal contents with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) or other pathogens, or both, or chemically due to contamination of internal contents with dioxins, pesticides, or heavy metals. Quality may be affected through changes in the integrity of the shell, yolk, or albumen along with changes in function, composition, or nutrition. Season, hen breed, flock age, and flock disease-vaccination status also interact to affect egg safety and quality and must be taken into account. An understanding of these different effects is prudent before any large-scale move to an alternative housing system is undertaken.

  11. Quality Improvement Initiative Reduces Serious Safety Events in Pediatric Hospital Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Organization (PSO) Program Quality Measure Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Value Surveys on Patient Safety Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey ...

  12. Examining quality function deployment in safety promotion in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kullberg, Agneta; Nordqvist, Cecilia; Lindqvist, Kent; Timpka, Toomas

    2014-09-01

    The first-hand needs and demands of laypersons are not always considered when safety promotion programmes are being developed. We compared focal areas for interventions identified from residents' statements of safety needs with focal areas for interventions identified by local government professionals in a Swedish urban community certified by the international Safe Community movement supported by the World Health Organization. Quantitative and qualitative data on self-expressed safety needs from 787 housing residents were transformed into an intervention design, using the quality function deployment (QFD) technique and compared with the safety intervention programme developed by professionals at the municipality administrative office. The outcome of the comparison was investigated with regard to implications for the Safe Community movement. The QFD analysis identified the initiation and maintenance of social integrative processes in housing areas as the most highly prioritized interventions among the residents, but failed to highlight the safety needs of several vulnerable groups (the elderly, infants and persons with disabilities). The intervention programme designed by the public health professionals did not address the social integrative processes, but it did highlight the vulnerable groups. This study indicates that the QFD technique is suitable for providing residential safety promotion efforts with a quality orientation from the layperson's perspective. Views of public health professionals have to be included to ascertain that the needs of socially deprived residents are adequately taken into account. QFD can augment the methodological toolbox for safety promotion programmes, including interventions in residential areas. PMID:23322486

  13. Examining quality function deployment in safety promotion in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kullberg, Agneta; Nordqvist, Cecilia; Lindqvist, Kent; Timpka, Toomas

    2014-09-01

    The first-hand needs and demands of laypersons are not always considered when safety promotion programmes are being developed. We compared focal areas for interventions identified from residents' statements of safety needs with focal areas for interventions identified by local government professionals in a Swedish urban community certified by the international Safe Community movement supported by the World Health Organization. Quantitative and qualitative data on self-expressed safety needs from 787 housing residents were transformed into an intervention design, using the quality function deployment (QFD) technique and compared with the safety intervention programme developed by professionals at the municipality administrative office. The outcome of the comparison was investigated with regard to implications for the Safe Community movement. The QFD analysis identified the initiation and maintenance of social integrative processes in housing areas as the most highly prioritized interventions among the residents, but failed to highlight the safety needs of several vulnerable groups (the elderly, infants and persons with disabilities). The intervention programme designed by the public health professionals did not address the social integrative processes, but it did highlight the vulnerable groups. This study indicates that the QFD technique is suitable for providing residential safety promotion efforts with a quality orientation from the layperson's perspective. Views of public health professionals have to be included to ascertain that the needs of socially deprived residents are adequately taken into account. QFD can augment the methodological toolbox for safety promotion programmes, including interventions in residential areas.

  14. TH-E-19A-01: Quality and Safety in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, E; Ezzell, G; Miller, B; Yorke, E

    2014-06-15

    Clinical radiotherapy data clearly demonstrate the link between the quality and safety of radiation treatments and the outcome for patients. The medical physicist plays an essential role in this process. To ensure the highest quality treatments, the medical physicist must understand and employ modern quality improvement techniques. This extends well beyond the duties traditionally associated with prescriptive QA measures. This session will review the current best practices for improving quality and safety in radiation therapy. General elements of quality management will be reviewed including: what makes a good quality management structure, the use of prospective risk analysis such as FMEA, and the use of incident learning. All of these practices are recommended in society-level documents and are incorporated into the new Practice Accreditation program developed by ASTRO. To be effective, however, these techniques must be practical in a resource-limited environment. This session will therefore focus on practical tools such as the newly-released radiation oncology incident learning system, RO-ILS, supported by AAPM and ASTRO. With these general constructs in mind, a case study will be presented of quality management in an SBRT service. An example FMEA risk assessment will be presented along with incident learning examples including root cause analysis. As the physicist's role as “quality officer” continues to evolve it will be essential to understand and employ the most effective techniques for quality improvement. This session will provide a concrete overview of the fundamentals in quality and safety. Learning Objectives: Recognize the essential elements of a good quality management system in radiotherapy. Understand the value of incident learning and the AAPM/ASTRO ROILS incident learning system. Appreciate failure mode and effects analysis as a risk assessment tool and its use in resource-limited environments. Understand the fundamental principles of good

  15. The health care work environment and adverse health and safety consequences for nurses.

    PubMed

    Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Lipscomb, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Nurses' working conditions are inextricably linked to the quality of care that is provided to patients and patients' safety. These same working conditions are associated with health and safety outcomes for nurses and other health care providers. This chapter describes aspects of the nursing work environment that have been linked to hazards and adverse exposures for nurses, as well as the most common health and safety outcomes of nursing work. We include studies from 2000 to the present by nurse researchers, studies of nurses as subjects, and studies of workers under similar working conditions that could translate to nurses' work environment. We explore a number of work organization factors including shift work and extended work hours, safety climate and culture, teamwork, and communication. We also describe environmental hazards, including chemical hazards (e.g., waste anesthetics, hazardous drugs, cleaning compounds) and airborne and bloodborne pathogen exposure. Nurses' health and safety outcomes include physical (e.g., musculoskeletal disorders, gastrointestinal, slips, trips and falls, physical assault) and psychosocial outcomes (e.g., burnout, work-family conflict). Finally, we present recommendations for future research to further protect nurses and all health care workers from a range of hazardous working conditions.

  16. Quality indicators for implementation of safety promotion: towards valid and reliable global certification of local programmes.

    PubMed

    Timpka, Toomas; Nordqvist, Cecilia; Festin, Karin; Lindqvist, Kent

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical underpinnings of safety promotion have not yet been integrated with implementation practice to ascertain between-community programme quality. This study sets out to develop a framework for verifying of the quality of community-based safety-promotion programmes in the global context. We analysed the certification indicators deployed in the international Safe Community movement in light of systems theory. Data were collected from focus group interviews with representatives from 10 certified Swedish communities and then analysed by qualitative methods. The community representatives were found to have used the present indicators mainly for marketing the safety-promotion concept to stakeholders rather than as benchmarks for safety practice. When appraised in regard to systems theory, it was found that the indicators did not cover important aspects of health-services implementation. Attainment of outcomes at the population level was not included. Consequently, that information about programme effects in high-risk groups and in risk environments could be neglected. We conclude that programme processes and outcomes at both organisational and population levels must be assessed when the quality of safety-promotion programmes is being certified. A revised set of indicators for certification of safety-promotion programmes fulfilling these criteria is presented.

  17. Factors affecting quality and safety of fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Francis, G A; Gallone, A; Nychas, G J; Sofos, J N; Colelli, G; Amodio, M L; Spano, G

    2012-01-01

    The quality of fresh-cut fruit and vegetable products includes a combination of attributes, such as appearance, texture, and flavor, as well as nutritional and safety aspects that determine their value to the consumer. Nutritionally, fruit and vegetables represent a good source of vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber, and fresh-cut produce satisfies consumer demand for freshly prepared, convenient, healthy food. However, fresh-cut produce deteriorates faster than corresponding intact produce, as a result of damage caused by minimal processing, which accelerates many physiological changes that lead to a reduction in produce quality and shelf-life. The symptoms of produce deterioration include discoloration, increased oxidative browning at cut surfaces, flaccidity as a result of loss of water, and decreased nutritional value. Damaged plant tissues also represent a better substrate for growth of microorganisms, including spoilage microorganisms and foodborne pathogens. The risk of pathogen contamination and growth is one of the main safety concerns associated with fresh-cut produce, as highlighted by the increasing number of produce-linked foodborne outbreaks in recent years. The pathogens of major concern in fresh-cut produce are Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic Escherichia coli mainly O157:H7, and Salmonella spp. This article describes the quality of fresh-cut produce, factors affecting quality, and various techniques for evaluating quality. In addition, the microbiological safety of fresh-cut produce and factors affecting pathogen survival and growth on fresh-cut produce are discussed in detail.

  18. Sampling the food processing environment: taking up the cudgel for preventive quality management in food processing environments.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Stessl, Beatrix

    2014-01-01

    The Listeria monitoring program for Austrian cheese factories was established in 1988. The basic idea is to control the introduction of L. monocytogenes into the food processing environment, preventing the pathogen from contaminating the food under processing. The Austrian Listeria monitoring program comprises four levels of investigation, dealing with routine monitoring of samples and consequences of finding a positive sample. Preventive quality control concepts attempt to detect a foodborne hazard along the food processing chain, prior to food delivery, retailing, and consumption. The implementation of a preventive food safety concept provokes a deepened insight by the manufacturers into problems concerning food safety. The development of preventive quality assurance strategies contributes to the national food safety status and protects public health. PMID:24792566

  19. Sampling the food processing environment: taking up the cudgel for preventive quality management in food processing environments.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Stessl, Beatrix

    2014-01-01

    The Listeria monitoring program for Austrian cheese factories was established in 1988. The basic idea is to control the introduction of L. monocytogenes into the food processing environment, preventing the pathogen from contaminating the food under processing. The Austrian Listeria monitoring program comprises four levels of investigation, dealing with routine monitoring of samples and consequences of finding a positive sample. Preventive quality control concepts attempt to detect a foodborne hazard along the food processing chain, prior to food delivery, retailing, and consumption. The implementation of a preventive food safety concept provokes a deepened insight by the manufacturers into problems concerning food safety. The development of preventive quality assurance strategies contributes to the national food safety status and protects public health.

  20. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 10-Point Initiative to strengthen environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs, and waste management activities at DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points involved conducting dent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special independent Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are ``more focused, concentrating on ES&H management, ES&H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.`` In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES&H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES&H areas. This manual documents the processes to be used to perform the ES&H Progress Assessments. It was developed based upon the lessons learned from Tiger Team Assessments, the two pilot Progress Assessments, and Progress Assessments that have been completed. The manual will be updated periodically to reflect lessons learned or changes in policy.

  1. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

  2. Using photographic interpretation to evaluate the safety of home environments.

    PubMed

    Lehna, Carlee; Twyman, Stephanie; Myers, John

    2016-12-01

    In the US there were 400,000 home fires resulting in 2755 deaths, 12,450 injuries, and $6.9B lost. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the content-validity of photographs taken in the home for use as an educational instrument to teach about "safe" and "unsafe" fire safety practice for adults and older adults. A total of 73 home fire safety experts were provided 27 photographs to evaluate home fire safety practice. Initially, a Krippendorff's alpha was calculated for the first 24 questions to evaluate inter-rater reliability, and differences in demographics were evaluated. Unique codes and themes for the last three questions were identified and inter-rater reliability examined. A majority of respondents were female (n = 43, 60.6%), college educated (n = 61, 83.6%), nurses (n = 25, 33.8%), or worked for a fire department (n = 21, 29.6%). Their mean age was 45.5 years and they had 11.05 years of experience. The first 24 questions had high inter-rater reliability (Krippendorff α = 0.831). No significant differences existed between the strata of the demographic variables (all p-values > 0.05). Similarly, based on the codes and themes identified, the last three questions had moderate-to-good inter-rater reliability (Krippendorff α = 0.764). Providing photographs as a 'seek-and-find' or 'What's wrong with this picture?' tools and simplified visual images is an excellent way to aid recognition of unsafe home fire safety environments. Education through non-traditional visual methods increases the possibility of change for diverse low-literacy populations. PMID:27617192

  3. Total quality management in the HMO environment.

    PubMed

    Omachonu, V K; Johnson, J A

    1993-01-01

    Increasing numbers of healthcare organization are turning to total quality management (TQM) to contain costs and improve quality. This article describes the implication of TQM for health maintenance organizations.

  4. IMPACTS OF SAFETY & QUALITY IN ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2004-07-26

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  5. Understanding the safety net: inpatient quality of care varies based on how one defines safety-net hospitals.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Megan; Kang, Raymond; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2009-10-01

    A challenge to investigating quality of care at safety-net hospitals is the absence of a standard method for identifying these hospitals. The authors identified three different, commonly used approaches for classifying hospitals as safety-net providers. Analyzing national data on hospital demographics and quality of care, they found little overlap among these three sets of hospitals. Under two definitions, safety-net providers clearly underperformed on quality compared with non-safety-net providers; under a third definition, results were mixed. How one defines safety-net providers can affect health services research outcomes and policy recommendations. PMID:19398722

  6. The prioritization of environment, safety, and health activities

    SciTech Connect

    Otway, H.; Puckett, J.M.; von Winterfeldt, D.

    1991-09-01

    Federal facilities, including the national laboratories, must bring existing operations into compliance with environment, safety, and health (ES H) regulations while restoring sites of past operations to conform with today's more rigorous standards. The need for ES H resources is increasing while overall budgets are decreasing, and the resulting staffing and financial constraints often make it impossible to carry out all necessary activities simultaneously. This stimulated interest in formal methods to prioritize ES H activities. We describe the development of an approach called MAPP (Multi-Attribute Prioritization Process), which features expert judgment, user values, and intensive user participation in the system design process. We present results of its application to the prioritization of 41 ES H activities having a total cost of over $25 million. We conclude that the insights gained from user participation in the design process and the formal prioritization results are probably of comparable value. 19 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jarrar, Mu’taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. Results: The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme “1 Care for 1 Malaysia” in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. Conclusions: There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. PMID:26755459

  8. Migration of nuclear criticality safety software from a mainfram to a workstation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, L.J.; Robinson, R.C.; Cain, V.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear criticality safety department (NCSD), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, has undergone the transition of executing the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Software (NCSS) on IBM mainframes to a Hewlett Packard (HP) 9000/730 workstation (NCSSHP). NCSSHP contains the following configuration-controlled modules and cross-section libraries: BONAMI, CSAS, GEOMCHK, ICE, KENO IV, KENO V.a, MODIFY, NITAWL, SCALE, SUBLIB, XSDRN, UNIXLIB, albedos library, weights library, 16-group HANSEN-ROACH master library, 27-group ENDF/B-IV master library, and standard composition library. This paper discusses the method used to choose the workstation, the hardware setup of the chosen workstation, an overview of Y-12 software quality assurance and configuration control methodology, code validation, difficulties encountered in migrating the codes, and advantages to migrating to a workstation environment.

  9. Migration of nuclear criticality safety software from a mainframe to a workstation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, L.J.; Robinson, R.C.; Cain, V.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has undergone the transition of executing the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Software (NCSS) on IBM mainframes to a Hewlett-Packard (HP) 9000/730 workstation (NCSSHP). NCSSHP contains the following configuration controlled modules and cross-section libraries: BONAMI, CSAS, GEOMCHY, ICE, KENO IV, KENO Va, MODIIFY, NITAWL SCALE, SLTBLIB, XSDRN, UNIXLIB, albedos library, weights library, 16-Group HANSEN-ROACH master library, 27-Group ENDF/B-IV master library, and standard composition library. This paper will discuss the method used to choose the workstation, the hardware setup of the chosen workstation, an overview of Y-12 software quality assurance and configuration control methodology, code validation, difficulties encountered in migrating the codes, and advantages to migrating to a workstation environment.

  10. EH&S annual report: Summary of activities Environment, Health and Safety Division, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report presents an overview of the environment, safety, and health program in operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. description of research in environmental science, remediation, waste management, safety, health services, radiation assessment, and emergency plans are provided.

  11. Microbiological quality and safety assessment of lettuce production in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ceuppens, Siele; Hessel, Claudia Titze; de Quadros Rodrigues, Rochele; Bartz, Sabrina; Tondo, Eduardo César; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    The microbiological quality and safety of lettuce during primary production in Brazil were determined by enumeration of hygiene indicators Escherichia coli, coliforms and enterococci and detection of enteric pathogens Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in organic fertilizers, soil, irrigation water, lettuce crops, harvest boxes and worker's hands taken from six different lettuce farms throughout the crop growth cycle. Generic E. coli was a suitable indicator for the presence of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7, while coliforms and enterococci were not. Few pathogens were detected: 5 salmonellae and 2 E. coli O157:H7 from 260 samples, of which only one was lettuce and the others were manure, soil and water. Most (5/7) pathogens were isolated from the same farm and all were from organic production. Statistical analysis revealed the following environmental and agro-technical risk factors for increased microbial load and pathogen prevalence in lettuce production: high temperature, flooding of lettuce fields, application of contaminated organic fertilizer, irrigation with water of inferior quality and large distances between the field and toilets. Control of the composting process of organic fertilizers and the irrigation water quality appear most crucial to improve and/or maintain the microbiological quality and safety during the primary production of lettuce.

  12. NAVIGATING A QUALITY ROUTE TO A NATIONAL SAFETY AWARD

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE SS

    2009-05-26

    Deming quality methodologies applied to safety are recognized with the National Safety Council's annual Robert W. Campbell Award. Over the last ten years, the implementation of Statistical Process Control and quality methodologies at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have contributed to improved safety. Improvements attributed to Statistical Process Control are evidenced in Occupational Safety and Health records and documented through several articles in Quality Progress and the American Society of Safety Engineers publication, Professional Safety. Statistical trending of safety, quality, and occurrence data continues to playa key role in improving safety and quality at what has been called the world's largest environmental cleanup project. DOE's Hanford Site played a pivotal role in the nation's defense beginning in the 1940s, when it was established as part of the Manhattan Project. After more than 50 years of producing material for nuclear weapons, Hanford, which covers 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state, is now focused on three outcomes: (1) Restoring the Columbia River corridor for multiple uses; (2) Transitioning the central plateau to support long-term waste management; and (3) Putting DOE assets to work for the future. The current environmental cleanup mission faces challenges of overlapping technical, political, regulatory, environmental, and cultural interests. From Oct. 1, 1996 through Sept. 30, 2008, Fluor Hanford was a prime contractor to the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. In this role, Fluor Hanford managed several major cleanup activities that included dismantling former nuclear-processing facilities, cleaning up the Site's contaminated groundwater, retrieving and processing transuranic waste for shipment and disposal off-site, maintaining the Site's infrastructure, providing security and fire protection, and operating the Volpentest HAMMER Training and Education Center. On October 1,2008, a transition

  13. Beyond metrics? Utilizing 'soft intelligence' for healthcare quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham P; McKee, Lorna; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Formal metrics for monitoring the quality and safety of healthcare have a valuable role, but may not, by themselves, yield full insight into the range of fallibilities in organizations. 'Soft intelligence' is usefully understood as the processes and behaviours associated with seeking and interpreting soft data-of the kind that evade easy capture, straightforward classification and simple quantification-to produce forms of knowledge that can provide the basis for intervention. With the aim of examining current and potential practice in relation to soft intelligence, we conducted and analysed 107 in-depth qualitative interviews with senior leaders, including managers and clinicians, involved in healthcare quality and safety in the English National Health Service. We found that participants were in little doubt about the value of softer forms of data, especially for their role in revealing troubling issues that might be obscured by conventional metrics. Their struggles lay in how to access softer data and turn them into a useful form of knowing. Some of the dominant approaches they used risked replicating the limitations of hard, quantitative data. They relied on processes of aggregation and triangulation that prioritised reliability, or on instrumental use of soft data to animate the metrics. The unpredictable, untameable, spontaneous quality of soft data could be lost in efforts to systematize their collection and interpretation to render them more tractable. A more challenging but potentially rewarding approach involved processes and behaviours aimed at disrupting taken-for-granted assumptions about quality, safety, and organizational performance. This approach, which explicitly values the seeking out and the hearing of multiple voices, is consistent with conceptual frameworks of organizational sensemaking and dialogical understandings of knowledge. Using soft intelligence this way can be challenging and discomfiting, but may offer a critical defence against the

  14. Beyond metrics? Utilizing 'soft intelligence' for healthcare quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham P; McKee, Lorna; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Formal metrics for monitoring the quality and safety of healthcare have a valuable role, but may not, by themselves, yield full insight into the range of fallibilities in organizations. 'Soft intelligence' is usefully understood as the processes and behaviours associated with seeking and interpreting soft data-of the kind that evade easy capture, straightforward classification and simple quantification-to produce forms of knowledge that can provide the basis for intervention. With the aim of examining current and potential practice in relation to soft intelligence, we conducted and analysed 107 in-depth qualitative interviews with senior leaders, including managers and clinicians, involved in healthcare quality and safety in the English National Health Service. We found that participants were in little doubt about the value of softer forms of data, especially for their role in revealing troubling issues that might be obscured by conventional metrics. Their struggles lay in how to access softer data and turn them into a useful form of knowing. Some of the dominant approaches they used risked replicating the limitations of hard, quantitative data. They relied on processes of aggregation and triangulation that prioritised reliability, or on instrumental use of soft data to animate the metrics. The unpredictable, untameable, spontaneous quality of soft data could be lost in efforts to systematize their collection and interpretation to render them more tractable. A more challenging but potentially rewarding approach involved processes and behaviours aimed at disrupting taken-for-granted assumptions about quality, safety, and organizational performance. This approach, which explicitly values the seeking out and the hearing of multiple voices, is consistent with conceptual frameworks of organizational sensemaking and dialogical understandings of knowledge. Using soft intelligence this way can be challenging and discomfiting, but may offer a critical defence against the

  15. Proteomics in food: Quality, safety, microbes, and allergens.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Roncada, Paola; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Bonizzi, Luigi; Soggiu, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Food safety and quality and their associated risks pose a major concern worldwide regarding not only the relative economical losses but also the potential danger to consumer's health. Customer's confidence in the integrity of the food supply could be hampered by inappropriate food safety measures. A lack of measures and reliable assays to evaluate and maintain a good control of food characteristics may affect the food industry economy and shatter consumer confidence. It is imperative to create and to establish fast and reliable analytical methods that allow a good and rapid analysis of food products during the whole food chain. Proteomics can represent a powerful tool to address this issue, due to its proven excellent quantitative and qualitative drawbacks in protein analysis. This review illustrates the applications of proteomics in the past few years in food science focusing on food of animal origin with some brief hints on other types. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of this science as a valuable tool to assess food quality and safety. Emphasis is also posed in food processing, allergies, and possible contaminants like bacteria, fungi, and other pathogens.

  16. Building a Culture of Safety: Camp Safety Director Ensures Safe Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Norman

    2001-01-01

    Having a designated safety expert at camp creates a culture of safety. The Gene Ezersky Camp Safety College, which certifies safety directors, has identified seven areas of camp that should be the focus of the safety director: kitchen and food services, health and sanitation, emergency preparation and management, leadership training, facility…

  17. Taking ownership of safety. What are the active ingredients of safety coaching and how do they impact safety outcomes in critical offshore working environments?

    PubMed

    Krauesslar, Victoria; Avery, Rachel E; Passmore, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Safety coaching interventions have become a common feature in the safety critical offshore working environments of the North Sea. Whilst the beneficial impact of coaching as an organizational tool has been evidenced, there remains a question specifically over the use of safety coaching and its impact on behavioural change and producing safe working practices. A series of 24 semi-structured interviews were conducted with three groups of experts in the offshore industry: safety coaches, offshore managers and HSE directors. Using a thematic analysis approach, several significant themes were identified across the three expert groups including connecting with and creating safety ownership in the individual, personal significance and humanisation, ingraining safety and assessing and measuring a safety coach's competence. Results suggest clear utility of safety coaching when applied by safety coaches with appropriate coach training and understanding of safety issues in an offshore environment. The current work has found that the use of safety coaching in the safety critical offshore oil and gas industry is a powerful tool in managing and promoting a culture of safety and care. PMID:26327261

  18. Taking ownership of safety. What are the active ingredients of safety coaching and how do they impact safety outcomes in critical offshore working environments?

    PubMed

    Krauesslar, Victoria; Avery, Rachel E; Passmore, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Safety coaching interventions have become a common feature in the safety critical offshore working environments of the North Sea. Whilst the beneficial impact of coaching as an organizational tool has been evidenced, there remains a question specifically over the use of safety coaching and its impact on behavioural change and producing safe working practices. A series of 24 semi-structured interviews were conducted with three groups of experts in the offshore industry: safety coaches, offshore managers and HSE directors. Using a thematic analysis approach, several significant themes were identified across the three expert groups including connecting with and creating safety ownership in the individual, personal significance and humanisation, ingraining safety and assessing and measuring a safety coach's competence. Results suggest clear utility of safety coaching when applied by safety coaches with appropriate coach training and understanding of safety issues in an offshore environment. The current work has found that the use of safety coaching in the safety critical offshore oil and gas industry is a powerful tool in managing and promoting a culture of safety and care.

  19. Safety in Urban Environment and Emergency Notice Boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confortini, Claudia; Tira, Maurizio

    2008-07-01

    Reliable and safe urban system conditions have to be a crucial goal of ordinary planning activities. Among planning goals, priority must be given to indications relating to the safety levels to be achieved and to the amount of resources to be directed towards reducing the vulnerability of urban systems and therefore of the measures to be taken. Uban vulnerability cannot in fact be reduced to the sum of the vulnerability of single buildings or to the physical vulnerability of its various components. This research work consists of identifying those urban sub-areas that are important for safety in relation to natural risks, ambits that should be highlighted by means of permanent emergency notice boards/billboards. What are the hazard notices relating to all natural hazards and related risks? Where are they located? Are they clear and straightforward so that all residents and visitors are able to understand them, as it is already the case for road signs (or at least it should be)? What urban sub-areas are worth highlighting in relation to natural risks, acting for example as escape routes or meeting points? How is information for the public managed in order that people are immediately, easily and regularly notified? What is the relation of such signals to ordinary traffic signals? Research into the state of the art of permanent notice boards/billboards of this type, currently distinguished only by sporadic and local initiatives, aims at carrying out a census of and recognizing urban elements already considered as important for reducing the vulnerability of the urban system to different natural calamities and at providing new highlights as regards the identification of new ones. The next step is to work out a decision and common-language strategy for planning these elements and for their adequate signposting, so as to be able to live in the urban environment with awareness, safety and confidence, including with respect to more remote and therefore often neglected

  20. Safety in urban environment and emergency notice boards

    SciTech Connect

    Confortini, Claudia; Tira, Maurizio

    2008-07-08

    Reliable and safe urban system conditions have to be a crucial goal of ordinary planning activities. Among planning goals, priority must be given to indications relating to the safety levels to be achieved and to the amount of resources to be directed towards reducing the vulnerability of urban systems and therefore of the measures to be taken. Uban vulnerability cannot in fact be reduced to the sum of the vulnerability of single buildings or to the physical vulnerability of its various components. This research work consists of identifying those urban sub-areas that are important for safety in relation to natural risks, ambits that should be highlighted by means of permanent emergency notice boards/billboards. What are the hazard notices relating to all natural hazards and related risks? Where are they located? Are they clear and straightforward so that all residents and visitors are able to understand them, as it is already the case for road signs (or at least it should be)? What urban sub-areas are worth highlighting in relation to natural risks, acting for example as escape routes or meeting points? How is information for the public managed in order that people are immediately, easily and regularly notified? What is the relation of such signals to ordinary traffic signals? Research into the state of the art of permanent notice boards/billboards of this type, currently distinguished only by sporadic and local initiatives, aims at carrying out a census of and recognizing urban elements already considered as important for reducing the vulnerability of the urban system to different natural calamities and at providing new highlights as regards the identification of new ones. The next step is to work out a decision and common-language strategy for planning these elements and for their adequate signposting, so as to be able to live in the urban environment with awareness, safety and confidence, including with respect to more remote and therefore often neglected

  1. Evaluating Water Quality in a Suburban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Garza, N.

    2008-12-01

    A water quality analysis and modeling study is currently being conducted on the Martinez Creek, a small catchment within Cibolo watershed, a sub-basin of the San Antonio River, Texas. Several other major creeks, such as Salatrillo, Escondido, and Woman Hollering merge with Martinez Creek. Land use and land cover analysis shows that the major portion of the watershed is dominated by residential development with average impervious cover percentage of approximately 40% along with a some of agricultural areas and brushlands. This catchment is characterized by the presence of three small wastewater treatment plants. Previous site visits and sampling of water quality indicate the presence of algae and fecal coliform bacteria at levels well above state standards at several locations in the catchment throughout the year. Due to the presence of livestock, residential development and wastewater treatment plants, a comprehensive understanding of water quality is important to evaluate the sources and find means to control pollution. As part of the study, a spatial and temporal water quality analyses of conventional parameters as well as emerging contaminants, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals and microbial pathogens is being conducted to identify critical locations and sources. Additionally, the Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) will be used to identify best management practices that can be incorporated given the projected growth and development and feasibility.

  2. Environment, Safety and Health progress assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Department`s continuous improvement process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the INEL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Department with concise independent information on the following: (1) change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; (2) progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from previous Tiger Team Assessments; (3) adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment programs of the DOE line organizations and the site management and operating contractor; and (4) effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems. It is not intended that this Progress Assessment be a comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The points of reference for assessing programs at the INEL were, for the most part, the 1991 INEL Tiger Team Assessment, the INEL Corrective Action Plan, and recent appraisals and self-assessments of INEL. Horizontal and vertical reviews of the following programmatic areas were conducted: Management: Corrective action program; self-assessment; oversight; directives, policies, and procedures; human resources management; and planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. Environment: Air quality management, surface water management, groundwater protection, and environmental radiation. Safety and Health: Construction safety, worker safety and OSHA, maintenance, packaging and transportation, site/facility safety review, and industrial hygiene.

  3. Quality and Safety in Orthopaedics: Learning and Teaching at the Same Time: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin P; Armstrong, April D; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-11-01

    Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them.The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow.Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety.Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety. PMID:26537169

  4. Quality and Safety in Orthopaedics: Learning and Teaching at the Same Time: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin P; Armstrong, April D; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-11-01

    Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them.The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow.Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety.Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety.

  5. The Impact of eHealth on the Quality and Safety of Healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Azeem; Black, Ashly; Car, Josip; Anandan, Chantelle; Cresswell, Kathrin; McKinstry, Brian; Pagliari, Claudia; Procter, Rob; Sheikh, Aziz

    There is considerable interest in using information technology (IT) to enhance the quality and safety of healthcare. We undertook a systematic literature review to assess the impact of eHealth applications on the quality and safety of healthcare. We retrieved 46,349 potentially relevant publications, from which we selected 67 relevant systematic reviews for inclusion. The literature was found to be poorly collated and of variable quality in its methodology, reporting and utility. We categorised eHealth applications into three main areas: i). storing, managing and transmission of data; ii). supporting clinical decision-making; and iii). facilitating care from a distance. We found that relative to the potential benefits noted within the literature, little empirical evidence exists in support of these applications. Of the few studies revealing the clearest evidence of benefits, many are from academic clinical centres where developers of new applications have also been directly associated with their evaluation. It is therefore unclear how effective these applications would be if deployed outside the environment in which they were developed. Our review of the impact of eHealth applications on quality and safety of healthcare demonstrated a vast gap between the postulated and empirically demonstrated benefits. In addition, there is a lack of robust research on risks and costs. Consequently, the cost-effectiveness of these interventions has yet to be demonstrated.

  6. The History of Infant Formula: Quality, Safety, and Standard Methods.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Wayne F

    2016-01-01

    Food-related laws and regulations have existed since ancient times. Egyptian scrolls prescribed the labeling needed for certain foods. In ancient Athens, beer and wines were inspected for purity and soundness, and the Romans had a well-organized state food control system to protect consumers from fraud or bad produce. In Europe during the Middle Ages, individual countries passed laws concerning the quality and safety of eggs, sausages, cheese, beer, wine, and bread; some of these laws still exist today. But more modern dietary guidelines and food regulations have their origins in the latter half of the 19th century when the first general food laws were adopted and basic food control systems were implemented to monitor compliance. Around this time, science and food chemistry began to provide the tools to determine "purity" of food based primarily on chemical composition and to determine whether it had been adulterated in any way. Since the key chemical components of mammalian milk were first understood, infant formulas have steadily advanced in complexity as manufacturers attempt to close the compositional gap with human breast milk. To verify these compositional innovations and ensure product quality and safety, infant formula has become one of the most regulated foods in the world. The present paper examines the historical development of nutritional alternatives to breastfeeding, focusing on efforts undertaken to ensure the quality and safety from antiquity to present day. The impact of commercial infant formulas on global regulations is addressed, along with the resulting need for harmonized, fit-for-purpose, voluntary consensus standard methods. PMID:26811237

  7. The History of Infant Formula: Quality, Safety, and Standard Methods.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Wayne F

    2016-01-01

    Food-related laws and regulations have existed since ancient times. Egyptian scrolls prescribed the labeling needed for certain foods. In ancient Athens, beer and wines were inspected for purity and soundness, and the Romans had a well-organized state food control system to protect consumers from fraud or bad produce. In Europe during the Middle Ages, individual countries passed laws concerning the quality and safety of eggs, sausages, cheese, beer, wine, and bread; some of these laws still exist today. But more modern dietary guidelines and food regulations have their origins in the latter half of the 19th century when the first general food laws were adopted and basic food control systems were implemented to monitor compliance. Around this time, science and food chemistry began to provide the tools to determine "purity" of food based primarily on chemical composition and to determine whether it had been adulterated in any way. Since the key chemical components of mammalian milk were first understood, infant formulas have steadily advanced in complexity as manufacturers attempt to close the compositional gap with human breast milk. To verify these compositional innovations and ensure product quality and safety, infant formula has become one of the most regulated foods in the world. The present paper examines the historical development of nutritional alternatives to breastfeeding, focusing on efforts undertaken to ensure the quality and safety from antiquity to present day. The impact of commercial infant formulas on global regulations is addressed, along with the resulting need for harmonized, fit-for-purpose, voluntary consensus standard methods.

  8. Occupational Safety and Related Impacts on Health and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The inter-relationship between safety, health and the ‘environment’ is a complex and at times a relatively neglected topic. In this issue, ‘safety’ is often viewed by contributors as ‘health and safety’ and includes occupationally-related ill health as well as injury or harm to employees and the wider public. ‘Environment’ is also interpreted in the widest sense covering both physical and work environments with upstream work hazards presenting risks to downstream communities. The focus is very much on exploring and where possible addressing the challenges, some old and some facing workers in a range of public and private settings and also at times their nearby communities. The 19 papers in the issue cover public and private sectors, global and very local populations, macro-theoretical perspectives, large epidemiological and some single factory or hospital site small case studies. A number of the papers are just beginning to explore and draw out for the first time the risks from hazards in their part of the world. The methodologies adopted also range from lab-based studies through ergonomic assessments and interventions to therapeutic approaches. PMID:27782047

  9. The creation and impact of a dedicated section on quality and patient safety in a clinical academic department.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Arthur M; Vetter, Thomas R

    2013-02-01

    Optimizing the effectiveness, efficiency, integration, and satisfaction associated with delivered health care is not only highly principled but also good business practice in an extremely competitive environment. Programs that foster quality improvement and patient safety efforts while also promoting a scholarly focus can generate the incentives and organizational recognition needed to make patient safety and quality improvement bona fide components of the academic mission. The authors describe the development, implementation, and results of a dedicated Section on Quality and Patient Safety (SQPS) within an academic anesthesiology department. Spearheaded by a physician champion and vigorously supported by the departmental chair, this SQPS engaged core leaders from the Department of Anesthesiology. This departmental quality and patient safety management team adopted quality improvement and performance improvement techniques that have been successfully used in other industries. The SQPS has gained support through data-driven results and reiterative promotion. Transparency and accountability have also been powerful motivators for achieving clinician buy-in and changing behavior. Since its inception in 2007, the SQPS has initiated or managed through to completion more than 25 quality and performance improvement projects, including an intraoperative corneal injury reduction program, a wrong-sided regional anesthesia procedure, a drug-eluting coronary stent protocol, and a practice-improvement initiative for resident physicians. The SQPS has not only robustly promoted a departmental culture of quality patient care and safety but also set the standard for other departments and stakeholders within the authors' health system.

  10. Light, Colour & Air Quality: Important Elements of the Learning Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews and evaluates studies of the effects of light, color, and air quality on the learning environment. Concludes that studies suggest a role for light in establishing and maintaining physiological functions and balances and a need for improved air quality in airtight, energy efficient buildings. (JHZ)

  11. Patient safety and quality improvement: a 'CLER' time to move beyond peripheral participation.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Frohna, John G

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has instituted a new program, the Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER), that places focus in six important areas of the resident and fellow working and learning environment. Two of these areas are patient safety and quality improvement (QI). In their early CLER reviews of institutions housing ACGME-accredited training programs, ACGME has found that despite significant progress in patient safety and QI to date much work remains, especially when it comes to meaningful engagement of medical trainees in this work. In this article, the authors argue that peripheral involvement of trainees in patient safety and QI work does not allow the experiential learning that is necessary for professional development and the ultimate ability to execute performance that meets the needs of patients in contemporary clinical practice. Rather, as leaders in patient safety and QI have advocated since early in this movement, embedded and immersed experiences are necessary for learning and success. PMID:27452336

  12. Patient safety and quality improvement: a ‘CLER’ time to move beyond peripheral participation

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Daniel J.; Frohna, John G.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has instituted a new program, the Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER), that places focus in six important areas of the resident and fellow working and learning environment. Two of these areas are patient safety and quality improvement (QI). In their early CLER reviews of institutions housing ACGME-accredited training programs, ACGME has found that despite significant progress in patient safety and QI to date much work remains, especially when it comes to meaningful engagement of medical trainees in this work. In this article, the authors argue that peripheral involvement of trainees in patient safety and QI work does not allow the experiential learning that is necessary for professional development and the ultimate ability to execute performance that meets the needs of patients in contemporary clinical practice. Rather, as leaders in patient safety and QI have advocated since early in this movement, embedded and immersed experiences are necessary for learning and success. PMID:27452336

  13. 24 CFR 1005.111 - What safety and quality standards apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What safety and quality standards... URBAN DEVELOPMENT LOAN GUARANTEES FOR INDIAN HOUSING § 1005.111 What safety and quality standards apply? (a) Loans guaranteed under section 184 must be for dwelling units which meet the safety and...

  14. Integrated Environment and Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL, R.L.

    2000-01-10

    The Integrated Environment, Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan serves as the project document to guide the Fluor Hanford, Inc (FHI) and Major Subcontractor (MSC) participants through the steps necessary to complete the integration of environment, safety, and health into management and work practices at all levels.

  15. Quality control in a deterministic manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barkman, W.E.; Babelay, E.F.; De Mint, P.D.; Lewis, J.C.; Woodard, L.M.

    1985-01-24

    An approach for establishing quality control in processes which exhibit undesired continual or intermittent excursions in key process parameters is discussed. The method is called deterministic manufacturing, and it is designed to employ automatic monitoring of the key process variables for process certification, but utilizes only sample certification of the process output to verify the validity of the measurement process. The system utilizes a local minicomputer to sample the appropriate process parameters that describe the condition of the machine tool, the cutting process, and the computer numerical control system. Sampled data are pre-processed by the minicomputer and then sent to a host computer that maintains a permanent data base describing the manufacturing conditions for each work piece. Parts are accepted if the various parameters remain within the required limits during the machining cycle. The need for additional actions is flagged if limits are exceeded. With this system it is possible to retrospectively examine the process status just prior to the occurrence of a problem. (LEW)

  16. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance... install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in wells located on the OCS....

  17. The possible effects on health, comfort and safety of aircraft cabin environments.

    PubMed

    Brown, T P; Shuker, L K; Rushton, L; Warren, F; Stevens, J

    2001-09-01

    A consultation was undertaken to investigate the views and concerns of stakeholders in the aircraft industry about the possible harmful effects on personal health, comfort and safety of aircraft cabin environments. Stakeholders were identified from a variety of sources including Government agencies, the Internet, House of Lords inquiry, and suggestions of interviewees. They represented: aircraft crews, aircraft constructors and engineers, government departments and authorities, holiday/flight companies, insurance companies, non-governmental organisations, occupational health physicians, passenger representatives, and independent researchers and consultants. Eighty-seven were contacted of which 57 were interviewed over the telephone using a semi-structured questionnaire. Their concerns were transcribed into a standard format and analysed qualitatively. Key stakeholders, along with Government officials, were invited to a workshop to discuss and prioritize the issues raised during the interviews. The main concerns expressed by the participants fell into five main areas: deep vein thrombosis, air quality, infection, cosmic radiation, and jet lag and work patterns. In addition, a number of safety concerns were raised as well as comments on the provision of appropriate advice to passengers. It was generally felt that further research was required on each of these subjects, as well as an improvement in the quality, quantity and availability of information provided for passengers prior to boarding a flight.

  18. The Implementation of Payload Safety in an Operational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cissom, R. D.; Horvath, Tim J.; Watson, Kristi S.; Rogers, Mark N. (Technical Monitor); Vanhooser, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to define the safety life-cycle process for a payload beginning with the output of the Payload Safety Review Panel and continuing through the life of the payload on-orbit. It focuses on the processes and products of the operations safety implementation through the increment preparations and real-time operations processes. In addition, the paper addresses the role of the Payload Operations and Integration Center and the interfaces to the International Partner Payload Control Centers.

  19. 32 CFR 861.4 - DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... so as to ensure proper crew rest and considers quality-of-life factors. Attention is given to the... FORCE AIRCRAFT DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION QUALITY AND SAFETY REVIEW PROGRAM § 861.4 DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements. (a) General. The DOD, as a customer...

  20. 32 CFR 861.4 - DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... so as to ensure proper crew rest and considers quality-of-life factors. Attention is given to the... FORCE AIRCRAFT DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION QUALITY AND SAFETY REVIEW PROGRAM § 861.4 DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements. (a) General. The DOD, as a customer...

  1. 32 CFR 861.4 - DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... so as to ensure proper crew rest and considers quality-of-life factors. Attention is given to the... FORCE AIRCRAFT DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION QUALITY AND SAFETY REVIEW PROGRAM § 861.4 DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements. (a) General. The DOD, as a customer...

  2. 32 CFR 861.4 - DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... so as to ensure proper crew rest and considers quality-of-life factors. Attention is given to the... FORCE AIRCRAFT DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION QUALITY AND SAFETY REVIEW PROGRAM § 861.4 DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements. (a) General. The DOD, as a customer...

  3. 78 FR 55257 - Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... for Healthcare Research and Quality. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Rule, 73 FR 70732 (Nov... maximum CMP amount for violations of the confidentiality provisions of the Rule. (74 FR 42777 (Aug. 25... HUMAN SERVICES Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustment...

  4. Road safety control: Application in urban environment in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charisoudis, A.; Mintsis, G.; Basbas, S.; Taxiltaris, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine what is and what is not a "road safety control" on the one hand and on the other hand to examine the procedure of the realization of this control in different countries in the level of the organization as well as in the level of the praxis through the Road Safety Manuals of each country. The countries under examination are: The United Kinghdom, Danish, U.S.A, Australia and New Zeeland. The Road Safety Manual of the International Organization World Road Association-PIARC is also mentioned. Finally examples of the application of road safety control, which were realized in the frame of the research programs of the research team of the Department of Transportation Engineering, School of Rural and Surveing, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in the town of Aridea, are given.(in Greeks)

  5. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1) Performing... would have a significant effect on safety, health, or the environment; (2) If it is...

  6. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1) Performing... would have a significant effect on safety, health, or the environment; (2) If it is...

  7. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1) Performing... would have a significant effect on safety, health, or the environment; (2) If it is...

  8. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  9. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. METC is currently a research and development facility, managed by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. Its goal is to focus energy research and development to develop engineered fossil fuel systems, that are economically viable and environmentally sound, for commercial application. There is clear evidence that, since the 1991 Tiger Team Assessment, substantial progress has been made by both FE and METC in most aspects of their ES&H program. The array of new and restructured organizations, systems, and programs at FE and METC; increased assignments of staff to support these initiatives; extensive training activities; and the maturing planning processes, all reflect a discernable, continuous improvement in the quality of the ES&H performance.

  10. Hygiene and Safety in the Meat Processing Environment from Butcher Shops: Microbiological Contamination and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo Augusto Lopes da; Dias, Mariane Rezende; Cossi, Marcus Vinícius Coutinho; Castilho, Natália Parma Augusto de; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Nero, Lúis Augusto

    2016-04-01

    The quality and safety of meat products can be estimated by assessing their contamination by hygiene indicator microorganisms and some foodborne pathogens, with Listeria monocytogenes as a major concern. To identify the main sources of microbiological contamination in the processing environment of three butcher shops, surface samples were obtained from the hands of employees, tables, knives, inside butcher displays, grinders, and meat tenderizers (24 samples per point). All samples were subjected to enumeration of hygiene indicator microorganisms and detection of L. monocytogenes, and the obtained isolates were characterized by their serogroups and virulence genes. The results demonstrated the absence of relevant differences in the levels of microbiological contamination among butcher shops; samples with counts higher than reference values indicated inefficiency in adopted hygiene procedures. A total of 87 samples were positive for Listeria spp. (60.4%): 22 from tables, 20 from grinders, 16 from knives, 13 from hands, 9 from meat tenderizers, and 7 from butcher shop displays. Thirty-one samples (21.5%) were positive for L. monocytogenes, indicating the presence of the pathogen in meat processing environments. Seventy-four L. monocytogenes isolates were identified, with 52 from serogroups 1/2c or 3c and 22 from serogroups 4b, 4d, 4a, or 4c. All 74 isolates were positive for hlyA, iap, plcA, actA, and internalins (inlA, inlB, inlC, and inlJ). The establishment of appropriate procedures to reduce microbial counts and control the spread of L. monocytogenes in the final steps of the meat production chain is of utmost importance, with obvious effects on the quality and safety of meat products for human consumption.

  11. The Armstrong Institute: An Academic Institute for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement, Research, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Molello, Nancy E; Paine, Lori; Winner, Laura; Marsteller, Jill A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Demski, Renee; Armstrong, C Michael

    2015-10-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) could advance the science of health care delivery, improve patient safety and quality improvement, and enhance value, but many centers have fragmented efforts with little accountability. Johns Hopkins Medicine, the AMC under which the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Health System are organized, experienced similar challenges, with operational patient safety and quality leadership separate from safety and quality-related research efforts. To unite efforts and establish accountability, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was created in 2011.The authors describe the development, purpose, governance, function, and challenges of the institute to help other AMCs replicate it and accelerate safety and quality improvement. The purpose is to partner with patients, their loved ones, and all interested parties to end preventable harm, continuously improve patient outcomes and experience, and eliminate waste in health care. A governance structure was created, with care mapped into seven categories, to oversee the quality and safety of all patients treated at a Johns Hopkins Medicine entity. The governance has a Patient Safety and Quality Board Committee that sets strategic goals, and the institute communicates these goals throughout the health system and supports personnel in meeting these goals. The institute is organized into 13 functional councils reflecting their behaviors and purpose. The institute works daily to build the capacity of clinicians trained in safety and quality through established programs, advance improvement science, and implement and evaluate interventions to improve the quality of care and safety of patients.

  12. [Agricultural environment quality of China and its improving countermeasures].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xibai; Yang, Zhengli

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzed the present status of China agricultural water and soil environment. It was indicated that the agricultural water environment in this country was more serious, with the affected area being approximately 20% of the total farmland, and 5% of it being severely affected. More attention should be paid to the pollution of agricultural chemicals in soil environment. The impacts of industrial wastes, urban sewage and garbage, agricultural chemicals, and soil erosion on agro-environment were discussed, with the impact degree of these factors analyzed. The major problems in China agricultural environment melioration were presented, related researches and major countermeasures in this country and developed countries were reviewed, and relevant measures and suggestions on improving the agricultural environment quality of China were put forward.

  13. Effects of gamma radiation on raspberries: safety and quality issues.

    PubMed

    Verde, S Cabo; Trigo, M J; Sousa, M B; Ferreira, A; Ramos, A C; Nunes, I; Junqueira, C; Melo, R; Santos, P M P; Botelho, M L

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing global demand from consumers for high-quality foods with major emphasis placed on quality and safety attributes. One of the main demands that consumers display is for minimally processed, high-nutrition/low-energy natural foods with no or minimal chemical preservatives. The nutritional value of raspberry fruit is widely recognized. In particular, red raspberries are known to demonstrate a strong antioxidant capacity that might prove beneficial to human health by preventing free radical-induced oxidative stress. However, food products that are consumed raw, are increasingly being recognized as important vehicles for transmission of human pathogens. Food irradiation is one of the few technologies that address both food quality and safety by virtue of its ability to control spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms without significantly affecting sensory or other organoleptic attributes of the food. Food irradiation is well established as a physical, nonthermal treatment (cold pasteurization) that processes foods at or nearly at ambient temperature in the final packaging, reducing the possibility of cross contamination until the food is actually used by the consumer. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of gamma radiation on raspberries in order to assess consequences of irradiation. Freshly packed raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) were irradiated in a (60)Co source at several doses (0.5, 1, or 1.5 kGy). Bioburden, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, physicochemical properties such as texture, color, pH, soluble solids content, and acidity, and sensorial parameters were assessed before and after irradiation and during storage time up to 14 d at 4°C. Characterization of raspberries microbiota showed an average bioburden value of 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g and a diverse microbial population predominantly composed of two morphological types (gram-negative, oxidase-negative rods, 35%, and filamentous fungi, 41

  14. NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC : evaluation and selection of tools for the quality environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Julie F.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Vigil, Dena M.; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. These M&S capabilities are to be managed, verified, and validated within the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. M&S capabilities and the supporting analysis workflow and simulation data management tools will be distributed to end-users from this same quality environment. The same analysis workflow and simulation data management tools that are to be distributed to end-users will be used for verification and validation (V&V) activities within the quality environment. This strategic decision reduces the number of tools to be supported, and increases the quality of tools distributed to end users due to rigorous use by V&V activities. This report documents an evaluation of the needs, options, and tools selected for the NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC quality environment. The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Nuclear Waste Management Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Nuclear Waste Management IPSC) program element is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to assess quantitatively the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. This objective will be fulfilled by acquiring and developing M&S capabilities, and establishing a defensible level of confidence in these M&S capabilities. The foundation for assessing the level of confidence is based upon

  15. [Construction and implementation of quality control index for clinical safety of Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-jie; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-12-01

    In order to ensure the authenticity and accuracy of traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring data, Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring quality control indicators, including the monitoring center, monitoring personnel, hardware conditions, monitoring progress and the number of patients into the group, original documents and archives management, electronic data, adverse events, quality management were constructed. Its application in the creation of major new drugs technology major projects, 10 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine injections clinical safety monitoring quality control work, found the missing case surveillance, not reported adverse events, only reported adverse reactions, electronic data reporting lag, lack of level of efforts to control the problem, and corrected, the traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring of quality control and quality assurance, and subsequent Chinese medicine safety monitoring quality control to provide the reference. PMID:27245020

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  17. Creating a Total Quality Environment (TQE) for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Jann E.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a model for creating a total quality environment (TQE) for learning in which everyone is considered a learner. The model consists of 11 interrelated characteristics derived from the literature in the areas of continuous improvement, leadership, learning, learning organizations, and spirituality. The characteristics in the…

  18. Improving Safety, Quality and Efficiency through the Management of Emerging Processes: The TenarisDalmine Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonometti, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this contribution is to describe a new complexity-science-based approach for improving safety, quality and efficiency and the way it was implemented by TenarisDalmine. Design/methodology/approach: This methodology is called "a safety-building community". It consists of a safety-behaviour social self-construction process…

  19. Environment Health & Safety Research Program. Organization and 1979-1980 Publications

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This document was prepared to assist readers in understanding the organization of Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and the organization and functions of the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program Office. Telephone numbers of the principal management staff are provided. Also included is a list of 1979 and 1980 publications reporting on work performed in the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program, as well as a list of papers submitted for publication.

  20. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  1. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  2. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  3. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  4. 78 FR 12067 - Extreme Weather Effects on Medical Device Safety and Quality

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Extreme Weather Effects on Medical Device Safety and Quality... Drug Administration (FDA) is studying the potential effects of extreme weather and natural disasters on... extreme weather effects on medical device safety and quality. DATES: Submit either electronic or...

  5. Developing a quality and safety curriculum for fellows: lessons learned from a neonatology fellowship program.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Munish; Ringer, Steve; Tess, Anjala; Hansen, Anne; Zupancic, John

    2014-01-01

    Formal training in health care quality and safety has become an important component of medical education at all levels, and quality and safety are core concepts within the practice-based learning and system-based practice medical education competencies. Residency and fellowship programs are rapidly attempting to incorporate quality and safety curriculum into their training programs but have encountered numerous challenges and barriers. Many program directors have questioned the feasibility and utility of quality and safety education during this stage of training. In 2010, we adopted a quality and safety educational module in our neonatal fellowship program that sought to provide a robust and practical introduction to quality improvement and patient safety through a combination of didactic and experiential activities. Our module has been successfully integrated into the fellowship program's curriculum and has been beneficial to trainees, faculty, and our clinical services, and our experience suggests that fellowship may be particularly well suited to incorporation of quality and safety training. We describe our module and share tools and lessons learned during our experience; we believe these resources will be useful to other fellowship programs seeking to improve the quality and safety education of their trainees.

  6. Safety of implanted cardiac devices in an MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Nazarian, Saman

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an essential diagnostic modality for the evaluation of various conditions. In line with the increase in MRI applications, the use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) is growing and many of the CEID recipients of today may require MRI examinations in the future. Traditionally, MRI examination of CIED recipients has been considered a contraindication. However, recent studies have provided strong evidence that MRI can safely be performed in selected patients with specific precautions. This review highlights the interactions of MRI with CIEDs, summarizes the literature, and outlines the Johns Hopkins Safety Protocol. PMID:26026996

  7. Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

  8. Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

  9. ADSA Foundation Scholar Award: Trends in culture-independent methods for assessing dairy food quality and safety: emerging metagenomic tools.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Marie

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the quality and safety of dairy food is critical to maintaining the competitiveness of dairy products in the food and beverage market and in reinforcing consumer confidence in the dairy industry. Raw milk quality has a significant effect on finished product quality. Several microbial groups found in raw milk have been shown to adversely affect the shelf life of pasteurized milk. Current microbiological criteria used to define milk quality are based primarily on culture-dependent methods, some of which are perceived to lack the desired sensitivity and specificity. To supplement traditional methods, culture-independent methods are increasingly being used to identify specific species or microbial groups, and to detect indicator genes or proteins in raw milk or dairy products. Some molecular subtyping techniques have been developed to track the transmission of microbes in dairy environments. The burgeoning "-omics" technologies offer new and exciting opportunities to enhance our understanding of food quality and safety in relation to microbes. Metagenomics has the potential to characterize microbial diversity, detect nonculturable microbes, and identify unique sequences or other factors associated with dairy product quality and safety. In this review, fluid milk will be used as the primary example to examine the adequacy and validity of conventional methods, the current trend of culture-independent methods, and the potential applications of metagenomics in dairy food research.

  10. Fostering Future Leadership in Quality and Safety in Health Care through Systems Thinking.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janet M; Stalter, Ann M; Dolansky, Mary A; Lopez, Gloria McKee

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical need for leadership in quality and safety to reform today's disparate spectrum of health services to serve patients in complex health care environments. Nurse graduates of degree completion programs (registered nurse-bachelor of science in nursing [RN-BSN]) are poised for leadership due to their recent education and nursing practice experience. The authors propose that integration of systems thinking into RN-BSN curricula is essential for developing these much needed leadership skills. The purpose of this article is to introduce progressive teaching strategies to help nurse educators achieve the student competencies described in the second essential of the BSN Essentials document (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2009), linking them with the competencies in Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN; L. Cronenwett et al., 2007) using an author-created model for curricular design, the Systems-level Awareness Model. The Systems Thinking Tool (M. A. Dolansky & S. M. Moore, 2013) can be used to evaluate systems thinking in the RN-BSN curriculum. PMID:26802587

  11. National ignition facility environment, safety, and health management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The ES&H Management Plan describes all of the environmental, safety, and health evaluations and reviews that must be carried out in support of the implementation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. It describes the policy, organizational responsibilities and interfaces, activities, and ES&H documents that will be prepared by the Laboratory Project Office for the DOE. The only activity not described is the preparation of the NIF Project Specific Assessment (PSA), which is to be incorporated into the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (PEIS). This PSA is being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with input from the Laboratory participants. As the independent NEPA document preparers ANL is directly contracted by the DOE, and its deliverables and schedule are agreed to separately with DOE/OAK.

  12. Maintaining space shuttle safety within an environment of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Michael A.

    1999-09-01

    In the 10 years since the Challenger accident, NASA has developed a set of stable and capable processes to prepare the Space Shuttle for safe launch and return. Capitalizing on the extensive experience gained from a string of over 50 successful flights, NASA today is changing the way it does business in an effort to reduce cost. A single Shuttle Flight Operations Contractor (SFOC) has been chosen to operate the Shuttle. The Government role will change from direct "oversight" to "insight" gained through understanding and measuring the contractor's processes. This paper describes the program management changes underway and the NASA Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) organization's philosophy, role, and methodology for pursuing this new approach. It describes how audit and surveillance will replace direct oversight and how meaningful performance metrics will be implemented.

  13. Quality and safety of bovine clones and their products.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Y; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Fromentin, G; Berthelot, V; Jurie, C; Bas, P; Dubarry, M; Mialot, J P; Remy, D; Richard, C; Martignat, L; Vignon, X; Renard, J P

    2007-08-01

    cattle derived from somatic nuclear transfer than in cattle born from conventional reproduction. Our results confirm that the quality and safety of products (milk and meat) from adult and clinically healthy cloned cattle is globally similar to normal animals. However, from a strictly biological point of view, the slightly delayed maturation we observed in the muscle of clones together with some marginal differences identified in FA composition of both muscle and milk, point to the need for more refined analysis to totally exclude any risks from the consumption of those products.

  14. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT..., property, and the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1... would have a significant effect on safety, health, or the environment; (2) If it is...

  15. Measuring Safety Levels in Playgrounds Using Environment Assessment Scales: The Issue of Playground Safety in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botsoglou, Kafenia; Hrisikou, Spyridoula; Kakana, Domna Mika

    2011-01-01

    Playgrounds beget an unrivalled context which, through play activity, can foster children's growth. The foremost function of all playgrounds is to provide for safety. In the present study, our primary focus is to determine the degree of adequacy as far as playground equipment is concerned, including estimates of imminent dangers and the level of…

  16. Listserv use enhances quality and safety in multisite quality improvement efforts.

    PubMed

    Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D; Surott-Kimberly, B C; Weeks, William Brinson

    2004-01-01

    A listserv is an e-mail group to which people subscribe based upon common interests. We used a retrospective study to examine the relationship between listserv use and team success for health care quality improvement efforts. We hypothesized high listserv use would be associated with team success. Eighty-seven Department of Veterans Affairs teams participated in facilitated quality improvement efforts to address three areas: improving safety in high-hazard areas, improving the disability evaluation process, and reducing falls and related injuries. We coded messages sent to the listserv according to sender (faculty or participant), team, and content. We correlated the volume of messages sent per team with team success and with team and facility characteristics. Teams with high listserv contributions were more likely to complete their first test of change, report facility use of nonpunitive methods of investigating medical incidents, and report their information systems were useful. We found a negative correlation between listserv contribution and the number of face-to-face meetings and a physician as an active team member, but we found no relationship between team success and listserv contribution. Team listserv contribution was not associated with team success in multisite quality improvement efforts. Successful teams may be accessing information on the listserv but not sending a message to indicate use.

  17. Impact of Virtual Environments on Sensorimotor Coordination and User Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Taylor, Laura C.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Reschke, Millard F.

    2011-01-01

    One critical unresolved issue related to the safe use of virtual environments (VEs) is maladaptive sensorimotor coordination following exposure to VEs. Moving visual displays used in VEs, especially in the absence of concordant vestibular signals leads to adaptive responses during VE exposure, but maladaptive responses following return to the normal environment. In the current set of investigations, we examined the effect of HMD and dome VE displays on eye-head-hand coordination, gaze holding and postural equilibrium. Subjects (61) performed a navigation and a pick and place task. Further, we compared 30 min and 60 min exposures across 3 days (each separated by 1 day). A subset of these results will be presented. In general, we found significant decrements in all three measures following exposure to the VEs. In addition, we found that these disturbances generally recovered within 1-2 hrs and decreased across days. These findings suggest the need for post-VE monitoring of sensorimotor coordination and for developing a set of recommendations for users concerning activities that are safe to engage in following use of a VE.

  18. Embedding quality and safety in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery education.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael E; Stadler, Michael E; Shah, Rahul K

    2015-05-01

    Education in patient safety (PS) and quality improvement (QI) helps both medical students and residents understand the health care environment in the United States, where these concepts are now incorporated into virtually every aspect of patient care. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education has made PS/QI a mandatory component of resident education, and a number of specialties have published their experiences with incorporating PS/QI into their training programs. In otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, a strong curriculum can be built by teaching residents about the principles of PS/QI through both didactic and experiential learning, and morbidity and mortality and QI conferences can serve as the cornerstone of this curriculum. Understanding the potential challenges in PS/QI education can allow training programs to plan their strategy effectively for successful incorporation into their existing curricula.

  19. Proceedings from the 2008 Wisconsin Quality and Safety Forum, part II.

    PubMed

    2009-02-01

    In 2008, quality and safety improvement initiatives in Wisconsin focused on developing an organization-wide culture of quality, and implementing processes to improve patient care and satisfaction. Below are descriptions of improvement projects undertaken by hospitals and other health care organizations, and showcased at the 2008 Wisconsin Quality & Safety Forum. The projects are broken into 6 categories: clinical improvement, customer service, infection control, medications, performance improvement, and safety. The first 3 categories appeared in Issue 8 of Volume 107 of the Wisconsin Medical Journal. (WMJ. 2008;107[8]:382-388). PMID:19326638

  20. Laser programs facility management plan for environment, safety, and health

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Laser Programs ES&H policy is established by the Associate Director for Laser Programs. This FMP is one component of that policy. Laser Programs personnel design, construct and operate research and development equipment located in various Livermore and Site 300 buildings. The Programs include a variety of activities, primarily laser research and development, inertial confinement fusion, isotope separation, and an increasing emphasis on materials processing, imaging systems, and signal analysis. This FMP is a formal statement of responsibilities and controls to assure operational activities are conducted without harm to employees, the general public, or the environment. This plan identifies the hazards associated with operating a large research and development facility and is a vehicle to control and mitigate those hazards. Hazards include, but are not limited to: laser beams, hazardous and radioactive materials, criticality, ionizing radiation or x rays, high-voltage electrical equipment, chemicals, and powered machinery.

  1. Impact of Performance Obstacles on Intensive Care Nurses‘ Workload, Perceived Quality and Safety of Care, and Quality of Working Life

    PubMed Central

    Gurses, Ayse P; Carayon, Pascale; Wall, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To study the impact of performance obstacles on intensive care nurses‘ workload, quality and safety of care, and quality of working life (QWL). Performance obstacles are factors that hinder nurses‘ capacity to perform their job and that are closely associated with their immediate work system. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 265 nurses in 17 intensive care units (ICUs) between February and August 2004 via a structured questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 80 percent. Study Design A cross-sectional study design was used. Data were analyzed by correlation analyses and structural equation modeling. Principal Findings Performance obstacles were found to affect perceived quality and safety of care and QWL of ICU nurses. Workload mediated the impact of performance obstacles with the exception of equipment-related issues on perceived quality and safety of care as well as QWL. Conclusions Performance obstacles in ICUs are a major determinant of nursing workload, perceived quality and safety of care, and QWL. In general, performance obstacles increase nursing workload, which in turn negatively affect perceived quality and safety of care and QWL. Redesigning the ICU work system to reduce performance obstacles may improve nurses‘ work. PMID:19207589

  2. The School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy): An Observational Measure of the School Environment.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Milam, Adam J; Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2015-12-01

    School safety is of great concern for prevention researchers, school officials, parents, and students, yet there are a dearth of assessments that have operationalized school safety from an organizational framework using objective tools and measures. Such a tool would be important for deriving unbiased assessments of the school environment, which in turn could be used as an evaluative tool for school violence prevention efforts. The current paper presents a framework for conceptualizing school safety consistent with Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) model and social disorganization theory, both of which highlight the importance of context as a driver for adolescents' risk for involvement in substance use and violence. This paper describes the development of a novel observational measure, called the School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy), which applies CPTED and social disorganizational frameworks to schools to measure eight indicators of school physical and social environment (i.e., disorder, trash, graffiti/vandalism, appearance, illumination, surveillance, ownership, and positive behavioral expectations). Drawing upon data from 58 high schools, we provide preliminary data regarding the validity and reliability of the SAfETy and describe patterns of the school safety indicators. Findings demonstrate the reliability and validity of the SAfETy and are discussed with regard to the prevention of violence in schools.

  3. The School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy): An Observational Measure of the School Environment.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Milam, Adam J; Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2015-12-01

    School safety is of great concern for prevention researchers, school officials, parents, and students, yet there are a dearth of assessments that have operationalized school safety from an organizational framework using objective tools and measures. Such a tool would be important for deriving unbiased assessments of the school environment, which in turn could be used as an evaluative tool for school violence prevention efforts. The current paper presents a framework for conceptualizing school safety consistent with Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) model and social disorganization theory, both of which highlight the importance of context as a driver for adolescents' risk for involvement in substance use and violence. This paper describes the development of a novel observational measure, called the School Assessment for Environmental Typology (SAfETy), which applies CPTED and social disorganizational frameworks to schools to measure eight indicators of school physical and social environment (i.e., disorder, trash, graffiti/vandalism, appearance, illumination, surveillance, ownership, and positive behavioral expectations). Drawing upon data from 58 high schools, we provide preliminary data regarding the validity and reliability of the SAfETy and describe patterns of the school safety indicators. Findings demonstrate the reliability and validity of the SAfETy and are discussed with regard to the prevention of violence in schools. PMID:26296310

  4. Analysis of Aviation Safety Reporting System Incident Data Associated with the Technical Challenges of the Atmospheric Environment Safety Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withrow, Colleen A.; Reveley, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed aircraft incidents in the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) that apply to two of the three technical challenges (TCs) in NASA's Aviation Safety Program's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technology Project. The aircraft incidents are related to airframe icing and atmospheric hazards TCs. The study reviewed incidents that listed their primary problem as weather or environment-nonweather between 1994 and 2011 for aircraft defined by Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91. The study investigated the phases of flight, a variety of anomalies, flight conditions, and incidents by FAR part, along with other categories. The first part of the analysis focused on airframe-icing-related incidents and found 275 incidents out of 3526 weather-related incidents over the 18-yr period. The second portion of the study focused on atmospheric hazards and found 4647 incidents over the same time period. Atmospheric hazards-related incidents included a range of conditions from clear air turbulence and wake vortex, to controlled flight toward terrain, ground encounters, and incursions.

  5. [Issues of the support of the quality and safety of baby food].

    PubMed

    Kon, I Ya; Konovalova, L S; Georgieva, O V

    2013-01-01

    In article there are presented data on hypersensibility of children to the action of contaminants and caused by it the increased requirements to hygienic safety of products of baby food. Data on the main indices of safety, of such products, regulated by hygiene legislative requirements are provided. The system of hygienic expertise of baby food products, including the offered screening methods of studying of indices of quality and safety is considered. PMID:23805691

  6. Can healthcare boards really make a difference in quality and safety?

    PubMed

    Carlow, Donald R

    2010-01-01

    There is now a heightened interest on the part of many Canadian healthcare boards in improving processes for assuring quality and safety. This interest has been driven by a number of reports and studies which have identified significant quality and safety issues and the need for greater attention to these by those who lead, including governing boards. Despite progress by some boards, there are those who continue to struggle with their role and how it should be fulfilled. This article addresses why, above all else, quality and safety require greater board attention, precisely what boards should do to fulfill their role and how they should organize themselves to achieve it. Special emphasis is placed on how the boards' role in quality and safety, if properly fulfilled, can and will have a beneficial impact on outcomes.

  7. [Endorsement of risk management and patient safety by certification of conformity in health care quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Waßmuth, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Certification of conformity in health care should provide assurance of compliance with quality standards. This also includes risk management and patient safety. Based on a comprehensive definition of quality, beneficial effects on the management of risks and the enhancement of patient safety can be expected from certification of conformity. While these effects have strong face validity, they are currently not sufficiently supported by evidence from health care research. Whether this relates to a lack of evidence or a lack of investigation remains open. Advancing safety culture and "climate", as well as learning from adverse events rely in part on quality management and are at least in part reflected in the certification of healthcare quality. However, again, evidence of the effectiveness of such measures is limited. Moreover, additional factors related to personality, attitude and proactive action of healthcare professionals are crucial factors in advancing risk management and patient safety which are currently not adequately reflected in certification of conformity programs.

  8. The Quality and Safety Educators Academy: fulfilling an unmet need for faculty development.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; Tess, Anjala; Glasheen, Jeffrey J; O'Malley, Cheryl; Baum, Karyn D; Fisher, Erin Stucky; O'Leary, Kevin J; Spencer, Abby; Warm, Eric; Wiese, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Educating physician trainees in the principles of quality improvement (QI) and patient safety (PS) is a national imperative. Few faculty are trained in these disciplines, and few teaching institutions have the resources and infrastructure to develop faculty as instructors of these skills. The authors designed a 3-day, in-person academy to provide medical educators with the knowledge and tools to integrate QI and PS concepts into their training programs. The curriculum provided instruction in quality and safety, curriculum development and assessment, change management, and professional development while fostering peer networking, mentorship, and professional development. This article describes the characteristics, experiences, and needs of a cross-sectional group of faculty interested in acquiring skills to help them succeed as quality and safety educators. It also describes the guiding principles, curriculum blueprint, program evaluation, and lessons learned from this experience which could be applied to future faculty development programs in quality and safety education.

  9. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements. (a) General requirements. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, you may install only certified safety and...

  10. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Integration of environment... Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. As prescribed in 970.2303-3(b), insert the following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work Planning...

  11. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Integration of environment... Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. As prescribed in 970.2303-3(b), insert the following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work Planning...

  12. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Integration of environment... Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. As prescribed in 970.2303-3(b), insert the following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work Planning...

  13. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integration of environment... Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. As prescribed in 970.2303-3(b), insert the following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work Planning...

  14. 30 CFR 250.107 - What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., property, and the environment? 250.107 Section 250.107 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... Performance Standards § 250.107 What must I do to protect health, safety, property, and the environment? (a) You must protect health, safety, property, and the environment by: (1) Performing all operations in...

  15. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integration of environment... Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. As prescribed in 970.2303-3(b), insert the following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work Planning...

  16. Limitations of ambient air quality standards in evaluating indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.E. )

    1992-03-01

    Analysis of the kinds of data used for the derivation of ambient air quality standards (AAQSs) for carbon monoxide and ozone shows that these values are based on the toxicology of the materials and thus are suitable for evaluating potential health effects of indoor environments, especially on the very young, the aged, and the infirm. A similar analysis shows that the AAQSs for suspended particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide are strictly empirical and that they should not be used for any but their first, intended purpose. The AAQSs for non-methane hydrocarbons are based on photochemical smog production, not injury of any kind, and have no utility for indoor environment evaluation.

  17. The Development of Quality Assurance and Visualization for Safety Assessment System

    SciTech Connect

    Lak Kim, C.; Yo Yun, B.; Lee, K.J.; Moon Park, S.; Wan Park, J.; Ho Choi, S.

    2007-07-01

    Site Information and Total Environmental data management System (SITES) is an integrated program for overall data acquisition, environmental monitoring, and safety analysis. SITES is composed of three main modules such as site database system, safety assessment system and environmental monitoring system named SECURE, SAINT and SUDAL, respectively. SAINT abbreviated for Safety Assessment Integration system is the integrated interface for the radioactive waste safety assessment codes in the SITES. SAINT is developed for the application and analysis of data from SECURE and for the systematic management of the resulted data from the safety assessment. The Quality Assurance module in SAINT is implemented to enhance the reliability of safety assessment results. The visualization in SAINT is purposed of reliability, comprehension of safety assessment results and user's convenience which can easily recognize the assessment results using the geographic information. (authors)

  18. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  19. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces.

  20. Nurses' sleep quality, work environment and quality of care in the Spanish National Health System: observational study among different shifts

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-García, Teresa; Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Fuentelsaz-Gallego, Carmen; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Rol, Maria Angeles; Martínez-Madrid, María José; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the characteristics of nurses' work environments in hospitals in the Spanish National Health System (SNHS) with nurse reported quality of care, and how care was provided by using different shifts schemes. The study also examined the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, sleep quality and daytime drowsiness of nurses and shift work. Methods This was a multicentre, observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study, centred on a self-administered questionnaire. The study was conducted in seven SNHS hospitals of different sizes. We recruited 635 registered nurses who worked on day, night and rotational shifts on surgical, medical and critical care units. Their average age was 41.1 years, their average work experience was 16.4 years and 90% worked full time. A descriptive and bivariate analysis was carried out to study the relationship between work environment, quality and safety care, and sleep quality of nurses working different shift patterns. Results 65.4% (410) of nurses worked on a rotating shift. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index classification ranked 20% (95) as favourable, showing differences in nurse manager ability, leadership and support between shifts (p=0.003). 46.6% (286) were sure that patients could manage their self-care after discharge, but there were differences between shifts (p=0.035). 33.1% (201) agreed with information being lost in the shift change, showing differences between shifts (p=0.002). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index reflected an average of 6.8 (SD 3.39), with differences between shifts (p=0.017). Conclusions Nursing requires shift work, and the results showed that the rotating shift was the most common. Rotating shift nurses reported worse perception in organisational and work environmental factors. Rotating and night shift nurses were less confident about patients' competence of self-care after discharge. The

  1. Energy systems programs funded by the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: FY 1993--FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Buttram, A.W.

    1994-12-31

    This document presents an overview of work at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) during FY 1993--FY 1994 that was funded by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ASEH). To illustrate the programmatic breadth of Energy Systems and to establish the context within which this work was accomplished, this document also includes representative descriptions of ASEH-related work at Energy Systems done for other sponsors. Activities for ASEH cover a wide variety of subjects that are geared towards the environmental, safety, and health aspects of DOE operations. Subjects include the following: environmental compliance, environmental guidance, environmental audits, NEPA oversight, epidemiology and health surveillance, transportation and packaging safety, safety and quality assurance; technical standards, performance indicators, occurrence reporting, health physics instrumentation, risk management, security evaluations, and medical programs. The technical support section describes work in progress for ASEH, including specific program accomplishments. The work for others section describes work for non-ASEH sponsors that reinforces and supplements the ASEH work. Appendix A includes a list of FY 1993--FY 1994 publications related to the ASEH work.

  2. The Importance of Safety and Quality in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstin, Helen; Wakefield, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 5 years ago, concerns about patient safety in America were highlighted by the Institute of Medicine?s (IOM) report "To Err is Human." This report demonstrated that between 44,000 and 98,000 people die as a result of medical errors annually. In addition to the human costs, medical errors carry an annual economic cost of $17 billion…

  3. Microbial safety and quality of Irradiated fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lack of a broadly applicable bactericidal process (a “kill step”) is hampering the food safety efforts of the fresh produce industry. Irradiation in the form of electron beams, x-rays or gamma rays was recently approved by FDA for use on iceberg lettuce and spinach. This nonthermal process kills...

  4. Measuring School Climate in High Schools: A Focus on Safety, Engagement, and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Debnam, Katrina J.; Johnson, Sarah Lindstrom

    2014-01-01

    Background: School climate has been linked to multiple student behavioral, academic, health, and social-emotional outcomes. The US Department of Education (USDOE) developed a 3-factor model of school climate comprised of safety, engagement, and environment. This article examines the factor structure and measurement invariance of the USDOE model.…

  5. Perceptions of Psychological and Physical Safety Environments of Information Technology Employees: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Sheila C.

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted to gain a deeper understanding of psychological and safety environments of an oil and gas multinational enterprise. Twenty information technology professionals were interviewed to explore their feelings, perceptions, beliefs, and values of the phenomenon. The interviews elicited data about facets…

  6. Safety net hospital performance on national quality of care process measures.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lindsey; Harbin, Vanessa; Hooker, Jane; Oswald, John; Cummings, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have found poor or mixed performance by safety net hospitals on national measures of quality. The study's purposes were to determine whether safety net hospital performance is similar to the average U.S. hospital, both currently and during earlier reporting periods, and to summarize features commonly used to assess performance, including definition of safety net and patient characteristics. This study reviewed quality performance data for the Joint Commission's accountability measures for hospitals that are members of the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems (NAPH)-safety net hospitals that serve a large proportion of Medicaid and uninsured patients. Analyses of quality performance on the earliest data show that on average there was no statistically significant difference in performance between NAPH members and other hospitals on 6 of 15 measures. According to the most recent data, NAPH hospitals on average had no statistically significant differences as other hospitals on 13 of 18 measures and had statistically significantly better scores on two measures. These results are an important addition to the literature regarding safety net hospitals that serve a high proportion of Medicaid, low income, and uninsured patients, and support the case that quality of care at safety net hospitals is equivalent to that of non-safety net hospitals.

  7. High speed railway environment safety evaluation based on measurement attribute recognition model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qizhou; Gao, Ningbo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    In order to rationally evaluate the high speed railway operation safety level, the environmental safety evaluation index system of high speed railway should be well established by means of analyzing the impact mechanism of severe weather such as raining, thundering, lightning, earthquake, winding, and snowing. In addition to that, the attribute recognition will be identified to determine the similarity between samples and their corresponding attribute classes on the multidimensional space, which is on the basis of the Mahalanobis distance measurement function in terms of Mahalanobis distance with the characteristics of noncorrelation and nondimensionless influence. On top of the assumption, the high speed railway of China environment safety situation will be well elaborated by the suggested methods. The results from the detailed analysis show that the evaluation is basically matched up with the actual situation and could lay a scientific foundation for the high speed railway operation safety. PMID:25435866

  8. High speed railway environment safety evaluation based on measurement attribute recognition model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qizhou; Gao, Ningbo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    In order to rationally evaluate the high speed railway operation safety level, the environmental safety evaluation index system of high speed railway should be well established by means of analyzing the impact mechanism of severe weather such as raining, thundering, lightning, earthquake, winding, and snowing. In addition to that, the attribute recognition will be identified to determine the similarity between samples and their corresponding attribute classes on the multidimensional space, which is on the basis of the Mahalanobis distance measurement function in terms of Mahalanobis distance with the characteristics of noncorrelation and nondimensionless influence. On top of the assumption, the high speed railway of China environment safety situation will be well elaborated by the suggested methods. The results from the detailed analysis show that the evaluation is basically matched up with the actual situation and could lay a scientific foundation for the high speed railway operation safety.

  9. High Speed Railway Environment Safety Evaluation Based on Measurement Attribute Recognition Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qizhou; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    In order to rationally evaluate the high speed railway operation safety level, the environmental safety evaluation index system of high speed railway should be well established by means of analyzing the impact mechanism of severe weather such as raining, thundering, lightning, earthquake, winding, and snowing. In addition to that, the attribute recognition will be identified to determine the similarity between samples and their corresponding attribute classes on the multidimensional space, which is on the basis of the Mahalanobis distance measurement function in terms of Mahalanobis distance with the characteristics of noncorrelation and nondimensionless influence. On top of the assumption, the high speed railway of China environment safety situation will be well elaborated by the suggested methods. The results from the detailed analysis show that the evaluation is basically matched up with the actual situation and could lay a scientific foundation for the high speed railway operation safety. PMID:25435866

  10. [Discussion on agricultural product quality and safety problem from ecological view].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Dong, Nan; Lyu, Xin

    2015-08-01

    There are many different perspectives about the sustainable agriculture, which had been proposed since the last three decades in the world. While China's ecologists and agronomists proposed a similar concept named 'ecological agriculture'. Although ecological agriculture in China has achieved substantial progress, including theory, models and supporting technologies nearly several decades of practice and development, its application guidance still is not yet clear. The organic agriculture model proposed by European Union is popular, but it is limited in the beneficiary groups and the social and ecological responsibility. In this context, the article based on an ecological point of view, analyzed the shortcomings of ecological imbalance caused by a single mode of agricultural production and the negative impact on the quality of agricultural products, and discussed the core values of ecological agriculture. On this basis, we put forward the concept of sustainable security of agricultural products. Based on this concept, an agricultural platform was established under the healthy ecosysphere environment, and from this agricultural platform, agricultural products could be safely and sustainably obtained. Around the central value of the concept, we designed the agricultural sustainable and security production model. Finally, we compared the responsibility, benefiting groups, agronomic practices selection and other aspects of sustainable agriculture with organic agriculture, and proved the advancement of sustainable agricultural model in agricultural production quality and safety. PMID:26685623

  11. [Discussion on agricultural product quality and safety problem from ecological view].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Dong, Nan; Lyu, Xin

    2015-08-01

    There are many different perspectives about the sustainable agriculture, which had been proposed since the last three decades in the world. While China's ecologists and agronomists proposed a similar concept named 'ecological agriculture'. Although ecological agriculture in China has achieved substantial progress, including theory, models and supporting technologies nearly several decades of practice and development, its application guidance still is not yet clear. The organic agriculture model proposed by European Union is popular, but it is limited in the beneficiary groups and the social and ecological responsibility. In this context, the article based on an ecological point of view, analyzed the shortcomings of ecological imbalance caused by a single mode of agricultural production and the negative impact on the quality of agricultural products, and discussed the core values of ecological agriculture. On this basis, we put forward the concept of sustainable security of agricultural products. Based on this concept, an agricultural platform was established under the healthy ecosysphere environment, and from this agricultural platform, agricultural products could be safely and sustainably obtained. Around the central value of the concept, we designed the agricultural sustainable and security production model. Finally, we compared the responsibility, benefiting groups, agronomic practices selection and other aspects of sustainable agriculture with organic agriculture, and proved the advancement of sustainable agricultural model in agricultural production quality and safety.

  12. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  13. Battery-free radio frequency identification (RFID) sensors for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Nagraj, Nandini; Tang, Zhexiong; Mondello, Frank J; Surman, Cheryl; Morris, William

    2012-09-01

    Market demands for new sensors for food quality and safety stimulate the development of new sensing technologies that can provide an unobtrusive sensor form, battery-free operation, and minimal sensor cost. Intelligent labeling of food products to indicate and report their freshness and other conditions is one important possible application of such new sensors. This study applied passive (battery-free) radio frequency identification (RFID) sensors for the highly sensitive and selective detection of food freshness and bacterial growth. In these sensors, the electric field generated in the RFID sensor antenna extends from the plane of the RFID sensor and is affected by the ambient environment, providing the opportunity for sensing. This environment may be in the form of a food sample within the electric field of the sensing region or a sensing film deposited onto the sensor antenna. Examples of applications include monitoring of milk freshness, fish freshness, and bacterial growth in a solution. Unlike other food freshness monitoring approaches that require a thin film battery for operation of an RFID sensor and fabrication of custom-made sensors, the passive RFID sensing approach developed here combines the advantages of both battery-free and cost-effective sensor design and offers response selectivity that is impossible to achieve with other individual sensors.

  14. Battery-free radio frequency identification (RFID) sensors for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Nagraj, Nandini; Tang, Zhexiong; Mondello, Frank J; Surman, Cheryl; Morris, William

    2012-09-01

    Market demands for new sensors for food quality and safety stimulate the development of new sensing technologies that can provide an unobtrusive sensor form, battery-free operation, and minimal sensor cost. Intelligent labeling of food products to indicate and report their freshness and other conditions is one important possible application of such new sensors. This study applied passive (battery-free) radio frequency identification (RFID) sensors for the highly sensitive and selective detection of food freshness and bacterial growth. In these sensors, the electric field generated in the RFID sensor antenna extends from the plane of the RFID sensor and is affected by the ambient environment, providing the opportunity for sensing. This environment may be in the form of a food sample within the electric field of the sensing region or a sensing film deposited onto the sensor antenna. Examples of applications include monitoring of milk freshness, fish freshness, and bacterial growth in a solution. Unlike other food freshness monitoring approaches that require a thin film battery for operation of an RFID sensor and fabrication of custom-made sensors, the passive RFID sensing approach developed here combines the advantages of both battery-free and cost-effective sensor design and offers response selectivity that is impossible to achieve with other individual sensors. PMID:22881825

  15. Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Tejal K; Abookire, Susan A; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality is a 2-year physician-oriented training program with a strong operational orientation, embedding trainees in the quality departments of participating hospitals. It also integrates didactic and experiential learning and offers the option of obtaining a master's degree in public health. The program focuses on methodologically rigorous improvement and measurement, with an emphasis on the development and implementation of innovative practice. The operational orientation is intended to foster the professional development of future quality and safety leaders. The purpose of this article is to describe the design and development of the fellowship.

  16. Temporal Patterns in Seawater Quality from Dredging in Tropical Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ross; Fisher, Rebecca; Stark, Clair; Ridd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance and capital dredging represents a potential risk to tropical environments, especially in turbidity-sensitive environments such as coral reefs. There is little detailed, published observational time-series data that quantifies how dredging affects seawater quality conditions temporally and spatially. This information is needed to test realistic exposure scenarios to better understand the seawater-quality implications of dredging and ultimately to better predict and manage impacts of future projects. Using data from three recent major capital dredging programs in North Western Australia, the extent and duration of natural (baseline) and dredging-related turbidity events are described over periods ranging from hours to weeks. Very close to dredging i.e. <500 m distance, a characteristic features of these particular case studies was high temporal variability. Over several hours suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) can range from 100–500 mg L-1. Less turbid conditions (10–80 mg L-1) can persist over several days but over longer periods (weeks to months) averages were <10 mg L-1. During turbidity events all benthic light was sometimes extinguished, even in the shallow reefal environment, however a much more common feature was very low light ‘caliginous’ or daytime twilight periods. Compared to pre-dredging conditions, dredging increased the intensity, duration and frequency of the turbidity events by 10-, 5- and 3-fold respectively (at sites <500 m from dredging). However, when averaged across the entire dredging period of 80–180 weeks, turbidity values only increased by 2–3 fold above pre-dredging levels. Similarly, the upper percentile values (e.g., P99, P95) of seawater quality parameters can be highly elevated over short periods, but converge to values only marginally above baseline states over longer periods. Dredging in these studies altered the overall probability density distribution, increasing the frequency of extreme values. As such

  17. Effects of characteristics of image quality in an immersive environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duh, Henry Been-Lirn; Lin, James J W.; Kenyon, Robert V.; Parker, Donald E.; Furness, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Image quality issues such as field of view (FOV) and resolution are important for evaluating "presence" and simulator sickness (SS) in virtual environments (VEs). This research examined effects on postural stability of varying FOV, image resolution, and scene content in an immersive visual display. Two different scenes (a photograph of a fountain and a simple radial pattern) at two different resolutions were tested using six FOVs (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 deg.). Both postural stability, recorded by force plates, and subjective difficulty ratings varied as a function of FOV, scene content, and image resolution. Subjects exhibited more balance disturbance and reported more difficulty in maintaining posture in the wide-FOV, high-resolution, and natural scene conditions.

  18. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Management Plan. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report describes efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to effectively plan for environment, safety and health activities that protect the environment, workers and the public from harm. This document, which covers fiscal year 1996, reflects planning by operating contractors and Program Offices in early 1994, updated to be consistent with the President`s FY 1996 budget submittal to Congress, and subsequent Department of Energy Program refinements. Prior to 1992, only a small number of facilities had a structured process for identifying environment, safety and health (ES and H) needs, reporting the costs (in both direct and indirect budgets) of ES and H requirements, prioritizing and allocating available resources, and efficiently communicating this information to DOE. Planned costs for ES and H activities were usually developed as an afterthought to program budgets. There was no visible, consistently applied mechanism for determining the appropriate amount of resources that should be allocated to ES and H, or for assuring that significant ES and H vulnerabilities were planned to be funded. To address this issue, the Secretary (in November 1991) directed DOE to develop a Safety and Health Five-Year Plan to serve as a line management tool to delineate DOE-wide programs to reduce and manage safety and health risks, and to establish a consistent framework for risk-based resource planning and allocation.

  19. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  20. OECD environment, health and safety programme: information on the world wide web.

    PubMed

    de Marcellus, Sally

    2003-08-21

    This article presents the computerised resources of the Environment, Health and Safety (EHS) Programme of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The main focus is the dissemination of tools for chemical safety assessment, which are used by OECD member countries, with the aim of promoting harmonization. The contents include the activities of the programme with special emphasis on dissemination of information via the web site (http://www.oecd.org/ehs) in the form of up-to-date information on activities, publications, directories, databases, contact points and links to other sites of importance. PMID:12909404

  1. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  2. Implementing quality/productivity improvement initiatives in an engineering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruda, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Quality/Productivity Improvement (QPI) initiatives in the engineering environment at McDonnell Douglas-Houston include several different, distinct activities, each having its own application, yet all targeted toward one common goal - making continuous improvement a way of life. The chief executive and the next two levels of management demonstrate their commitment to QPI with hands-on involvement in several activities. Each is a member of a QPI Council which consists of six panels - Participative Management, Communications, Training, Performance/Productivity, Human Resources Management and Strategic Management. In addition, each manager conducts Workplace Visits and Bosstalks, to enhance communications with employees and to provide a forum for the identification of problems - both real and perceived. Quality Circles and Project Teams are well established within McConnel Douglas as useful and desirable employee involvement teams. The continued growth of voluntary membership in the circles program is strong evidence of the employee interest and management support that have developed within the organization.

  3. [Application of Raman Spectroscopy Technique to Agricultural Products Quality and Safety Determination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-de; Jin, Tan-tan

    2015-09-01

    The quality and safety of agricultural products and people health are inseparable. Using the conventional chemical methods which have so many defects, such as sample pretreatment, complicated operation process and destroying the samples. Raman spectroscopy as a powerful tool of analysing and testing molecular structure, can implement samples quickly without damage, qualitative and quantitative detection analysis. With the continuous improvement and the scope of the application of Raman spectroscopy technology gradually widen, Raman spectroscopy technique plays an important role in agricultural products quality and safety determination, and has wide application prospects. There have been a lot of related research reports based on Raman spectroscopy detection on agricultural product quality safety at present. For the understanding of the principle of detection and the current development situation of Raman spectroscopy, as well as tracking the latest research progress both at home and abroad, the basic principles and the development of Raman spectroscopy as well as the detection device were introduced briefly. The latest research progress of quality and safety determination in fruits and vegetables, livestock and grain by Raman spectroscopy technique were reviewed deeply. Its technical problems for agricultural products quality and safety determination were pointed out. In addition, the text also briefly introduces some information of Raman spectrometer and the application for patent of the portable Raman spectrometer, prospects the future research and application.

  4. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN): The Key is Systems Thinking.

    PubMed

    Dolansky, Mary A; Moore, Shirley M

    2013-09-01

    Over a decade has passed since the Institute of Medicine's reports on the need to improve the American healthcare system, and yet only slight improvement in quality and safety has been reported. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative was developed to integrate quality and safety competencies into nursing education. The current challenge is for nurses to move beyond the application of QSEN competencies to individual patients and families and incorporate systems thinking in quality and safety education and healthcare delivery. This article provides a history of QSEN and proposes a framework in which systems thinking is a critical aspect in the application of the QSEN competencies. We provide examples of how using this framework expands nursing focus from individual care to care of the system and propose ways to teach and measure systems thinking. The conclusion calls for movement from personal effort and individual care to a focus on care of the system that will accelerate improvement of healthcare quality and safety.

  5. Overarching goals: a strategy for improving healthcare quality and safety?

    PubMed

    Nanji, Karen C; Ferris, Timothy G; Torchiana, David F; Meyer, Gregg S

    2013-03-01

    The management literature reveals that many successful organisations have strategic plans that include a bold 'stretch-goal' to stimulate progress over a ten-to-thirty-year period. A stretch goal is clear, compelling and easily understood. It serves as a unifying focal point for organisational efforts. The ambitiousness of such goals has been emphasised with the phrase Big Hairy Audacious Goal ('BHAG'). President Kennedy's proclamation in 1961 that 'this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth' provides a famous example. This goal energised the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and it captured the attention of the American public and resulted in one of the largest accomplishments of any organisation. The goal set by Sony, a small, cash-strapped electronics company in the 1950s, to change the poor image of Japanese products around the world represents a classic BHAG. Few examples of quality goals that conform to the BHAG definition exist in the healthcare literature. However, the concept may provide a useful framework for organisations seeking to transform the quality of care they deliver. This review examines the merits and cautions of setting overarching quality goals to catalyse quality improvement efforts, and assists healthcare organisations with determining whether to adopt these goals.

  6. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. 952.223-71 Section 952.223-71 Federal Acquisition... Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...

  7. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. 952.223-71 Section 952.223-71 Federal Acquisition... Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...

  8. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. 952.223-71 Section 952.223-71 Federal Acquisition... Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...

  9. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. 952.223-71 Section 952.223-71 Federal Acquisition... Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...

  10. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution. 952.223-71 Section 952.223-71 Federal Acquisition... Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...

  11. Water quality of hydrologic bench marks; an indicator of water quality in the natural environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biesecker, James E.; Leifeste, Donald K.

    1974-01-01

    Water-quality data, collected at 57 hydrologic bench-mark stations in 37 States, allow the definition of water quality in the 'natural' environment and the comparison of 'natural' water quality with water quality of major streams draining similar water-resources regions. Results indicate that water quality in the 'natural' environment is generally very good. Streams draining hydrologic bench-mark basins generally contain low concentrations of dissolved constituents. Water collected at the hydrologic bench-mark stations was analyzed for the following minor metals: arsenic, barium, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, and zinc. Of 642 analyses, about 65 percent of the observed concentrations were zero. Only three samples contained metals in excess of U.S. Public Health Service recommended drinking-water standards--two selenium concentrations and one cadmium concentration. A total of 213 samples were analyzed for 11 pesticidal compounds. Widespread but very low-level occurrence of pesticide residues in the 'natural' environment was found--about 30 percent of all samples contained low-level concentrations of pesticidal compounds. The DDT family of pesticides occurred most commonly, accounting for 75 percent of the detected occurrences. The highest observed concentration of DDT was 0.06 microgram per litre, well below the recommended maximum permissible in drinking water. Nitrate concentrations in the 'natural' environment generally varied from 0.2 to 0.5 milligram per litre. The average concentration of nitrate in many major streams is as much as 10 times greater. The relationship between dissolved-solids concentration and discharge per unit area in the 'natural' environment for the various physical divisions in the United States has been shown to be an applicable tool for approximating 'natural' water quality. The relationship between dissolved-solids concentration and discharge per unit area is applicable in all the physical

  12. The role of hospital managers in quality and patient safety: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Parand, Anam; Dopson, Sue; Renz, Anna; Vincent, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review the empirical literature to identify the activities, time spent and engagement of hospital managers in quality of care. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods A search was carried out on the databases MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, HMIC. The search strategy covered three facets: management, quality of care and the hospital setting comprising medical subject headings and key terms. Reviewers screened 15 447 titles/abstracts and 423 full texts were checked against inclusion criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed on 19 included articles. Results The majority of studies were set in the USA and investigated Board/senior level management. The most common research designs were interviews and surveys on the perceptions of managerial quality and safety practices. Managerial activities comprised strategy, culture and data-centred activities, such as driving improvement culture and promotion of quality, strategy/goal setting and providing feedback. Significant positive associations with quality included compensation attached to quality, using quality improvement measures and having a Board quality committee. However, there is an inconsistency and inadequate employment of these conditions and actions across the sample hospitals. Conclusions There is some evidence that managers’ time spent and work can influence quality and safety clinical outcomes, processes and performance. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies, further weakened by a lack of objective outcome measures and little examination of actual actions undertaken. We present a model to summarise the conditions and activities that affect quality performance. PMID:25192876

  13. The gluten-free diet: safety and nutritional quality.

    PubMed

    Saturni, Letizia; Ferretti, Gianna; Bacchetti, Tiziana

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, atrophy of intestinal villi and several clinical manifestations has increased in recent years. Subjects affected by CD cannot tolerate gluten protein, a mixture of storage proteins contained in several cereals (wheat, rye, barley and derivatives). Gluten free-diet remains the cornerstone treatment for celiac patients. Therefore the absence of gluten in natural and processed foods represents a key aspect of food safety of the gluten-free diet. A promising area is the use of minor or pseudo-cereals such as amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum and teff. The paper is focused on the new definition of gluten-free products in food label, the nutritional properties of the gluten-free cereals and their use to prevent nutritional deficiencies of celiac subjects.

  14. [Theory of training and quality of safety in health].

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, G; Bettineschi, L; Barberis, L; Signorini, A

    2002-01-01

    This article aims to define the concept of security, particularly in relation to concepts of risk, error, danger and adverse events. The authors go on to analyse the latest theory of adult training, applying it to healthcare safety whilst recognising that this is a complex facility. By using tools such as guidelines and risk management, the authors propose a new kind of corporate culture that enables certain initiatives, such as clinical governance and therefore learning organisation, to develop. This strategic organisation the company allows vital knowledge and experience, which lead to problem-solving and an increased guarantee of security for both internal and external clients, to become the common knowledge and property of the company as a whole and of all who operate in and around it. PMID:12528348

  15. Unlocking Potentials of Microwaves for Food Safety and Quality.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juming

    2015-08-01

    Microwave is an effective means to deliver energy to food through polymeric package materials, offering potential for developing short-time in-package sterilization and pasteurization processes. The complex physics related to microwave propagation and microwave heating require special attention to the design of process systems and development of thermal processes in compliance with regulatory requirements for food safety. This article describes the basic microwave properties relevant to heating uniformity and system design, and provides a historical overview on the development of microwave-assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) and pasteurization systems in research laboratories and used in food plants. It presents recent activities on the development of 915 MHz single-mode MATS technology, the procedures leading to regulatory acceptance, and sensory results of the processed products. The article discusses needs for further efforts to bridge remaining knowledge gaps and facilitate transfer of academic research to industrial implementation.

  16. Unlocking Potentials of Microwaves for Food Safety and Quality.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juming

    2015-08-01

    Microwave is an effective means to deliver energy to food through polymeric package materials, offering potential for developing short-time in-package sterilization and pasteurization processes. The complex physics related to microwave propagation and microwave heating require special attention to the design of process systems and development of thermal processes in compliance with regulatory requirements for food safety. This article describes the basic microwave properties relevant to heating uniformity and system design, and provides a historical overview on the development of microwave-assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) and pasteurization systems in research laboratories and used in food plants. It presents recent activities on the development of 915 MHz single-mode MATS technology, the procedures leading to regulatory acceptance, and sensory results of the processed products. The article discusses needs for further efforts to bridge remaining knowledge gaps and facilitate transfer of academic research to industrial implementation. PMID:26242920

  17. Unlocking Potentials of Microwaves for Food Safety and Quality

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Juming

    2015-01-01

    Microwave is an effective means to deliver energy to food through polymeric package materials, offering potential for developing short-time in-package sterilization and pasteurization processes. The complex physics related to microwave propagation and microwave heating require special attention to the design of process systems and development of thermal processes in compliance with regulatory requirements for food safety. This article describes the basic microwave properties relevant to heating uniformity and system design, and provides a historical overview on the development of microwave-assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) and pasteurization systems in research laboratories and used in food plants. It presents recent activities on the development of 915 MHz single-mode MATS technology, the procedures leading to regulatory acceptance, and sensory results of the processed products. The article discusses needs for further efforts to bridge remaining knowledge gaps and facilitate transfer of academic research to industrial implementation. PMID:26242920

  18. Microbial interactions in cheese: implications for cheese quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Irlinger, Françoise; Mounier, Jérôme

    2009-04-01

    The cheese microbiota, whose community structure evolves through a succession of different microbial groups, plays a central role in cheese-making. The subtleties of cheese character, as well as cheese shelf-life and safety, are largely determined by the composition and evolution of this microbiota. Adjunct and surface-ripening cultures marketed today for smear cheeses are inadequate for adequately mimicking the real diversity encountered in cheese microbiota. The interactions between bacteria and fungi within these communities determine their structure and function. Yeasts play a key role in the establishment of ripening bacteria. The understanding of these interactions offers to enhance cheese flavour formation and to control and/or prevent the growth of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms in cheese.

  19. The Gluten-Free Diet: Safety and Nutritional Quality

    PubMed Central

    Saturni, Letizia; Ferretti, Gianna; Bacchetti, Tiziana

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of Celiac Disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, atrophy of intestinal villi and several clinical manifestations has increased in recent years. Subjects affected by CD cannot tolerate gluten protein, a mixture of storage proteins contained in several cereals (wheat, rye, barley and derivatives). Gluten free-diet remains the cornerstone treatment for celiac patients. Therefore the absence of gluten in natural and processed foods represents a key aspect of food safety of the gluten-free diet. A promising area is the use of minor or pseudo-cereals such as amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum and teff. The paper is focused on the new definition of gluten-free products in food label, the nutritional properties of the gluten-free cereals and their use to prevent nutritional deficiencies of celiac subjects. PMID:22253989

  20. [Toxicity tests and their application in safety assessment of water quality].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Ying; Zhao, Chun-Tao; Wei, Dong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    The safety of water quality has important impacts not only on the health of ecological system, but also on the survival and development of human beings. The conventional assessment methods for water quality based on the concentration limits are not reliable. The toxicity tests can vividly reflect the whole adverse biological effects of multiple chemicals in water body, which has been regarded as a necessary supplement for conventional water quality assessment methods based on physicochemical parameters. Considering the chemical pollutants usually have various adverse biological effects, the ecotoxicity testing methods, including lethality, genotoxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, were classified according to the different toxicity types. Then, the potential applications of toxicity testing methods and corresponding evaluation indices in evaluating the toxicity characteristics of ambient water samples were discussed. Particularly, the safety assessment methods for water quality based on the toxicity tests, including potential toxicology, toxicity unit classification system, potential ecotoxic effect probe, and safety assessment of water quality based on toxicity test battery, were summarized. This paper not only systematically reviewed the progress of toxicity tests and their application in safety assessment of water quality, but also provided the scientific basis for the further development in the future.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Moraski, R.V.; Selby, J.M.

    1991-05-01

    Part 5 of the 1990 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance, the Office of Environmental Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1990. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  2. What is the value and impact of quality and safety teams? A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to conduct a scoping review of the literature about the establishment and impact of quality and safety team initiatives in acute care. Methods Studies were identified through electronic searches of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ABI Inform, Cochrane databases. Grey literature and bibliographies were also searched. Qualitative or quantitative studies that occurred in acute care, describing how quality and safety teams were established or implemented, the impact of teams, or the barriers and/or facilitators of teams were included. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study design, sample, interventions, and outcomes. Quality assessment of full text articles was done independently by two reviewers. Studies were categorized according to dimensions of quality. Results Of 6,674 articles identified, 99 were included in the study. The heterogeneity of studies and results reported precluded quantitative data analyses. Findings revealed limited information about attributes of successful and unsuccessful team initiatives, barriers and facilitators to team initiatives, unique or combined contribution of selected interventions, or how to effectively establish these teams. Conclusions Not unlike systematic reviews of quality improvement collaboratives, this broad review revealed that while teams reported a number of positive results, there are many methodological issues. This study is unique in utilizing traditional quality assessment and more novel methods of quality assessment and reporting of results (SQUIRE) to appraise studies. Rigorous design, evaluation, and reporting of quality and safety team initiatives are required. PMID:21861911

  3. [Quality & Safety in radiotherapy: advocacy for a professional strategy].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, G

    2008-11-01

    In medicine, as in oncological radiotherapy, as elsewhere, the precept of quality has no meaning if it is not defined. In France as everywhere radiotherapy has its forces and its weaknesses. As in every country, its future seems assured by its character cost effective as by its capacity to make progress in the triple point of view of its equipment, its professions and its organization. However, the French radiotherapy is in crisis. The professionals saw clearly. For more than 10 years they had recalled the medical authorities to their responsibilities concerning the demographic trends for the radiotherapists and the physicists, the renovation of the equipment, the modernization of the organizations, the promotion of the evaluation of procedures and outcomes and the development of a greater fairness in the financings. But the delay taken, the setting under pressure of the professionals by the State, its services, its agencies and the media following the recent accidents cause numerous perverse effects and worried the staff. The accident of Epinal was the starting fact of an effort of professionalisation of the risk management, but also of a disturbed period favourable with a certain confusion of minds, discouragement and protective behaviors. The risks felt by the professionals then seem especially to come from the authorities and the media. It appears that the topic of quality is at the center of all these speeches. Under this vocable, it is in fact the respect of the procedures related to the requirement of security which is privileged by the State and its representatives. The apparent security seems to override the real quality of the practices. Thus, time came for a clarification of the quality and security concepts, of organizations which contribute to it and for the development of a clear strategy bringing together the interprofessionnal actors. In this context, the implication of the College and especially of the Société française de radioth

  4. [Quality & Safety in radiotherapy: advocacy for a professional strategy].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, G

    2008-11-01

    In medicine, as in oncological radiotherapy, as elsewhere, the precept of quality has no meaning if it is not defined. In France as everywhere radiotherapy has its forces and its weaknesses. As in every country, its future seems assured by its character cost effective as by its capacity to make progress in the triple point of view of its equipment, its professions and its organization. However, the French radiotherapy is in crisis. The professionals saw clearly. For more than 10 years they had recalled the medical authorities to their responsibilities concerning the demographic trends for the radiotherapists and the physicists, the renovation of the equipment, the modernization of the organizations, the promotion of the evaluation of procedures and outcomes and the development of a greater fairness in the financings. But the delay taken, the setting under pressure of the professionals by the State, its services, its agencies and the media following the recent accidents cause numerous perverse effects and worried the staff. The accident of Epinal was the starting fact of an effort of professionalisation of the risk management, but also of a disturbed period favourable with a certain confusion of minds, discouragement and protective behaviors. The risks felt by the professionals then seem especially to come from the authorities and the media. It appears that the topic of quality is at the center of all these speeches. Under this vocable, it is in fact the respect of the procedures related to the requirement of security which is privileged by the State and its representatives. The apparent security seems to override the real quality of the practices. Thus, time came for a clarification of the quality and security concepts, of organizations which contribute to it and for the development of a clear strategy bringing together the interprofessionnal actors. In this context, the implication of the College and especially of the Société française de radioth

  5. Quality and safety education for nurses: a nursing leadership skills exercise.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth Marion

    2014-06-01

    The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative was established to answer the Institute of Medicine's trio of reports that stress the need to enhance the quality and safety of health care in the United States. The initiative has resulted in six competencies, along with innovative curricular guides to better prepare nurses to improve the health care systems within which they work. Participating in a root cause analysis (RCA) is one of several teaching strategies common to the development of QSEN competencies. This article describes the development, evaluation, and revision of a nursing leadership skills exercise that enabled students to participate in an RCA. In addition to making learning relevant, this exercise focused student attention on the nation's concern about the quality and safety of health care in the United States.

  6. Bridging the Gap: A Framework and Strategies for Integrating the Quality and Safety Mission of Teaching Hospitals and Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Yang, Julius; Myers, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Integrating the quality and safety mission of teaching hospitals and graduate medical education (GME) is a necessary step to provide the next generation of physicians with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to participate in health system improvement. Although many teaching hospital and health system leaders have made substantial efforts to improve the quality of patient care, few have fully included residents and fellows, who deliver a large portion of that care, in their efforts. Despite expectations related to the engagement of these trainees in health care quality improvement and patient safety outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Clinical Learning Environment Review program, a structure for approaching this integration has not been described.In this article, the authors present a framework that they hope will assist teaching hospitals in integrating residents and fellows into their quality and safety efforts and in fostering a positive clinical learning environment for education and patient care. The authors define the six essential elements of this framework-organizational culture, teaching hospital-GME alignment, infrastructure, curricular resources, faculty development, and interprofessional collaboration. They then describe the organizational characteristics required for each element and offer concrete strategies to achieve integration. This framework is meant to be a starting point for the development of robust national models of infrastructure, alignment, and collaboration between GME and health care quality and safety leaders at teaching hospitals. PMID:26039138

  7. Bridging the Gap: A Framework and Strategies for Integrating the Quality and Safety Mission of Teaching Hospitals and Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Yang, Julius; Myers, Jennifer S

    2015-09-01

    Integrating the quality and safety mission of teaching hospitals and graduate medical education (GME) is a necessary step to provide the next generation of physicians with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to participate in health system improvement. Although many teaching hospital and health system leaders have made substantial efforts to improve the quality of patient care, few have fully included residents and fellows, who deliver a large portion of that care, in their efforts. Despite expectations related to the engagement of these trainees in health care quality improvement and patient safety outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Clinical Learning Environment Review program, a structure for approaching this integration has not been described.In this article, the authors present a framework that they hope will assist teaching hospitals in integrating residents and fellows into their quality and safety efforts and in fostering a positive clinical learning environment for education and patient care. The authors define the six essential elements of this framework-organizational culture, teaching hospital-GME alignment, infrastructure, curricular resources, faculty development, and interprofessional collaboration. They then describe the organizational characteristics required for each element and offer concrete strategies to achieve integration. This framework is meant to be a starting point for the development of robust national models of infrastructure, alignment, and collaboration between GME and health care quality and safety leaders at teaching hospitals.

  8. US Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The assessment, which was conducted from July 20 through August 4, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and progress of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices; the DOE Nevada Field Office (NV); and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. This report presents a summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management.

  9. Aviation Trends Related to Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Barr, Lawrence C.; Evans, Joni K.; Leone, Karen M.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future aviation safety trends related to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project's three technical challenges (engine icing characterization and simulation capability; airframe icing simulation and engineering tool capability; and atmospheric hazard sensing and mitigation technology capability) were assessed by examining the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident database (1989 to 2008), incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accident/incident database (1989 to 2006), and literature from various industry and government sources. The accident and incident data were examined for events involving fixed-wing airplanes operating under Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91 for atmospheric conditions related to airframe icing, ice-crystal engine icing, turbulence, clear air turbulence, wake vortex, lightning, and low visibility (fog, low ceiling, clouds, precipitation, and low lighting). Five future aviation safety risk areas associated with the three AEST technical challenges were identified after an exhaustive survey of a variety of sources and include: approach and landing accident reduction, icing/ice detection, loss of control in flight, super density operations, and runway safety.

  10. Managing Quality and Safety in Real Time? Evidence from an Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Randell, Rebecca; Keen, Justin; Gates, Cara; Ferguson, Emma; Long, Andrew; Ginn, Claire; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Whittle, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Health systems around the world are investing increasing effort in monitoring care quality and safety. Dashboards can support this process, providing summary data on processes and outcomes of care, making use of data visualization techniques such as graphs. As part of a study exploring development and use of dashboards in English hospitals, we interviewed senior managers across 15 healthcare providers. Findings revealed substantial variation in sophistication of the dashboards in place, largely presenting retrospective data items determined by national bodies and dependent on manual collation from a number of systems. Where real time systems were in place, they supported staff in proactively managing quality and safety. PMID:27577334

  11. Guide for reviewing safety analysis reports for packaging: Review of quality assurance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, D.W.

    1988-10-01

    This review section describes quality assurance requirements applying to design, purchase, fabrication, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, assembly, inspection, testing, operation, maintenance, repair, and modification of components of packaging which are important to safety. The design effort, operation's plans, and quality assurance requirements should be integrated to achieve a system in which the independent QA program is not overly stringent and the application of QA requirements is commensurate with safety significance. The reviewer must verify that the applicant's QA section in the SARP contains package-specific QA information required by DOE Orders and federal regulations that demonstrate compliance. 8 refs.

  12. Incorporating quality and safety education for nurses competencies in simulation scenario design.

    PubMed

    Jarzemsky, Paula; McCarthy, Jane; Ellis, Nadege

    2010-01-01

    When planning a simulation scenario, even if adopting prepackaged simulation scenarios, faculty should first conduct a task analysis to guide development of learning objectives and cue critical events. The authors describe a strategy for systematic planning of simulation-based training that incorporates knowledge, skills, and attitudes as defined by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative. The strategy cues faculty to incorporate activities that target QSEN competencies (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, informatics, and safety) before, during, and after simulation scenarios.

  13. Automating patient safety incident reporting to improve healthcare quality in the defence medical services.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Di; Piper, N

    2015-12-01

    There are many reasons for poor compliance with patient safety incident reporting in the UK. The Defence Medical Services has made a significant investment to address the culture and process by which risk to patient safety is managed within its organisation. This paper describes the decision process and technical considerations in the design of an automated reporting system together with the implementation procedure aimed to maximise compliance. The elimination of inherent weaknesses in feedback mechanisms from the three Armed Forces, which had been uniquely different, ensured the quality of data improved, which enabled resources to be prioritised that would also have a direct impact upon the quality of patient care.

  14. Recent Developments in Hyperspectral Imaging for Assessment of Food Quality and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Liu, Li; Ngadi, Michael O.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging which combines imaging and spectroscopic technology is rapidly gaining ground as a non-destructive, real-time detection tool for food quality and safety assessment. Hyperspectral imaging could be used to simultaneously obtain large amounts of spatial and spectral information on the objects being studied. This paper provides a comprehensive review on the recent development of hyperspectral imaging applications in food and food products. The potential and future work of hyperspectral imaging for food quality and safety control is also discussed. PMID:24759119

  15. Parameters affecting greywater quality and its safety for reuse.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Adi; Friedler, Eran; Gross, Amit

    2014-07-15

    Reusing greywater (GW) for on-site irrigation is becoming a common practice worldwide. Alongside its benefits, GW reuse might pose health and environmental risks. The current study assesses the risks associated with on-site GW reuse and the main factors affecting them. GW from 34 households in Israel was analyzed for physicochemical parameters, Escherichia coli (as an indicator for rotavirus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Each participating household filled out a questionnaire about their GW sources, treatment and usages. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was performed based on the measured microbial quality, and on exposure scenarios derived from the questionnaires and literature data. The type of treatment was found to have a significant effect on the quality of the treated GW. The average E. coli counts in GW (which exclude kitchen effluent) treated by professionally-designed system resulted in acceptable risk under all exposure scenarios while the risk from inadequately-treated GW was above the accepted level as set by the WHO. In conclusion, safe GW reuse requires a suitable and well-designed treatment system. A risk-assessment approach should be used to adjust the current regulations/guidelines and to assess the performance of GW treatment and reuse systems.

  16. Integrating quality and safety education into clinical nursing education through a dedicated education unit.

    PubMed

    Masters, Kelli

    2016-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing are calling for curriculum redesign that prepares nursing students with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide safe, high quality care. The purpose of this project was to improve nursing students' knowledge of quality and safety by integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into clinical nursing education through development of a dedicated education unit. This model, which pairs nursing students with front-line nursing staff for clinical experiences, was implemented on a medical floor in an acute care hospital. Prior to implementation, nurses and students were educated about the dedicated education unit and quality and safety competencies. During each clinical rotation, students collaborated with their nurses on projects related to these competencies. Students' knowledge was assessed using questions related to quality and safety. Students who participated in the dedicated education unit had higher scores than those with traditional clinical rotations. Focus groups were held mid-semester to assess nurses' perceptions of the experience. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data including thirsting for knowledge, building teamwork and collaboration, establishing trust and decreasing anxiety, mirroring organization and time management skills, and evolving confidence in the nursing role. PMID:26777871

  17. Integrating quality and safety education into clinical nursing education through a dedicated education unit.

    PubMed

    Masters, Kelli

    2016-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing are calling for curriculum redesign that prepares nursing students with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide safe, high quality care. The purpose of this project was to improve nursing students' knowledge of quality and safety by integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into clinical nursing education through development of a dedicated education unit. This model, which pairs nursing students with front-line nursing staff for clinical experiences, was implemented on a medical floor in an acute care hospital. Prior to implementation, nurses and students were educated about the dedicated education unit and quality and safety competencies. During each clinical rotation, students collaborated with their nurses on projects related to these competencies. Students' knowledge was assessed using questions related to quality and safety. Students who participated in the dedicated education unit had higher scores than those with traditional clinical rotations. Focus groups were held mid-semester to assess nurses' perceptions of the experience. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data including thirsting for knowledge, building teamwork and collaboration, establishing trust and decreasing anxiety, mirroring organization and time management skills, and evolving confidence in the nursing role.

  18. Air-Quality and Climate Interaction within Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszar, Peter; Halenka, Tomas; Belda, Michal

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies show considerable effect of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols on climate on regional and local scale, especially within the industrial and urbanized areas. Moreover, there is strong potential of urban environment to affect these processes, especially due to urban heat island. For the purpose of qualifying and quantifying these effects the surface parameterisation in regional climate model RegCM has been extended with Single Layer Urban Canopy Model (SLUCM), which can be used both in dynamic scale within BATS scheme and more detailed SUBBATS scale. Experimental tests of the urban parameterization has been performed on Central Europe region in 10 km resolution with 2 km resolution of SUBBATS scheme. Results show clearly urban heat island (UHI) patterns for most the big cities or urbanized areas in the region and sensitivity tests with eliminating urban and suburban land use types provide the estimate of urban parameterization influence. Parameters of the scheme are tuned for Central Europe cities with special emphasis to Prague within the UHI Project. Detailed analysis at 2 km scale shows the local features of the UHI in Prague region. These improved simulations with urban parameterization included are used for offline coupling with CAMx to assess the effects on air quality in the region.

  19. What can the UK learn from the USA about improving the quality and safety of healthcare?

    PubMed

    Tomson, Charles R V; Berwick, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The US healthcare system provides evidence that spending more on healthcare does not result in better care, but also offers many lessons and surprises on how the quality and safety of healthcare can be improved. The US Institute of Medicine has clearly articulated what needs to be achieved. A series of US agencies, including the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), other major players, and the Hospital Quality Alliance, routinely collect and report on numerous measures of the quality and safety of inpatient and outpatient healthcare. Most attention to improving care in the UK has focused on vertically integrated, closed healthcare systems, but the US experience provides additional models from the work of Quality Improvement Organizations and of numerous voluntary organisations that sponsor collaborative improvement.

  20. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on safety and quality indicators in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David; Barkun, Alan; Bridges, Ron; Carter, Rose; de Gara, Chris; Dubé, Catherine; Enns, Robert; Hollingworth, Roger; MacIntosh, Donald; Borgaonkar, Mark; Forget, Sylviane; Leontiadis, Grigorios; Meddings, Jonathan; Cotton, Peter; Kuipers, Ernst J; Valori, Roland

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing use of gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly for colorectal cancer screening, and increasing emphasis on health care quality, highlight the need for clearly defined, evidence-based processes to support quality improvement in endoscopy. OBJECTIVE: To identify processes and indicators of quality and safety relevant to high-quality endoscopy service delivery. METHODS: A multidisciplinary group of 35 voting participants developed recommendation statements and performance indicators. Systematic literature searches generated 50 initial statements that were revised iteratively following a modified Delphi approach using a web-based evaluation and voting tool. Statement development and evidence evaluation followed the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines, REsearch and Evaluation) and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) guidelines. At the consensus conference, participants voted anonymously on all statements using a 6-point scale. Subsequent web-based voting evaluated recommendations for specific, individual quality indicators, safety indicators and mandatory endoscopy reporting fields. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by 80% of participants. RESULTS: Consensus was reached on 23 recommendation statements addressing the following: ethics (statement 1: agreement 100%), facility standards and policies (statements 2 to 9: 90% to 100%), quality assurance (statements 10 to 13: 94% to 100%), training, education, competency and privileges (statements 14 to 19: 97% to 100%), endoscopy reporting standards (statements 20 and 21: 97% to 100%) and patient perceptions (statements 22 and 23: 100%). Additionally, 18 quality indicators (agreement 83% to 100%), 20 safety indicators (agreement 77% to 100%) and 23 recommended endoscopy-reporting elements (agreement 91% to 100%) were identified. DISCUSSION: The consensus process identified a clear need for high-quality clinical and outcomes research to support quality

  1. Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Report, Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Chernowski, John

    2009-02-27

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program ensures that Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is implemented institutionally and by all divisions. The Self-Assessment Program, managed by the Office of Contract Assurance (OCA), provides for an internal evaluation of all ES&H programs and systems at LBNL. The functions of the program are to ensure that work is conducted safely, and with minimal negative impact to workers, the public, and the environment. The Self-Assessment Program is also the mechanism used to institute continuous improvements to the Laboratory's ES&H programs. The program is described in LBNL/PUB 5344, Environment, Safety, and Health Self-Assessment Program and is composed of four distinct assessments: the Division Self-Assessment, the Management of Environment, Safety, and Health (MESH) review, ES&H Technical Assurance, and the Appendix B Self-Assessment. The Division Self-Assessment uses the five core functions and seven guiding principles of ISM as the basis of evaluation. Metrics are created to measure performance in fulfilling ISM core functions and guiding principles, as well as promoting compliance with applicable regulations. The five core functions of ISM are as follows: (1) Define the Scope of Work; (2) Identify and Analyze Hazards; (3) Control the Hazards; (4) Perform the Work; and (5) Feedback and Improvement. The seven guiding principles of ISM are as follows: (1) Line Management Responsibility for ES&H; (2) Clear Roles and Responsibilities; (3) Competence Commensurate with Responsibilities; (4) Balanced Priorities; (5) Identification of ES&H Standards and Requirements; (6) Hazard Controls Tailored to the Work Performed; and (7) Operations Authorization. Performance indicators are developed by consensus with OCA, representatives from each division, and Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Division program managers. Line management of each division performs the Division Self

  2. Construction of Traceability System for Quality Safety of Cereal and Oil Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huoguo; Liu, Shihong; Meng, Hong; Hu, Haiyan

    After several significant food safety incident, global food industry and governments in many countries are putting increasing emphasis on establishment of food traceability systems. Food traceability has become an effective way in food quality and safety management. The traceability system for quality safety of cereal and oil products was designed and implemented with HACCP and FMECA method, encoding, information processing, and hardware R&D technology etc, according to the whole supply chain of cereal and oil products. Results indicated that the system provide not only the management in origin, processing, circulating and consuming for enterprise, but also tracing service for customers and supervisor by means of telephone, internet, SMS, touch machine and mobile terminal.

  3. ONLINE MULTITASKING LINE-SCAN IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR SIMULTANEOUS SAFETY AND QUALITY EVALUATION OF APPLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lab developed a push-broom, line-scan imaging system capable of simultaneous measurements of reflectance and fluorescence. The system allows multitasking inspections for quality and safety attributes of apples due to its dynamic capabilities in simultaneously capturing fluorescence and reflectan...

  4. Surface and subsurface inspection of food safety and quality using a line-scan Raman system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a line-scan Raman platform for food safety and quality research, which can be configured for Raman chemical imaging (RCI) mode for surface inspection and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) mode for subsurface inspection. In the RCI mode, macro-scale imaging was achieved u...

  5. 32 CFR 861.4 - DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 861.4 DOD air transportation quality and safety requirements. (a) General. The DOD, as a customer of.... For example, when specific medical treatment is obtained on an individual basis by or for DOD... considered in the evaluation process. The specifics of the applicable DOD contract or agreement (if any),...

  6. Feminist Heuristics: Transforming the Foundation of Food Quality and Safety Assurance Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Aya Hirata

    2012-01-01

    Food safety and quality assurance systems have emerged as a key mechanism of food governance in recent years and are also popular among alternative agrofood movements, such as the organic and fair trade movements. Rural sociologists have identified many problems with existing systems, including corporate cooptation, the marginalization of small…

  7. (Mis)Perceptions of Continuing Education: Insights from Knowledge Translation, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon C.; Bell, Mary; Goldman, Joanne; Peller, Jennifer; Silver, Ivan; Sargeant, Joan; Reeves, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Minimal attention has been given to the intersection and potential collaboration among the domains of continuing education (CE), knowledge translation (KT), quality improvement (QI), and patient safety (PS), despite their overlapping objectives. A study was undertaken to examine leaders' perspectives of these 4 domains and their…

  8. Using Principles of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses in School Nurse Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Ruth K.; Sprague-McRae, Julie

    2014-01-01

    School nurses require ongoing continuing education in a number of areas. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) framework can be utilized in considering school nurses' roles and developing continuing education. Focusing on neurology continuing education, the QSEN framework is illustrated with the example of concussion management…

  9. Extended Editorial: Research and Education in Reliability, Maintenance, Quality Control, Risk and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramalhoto, M. F.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a special theme journal issue on research and education in quality control, maintenance, reliability, risk analysis, and safety. Discusses each of these theme concepts and their applications to naval architecture, marine engineering, and industrial engineering. Considers the effects of the rapid transfer of research results through…

  10. Applications of hyperspectral imaging in chicken meat safety and quality detection and evaluation: a review.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhenjie; Xie, Anguo; Sun, Da-Wen; Zeng, Xin-An; Liu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the issue of food safety and quality is a great public concern. In order to satisfy the demands of consumers and obtain superior food qualities, non-destructive and fast methods are required for quality evaluation. As one of these methods, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technique has emerged as a smart and promising analytical tool for quality evaluation purposes and has attracted much interest in non-destructive analysis of different food products. With the main advantage of combining both spectroscopy technique and imaging technique, HSI technique shows a convinced attitude to detect and evaluate chicken meat quality objectively. Moreover, developing a quality evaluation system based on HSI technology would bring economic benefits to the chicken meat industry. Therefore, in recent years, many studies have been conducted on using HSI technology for the safety and quality detection and evaluation of chicken meat. The aim of this review is thus to give a detailed overview about HSI and focus on the recently developed methods exerted in HSI technology developed for microbiological spoilage detection and quality classification of chicken meat. Moreover, the usefulness of HSI technique for detecting fecal contamination and bone fragments of chicken carcasses are presented. Finally, some viewpoints on its future research and applicability in the modern poultry industry are proposed.

  11. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  12. Meeting patients' needs: quality care in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Rogut, L; Hudson, A

    1995-11-01

    Recent surveys of patients in New York and Cleveland, among other cities, indicate that there is substantial room for improvement in meeting patients' needs and preferences, particularly in the areas of emotional support, coordination of care, discharge preparation, and the involvement of family and friends. Hospitals are using a variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency in this challenging environment. One prominent approach, reengineering, offers a means by which hospitals can integrate highly specialized departmental structures and functions by focusing on interdisciplinary teamwork and organizing the delivery of care around patients. Key elements of successful hospital reengineering efforts have included: - the involvement and commitment of senior management and other key stakeholders, particularly physicians, nurses, and union representatives; - investment in staff training and retraining, and the redesign of staff evaluation and compensation systems; - timely, unit-specific measures of patient satisfaction and the clinical quality of care; - consistent and frequent internal communication between staff and leadership; and - treatment that emphasizes communication among caregivers, patients, and their family members. Several basic issues need to be addressed if hospitals are to offer technically sophisticated medical care that is also responsive to their patients' personal needs, including: - variations among patients regarding the amount of information they want and need, and the amount of involvement they want in their care; - the means by which patients will get information about their medical care, and who will provide any additional support that may be needed by non-English-speaking or socioeconomically disadvantaged patients; and - the specific changes in medical practice and hospital processes that will promote the involvement of patients in their care. PMID:10164376

  13. DairyBeef: maximizing quality and profits--a consistent food safety message.

    PubMed

    Moore, D A; Kirk, J H; Klingborg, D J; Garry, F; Wailes, W; Dalton, J; Busboom, J; Sams, R W; Poe, M; Payne, M; Marchello, J; Looper, M; Falk, D; Wright, T

    2004-01-01

    To respond to meat safety and quality issues in dairy market cattle, a collaborative project team for 7 western states was established to develop educational resources providing a consistent meat safety and quality message to dairy producers, farm advisors, and veterinarians. The team produced an educational website and CD-ROM course that included videos, narrated slide sets, and on-farm tools. The objectives of this course were: 1) to help producers and their advisors understand market cattle food safety and quality issues, 2) help maintain markets for these cows, and 3) help producers identify ways to improve the quality of dairy cattle going to slaughter. DairyBeef. Maximizing Quality & Profits consists of 6 sections, including 4 core segments. Successful completion of quizzes following each core segment is required for participants to receive a certificate of completion. A formative evaluation of the program revealed the necessity for minor content and technological changes with the web-based course. All evaluators considered the materials relevant to dairy producers. After editing, course availability was enabled in February, 2003. Between February and May, 2003, 21 individuals received certificates of completion.

  14. Quality and safety attributes of afghan raisins before and after processing

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Stacy; Chang, Jun Won; McNamara, Kevin T; Oliver, Haley F; Deering, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Raisins are an important export commodity for Afghanistan; however, Afghan packers are unable to export to markets seeking high-quality products due to limited knowledge regarding their quality and safety. To evaluate this, Afghan raisin samples from pre-, semi-, and postprocessed raisins were obtained from a raisin packer in Kabul, Afghanistan. The raisins were analyzed and compared to U.S. standards for processed raisins. The samples tested did not meet U.S. industry standards for embedded sand and pieces of stem, total soluble solids, and titratable acidity. The Afghan raisins did meet or exceed U.S. Grade A standard for the number of cap-stems, percent damaged, crystallization levels, moisture content, and color. Following processing, the number of total aerobic bacteria, yeasts, molds, and total coliforms were within the acceptable limits. Although quality issues are present in the Afghan raisins, the process used to clean the raisins is suitable to maintain food safety standards. PMID:25650241

  15. A national Delphi to determine developmental progression of quality and safety competencies in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Barton, Amy J; Armstrong, Gail; Preheim, Gayle; Gelmon, Sherril B; Andrus, Lynne C

    2009-01-01

    Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) faculty outlined 6 competency domains: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. In this study, 18 subject matter experts participated in a web-based modified Delphi survey between October 2008 and February 2009 to determine whether there was consensus on the developmental progression of knowledge, skill, and attitude elements within the QSEN competencies. Support for creation of curricular threads to facilitate student progressive achievement of the QSEN competencies was validated. Competency development related to the individual patient was emphasized early in the curriculum, whereas teams and systems were emphasized later. Complex concepts such as teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and informatics were emphasized in advanced courses. Experts outlined a developmental approach in curriculum design, which would potentially encourage practice, reinforcement of learning, and recognition of context of care.

  16. Impact of Electronic Health Record Systems on Information Integrity: Quality and Safety Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Sue

    2013-01-01

    While the adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems promises a number of substantial benefits, including better care and decreased healthcare costs, serious unintended consequences from the implementation of these systems have emerged. Poor EHR system design and improper use can cause EHR-related errors that jeopardize the integrity of the information in the EHR, leading to errors that endanger patient safety or decrease the quality of care. These unintended consequences also may increase fraud and abuse and can have serious legal implications. This literature review examines the impact of unintended consequences of the use of EHR systems on the quality of care and proposed solutions to address EHR-related errors. This analysis of the literature on EHR risks is intended to serve as an impetus for further research on the prevalence of these risks, their impact on quality and safety of patient care, and strategies for reducing them. PMID:24159271

  17. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  18. Current Assessments of Quality and Safety Competencies in Registered Professional Nurses: An Examination of Nurse Leader Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elaine Lois

    2012-01-01

    Quality and safety in healthcare is a national concern. It has been proposed that nurses and other clinicians need to develop a new set of competencies in order to make significant improvements in the quality and safety of patient care. These new competencies include: patient-centered care; teamwork and collaboration; evidence-based practice;…

  19. Diabetes and Hypertension Quality Measurement in Four Safety-Net Sites

    PubMed Central

    Benkert, R.; Dennehy, P.; White, J.; Hamilton, A.; Tanner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In this new era after the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, the literature on lessons learned with electronic health record (EHR) implementation needs to be revisited. Objectives Our objective was to describe what implementation of a commercially available EHR with built-in quality query algorithms showed us about our care for diabetes and hypertension populations in four safety net clinics, specifically feasibility of data retrieval, measurements over time, quality of data, and how our teams used this data. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2008 to October 2012 in four safety-net clinics located in the Midwest and Western United States. A data warehouse that stores data from across the U.S was utilized for data extraction from patients with diabetes or hypertension diagnoses and at least two office visits per year. Standard quality measures were collected over a period of two to four years. All sites were engaged in a partnership model with the IT staff and a shared learning process to enhance the use of the quality metrics. Results While use of the algorithms was feasible across sites, challenges occurred when attempting to use the query results for research purposes. There was wide variation of both process and outcome results by individual centers. Composite calculations balanced out the differences seen in the individual measures. Despite using consistent quality definitions, the differences across centers had an impact on numerators and denominators. All sites agreed to a partnership model of EHR implementation, and each center utilized the available resources of the partnership for Center-specific quality initiatives. Conclusions Utilizing a shared EHR, a Regional Extension Center-like partnership model, and similar quality query algorithms allowed safety-net clinics to benchmark and improve the quality of care across differing patient populations and health care

  20. Electronic Informational and Educational Environment as a Factor of Competence-Oriented Higher Pedagogical Education in the Sphere of Health, Safety and Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamerilova, Galina S.; Kartavykh, Marina A.; Ageeva, Elena L.; Veryaskina, Marina A.; Ruban, Elena M.

    2016-01-01

    The authors consider the question of computerisation in health, safety and environment teachers' training in the context of the general approaches and requirements of the Federal National Standard of Higher Education, which is realised through designing of electronic informational and educational environment. The researchers argue indispensability…

  1. Work Placements as Learning Environments for Patient Safety: Finnish and British Preregistration Nursing Students' Important Learning Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Susanna; Smith, Nancy-Jane; Partanen, Pirjo; Turunen, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Learning to ensure patient safety in complex health care environments is an internationally recognised concern. This article explores and compares Finnish (n = 22) and British (n = 32) pre-registration nursing students' important learning events about patient safety from their work placements in health care organisations. Written descriptions were…

  2. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  3. Assessing quality management in an R and D environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, B.D.

    1998-02-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a premier research and development institution operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Since 1991, LANL has pursued a heightened commitment to developing world-class quality in management and operations. In 1994 LANL adopted the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria as a framework for all activities and initiated more formalized customer focus and quality management. Five measurement systems drive the current integration of quality efforts: an annual Baldrige-based assessment, a customer focus program, customer-driven performance measurement, an employee performance management system and annual employee surveys, and integrated planning processes with associated goals and measures.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: Part 5, Nuclear and operational safety

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Kennedy, W.E.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1987-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1986 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis. For each project, as identified by the Field Task Proposal/Agreement, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1986. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from three of the seven research departments of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  5. High-pressure processing--effects on microbial food safety and food quality.

    PubMed

    Considine, Kiera M; Kelly, Alan L; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D

    2008-04-01

    High-pressure processing (HPP) is a nonthermal process capable of inactivating and eliminating pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms. This novel technology has enormous potential in the food industry, controlling food spoilage, improving food safety and extending product shelf life while retaining the characteristics of fresh, preservative-free, minimally processed foods. As with other food processing methods, such as thermal processing, HPP has somewhat limited applications as it cannot be universally applied to all food types, such as some dairy and animal products and shelf-stable low-acid foods. Herein, we discuss the effects of high-pressure processing on microbial food safety and, to a lesser degree, food quality.

  6. Nanotechnology: a future tool to improve quality and safety in meat industry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jairath, Gauri; Ahlawat, Satyavir Singh

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the new aspect of science modifies its physical, chemical and biological properties leading to new applications or enhanced utility. Keeping the pace with other industries, the meat industry has adopted the new technology in a range of applications to improve the quality and safety of products. The potential applications include the improvement in the tastes, texture, flavor, production of low fat and salt products, enhanced nutrient absorption, improved packaging techniques and better pathogen detection system. However some safety issues need to be addressed before taking a ride on the technology at the full throttle. PMID:27413202

  7. Nanotechnology: a future tool to improve quality and safety in meat industry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jairath, Gauri; Ahlawat, Satyavir Singh

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the new aspect of science modifies its physical, chemical and biological properties leading to new applications or enhanced utility. Keeping the pace with other industries, the meat industry has adopted the new technology in a range of applications to improve the quality and safety of products. The potential applications include the improvement in the tastes, texture, flavor, production of low fat and salt products, enhanced nutrient absorption, improved packaging techniques and better pathogen detection system. However some safety issues need to be addressed before taking a ride on the technology at the full throttle.

  8. Service Quality Ideals in a Competitive Tertiary Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Roland K.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of an Engineering School in Singapore, the paper explores the success factors of service quality in higher education by integrating the characteristics of SERVQUAL (an instrument for assessing students' experience of higher education) and SQA (Singapore Quality Award). Data were collected by means of structured…

  9. The New Knowledge Environment: Quality Initiatives in Health Sciences Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Reviews changes in health sciences libraries, including the evolving role of health sciences librarians, education and training of health sciences librarians, rethinking reference services, impact on quality health care, improving the value of information, virtual libraries, National Library of Medicine initiatives, and quality initiatives. (LRW)

  10. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part II: Three Early Reports on Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-09-01

    The 1990 Institute of Medicine report Medicare: A Strategy for Quality Assurance offered a definition of quality in health care and recommendations on how to achieve it. The forces for change would include different activities by the federal government, informed consumers, professionalism, and private initiatives. Eight years later, the National Roundtable report Statement on Quality of Care indicated that there were major problems of underuse, overuse, and misuse of health care services. In the same year, the President's Advisory Commission report Quality First: Better Health Care for All Americans discussed major problems with health care and proposed many initiatives to correct them, and also recommended a Bill of Rights and Responsibilities for the patients. PMID:26244402

  11. Subjective voice quality evaluation in a satellite communications environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, E. V.; Lavalley, R. W.; Hardy, W. C.

    The development of a subjective test procedure for evaluating voice quality is described. The technical characteristics of the satellite communication system are analyzed in order to identify the factors that impair voice quality. The factors that affect the system are: (1) low volume, (2) constant noise, (3) busting noise, (4) noise on speech, (5) speech distortion, (6) incomplete words, (7) garbling, (8) mutual interpretation, and (9) echo. The communication system was rated by test callers based on the occurrence of each noise impairment, the effect of the impairments on the call quality, and the overall quality of the call. Analysis of the data reveals that it is feasible to develop a voice quality evaluation system based on electronic measurements of parameters that predict the occurrence and severity of the nine impairments.

  12. Quality and safety aspects of food products addressing the needs of pregnant women and infants.

    PubMed

    Hoeft, Birgit; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Heck, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Food safety is a primary concern for pregnant women and infants as the immune system is weakened during pregnancy and not developed enough in infants, which makes them especially vulnerable to suffering from the negative effects of nonquality food products. However, food contaminations not only affect an individual's health but also a country's economic development, social harmony, food trade and even politics, as seen during the Chinese infant formula crisis in 2008. Thus, quality control is crucial in the production processes in order to have safe food products on the market. But quality control alone is not enough: manufacturers must embrace quality beyond classic in-process parameters and perform a final microbiological analysis at the end of the production process. This requires a clear and trustworthy approach to quality and safety and the involvement of all stakeholders from industry, government and academia over policy makers to consumers. This paper provides an introductory context for current quality management systems and gives real-life examples of challenges that manufacturers face during quality management and control throughout the production process.

  13. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were…

  14. Quality of the Literacy Environment in Inclusive Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ying; Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of the literacy environment in inclusive early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms ("N" = 54). The first aim was to describe the quality of the literacy environment in terms of structure (i.e., book materials and print/writing materials) and instruction (i.e., instructional…

  15. Enhancing quality and safety competency development at the unit level: an initial evaluation of student learning and clinical teaching on dedicated education units.

    PubMed

    Mulready-Shick, Joann; Kafel, Kathleen W; Banister, Gaurdia; Mylott, Laura

    2009-12-01

    The need to attend to quality and safety competency development, increase capacity in nursing education programs, address the faculty and nursing shortages, and find new ways to keep step with an ever-changing health care environment has brought forth numerous creative curricular responses and collaborative efforts. To tackle these multiple needs and challenges simultaneously, a new academic-service partnership was created to collaboratively develop an innovative clinical education delivery model. The designed dedicated education unit model not only promoted student learning about quality and safety competencies via unit-based projects but also supported quality improvements in nursing care delivery. Following the initial semester of the model's implementation, a pilot study was conducted. The findings generated the evidence required to take this innovation to the next level. Moreover, the education-practice partnership, which was created to implement the clinical education delivery model, was strengthened as a result of this preliminary evaluation.

  16. Design of the environment of care for safety of patients and personnel: does form follow function or vice versa in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed

    Bartley, Judene; Streifel, Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    We review the context of the environment of care in the intensive care unit setting in relation to patient safety and quality, specifically addressing healthcare-associated infection issues and solutions involving interdisciplinary teams. Issues addressed include current and future architectural design and layout trends, construction trends affecting intensive care units, and prevention of construction-associated healthcare-associated infections related to airborne and waterborne risks and design solutions. Specific elements include single-occupancy, acuity-scalable intensive care unit rooms; environmental aspects of hand hygiene, such as water risks, sink design/location, human waste management, surface selection (floor covering, countertops, furniture, and equipment) and cleaning, antimicrobial-treated or similar materials, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation, specialized rooms (airborne infection isolation and protective environments), and water system design and strategies for safe use of potable water and mitigation of water intrusion. Effective design and operational use of the intensive care unit environment of care must engage critical care personnel from initial planning and design through occupancy of the new/renovated intensive care unit as part of the infection control risk assessment team. The interdisciplinary infection control risk assessment team can address key environment of care design features to enhance the safety of intensive care unit patients, personnel, and visitors. This perspective will ensure the environment of care supports human factors and behavioral aspects of the interaction between the environment of care and its occupants. PMID:20647797

  17. Surgical briefings, checklists, and the creation of an environment of safety in the neurosurgical intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suite.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Traul, David E; Avitsian, Rafi; Yunak, Marisa; Harper, Nicole T; Barnett, Gene H; Recinos, Violette Renard

    2012-11-01

    Technological advances have made it possible to seamlessly integrate modern neuroimaging into the neurosurgical operative environment. This integration has introduced many new applications improving surgical treatments. One major addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium is intraoperative navigation and MRI, enabling real-time use during surgery. In the 1970s, the American College of Radiology issued safety guidelines for diagnostic MRI facilities. Until now, however, no such guidelines existed for the MRI-integrated operating room, which is a high-risk zone requiring standardized protocols to ensure the safety of both the patient and the operating room staff. The forces associated with the strong 1.5- and 3.0-T magnets used for MRI are potent and hazardous, creating distinct concerns regarding safety, infection control, and image interpretation. Authors of this paper provide an overview of the intraoperative MRI operating room, safety considerations, and a series of checklists and protocols for maintaining safety in this zero tolerance environment. PMID:23116092

  18. Sociological refigurations of patient safety; ontologies of improvement and 'acting with' quality collaboratives in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Zuiderent-Jerak, Teun; Strating, Mathilde; Nieboer, Anna; Bal, Roland

    2009-12-01

    The increasing focus on patient safety in the field of health policy is accompanied by research programs that articulate the role of the social sciences as one of contributing to enhancing safety in healthcare. Through these programs, new approaches to studying safety are facing a narrow definition of 'usefulness' in which researchers are to discover the factors that support or hamper the implementation of existing policy agendas. This is unfortunate since such claims for useful involvement in predefined policy agendas may undo one of the strongest assets of good social science research: the capacity to complexify the taken-for-granted conceptualizations of the object of study. As an alternative to this definition of 'usefulness', this article proposes a focus on multiple ontologies in the making when studying patient safety. Through such a focus, the role of social scientists becomes the involvement in refiguring the problem space of patient safety, the relations between research subjects and objects, and the existing policy agendas. This role gives medical sociologists the opportunity to focus on the question of which practices of 'effective care' are being enacted through different approaches for dealing with patient safety and what their consequences are for the care practices under study. In order to explore these questions, this article draws on empirical material from an ongoing evaluation of a large quality improvement collaborative for the care sectors in the Netherlands. It addresses how issues like 'effectiveness' and 'client participation' are at present articulated in this collaborative and shows that alternative figurations of these notions dissolve many 'implementation problems' presently experienced. Further it analyzes how such a focus of medical sociology on multiple ontologies engenders new potential for exploring particular spaces for 'acting with' quality improvement agents.

  19. Low Quality of Basic Caregiving Environments in Child Care: Actual Reality or Artifact of Scoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah J.; Guss, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Quality Rating Improvement Systems (QRIS) frequently include the Infant-Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R) as part of rating and improving child care quality. However, studies utilizing the ITERS-R consistently report low quality, especially for basic caregiving items. This research examined whether the low scores reflected the…

  20. Quality of Child Care Using the Environment Rating Scales: A Meta-Analysis of International Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Harriet J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Cárcamo, Rodrigo A.; Harrison, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study provides a systematic examination of child care quality around the globe, using the Environment Rating Scales (ERS). Additional goals of this study are to examine associations between ERS process quality and structural features (group size, caregiver-child ratio) that underpin quality and between ERS and more proximal aspects of…

  1. Quality and safety in health care, part V: introduction to crossing the quality chasm.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century focused on quality issues generally in health care, not only on mistakes. It made numerous recommendations for improving health care, including 6 aims and 10 rules to guide policy makers. This was intended to help redesign health care. However, the authors of the report did not attempt to provide all the answers because they realized that innovation was important and that they could not foresee all the sociopolitical forces and technological and research breakthroughs in the future.

  2. Quality and safety in health care, part V: introduction to crossing the quality chasm.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century focused on quality issues generally in health care, not only on mistakes. It made numerous recommendations for improving health care, including 6 aims and 10 rules to guide policy makers. This was intended to help redesign health care. However, the authors of the report did not attempt to provide all the answers because they realized that innovation was important and that they could not foresee all the sociopolitical forces and technological and research breakthroughs in the future. PMID:26402122

  3. Quality and safety aspects of reusable plastic food packaging materials: influence of reuse on intrinsic properties.

    PubMed

    Jetten, J; de, Kruijf N

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the project was to develop a comprehensive package of quality assurance criteria for use by the industry and by regulatory authorities to ensure the quality and safety-in-use (sensory, microbiological and chemical safety) of reused plastics for food packaging. The paper describes the investigations into potential adulteration effects by reuse on the intrinsic properties of plastics in more detail. The plastic articles investigated were bottles of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polycarbonate (PC) and vending cups of polypropylene (PP). The influence of repeated use on the migration of plastic constituents, degradation products of plastic additives, barrier properties and surface characteristics were investigated. The overall conclusion was that the investigated intrinsic properties of the refillable articles were not significantly influenced by repeated use. Only the hydrophobicity of the refillable PC and PP articles seemed to be influenced by repeated washing. PC bottles washed 15 times were significantly less hydrophobic than unwashed bottles.

  4. Online Multitasking Line-Scan Imaging Techniques for Simultaneous Safety and Quality Evaluation of Apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon Sung; Lee, Kangjin; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Jun, Won

    We developed a push-broom, line-scan imaging system capable of simultaneous measurements of reflectance and fluorescence. The system allows multitasking inspections for quality and safety attributes of apples due to its dynamic capabilities in simultaneously capturing fluorescence and reflectance, and selectivity in multispectral bands. A multitasking image-based inspection system for online applications has been suggested in that a single imaging device that could perform a multitude of both safety and quality inspection needs. The presented multitask inspection approach in online applications may provide an economically viable means for a number of food processing industries being able to adapt to operate and meet the dynamic and specific inspection and sorting needs.

  5. Quality and safety aspects of meat products as affected by various physical manipulations of packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Taik

    2010-09-01

    This article explores the effects of physically manipulated packaging materials on the quality and safety of meat products. Recently, innovative measures for improving quality and extending the shelf-life of packaged meat products have been developed, utilizing technologies including barrier film, active packaging, nanotechnology, microperforation, irradiation, plasma and far-infrared ray (FIR) treatments. Despite these developments, each technology has peculiar drawbacks which will need to be addressed by meat scientists in the future. To develop successful meat packaging systems, key product characteristics affecting stability, environmental conditions during storage until consumption, and consumers' packaging expectations must all be taken into consideration. Furthermore, the safety issues related to packaging materials must also be taken into account when processing, packaging and storing meat products.

  6. Quality and safety aspects of reusable plastic food packaging materials: influence of reuse on intrinsic properties.

    PubMed

    Jetten, J; de, Kruijf N

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the project was to develop a comprehensive package of quality assurance criteria for use by the industry and by regulatory authorities to ensure the quality and safety-in-use (sensory, microbiological and chemical safety) of reused plastics for food packaging. The paper describes the investigations into potential adulteration effects by reuse on the intrinsic properties of plastics in more detail. The plastic articles investigated were bottles of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polycarbonate (PC) and vending cups of polypropylene (PP). The influence of repeated use on the migration of plastic constituents, degradation products of plastic additives, barrier properties and surface characteristics were investigated. The overall conclusion was that the investigated intrinsic properties of the refillable articles were not significantly influenced by repeated use. Only the hydrophobicity of the refillable PC and PP articles seemed to be influenced by repeated washing. PC bottles washed 15 times were significantly less hydrophobic than unwashed bottles. PMID:11811768

  7. Quality and microbial safety evaluation of new isotonic beverages upon thermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Moreno, Diego A; Periago, Paula M; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, it was evaluated how two different thermal treatments (Mild and Severe) may affect the anthocyanin content, antioxidant capacity (ABTS(+), DPPH, and FRAP), quality (CIELAB colour parameters), and microbiological safety of a new isotonic drink made of lemon and maqui berry over a commercial storage simulation using a shelf life of 56days at two preservation temperature (7°C and 37°C). Both heat treatments did not affect drastically the anthocyanins content and their percentage of retention. The antioxidant capacity, probably because of the short time, was also not affected. The CIELAB colour parameters were affected by the heat, although the isotonic drinks remained with attractive red colour during shelf life. From a microbiological point of view, the Mild heat treatment with storage at 7°C is the ideal for the preservation of microbial growth, being useful for keeping the quality and safety of beverages in commercial life.

  8. Quality control in tissue banking--ensuring the safety of allograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Linda K; Mansavage, Vicki L

    2006-09-01

    DESPITE FEDERAL REGULATIONS for tissue-banking practices, inadequate quality control led to the largest allograft tissue recall in history in October 2005. THE RECALL INCLUDED all allograft tissues obtained from 761 donors and distributed by five tissue banks. Many of these tissues already had been implanted and were unrecoverable. THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES the many tissue-banking industry variables, including donor selection and testing and tissue recovery, processing, and preservation. QUESTIONS THAT HEALTH CARE providers can ask to determine which tissue banks' quality control measures best ensure the safety of the allografts they provide also are included. PMID:17004664

  9. Quest for quality care and patient safety: the case of Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Lim, M

    2004-01-01

    

 Quality of care in Singapore has seen a paradigm shift from a traditional focus on structural approaches to a broader multidimensional concept which includes the monitoring of clinical indicators and medical errors. Strong political commitment and institutional capacities have been important factors for making the transition. What is still lacking, however, is a culture of rigorous programme evaluation, public involvement, and patient empowerment. Despite these imperfections, Singapore has made considerable strides and its experience may hold lessons for other small developing countries in the common quest for quality care and patient safety. PMID:14757804

  10. Ensuring quality in the coding process: A key differentiator for the accurate interpretation of safety data

    PubMed Central

    Nair, G. Jaya

    2013-01-01

    Medical coding and dictionaries for clinical trials have seen a wave of change over the past decade where emphasis on more standardized tools for coding and reporting clinical data has taken precedence. Coding personifies the backbone of clinical reporting as safety data reports primarily depend on the coded data. Hence, maintaining an optimum quality of coding is quintessential to the accurate analysis and interpretation of critical clinical data. The perception that medical coding is merely a process of assigning numeric/alphanumeric codes to clinical data needs to be revisited. The significance of quality coding and its impact on clinical reporting has been highlighted in this article. PMID:24010060

  11. A comparison of inpatient glucose management guidelines: implications for patient safety and quality.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2015-03-01

    Inpatient glucose management guidelines and consensus statements play an important role in helping to keep hospitalized patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia safe and in optimizing the quality of their glycemic control. In this review article, we compare and contrast seven prominent US guidelines on recommended glycemic outcome measures and processes of care, with the goal of highlighting how variation among them might influence patient safety and quality. The outcome measures of interest include definitions of glucose abnormalities and glycemic targets. The relevant process measures include detection and documentation of diabetes/hyperglycemia, methods of and indications for insulin therapy, management of non-insulin agents, blood glucose monitoring, management of special situations (e.g., parenteral/enteral nutrition, glucocorticoids, surgery, insulin pumps), and appropriate transitions of care. In addition, we address elements of quality improvement, such as glycemic control program infrastructure, glucometrics, insulin safety, and professional education. While most of these guidelines align with respect to outcome measures such as glycemic targets, there is significant heterogeneity among process measures, which we propose might introduce variation or even confusion in clinical practice and possibly affect quality of care. Guideline-related factors, such as rigor of development, clarity, and presentation, may also affect provider trust in and adherence to guidelines. There is a need for high-quality research to address knowledge gaps in optimal glucose management practice approaches in the hospital setting. PMID:25690724

  12. John F. Kennedy Space Center, Safety, Reliability, Maintainability and Quality Assurance, Survey and Audit Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This document is the product of the KSC Survey and Audit Working Group composed of civil service and contractor Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) personnel. The program described herein provides standardized terminology, uniformity of survey and audit operations, and emphasizes process assessments rather than a program based solely on compliance. The program establishes minimum training requirements, adopts an auditor certification methodology, and includes survey and audit metrics for the audited organizations as well as the auditing organization.

  13. Recent advances in MRI technology: Implications for image quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Wlad T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in MRI technology are presented, with emphasis on how this new technology impacts clinical operations (better image quality, faster exam times, and improved throughput). In addition, implications for patient safety are discussed with emphasis on the risk of patient injury due to either high local specific absorption rate (SAR) or large cumulative energy doses delivered during long exam times. Patient comfort issues are examined as well. PMID:23961024

  14. Road safety alerting system with radar and GPS cooperation in a VANET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Amilcare Francesco; Sottile, Cesare; De Rango, Floriano; Voznak, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    New applications in wireless environments are increasing and keeping even more interests from the developer companies and researchers. In particular, in these last few years the government and institutional organization for road safety spent a lot of resources and money to promote Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET) technology, also car manufactures are giving a lot of contributions on this field as well. In our paper, we propose an innovative system to increase road safety, matching the requests of the market allowing a cooperation between on-board devices. The vehicles are equipped with On Board Unit (OBU) and On Board Radar Unit (OBRU), which can spread alerting messages around the network regarding warning and dangerous situations exploiting IEEE802.llp standard. Vehicles move along roads observing the environment, traffic and road conditions, and vehicles parameters as well. These information can be elaborated and shared between neighbors, Road Side Unit (RSU)s and, of course, with Internet, allowing inter-system communications exploiting an Road Traffic Manager (RTM). Radar systems task it the detection of the environment in order to increase the knowledge of current conditions of the roads, for example it is important to identify obstacles, road accidents, dangerous situations and so on. Once detected exploiting onboard devices, such as Global Position System (GPS) receiver it is possible to know the exact location of the caught event and after a data elaboration the information is spread along the network. Once the drivers are advised, they can make some precautionary actions such as reduction of traveling speed or modification of current road path. In this work the routing algorithms, which have the main goal to rapidly disseminate information, are also been investigated.

  15. [Water quality safety of ozonation and biologically activated carbon process in application].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tie-Jun; Zhang, Xi-Hui

    2009-11-01

    Ozonation and biologically activated carbon process, one of advanced treatment technologies, has been applied in many places at home and abroad. However, some emerging water quality problems appeared in operation. Drinking water treatment plant (6 x 10(5) m3/d) with ozonation and biologically activated carbon process (O3-BAC process) was investigated systematically, including microbial safety, the excessive growth of aquatic microorganism and chemical stability of water quality. And some experiments were done in the pilot plant (10 m3/h) at the same time. O3-BAC process is reliable in microbial safety, but operation management should be enhanced. A good number of aquatic microorganisms grow immoderately during operation of O3-BAC process, which is more serious especially in place with high temperature and humidity. With prolong of runtime, the growth of aquatic microorganisms varies regularly. That is hazardous to water quality safety. When raw water is low with alkalinity, decrease of pH in O3-BAC process is obvious. That will seriously affect on chemical stability. PMID:20063746

  16. Protein crystal quality in diffusive environments and its evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Jaramillo, F. J.; Otálora, F.; Gavira, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the crystal quality along a capillary by a precise protocol that comprises the study of tetragonal lysozyme cylindrical crystals that fill the capillary diameter (i.e. rods), the careful definition of the diffraction parameters and the use of a single software for the data reduction in order to avoid any bias in the comparison of the quality of different data sets. Our results cannot be explained on the basis of the different redundancy of the data sets and they demonstrate that the gel acupuncture method promotes a gradient of supersaturation along the capillary that yields in the same experiment crystals of increasing quality as a function of the position. However, despite being single crystals, rods have regions that show different crystal quality because they grew at different supersaturations. Our data are in agreement with the existence of a relation between length of the c-axis and crystal quality reported by other groups, but a deeper analysis of the cell parameters reveals the existence of a significant linear relation ( R=0.87) with the c/ a-axis ratio. This result points to the hypothesis of an ideal unit cell that yields the best crystals in terms of I/ σ( I).

  17. Intelligent quality function deployment system in concurrent engineering environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhihang; Che, Ada

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes work being undertaken in the development of an intelligent distributed quality function deployment (IDQFD) system, which supports product design team to transfer and deployment the `Voice of Customer' through `House of Quality' into the various stages of product planning, engineering and manufacturing. The requirement modeling of products, the optimization in QFD are indicated. The framework of the system, including QFD tools and platform for distributed collaborative work in QFD, is described. The strategy and methods for the collaboration processing in QFD process are presented. It shows promise for application in practice.

  18. A Perinatal Care Quality and Safety Initiative: Hospital Costs and Potential Savings

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Sommerness, Samantha; Rauk, Phillip; Gams, Rebecca; Hirt, Charles; Davis, Stanley; Miller, Kristi K.; Landers, Daniel V.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing national focus on hospital initiatives to improve obstetric and neonatal outcomes. While costs of providing care may decrease with improved quality, the accompanying reduced adverse outcomes may impact hospital revenues. The purpose of this study was to estimate, from a hospital perspective, the financial impacts of implementing a perinatal quality and safety initiative. Methods In 2008, a Minnesota-based health system (Fairview Health Services) launched the Zero Birth Injury (ZBI) initiative, which uses evidence-based care bundles to guide management of obstetric services. We conducted a pre-post analysis of financial impacts of ZBI, using hospital administrative records to measure costs and revenues associated with changes in maternal and neonatal birth injuries before (2008) and after (2009–11) the initiative. Results After adjusting for relevant covariates, implementation of ZBI was associated with an 11% decrease in the rate of maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes between 2008 and 2011 (AOR=0.89, p=0.076). As a result of the adverse events avoided, the hospital system saved $284,985 in costs but earned $324,333 less revenue, which produced a net financial decrease of $39,348 (or a $305 net financial loss per adverse event avoided) in 2011, compared with 2008. Conclusions Adoption of a perinatal quality and safety initiative that reduced birth injuries had little net financial impact on the hospital. ZBI produced better clinical results at a lower cost, which represents potential savings for payers, but the hospital system offering increased quality reaped no clear financial rewards. These results highlight the important role for shared-savings collaborations (among patients, providers, government and third-party payers, and employers) to incentivize quality improvement. Widespread adoption of perinatal safety initiatives combined with innovative payment models may contribute to better health at reduced cost. PMID:23991507

  19. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part I: Five Pioneers in Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Five pioneers had a huge impact on the quality movement in health care in the United States. Ernest Codman contributed in many ways, including his focus on outcome analysis. Avidis Donabedian is known for his focus on the 3 domains of structure, process, and outcome in health care. Walter Shewhart is known especially for the control chart and early work on what W. Edwards Deming made into the PDSA cycle. Deming is also known for other contributions, including his 14 points of management, correcting system problems rather than blaming the workers, and his System of Profound Knowledge. Juran is known for the Pareto principle and his emphasis on customer satisfaction and addressing the human, not just statistical side, of quality improvement.

  20. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part VII: Lower Costs and Higher Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine report entitled The Health Care Imperative: Lowering Costs and Improving Outcomes discussed numerous ways to decrease costs in the health care system without decreasing quality. The use of evidence-based medicine, eliminating wasteful spending such as needlessly high administrative costs, having more preventive services, having a better reimbursement system that emphasized quality, developing a less fragmented and more efficient medical delivery system, having more transparency for patients on the outcomes of different providers, having greater health care literacy for patients, and eliminating fraud were some of the recommendations. The total savings from eliminating unnecessary health care costs was estimated to be over 3 quarters of a trillion dollars each year. PMID:26545019

  1. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part I: Five Pioneers in Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Five pioneers had a huge impact on the quality movement in health care in the United States. Ernest Codman contributed in many ways, including his focus on outcome analysis. Avidis Donabedian is known for his focus on the 3 domains of structure, process, and outcome in health care. Walter Shewhart is known especially for the control chart and early work on what W. Edwards Deming made into the PDSA cycle. Deming is also known for other contributions, including his 14 points of management, correcting system problems rather than blaming the workers, and his System of Profound Knowledge. Juran is known for the Pareto principle and his emphasis on customer satisfaction and addressing the human, not just statistical side, of quality improvement. PMID:26147460

  2. Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Scott

    2011-03-23

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program was established to ensure that Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is implemented institutionally and by all divisions. The ES&H Self-Assessment Program, managed by the Office of Contractor Assurance (OCA), provides for an internal evaluation of all ES&H programs and systems at LBNL. The primary objective of the program is to ensure that work is conducted safely and with minimal negative impact to workers, the public, and the environment. Self-assessment follows the five core functions and guiding principles of ISM. Self-assessment is the mechanism used to promote the continuous improvement of the Laboratory's ES&H programs. The process is described in the Environment, Safety, and Health Assurance Plan (PUB-5344) and is composed of three types of self-assessments: Division ES&H Self-Assessment, ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment, and Division ES&H Peer Review. The Division ES&H Self-Assessment Manual (PUB-3105) provides the framework by which divisions conduct formal ES&H self-assessments to systematically identify program deficiencies. Issue-specific assessments are designed and implemented by the divisions and focus on areas of interest to division management. They may be conducted by teams and involve advance planning to ensure that appropriate resources are available. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program Manual (PUB-913E) provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs and processes. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment is designed to evaluate whether ES&H programs and processes are compliant with guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented by LBNL divisions. The Division ES&H Peer Review Manual provides the framework by which division ISM systems are evaluated and improved. Peer Reviews are conducted by teams under the direction of senior division management and focus on higher-level management

  3. Variation in U.S. Traffic Safety Policy Environments and Motor Vehicle Fatalities 1980–2010

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Diana; Macinko, James; Bae, Jin Yung; Jimenez, Geronimo; Paul, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of variation in state laws governing traffic safety on motor vehicle fatalities. Study Design Repeated cross sectional time series design. Methods Fixed effects regression models estimate the relationship between state motor vehicle fatality rates and the strength of the state law environment for 50 states, 1980–2010. The strength of the state policy environment is measured by calculating the proportion of a set of 27 evidence-based laws in place each year. The effect of alcohol consumption on motor vehicle fatalities is estimated using a subset of alcohol laws as instrumental variables. Results Once other risk factors are controlled in statistical models, states with stronger regulation of safer driving and driver/passenger protections had significantly lower motor vehicle fatality rates for all ages. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with higher MVC death rates, as were state unemployment rates. Conclusions Encouraging laggard states to adopt the full range of available laws could significantly reduce preventable traffic-related deaths in the U.S. – especially those among younger individuals. Estimating the relationship between different policy environments and health outcomes can quantify the result of policy gaps. PMID:24275035

  4. Occupational health and safety professionals strategies to improve working environment and their self-assessed impact.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) practitioners have difficulty influencing the decision-making process because they are placed on the sidelines in the organisation. This paper analyses the strategies that OHS practitioners use to fulfill their job role and the impact they have on the working environment and OHS management systems. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten New Zealand OHS practitioners from mainly large private and public organisations about their job role, OHS tasks, strategies and their impact. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, entered into a qualitative data management programme and analysed thematically in relation to their strategies, barriers and their impact on the OHS management system and working environment. The analysis revealed that these OHS practitioners used multiple strategies - chosen in relation to the situation, the stakeholders and their own resources. They saw themselves as change agents or facilitators. They preferred to use a knowledge strategy, supported by an audit strategy. Their last resort was a regulation strategy. All of the practitioners had a positive impact on stakeholders' knowledge, attitude and behavior and on OHS management systems. Some practitioners improved the working environment but few were involved in introduction of new technology.

  5. Measuring Service Quality in the Information Services Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox-Swan, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the service factors that influence judgments of customer satisfaction in the academic library/media center. The study, conducted at Florida State University examined the relative importance of these determinants of service quality and compared these results to earlier studies conducted with customers of…

  6. Magnitude of genotype x environment interactions affecting tomato fruit quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a growing interest by consumers to purchase fresh tomato with improved quality traits including lycopene, total soluble solids (TSS), vitamin C and titratable acid (TA) content. Therefore, there are considerable efforts by tomato breeders to improve tomato for these traits. However, suitabl...

  7. HR Manager Leadership in Quality Improvement in a College Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharabi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the influence of the human resource (HR) manager on the quality of service in an academic college, and the human resource management (HRM) outcomes of the process. Design/methodology/approach: The paper relates to a customer satisfaction survey. More than 120 questionnaires were completed by the…

  8. Is the relationship between the built environment and physical activity moderated by perceptions of crime and safety?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Direct relationships between safety concerns and physical activity have been inconsistently patterned in the literature. To tease out these relationships, crime, pedestrian, and traffic safety were examined as moderators of built environment associations with physical activity. Methods Exploratory analyses used two cross-sectional studies of 2068 adults ages 20–65 and 718 seniors ages 66+ with similar designs and measures. The studies were conducted in the Baltimore, Maryland-Washington, DC and Seattle-King County, Washington regions during 2001–2005 (adults) and 2005–2008 (seniors). Participants were recruited from areas selected to sample high- and low- income and walkability. Independent variables perceived crime, traffic, and pedestrian safety were measured using scales from validated instruments. A GIS-based walkability index was calculated for a street-network buffer around each participant’s home address. Outcomes were total physical activity measured using accelerometers and transportation and leisure walking measured with validated self-reports (IPAQ-long). Mixed effects regression models were conducted separately for each sample. Results Of 36 interactions evaluated across both studies, only 5 were significant (p < .05). Significant interactions did not consistently support a pattern of highest physical activity when safety was rated high and environments were favorable. There was not consistent evidence that safety concerns reduced the beneficial effects of favorable environments on physical activity. Only pedestrian safety showed evidence of a consistent main effect with physical activity outcomes, possibly because pedestrian safety items (e.g., crosswalks, sidewalks) were not as subjective as those on the crime and traffic safety scales. Conclusions Clear relationships between crime, pedestrian, and traffic safety with physical activity levels remain elusive. The development of more precise safety variables and the use of

  9. Quality of Undergraduate Management Studies in a Changing University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudiene, Vida

    2005-01-01

    The environment for teaching management in Baltic States' universities has undergone profound changes. The factors involved are: greater interaction between classroom teaching and the "real world", market expansion, internationalization, and increasingly diverse students. The author reports on the survey findings from the three management higher…

  10. Ambulatory Care Nurse-Sensitive Indicators Series: Reaching for the Tipping Point in Measuring Nurse-Sensitive Quality in the Ambulatory Surgical and Procedure Environments.

    PubMed

    Brown, Diane Storer; Aronow, Harriet Udin

    2016-01-01

    The value of the ambulatory care nurse remains undocumented from a quality and patient safety measurement perspective and the practice is at risk of being highly variable and of unknown quality. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing and the Collaborative Alliance for Nursing Outcomes propose nurse leaders create a tipping point to measure the value of nursing across the continuum of nursing care, moving from inpatient to ambulatory care. As care continues to shift into the ambulatory care environment, the quality imperative must also shift to assure highly reliable, safe, and effective health care. PMID:27439252

  11. Work Environment and Its Relationship to Quality Improvement: Health Care Providers' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Azza Hassan Mohamed; Abou Hashish, Ebtsam Aly

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap in understanding how work environment contributes to hospitals' readiness for quality improvement (QI) in developing countries; thus, diagnosing work environment problems in health care organizations is the initial step in designing strategies for QI in organizations. This study examines the relationship between nurses' and physicians' perspectives of the work environments and hospitals' climate for QI. Study results indicate that work environment is positively associated with hospitals' readiness for QI. PMID:27191372

  12. Protection of Operators and Environment - the Safety Concept of the Karlsruhe Vitrification Plant VEK

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisch, J.; Kuttruf, H.; Lumpp, W.; Pfeifer, W.; Roth, G.; Weisenburger, S.

    2002-02-26

    The Karlsruhe Vitrification Plant (VEK) plant is a milestone in decommissioning and complete dismantling of the former Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant WAK, which is in an advanced stage of disassembly. The VEK is scheduled to vitrify approx. 70 m3 of the highly radioactive liquid waste (HLW) resulting from reprocessing. Site preparation, civil work and component manufacturing began in 1999. The building will be finalized by mid of 2002, hot vitrification operation is currently scheduled for 2004/2005. Provisions against damages arising from construction and operation of the VEK had to be made in accordance with the state of the art as laid down in the German Atomic Law and the Radiation Protection Regulations. For this purpose, the appropriate analysis of accidents and their external and internal impacts were investigated. During the detailed design phase, a failure effects analysis was carried out, in which single events were studied with respect to the objectives of protection and ensuring activity containment, limiting radioactive discharges to the environment and protecting of the staff. Parallel to the planning phase of the VEK plant a cold prototype test facility (PVA) covering the main process steps was constructed and operated at the Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE) of FZK. This pilot operation served to demonstrate the process technique and its operation with a simulated waste solution, and to test the main items of equipment, but was conducted also to use the experimental data and experience to back the safety concept of the radioactive VEK plant. This paper describes the basis of the safety concept of the VEK plant and results of the failure effect analysis. The experimental simulation of the failure scenarios, their effect on the process behavior, and the controllability of these events as well as the effect of the results on the safety concept of VEK are discussed. Additionally, an overview of the actual status of civil work and manufacturing of

  13. Safety in petroleum movement: Is enough being done to protect the environment. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bialas, B.H.

    1991-12-01

    This thesis is an investigation to identify whether sufficient efforts are being taken to provide the highest possible safety in petroleum movement. Current practices and on going initiatives for spill prevention and cleanup are identified. From these efforts, overall trends in spills have been identified. The small percentage of oil spilled, compared to the amount transferred is examined; in addition, long term impact on the environment is analyzed. It is concluded that oil spills are inevitable no matter how much effort is exerted; they are a part of petroleum movements. However, due to the concerted efforts by industry and government, spills should continue to decline via better prevention, and those spills that do occur will be cleaned up more promptly, with less environmental impact. The author recommends that efforts for oil spill reduction need to continue and require constant management attention. In addition, specific recommendations for the oil spill program are also included.

  14. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  15. Site Environmental Report for 2006. Volume I, Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-30

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.1 The Site Environmental Report for 2006 summarizes Berkeley Lab’s environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2006. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as “Berkeley Lab,” “the Laboratory,” “Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,” and “LBNL.”) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory’s environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  16. Tiger Team environment, safety, and health assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted from October 22 and November 30, 1990. The assessment was conducted by a tam comprised of environment, safety, and health (ES H) professional from the Department, its contractors, and consultants. The purpose of the ORNL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on: current ES H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; and adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs. This information will assist DOE in determining patterns and trends in ES H compliance and probable root causes, and will provide guidance for management to take needed corrective actions.

  17. Sustaining global progress in E and P health, safety, and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Arscott, R.L.; Edwardes, R.J.; Ognedal, M.; Visser, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    The third International Conference on Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) was held in New Orleans in June 1996. During this meeting, the technical committee members were asked to complete a questionnaire with two questions: (1) What are the three biggest improvements in the industry`s performance in the HSE function over the past 5 years? and (2) What are the three biggest challenges for the next 5 years? The results from 30 replies from industry experts were compared with a similar survey conducted at the 1991 meeting, where the question was, What are the key action items the industry should take to enhance performance over the next decade? This article gives the most frequently occurring comments cited by the 1996 technical committee relating to the 1991 recommendations. This may be considered a mid-decade review of worldwide E and P progress.

  18. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

  19. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part VI: More on Crossing the Quality Chasm.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Crossing the Quality Chasm. A New Health System for the 21st Century report (Chasm report) was that 6 major aims for US health care were set forth. In addition, the report indicated that health care in the United States care should be redesigned in accordance with 10 enumerated rules. There were other recommendations as well, to try to bridge the huge gap between the health care many people in the United States receive and what they should receive. PMID:26447385

  20. Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Progress Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The onsite assessment, which was conducted from November 9 through November 20, 1992, included a selective review of the ES H management systems and programs with principal focus on the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP); San Francisco Field Office (SF), including the Livermore Site Office (LSO); and the site contractor, the University of California. The purpose of the LLNL ES H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES H issues and requirements. The assessment was not a comprehensive compliance assessment of ES H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at LLNL was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of LLNL, which was conducted from February 26 through April 5, 1990. The LLNL Progress Assessment was conducted by a team of 12 professionals from various DOE offices and their support contractors, with expertise in the areas of management, environment, safety, and health. The Progress Assessment Team concluded that LLNL management recognizes the importance that the Secretary of Energy places on ES H excellence and has responded with improvements in all ES H areas. Progress has been made in addressing the deficiencies identified in the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment. Although much remains to be done and concerns were noted in several areas, these concerns do not diminish the significance of the progress made since the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment.

  1. Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The onsite assessment, which was conducted from November 9 through November 20, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP); San Francisco Field Office (SF), including the Livermore Site Office (LSO); and the site contractor, the University of California. The purpose of the LLNL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H issues and requirements. The assessment was not a comprehensive compliance assessment of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at LLNL was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of LLNL, which was conducted from February 26 through April 5, 1990. The LLNL Progress Assessment was conducted by a team of 12 professionals from various DOE offices and their support contractors, with expertise in the areas of management, environment, safety, and health. The Progress Assessment Team concluded that LLNL management recognizes the importance that the Secretary of Energy places on ES&H excellence and has responded with improvements in all ES&H areas. Progress has been made in addressing the deficiencies identified in the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment. Although much remains to be done and concerns were noted in several areas, these concerns do not diminish the significance of the progress made since the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment.

  2. Evaluation of commercial grated cheese in the central region of Brazil for microbiological quality and safety.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Thaís Cristina Dias; da Silva, Patrícia Helena Caldeira; de Souza, Stefânia Márcia; Nero, Luís Augusto; Ferreira, Márcia de Aguiar

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to further the scientific understanding of the microbial quality and safety of grated cheese. Samples of grated cheese product (n = 20) were obtained from markets in the central region of Brazil and submitted to microbiological analysis using conventional and alternative (Petrifilm™ and RIDA(®) plates) methodologies. Based only on the criteria from the Brazilian Health Ministry, all samples were considered adequate for consumption. However, most samples presented foreign substances and high levels of contamination by other hygiene indicator microorganisms, indicating failures in processing and possible risks to consumers. Despite the hygienic quality of the samples, the obtained results showed good correlation indexes and similarities between the conventional and the alternative methodologies, indicating their viability for the quality control of grated cheese.

  3. High-throughput proteomics: a new tool for quality and safety in fishery products.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Sara; Mullen, William; Cristobal, Susana

    2014-03-01

    In order to cope with the increasing demand for fishery products, sensitive technological tools are required to ensure high quality and wholesomeness and to monitor their production process in a sustainable manner while complying with the strict standards imposed by regulatory authorities. Proteomics may assist the industry as it allows an unbiased approach in the discovery of biomarkers that could be used to increase our understanding of different biological, physiological and ecological aspects that may be advantageous in optimizing quality and safety in aquatic species. The aim of this review is to highlight the potential of cost-effective high-throughput technologies, such as those offered by proteomics using "on-line" mass spectrometry to improve the efficiency of the industry in identifying biomarkers relevant for safe high quality products.

  4. The Role and Quality of Software Safety in the NASA Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, Lucas; Basili, Victor R.; Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examine software safety risk in the early design phase of the NASA Constellation spaceflight program. Obtaining an accurate, program-wide picture of software safety risk is difficult across multiple, independently-developing systems. We leverage one source of safety information, hazard analysis, to provide NASA quality assurance managers with information regarding the ongoing state of software safety across the program. The goal of this research is two-fold: 1) to quantify the relative importance of software with respect to system safety; and 2) to quantify the level of risk presented by software in the hazard analysis. We examined 154 hazard reports created during the preliminary design phase of three major flight hardware systems within the Constellation program. To quantify the importance of software, we collected metrics based on the number of software-related causes and controls of hazardous conditions. To quantify the level of risk presented by software, we created a metric scheme to measure the specificity of these software causes. We found that from 49-70% of hazardous conditions in the three systems could be caused by software or software was involved in the prevention of the hazardous condition. We also found that 12-17% of the 2013 hazard causes involved software, and that 23-29% of all causes had a software control. Furthermore, 10-12% of all controls were software-based. There is potential for inaccuracy in these counts, however, as software causes are not consistently scoped, and the presence of software in a cause or control is not always clear. The application of our software specificity metrics also identified risks in the hazard reporting process. In particular, we found a number of traceability risks in the hazard reports may impede verification of software and system safety.

  5. Beyond metrics? Utilizing ‘soft intelligence’ for healthcare quality and safety

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Graham P.; McKee, Lorna; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Formal metrics for monitoring the quality and safety of healthcare have a valuable role, but may not, by themselves, yield full insight into the range of fallibilities in organizations. ‘Soft intelligence’ is usefully understood as the processes and behaviours associated with seeking and interpreting soft data—of the kind that evade easy capture, straightforward classification and simple quantification—to produce forms of knowledge that can provide the basis for intervention. With the aim of examining current and potential practice in relation to soft intelligence, we conducted and analysed 107 in-depth qualitative interviews with senior leaders, including managers and clinicians, involved in healthcare quality and safety in the English National Health Service. We found that participants were in little doubt about the value of softer forms of data, especially for their role in revealing troubling issues that might be obscured by conventional metrics. Their struggles lay in how to access softer data and turn them into a useful form of knowing. Some of the dominant approaches they used risked replicating the limitations of hard, quantitative data. They relied on processes of aggregation and triangulation that prioritised reliability, or on instrumental use of soft data to animate the metrics. The unpredictable, untameable, spontaneous quality of soft data could be lost in efforts to systematize their collection and interpretation to render them more tractable. A more challenging but potentially rewarding approach involved processes and behaviours aimed at disrupting taken-for-granted assumptions about quality, safety, and organizational performance. This approach, which explicitly values the seeking out and the hearing of multiple voices, is consistent with conceptual frameworks of organizational sensemaking and dialogical understandings of knowledge. Using soft intelligence this way can be challenging and discomfiting, but may offer a critical defence

  6. The impact of cooking methods on the nutritional quality and safety of chicken breaded nuggets.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Albuquerque, Tânia; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Sanches-Silva, Ana; Cristina Bento, Ana; Costa, Helena S

    2016-06-15

    The impact of cooking methods (industrial pre-frying, deep-fat frying and baking) on the nutritional quality and safety of chicken breaded nugget samples from supermarket and commercial brands was evaluated. The changes in the quality characteristics (nutritional composition, fatty acids profile, cholesterol and salt) of the fried food and frying oil, after ten consecutive frying operations, were evaluated. The total fat content of nuggets varied between 10.9 and 22.7 g per 100 g of edible portion and the salt content ranged from 0.873 to 1.63 g per 100 g. Taking into account one portion of nuggets, the daily intake of salt can reach 49%, which can have a significant impact on the health of those who regularly consume this type of food, especially considering the prevalence of hypertension around the world. The analysed chicken breaded nuggets are rich in unsaturated fatty acids, which have been related with potential health benefits, namely regarding cardiovascular diseases. The cholesterol content of baked samples was two times higher when compared with the fried ones. The trans fatty acids and polar compounds contents of the frying oil used for frying significantly increased, but the values were still away from the maximum recommended by legal entities for its rejection. From a nutritional point of view, it is possible to conclude that the applied cooking methods can significantly influence the nutritional quality and safety of the analysed chicken breaded nuggets. This study will contribute to important knowledge on how the applied cooking methods can change the nutritional quality and safety of foods, namely of chicken nuggets, and can be very useful for dietary recommendations and nutritional assessment. PMID:27213579

  7. Code of Conduct: Safety, Discipline, and School Climate. Quality Counts, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This 17th edition of "Education Week's" annual "Quality Counts" report takes aim at an issue freighted with emotional as well as policy implications: the impact of a school's social and disciplinary environment on students' ability to learn and on the teachers and administrators tasked with guiding them. National initiatives to improve schools…

  8. An integrated framework for safety, quality and risk management: an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification

    PubMed Central

    Runciman, W B; Williamson, J A H; Deakin, A; Benveniste, K A; Bannon, K; Hibbert, P D

    2006-01-01

    More needs to be done to improve safety and quality and to manage risks in health care. Existing processes are fragmented and there is no single comprehensive source of information about what goes wrong. An integrated framework for the management of safety, quality and risk is needed, with an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification. The World Alliance for Patient Safety provides a platform for the development of a coherent approach; 43 desirable attributes for such an approach are discussed. An example of an incident management and information system serving a patient safety classification is presented, with a brief account of how and where it is currently used. Any such system is valueless unless it improves safety and quality. Quadruple‐loop learning (personal, local, national and international) is proposed with examples of how an exemplar system has been successfully used at the various levels. There is currently an opportunity to “get it right” by international cooperation via the World Health Organization to develop an integrated framework incorporating systems that can accommodate information from all sources, manage and monitor things that go wrong, and allow the worldwide sharing of information and the dissemination of tools for the implementation of strategies which have been shown to work. PMID:17142615

  9. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  10. Building capacity for quality and safety in critical care: A roundtable discussion from the second international patient safety conference in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Yaseen M.; Taher, Saadi; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Alamry, Ahmed; Hijazi, Ra’ed; Alatassi, Abdulaleem; Marini, Abdellatif M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion from the Second International Patient Safety Conference held in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to: (1) review the conceptual framework for building capacity in quality and safety in critical care. (2) examine examples of leading international experiences in building capacity. (3) review the experience in Saudi Arabia in this area. (4) discuss the role of building capacity in simulation for patient safety in critical care and (5) review the experience in building capacity in an ongoing improvement project for severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:24250730

  11. Humidification and perceived indoor air quality in the office environment.

    PubMed Central

    Reinikainen, L M; Aunela-Tapola, L; Jaakkola, J J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of humidification on the odour, acceptability, and stuffiness of indoor air. METHODS: In a six period cross over trial at the Pasila Office Center, Helsinki, the air of two wings of the building in turn were ventilated with air of 30%-40% humidity. A third wing served as a non-humidified control area. The quality of indoor air was assessed weekly by a panel containing 18 to 23 members. The intraindividual differences in the ratings for odour, stuffiness, and acceptability between humidified and non-humidified wings were used to assess the effect of humidification. The roles of sex, current smoking, and age as potential effect modifiers were assessed by comparing the mean intraindividual differences in ratings between the groups. RESULTS: Humidified air was found to be more odorous and stuffy (paired t test P = 0.0001) and less acceptable than the non-humidified air (McNemar's test P < 0.001). The differences in odour and stuffiness between humidified and non-humidified air were greater for women and for non-smokers, and greatest differences were in the youngest age group, and least in the oldest age group. The differences were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: An untrained panel of 20 members is able to differentiate a slight malodour and stuffiness in indoor air. The results suggest that steam air humidification decreases the perceived air quality. This effect is strongest in women and young subjects. PMID:9196454

  12. Review of the quality and safety of irradiated food. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This monograph will describe the food-irradiation process and summarizing its historical development as a way to prolong the shelf-life of food and prevent the spread of food-borne illness. It will also examine of the known effects of irradiation on food quality. Including a presentation of the effect of irradiation on the flavor, appearance, and smell of food. The nutritional adequacy of irradiated foods and several improvements in some foods caused by irradiation are also discussed. Finally, a discussion of the safety issues associated with the process and its products. The safety of irradiated foods is an issue of growing concern to the American public. While irradiation shows great potential for reducing foodborne illness, the formation of radiolytic products, the physical dangers of radiation, and the possibility of cancer or genetic mutation worries many people.

  13. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

  14. Medicinal plants in the treatment of women's disorders: Analytical strategies to assure quality, safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Masullo, Milena; Montoro, Paola; Mari, Angela; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2015-09-10

    During last decades an increasing number of herbal products specifically targeting women's disorders has appeared in the worldwide marketplace. This growth highlights the need for a critical evaluation of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. Analytical techniques applied to the quality control of the main medicinal plants used for women health (relief of menopause and menstrual related symptoms) have been reviewed. Thanks to the innovation in analytical technology, identification and detection of secondary metabolites dramatically improved. In particular, hyphenated techniques have proved to be the most suitable for the rapid identification of compounds in plant matrix. Moreover, taking into account that differences in sample quality are not only found in the main compounds or in the chemical markers but also in the low-concentration compounds, fingerprint analysis might be a simple way for identification and quality control of herbal products containing a large number of low amounts of unknown compounds. Furthermore in several papers the informations obtained from the analysis of a plant have been processed by statistical elaborations. Medicinal plants here discussed are classified on the basis of the chemical markers used for their quality control.

  15. Framing and Enhancing Distributed Leadership in the Quality Management of Online Learning Environments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Gosper, Maree; Sankey, Michael; Allan, Garry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of senior leadership interviews in a nationally funded project on distributed leadership in the quality management of online learning environments (OLEs) in higher education. Questions were framed around the development of an OLE quality management framework and the situation of the characteristics of…

  16. New Courses: Unlock the Mysteries of Productivity, Air Quality, and the Indoor Environment in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiford, Regina

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between indoor air quality and productivity and a three-year research project to measure productivity within an educational setting. Also discusses research showing the impact of good indoor air quality on increasing productivity. Ten ways to manage asthma in a school environment are highlighted. (GR)

  17. Quality and safety of herbal medical products: regulation and the need for quality assurance along the value chains

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicines and products derived from them are a diverse group of products for which different (and often limited) levels of evidence are available. As importantly, such products generally vary in their composition and are at the end of an often poorly understood value chain, which often links producers in biodiversity rich countries with the large markets in the North. This paper discusses the current regulatory framework of such herbal medical products (with a focus on the UK) and using examples from our own metabolomic research on Curcumal longa L. (turmeric, Zingiberaceae) how value chains impact on the composition and quality (and thus the safety) of such products. Overall, our recent research demonstrates the need for studying the links between producers and consumers of commodities produced in provider countries and that plant metabolomics offer a novel way of assessing the chemical variability along a value chain. PMID:25581270

  18. Associations between the Quality of the Residential Built Environment and Pregnancy Outcomes among Women in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Lynne C.; Kroeger, Gretchen L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The built environment, a key component of environmental health, may be an important contributor to health disparities, particularly for reproductive health outcomes. Objective: In this study we investigated the relationship between seven indices of residential built environment quality and adverse reproductive outcomes for the City of Durham, North Carolina (USA). Methods: We surveyed approximately 17,000 residential tax parcels in central Durham, assessing > 50 individual variables on each. These data, collected using direct observation, were combined with tax assessor, public safety, and U.S. Census data to construct seven indices representing important domains of the residential built environment: housing damage, property disorder, security measures, tenure (owner or renter occupied), vacancy, crime count, and nuisance count. Fixed-slope random-intercept multilevel models estimated the association between the residential built environment and five adverse birth outcomes. Models were adjusted for maternal characteristics and clustered at the primary adjacency community unit, defined as the index block, plus all adjacent blocks that share any portion of a line segment (block boundary) or vertex. Results: Five built environment indices (housing damage, property disorder, tenure, vacancy, and nuisance count) were associated with each of the five outcomes in the unadjusted context: preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA), low birth weight (LBW), continuous birth weight, and birth weight percentile for gestational age (BWPGA; sex-specific birth weight distributions for infants delivered at each gestational age using National Center for Health Statistics referent births for 2000–2004). However, some estimates were attenuated after adjustment. In models adjusted for individual-level covariates, housing damage remained statistically significantly associated with SGA, birth weight, and BWPGA. Conclusion: This work suggests a real and meaningful

  19. Collaborative Depression Care in a Safety Net Medical Home: Facilitators and Barriers to Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Dunn-Lombard, Donisha; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Lefante, John J

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about how to integrate primary care with mental/behavioral services outside of clinical trials. The authors implemented a collaborative care model (CCM) for depression in a safety net patient-centered medical home. The model focused on universal screening for symptoms, risk stratification based on symptom severity, care management for intensive follow-up, and psychiatry consultation. CCM increased rates of primary care physician encounters, timely follow-up for monitoring symptoms of depression, and documentation of treatment response. Contextual factors that facilitated or hindered practice redesign included clinic leadership, quality improvement culture, staffing, technology infrastructure, and external incentives/disincentives for organizational change. PMID:26087153

  20. The Creation of a Quality Environment for the Social Development of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lijuan, Pang

    Many researchers in the field of education and psychology have been aware of the tremendous impact of the environment as a complex system on human development. By providing and creating the most favorable environment for children, active and wholesome social development is promoted. Three principle areas of concern in creating a quality early…

  1. Students' Learning Environment and Education Quality in Faculty of Education of University of Tehran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Vaziri, Seyed Ali; Jafari, Ahmad; Alizadeh, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to review between students' learning environment and education quality. A non-experimental, quantitative, SPSS 17.0 research design was used to explore the relationship between background demographic characteristics, transformational, and transactional leadership styles, learning environment, and education…

  2. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  3. Lessons learned: use of event reporting by nurses to improve patient safety and quality.

    PubMed

    Hession-Laband, Eileen; Mantell, Patricia

    2011-04-01

    The Magnet Recognition Program encourages nurse-initiated, data-driven quality projects. Using data gained from medical error event reporting has been cited as a strategy to improve safety and quality. This article describes a process by which nurses at the Children's Hospital Boston increased error reporting and used knowledge gained from event reports to provide education and implement practice changes. The medical and surgical units experienced a 35% increase in reported events and a decrease in the severity level of events over a 2-year period. Meaningful data from event reporting systems are critical in helping nurses develop interventions to prevent errors. The Magnet Model components are illustrated in the steps of this project. PMID:21419975

  4. Using lean methodology to teach quality improvement to internal medicine residents at a safety net hospital.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Charlene; Suen, Winnie; Gupte, Gouri

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this initiative was to develop a quality improvement (QI) curriculum using Lean methodology for internal medicine residents at Boston Medical Center, a safety net academic hospital. A total of 90 residents and 8 School of Public Health students participated in a series of four, 60- to 90-minute interactive and hands-on QI sessions. Seventeen QI project plans were created and conducted over a 4-month period. The curriculum facilitated internal medicine residents' learning about QI and development of positive attitudes toward QI (assessed using pre- and post-attitude surveys) and exposed them to an interprofessional team structure that duplicates future working relationships. This QI curriculum can be an educational model of how health care trainees can work collaboratively to improve health care quality.

  5. Preliminary mechanism of acidic electrolyzed water ice on improving the quality and safety of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Jing Jing; Sun, Xiao Hong; Pan, Ying Jie; Zhao, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Preliminary mechanism of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW) ice on improving the quality and safety of shrimp was investigated by examining the physicochemical and microbiological changes, sarcoplasmic proteins and enzymatic activities. The results showed that compared with tap water (TW) ice, AEW ice had an obvious (p<0.05) capability in limiting the changes of pH and shrinkage of muscle fibers in shrimp. Plate count enumeration and PCR-DGGE indicated that AEW greatly inhibited growth of bacteria on shrimp. Additionally, AEW ice had no adverse effects on sarcoplasmic proteins by SDS-PAGE method. And AEW ice displayed inhibitory activity (p<0.05) toward cathepsin B and polyphenol oxidase (PPO), although it did not present positive effects on inhibiting cathepsin D, acid phosphatase and lipase activity. Thus, this study brought new evidence to further demonstrate that AEW ice can serve as a promising technology for improving the quality of aquatic products in food industry.

  6. A statistical evaluation of the safety factor and species sensitivity distribution approaches to deriving environmental quality guidelines.

    PubMed

    Zajdlik, Barry Alan

    2016-04-01

    The species sensitivity distribution (SSD) distribution approach to estimating water quality guidelines (WQGs) is the preferred method in all jurisdictions reviewed (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] members, South Africa, United States) and is one of the recommended methods for European Commission members for 33 priority and priority hazardous substances. In the event that jurisdiction-specific criteria for data quality, quantity, and taxonomic representation are not met, all of these jurisdictions endorse the use of additional safety factors (SFs) applied to either the SSD-based WQG or, the lowest suitable toxicity test endpoint. In Canada, the British Columbia Ministry of Environment endorses this latter approach as the preferred approach in the belief that so-derived WQGs are more protective than SSD-based WQGs. The level of protection afforded by the latter SF approach was evaluated by statistically sampling minima from random samples of the following distributions: normal, Gumbel, logistic, and Weibull, using a range of coefficients of variation (cVs) and applying the SFs of 2 or 10 used in British Columbia. The simulations indicate that the potentially affected fraction of species (PAF) can be as high as 20%, or, approach 0%. The PAF varies with sample size and CV. Because CVs can vary systematically with mode of toxic action, the PAF using SF-based WQGs can also vary systematically with analyte class. The varying levels of protection afforded by SF-based WQGs are generally inconsistent with the common water quality management goal that allows for a small degree of change under long-term exposure. The findings suggest that further efforts be made to develop high-quality WQGs that support informed decision making and are consistent with the environmental management goal instead of using SFs in the hope of achieving an acceptable but unknown, degree of environmental protection. PMID:26272692

  7. Patient safety measures in burn care: do National reporting systems accurately reflect quality of burn care?

    PubMed

    Mandell, Samuel P; Robinson, Ellen F; Cooper, Claudette L; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been placed on quality of care metrics and patient safety. Groups such as the University Health-System Consortium (UHC) collect and review patient safety data, monitor healthcare facilities, and often report data using mortality and complication rates as outcomes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UHC database to determine if it differentiates quality of care across burn centers. We reviewed UHC clinical database (CDB) fields and available data from 2006 to 2008 for the burn product line. Based on the September 2008 American Burn Association (ABA) list of verified burn centers, we categorized centers as American Burn Association-verified burn centers, self-identified burn centers, and other centers that are not burn units but admit some burn patients. We compared total burn admissions, risk pool, complication rates, and mortality rates. Overall mortality was compared between the UHC and National Burn Repository. The UHC CDB provides fields for number of admissions, % intensive care unit admission, risk pool, length of stay, complication profiles, and mortality index. The overall numbers of burn patients in the database for the study period included 17,740 patients admitted to verified burn centers (mean 631 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), 10,834 for self-identified burn centers (mean 437 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), and 1,487 for other centers (mean 11.5 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years). Reported complication rates for verified burn centers (21.6%), self-identified burn centers (21.3%), and others (20%) were similar. Mortality rates were highest for self-identified burn centers (3.06%), less for verified centers (2.88%), and lowest for other centers (0.74%). However, these outcomes data may be misleading, because the risk pool criteria do not include burn-specific risk factors, and the inability to adjust for injury severity prevents rigorous comparison across centers. Databases such as the

  8. Patient safety in plastic surgery: identifying areas for quality improvement efforts.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn M; Rhoads, Kim F; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-05-01

    Improving quality of health care is a global priority. Before quality benchmarks are established, we first must understand rates of adverse events (AEs). This project assessed risk-adjusted rates of inpatient AEs for soft tissue reconstructive procedures.Patients receiving soft tissue reconstructive procedures from 2005 to 2010 were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Inpatient AEs were identified using patient safety indicators (PSIs), established measures developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.We identified 409,991 patients with soft tissue reconstruction and 16,635 (4.06%) had a PSI during their hospital stay. Patient safety indicators were associated with increased risk-adjusted mortality, longer length of stay, and decreased routine disposition (P < 0.01). Patient characteristics associated with a higher risk-adjusted rate per 1000 patients at risk included older age, men, nonwhite, and public payer (P < 0.05). Overall, plastic surgery patients had significantly lower risk-adjusted rate compared to other surgical inpatients for all events evaluated except for failure to rescue and postoperative hemorrhage or hematoma, which were not statistically different. Risk-adjusted rates of hematoma hemorrhage were significantly higher in patients receiving size-reduction surgery, and these rates were further accentuated when broken down by sex and payer. In general, plastic surgery patients had lower rates of in-hospital AEs than other surgical disciplines, but PSIs were not uncommon. With the establishment of national basal PSI rates in plastic surgery patients, benchmarks can be devised and target areas for quality improvement efforts identified. Further prospective studies should be designed to elucidate the drivers of AEs identified in this population.

  9. Effects of Nursing Practice Environments on Quality Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Liang, Yulan; Dickson, Geri L.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether nurse staffing levels and modifiable characteristics of the nursing practice environment are associated with important quality indicators represented by the percentage of residents with pressure ulcers and numbers of deficiency citations in nursing homes. A cross-sectional design linked nurse survey data, aggregated to the facility level, with Nursing Home Compare, a publicly available federal database containing nursing home–level measures of quality. The facility sample consisted of 63 Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New Jersey, and the nurse survey sample comprised 340 registered nurses providing direct resident care. Characteristics of the practice environment were measured using the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, included in the nurse survey. The total number of deficiency citations, the percentage of residents with pressure ulcers, nurse staffing levels, and facility characteristics were extracted from the Nursing Home Compare database. Results indicated that a supportive practice environment was inversely associated with the percentage of residents with pressure ulcers and fully mediated the effect of profit status on this important outcome. The nursing practice environment and facility size explained 25% of the variance in quality deficiencies. There were no associations between staffing levels and quality indicators. Findings indicate that administrative initiatives to create environments that support nursing practice may hold promise for improving quality indicators in nursing homes. PMID:21054327

  10. Quality indicators for patient safety in primary care. A review and Delphi-survey by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Frigola-Capell, Eva; Pareja-Rossell, Clara; Gens-Barber, Montse; Oliva-Oliva, Glòria; Alava-Cano, Fernando; Wensing, Michel; Davins-Miralles, Josep

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Quality indicators are measured aspects of healthcare, reflecting the performance of a healthcare provider or healthcare system. They have a crucial role in programmes to assess and improve healthcare. Many performance measures for primary care have been developed. Only the Catalan model for patient safety in primary care identifies key domains of patient safety in primary care. Objective: To present an international framework for patient safety indicators in primary care. Methods: Literature review and online Delphi-survey, starting from the Catalan model. Results: A set of 30 topics is presented, identified by an international panel and organized according to the Catalan model for patient safety in primary care. Most topic areas referred to specific clinical processes; additional topics were leadership, people management, partnership and resources. Conclusion: The framework can be used to organize indicator development and guide further work in the field. PMID:26339833

  11. 78 FR 10181 - Global Quality Systems-An Integrated Approach To Improving Medical Product Safety; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Global Quality Systems--An Integrated Approach To Improving... ``Global Quality Systems--An Integrated Approach to Improving Medical Product Safety.'' This 2-day public... With Implementation of U.S.P. 35 on a Global Basis. Pilot Program for Abbreviated Drug Inspections....

  12. Receptionist input to quality and safety in repeat prescribing in UK general practice: ethnographic case study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Myall, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe, explore, and compare organisational routines for repeat prescribing in general practice to identify contributors and barriers to safety and quality. Design Ethnographic case study. Setting Four urban UK general practices with diverse organisational characteristics using electronic patient records that supported semi-automation of repeat prescribing. Participants 395 hours of ethnographic observation of staff (25 doctors, 16 nurses, 4 healthcare assistants, 6 managers, and 56 reception or administrative staff), and 28 documents and other artefacts relating to repeat prescribing locally and nationally. Main outcome measures Potential threats to patient safety and characteristics of good practice. Methods Observation of how doctors, receptionists, and other administrative staff contributed to, and collaborated on, the repeat prescribing routine. Analysis included mapping prescribing routines, building a rich description of organisational practices, and drawing these together through narrative synthesis. This was informed by a sociological model of how organisational routines shape and are shaped by information and communications technologies. Results Repeat prescribing was a complex, technology-supported social practice requiring collaboration between clinical and administrative staff, with important implications for patient safety. More than half of requests for repeat prescriptions were classed as “exceptions” by receptionists (most commonly because the drug, dose, or timing differed from what was on the electronic repeat list). They managed these exceptions by making situated judgments that enabled them (sometimes but not always) to bridge the gap between the idealised assumptions about tasks, roles, and interactions that were built into the electronic patient record and formal protocols, and the actual repeat prescribing routine as it played out in practice. This work was creative and demanded both explicit and tacit knowledge

  13. The effect of leader communication style on safety-conscious work environments at domestic nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Edward Michael

    Public risk from unsafe nuclear power plant operations increases when plant workers are reluctant to raise issues and concerns. The effect of leader communication style on the safety-conscious work environment (SCWE) at domestic nuclear power plants was evaluated using a descriptive quantitative research study. A sample of 379 plant employees was surveyed to determine leader communication style elements that foster SCWE. The results reveal that leader communication style significantly affects a safety-conscious work environment. Specific attributes such as wit, articulation, self-disclosure, and social composure, confirmation, and experience, were proven to directly affect worker's likelihood to raise issues and concerns. The direct effect of leader, communication style on safe plant operations and the communication actions leaders can take to improve the safety of those operations is discussed.

  14. 15 CFR 971.804 - Amendment to regulations for conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sea. The Administrator may amend the regulations in this part and 15 CFR part 970 at any time as the... issued or maintained pursuant to this part or 15 CFR part 970, except that amended regulations which... conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and property at sea. 971.804 Section...

  15. 15 CFR 971.804 - Amendment to regulations for conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sea. The Administrator may amend the regulations in this part and 15 CFR part 970 at any time as the... issued or maintained pursuant to this part or 15 CFR part 970, except that amended regulations which... conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and property at sea. 971.804 Section...

  16. 15 CFR 971.804 - Amendment to regulations for conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sea. The Administrator may amend the regulations in this part and 15 CFR part 970 at any time as the... issued or maintained pursuant to this part or 15 CFR part 970, except that amended regulations which... conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and property at sea. 971.804 Section...

  17. 15 CFR 971.804 - Amendment to regulations for conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sea. The Administrator may amend the regulations in this part and 15 CFR part 970 at any time as the... issued or maintained pursuant to this part or 15 CFR part 970, except that amended regulations which... conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and property at sea. 971.804 Section...

  18. 15 CFR 971.804 - Amendment to regulations for conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... sea. The Administrator may amend the regulations in this part and 15 CFR part 970 at any time as the... issued or maintained pursuant to this part or 15 CFR part 970, except that amended regulations which... conservation, protection of the environment, and safety of life and property at sea. 971.804 Section...

  19. Best Practices for Chemotherapy Administration in Pediatric Oncology: Quality and Safety Process Improvements (2015).

    PubMed

    Looper, Karen; Winchester, Kari; Robinson, Deborah; Price, Andrea; Langley, Rachel; Martin, Gina; Jones, Sally; Holloway, Jodi; Rosenberg, Susanne; Flake, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The administration of chemotherapy to children with cancer is a high-risk process that must be performed in a safe and consistent manner with high reliability. Clinical trials play a major role in the treatment of children with cancer; conformance to chemotherapy protocol requirements and accurate documentation in the medical record are critical. Inconsistencies in the administration and documentation of chemotherapy were identified as opportunities for errors to occur. A major process improvement was initiated to establish best practices for nurses who administer chemotherapy to children. An interdisciplinary team was formed to evaluate the current process and to develop best practices based on current evidence, protocol requirements, available resources, and safety requirements. The process improvement focused on the establishment of standardized and safe administration techniques, exact administration times, and consistent electronic documentation that could easily be retrieved in medical record audits. Quality improvement tools including SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation), process mapping, PDSA (Plan, Do. Study, Act) cycles, and quality metrics were used with this process improvement. The team established best practices in chemotherapy administration to children that have proven to be safe and reliable. Follow-up data have demonstrated that the project was highly successful and improved accuracy, patient and nurse safety, and effectiveness of chemotherapy administration.

  20. Male enhancement Nutraceuticals in the Middle East market: Claim, pharmaceutical quality and safety assessments.

    PubMed

    ElAgouri, Ghada; ElAmrawy, Fatema; ElYazbi, Ahmed; Eshra, Ahmed; Nounou, Mohamed I

    2015-08-15

    The global market is invaded by male enhancement nutraceuticals claimed to be of natural origin sold with a major therapeutic claim. Most of these products have been reported by international systems like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We hypothesize that these products could represent a major threat to the health of the consumers. In this paper, pharmaceutical evaluation of some of these nutraceutical products sold in Egypt under the therapeutic claim of treating erectile dysfunction, are discussed along with pharmacological evaluation to investigate their safety and efficacy parameters. Samples were analyzed utterly using conventional methods, i.e.: HPLC, HPTLC, NIR, content uniformity and weight variation and friability. The SeDeM system was used for quality assessment. On the basis of the results of this research, the sampled products are adulterated and totally heterogeneous in their adulterant drug content and pharmaceutical quality. These products represent a major safety threat for the consumers in Egypt and the Middle East, especially; the target audience is mostly affected with heart and blood pressure problems seeking natural and safe alternatives to the well-established Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors (PDE-5Is).

  1. Microbiological Quality and Food Safety of Plants Grown on ISS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to select and advance methods to enable real-time sampling, microbiological analysis, and sanitation of crops grown on the International Space Station (ISS). These methods would validate the microbiological quality of crops grown for consumption to ensure safe and palatable fresh foods. This would be achieved through the development / advancement of microbiological sample collection, rapid pathogen detection and effective sanitation methods that are compatible with a microgravity environment.

  2. Test plan and report for Space Shuttle launch environment testing of Bergen cable technology safety cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, John

    1992-01-01

    Bergen Cable Technology (BCT) has introduced a new product they refer to as 'safety cable'. This product is intended as a replacement for lockwire when installed per Aerospace Standard (AS) 4536 (included in Appendix D of this document). Installation of safety cable is reportedly faster and more uniform than lockwire. NASA/GSFC proposes to use this safety cable in Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP) applications on upcoming Shuttle missions. To assure that BCT safety cable will provide positive locking of fasteners equivalent to lockwire, the SSPP will conduct vibration and pull tests of the safety cable.

  3. Urban environment and well-being: cross-cultural studies on Perceived Residential Environment Quality Indicators (PREQIs).

    PubMed

    Bonaiuto, Marino; Fornara, Ferdinando; Alves, Susana; Ferreira, Ines; Mao, Yanhui; Moffat, Eva; Piccinin, Gloria; Rahimi, Leila

    2015-09-01

    Architectural and environmental psychology literature has shown the importance of urban design in provoking stress feelings or enhancing well-being and quality of life. The aim of this contribution is to show the main results of a set of cross-cultural survey studies concerning the perceived quality of urban features at the neighbourhood level. A questionnaire was used including the extended or the short version of the 11 scales measuring Perceived Residential Environment Quality Indicators (PREQIs), which cover architectural, social, functional, and contextual aspects. Both versions of PREQIs showed a similar factorial structure and a good (or at least acceptable) reliability across different geographical contexts, even though some differences emerged in those countries that are more distant from the Western linguistic and cultural milieu. The development of tools like PREQIs should increase a "user-centred" vision on urban issues.

  4. Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) use social information as an indicator of safety in dangerous environments

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Erika H.; Chittka, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Avoiding predation is one of the most important challenges that an animal faces. Several anti-predation behaviours can be employed, yet simply using the presence of conspecifics can be a good signal of safety in an environment with potential predation hazards. Here, we show, for the first time, that past experience of predation causes bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to aggregate with conspecifics, facilitating the identification of safe foraging patches. Bees were trained to differentiate between flowers that harboured predators and flowers that were predator free. When test subjects were subsequently presented solely with the previously predator-infested flower species, there was a significant preference to only land on flowers occupied by other feeding conspecifics. Yet, when safe flowers were made available to subjects previously entrained to discriminate safe from predator-occupied flowers, subjects ignored other bees and the social information potentially provided by them, demonstrating that attraction towards conspecifics is confined to dangerous situations. Our findings demonstrate a previously unknown social interaction in pollinators which may have important implications for plant–pollinator interactions. PMID:24789891

  5. Environment, safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the DOE Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. The assessment, which was conducted during the period of May 17 through May 28, 1993, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices (Defense Programs (DP) and Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM)), the DOE Rocky Flats Office (RFO), and the site contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G). Despite the near constant state of flux under which RFP has been required to operate, the Progress Assessment Team has concluded that significant progress has been made in correcting the deficiencies identified in the 1989 Assessment and in responding responsibly to regulations, and DOE directives and guidance that have been issued since that time. The Team concluded that the improvements have been concentrated in the activities associated with plutonium facilities and in regulatory driven programs. Much remains to be done with respect to implementing on a sitewide basis those management systems that anchor an organization`s pursuit of continuous ES&H improvement. Furthermore the Team concluded that the pace of improvement has been constrained by a combination of factors that have limited the site`s ability to manage change in the pursuit of sitewide ES&H excellence.

  6. Environment, safety, and health considerations for a neutrino source based on a muon storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    J. Donald Cossairt

    2000-05-15

    The Neutrino Source presents a number of challenges in the general area of environment, safety, and health. It is the intent of this paper to identify these challenges and make a preliminary, but not detailed assessment of how they might be addressed and of their potential impact on the project. Some of the considerations which must be taken into account are very similar to those that have been encountered and solved during the construction and operation of other facilities at Fermilab and at similar laboratories elsewhere in the US and worldwide. Other considerations have not been encountered previously in connection with the construction and operation of accelerator laboratories. These novel issues will require particular attention as such a project proceeds to assure their timely resolution in a manner that is cost-effective and that meets the approval of the public. In this paper, both the conventional and the novel issues are discussed, with more emphasis on the latter. It is concluded here that with adequate planning in the design stages, these problems can be adequately addressed in a manner that merits the support of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and the public. An abbreviated version of this paper appears as Chapter 14 in the report of a recent feasibility study (Ho 00)and the figures have come from that work.

  7. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS), near Chicago, Illinois, conducted from October 25 through November 9, 1993. During the Progress Assessment, activities included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the DOE Office of Energy Research (ER); CH, which includes the Argonne Area Office; the University of Chicago; and the contractor`s organization responsible for operation of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of DOE`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the AIS ES&H Progress Assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy, senior DOE managers, and contractor management with concise independent information on the following: change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from the previous Tiger Team Assessment; adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment process of the DOE line organizations, the site management, and the operating contractor; and effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems and new ES&H initiatives.

  8. Predicting Fatigue and Psychophysiological Test Performance from Speech for Safety-Critical Environments

    PubMed Central

    Baykaner, Khan Richard; Huckvale, Mark; Whiteley, Iya; Andreeva, Svetlana; Ryumin, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Automatic systems for estimating operator fatigue have application in safety-critical environments. A system which could estimate level of fatigue from speech would have application in domains where operators engage in regular verbal communication as part of their duties. Previous studies on the prediction of fatigue from speech have been limited because of their reliance on subjective ratings and because they lack comparison to other methods for assessing fatigue. In this paper, we present an analysis of voice recordings and psychophysiological test scores collected from seven aerospace personnel during a training task in which they remained awake for 60 h. We show that voice features and test scores are affected by both the total time spent awake and the time position within each subject’s circadian cycle. However, we show that time spent awake and time-of-day information are poor predictors of the test results, while voice features can give good predictions of the psychophysiological test scores and sleep latency. Mean absolute errors of prediction are possible within about 17.5% for sleep latency and 5–12% for test scores. We discuss the implications for the use of voice as a means to monitor the effects of fatigue on cognitive performance in practical applications. PMID:26380259

  9. Site Environmental Report for 2004. Volume 1, Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-30

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.1 The Site Environmental Report for 2004 summarizes Berkeley Lab’s environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2004. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as “Berkeley Lab,” “the Laboratory,” “Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,” and “LBNL.”) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from these activities. This year, the Site Environmental Report was distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request.

  10. Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) use social information as an indicator of safety in dangerous environments.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Erika H; Chittka, Lars

    2014-06-22

    Avoiding predation is one of the most important challenges that an animal faces. Several anti-predation behaviours can be employed, yet simply using the presence of conspecifics can be a good signal of safety in an environment with potential predation hazards. Here, we show, for the first time, that past experience of predation causes bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to aggregate with conspecifics, facilitating the identification of safe foraging patches. Bees were trained to differentiate between flowers that harboured predators and flowers that were predator free. When test subjects were subsequently presented solely with the previously predator-infested flower species, there was a significant preference to only land on flowers occupied by other feeding conspecifics. Yet, when safe flowers were made available to subjects previously entrained to discriminate safe from predator-occupied flowers, subjects ignored other bees and the social information potentially provided by them, demonstrating that attraction towards conspecifics is confined to dangerous situations. Our findings demonstrate a previously unknown social interaction in pollinators which may have important implications for plant-pollinator interactions.

  11. Effects of abiotic stress and crop management on cereal grain composition: implications for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Curtis, Tanya Y; Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    The effects of abiotic stresses and crop management on cereal grain composition are reviewed, focusing on phytochemicals, vitamins, fibre, protein, free amino acids, sugars, and oils. These effects are discussed in the context of nutritional and processing quality and the potential for formation of processing contaminants, such as acrylamide, furan, hydroxymethylfurfuryl, and trans fatty acids. The implications of climate change for cereal grain quality and food safety are considered. It is concluded that the identification of specific environmental stresses that affect grain composition in ways that have implications for food quality and safety and how these stresses interact with genetic factors and will be affected by climate change needs more investigation. Plant researchers and breeders are encouraged to address the issue of processing contaminants or risk appearing out of touch with major end-users in the food industry, and not to overlook the effects of environmental stresses and crop management on crop composition, quality, and safety as they strive to increase yield.

  12. The human factors of quality and QA in R D environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    Achieving quality is a human activity. It is therefore important to consider the human in the design, development and evaluation of work processes and environments in an effort to enhance human performance and minimize error. It is also important to allow for individual differences when considering human factors issues. Human Factors is the field of study which can provide information on integrating the human into the system. Human factors and quality are related for the customer of R D work, R D personnel who perform the work, and the quality professional who overviews the process of quality in the work. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  13. The quality of children's home environment and attachment security in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Zevalkink, Jolien; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; Bradley, Robert H

    2008-03-01

    The authors examined the relation of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory (B. M. Caldwell & R. H. Bradley, 1984) for 0- to 6-year-old Sundanese Indonesian children with the quality of the mother-child attachment relationship (n=44) and attachment-related behaviors during play interactions (n=37) and with characteristics of the Indonesian caregiving context (N=77). Results showed that infants and toddlers with secure attachment relationships lived in higher quality home environments than did children with insecure attachment relationships. In particular, children with insecure-resistant attachment relationships lived in more unsafe and less organized homes with less play material available. For preschoolers, a lower quality home environment predicted more negativity and noncompliance toward their mothers in a play setting outside the home. With regard to the caregiving context, the socioeconomic status of the family was strongly related to the quality of preschoolers' home environment. Scores on the HOME Inventory for Infants/Toddlers and the HOME Inventory for Early Childhood were related to other culture-specific contextual characteristics for 0- to 6-year old Indonesian children as well. As a whole, the HOME was a good indicator of the general quality of the Sundanese Indonesian home environment. PMID:18476478

  14. Quality management and the work environment: an empirical investigation in a public sector organization.

    PubMed

    Taveira, Alvaro D; James, Craig A; Karsh, Ben -Tzion; Sainfort, François

    2003-07-01

    The integration of quality management initiatives, particularly total quality management (TQM), and ergonomics has received increasing attention from scholars and practitioners. Above all, the question of how TQM programs relate to ergonomic aspects of organizational design and culture is at the center of this discussion. This study examines how elements of a "typical", Deming-inspired, TQM program in the public sector interact with the work environment. Elements of the TQM program were defined and measured using the Malcom Baldridge Award criteria. The specific elements examined were "Management Support of Quality", "Information and Analysis", "Human Resources", "Processes and Quality Results", and "Customer Focus and Satisfaction". The relationship between these TQM elements and the work environment were defined through five separate hypotheses. The work environment was described by the constructs "Supervisor Support", "Task Clarity", "Task Orientation", and "Innovation". Data were obtained through survey questionnaires administered to employees of four departments in a municipal government organization. Results supported three of the hypotheses, but produced some unanticipated outcomes with regard to the other two. Namely, "Management Support of Quality" was significantly related to "Supervisor Support", "Task Orientation", "Task Clarity" and "Innovation"; "Human Resources" was significantly related to "Supervisor Support"; "Processes and Quality Results" was significantly related to "Task Orientation" and "Innovation". Contrary to predicted "Information and Analysis" was negatively related to "Innovation", and "Customer Focus" was unrelated to any of the outcome variables. The relationships between these TQM elements and work environment dimensions are discussed. Implications for TQM and ergonomic practice are analyzed, and directions for future research proposed.

  15. [JUSTIFICATION OF USING EQUIVALENCE OF THE INDICES OF QUALITY, SAFETY, AND EFFICACY IN DEVELOPING BIOANALOGS].

    PubMed

    Niyazov, R R; Goryachev, D V; Gavrishina, E V; Romodanovskii, D P; Dranitsyna, M A

    2015-01-01

    We describe general principles of demonstrating biosimilarity, as well as selecting the biosimilarity margins. Any change in the structure of a biological molecule can modify its functional activity. Therefore, therapeutic equivalence between a biosimilar product and the corresponding reference product cannot be demonstrated using a single criterion. To demonstrate biosimilarity between two medicinal products, their various characteristics have to be evaluated which may, directly or indirectly, justify that clinically significant differences are absent. Insufficient understanding of 6ritical quality attributes brings a risk for the biosimilar product developer. This will either increase the number of non-clinical and clinical tests and trials needed or will result in awareness that the manufacturing process needs to be improved at the late stages of development, after investing significant resources in the development process. At the same time, the specification of the biological medicinal product cannot solely ensure safety and efficacy thereof. Properly characterized and controlled manufacturing process, which ensures consistency in its attributes not adequately controlled in specifications but influencing safety and efficacy profiles and showing their relevance in non-clinical tests and clinical trials, is an additional quality assurance factor. Justification of all development strategy details, including biosimilarity margins, has to be provided each time when the development process is initiated or when proceeding to the next steps. All problems encountered by the developer have to be resolved in close communication with the regulatory authority. In order to increase the quality of investigation and developer's adherence to good practices, clinical trial results should be published in detail. PMID:26292513

  16. Health professional networks as a vector for improving healthcare quality and safety: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ranmuthugala, Geetha; Plumb, Jennifer; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background While there is a considerable corpus of theoretical and empirical literature on networks within and outside of the health sector, multiple research questions are yet to be answered. Objective To conduct a systematic review of studies of professionals' network structures, identifying factors associated with network effectiveness and sustainability, particularly in relation to quality of care and patient safety. Methods The authors searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science and Business Source Premier from January 1995 to December 2009. Results A majority of the 26 unique studies identified used social network analysis to examine structural relationships in networks: structural relationships within and between networks, health professionals and their social context, health collaboratives and partnerships, and knowledge sharing networks. Key aspects of networks explored were administrative and clinical exchanges, network performance, integration, stability and influences on the quality of healthcare. More recent studies show that cohesive and collaborative health professional networks can facilitate the coordination of care and contribute to improving quality and safety of care. Structural network vulnerabilities include cliques, professional and gender homophily, and over-reliance on central agencies or individuals. Conclusions Effective professional networks employ natural structural network features (eg, bridges, brokers, density, centrality, degrees of separation, social capital, trust) in producing collaboratively oriented healthcare. This requires efficient transmission of information and social and professional interaction within and across networks. For those using networks to improve care, recurring success factors are understanding your network's characteristics, attending to its functioning and investing time in facilitating its improvement. Despite this, there is no guarantee that time spent on networks will necessarily improve patient

  17. Microbiological safety and quality of Mozzarella cheese assessed by the microbiological survey method.

    PubMed

    Losito, Francesca; Arienzo, Alyexandra; Bottini, Giorgia; Priolisi, Francesca Romana; Mari, Alberto; Antonini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Dairy products are characterized by reduced shelf life because they are an excellent growth medium for a wide range of microorganisms. For this reason, it is important to monitor the microbiological quality of dairy products and, in particular, the total viable count and concentration of Escherichia coli, as they are indicators of the hygienic state of these products. In addition, in dairy products such as Mozzarella cheese, it is important to monitor the concentration of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as they are the major components of starter cultures used in cheese production, contributing to the taste and texture of fermented products and inhibiting food spoilage bacteria by producing growth-inhibiting substances. For these reasons, to ensure the quality and safety of their products, cheese makers should monitor frequently, during fresh cheese production, the concentration of LAB and spoilage bacteria. However, usually, small- to medium-size dairy factories do not have an internal microbiological laboratory and external laboratories of analysis are often too expensive and require several days for the results. Compared with traditional methods, the microbiological survey (MBS) method developed by Roma Tre University (Rome, Italy) allows faster and less-expensive microbiological analyses to be conducted wherever they are necessary, without the need for a microbiological laboratory or any instrumentation other than MBS vials and a thermostat. In this paper, we report the primary validation of the MBS method to monitor LAB concentration in Mozzarella cheese and the analysis, using the MBS method, of total viable count, E. coli, and LAB concentrations in the production line of Mozzarella cheese as well as during the shelf life of the product stored at 20°C. The results obtained indicate that the MBS method may be successfully used by small- to medium-size dairy factories that do not have an internal microbiological laboratory. Using the MBS method, these dairy

  18. Safety

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the methods that all rocketeers should use to create a safe and fun rocket environment. As a reminder, these videos are for instructional purposes only and are not meant to rep...

  19. Case study of physician leaders in quality and patient safety, and the development of a physician leadership network.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Chris; Yousefi, Vandad; Wallington, Tamara; Ginzburg, Amir

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need for physician leadership in quality and patient safety, and emerging evidence that physician leadership contributes to improved care. Hospitals are beginning to establish physician leader positions; however, there is little guidance on how to define these roles and the strategies physician leaders can use toward improving care. This case study examines the roles of four physician leaders, describes their contribution to the design and implementation of hospital quality and patient safety agendas and discusses the creation of a physician network to support these activities. The positions were established between July 2006 and April 2009. All are corporate roles with varying reporting and accountability structures. The physician leads are involved in strategic planning, identifying and leading quality and safety initiatives, physician engagement and culture change. All have significantly contributed to the implementation of hospital improvement activities and are seen as influential among their peers as resources and mentors for local project success. Despite their accomplishments, these physician leads have been challenged by ambiguous role descriptions and difficulty identifying effective improvement strategies. As such, an expanding physician network was created with the goal of sharing approaches and tools and creating new strategies. Physician leaders are an important factor in the improvement of safety and quality within hospitals. This case study provides a template for the creation of such positions and highlights the importance of networking as an effective strategy for improving local care and advancing professional development of physician leaders in quality and patient safety. PMID:20959733

  20. Quality Detection of Litchi Stored in Different Environments Using an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sai; Lü, Enli; Lu, Huazhong; Zhou, Zhiyan; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Yajuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to explore the utility of an electronic nose to detect the quality of litchi fruit stored in different environments. In this study, a PEN3 electronic nose was adopted to test the storage time and hardness of litchi that were stored in three different types of environment (room temperature, refrigerator and controlled-atmosphere). After acquiring data about the hardness of the sample and from the electronic nose, linear discriminant analysis (LDA), canonical correlation analysis (CCA), BP neural network (BPNN) and BP neural network-partial least squares regression (BPNN-PLSR), were employed for data processing. The experimental results showed that the hardness of litchi fruits stored in all three environments decreased during storage. The litchi stored at room temperature had the fastest rate of decrease in hardness, followed by those stored in a refrigerator environment and under a controlled-atmosphere. LDA has a poor ability to classify the storage time of the three environments in which litchi was stored. BPNN can effectively recognize the storage time of litchi stored in a refrigerator and a controlled-atmosphere environment. However, the BPNN classification of the effect of room temperature storage on litchi was poor. CCA results show a significant correlation between electronic nose data and hardness data under the room temperature, and the correlation is more obvious for those under the refrigerator environment and controlled-atmosphere environment. The BPNN-PLSR can effectively predict the hardness of litchi under refrigerator storage conditions and a controlled-atmosphere environment. However, the BPNN-PLSR prediction of the effect of room temperature storage on litchi and global environment storage on litchi were poor. Thus, this experiment proved that an electronic nose can detect the quality of litchi under refrigeratored storage and a controlled-atmosphere environment. These results provide a useful reference for future

  1. Microbial Quality of Water in Rural Households of Ethiopia: Implications for Milk Safety and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Marisa; André, Markemann; Valle Zárate, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Waterborne pathogenic agents affect the health of people either by direct consumption of contaminated water or by its indirect use in food production and/or processing. Studies on the microbiological quality of water in rural areas of Ethiopia are still limited, especially at the household level. The aim of the present study was to assess the microbial quality of water from different sources in rural households in two districts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley area. The correlation between E. coli counts in water and milk was also investigated. In total, 233 water samples (126 collected in dry and 107 in wet season) and 53 milk samples (19 from raw milk and 36 from processed milk products) were analyzed for E. coli contamination. The overall prevalence of E. coli in water samples was 54.9% (n=233). In most of the analyzed samples, a higher prevalence of E. coli was recorded during the wet compared to the dry season. The highest load of E. coli was detected in water samples from dugouts. The quality of raw milk and traditionally-processed milk products showed variations between districts, and the traditionally-processed milk products were found to contain higher E. coli loads than raw milk. The correlation between the E. coli counts in water and milk only showed a weak but positive relationship (r=0.1). Taking E. coli as a proxy for water quality, the microbiological quality of water consumed in the study area was found to be very poor, posing a potential food safety and health risk to the rural communities. PMID:25076657

  2. Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Program: Benefits of Improving Air Quality in the School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools (IAQ TfS) Program to help schools prevent, identify, and resolve their IAQ problems. This publication describes the program and its advantages, explaining that through simple, low-cost measures, schools can: reduce IAQ-related health risks and…

  3. Novel edible coating based on aloe vera gel to maintain table grape quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Juan Miguel; Valero, Daniel; Martínez-Romero, Domingo; Guillén, Fabián; Castillo, Salvador; Serrano, María

    2005-10-01

    A novel edible coating based on Aloe vera gel obtained according to SP Patent Filed 200302937 has been used as a means of preservation to maintain the quality and safety of cv. Crimson Seedless table grapes during cold storage and subsequent shelf life. Table grapes have a crucial economic value as a dessert fruit, but once harvested show a reduction of shelf life due to a rapid loss of quality. Uncoated clusters showed a rapid deterioration with an estimated shelf life period of 7 days at 1 degrees C plus 4 days at 20 degrees C, based on the fast weight loss, color changes, accelerated softening and ripening, rachis browning, and high incidence of berry decay. On the contrary, those clusters treated with A. vera gel significantly delayed the above parameters related to postharvest quality losses, and storability could be extended up to 35 days at 1 degrees C. Interestingly, this edible coating was able to reduce the initial microbial counts for both mesophillic aerobic and yeast and molds, which significantly increased in uncoated berries over storage. Moreover, the sensory analyses revealed beneficial effects in terms of delaying rachis browning and dehydration and maintenance of the visual aspect of the berry without any detrimental effect on taste, aroma, or flavors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time A. vera gel has been used as an edible coating in fruits, which would be an innovative and interesting means for commercial application and an alternative to the use of postharvest chemical treatments. PMID:16190634

  4. Novel edible coating based on aloe vera gel to maintain table grape quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Juan Miguel; Valero, Daniel; Martínez-Romero, Domingo; Guillén, Fabián; Castillo, Salvador; Serrano, María

    2005-10-01

    A novel edible coating based on Aloe vera gel obtained according to SP Patent Filed 200302937 has been used as a means of preservation to maintain the quality and safety of cv. Crimson Seedless table grapes during cold storage and subsequent shelf life. Table grapes have a crucial economic value as a dessert fruit, but once harvested show a reduction of shelf life due to a rapid loss of quality. Uncoated clusters showed a rapid deterioration with an estimated shelf life period of 7 days at 1 degrees C plus 4 days at 20 degrees C, based on the fast weight loss, color changes, accelerated softening and ripening, rachis browning, and high incidence of berry decay. On the contrary, those clusters treated with A. vera gel significantly delayed the above parameters related to postharvest quality losses, and storability could be extended up to 35 days at 1 degrees C. Interestingly, this edible coating was able to reduce the initial microbial counts for both mesophillic aerobic and yeast and molds, which significantly increased in uncoated berries over storage. Moreover, the sensory analyses revealed beneficial effects in terms of delaying rachis browning and dehydration and maintenance of the visual aspect of the berry without any detrimental effect on taste, aroma, or flavors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time A. vera gel has been used as an edible coating in fruits, which would be an innovative and interesting means for commercial application and an alternative to the use of postharvest chemical treatments.

  5. DICOM index tracker enterprise: advanced system for enterprise-wide quality assurance and patient safety monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Pavlicek, William; Panda, Anshuman; Langer, Steve G.; Morin, Richard; Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Paden, Robert; Hanson, James; Wu, Lin-Wei; Wu, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    DICOM Index Tracker (DIT) is an integrated platform to harvest rich information available from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to improve quality assurance in radiology practices. It is designed to capture and maintain longitudinal patient-specific exam indices of interests for all diagnostic and procedural uses of imaging modalities. Thus, it effectively serves as a quality assurance and patient safety monitoring tool. The foundation of DIT is an intelligent database system which stores the information accepted and parsed via a DICOM receiver and parser. The database system enables the basic dosimetry analysis. The success of DIT implementation at Mayo Clinic Arizona calls for the DIT deployment at the enterprise level which requires significant improvements. First, for geographically distributed multi-site implementation, the first bottleneck is the communication (network) delay; the second is the scalability of the DICOM parser to handle the large volume of exams from different sites. To address this issue, DICOM receiver and parser are separated and decentralized by site. To facilitate the enterprise wide Quality Assurance (QA), a notable challenge is the great diversities of manufacturers, modalities and software versions, as the solution DIT Enterprise provides the standardization tool for device naming, protocol naming, physician naming across sites. Thirdly, advanced analytic engines are implemented online which support the proactive QA in DIT Enterprise.

  6. Bacterial quality and safety of packaged fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level in Finland.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, L-L; Joutsen, S; Lunden, J; Hänninen, M-L; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M

    2016-09-01

    Consumption of packaged fresh leafy vegetables, which are convenient ready-to-eat products, has increased during the last decade. The number of foodborne outbreaks associated with these products has concurrently increased. In our study, (1) label information, (2) O2/CO2 composition, (3) bacterial quality and (4) safety of 100 fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level were studied in Finland during 2013. Bacterial quality was studied using aerobic bacteria (AB) and coliform bacteria (CB) counts, and searching for the presence of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Yersinia. The safety was studied by the presence of Salmonella, ail-positive Yersinia, stx-positive E. coli (STEC) and Listeria monocytogenes using PCR and culturing. Important label information was unavailable on several packages originating from different companies. The packaging date was missing on all packages and the date of durability on 83% of the packages. Storage temperature was declared on 62% of the packages and 73% of the packages contained information about prewashing. The batch/lot number was missing on 29% of the packages. Very low oxygen (O2) (<1%) and elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) (2-22%) concentrations were measured in all packages labelled to contain a protective atmosphere. O2 and CO2 concentrations varied widely in the rest of the packages. AB and CB counts were high in the leafy vegetable samples varying between 6.2 and 10.6 and 4.2-8.3logcfu/g, respectively. In most of the samples, the AB and CB counts exceeded 10(8) and 10(6)cfu/g, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the AB and CB counts. E. coli was isolated from 15% of the samples and Yersinia from 33%. L. monocytogenes was isolated from two samples and ail-positive Y. enterocolitica in one. Using PCR, STEC was detected in seven samples, and Salmonella and ail-positive Y. enterocolitica in two samples each. The AB and CB mean values of products originating from different companies varied widely. High AB and CB

  7. Effects of toxic work environments on sperm quality and ascorbic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, E.B.; Harris, W.A.; Powell, L.C. )

    1990-02-26

    Surveys have shown that toxic work environments lower sperm quality, and controlled studies indicate that ascorbic acid supplementation improves sperm viability and agglutination. The sperm quality of 50 subjects each from: (1) office workers, (2) a lead smelter, (3) petroleum refineries, and (4) a herbicide plant were compared with serum and semen ascorbic acid levels. The sperm characteristics studied were: count as million/ml and as percent; viability, motility, clumping, and abnormal morphology. The serum ascorbic acid levels were directly proportional to sperm viability and inversely correlated to clumping of all groups. Moreover, serum ascorbic acid levels were also inversely correlated to twin tail and amorphous forms of abnormal sperm morphology. The results of the study indicate that toxic environments depress sperm quality and suggest that ascorbic acid supplementation will improve sperm quality and fertility.

  8. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report culminates the work accomplished during a three year design project on the automation of an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) suitable for space travel and colonization. The system would provide a comfortable living environment in space that is fully functional with limited human supervision. A completely automated ECLSS would increase astronaut productivity while contributing to their safety and comfort. The first section of this report, section 1.0, briefly explains the project, its goals, and the scheduling used by the team in meeting these goals. Section 2.0 presents an in-depth look at each of the component subsystems. Each subsection describes the mathematical modeling and computer simulation used to represent that portion of the system. The individual models have been integrated into a complete computer simulation of the CO2 removal process. In section 3.0, the two simulation control schemes are described. The classical control approach uses traditional methods to control the mechanical equipment. The expert control system uses fuzzy logic and artificial intelligence to control the system. By integrating the two control systems with the mathematical computer simulation, the effectiveness of the two schemes can be compared. The results are then used as proof of concept in considering new control schemes for the entire ECLSS. Section 4.0 covers the results and trends observed when the model was subjected to different test situations. These results provide insight into the operating procedures of the model and the different control schemes. The appendix, section 5.0, contains summaries of lectures presented during the past year, homework assignments, and the completed source code used for the computer simulation and control system.

  9. MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT SAFETY & HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (ISMS) CORE FUNCTION FOR FEEDBACK & CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    VON WEBER, M.

    2005-07-26

    Management assessment is required of US Department of Energy contractors by 10 CFR 830.122 and DOE Order 414.1. The management assessment process is a rigorous, preplanned, forward-looking review. It is required to be performed by owners of the processes that are being assessed. Written from the perspective of the Assessment Program Director and an Assessment Specialist, this paper describes the evolution of the process used by CH2MHILL to implement its management assessment program over the past two years including: roles, responsibilities, and details about our program improvement project designed to produce a clear picture of management processes and to identify opportunities for improvement. The management assessment program is essential to successful implementation, maintenance, and improvement of the CH2MHILL Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS). The management assessment program implements, in part, ISMS Core Function No. 5. ''Feedback and Continuous Improvement''. Organizations use the management assessment process to assess ISMS implementation and effectiveness. Management assessments evaluate the total picture of how well management processes are meeting organizational objectives and the customer's requirements and expectations. The emphasis is on management issues affecting performance, systems, and processes such as: strategic planning, qualification, training, staffing, organizational interfaces, communication, cost and schedule control and mission objectives. Management assessments should identify any weaknesses in the management aspects of performance and make process improvements. All managers from first line supervisors to the president and general manager are involved in the management assessment process. More senior managers, in conducting their assessment, will use data from lower levels of management. This approach will facilitate the objective of having managers closer to the work under review focusing on more

  10. Using quality and safety education for nurses to guide clinical teaching on a new dedicated education unit.

    PubMed

    McKown, Terri; McKeon, Leslie; McKown, Leslie; Webb, Sherry

    2011-12-01

    Gaps exist in health professional education versus the demands of current practice. Leveraging front-line nurses to teach students exemplary practice in a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) may narrow this gap. The DEU is an innovative model for experiential learning, capitalizing on the expertise of staff nurses as clinical teachers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a new academic-practice DEU in facilitating quality and safety competency achievement among students. Six clinical teachers received education in clinical teaching and use of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies to guide acquisition of essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes for continuous health care improvement. Twelve students assigned to the six teachers completed daily logs for the 10-week practicum. Findings suggest that DEU students achieved QSEN competencies through clinical teacher mentoring in interdisciplinary collaboration, using electronic information for best practice and patient teaching, patient/family decision making, quality improvement, and resolution of safety issues.

  11. Quality of reporting in clinical trials of preharvest food safety interventions and associations with treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Jan M; Saint-Onge, Jacqueline; Valcour, James; Thompson, Adam; Elgie, Robyn; Snedeker, Kate; Marcynuk, Pasha

    2009-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for evaluating treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is important that RCTs are conducted with methodological rigor to prevent biased results and report results in a manner that allows the reader to evaluate internal and external validity. Most human health journals now require manuscripts to meet the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) criteria for reporting of RCTs. Our objective was to evaluate preharvest food safety trials using a modification of the CONSORT criteria to assess methodological quality and completeness of reporting, and to investigate associations between reporting and treatment effects. One hundred randomly selected trials were evaluated using a modified CONSORT statement. The majority of the selected trials (84%) used a deliberate disease challenge, with the remainder representing natural pathogen exposure. There were widespread deficiencies in the reporting of many trial features. Randomization, double blinding, and the number of subjects lost to follow-up were reported in only 46%, 0%, and 43% of trials, respectively. The inclusion criteria for study subjects were only described in 16% of trials, and the number of animals housed together was only stated in 52% of the trials. Although 91 trials had more than one outcome, no trials specified the primary outcome of interest. There were significant bivariable associations between the proportion of positive treatment effects and failure to report the number of subjects lost to follow-up, the number of animals housed together in a group, the level of treatment allocation, and possible study limitations. The results suggest that there are substantive deficiencies in reporting of preharvest food safety trials, and that these deficiencies may be associated with biased treatment effects. The creation and adoption of standards for reporting in preharvest food safety trials will help to ensure the inclusion of important trial details

  12. Developing a Framework for Evaluating the Patient Engagement, Quality, and Safety of Mobile Health Applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karandeep; Drouin, Kaitlin; Newmark, Lisa P; Rozenblum, Ronen; Lee, Jaeho; Landman, Adam; Pabo, Erika; Klinger, Elissa V; Bates, David W

    2016-02-01

    Rising ownership of smartphones and tablets across social and demographic groups has made mobile applications, or apps, a potentially promising tool for engaging patients in their health care, particularly those with high health care needs. Through a systematic search of iOS (Apple) and Android app stores and an analysis of apps targeting individuals with chronic illnesses, we assessed the degree to which apps are likely to be useful in patient engagement efforts. Usefulness was determined based on the following criteria: description of engagement, relevance to the targeted patient population, consumer ratings and reviews, and most recent app update. Among the 1,046 health care-related, patient-facing applications identified by our search, 43 percent of iOS apps and 27 percent of Android apps appeared likely to be useful. We also developed criteria for evaluating the patient engagement, quality, and safety of mobile apps. PMID:26934758

  13. Ensuring the quality, potency and safety of vaccines during preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Jose A; Wolf, Jayanthi J; Kaplanski, Catherine V; Ledwith, Brian J

    2005-12-01

    There is an abundance of vaccines currently in development, with most of them exploring novel mechanisms, adjuvants and/or delivery systems not only for traditional prophylactic use, but also for therapeutic uses. As vaccines are generally administered to healthy individuals, ensuring their quality, potency and safety becomes crucial, especially prior to evaluation in humans. To ensure these key attributes, vaccine developers need to incorporate them as early in the development program as possible, starting in basic research and continuing through preclinical, clinical and postmarketing development. Fortunately for vaccine developers, ample guidance is available from various regulatory agencies to enlighten the long and arduous path of vaccine development. This review will highlight these regulatory expectations, and provide some clarity as to why they are in place.

  14. Safety and quality in healthcare: what can England and Australia learn from each other?

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Australia and England have similar healthcare systems. They are affordable and accessible to all; both are blessed with health professionals of great skill. Anybody who falls ill in either country can expect a high standard of care. And yet, all is not well. The care we give our patients is not as safe as it should be and the community is becoming well aware of this. Our public healthcare systems never seem to have enough resources; our public hospitals show varying degrees of dilapidation. Access to care, while universal, is too often delayed. The medical workforce is understaffed, maldistributed (or both) and the shortage of nurses is of great concern. In both professions, morale is fragile. What, then, can be done to improve the safety and quality of healthcare in Australia and England? PMID:12617419

  15. Yeasts in foods and beverages: impact on product quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Graham H

    2007-04-01

    The role of yeasts in food and beverage production extends beyond the well-known bread, beer and wine fermentations. Molecular analytical technologies have led to a major revision of yeast taxonomy, and have facilitated the ecological study of yeasts in many other products. The mechanisms by which yeasts grow in these ecosystems and impact on product quality can now be studied at the level of gene expression. Their growth and metabolic activities are moderated by a network of strain and species interactions, including interactions with bacteria and other fungi. Some yeasts have been developed as agents for the biocontrol of food spoilage fungi, and others are being considered as novel probiotic organisms. The association of yeasts with opportunistic infections and other adverse responses in humans raises new issues in the field of food safety. PMID:17275276

  16. Yeasts in foods and beverages: impact on product quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Graham H

    2007-04-01

    The role of yeasts in food and beverage production extends beyond the well-known bread, beer and wine fermentations. Molecular analytical technologies have led to a major revision of yeast taxonomy, and have facilitated the ecological study of yeasts in many other products. The mechanisms by which yeasts grow in these ecosystems and impact on product quality can now be studied at the level of gene expression. Their growth and metabolic activities are moderated by a network of strain and species interactions, including interactions with bacteria and other fungi. Some yeasts have been developed as agents for the biocontrol of food spoilage fungi, and others are being considered as novel probiotic organisms. The association of yeasts with opportunistic infections and other adverse responses in humans raises new issues in the field of food safety.

  17. Validity of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Leavell, Patricia; Stockslager, Gregory; Mays, Catherine; Harvey, Dale; Duane, Therese M

    2013-06-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality developed Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) to screen for in-hospital complications and patient safety events through International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification coding. The purpose of this study was to validate 10 common surgically related PSIs at our academic medical center and investigate the causes for inaccuracies. We reviewed patient records between October 2011 and September 2012 at our urban academic medical center for 10 common surgically related PSIs. The records were reviewed for incorrectly identified PSIs and a subset was further reviewed for the contributing factors. There were 93,169 charts analyzed for PSIs and 358 PSIs were identified (3.84 per 1000 cases). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) was 83 per cent (95% confidence interval 79 to -86%). The lowest PPVs were associated with catheter-related bloodstream infections (67%), postoperative respiratory failure (71%), and pressure ulcers (79%). The most common contributing factors for incorrect PSIs were coding errors (30%), documentation errors (19%), and insufficient criteria for PSI in the chart (16%). We conclude that the validity of PSIs is low and could be improved by increased education for clinicians and coders. In their current form, PSIs remain suboptimal for widespread use in public reporting and pay-for-performance evaluation. PMID:23711266

  18. Application of color mixing for safety and quality inspection of agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fujian; Chen, Yud-Ren; Chao, Kuanglin

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, color-mixing applications for food safety and quality was studied, including two-color mixing and three-color mixing. It was shown that the chromaticness of the visual signal resulting from two- or three-color mixing is directly related to the band ratio of light intensity at the two or three selected wavebands. An optical visual device using color mixing to implement the band ratio criterion was presented. Inspection through human vision assisted by an optical device that implements the band ratio criterion would offer flexibility and significant cost savings as compared to inspection with a multispectral machine vision system that implements the same criterion. Example applications of this optical color mixing technique were given for the inspection of chicken carcasses with various diseases and for the detection of chilling injury in cucumbers. Simulation results showed that discrimination by chromaticness that has a direct relation with band ratio can work very well with proper selection of the two or three narrow wavebands. This novel color mixing technique for visual inspection can be implemented on visual devices for a variety of applications, ranging from target detection to food safety inspection.

  19. Novel biopreservatives to enhance the safety and quality of strawberry juice.

    PubMed

    Tomadoni, B; Viacava, G; Cassani, L; Moreira, M R; Ponce, A

    2016-01-01

    Pomegranate extract, vanillin and geraniol were studied as natural antimicrobials on strawberry juice. Strawberry juice was treated with each agent at two concentrations: pomegranate extract at 180 and 360 μg/mL; vanillin at 2.5 and 5 mg/mL; and geraniol at 0.6 and 1.2 μL/mL. After being treated, juices were stored at 5 °C and microbiological, physicochemical and sensory studies were carried out. Also, a second batch of juice was inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 (10(5) CFU/mL) before being treated, to safety study. Geraniol and vanillin, at both concentrations tested, were highly effective in reducing the native microflora on strawberry juice (more than 3 log cycles), extending the microbiological shelf-life of the product. Moreover, both antimicrobials improved the product safety by reducing inoculated E. coli O157:H7. Furthermore, vanillin showed a significant increase in polyphenol content compared to untreated juice. On the other hand, pomegranate extract applied at the highest concentration showed important reductions on mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, but no effect on yeast and molds and inoculated E. coli. Even though vanillin and geraniol incorporation on strawberry juice had a negative effect on its sensory quality, pomegranate extract had no impact on the sensory attributes evaluated. Combinations of the biopreservatives could be studied in order to decrease the concentration of the antimicrobials, reducing the effects on strawberry juice sensory characteristics. PMID:26787948

  20. Improving contractor safety performance in a high risk multi-project environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashiedu, R.I.; Okoene, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    Up to 80% of the Exploration and Production activities of Oil and Gas operations are being executed by contractors. The industry`s safety performance is therefore what the contractors make of it, implying that any meaningful performance improvement must derive directly from improvements in the contractor`s safety performance. A detailed review has been conducted on the operator contractor safety management interface, leading to the establishment of a controlled series of improvement initiatives. These initiatives which must be driven by the operator should commence with an enlightenment that to improve safety would improve overall business. Contractor involvement, development programme for contractor safety management system and rigorous auditing to check compliance with systems and procedures, being the main focus. The result of implementing these improvement initiatives demonstrate their effectiveness. Injury levels will be kept low with a sustained reduction trend.

  1. A Real-Time Safety and Quality Reporting System: Assessment of Clinical Data and Staff Participation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, Douglas A.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. Methods and Materials: On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). Results: During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (P<.001). Physician participation in ROQRS was nonexistent initially, but improved after an education program. Conclusions: Incident learning systems are a useful and practical means of improving safety and quality in patient care.

  2. ViSTREET: An Educational Virtual Environment for the Teaching of Road Safety Skills to School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Kee Man; Chen, Chwen Jen; Teh, Chee Siong

    Virtual reality (VR) has been prevalently used as a tool to help students learn and to simulate situations that are too hazardous to practice in real life. The present study aims to explore the capability of VR to achieve these two purposes and demonstrate a novel application of the result, using VR to help school students learn about road safety skills, which are impractical to be carried out in real-life situations. This paper describes the system design of the VR-based learning environment known as Virtual Simulated Traffics for Road Safety Education (ViSTREET) and its various features. An overview of the technical procedures for its development is also included. Ultimately, this paper highlights the potential use of VR in addressing the learning problem concerning road safety education programme in Malaysia.

  3. The virgin land of quality management: a first measure of patient safety climate at the National Hospital of the Faroe Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Túgvustein, Naina; Zachariassen, Hjørdis; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Faroe Islands are formally part of the Kingdom of Denmark, but the islands enjoy extensive autonomy as home ruled. In Denmark, extensive quality management initiatives have been implemented throughout hospitals, this was not the case in the Faroese Islands in 2013. The purpose of this study is to investigate the patient safety culture in the National Hospital of the Faroe Islands prior to implementation of quality management initiatives. Methods The Danish version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ-DK) was distributed electronically to 557 staff members from five medical centers of the hospital, and one administrative unit. SAQ-DK has six cultural dimensions. The proportion of respondents with positive attitudes and mean scale scores were described, and comparison between medical specialties, and between clinical leaders and frontline staff was made using analysis of variance and chi-square test, respectively. Results The response rate was 65.8% (N=367). Job satisfaction was rated most favorable, and the perceived culture of the top management least favorable. Safety climate was the dimension with the greatest variability across the 28 units. The diagnostic center had the most favorable culture of all centers. More leaders than frontline staff had positive attitudes toward teamwork and safety climate, and working conditions, respectively. Also, the leaders perceived these dimensions more positive than the frontline staff, P<0.05. Among three management levels, the unit management was perceived most favorable and the top management least favorable. Conclusion The management group is recommended to raise awareness of their role in supporting a safe and caring environment for patients and staff, moreover the leaders should ensure that every day work achieves its objectives; keeping the patients safe. Furthermore, following the development in patient safety culture over time is recommended. PMID:27217800

  4. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in...

  5. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in...

  6. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in...

  7. Novel topical formulation for ischemic chronic wounds. Technological design, quality control and safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Carla Agostina; Ramos, Alberto Nicolas; Loandos, María Del Huerto; Valdez, Juan Carlos; Sesto Cabral, Maria Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Ulceration of the foot in diabetes is common and disabling, and frequently leads to amputation of the leg. The pathogenesis of foot ulceration is complex, clinical presentation variable and management requires early expert assessment. Despite treatment, ulcers readily become chronic wounds. Chronic wounds are those that remain in a chronic inflammatory state failing a normal healing process patterns. This is partially caused by inefficient eradication of opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We propose its control or eradication will promote wound healing. Lactobacillus plantarum cultures supernatants (LAPS) shows antipathogenic and pro-healing properties. The main objective was to design two pharmaceutical dosage forms by using LAPS as active pharmaceutical ingredient and to perform its quality control, in vitro activity conservation tests and human trials (safety evaluation). Both selected formulations reach the technological quality expected for 120 days, shows adequate occlusive characteristics and proper adhesion to human skin. From the in vitro release assays were found that LAPS shows adequate release from matrix and maintain its antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity. First human trials were developed and neither edema nor erythema on healthy skin voluntaries was found. We conclude that C80 and C100 are adequate for their use in future clinical trials to demonstrate a comprehensive therapeutic effectiveness in ischemic chronic wounds.

  8. The Quality of Children's Home Environment and Attachment Security in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevalkink, Jolien; Riksen-walravenn, J. Marianne; Bradley, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the relation of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory (B. M. Caldwell & R. H. Bradley, 1984) for 0- to 6-year-old Sundanese Indonesian children with the quality of the mother-child attachment relationship (n = 44) and attachment-related behaviors during play interactions (n = 37) and with…

  9. Associations Among Parental Education, Home Environment Quality, Effortful Control, and Preacademic Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Emily C.; Landry, Susan H.; Williams, Jeffrey M.; Barnes, Marcia A.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos; Assel, Michael; Taylor, Heather B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine

    2014-01-01

    This study used a longitudinal design to examine whether effortful control mediated the associations of parental education and home environment quality with preacademic knowledge in toddlers and young preschoolers. The sample consisted of 226 children (2 to 4 years of age at T1) from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. Parents provided data on parent education and home environment quality. Children completed effortful control, early literacy, and early math assessments. T2 effortful control partially mediated the associations of T1 parental education and T1 home environment quality with T3 emergent literacy after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early literacy. T2 effortful control partially mediated the association between T1 parental education and T3 emergent math after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early math. Prior to entry into preschool, parental education and home environment quality may shape effortful control which in turn influences preacademic knowledge. PMID:25110382

  10. Assessing Dialogic Argumentation in Online Environments to Relate Structure, Grounds, and Conceptual Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas B.; Sampson, Victor

    2008-01-01

    The national science standards, along with prominent researchers, call for increased focus on scientific argumentation in the classroom. Over the past decade, researchers have developed sophisticated online science learning environments to support these opportunities for scientific argumentation. Assessing the quality of dialogic argumentation,…

  11. Incentives as an Aid for Improving the Quality of the Family Housing Environment: A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Tom

    This study is the twentieth in a series of twenty reports completed by the Children's Environments Advisory Service for the International Year of the Child, 1979. The objective of the investigation was to examine the use of incentives to encourage desired housing quality improvements in new housing being built. Findings, conclusions and…

  12. Predictors of Study Success from a Teacher's Perspective of the Quality of the Built Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Herman; Mobach, Mark; Omta, Onno

    2015-01-01

    The article aims to find predictors of study success from a teacher's perspective that relate to the built environment. The research is based on a national online survey among 1752 teachers at 18 Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences. Multivariate data analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the quality of spatial and functional aspects at…

  13. Leading the Quality Management of Online Learning Environments in Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Munro, Judy; Solomonides, Ian; Gosper, Maree; Hicks, Margaret; Sankey, Michael; Allan, Garry; Hollenbeck, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of the first year of a nationally funded Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) project on the quality management of online learning environments by and through distributed leadership. The project is being undertaken by five Australian universities with major commitments to online and distance education.…

  14. Subjective Residential Environment and Its Implications for Quality of Life among University Students in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Sai Leung

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a convenient sample survey of 500 Hong Kong university students conducted in May 2003. The main aim of the survey was to investigate the respondents' perception of the residential environment and its implications for the quality of life (QOL). Results indicated that the respondents were generally satisfied with…

  15. Environmental Quality and the Citizen. A Teaching Guide for Adult Education Courses Related to the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, Bernard L.; Iverson, Ross L.

    This guide was written to aid the organization of an adult education course on the environment. Each of the ten sessions in the guide is an independent unit--to be used as such or to be interchanged with other sessions. Topics or units are titled: Environmental Quality--Everyone's Responsibility; Land and Space Resources; Population Stress and Its…

  16. Quality of Learning Facilities and Learning Environment: Challenges for Teaching and Learning in Kenya's Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndirangu, Mwangi; Udoto, Maurice O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for teaching/learning, and the learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. A total of 332 and 107 undergraduate students…

  17. Hanford Site Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) FY 1999 and FY 2000 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the S&H resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 2000 information (Sieracki 1999) and data contained in the ''Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk Management Summary'' (RL 1999) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2000 finding of Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) activities is based on the President's budget of $1,065.1 million and $28.0 million, plus $2.7 million carryover finding, respectively, as of October 31, 1999. Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2002 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2000. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 1999 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H ''Guidance for FY200l Budget Formulations and Execution'' (DOE 1999).

  18. Older People's Perceptions of Pedestrian Friendliness and Traffic Safety: An Experiment Using Computer-Simulated Walking Environments.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Daniela; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness are considered to be important conditions for older people's motivation to walk through their environment. This study uses an experimental study design with computer-simulated living environments to investigate the effect of micro-scale environmental factors (parking spaces and green verges with trees) on older people's perceptions of both motivational antecedents (dependent variables). Seventy-four consecutively recruited older people were randomly assigned watching one of two scenarios (independent variable) on a computer screen. The scenarios simulated a stroll on a sidewalk, as it is 'typical' for a German city. In version 'A,' the subjects take a fictive walk on a sidewalk where a number of cars are parked partially on it. In version 'B', cars are in parking spaces separated from the sidewalk by grass verges and trees. Subjects assessed their impressions of both dependent variables. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'. Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively. The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior. PMID:26308026

  19. Older People's Perceptions of Pedestrian Friendliness and Traffic Safety: An Experiment Using Computer-Simulated Walking Environments.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Daniela; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2015-08-21

    Traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness are considered to be important conditions for older people's motivation to walk through their environment. This study uses an experimental study design with computer-simulated living environments to investigate the effect of micro-scale environmental factors (parking spaces and green verges with trees) on older people's perceptions of both motivational antecedents (dependent variables). Seventy-four consecutively recruited older people were randomly assigned watching one of two scenarios (independent variable) on a computer screen. The scenarios simulated a stroll on a sidewalk, as it is 'typical' for a German city. In version 'A,' the subjects take a fictive walk on a sidewalk where a number of cars are parked partially on it. In version 'B', cars are in parking spaces separated from the sidewalk by grass verges and trees. Subjects assessed their impressions of both dependent variables. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'. Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively. The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior.

  20. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) for the Space Station Freedom and future colonization of the Moon and Mars presents new challenges for present technologies. Current plans call for a crew of 8 to live in a safe, shirt-sleeve environment for 90 days without ground support. Because of these requirements, all life support systems must be self-sufficient and reliable. The ECLSS is composed of six subsystems. The temperature and humidity control (THC) subsystem maintains the cabin temperature and humidity at a comfortable level. The atmosphere control and supply (ACS) subsystem insures proper cabin pressure and partial pressures of oxygen and nitrogen. To protect the space station from fire damage, the fire detection and suppression (FDS) subsystem provides fire sensing alarms and extinguishers. The waste management (WM) subsystem compacts solid wastes for return to Earth, and collects urine for water recovery. Because it is impractical, if not impossible, to supply the station with enough fresh air and water for the duration of the space station's extended mission, these elements are recycled. The atmosphere revitalization (AR) subsystem removes CO2 and other dangerous contaminants from the air. The water recovery and management (WRM) subsystem collects and filters condensate from the cabin to replenish potable water supplies, and processes urine and other waste waters to replenish hygiene water supplies. These subsystems are not fully automated at this time. Furthermore, the control of these subsystems is not presently integrated; they are largely independent of one another. A fully integrated and automated ECLSS would increase astronauts' productivity and contribute to their safety and comfort. The Kansas State University Advanced Design Team is in the process of researching and designing controls for the automation of the ECLSS for Space Station Freedom and beyond. The approach chosen to solve this problem is to divide the design into three

  1. Information and Communications Technical Support Services to the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following tasks: development of safety publications, conference support, planning and reporting, MORT A/I video, print products, special graphics, and SAFE software development.

  2. [Spatial coupling characteristics of eco-environment quality and economic poverty in Lüliang area].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Yi; Wang, Yan-Hui

    2014-06-01

    It is one of the important strategies during the poverty alleviation to maintain a basic balance between the eco-environment and economic development in poor areas. Taking the whole 20 counties in Lüliang national contiguous special poverty-stricken areas and the surrounding 36 counties as multi-type and multi-scale typical study areas, the relationship between eco-environment quality and poverty in the poverty-stricken areas was explored in this paper. Firstly, the region's ecological poverty index system was systematically built, and by integrated use of the subjective and objective weighting method, the ecological environment quality was evaluated in the perspective of natural environment. Then, the coupling coordination degree was calculated by coupling the ecological environment quality index and the average disposable income. Finally, the spatial variation was analyzed in detail respectively at provincial, city and county scales. Results showed that as a whole, the spatial autocorrelation coefficient of coupling coordination degree was relatively higher in the study area, and the coupling coordination degree in the eastern part was higher than that in the western part; the whole coupling coordination degree in Shanxi Province was slightly higher than in Shaanxi Province; the national poverty counties presented a state of recession, and their coordinated development degrees were far lower than that of non-national poverty counties.

  3. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were consistently tied to HDI; the availability of formal and informal learning materials little less so. Gross domestic product (GDP) tended to show a stronger independent relation with housing quality and material resources than life expectancy and education. Formal learning resources were independently related to the GDP and education indices, and informal learning resources were not independently related to any constituent indices of the overall HDI. PMID:22277008

  4. Chicago Residents’ Perceptions of Air Quality: Objective Pollution, the Built Environment, and Neighborhood Stigma Theory

    PubMed Central

    King, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial research documents higher pollution levels in minority neighborhoods, but little research evaluates how residents perceive their own communities’ pollution risks. According to “Neighborhood stigma” theory, survey respondents share a cultural bias that minorities cause social dysfunction, leading to over-reports of dysfunction in minority communities. This study investigates perceptions of residential outdoor air quality by linking objective data on built and social environments with multiple measures of pollution and a representative survey of Chicago residents. Consistent with the scholarly narrative, results show air quality is rated worse where minorities and poverty are concentrated, even after extensive adjustment for objective pollution and built environment measures. Perceptions of air pollution may thus be driven by neighborhood socioeconomic position far more than by respondents’ ability to perceive pollution. The finding that 63.5% of the sample reported excellent or good air quality helps to explain current challenging in promoting environmental action. PMID:26527847

  5. Standards--the common element in providing the safety, quality and performance of the medical practice.

    PubMed

    Greabu, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Knowing and applying standards is an opportunity of the years 2007-2008 in any kind of field where a successful activity is intended and this assures a certain way towards competence and quality. The most recent German studies highlighted, to the surprise of the specialists, that standardization holds the second place, after the material means, in the row of the elements considered to be decisive for the success of a business. The existence of standards and the concern for their implementation in the activity provides a high technical and quality level of the products/services offered to the clients and the increase in the level of competence of the personnel, who will be able to cope with all the challenges. This need comes from the process of Romania's accession to the European Union. There are a lot of reasons why standards represent a fundamental part of our daily life. Practically, we are surrounded by standards. Everything is "working" well and it is efficient if the standards used as a base for manufacturing "things" have been correctly developed and applied. Standards open communication channels and commercial channels, promote the understanding of technical products, the compatibility of products and services, facilitate mass production and, most importantly, they are the necessary base for the achievement of the objectives in the fields of health and safety and a better quality of life. The transition towards the global market needs an instrument for the removal of the barriers to the application of the latest discoveries in the field of medical instruments, materials and manual labor. Each medical device, equipment and material used in the Dental and General Medicine is standardized, in fact that leads to their better knowing and provides controllable treatment for manual labor with predictable and repeatable results. This presentation intends to make a survey of some general aspects on standardization as well as a review of the standards in the medical

  6. Tube feeding in dementia: how incentives undermine health care quality and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E; Christmas, Colleen; Leff, Bruce A

    2007-05-01

    For nursing home residents with advanced dementia, very little evidence is available to show clinical benefit from enteral tube feeding. Although no randomized clinical trials have been done, considerable evidence from studies of weaker design strongly suggest that tube feeding does not reduce the risks of death, aspiration pneumonia, pressure ulcers, other infections, or poor functional outcome. Nationally, however, utilization is high and highly variable. System-wide incentives favor use of tube feeding, and may influence substitute decision-makers, bedside clinicians, gastroenterologists, and administrators regardless of patient preferences or putative medical indications. Underlying the widespread use of this marginally effective therapy is a basic misunderstanding about malnutrition and about aspiration pneumonia. The face value of tube feeding is strong indeed. In addition to the general faith in intervention, the impulse to "do something" when things are going poorly, financial incentives favor tube feeding for gastroenterologists, hospitals, and nursing homes. The desire to avoid regulatory sanctions, bad publicity, and liability exposure creates a further incentive for nursing homes to provide tube feeding. Rational, evidence-based use of tube feeding in advanced dementia will depend fundamentally on improved education. Reimbursement schemes require significant modification to limit the irrational use of tube feeding. Nursing home regulations based more securely on scientific evidence would likely reduce nonbeneficial tube feeding, as would evidence-based tort reform. Quality improvement initiatives could create positive incentives. Realigning incentives in these ways could, we believe, improve the quality of care, quality of life, and safety of these vulnerable individuals, likely with reduced costs of care.

  7. Standards--the common element in providing the safety, quality and performance of the medical practice.

    PubMed

    Greabu, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Knowing and applying standards is an opportunity of the years 2007-2008 in any kind of field where a successful activity is intended and this assures a certain way towards competence and quality. The most recent German studies highlighted, to the surprise of the specialists, that standardization holds the second place, after the material means, in the row of the elements considered to be decisive for the success of a business. The existence of standards and the concern for their implementation in the activity provides a high technical and quality level of the products/services offered to the clients and the increase in the level of competence of the personnel, who will be able to cope with all the challenges. This need comes from the process of Romania's accession to the European Union. There are a lot of reasons why standards represent a fundamental part of our daily life. Practically, we are surrounded by standards. Everything is "working" well and it is efficient if the standards used as a base for manufacturing "things" have been correctly developed and applied. Standards open communication channels and commercial channels, promote the understanding of technical products, the compatibility of products and services, facilitate mass production and, most importantly, they are the necessary base for the achievement of the objectives in the fields of health and safety and a better quality of life. The transition towards the global market needs an instrument for the removal of the barriers to the application of the latest discoveries in the field of medical instruments, materials and manual labor. Each medical device, equipment and material used in the Dental and General Medicine is standardized, in fact that leads to their better knowing and provides controllable treatment for manual labor with predictable and repeatable results. This presentation intends to make a survey of some general aspects on standardization as well as a review of the standards in the medical

  8. Standards - the common element in providing the safety, quality and performance of the medical practice

    PubMed Central

    Greabu, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    Knowing and applying standards is an opportunity of the years 2007-2008 in any kind of field where a successful activity is intended and this assures a certain way towards competence and quality. The most recent German studies highlighted, to the surprise of the specialists, that standardization holds the second place, after the material means, in the row of the elements considered to be decisive for the success of a business. The existence of standards and the concern for their implementation in the activity provides a high technical and quality level of the products services offered to the clients and the increase in the level of competence of the personnel, who will be able to cope with all the challenges. This need comes from the process of Romania’s accession to the European Union. There are a lot of reasons why standards represent a fundamental part of our daily life. Practically, we are surrounded by standards. Everything is „working” well and it is efficient if the standards used as a base for manufacturing „things” have been correctly developed and applied. Standards open communication channels and commercial channels, promote the understanding of technical products, the compatibility of products and services, facilitate mass production and, most importantly, they are the necessary base for the achievement of the objectives in the fields of health and safety and a better quality of life. The transition towards the global market needs an instrument for the removal of the barriers to the application of the latest discoveries in the field of medical instruments, materials and manual labor. Each medical device, equipment and material used in the Dental and General Medicine is standardized, in fact that leads to their better knowing and provides controllable treatment for manual labor with predictable and repeatable results. This presentation intends to make a survey of some general aspects on standardization as well as a review of the standards in

  9. The hazardous priority substances in Italy: National rules and environmental quality standard in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, Chiara Onorati, Fulvio Lamberti, Claudia Virno Cicero, Anna Maria

    2008-01-15

    Article number 16 of the Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC) lays down the community strategy for establishment of harmonised quality standards for the priority substances and other substances posing a significant risk to the aquatic environment. In order to achieve the protection objectives of the Directive 2000/60/EC, the Italian Ministry of the Environment proposed the quality standards for surface water, sediments and biota related to the priority substances listed in the decision No. 2455/2001/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of November 20 (2001) [Decision N. 2455/2001/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 November 2001. The list of priority substances in the field of water policy and amending Directive 2000/60/EC. Official Journal of the European Communities, 15.12.2001, p. 5]. Particularly, for the protection of the marine environment, the proposed Italian rules state that, from 1 January 2021, the concentrations of the hazardous priority substances in Italian marine and lagoon waters must be near the natural background for natural substances, like metals, and near zero for the anthropogenic one. According to Directive 2000/60/EC, the Italian Ministry of Environment issued in 2003 Decree 367 in which has derived 160 Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) for water and 27 Environmental Quality Objective (EQO) for sediment of marine coastal area, lagoons and coastal ponds. Biota quality standards have still to be fixed. The paper illustrates the criteria applied for the definition of the quality standards and some comments are presented.

  10. Quality management and the work environment: an empirical investigation in a public sector organization.

    PubMed

    Taveira, Alvaro D; James, Craig A; Karsh, Ben -Tzion; Sainfort, François

    2003-07-01

    The integration of quality management initiatives, particularly total quality management (TQM), and ergonomics has received increasing attention from scholars and practitioners. Above all, the question of how TQM programs relate to ergonomic aspects of organizational design and culture is at the center of this discussion. This study examines how elements of a "typical", Deming-inspired, TQM program in the public sector interact with the work environment. Elements of the TQM program were defined and measured using the Malcom Baldridge Award criteria. The specific elements examined were "Management Support of Quality", "Information and Analysis", "Human Resources", "Processes and Quality Results", and "Customer Focus and Satisfaction". The relationship between these TQM elements and the work environment were defined through five separate hypotheses. The work environment was described by the constructs "Supervisor Support", "Task Clarity", "Task Orientation", and "Innovation". Data were obtained through survey questionnaires administered to employees of four departments in a municipal government organization. Results supported three of the hypotheses, but produced some unanticipated outcomes with regard to the other two. Namely, "Management Support of Quality" was significantly related to "Supervisor Support", "Task Orientation", "Task Clarity" and "Innovation"; "Human Resources" was significantly related to "Supervisor Support"; "Processes and Quality Results" was significantly related to "Task Orientation" and "Innovation". Contrary to predicted "Information and Analysis" was negatively related to "Innovation", and "Customer Focus" was unrelated to any of the outcome variables. The relationships between these TQM elements and work environment dimensions are discussed. Implications for TQM and ergonomic practice are analyzed, and directions for future research proposed. PMID:12880738

  11. A study of the noncompliance of blood banks on safety and quality parameters in blood donation camps in Bengaluru

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajat Kumar; Dhanya, Rakesh; Parmar, Lalith G.; Vaish, Arpit; Sedai, Amit; Periyavan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The compliance of safety and quality parameters laid out by national and international guidelines in outdoor blood donation camps has not been studied in India. Our study aimed at identifying, monitoring, analyzing, and developing preventive strategies for several key parameters associated with the quality and safety of outdoor voluntary blood donation camps (VBDC). Settings: The study covered a total of 424 VBDCs at various locations in Bengaluru, Karnataka (South India) from 2009 to 2013. Seven government hospitals based blood banks, three private hospitals based blood banks and two voluntary standalone blood banks participated in the VBDCs included in the study. Materials and Methods: At the onset, the quality and safety standards to be followed were discussed and agreed upon. During the study, noncompliance (NC) to the agreed upon standards were recorded and shared. Periodic trainings were also organized to help minimize NC. Results: One or more instances of NC in 73% of the VBDCs. Highest NC were observed associated with punctuality (34%), wearing gloves (16%), hemoglobin (Hb) estimation (11%) and donor screening and selection other than Hb check (8-9%). Conclusion: For all 16 parameters under study, significant NC was observed. As a whole private hospital based blood banks were more noncompliant. The high degree of NC to matters relating to quality and safety in VBDCs is high and warrants for urgent attention and further study. Our study also shows that regular monitoring and systematic and strategic intervention can decrease the rate of NC. PMID:25722568

  12. Livestock waste treatment systems of the future: A challenge to environmental quality, food safety, and sustainability. OECD Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Special Issue of Bioresource Technology is dedicated to selected contributions presented at the international Workshop: “Livestock waste treatment systems of the future: A challenge to environmental quality, food safety, and sustainability,” held 2-4 April, 2008, in Florence, South Carolina (US...

  13. The effect of chlorine dioxide and chitosan/essential oil coatings on the safety and quality of fresh blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries are high-value fruit with strong antioxidant capacity and other health-promoting benefits. Controlled release chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or chitosan coating plus different essential oils were applied to fresh blueberries to preserve their quality and safety during postharvest storage. In vi...

  14. Maintaining high-quality IP audio services in lossy IP network environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Robert J., III; Chodura, Hartmut

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we present our research activities in the area of digital audio processing and transmission. Today's available teleconference audio solutions are lacking in flexibility, robustness and fidelity. There was a need for enhancing the quality of audio for IP-based applications to guarantee optimal services under varying conditions. Multiple tests and user evaluations have shown that a reliable audio communication toolkit is essential for any teleconference application. This paper summarizes our research activities and gives an overview of developed applications. In a first step the parameters, which influence the audio quality, were evaluated. All of these parameters have to be optimized in order to result into the best achievable quality. Therefore it was necessary to enhance existing schemes or develop new methods. Applications were developed for Internet-Telephony, broadcast of live music and spatial audio for Virtual Reality environments. This paper describes these applications and issues of delivering high quality digital audio services over lossy IP networks.

  15. A longitudinal study of clinical peer review's impact on quality and safety in U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marc T

    2013-01-01

    Clinical peer review is the dominant method of event analysis in U.S. hospitals. It is pivotal to medical staff efforts to improve quality and safety, yet the quality assurance process model that has prevailed for the past 30 years evokes fear and is fundamentally antithetical to a culture of safety. Two prior national studies characterized a quality improvement model that corrects this dysfunction but failed to demonstrate progress toward its adoption despite a high rate of program change between 2007 and 2009. This study's online survey of 470 organizations participating in either of the prior studies further assessed relationships between clinical peer review program factors, including the degree of conformance to the quality improvement model (the QI model score), and subjectively measured program impact variables. Among the 300 hospitals (64%) that responded, the median QI model score was only 60 on a 100-point scale. Scores increased somewhat for the 2007 cohort (mean pair-wise difference of 5.9 [2-10]), but not for the 2009 cohort. The QI model is expanded as the result of the finding that self-reporting of adverse events, near misses, and hazardous conditions--an essential practice in high-reliability organizations--is no longer rare in hospitals. Self-reporting and the quality of case review are additional multivariate predictors of the perceived ongoing impact of clinical peer review on quality and safety, medical staff perceptions of the program, and medical staff engagement in quality and safety initiatives. Hospital leaders and trustees who seek to improve patient outcomes should facilitate the adoption of this best practice model for clinical peer review. PMID:24195344

  16. Live births achieved via IVF are increased by improvements in air quality and laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Hill, Micah J; James, Aidita N; Schimmel, Tim; Segars, James H; Csokmay, John M; Cohen, Jacques; Payson, Mark D

    2015-09-01

    Infertility is a common disease, which causes many couples to seek treatment with assisted reproduction techniques. Many factors contribute to successful assisted reproduction technique outcomes. One important factor is laboratory environment and air quality. Our facility had the unique opportunity to compare consecutively used, but separate assisted reproduction technique laboratories, as a result of a required move. Environmental conditions were improved by strategic engineering designs. All other aspects of the IVF laboratory, including equipment, physicians, embryologists, nursing staff and protocols, were kept constant between facilities. Air quality testing showed improved air quality at the new IVF site. Embryo implantation (32.4% versus 24.3%; P < 0.01) and live birth (39.3% versus 31.8%, P < 0.05) were significantly increased in the new facility compared with the old facility. More patients met clinical criteria and underwent mandatory single embryo transfer on day 5 leading to both a reduction in multiple gestation pregnancies and increased numbers of vitrified embryos per patient with supernumerary embryos available. Improvements in IVF laboratory conditions and air quality had profound positive effects on laboratory measures and patient outcomes. This study further strengthens the importance of the laboratory environment and air quality in the success of an IVF programme.

  17. Live births achieved via IVF are increased by improvements in air quality and laboratory environment

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Hill, Micah J; James, Aidita N; Schimmel, Tim; Segars, James H; Csokmay, John M; Cohen, Jacques; Payson, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common disease, which causes many couples to seek treatment with assisted reproduction techniques. Many factors contribute to successful assisted reproduction technique outcomes. One important factor is laboratory environment and air quality. Our facility had the unique opportunity to compare consecutively used, but separate assisted reproduction technique laboratories, as a result of a required move. Environmental conditions were improved by strategic engineering designs. All other aspects of the IVF laboratory, including equipment, physicians, embryologists, nursing staff and protocols, were kept constant between facilities. Air quality testing showed improved air quality at the new IVF site. Embryo implantation (32.4% versus 24.3%; P < 0.01) and live birth (39.3% versus 31.8%, P < 0.05) were significantly increased in the new facility compared with the old facility. More patients met clinical criteria and underwent mandatory single embryo transfer on day 5 leading to both a reduction in multiple gestation pregnancies and increased numbers of vitrified embryos per patient with supernumerary embryos available. Improvements in IVF laboratory conditions and air quality had profound positive effects on laboratory measures and patient outcomes. This study further strengthens the importance of the laboratory environment and air quality in the success of an IVF programme. PMID:26194882

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on microbial safety and quality of stir fry chicken dices with hot chili during storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Cao, Mei; Chen, Hao; Gao, Peng; Fu, Yi; Liu, Mianxue; Wang, Yan; Huang, Min

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of irradiation with different doses on microbial safety, sensory quality and protein content of ready-to-eat stir fry chicken dices with hot chili (FCC) during one year storage. Fresh chicken meat was cut into small dices and fried at approximately 180 °C for 10 min for preparation of FCC samples. The samples were vacuum-packaged and gamma irradiated at 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy. The results suggest that irradiation with the doses of 10 and 20 kGy could ensure microbiological safety of the samples without deterioration of sensory quality. Microbial counts, sensory qualities and protein contents of the samples were investigated during one year storage. No viable cells were observed and the samples were completely sterilized. Sensory qualities showed no significant difference after irradiated at the doses of 10 and 20 kGy during the storage period. Protein contents were also not affected by irradiation at the same doses. Our results indicate that gamma irradiation of 10 and 20 kGy are effective to maintain shelf stability of ready-to-eat FCC products with microbial safety, sensory quality and nutritional value.

  19. The Meaning of Annoyance in Relation to the Quality of Acoustic Environments.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2002-01-01

    A supportive environment should take care of health. It is an environment that provides complete physical, mental and social well-being. It is not suffiently characterized by infirmity or the absence of disease. It should trigger good feelings and safety (WHO, 2000). Interdisciplinary procedures are needed that include acoustics, physics, psychology, and sociology when a survey on perception of acoustic environments is carried out under the aspect of comfort. It is necessary to combine methods with different sensibilities in order to measure the subjective perception of noise in such an environment. The context, the focus of attention, and the knowledge of past experiences must be taken into account. (Ipsen, 2001) These three conditions are required to implement an adequate measurement. Subject-centred methodological procedures should be used to develop a suitable measurement procedure. Such procedures will be presented with the aim to improve social surveys that especially address the meaning of annoyance in an acoustic environment and the contribution of a soundscape.

  20. The Meaning of Annoyance in Relation to the Quality of Acoustic Environments.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2002-01-01

    A supportive environment should take care of health. It is an environment that provides complete physical, mental and social well-being. It is not suffiently characterized by infirmity or the absence of disease. It should trigger good feelings and safety (WHO, 2000). Interdisciplinary procedures are needed that include acoustics, physics, psychology, and sociology when a survey on perception of acoustic environments is carried out under the aspect of comfort. It is necessary to combine methods with different sensibilities in order to measure the subjective perception of noise in such an environment. The context, the focus of attention, and the knowledge of past experiences must be taken into account. (Ipsen, 2001) These three conditions are required to implement an adequate measurement. Subject-centred methodological procedures should be used to develop a suitable measurement procedure. Such procedures will be presented with the aim to improve social surveys that especially address the meaning of annoyance in an acoustic environment and the contribution of a soundscape. PMID:12678945

  1. Qualification of Integrated Tool Environments (QUITE) for the development of computer-based safety systems in NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Miedl, H. A.; Mortz, J.

    2006-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) analogue Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems are increasingly replaced by computer-based I and C systems. Integrated Tool Environments (ITE) are used for the development of safety-related computer-based I and C systems. Most of these ITE were not conceived originally for the implementation of nuclear specific applications. The ITE may be proven and certified for industrial applications but qualification for the nuclear application has to be demonstrated, too. To conduct an efficient and objective qualification a framework is required. This paper presents the methodical foundations and a frame of activities to qualify ITE for the use in safety-related applications according to nuclear standards and state of the art. The assessment framework aims at a pre-qualification of ITE detached as far as possible from the safety functions implemented by them. The results of this pre-qualification shall assist and facilitate the safety analysis of the application software. (authors)

  2. Quality compliance in the shift from cell transplantation to cell therapy in non-pharma environments.

    PubMed

    Vives, Joaquim; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Pla, Arnau

    2015-08-01

    Along with academic and charitable organizations, transfusion centers have ventured into the stem cell field, with the aim of testing of novel cell-based therapeutics in a clinical setting for future marketing approval. The fact that quality management structures, which are required for compliance with good scientific practice regulations, were originally designed for product development in corporate environments represents a major challenge for many developers. In this Commentary, challenges that non-pharmaceutical institutions must overcome to translate cell-based products into clinical therapies will be discussed from a quality standpoint. Furthermore, our development experience for a mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapy will be shared as a case study.

  3. Influence of data acquisition environment on accuracy of acoustic voice quality measurements.

    PubMed

    Deliyski, Dimitar D; Evans, Maegan K; Shaw, Heather S

    2005-06-01

    Accuracy of acoustic voice analysis is influenced by the quality of recording. Lately, articles have suggested that soundcards perform equivalently to specialized professional-grade data acquisition (DA) systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of DA environment (DA system and microphone) on acoustic voice quality measurement (VQM) while balancing for gender, age, intersubject and intrasubject variability, and analysis software. More specifically, the relative performance of different hardware environments and the relationship between their technical characteristics and VQM performance was investigated. The discretization error and the effective dynamic range of the different DA environments were measured. We used 3 software systems to record and measure separately 2000 acoustic samples of sustained phonation for fundamental frequency, jitter, and shimmer. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) were performed with these parameters as the dependent variables. The results of the study suggested that professional-grade DA hardware is strongly recommended to provide accurate and valid voice assessment. The fundamental frequency measurement differences across DA environments were highly correlated to the discretization error (r=1.00), whereas jitter and shimmer were highly correlated to the effective dynamic range of the DA environments (r=-0.68 and r=-0.86, respectively).

  4. Safe at School: Addressing the School Environment and LGBT Safety through Policy and Legislation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biegel, Stuart; Kuehl, Sheila James

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students face a unique set of safety concerns each day. Over 85% report being harassed because of their sexual or gender identity, and over 20% report being physically attacked. Far too often teachers and administrators do nothing in response. In part because of this, the suicide rate for LGBT…

  5. Internet Safety Gone Wild? Sacrificing the Educational and Psychosocial Benefits of Online Social Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynes, Brendesha M.

    2007-01-01

    Many Internet safety and parenting experts suggest that parents prohibit their teens from social networking sites and other online spaces where predators may lurk. But we may do adolescents a disservice when we curtail their participation in these spaces, because the educational and psychosocial benefits of this type of communication can far…

  6. National Summit on Campus Public Safety. Strategies for Colleges and Universities in a Homeland Security Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Justice, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The aftermath of September 11, 2001 prompted the reexamination of the nation's defenses and vulnerabilities in light of new realities. Every sector of society, particularly those who protect the well being of communities, required change. Safety and security operations on the nation's college and university campuses are no exception. The nation's…

  7. Life safety in the perianesthesia care environment: planning for internal disasters.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, E

    2000-06-01

    Nurses in perianesthesia areas have a critical responsibility to provide a well thought-out safety plan in the event of internal disaster. Working together as a team, identifying key people, assigning responsibilities, and communicating the plan will prepare the staff to efficiently manage the unexpected event. PMID:11249340

  8. Prospects for comparing European hospitals in terms of quality and safety: lessons from a comparative study in five countries

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Susan; Renz, Anna; Wiig, Siri; Fernandes, Alexandra; Weggelaar, Anne Marie; Calltorp, Johan; Anderson, Janet E.; Robert, Glenn; Vincent, Charles; Fulop, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Being able to compare hospitals in terms of quality and safety between countries is important for a number of reasons. For example, the 2011 European Union directive on patients' rights to cross-border health care places a requirement on all member states to provide patients with comparable information on health-care quality, so that they can make an informed choice. Here, we report on the feasibility of using common process and outcome indicators to compare hospitals for quality and safety in five countries (England, Portugal, The Netherlands, Sweden and Norway). Main Challenges Identified The cross-country comparison identified the following seven challenges with respect to comparing the quality of hospitals across Europe: different indicators are collected in each country; different definitions of the same indicators are used; different mandatory versus voluntary data collection requirements are in place; different types of organizations oversee data collection; different levels of aggregation of data exist (country, region and hospital); different levels of public access to data exist; and finally, hospital accreditation and licensing systems differ in each country. Conclusion Our findings indicate that if patients and policymakers are to compare the quality and safety of hospitals across Europe, then further work is urgently needed to agree the way forward. Until then, patients will not be able to make informed choices about where they receive their health care in different countries, and some governments will remain in the dark about the quality and safety of care available to their citizens as compared to that available in neighbouring countries. PMID:23292003

  9. Line-scan spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for inspecting subsurface food safety and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presented a method for subsurface food inspection using a newly developed line-scan spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) technique. A 785 nm laser was used as a Raman excitation source. The line-shape SORS data was collected in a wavenumber range of 0-2815 cm-1 using a detection module consisting of an imaging spectrograph and a CCD camera. A layered sample, which was created by placing a plastic sheet cut from the original container on top of cane sugar, was used to test the capability for subsurface food inspection. A whole set of SORS data was acquired in an offset range of 0-36 mm (two sides of the laser) with a spatial interval of 0.07 mm. Raman spectrum from the cane sugar under the plastic sheet was resolved using self-modeling mixture analysis algorithms, demonstrating the potential of the technique for authenticating foods and ingredients through packaging. The line-scan SORS measurement technique provides a new method for subsurface inspection of food safety and quality.

  10. DNA Analyses in Food Safety and Quality: Current Status and Expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchelli, Rosangela; Tedeschi, Tullia; Tonelli, Alessandro

    Food safety and quality are very important issues receiving a lot of attention in most countries by producers, consumers and regulatory and control authorities. In particular, DNA analysis in food is becoming popular not only in relation to genetically modified products (GMOs), in which DNA modification is the "clue" of the novelty, but also in other fields like microbiology and pathogen detection, which require long times for the cultivation and specially in cases in which the microorganisms are not cultivable like some viruses, as well as for authenticity and allergen detection. A new topic concerning "nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics" has also been mentioned, very important but still in its infancy, which could lead in the future to a personalized diet. In this chapter we have described the main areas of food research and fields of application where DNA analysis is being performed and the relative methods of detection, which are generally based on PCR. The possibility/opportunity to detect DNA without previous amplification (PCR-free) will be discussed. We have examined the following areas: (1) genetically modified foods (GMOs); (2) food allergens; (3) microbiological contaminations; (4) food authenticity; (5) nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics.

  11. Applicability of biological time temperature integrators as quality and safety indicators for meat products.

    PubMed

    Ellouze, M; Augustin, J-C

    2010-03-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate (eO), a biological time temperature integrator (TTI) as a quality and safety indicator for ground beef packed under modified atmosphere and spiced cooked chicken slices packed under modified atmosphere. Storage trials and challenge tests were thus performed on several batches of the studied food to monitor and model the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and the indigenous food flora. Then, two different prototypes of the TTI (eO) were set and manufactured according to the studied products shelf lives. The TTI evolution with time at static and dynamic temperatures was monitored and modeled. Finally, exposure assessment models were set and used under several realistic storage profiles to assess the distributions of the concentration of the indigenous food flora and the distributions of the increase in the pathogens populations obtained at the end of the product shelf life or at the end point of the TTI, taking into account the TTIs batch variability. Results showed that in case of poor storage conditions, TTI can reduce the consumer exposure to altered or hazardous foods. PMID:20074826

  12. Optical biosensors for food quality and safety assurance-a review.

    PubMed

    Narsaiah, K; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Bhardwaj, Rishi; Sharma, Rajiv; Kumar, Ramesh

    2012-08-01

    Food quality and safety is a scientific discipline describing handling, preparation and storage of food in ways that prevent food borne illness. Food serves as a growth medium for microorganisms that can be pathogenic or cause food spoilage. Therefore, it is imperative to have stringent laws and standards for the preparation, packaging and transportation of food. The conventional methods for detection of food contamination based on culturing, colony counting, chromatography and immunoassay are tedious and time consuming while biosensors have overcome some of these disadvantages. There is growing interest in biosensors due to high specificity, convenience and quick response. Optical biosensors show greater potential for the detection of pathogens, pesticide and drug residues, hygiene monitoring, heavy metals and other toxic substances in the food to check whether it is safe for consumption or not. This review focuses on optical biosensors, the recent developments in the associated instrumentation with emphasis on fiber optic and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensors for detecting a range of analytes in food samples, the major advantages and challenges associated with optical biosensors. It also briefly covers the different methods employed for the immobilization of bio-molecules used in developing biosensors. PMID:23904648

  13. Optical biosensors for food quality and safety assurance-a review.

    PubMed

    Narsaiah, K; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Bhardwaj, Rishi; Sharma, Rajiv; Kumar, Ramesh

    2012-08-01

    Food quality and safety is a scientific discipline describing handling, preparation and storage of food in ways that prevent food borne illness. Food serves as a growth medium for microorganisms that can be pathogenic or cause food spoilage. Therefore, it is imperative to have stringent laws and standards for the preparation, packaging and transportation of food. The conventional methods for detection of food contamination based on culturing, colony counting, chromatography and immunoassay are tedious and time consuming while biosensors have overcome some of these disadvantages. There is growing interest in biosensors due to high specificity, convenience and quick response. Optical biosensors show greater potential for the detection of pathogens, pesticide and drug residues, hygiene monitoring, heavy metals and other toxic substances in the food to check whether it is safe for consumption or not. This review focuses on optical biosensors, the recent developments in the associated instrumentation with emphasis on fiber optic and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensors for detecting a range of analytes in food samples, the major advantages and challenges associated with optical biosensors. It also briefly covers the different methods employed for the immobilization of bio-molecules used in developing biosensors.

  14. Impact of telemedicine in hospital culture and its consequences on quality of care and safety

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Milton; Morbeck, Renata Albaladejo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Abreu, Carlos Alberto Cordeiro; Andrade, Ana Helena Vicente; Terra, Jose Claudio Cyrineu; Teixeira, José Carlos; Kanamura, Alberto Hideki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe the impact of the telemedicine application on the clinical process of care and its different effects on hospital culture and healthcare practice. Methods The concept of telemedicine through real time audio-visual coverage was implemented at two different hospitals in São Paulo: a secondary and public hospital, Hospital Municipal Dr. Moysés Deutsch, and a tertiary and private hospital, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. Results Data were obtained from 257 teleconsultations records over a 12-month period and were compared to a similar period before telemedicine implementation. For 18 patients (7.1%) telemedicine consultation influenced in diagnosis conclusion, and for 239 patients (92.9%), the consultation contributed to clinical management. After telemedicine implementation, stroke thrombolysis protocol was applied in 11% of ischemic stroke patients. Telemedicine approach reduced the need to transfer the patient to another hospital in 25.9% regarding neurological evaluation. Sepsis protocol were adopted and lead to a 30.4% reduction mortality regarding severe sepsis. Conclusion The application is associated with differences in the use of health services: emergency transfers, mortality, implementation of protocols and patient management decisions, especially regarding thrombolysis. These results highlight the role of telemedicine as a vector for transformation of hospital culture impacting on the safety and quality of care. PMID:26676268

  15. The Impact of eHealth on the Quality and Safety of Health Care: A Systematic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ashly D.; Car, Josip; Pagliari, Claudia; Anandan, Chantelle; Cresswell, Kathrin; Bokun, Tomislav; McKinstry, Brian; Procter, Rob; Majeed, Azeem; Sheikh, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Background There is considerable international interest in exploiting the potential of digital solutions to enhance the quality and safety of health care. Implementations of transformative eHealth technologies are underway globally, often at very considerable cost. In order to assess the impact of eHealth solutions on the quality and safety of health care, and to inform policy decisions on eHealth deployments, we undertook a systematic review of systematic reviews assessing the effectiveness and consequences of various eHealth technologies on the quality and safety of care. Methods and Findings We developed novel search strategies, conceptual maps of health care quality, safety, and eHealth interventions, and then systematically identified, scrutinised, and synthesised the systematic review literature. Major biomedical databases were searched to identify systematic reviews published between 1997 and 2010. Related theoretical, methodological, and technical material was also reviewed. We identified 53 systematic reviews that focused on assessing the impact of eHealth interventions on the quality and/or safety of health care and 55 supplementary systematic reviews providing relevant supportive information. This systematic review literature was found to be generally of substandard quality with regards to methodology, reporting, and utility. We thematically categorised eHealth technologies into three main areas: (1) storing, managing, and transmission of data; (2) clinical decision support; and (3) facilitating care from a distance. We found that despite support from policymakers, there was relatively little empirical evidence to substantiate many of the claims made in relation to these technologies. Whether the success of those relatively few solutions identified to improve quality and safety would continue if these were deployed beyond the contexts in which they were originally developed, has yet to be established. Importantly, best practice guidelines in effective

  16. Back to the future: Patient experience and the link to quality, safety, and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Bonnie S; Hagins, Mitch; King, John A; Picciano, Gino; McCafferty, Maureen M; Nelson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Improving patient experience has emerged as an important healthcare policy priority across Canada. Tools and systems for monitoring patient experience metrics are becoming increasingly refined and standardized, and the trend toward greater accountability for improvements that are sustainable and affordable is well underway. For many healthcare professionals, this represents a renewed focus on core patient needs and priorities, following decades during which structural and technological changes have dominated healthcare agendas. Improving patient experience in our contemporary healthcare environment presents major challenges-and opportunities-for Canadian health leaders. The experience of Studer Group partner organizations in Canada is relevant and instructive in this context. These organizations have adopted a model known as Evidence-Based Leadership (EBL) that enables and supports the alignment of all activities and behaviours toward specific organizational goals, including measurable patient experience improvements. This article reviews case studies of organizations that have adopted EBL. These organizations are demonstrating rapid progress in patient experience indicators while simultaneously making gains in critical areas such as clinical outcomes, safety, physician and staff engagement, and financial performance. Emerging evidence concerning the factors and processes that underlie these improvements is also discussed.

  17. FOCUS: the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists' initiative to improve quality and safety in the cardiovascular operating room.

    PubMed

    Barbeito, Atilio; Lau, William Travis; Weitzel, Nathaen; Abernathy, James H; Wahr, Joyce; Mark, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) introduced the FOCUS initiative (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems) in 2005 in response to the need for a rigorous scientific approach to improve quality and safety in the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR). The goal of the project, which is supported by the SCA Foundation, is to identify hazards and develop evidence-based protocols to improve cardiac surgery safety. A hazard is anything that has the potential to cause a preventable adverse event. Specifically, the strategic plan of FOCUS includes 3 goals: (1) identifying hazards in the CVOR, (2) prioritizing hazards and developing risk-reduction interventions, and (3) disseminating these interventions. Collectively, the FOCUS initiative, through the work of several groups composed of members from different disciplines such as clinical medicine, human factors engineering, industrial psychology, and organizational sociology, has identified and documented significant hazards occurring daily in our CVORs. Some examples of frequent occurrences that contribute to reduce the safety and quality of care provided to cardiac surgery patients include deficiencies in teamwork, poor OR design, incompatible technologies, and failure to adhere to best practices. Several projects are currently under way that are aimed at better understanding these hazards and developing interventions to mitigate them. The SCA, through the FOCUS initiative, has begun this journey of science-driven improvement in quality and safety. There is a long and arduous road ahead, but one we need to continue to travel. PMID:25232690

  18. An Intelligent System for Monitoring the Microgravity Environment Quality On-Board the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Paul P.; Jules, Kenol

    2002-01-01

    An intelligent system for monitoring the microgravity environment quality on-board the International Space Station is presented. The monitoring system uses a new approach combining Kohonen's self-organizing feature map, learning vector quantization, and back propagation neural network to recognize and classify the known and unknown patterns. Finally, fuzzy logic is used to assess the level of confidence associated with each vibrating source activation detected by the system.

  19. Hospital Board Oversight of Quality and Patient Safety: A Narrative Review and Synthesis of Recent Empirical Research

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Ross; Mannion, Russell; Freeman, Tim; Davies, Huw TO

    2013-01-01

    Context Recurring problems with patient safety have led to a growing interest in helping hospitals’ governing bodies provide more effective oversight of the quality and safety of their services. National directives and initiatives emphasize the importance of action by boards, but the empirical basis for informing effective hospital board oversight has yet to receive full and careful review. Methods This article presents a narrative review of empirical research to inform the debate about hospital boards’ oversight of quality and patient safety. A systematic and comprehensive search identified 122 papers for detailed review. Much of the empirical work appeared in the last ten years, is from the United States, and employs cross-sectional survey methods. Findings Recent empirical studies linking board composition and processes with patient outcomes have found clear differences between high- and low-performing hospitals, highlighting the importance of strong and committed leadership that prioritizes quality and safety and sets clear and measurable goals for improvement. Effective oversight is also associated with well-informed and skilled board members. External factors (such as regulatory regimes and the publication of performance data) might also have a role in influencing boards, but detailed empirical work on these is scant. Conclusions Health policy debates recognize the important role of hospital boards in overseeing patient quality and safety, and a growing body of empirical research has sought to elucidate that role. This review finds a number of areas of guidance that have some empirical support, but it also exposes the relatively inchoate nature of the field. Greater theoretical and methodological development is required if we are to secure more evidence-informed governance systems and practices that can contribute to safer care. PMID:24320168

  20. How many diagnosis fields are needed to capture safety events in administrative data? Findings and recommendations from the WHO ICD-11 Topic Advisory Group on Quality and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Drösler, Saskia E.; Romano, Patrick S.; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Burnand, Bernard; Colin, Cyrille; Pincus, Harold; Ghali, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective As part of the WHO ICD-11 development initiative, the Topic Advisory Group on Quality and Safety explores meta-features of morbidity data sets, such as the optimal number of secondary diagnosis fields. Design The Health Care Quality Indicators Project of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development collected Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) information from administrative hospital data of 19–20 countries in 2009 and 2011. We investigated whether three countries that expanded their data systems to include more secondary diagnosis fields showed increased PSI rates compared with six countries that did not. Furthermore, administrative hospital data from six of these countries and two American states, California (2011) and Florida (2010), were analysed for distributions of coded patient safety events across diagnosis fields. Results Among the participating countries, increasing the number of diagnosis fields was not associated with any overall increase in PSI rates. However, high proportions of PSI-related diagnoses appeared beyond the sixth secondary diagnosis field. The distribution of three PSI-related ICD codes was similar in California and Florida: 89–90% of central venous catheter infections and 97–99% of retained foreign bodies and accidental punctures or lacerations were captured within 15 secondary diagnosis fields. Conclusions Six to nine secondary diagnosis fields are inadequate for comparing complication rates using hospital administrative data; at least 15 (and perhaps more with ICD-11) are recommended to fully characterize clinical outcomes. Increasing the number of fields should improve the international and intra-national comparability of data for epidemiologic and health services research, utilization analyses and quality of care assessment. PMID:24334247

  1. Standardized handoff report form in clinical nursing education: An educational tool for patient safety and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fidelindo; Pajarillo, Edmund J Y

    2016-02-01

    Effective change-of-shift handoff communication is a core competency in the generalist education of nurses. The use of a standardized handoff tool that fosters higher order thinking and clinical reasoning is fundamental in clinical education and nursing practice (AACN, 2008). A checklist that prompts students to implement evidence-based safety alerts will increase students' confidence and autonomy, prevent errors, promote patient safety, and successfully transform theoretical learning into competent practice. High-quality handoffs and contextualized post-conference debriefing using key items in the handoff form will help increase students' feelings of precision, accuracy, improve their self-image, and enhance their sense of professional belonging. PMID:26573150

  2. Safety aspects of liquefied natural gas in the marine environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This study evaluates the safety issues associated with the marine transportation, handling, and storage of LNG. The panel concluded that the first concern should be the prevention of an accident that would lead to a large, uncontrolled release of LNG in or near populated areas. This concern was addressed by reviewing the design principles of LNG transportation systems, the operational principles involved in the shipment of LNG, and other factors that might reasonably be expected to improve further the safety of the system. The panel concluded that the second concern was the development of ways to mitigate the consequences of potentially hazardous LNG releases in the event that, contrary to all expectations, measures to maintain tank integrity should fail. Development of these methods requires an understanding of the underlying physical and chemical principles governing large LNG release, including spill dynamics, dispersion on water as well as on land, ignition, and resulting fire and blast effects.

  3. Perspective: call to action: it is time for academic institutions to appoint a resident quality and patient safety officer.

    PubMed

    Fleischut, Peter M; Evans, Adam S; Nugent, William C; Faggiani, Susan L; Kerr, Gregory E; Lazar, Eliot J

    2011-07-01

    In meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competency requirements, teaching hospitals often find it challenging to ensure effective involvement of housestaff in the area of quality and patient safety (QPS). Because housestaff are the frontline providers of care to patients, and medical errors occasionally occur based on their actions, it is essential for health care organizations to engage them in QPS processes.In early 2008 a Housestaff Quality Council (HQC) was established at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center, to improve QPS by engaging housestaff in policy and decision-making processes and to promote greater housestaff participation in QPS initiatives. It was quickly realized that the success of the HQC was highly contingent on alignment with the institution's overall QPS agenda. To this end, the position of resident QPS officer was created to strengthen the relationship between the hospital's strategic goals and the HQC. The authors describe the success of the resident QPS officers at their institution and observe that by appointing and supporting resident QPS officers, hospitals will be better able to meet their quality and safety goals, residency programs will be able to fulfill their required ACGME core competencies, and the overall quality and safety of patient care can be improved. Simultaneously, the creation of this position will help to create a new cadre of physician leaders needed to further the goals of QPS in health care. PMID:21617508

  4. Effects of abiotic stress and crop management on cereal grain composition: implications for food quality and safety

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Nigel G.; Curtis, Tanya Y.; Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The effects of abiotic stresses and crop management on cereal grain composition are reviewed, focusing on phytochemicals, vitamins, fibre, protein, free amino acids, sugars, and oils. These effects are discussed in the context of nutritional and processing quality and the potential for formation of processing contaminants, such as acrylamide, furan, hydroxymethylfurfuryl, and trans fatty acids. The implications of climate change for cereal grain quality and food safety are considered. It is concluded that the identification of specific environmental stresses that affect grain composition in ways that have implications for food quality and safety and how these stresses interact with genetic factors and will be affected by climate change needs more investigation. Plant researchers and breeders are encouraged to address the issue of processing contaminants or risk appearing out of touch with major end-users in the food industry, and not to overlook the effects of environmental stresses and crop management on crop composition, quality, and safety as they strive to increase yield. PMID:25428997

  5. Special studies and analyses for the Assistant Secretary for Policy, Safety, and Environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    The report identifies major tasks accomplished, details plans for the orderly completion of all work in process, and provides a complete listing of deliverables (reports, briefings, letters, etc.) provided under the contract. Purpose of this contract was to provide environmental studies, analytical planning, evaluation, and other technical assistance and support to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness (EP) and designated EP offices and divisions.

  6. Assessment of Learning Environment Motivational Quality from the Point of View of Secondary and High School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso-Tapia, Jesus; Pardo, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing interest about learning environments enhancing learning motivation. However, two questions need to be answered to improve learning environment motivational quality: how much motivational value do students attribute to each particular component of learning environments? And in what degree is such value mediated by students'…

  7. Using *ORA, a Network Analysis Tool, to Assess the Relationship of Handoffs to Quality and Safety Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Effken, Judith A.; Gephart, Sheila M.; Brewer, Barbara B.; Carley, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Communication during patient handoffs has been widely implicated in patient safety issues. However, few studies have actually been able to quantify the relationship between handoffs and patient outcomes. We used *ORA, a dynamic network analysis tool, to examine handoffs between day and night shifts on seven units in three hospitals in the Southwest. Using *ORA’s visualization and analysis capabilities we examined the relationships between the handoff communication network metrics and a variety of patient safety quality and satisfaction outcomes. Unique network patterns were observed for different types of outcome variable (e.g., safety, symptom management, self care, and patient satisfaction). This exploratory project demonstrates the power of *ORA to identify communication patterns for large groups, such as patient care units. *ORA’s network metrics can then be related to specific patient outcomes. PMID:23114394

  8. The Impact of Telehealthcare on the Quality and Safety of Care: A Systematic Overview

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Susannah; Sheikh, Aziz; Cresswell, Kathrin; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Mukherjee, Mome; Hemmi, Akiko; Pagliari, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Background Telehealthcare involves the use of information and communication technologies to deliver healthcare at a distance and to support patient self-management through remote monitoring and personalised feedback. It is timely to scrutinise the evidence regarding the benefits, risks and costs of telehealthcare. Methods and Findings Two reviewers searched for relevant systematic reviews published from January 1997 to November 2011 in: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, IndMed and PakMed. Reviewers undertook independent quality assessment of studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool for systematic reviews. 1,782 review articles were identified, from which 80 systematic reviews were selected for inclusion. These covered a range of telehealthcare models involving both synchronous (live) and asynchronous (store-and-forward) interactions between provider and patients. Many studies showed no differences in outcomes between telehealthcare and usual care. Several reviews highlighted the large number of short-term (<12 months) feasibility studies with under 20 participants. Effects of telehealthcare on health service indicators were reported in several reviews, particularly reduced hospitalisations. The reported clinical effectiveness of telehealthcare interventions for patients with long-term conditions appeared to be greatest in those with more severe disease at high-risk of hospitalisation and death. The failure of many studies to adequately describe the intervention makes it difficult to disentangle the contributions of technological and human/organisational factors on the outcomes reported. Evidence on the cost-effectiveness of telehealthcare remains sparse. Patient safety considerations were absent from the evaluative telehealthcare literature. Conclusions Policymakers and planners need to be aware that investment in telehealthcare will not inevitably yield clinical or economic benefits. It is likely that the greatest gains will

  9. Assessment of the safety of spent fuel transportation in urban environs

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, R.P.; Weber, J.P.; Levine, H.S.; Romig, A.D.; Johnson, J.D.; Luna, R.E.; Newton, G.J.; Wong, B.A.; Marshall, R.W. Jr.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    The results of a program to provide an experimental data base for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical sabotage attack on a light-water-reactor spent fuel shipping cask in a densely populated area are presented. The results of subscale and full-scale experiments in conjunction with an analytical modeling study are described. The experimental data were used as input to a reactor-safety consequence model to predict radiological health consequences resulting from a hypothetical sabotage attack on a spent-fuel shipping cask in the Manhattan borough of New York City. The results of these calculations are presented.

  10. Work life and patient safety culture in Canadian healthcare: connecting the quality dots using national accreditation results.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan I

    2012-01-01

    Fostering quality work life is paramount to building a strong patient safety culture in healthcare organizations. Data from two patient safety culture and work-life questionnaires used for Accreditation Canada's national program were analyzed. Strong team leadership was reported in that units were doing a good job of identifying, assessing and managing risks to patients. Seventy-one percent of respondents gave their unit a positive overall grade on patient safety, and 79% of respondents felt that they could often do their best-quality work in their job. However, healthcare workers felt that they did not have enough time to do their jobs adequately and indicated that co-workers were cutting corners in patient care in order to save time. This article discusses engaging both senior leadership and the entire organization in the change process, ensuring supervisory support, and using performance measures to focus organizational efforts on key priorities all as improvement strategies relevant to these findings. These strategies can be used by organizations across sectors and jurisdictions and by healthcare leaders to positively affect work life and patient safety. PMID:22354056

  11. [Effects of food supplements on the safety and quality of seafoods].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The safety of foodstuffs from the hydrocoles made with food supplements is considered. The use in the seafoods of sodium benzoate (E 211), a preservative, monosodium glutamate (E 621), an agent enhancing the flavor of the food, does not provide safety of products, the use of which negative influences human health.

  12. Effects of the space environment on the health and safety of space workers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Large numbers of individuals are required to work in space to assemble and operate a Solar Power Satellite. The physiological and behavioral consequences for large groups of men and women who perform complex tasks in the vehicular or extravehicular environments over long periods of orbital stay time were considered. The most disturbing consequences of exposure to the null gravity environment found relate to: (1) a generalized cardiovascular deconditioning along with loss of a significant amount of body fluid volume; (2) loss of bone minerals and muscle mass; and (3) degraded performance of neutral mechanisms which govern equilibrium and spatial orientation.

  13. Negotiating Safety and Sexual Risk Reduction With Clients in Unsanctioned Safer Indoor Sex Work Environments: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Krüsi, Andrea; Chettiar, Jill; Ridgway, Amelia; Abbott, Janice; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined how unique, low-barrier, supportive housing programs for women who are functioning as unsanctioned indoor sex work environments in a Canadian urban setting influence risk negotiation with clients in sex work transactions. Methods. We conducted 39 semistructured qualitative interviews and 6 focus groups with women who live in low-barrier, supportive housing for marginalized sex workers with substance use issues. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results. Women’s accounts indicated that unsanctioned indoor sex work environments promoted increased control over negotiating sex work transactions, including the capacity to refuse unwanted services, negotiate condom use, and avoid violent perpetrators. Despite the lack of formal legal and policy support for indoor sex work venues in Canada, the environmental-structural supports afforded by these unsanctioned indoor sex work environments, including surveillance cameras and support from staff or police in removing violent clients, were linked to improved police relationships and facilitated the institution of informal peer-safety mechanisms. Conclusions. This study has drawn attention to the potential role of safer indoor sex work environments as venues for public health and violence prevention interventions and has indicated the critical importance of removing the sociolegal barriers preventing the formal implementation of such programs. PMID:22571708

  14. 76 FR 7854 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Quality Excellence, Inc./PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Delisting From Quality Excellence, Inc./PSO AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Quality Excellence Inc./PSO: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Quality Excellence Inc./PSO, a component entity of Arkansas Foundation...

  15. Efficacy of different washing solutions and contact times on the microbial quality and safety of fresh-cut paprika.

    PubMed

    Das, B Kumar; Kim, Ji Gang; Choi, Ji Weon

    2011-10-01

    The role of different washing solutions and contact times was investigated to determine their use as potential sanitizers for maintaining the microbial quality and food safety of fresh-cut paprika. Samples were cut into small pieces, washed for both 90 and 180 s by different washing solutions: tap water, chlorinated water (100 mg/L and pH 6.5-7), electrolyzed water (pH 7.2) and ozonized water (4 mg/L). Then, samples were packaged in 50 µm polypropylene bags and stored at 5 °C for 12 days, followed by an evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of the treatments. Various quality and safety parameters, such as gas composition, color, off-odor, electrical conductivity and microbial numbers, were evaluated during storage. Results revealed insignificant differences in gas composition, and no off-odor was observed in any of the samples during the storage period. However, longer contact time resulted in slightly lower hue angle value than a short one for all washing solutions. Moreover, samples washed with ozone washings showed lower electrolyte leakage than other washing solutions. Samples washed for longer contact time except those washed in ozonized water showed increased microbial numbers during storage. Hence, it has been concluded that longer contact time with ozone has positive effects, whereas the other washing solutions adversely affect the microbial quality and safety aspects of fresh-cut paprika.

  16. Quality assessment of medicinal herbs and their extracts: Criteria and prerequisites for consistent safety and efficacy of herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Govindaraghavan, Suresh; Sucher, Nikolaus J

    2015-11-01

    Ingredients of commercial herbal medicines are assessed for quality primarily to ensure their safety. However, as complex mixtures of different groups of plant secondary metabolites, retention of overall phytochemical consistency of herbal medicines is pivotal to their efficacy. Authenticity and homogeneity of the herbs and strict regimes of physical processing and extract manufacturing are critical factors to maintain phytochemical consistency in commercial products. To ensure both safety and efficacy of herbal medicines, implementation of and adherence to good agricultural and collection practice (GACP), good plant authentication and identification practice (GPAIP), good manufacturing practice (GMP) before and during the manufacturing process, and good laboratory practice (GLP) in analysis are necessary. Establishment and application of harmonized multilaboratory-validated analytical methods and transparency in the supply (value) chain through vendor audits are additional requirements in quality assurance. In this article, we outline steps of a comprehensive quality assurance paradigm aimed at achieving and maintaining safety, consistent phytochemical composition, and clinical efficacy of ingredients of herbal medicines. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Botanicals for Epilepsy.

  17. Health and Safety in the School Environment. A Manual of Recommended Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This manual emphasizes the health relationships in the physical school environment and provides environmental criteria by which existing or planned facilities can be evaluated. Individual chapters deal with school health programs; planning for new schools; school site selection, building plan, and plan review; water supply; plumbing; sewage…

  18. The relationship between the quality of the built environment and the quality of life of people with dementia in residential care.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Richard; Goodenough, Belinda; Low, Lee-Fay; Chenoweth, Lynn; Brodaty, Henry

    2016-07-01

    While there is considerable evidence on the impact of specific design features on problems associated with dementia, the link between the quality of the built environment and quality of life of people with dementia is largely unexplored. This study explored the environmental and personal characteristics that are associated with quality of life in people with dementia living in residential aged care. Data were obtained from 275 residents of 35 aged care homes and analysed using linear regression. The quality of the built environment was significantly associated with the quality of life of the resident measured by global self-report. Environmental ratings were not associated with proxy or detailed self-report ratings. Higher quality of life is associated with buildings that facilitate engagement with a variety of activities both inside and outside, are familiar, provide a variety of private and community spaces and the amenities and opportunities to take part in domestic activities.

  19. Comparing Cultural Differences in Two Quality Measures in Chinese Kindergartens: The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised and the Kindergarten Quality Rating System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Bi Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degrees of congruence between two early childhood evaluation systems on various quality concepts: the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) and Zhejiang's Kindergarten Quality Rating System (KQRS). Analysis of variance and post hoc least significant difference tests were employed to show the extent…

  20. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    PubMed

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF.