Science.gov

Sample records for environmental bacillus subtilis

  1. Environmental Persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Meyer, Kathryn M; Kelly, Thomas J; Choi, Young W; Rogers, James V; Riggs, Karen B; Willenberg, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data for how the viability of biological agents may degrade over time in different environments. In this study, experiments were conducted to determine the persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores on outdoor materials with and without exposure to simulated sunlight, using ultraviolet (UV)-A/B radiation. Spores were inoculated onto glass, wood, concrete, and topsoil and recovered after periods of 2, 14, 28, and 56 days. Recovery and inactivation kinetics for the two species were assessed for each surface material and UV exposure condition. Results suggest that with exposure to UV, decay of spore viability for both Bacillus species occurs in two phases, with an initial rapid decay, followed by a slower inactivation period. The exception was with topsoil, in which there was minimal loss of spore viability in soil over 56 days, with or without UV exposure. The greatest loss in viable spore recovery occurred on glass with UV exposure, with nearly a four log10 reduction after just two days. In most cases, B. subtilis had a slower rate of decay than B. anthracis, although less B. subtilis was recovered initially. PMID:26372011

  2. Environmental Persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Joseph P.; Meyer, Kathryn M.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Choi, Young W.; Rogers, James V.; Riggs, Karen B.; Willenberg, Zachary J.

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data for how the viability of biological agents may degrade over time in different environments. In this study, experiments were conducted to determine the persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores on outdoor materials with and without exposure to simulated sunlight, using ultraviolet (UV)-A/B radiation. Spores were inoculated onto glass, wood, concrete, and topsoil and recovered after periods of 2, 14, 28, and 56 days. Recovery and inactivation kinetics for the two species were assessed for each surface material and UV exposure condition. Results suggest that with exposure to UV, decay of spore viability for both Bacillus species occurs in two phases, with an initial rapid decay, followed by a slower inactivation period. The exception was with topsoil, in which there was minimal loss of spore viability in soil over 56 days, with or without UV exposure. The greatest loss in viable spore recovery occurred on glass with UV exposure, with nearly a four log10 reduction after just two days. In most cases, B. subtilis had a slower rate of decay than B. anthracis, although less B. subtilis was recovered initially. PMID:26372011

  3. Environmental Persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Meyer, Kathryn M; Kelly, Thomas J; Choi, Young W; Rogers, James V; Riggs, Karen B; Willenberg, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data for how the viability of biological agents may degrade over time in different environments. In this study, experiments were conducted to determine the persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores on outdoor materials with and without exposure to simulated sunlight, using ultraviolet (UV)-A/B radiation. Spores were inoculated onto glass, wood, concrete, and topsoil and recovered after periods of 2, 14, 28, and 56 days. Recovery and inactivation kinetics for the two species were assessed for each surface material and UV exposure condition. Results suggest that with exposure to UV, decay of spore viability for both Bacillus species occurs in two phases, with an initial rapid decay, followed by a slower inactivation period. The exception was with topsoil, in which there was minimal loss of spore viability in soil over 56 days, with or without UV exposure. The greatest loss in viable spore recovery occurred on glass with UV exposure, with nearly a four log10 reduction after just two days. In most cases, B. subtilis had a slower rate of decay than B. anthracis, although less B. subtilis was recovered initially.

  4. Transduction in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    THORNE, C B

    1962-01-01

    Thorne, Curtis B. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.). Transduction in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 83:106-111. 1962.-A bacteriophage, SP-10, isolated from soil carries out general transduction in Bacillus subtilis. Phage propagated on a streptomycin-resistant mutant of the wild-type strain W-23 was capable of transducing to prototrophy strain 168 (indole(-)), as well as all of the auxotrophic mutants of W-23-S(r) tested, which included mutants requiring arginine, histidine, adenine, guanine, thiamine, leucine, or methionine. Although strain 168 was transduced by phage SP-10, lytic activity on this strain could not be detected and attempts to propagate the phage on it failed. Transductions occurred at frequencies in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-5) per plaque-forming unit. Homologous phage was ineffective, deoxyribonuclease had no effect on the frequency of transduction, and transduction was prevented by the addition of phage antiserum. Phage SP-10 was capable of lysogenizing strain W-23-S(r), and this condition was maintained through repeated growth and sporulation cycles in potato-extract medium. Although heating at 65 C for 60 min inactivated free phage particles, spores retained their lysogenic condition after such heat treatment. When heat-treated spores of the lysogenic cultures were used as inocula for growth in a nutrient broth-yeast extract-glucose medium, filtrates contained 10(9), or more, phage particles per ml.

  5. Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Irene S.; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although prokaryotes ordinarily undergo binary fission to produce two identical daughter cells, some are able to undergo alternative developmental pathways that produce daughter cells of distinct cell morphology and fate. One such example is a developmental program called sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, which occurs under conditions of environmental stress. Sporulation has long been used as a model system to help elucidate basic processes of developmental biology including transcription regulation, intercellular signaling, membrane remodeling, protein localization, and cell fate determination. This review highlights some of the recent work that has been done to further understand prokaryotic cell differentiation during sporulation and its potential applications. PMID:24983526

  6. Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Irene S; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2014-06-01

    Although prokaryotes ordinarily undergo binary fission to produce two identical daughter cells, some are able to undergo alternative developmental pathways that produce daughter cells of distinct cell morphology and fate. One such example is a developmental programme called sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, which occurs under conditions of environmental stress. Sporulation has long been used as a model system to help elucidate basic processes of developmental biology including transcription regulation, intercellular signalling, membrane remodelling, protein localization and cell fate determination. This review highlights some of the recent work that has been done to further understand prokaryotic cell differentiation during sporulation and its potential applications. PMID:24983526

  7. Aminopeptidases of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, E P; Starnes, W L; Behal, F J

    1975-01-01

    Three enzymes with L- and one enzyme with D-aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11; alpha-aminoacyl peptide hydrolase) activity have been separated from each other and partially purified from Bacillus subtilis 168 W.T., distinguished with respect to their molecular weights and catalytic properties, and studied in relation to the physiology of this bacterium. One L-aminopeptidase, designated aminopeptidase I, has a molecular weight of 210,000 +/- 20,000, is produced early in growth, and hydrolyzes L-alanyl-beta-naphthylamide most rapidly. Another, designated aminopeptidase II, molecular weight 67,000 +/- 10,000, is also produced early in growth and hydrolyzes L-lysyl-beta-naphthylamide most rapidly. A third, aminopeptidase III, molecular weight 228,000 +/- 20,000, is produced predominantly in early stationary phase and most efficiently utilizes L-alpha-aspartyl-beta-naphthylamide as substrate. The synthesis of aminopeptidase III in early stationary phase suggests that selective catabolism of peptides occurs at this time, perhaps related to the cessation of growth or the onset of early sporulation-associated events. A D-aminopeptidase which hydrolyzes the carboxyl-blocked dipeptide D-alanyl-D-alanyl-beta-naphthylamide (as well as D-alanyl-beta-naphthylamide and D-alanyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine) has also been identified, separated from aminopeptidase II, and purified 170-fold. D-Aminopeptidase, molecular weight 220,000 +/- 20,000, is localized predominantly in the cell wall and periplasm of the organism. This evidence and the variation of the activity during the growth cycle suggest an important function in cell wall or peptide antibiotic metabolism. PMID:240808

  8. Environmental dependence of stationary-phase metabolism in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chubukov, Victor; Sauer, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    When microbes lack the nutrients necessary for growth, they enter stationary phase. In cases when energy sources are still present in the environment, they must decide whether to continue to use their metabolic program to harvest the available energy. Here we characterized the metabolic response to a variety of types of nutrient starvation in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We found that E. coli exhibits a range of phenotypes, with the lowest metabolic rates under nitrogen starvation and highest rates under magnesium starvation. In contrast, the phenotype of B. subtilis was dominated by its decision to form metabolically inactive endospores. While its metabolic rates under most conditions were thus lower than those of E. coli, when sporulation was suppressed by a genetic perturbation or an unnatural starvation condition, the situation was reversed. To further probe stationary-phase metabolism, we used quantitative metabolomics to investigate possible small-molecule signals that may regulate the metabolic rate of E. coli and initiate sporulation in B. subtilis. We hypothesize a role for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) in regulating E. coli glucose uptake and for the redox cofactors NAD(H) and NADP(H) in initiation of sporulation. Our work is directly relevant to synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, where active metabolism during stationary phase, which uncouples production from growth, remains an elusive goal.

  9. Genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Dubnau, D

    1991-01-01

    Genetic competence may be defined as a physiological state enabling a bacterial culture to bind and take up high-molecular-weight exogenous DNA (transformation). In Bacillus subtilis, competence develops postexponentially and only in certain media. In addition, only a minority of the cells in a competent culture become competent, and these are physiologically distinct. Thus, competence is subject to three regulatory modalities: growth stage specific, nutritionally responsive, and cell type specific. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge concerning competence in B. subtilis. The study of genes required for transformability has permitted their classification into two broad categories. Late competence genes are expressed under competence control and specify products required for the binding, uptake, and processing of transforming DNA. Regulatory genes specify products that are needed for the expression of the late genes. Several of the late competence gene products have been shown to be membrane localized, and others are predicted to be membrane associated on the basis of amino acid sequence data. Several of these predicted protein sequences show a striking resemblance to gene products that are involved in the export and/or assembly of extracellular proteins and structures in gram-negative organisms. This observation is consistent with the idea that the late products are directly involved in transport of DNA and is equally consistent with the notion that they play a morphogenetic role in the assembly of a transport apparatus. The competence regulatory apparatus constitutes an elaborate signal transduction system that senses and interprets environmental information and passes this information to the competence-specific transcriptional machinery. Many of the regulatory gene products have been identified and partially characterized, and their interactions have been studied genetically and in some cases biochemically as well. These include several

  10. The sigma factors of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Haldenwang, W G

    1995-01-01

    The specificity of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase for target promotes is largely due to the replaceable sigma subunit that it carries. Multiple sigma proteins, each conferring a unique promoter preference on RNA polymerase, are likely to be present in all bacteria; however, their abundance and diversity have been best characterized in Bacillus subtilis, the bacterium in which multiple sigma factors were first discovered. The 10 sigma factors thus far identified in B. subtilis directly contribute to the bacterium's ability to control gene expression. These proteins are not merely necessary for the expression of those operons whose promoters they recognize; in many instances, their appearance within the cell is sufficient to activate these operons. This review describes the discovery of each of the known B. subtilis sigma factors, their characteristics, the regulons they direct, and the complex restrictions placed on their synthesis and activities. These controls include the anticipated transcriptional regulation that modulates the expression of the sigma factor structural genes but, in the case of several of the B. subtilis sigma factors, go beyond this, adding novel posttranslational restraints on sigma factor activity. Two of the sigma factors (sigma E and sigma K) are, for example, synthesized as inactive precursor proteins. Their activities are kept in check by "pro-protein" sequences which are cleaved from the precursor molecules in response to intercellular cues. Other sigma factors (sigma B, sigma F, and sigma G) are inhibited by "anti-sigma factor" proteins that sequester them into complexes which block their ability to form RNA polymerase holoenzymes. The anti-sigma factors are, in turn, opposed by additional proteins which participate in the sigma factors' release. The devices used to control sigma factor activity in B, subtilis may prove to be as widespread as multiple sigma factors themselves, providing ways of coupling sigma factor activation to

  11. Bacillus subtilis as potential producer for polyhydroxyalkanoates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mamtesh; Patel, Sanjay KS; Kalia, Vipin C

    2009-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable polymers produced by microbes to overcome environmental stress. Commercial production of PHAs is limited by the high cost of production compared to conventional plastics. Another hindrance is the brittle nature and low strength of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), the most widely studied PHA. The needs are to produce PHAs, which have better elastomeric properties suitable for biomedical applications, preferably from inexpensive renewable sources to reduce cost. Certain unique properties of Bacillus subtilis such as lack of the toxic lipo-polysaccharides, expression of self-lysing genes on completion of PHA biosynthetic process – for easy and timely recovery, usage of biowastes as feed enable it to compete as potential candidate for commercial production of PHA. PMID:19619289

  12. Cannibalism stress response in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Höfler, Carolin; Heckmann, Judith; Fritsch, Anne; Popp, Philipp; Gebhard, Susanne; Fritz, Georg; Mascher, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    When faced with carbon source limitation, the Gram-positive soil organism Bacillus subtilis initiates a survival strategy called sporulation, which leads to the formation of highly resistant endospores that allow B. subtilis to survive even long periods of starvation. In order to avoid commitment to this energy-demanding and irreversible process, B. subtilis employs another strategy called 'cannibalism' to delay sporulation as long as possible. Cannibalism involves the production and secretion of two cannibalism toxins, sporulation delaying protein (SDP) and sporulation killing factor (SKF), which are able to lyse sensitive siblings. The lysed cells are thought to then provide nutrients for the cannibals to slow down or even prevent them from entering sporulation. In this study, we uncovered the role of the cell envelope stress response (CESR), especially the Bce-like antimicrobial peptide detoxification modules, in the cannibalism stress response during the stationary phase. SDP and SKF specifically induce Bce-like systems and some extracytoplasmic function σ factors in stationary-phase cultures, but only the latter provide some degree of protection. A full Bce response is only triggered by mature toxins, and not by toxin precursors. Our study provides insights into the close relationship between stationary-phase survival and the CESR of B. subtilis. PMID:26364265

  13. General and regulatory proteolysis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Molière, Noël; Turgay, Kürşad

    2013-01-01

    The soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus subtilis is widely used as a model organism to study the Gram-positive branch of Bacteria. A variety of different developmental pathways, such as endospore formation, genetic competence, motility, swarming and biofilm formation, have been studied in this organism. These processes are intricately connected and regulated by networks containing e.g. alternative sigma factors, two-component systems and other regulators. Importantly, in some of these regulatory networks the activity of important regulatory factors is controlled by proteases. Furthermore, together with chaperones, the same proteases constitute the cellular protein quality control (PQC) network, which plays a crucial role in protein homeostasis and stress tolerance of this organism. In this review, we will present the current knowledge on regulatory and general proteolysis in B. subtilis and discuss its involvement in developmental pathways and cellular stress management.

  14. Chaperone-protease systems in regulation and protein quality control in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Molière, Noël; Turgay, Kürşad

    2009-11-01

    The Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis is extremely well adapted to changing environmental conditions. The chaperone-protease ClpCP and other AAA+ proteases constitute an important component of the B. subtilis protein quality control system that is essential for survival during stress. In this review, we discuss recent discoveries concerning the molecular mechanism, regulation and localization of proteases and chaperones in B. subtilis.

  15. A Love Affair with Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    My career in science was launched when I was an undergraduate at Princeton University and reinforced by graduate training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. However, it was only after I moved to Harvard University as a junior fellow that my affections were captured by a seemingly mundane soil bacterium. What Bacillus subtilis offered was endless fascinating biological problems (alternative sigma factors, sporulation, swarming, biofilm formation, stochastic cell fate switching) embedded in a uniquely powerful genetic system. Along the way, my career in science became inseparably interwoven with teaching and mentoring, which proved to be as rewarding as the thrill of discovery. PMID:25533458

  16. Genetic exchange in Bacillus subtilis in soil.

    PubMed

    Graham, J B; Istock, C A

    1978-11-01

    Genetically labelled strains of Bacillus subtilis have been shown to exchange blocks of linked genes while growing together in soil. After eight days of incubation, 79% of unselected colony-forming units exhibited a phenotype containing markers from both parents; the parental strains were not detected after the first day of incubation. High frequencies of transformation were also obtained by adding genetically labelled deoxyribonucleic acid to single-strain soil cultures. Observed linkage of genetic markers was greater in soil transformation than in standard laboratory procedures. The results indicate that transformation may play an important role in the adaptation of the Bacilli to their natural habitat.

  17. Susceptibilities of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and avirulent Bacillus anthracis spores to liquid biocides.

    PubMed

    Hilgren, J; Swanson, K M J; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Cords, B

    2009-02-01

    The susceptibility of spores of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, and avirulent Bacillus anthracis to treatment with hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacetic acid, a peroxy-fatty acid mixture, sodium hypochlorite, and acidified sodium chlorite was investigated. Results indicated that B. cereus spores may be reasonable predictors of B. anthracis spore inactivation by peroxyacetic acid-based biocides. However, B. cereus was not a reliable predictor of B. anthracis inactivation by the other biocides. In studies comparing B. cereus and B. subtilis, B. cereus spores were more resistant (by 1.5 to 2.5 log CFU) than B. subtilis spores to peroxyacetic acid, the peroxy-fatty acid mixture, and acidified sodium chlorite. Conversely, B. subtilis spores were more resistant than B. cereus spores to hydrogen peroxide. These findings indicated the relevance of side-by-side testing of target organisms and potential surrogates against categories of biocides to determine whether both have similar properties and to validate the use of the surrogate microorganisms.

  18. Roles of small, acid-soluble spore proteins and core water content in survival of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to environmental solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis contain a number of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) which comprise up to 20% of total spore core protein. The multiple alpha/beta-type SASP have been shown to confer resistance to UV radiation, heat, peroxides, and other sporicidal treatments. In this study, SASP-defective mutants of B. subtilis and spores deficient in dacB, a mutation leading to an increased core water content, were used to study the relative contributions of SASP and increased core water content to spore resistance to germicidal 254-nm and simulated environmental UV exposure (280 to 400 nm, 290 to 400 nm, and 320 to 400 nm). Spores of strains carrying mutations in sspA, sspB, and both sspA and sspB (lacking the major SASP-alpha and/or SASP-beta) were significantly more sensitive to 254-nm and all polychromatic UV exposures, whereas the UV resistance of spores of the sspE strain (lacking SASP-gamma) was essentially identical to that of the wild type. Spores of the dacB-defective strain were as resistant to 254-nm UV-C radiation as wild-type spores. However, spores of the dacB strain were significantly more sensitive than wild-type spores to environmental UV treatments of >280 nm. Air-dried spores of the dacB mutant strain had a significantly higher water content than air-dried wild-type spores. Our results indicate that alpha/beta-type SASP and decreased spore core water content play an essential role in spore resistance to environmentally relevant UV wavelengths whereas SASP-gamma does not.

  19. FORMALDEHYDE GAS INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACE MATERIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research evaluated the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface material using formaldehyde gas. Spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 hr. Fo...

  20. The Bacillus subtilis heat shock stimulon

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    All organisms respond to a sudden increase in temperature by the so-called heat shock response. This response results in the induction of a subset of genes, designated heat shock genes coding for heat shock proteins, which allow the cell to cope with the stress regimen. Research carried out during the last 10 years with eubacteria has revealed that the heat shock genes of a given species fall into different classes (regulons), where each class is regulated by a different transcriptional regulator, which could be an alternative sigma factor, a transcriptional activator, or a transcriptional repressor. All regulons of a single species constitute the heat shock stimulon. In Bacillus subtilis, more than 200 genes representing over 7% of the transcriptionally active genes are induced at least 3-fold in response to a heat shock. This response becomes apparent within the first minute after exposure to heat stress, is transient, and is coordinated by at least 5 transcriptional regulator proteins, including 2 repressors, an alternate sigma-factor, and a 2-component signal transduction system. A detailed analysis of the regulation of all known heat shock genes has shown that they belong to at least 6 regulons that together comprise the B subtilis heat shock stimulon. Potential thermosensors are discussed in this article. PMID:14984053

  1. Protonmotive force and motility of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Shioi, J I; Imae, Y; Oosawa, F

    1978-01-01

    Motility of Bacillus subtilis was inhibited within a few minutes by a combination of valinomycin and a high concentration of potassium ions in the medium at neutral pH. Motility was restored by lowering the concentration of valinomycin or potassium ions. The valinomycin concentration necessary for motility inhibition was determined at various concentrations of potassium ions and various pH's. At pH 7.5, valinomycin of any concentration did not inhibit the motility, when the potassium ion concentration was lower than 9 mM. In the presence of 230 mM potassium ion, the motility inhibition by valinomycin was not detected at pH lower than 6.1. These results are easily explained by the idea that the motility of B. subtilis is supported by the electrochemical potential difference of the proton across the membrane, or the protonmotive force. The electrochemical potential difference necessary for motility was estimated to be about -90 mV. PMID:25261

  2. Storage stability of Bacillus subtilis ethylene oxide biological indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, R R

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis biological indicators, stored at ambient and freezer conditions for 24 months, demonstrated no statistical difference in ethylene oxide resistance and spore viability from initial production levels. PMID:6766701

  3. Visualizing Bacillus subtilis During Vegetative Growth and Spore Formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is the most commonly used Gram-positive bacterium to study cellular processes because of its genetic tractability. In addition, during nutrient limitation, B. subtilis undergoes the development process of spore formation, which is among the simplest examples of cellular differentiation. Many aspects of these processes have benefited from fluorescence microscopy. Here, we describe basic wide-field fluorescence microscopy techniques to visualize B. subtilis during vegetative growth, and the developmental process of sporulation. PMID:27283315

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain KATMIRA1933

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of Bacillus subtilis KATMIRA1933. Previous studies demonstrated probiotic properties of this strain partially attributed to production of an antibacterial compound, subtilosin. Comparative analysis of this strain’s genome with that of a commercial probiotic strain, B. subtilis Natto, is presented. PMID:24948771

  5. New family of regulators in the environmental signaling pathway which activates the general stress transcription factor sigma(B) of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Akbar, S; Gaidenko, T A; Kang, C M; O'Reilly, M; Devine, K M; Price, C W

    2001-02-01

    Expression of the general stress regulon of Bacillus subtilis is controlled by the alternative transcription factor sigma(B), which is activated when cells encounter growth-limiting energy or environmental stresses. The RsbT serine-threonine kinase is required to convey environmental stress signals to sigma(B), and this kinase activity is magnified in vitro by the RsbR protein, a positive regulator important for full in vivo response to salt or heat stress. Previous genetic analysis suggested that RsbR function is redundant with other unidentified regulators. A search of the translated B. subtilis genome found six paralogous proteins with significant similarity to RsbR: YetI, YezB, YkoB, YojH, YqhA, and YtvA. Their possible regulatory roles were investigated using three different approaches. First, genetic analysis found that null mutations in four of the six paralogous genes have marked effects on the sigma(B) environmental signaling pathway, either singly or in combination. The two exceptions were yetI and yezB, adjacent genes which appear to encode a split paralog. Second, biochemical analysis found that YkoB, YojH, and YqhA are specifically phosphorylated in vitro by the RsbT environmental signaling kinase, as had been previously shown for RsbR, which is phosphorylated on two threonine residues in its C-terminal region. Both residues are conserved in the three phosphorylated paralogs but are absent in the ones that were not substrates of RsbT: YetI and YezB, each of which bears only one of the conserved residues; and YtvA, which lacks both residues and instead possesses an N-terminal PAS domain. Third, analysis in the yeast two-hybrid system suggested that all six paralogs interact with each other and with the RsbR and RsbS environmental regulators. Our data indicate that (i) RsbR, YkoB, YojH, YqhA, and YtvA function in the environmental stress signaling pathway; (ii) YtvA acts as a positive regulator; and (iii) RsbR, YkoB, YojH, and YqhA collectively act as

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis Strain ∆6

    PubMed Central

    Reuß, Daniel R.; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Quax, Wim J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis ∆6 is a genome-reduced strain that was cured from six prophages and AT-rich islands. This strain is of great interest for biotechnological applications. Here, we announce the full-genome sequence of this strain. Interestingly, the conjugative element ICEBs1 has most likely undergone self-excision in B. subtilis ∆6. PMID:27469946

  7. Crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Ramona E; Löwe, Jan

    2010-08-27

    Lon ATP-dependent proteases are key components of the protein quality control systems of bacterial cells and eukaryotic organelles. Eubacterial Lon proteases contain an N-terminal domain, an ATPase domain, and a protease domain, all in one polypeptide chain. The N-terminal domain is thought to be involved in substrate recognition, the ATPase domain in substrate unfolding and translocation into the protease chamber, and the protease domain in the hydrolysis of polypeptides into small peptide fragments. Like other AAA+ ATPases and self-compartmentalising proteases, Lon functions as an oligomeric complex, although the subunit stoichiometry is currently unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of truncated versions of Lon protease from Bacillus subtilis (BsLon), which reveal previously unknown architectural features of Lon complexes. Our analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy show different oligomerisation of Lon proteases from two different bacterial species, Aquifex aeolicus and B. subtilis. The structure of BsLon-AP shows a hexameric complex consisting of a small part of the N-terminal domain, the ATPase, and protease domains. The structure shows the approximate arrangement of the three functional domains of Lon. It also reveals a resemblance between the architecture of Lon proteases and the bacterial proteasome-like protease HslUV. Our second structure, BsLon-N, represents the first 209 amino acids of the N-terminal domain of BsLon and consists of a globular domain, similar in structure to the E. coli Lon N-terminal domain, and an additional four-helix bundle, which is part of a predicted coiled-coil region. An unexpected dimeric interaction between BsLon-N monomers reveals the possibility that Lon complexes may be stabilised by coiled-coil interactions between neighbouring N-terminal domains. Together, BsLon-N and BsLon-AP are 36 amino acids short of offering a complete picture of a full-length Lon protease.

  8. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  9. Mechanical Behavior of a Bacillus subtilis Pellicle.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, Emily C; Douarche, Carine; Allain, Jean-Marc; Roger, Philippe; Regeard, Christophe; Cegelski, Lynette; Fuller, Gerald G; Raspaud, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial biofilms consist of a complex network of biopolymers embedded with microorganisms, and together these components form a physically robust structure that enables bacteria to grow in a protected environment. This structure can help unwanted biofilms persist in situations ranging from chronic infection to the biofouling of industrial equipment, but under certain circumstances it can allow the biofilm to disperse and colonize new niches. Mechanical properties are therefore a key aspect of biofilm life. In light of the recently discovered growth-induced compressive stress present within a biofilm, we studied the mechanical behavior of Bacillus subtilis pellicles, or biofilms at the air-liquid interface, and tracked simultaneously the force response and macroscopic structural changes during elongational deformations. We observed that pellicles behaved viscoelastically in response to small deformations, such that the growth-induced compressive stress was still present, and viscoplastically at large deformations, when the pellicles were under tension. In addition, by using particle imaging velocimetry we found that the pellicle deformations were nonaffine, indicating heterogeneous mechanical properties with the pellicle being more pliable near attachment surfaces. Overall, our results indicate that we must consider not only the viscoelastic but also the viscoplastic and mechanically heterogeneous nature of these structures to understand biofilm dispersal and removal. PMID:27046510

  10. Sporulation of Bacillus subtilis in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, I. W.; Mandelstam, J.

    1970-01-01

    Sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168 was studied in chemostat cultures. Sporulation occurred at high frequency under limitation of growth by glucose or the nitrogen source in minimal medium, whereas rates of sporulation were low for Mg2+, phosphate, citrate, or tryptophan limitation. Sporulation was found at all growth rates tested, and the incidence of spores increased with decrease in growth rate of the culture. Within the range of growth rates up to the maximum obtainable with the defined medium, no threshold effect of growth rate on sporulation was observed. By studying transient states, it was possible to determine the time taken for the appearance of a refractile spore after initiation of a cell to sporulation. Under conditions of glucose limitation, cells were found to be committed to sporulation as soon as they were initiated. In nitrogen-limited cultures, however, a partial relief of nitrogen limitation prevented the development of spores during the first hour after initiation. The results of experiments with multistep changes in dilution rate of a chemostat culture indicate that initiation to sporulation is probably restricted to a particular point in the cell division cycle. PMID:4990846

  11. Kin discrimination between sympatric Bacillus subtilis isolates.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Polonca; Kraigher, Barbara; Lyons, Nicholas Anthony; Kolter, Roberto; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2015-11-10

    Kin discrimination, broadly defined as differential treatment of conspecifics according to their relatedness, could help biological systems direct cooperative behavior toward their relatives. Here we investigated the ability of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis to discriminate kin from nonkin in the context of swarming, a cooperative multicellular behavior. We tested a collection of sympatric conspecifics from soil in pairwise combinations and found that despite their history of coexistence, the vast majority formed distinct boundaries when the swarms met. Some swarms did merge, and most interestingly, this behavior was only seen in the most highly related strain pairs. Overall the swarm interaction phenotype strongly correlated with phylogenetic relatedness, indicative of kin discrimination. Using a subset of strains, we examined cocolonization patterns on plant roots. Pairs of kin strains were able to cocolonize roots and formed a mixed-strain biofilm. In contrast, inoculating roots with pairs of nonkin strains resulted in biofilms consisting primarily of one strain, suggestive of an antagonistic interaction among nonkin strains. This study firmly establishes kin discrimination in a bacterial multicellular setting and suggests its potential effect on ecological interactions. PMID:26438858

  12. Kin discrimination between sympatric Bacillus subtilis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Stefanic, Polonca; Kraigher, Barbara; Lyons, Nicholas Anthony; Kolter, Roberto; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Kin discrimination, broadly defined as differential treatment of conspecifics according to their relatedness, could help biological systems direct cooperative behavior toward their relatives. Here we investigated the ability of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis to discriminate kin from nonkin in the context of swarming, a cooperative multicellular behavior. We tested a collection of sympatric conspecifics from soil in pairwise combinations and found that despite their history of coexistence, the vast majority formed distinct boundaries when the swarms met. Some swarms did merge, and most interestingly, this behavior was only seen in the most highly related strain pairs. Overall the swarm interaction phenotype strongly correlated with phylogenetic relatedness, indicative of kin discrimination. Using a subset of strains, we examined cocolonization patterns on plant roots. Pairs of kin strains were able to cocolonize roots and formed a mixed-strain biofilm. In contrast, inoculating roots with pairs of nonkin strains resulted in biofilms consisting primarily of one strain, suggestive of an antagonistic interaction among nonkin strains. This study firmly establishes kin discrimination in a bacterial multicellular setting and suggests its potential effect on ecological interactions. PMID:26438858

  13. Alanylated lipoteichoic acid primer in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid is a major lipid-anchored polymer in Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis. This polymer typically consists of repeating phosphate-containing units and therefore has a predominant negative charge. The repeating units are attached to a glycolipid anchor which has a diacylglycerol (DAG) moiety attached to a dihexopyranose head group. D-alanylation is known as the major modification of type I and type IV lipoteichoic acids, which partially neutralizes the polymer and plays important roles in bacterial survival and resistance to the host immune system. The biosynthesis pathways of the glycolipid anchor and lipoteichoic acid have been fully characterized. However, the exact mechanism of D-alanyl transfer from the cytosol to cell surface lipoteichoic acid remains unclear. Here I report the use of mass spectrometry in the identification of possible intermediate species in the biosynthesis and D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acid: the glycolipid anchor, nascent lipoteichoic acid primer with one phosphoglycerol unit, as well as mono- and di-alanylated forms of the lipoteichoic acid primer. Monitoring these species as well as the recently reported D-alanyl-phosphatidyl glycerol should aid in shedding light on the mechanism of the D-alanylation pathway of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:27134729

  14. Mechanical Behavior of a Bacillus subtilis Pellicle.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, Emily C; Douarche, Carine; Allain, Jean-Marc; Roger, Philippe; Regeard, Christophe; Cegelski, Lynette; Fuller, Gerald G; Raspaud, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial biofilms consist of a complex network of biopolymers embedded with microorganisms, and together these components form a physically robust structure that enables bacteria to grow in a protected environment. This structure can help unwanted biofilms persist in situations ranging from chronic infection to the biofouling of industrial equipment, but under certain circumstances it can allow the biofilm to disperse and colonize new niches. Mechanical properties are therefore a key aspect of biofilm life. In light of the recently discovered growth-induced compressive stress present within a biofilm, we studied the mechanical behavior of Bacillus subtilis pellicles, or biofilms at the air-liquid interface, and tracked simultaneously the force response and macroscopic structural changes during elongational deformations. We observed that pellicles behaved viscoelastically in response to small deformations, such that the growth-induced compressive stress was still present, and viscoplastically at large deformations, when the pellicles were under tension. In addition, by using particle imaging velocimetry we found that the pellicle deformations were nonaffine, indicating heterogeneous mechanical properties with the pellicle being more pliable near attachment surfaces. Overall, our results indicate that we must consider not only the viscoelastic but also the viscoplastic and mechanically heterogeneous nature of these structures to understand biofilm dispersal and removal.

  15. 40 CFR 180.1128 - Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1128 Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of... biofungicide Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 in or on all food commodities, including residues resulting from...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1111 - Bacillus subtilis GB03; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis GB03; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1111 Bacillus subtilis GB03; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The biofungicide Bacillus subtilis GB03 is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1111 - Bacillus subtilis GB03; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis GB03; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1111 Bacillus subtilis GB03; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The biofungicide Bacillus subtilis GB03 is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1128 - Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1128 Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of... biofungicide Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 in or on all food commodities, including residues resulting from...

  19. Optimizing Bacillus subtilis spore isolation and quantifying spore harvest purity.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Zoë R; Hertel, Mikaela R; Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2011-12-01

    Investigating the biochemistry, resilience and environmental interactions of bacterial endospores often requires a pure endospore biomass free of vegetative cells. Numerous endospore isolation methods, however, neglect to quantify the purity of the final endospore biomass. To ensure low vegetative cell contamination we developed a quality control technique that enables rapid quantification of endospore harvest purity. This method quantifies spore purity using bright-field and fluorescence microscopy imaging in conjunction with automated cell counting software. We applied this method to Bacillus subtilis endospore harvests isolated using a two-phase separation method that utilizes mild chemicals. The average spore purity of twenty-two harvests was 88±11% (error is 1σ) with a median value of 93%. A spearman coefficient of 0.97 correlating automated and manual bacterial counts confirms the accuracy of software generated data. PMID:21989299

  20. Sticking together: building a biofilm the Bacillus subtilis way.

    PubMed

    Vlamakis, Hera; Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous communities of tightly associated bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix. Bacillus subtilis has long served as a robust model organism to examine the molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation, and a number of studies have revealed that this process is regulated by several integrated pathways. In this Review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that control B. subtilis biofilm assembly, and then briefly summarize the current state of knowledge regarding biofilm disassembly. We also discuss recent progress that has expanded our understanding of B. subtilis biofilm formation on plant roots, which are a natural habitat for this soil bacterium.

  1. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  2. Localization of general and regulatory proteolysis in Bacillus subtilis cells.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Janine; Strahl, Henrik; Molière, Noël; Hamoen, Leendert W; Turgay, Kürşad

    2008-11-01

    Protein degradation mediated by ATP-dependent proteases, such as Hsp100/Clp and related AAA+ proteins, plays an important role in cellular protein homeostasis, protein quality control and the regulation of, e.g. heat shock adaptation and other cellular differentiation processes. ClpCP with its adaptor proteins and other related proteases, such as ClpXP or ClpEP of Bacillus subtilis, are involved in general and regulatory proteolysis. To determine if proteolysis occurs at specific locations in B. subtilis cells, we analysed the subcellular distribution of the Clp system together with adaptor and general and regulatory substrate proteins, under different environmental conditions. We can demonstrate that the ATPase and the proteolytic subunit of the Clp proteases, as well as the adaptor or substrate proteins, form visible foci, representing active protease clusters localized to the polar and to the mid-cell region. These clusters could represent a compartmentalized place for protein degradation positioned at the pole close to where most of the cellular protein biosynthesis and also protein quality control are taking place, thereby spatially separating protein synthesis and degradation.

  3. Role of methylation in aerotaxis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L S; Johnson, M S; Zhulin, I B; Taylor, B L

    1995-01-01

    Taxis to oxygen (aerotaxis) in Bacillus subtilis was characterized in a capillary assay and in a temporal assay in which the concentration of oxygen in a flow chamber was changed abruptly. A strong aerophilic response was present, but there was no aerophobic response to high concentrations of oxygen. Adaptation to a step increase in oxygen concentration was impaired when B. subtilis cells were depleted of methionine to prevent methylation of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. There was a transient increase in methanol release when wild-type B. subtilis, but not a cheR mutant that was deficient in methyltransferase activity, was stimulated by a step increase or a step decrease in oxygen concentration. The methanol released was quantitatively correlated with demethylation of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. This indicated that methylation is involved in aerotaxis in B. subtilis in contrast to aerotaxis in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, which is methylation independent. PMID:7608071

  4. [Asymmetric biosynthesis of d-pseudoephedrine by recombinant Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanhong; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhongyang; Wang, Zhengxiang; Shi, Guiyang

    2011-07-01

    In order to successfully express the carbonyl reductase gene mldh in Bacillus subtilis and complete coenzyme regeneration by B. subtilis glucose dehydrogenase, the promoter PrpsD and the terminator TrpsD from B. subtilis rpsD gene were used as the expression cassette to be a recombinant plasmid pHY300plk-PrpsD-TrpsD. After that, the carbonyl reductase gene mldh was inserted into the previous plasmid and a plasmid pHY300plk-PrpsD-mldh-TrpsD was achieved, followed by transformed into B. subtilis Wb600 to obtain a recombinant B. subtilis Wb600 (pHY300plk-PrpsD-mldh-TrpsD). Subsequently, the results for whole-cell biotransformation from recombinant B. subtilis showed that it could be used to catalyze MAK (1-phenyl- 1-keto-2-methylaminopropane) to d-pseudoephedrine in the presence of glucose. The yield of d-pseudoephedrine could be up to 97.5 mg/L and the conversion rate of MAK was 24.1%. This study indicates the possibility of biotransformation production of d-pseudoephedrine from recombinant B. subtilis.

  5. The LuxS Based Quorum Sensing Governs Lactose Induced Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Duanis-Assaf, Danielle; Steinberg, Doron; Chai, Yunrong; Shemesh, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS) by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2). However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilm. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway. PMID:26779171

  6. Bacillus subtilis biosensor engineered to assess meat spoilage.

    PubMed

    Daszczuk, Alicja; Dessalegne, Yonathan; Drenth, Ismaêl; Hendriks, Elbrich; Jo, Emeraldo; van Lente, Tom; Oldebesten, Arjan; Parrish, Jonathon; Poljakova, Wlada; Purwanto, Annisa A; van Raaphorst, Renske; Boonstra, Mirjam; van Heel, Auke; Herber, Martijn; van der Meulen, Sjoerd; Siebring, Jeroen; Sorg, Robin A; Heinemann, Matthias; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-12-19

    Here, we developed a cell-based biosensor that can assess meat freshness using the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis as a chassis. Using transcriptome analysis, we identified promoters that are specifically activated by volatiles released from spoiled meat. The most strongly activated promoter was PsboA, which drives expression of the genes required for the bacteriocin subtilosin. Next, we created a novel BioBrick compatible integration plasmid for B. subtilis and cloned PsboA as a BioBrick in front of the gene encoding the chromoprotein amilGFP inside this vector. We show that the newly identified promoter could efficiently drive fluorescent protein production in B. subtilis in response to spoiled meat and thus can be used as a biosensor to detect meat spoilage.

  7. Bacillus subtilis Hfq: A role in chemotaxis and motility.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Chandrakant B; Kumar, Pradeep; Rao, Krishnamurthy K

    2016-09-01

    Hfq is a global post-transcriptional regulator that modulates the translation and stability of target mRNAs and thereby regulates pleiotropic functions, such as growth, stress, virulence and motility, in many Gram-negative bacteria. However, comparatively little is known about the regulation and function(s) of Hfq in Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, in Bacillus subtilis, a role for Hfq in stationary phase survival has been suggested, although the possibility of Hfq having an additional role(s) cannot be ruled out. In this study we show that an ortholog of Hfq in B. subtilis is regulated by the stress sigma factor, sigma^B, in addition to the stationary phase sigma factor, sigma^H. We further demonstrate that Hfq positively regulates the expression of flagellum and chemotaxis genes (fla/che) that control chemotaxis and motility, thus assigning a new function for Hfq in B. subtilis.

  8. The structure and regulation of flagella in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial flagellar motility is among the most extensively studied physiological systems in biology but most research has been restricted to using the highly similar Gram negative species Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. Here we review the recent advances in the study of flagellar structure and regulation of the distantly-related and genetically-tractable Gram positive bacterium Bacillus subitlis. B. subtilis has a thicker layer of peptidoglycan and lacks the outer membrane of the Gram negative bacteria; thus, not only phylogenetic separation but also differences in fundamental cell architecture contributes to deviations in flagellar structure and regulation. We speculate that a large number of flagella and the absence of a periplasm makes B. subtilis a premier organism for the study of the earliest events in flagellar morphogenesis and type III secretion system. Furthermore, B. subtilis has been instrumental in the study of heterogeneous gene transcription in subpopulations, and flagellar regulation at the translational and functional level. PMID:25251856

  9. Bacillus subtilis Hfq: A role in chemotaxis and motility.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Chandrakant B; Kumar, Pradeep; Rao, Krishnamurthy K

    2016-09-01

    Hfq is a global post-transcriptional regulator that modulates the translation and stability of target mRNAs and thereby regulates pleiotropic functions, such as growth, stress, virulence and motility, in many Gram-negative bacteria. However, comparatively little is known about the regulation and function(s) of Hfq in Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, in Bacillus subtilis, a role for Hfq in stationary phase survival has been suggested, although the possibility of Hfq having an additional role(s) cannot be ruled out. In this study we show that an ortholog of Hfq in B. subtilis is regulated by the stress sigma factor, sigma^B, in addition to the stationary phase sigma factor, sigma^H. We further demonstrate that Hfq positively regulates the expression of flagellum and chemotaxis genes (fla/che) that control chemotaxis and motility, thus assigning a new function for Hfq in B. subtilis. PMID:27581927

  10. Bacillus subtilis biosensor engineered to assess meat spoilage.

    PubMed

    Daszczuk, Alicja; Dessalegne, Yonathan; Drenth, Ismaêl; Hendriks, Elbrich; Jo, Emeraldo; van Lente, Tom; Oldebesten, Arjan; Parrish, Jonathon; Poljakova, Wlada; Purwanto, Annisa A; van Raaphorst, Renske; Boonstra, Mirjam; van Heel, Auke; Herber, Martijn; van der Meulen, Sjoerd; Siebring, Jeroen; Sorg, Robin A; Heinemann, Matthias; Kuipers, Oscar P; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-12-19

    Here, we developed a cell-based biosensor that can assess meat freshness using the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis as a chassis. Using transcriptome analysis, we identified promoters that are specifically activated by volatiles released from spoiled meat. The most strongly activated promoter was PsboA, which drives expression of the genes required for the bacteriocin subtilosin. Next, we created a novel BioBrick compatible integration plasmid for B. subtilis and cloned PsboA as a BioBrick in front of the gene encoding the chromoprotein amilGFP inside this vector. We show that the newly identified promoter could efficiently drive fluorescent protein production in B. subtilis in response to spoiled meat and thus can be used as a biosensor to detect meat spoilage. PMID:25524109

  11. Biodegradation of furfural by Bacillus subtilis strain DS3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Lv, Quanxi

    2015-07-01

    An aerobic bacterial strain DS3, capable of growing on furfural as sole carbon source, was isolated from actived sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory after enrichment. Based on morphological physiological tests as well as 16SrDNA sequence and Biolog analyses it was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The study revealed that strain DS3 utilized furfural, as analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Under following conditions: pH 8.0, temperature 35 degrees C, 150 rpm and 10% inoculum, strain DS3 showed 31.2% furfural degradation. Furthermore, DS3 strain was found to tolerate furfural concentration as high as 6000 mg(-1). The ability of Bacillus subtilis strain DS3 to degrade furfural has been demonstrated for the first time in the present study.

  12. Biodegradation of furfural by Bacillus subtilis strain DS3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Lv, Quanxi

    2015-07-01

    An aerobic bacterial strain DS3, capable of growing on furfural as sole carbon source, was isolated from actived sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory after enrichment. Based on morphological physiological tests as well as 16SrDNA sequence and Biolog analyses it was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The study revealed that strain DS3 utilized furfural, as analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Under following conditions: pH 8.0, temperature 35 degrees C, 150 rpm and 10% inoculum, strain DS3 showed 31.2% furfural degradation. Furthermore, DS3 strain was found to tolerate furfural concentration as high as 6000 mg(-1). The ability of Bacillus subtilis strain DS3 to degrade furfural has been demonstrated for the first time in the present study. PMID:26387346

  13. Acid and base stress and transcriptomic responses in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Jessica C; Kitko, Ryan D; Cleeton, Sarah H; Lee, Grace E; Ugwu, Chinagozi S; Jones, Brian D; BonDurant, Sandra S; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2009-02-01

    Acid and base environmental stress responses were investigated in Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis AG174 cultures in buffered potassium-modified Luria broth were switched from pH 8.5 to pH 6.0 and recovered growth rapidly, whereas cultures switched from pH 6.0 to pH 8.5 showed a long lag time. Log-phase cultures at pH 6.0 survived 60 to 100% at pH 4.5, whereas cells grown at pH 7.0 survived <15%. Cells grown at pH 9.0 survived 40 to 100% at pH 10, whereas cells grown at pH 7.0 survived <5%. Thus, growth in a moderate acid or base induced adaptation to a more extreme acid or base, respectively. Expression indices from Affymetrix chip hybridization were obtained for 4,095 protein-encoding open reading frames of B. subtilis grown at external pH 6, pH 7, and pH 9. Growth at pH 6 upregulated acetoin production (alsDS), dehydrogenases (adhA, ald, fdhD, and gabD), and decarboxylases (psd and speA). Acid upregulated malate metabolism (maeN), metal export (czcDO and cadA), oxidative stress (catalase katA; OYE family namA), and the SigX extracytoplasmic stress regulon. Growth at pH 9 upregulated arginine catabolism (roc), which generates organic acids, glutamate synthase (gltAB), polyamine acetylation and transport (blt), the K(+)/H(+) antiporter (yhaTU), and cytochrome oxidoreductases (cyd, ctaACE, and qcrC). The SigH, SigL, and SigW regulons were upregulated at high pH. Overall, greater genetic adaptation was seen at pH 9 than at pH 6, which may explain the lag time required for growth shift to high pH. Low external pH favored dehydrogenases and decarboxylases that may consume acids and generate basic amines, whereas high external pH favored catabolism-generating acids.

  14. A novel cold-inducible expression system for Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Thuy Le, Ai Thi; Schumann, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins at low temperatures is one strategy to prevent formation of protein aggregates and the use of an expensive inducer such as IPTG. We report on the construction of two expression vectors both containing the cold-inducible des promoter of Bacillus subtilis, where one allows intra- and the other extracellular synthesis of recombinant proteins. Production of recombinant proteins started within the first 30min after temperature downshock to 25 degrees C and continued for about 5h.

  15. Assembly of minicellulosomes on the surface of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy D; Robson, Scott A; Jiang, Xiao Wen; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Lazazzera, Beth A; Clubb, Robert T

    2011-07-01

    To cost-efficiently produce biofuels, new methods are needed to convert lignocellulosic biomass into fermentable sugars. One promising approach is to degrade biomass using cellulosomes, which are surface-displayed multicellulase-containing complexes present in cellulolytic Clostridium and Ruminococcus species. In this study we created cellulolytic strains of Bacillus subtilis that display one or more cellulase enzymes. Proteins containing the appropriate cell wall sorting signal are covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan by coexpressing them with the Bacillus anthracis sortase A (SrtA) transpeptidase. This approach was used to covalently attach the Cel8A endoglucanase from Clostridium thermocellum to the cell wall. In addition, a Cel8A-dockerin fusion protein was anchored on the surface of B. subtilis via noncovalent interactions with a cell wall-attached cohesin module. We also demonstrate that it is possible to assemble multienzyme complexes on the cell surface. A three-enzyme-containing minicellulosome was displayed on the cell surface; it consisted of a cell wall-attached scaffoldin protein noncovalently bound to three cellulase-dockerin fusion proteins that were produced in Escherichia coli. B. subtilis has a robust genetic system and is currently used in a wide range of industrial processes. Thus, grafting larger, more elaborate minicellulosomes onto the surface of B. subtilis may yield cellulolytic bacteria with increased potency that can be used to degrade biomass.

  16. Genome engineering using a synthetic gene circuit in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da-Eun; Park, Seung-Hwan; Pan, Jae-Gu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Choi, Soo-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Genome engineering without leaving foreign DNA behind requires an efficient counter-selectable marker system. Here, we developed a genome engineering method in Bacillus subtilis using a synthetic gene circuit as a counter-selectable marker system. The system contained two repressible promoters (B. subtilis xylA (Pxyl) and spac (Pspac)) and two repressor genes (lacI and xylR). Pxyl-lacI was integrated into the B. subtilis genome with a target gene containing a desired mutation. The xylR and Pspac–chloramphenicol resistant genes (cat) were located on a helper plasmid. In the presence of xylose, repression of XylR by xylose induced LacI expression, the LacIs repressed the Pspac promoter and the cells become chloramphenicol sensitive. Thus, to survive in the presence of chloramphenicol, the cell must delete Pxyl-lacI by recombination between the wild-type and mutated target genes. The recombination leads to mutation of the target gene. The remaining helper plasmid was removed easily under the chloramphenicol absent condition. In this study, we showed base insertion, deletion and point mutation of the B. subtilis genome without leaving any foreign DNA behind. Additionally, we successfully deleted a 2-kb gene (amyE) and a 38-kb operon (ppsABCDE). This method will be useful to construct designer Bacillus strains for various industrial applications. PMID:25552415

  17. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering of bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, G.; Zito, G.; Pesce, G.; Sasso, A.; Isticato, R.; Ricca, E.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the complex interactions of molecules at biological interfaces is a fundamental issue in biochemistry, biotechnology as well as biomedicine. A plethora of biological processes are ruled by the molecular texture of cellular membrane: cellular communications, drug transportations and cellular recognition are just a few examples of such chemically-mediated processes. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) is a novel, Raman-based technique which is ideally suited for this purpose. TERS relies on the combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The basic idea is the use of a metalled tip as a sort of optical nano-antenna, which gives place to SERS effect close to the tip end. Herein, we present the application of TERS to analyze the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores. The choice of this biological systems is related to the fact that a number of reasons support the use of spores as a mucosal delivery system. The remarkable and well-documented resistance of spores to various environmental and toxic effects make them clear potentials as a novel, surface-display system. Our experimental outcomes demonstrate that TERS is able to provide a nano-scale chemical imaging of spore surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that TERS allows differentiation between wilde-type spore and genetically modified strains. These results hold promise for the characterization and optimization of spore surface for drug-delivery applications.

  18. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation.

  19. Highly selective antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ju; Rong, Kaifeng; Zhao, Huiping; Li, Fei; Lu, Zhong; Chen, Rong

    2013-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different sizes (5, 15 and 55 nm) were synthesized via simple method, and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The antibacterial activities of the prepared AgNPs against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were evaluated by inhibition zone, inhibition curve, and colony counting methods. The results showed that the AgNPs exhibited obvious bacterium-selective and size-dependent antibacterial activities. The Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and B. subtilis were more sensitive to AgNPs than Gram-negative bacterium E. coli. Interestingly, AgNPs displayed remarkably antibacterial activities against B. subtilis among Gram-positive bacteria, regardless of whether in separately or cocultured bacteria. It also showed that AgNPs with 5 nm in size presented the highest antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The effects of AgNPs on the membrane leakage of the reducing sugars from three bacteria were also measured by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. The leakage amount of reducing sugars from B. subtilis was the highest among the tested bacteria, indicating that AgNPs could damage the structure of bacteria cell membrane and resulted in the leakage of reducing sugars, leading to the death of bacteria.

  20. Engineering of Bacillus subtilis 168 for increased nisin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette E; Wangari, Romilda; Hansen, Egon B; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter R

    2009-11-01

    Nisin is a natural bacteriocin produced commercially by Lactococcus lactis and widely used in the food industry as a preservative because of its broad host spectrum. Despite the low productivity and troublesome fermentation of L. lactis, no alternative cost-effective host has yet been found. Bacillus subtilis had been suggested as a potential host for the biosynthesis of nisin but was discarded due to its sensitivity to the lethal action of nisin. In this study, we have reevaluated the potential of B. subtilis as a host organism for the heterologous production of nisin. We applied transcriptome and proteome analyses of B. subtilis and identified eight genes upregulated in the presence of nisin. We demonstrated that the overexpression of some of these genes boosts the natural defenses of B. subtilis, which allows it to sustain higher levels of nisin in the medium. We also attempted to overcome the nisin sensitivity of B. subtilis by introducing the nisin resistance genes nisFEG and nisI from L. lactis under the control of a synthetic promoter library. PMID:19749059

  1. Metabolic engineering of Bacillus subtilis for terpenoid production.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng; Xue, Dan; Abdallah, Ingy I; Dijkshoorn, Linda; Setroikromo, Rita; Lv, Guiyuan; Quax, Wim J

    2015-11-01

    Terpenoids are the largest group of small-molecule natural products, with more than 60,000 compounds made from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). As the most diverse group of small-molecule natural products, terpenoids play an important role in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. For decades, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) were extensively studied to biosynthesize terpenoids, because they are both fully amenable to genetic modifications and have vast molecular resources. On the other hand, our literature survey (20 years) revealed that terpenoids are naturally more widespread in Bacillales. In the mid-1990s, an inherent methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway was discovered in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Since B. subtilis is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) organism and has long been used for the industrial production of proteins, attempts to biosynthesize terpenoids in this bacterium have aroused much interest in the scientific community. This review discusses metabolic engineering of B. subtilis for terpenoid production, and encountered challenges will be discussed. We will summarize some major advances and outline future directions for exploiting the potential of B. subtilis as a desired "cell factory" to produce terpenoids.

  2. Tracking the Elusive Function of Bacillus subtilis Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Delumeau, Olivier; Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Noirot, Philippe; Bossi, Lionello; Dervyn, Etienne; Bouloc, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding protein Hfq is a key component of the adaptive responses of many proteobacterial species including Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Vibrio cholera. In these organisms, the importance of Hfq largely stems from its participation to regulatory mechanisms involving small non-coding RNAs. In contrast, the function of Hfq in Gram-positive bacteria has remained elusive and somewhat controversial. In the present study, we have further addressed this point by comparing growth phenotypes and transcription profiles between wild-type and an hfq deletion mutant of the model Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. The absence of Hfq had no significant consequences on growth rates under nearly two thousand metabolic conditions and chemical treatments. The only phenotypic difference was a survival defect of B. subtilis hfq mutant in rich medium in stationary phase. Transcriptomic analysis correlated this phenotype with a change in the levels of nearly one hundred transcripts. Albeit a significant fraction of these RNAs (36%) encoded sporulation-related functions, analyses in a strain unable to sporulate ruled out sporulation per se as the basis of the hfq mutant’s stationary phase fitness defect. When expressed in Salmonella, B. subtilis hfq complemented the sharp loss of viability of a degP hfq double mutant, attenuating the chronic σE-activated phenotype of this strain. However, B. subtilis hfq did not complement other regulatory deficiencies resulting from loss of Hfq-dependent small RNA activity in Salmonella indicating a limited functional overlap between Salmonella and B. subtilis Hfqs. Overall, this study confirmed that, despite structural similarities with other Hfq proteins, B. subtilis Hfq does not play a central role in post-transcriptional regulation but might have a more specialized function connected with stationary phase physiology. This would account for the high degree of conservation of Hfq proteins in all 17 B. subtilis strains whose

  3. Tracking the Elusive Function of Bacillus subtilis Hfq.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Tatiana; Delumeau, Olivier; Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Noirot, Philippe; Bossi, Lionello; Dervyn, Etienne; Bouloc, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding protein Hfq is a key component of the adaptive responses of many proteobacterial species including Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Vibrio cholera. In these organisms, the importance of Hfq largely stems from its participation to regulatory mechanisms involving small non-coding RNAs. In contrast, the function of Hfq in Gram-positive bacteria has remained elusive and somewhat controversial. In the present study, we have further addressed this point by comparing growth phenotypes and transcription profiles between wild-type and an hfq deletion mutant of the model Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. The absence of Hfq had no significant consequences on growth rates under nearly two thousand metabolic conditions and chemical treatments. The only phenotypic difference was a survival defect of B. subtilis hfq mutant in rich medium in stationary phase. Transcriptomic analysis correlated this phenotype with a change in the levels of nearly one hundred transcripts. Albeit a significant fraction of these RNAs (36%) encoded sporulation-related functions, analyses in a strain unable to sporulate ruled out sporulation per se as the basis of the hfq mutant's stationary phase fitness defect. When expressed in Salmonella, B. subtilis hfq complemented the sharp loss of viability of a degP hfq double mutant, attenuating the chronic σE-activated phenotype of this strain. However, B. subtilis hfq did not complement other regulatory deficiencies resulting from loss of Hfq-dependent small RNA activity in Salmonella indicating a limited functional overlap between Salmonella and B. subtilis Hfqs. Overall, this study confirmed that, despite structural similarities with other Hfq proteins, B. subtilis Hfq does not play a central role in post-transcriptional regulation but might have a more specialized function connected with stationary phase physiology. This would account for the high degree of conservation of Hfq proteins in all 17 B. subtilis strains whose

  4. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  5. Effect of sporulation conditions on the resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to heat and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi Minh, Hue; Durand, Alain; Loison, Pauline; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    Bacillus subtilis(B. subtilis) cells were placed in various environmental conditions to study the effects of aeration, water activity of the medium, temperature, pH, and calcium content on spore formation and the resulting properties. Modification of the sporulation conditions lengthened the growth period of B. subtilis and its sporulation. In some cases, it reduced the final spore concentration. The sporulation conditions significantly affected the spore properties, including germination capacity and resistance to heat treatment in water (30 min at 97°C) or to high pressure (60 min at 350 MPa and 40°C). The relationship between the modifications of these spore properties and the change in the spore structure induced by different sporulation conditions is also considered. According to this study, sporulation conditions must be carefully taken into account during settling sterilization processes applied in the food industry.

  6. PRODUCTION OF EXTRACELLULAR GUANOSINE-5'-MONOPHOSPHATE BY BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    PubMed Central

    Demain, A. L.; Miller, I. M.; Hendlin, D.

    1964-01-01

    Demain, A. L. (Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, N.J.), I. M. Miller, and D. Hendlin. Production of extracellular guanosine-5'-monophosphate by Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 88:991–995. 1964.—Wild-type Bacillus subtilis colonies were found to feed purineless mutants. A strain with high feeding capacity was selected for study, with a guanineless mutant of B. subtilis used as the assay organism. The factor was excreted during its growth phase in a complex medium containing starch and soybean meal extract. Nutritional studies led to the development of a defined medium to be used for biochemical studies and to aid in the isolation of the factor. Starch was replaced by maltose and the soybean meal extract by Mn++. Production of the factor was sensitive to the pH of the medium during growth. Practically its entire extracellular accumulation occurred before visible lysis. The factor was identified as guanosine-5'-monophosphate derived by extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of excreted ribonucleic acid. PMID:14219064

  7. Mutations Determining Mitomycin Resistance in Bacillus subtilis1

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, V. N.

    1966-01-01

    Iyer, V. N. (Microbiology Research Institute, Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada). Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1663–1669. 1966.—The pattern of development of genetic resistance in Bacillus subtilis to mitomycin C was studied, and spontaneous single and multistep mutants were obtained. The transmission and expression of these mutations in sensitive strains proved possible by means of genetic transformation. The mutations were genetically studied in relation to a chromosomal mutation, mac-1, which confers resistance to the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and which has been previously localized in the early-replicating segment of the B. subtilis chromosome. The results indicate that all of three primary mutations studied in this manner, as well as a secondary and tertiary mutation derived from one of the primary mutations, are clustered in this early-replicating segment. It appears that the secondary and tertiary mutations enhance the resistance conferred by the primary mutation, apparently without themselves conferring any resistance. PMID:4959718

  8. Sporicidal characteristics of heated dolomite powder against Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Yasue, Syogo; Sawai, Jun; Kikuchi, Mikio; Nakakuki, Takahito; Sano, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Takahide

    2014-01-01

    Dolomite is a double salt composed of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). The heat treatment of CaCO3 and MgCO3 respectively generates calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), which have antimicrobial activity. In this study, heated dolomite powder (HDP) slurry was investigated for its sporicidal activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 spores. The B. subtilis spores used in this study were not affected by acidic (pH 1) or alkaline (pH 13) conditions, indicating that they were highly resistant. However, dolomite powder heated to 1000℃ for 1 h could kill B. subtilis spores, even at pH 12.7. Sporicidal activity was only apparent when the dolomite powder was heated to 800℃ or higher, and sporicidal activity increased with increases in the heating temperature. This temperature corresponded to that of the generation of CaO. We determined that MgO did not contribute to the sporicidal activity of HDP. To elucidate the sporicidal mechanism of the HDP against B. subtilis spores, the generation of active oxygen from HDP slurry was examined by chemiluminescence analysis. The generation of active oxygen increased when the HDP slurry concentration rose. The results suggested that, in addition to its alkalinity, the active oxygen species generated from HDP were associated with sporicidal activity. PMID:25252642

  9. Prodigiosin Induces Autolysins in Actively Grown Bacillus subtilis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Tabor, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Prodigiosin produced by marine bacterium Vibrio ruber DSM 14379 exhibits a potent antimicrobial activity against a broad range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The mechanism of prodigiosin antimicrobial action, however, is not known. In this work, the effect of prodigiosin on Bacillus subtilis growth, cell membrane leakage, and induction of autolysins was studied. Treating B. subtilis with prodigiosin resulted in rapid decline of optical density and increased cell membrane leakage measured by β-galactosidase activity. Cell lysis was initiated immediately after treatment with prodigiosin in the middle exponential phase and was completed within 2 h. Lytic activity of prodigiosin in mutant strains with impaired autolysin genes lytABCD decreased for 80% compared to the wild type strain, while in lytABCDEF mutant strain prodigiosin had no bacteriolytic but only bacteriostatic effect. Fast prodigiosin lytic activity on individual B. subtilis cells was confirmed by a modified comet assay. The results indicate that prodigiosin autolysin induction in B. subtilis is growth phase dependent. PMID:26858704

  10. A part toolbox to tune genetic expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Guiziou, Sarah; Sauveplane, Vincent; Chang, Hung-Ju; Clerté, Caroline; Declerck, Nathalie; Jules, Matthieu; Bonnet, Jerome

    2016-09-01

    Libraries of well-characterised components regulating gene expression levels are essential to many synthetic biology applications. While widely available for the Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli, such libraries are lacking for the Gram-positive model Bacillus subtilis, a key organism for basic research and biotechnological applications. Here, we engineered a genetic toolbox comprising libraries of promoters, Ribosome Binding Sites (RBS), and protein degradation tags to precisely tune gene expression in B. subtilis We first designed a modular Expression Operating Unit (EOU) facilitating parts assembly and modifications and providing a standard genetic context for gene circuits implementation. We then selected native, constitutive promoters of B. subtilis and efficient RBS sequences from which we engineered three promoters and three RBS sequence libraries exhibiting ∼14 000-fold dynamic range in gene expression levels. We also designed a collection of SsrA proteolysis tags of variable strength. Finally, by using fluorescence fluctuation methods coupled with two-photon microscopy, we quantified the absolute concentration of GFP in a subset of strains from the library. Our complete promoters and RBS sequences library comprising over 135 constructs enables tuning of GFP concentration over five orders of magnitude, from 0.05 to 700 μM. This toolbox of regulatory components will support many research and engineering applications in B. subtilis. PMID:27402159

  11. A part toolbox to tune genetic expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Guiziou, Sarah; Sauveplane, Vincent; Chang, Hung-Ju; Clerté, Caroline; Declerck, Nathalie; Jules, Matthieu; Bonnet, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Libraries of well-characterised components regulating gene expression levels are essential to many synthetic biology applications. While widely available for the Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli, such libraries are lacking for the Gram-positive model Bacillus subtilis, a key organism for basic research and biotechnological applications. Here, we engineered a genetic toolbox comprising libraries of promoters, Ribosome Binding Sites (RBS), and protein degradation tags to precisely tune gene expression in B. subtilis. We first designed a modular Expression Operating Unit (EOU) facilitating parts assembly and modifications and providing a standard genetic context for gene circuits implementation. We then selected native, constitutive promoters of B. subtilis and efficient RBS sequences from which we engineered three promoters and three RBS sequence libraries exhibiting ∼14 000-fold dynamic range in gene expression levels. We also designed a collection of SsrA proteolysis tags of variable strength. Finally, by using fluorescence fluctuation methods coupled with two-photon microscopy, we quantified the absolute concentration of GFP in a subset of strains from the library. Our complete promoters and RBS sequences library comprising over 135 constructs enables tuning of GFP concentration over five orders of magnitude, from 0.05 to 700 μM. This toolbox of regulatory components will support many research and engineering applications in B. subtilis. PMID:27402159

  12. Complexity in regulation of tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Paul; Babitzke, Paul; Antson, Alfred; Yanofsky, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis uses novel regulatory mechanisms in controlling expression of its genes of tryptophan synthesis and transport. These mechanisms respond to changes in the intracellular concentrations of free tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp). The major B. subtilis protein that regulates tryptophan biosynthesis is the tryptophan-activated RNA-binding attenuation protein, TRAP. TRAP is a ring-shaped molecule composed of 11 identical subunits. Active TRAP binds to unique RNA segments containing multiple trinucleotide (NAG) repeats. Binding regulates both transcription termination and translation in the trp operon, and translation of other coding regions relevant to tryptophan metabolism. When there is a deficiency of charged tRNA(Trp), B. subtilis forms an anti-TRAP protein, AT. AT antagonizes TRAP function, thereby increasing expression of all the genes regulated by TRAP. Thus B. subtilis and Escherichia coli respond to identical regulatory signals, tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp), yet they employ different mechanisms in regulating trp gene expression. PMID:16285852

  13. Sporicidal characteristics of heated dolomite powder against Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Yasue, Syogo; Sawai, Jun; Kikuchi, Mikio; Nakakuki, Takahito; Sano, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Takahide

    2014-01-01

    Dolomite is a double salt composed of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). The heat treatment of CaCO3 and MgCO3 respectively generates calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), which have antimicrobial activity. In this study, heated dolomite powder (HDP) slurry was investigated for its sporicidal activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 spores. The B. subtilis spores used in this study were not affected by acidic (pH 1) or alkaline (pH 13) conditions, indicating that they were highly resistant. However, dolomite powder heated to 1000℃ for 1 h could kill B. subtilis spores, even at pH 12.7. Sporicidal activity was only apparent when the dolomite powder was heated to 800℃ or higher, and sporicidal activity increased with increases in the heating temperature. This temperature corresponded to that of the generation of CaO. We determined that MgO did not contribute to the sporicidal activity of HDP. To elucidate the sporicidal mechanism of the HDP against B. subtilis spores, the generation of active oxygen from HDP slurry was examined by chemiluminescence analysis. The generation of active oxygen increased when the HDP slurry concentration rose. The results suggested that, in addition to its alkalinity, the active oxygen species generated from HDP were associated with sporicidal activity.

  14. Prodigiosin Induces Autolysins in Actively Grown Bacillus subtilis Cells.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Tabor, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Prodigiosin produced by marine bacterium Vibrio ruber DSM 14379 exhibits a potent antimicrobial activity against a broad range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The mechanism of prodigiosin antimicrobial action, however, is not known. In this work, the effect of prodigiosin on Bacillus subtilis growth, cell membrane leakage, and induction of autolysins was studied. Treating B. subtilis with prodigiosin resulted in rapid decline of optical density and increased cell membrane leakage measured by β-galactosidase activity. Cell lysis was initiated immediately after treatment with prodigiosin in the middle exponential phase and was completed within 2 h. Lytic activity of prodigiosin in mutant strains with impaired autolysin genes lytABCD decreased for 80% compared to the wild type strain, while in lytABCDEF mutant strain prodigiosin had no bacteriolytic but only bacteriostatic effect. Fast prodigiosin lytic activity on individual B. subtilis cells was confirmed by a modified comet assay. The results indicate that prodigiosin autolysin induction in B. subtilis is growth phase dependent.

  15. Phosphate starvation induces the sporulation killing factor of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Watts, Carys A; Homuth, Georg; Prágai, Zoltán; Wipat, Anil; Ward, Alan C; Harwood, Colin R

    2006-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces and exports a peptide sporulation killing factor (SkfA) that induces lysis of sibling cells. skfA is part of the skf operon (skfA-H), which is responsible for immunity to SkfA, as well as for production and export of SkfA. Here we report that transcription of skfA is markedly induced when cells of B. subtilis are subjected to phosphate starvation. The role of PhoP in regulation of the skf operon was confirmed by in vitro gel shift assays, which showed that this operon is a new member of the PhoP regulon. A putative stem-loop structure in the skfA-skfB intergenic region is proposed to act as a stabilizer of an skfA-specific transcript. PMID:16816204

  16. Sporulation of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Yousten, Allan A.; Hanson, Richard S.

    1972-01-01

    A mutant of Bacillus subtilis 168 lacking aconitase (EC 4.2.1.3) was found to be blocked at stage 0 or I of sporulation. Although adenosine triphosphate levels, which normally decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants at the completion of exponential growth, could be maintained at higher levels by feeding metabolizable carbon sources, this did not permit the cells to progress further into the sporulation sequence. When post-exponential-phase cells of mutants blocked in the first half of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were resuspended with an energy source in culture fluid from post-exponential-phase wild-type B. subtilis or Escherichia coli, good sporulation occurred. The spores produced retained the mutant genotype and were heat stable but lost refractility and heat stability several hours after their production. Images PMID:4110146

  17. Stoichiometric growth model for riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Dauner, M; Sauer, U

    2001-09-01

    Rate equations for measured extracellular rates and macromolecular composition data were combined with a stoichiometric model to describe riboflavin production with an industrial Bacillus subtilis strain using errors in variables regression analysis. On the basis of this combined stoichiometric growth model, we explored the topological features of the B. subtilis metabolic reaction network that was assembled from a large amount of literature. More specifically, we simulated maximum theoretical yields of biomass and riboflavin, including the associated flux regimes. Based on the developed model, the importance of experimental data on building block requirements for maximum yield and flux calculations were investigated. These analyses clearly show that verification of macromolecular composition data is important for optimum flux calculations. PMID:11505383

  18. Carotenoid production in Bacillus subtilis achieved by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2009-11-01

    The carotenoid synthetic genes, crtM and crtN, derived from Staphylococcus aureus, were introduced into B. subtilis, resulting in yellow pigmentation. Absorption maxima of pigments and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated that the pigmented strain accumulated two C(30) carotenoids, 4,4'-diapolycopene and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. A survival test using H(2)O(2) revealed that the pigmented strain was more resistant to oxidative stress than the strain harboring an empty-vector. These findings indicate that B. subtilis can produce carotenoids, and the strain accumulating the carotenoids, CarotenoBacillus, will become a basal host for production of C(30) carotenoids and evaluation of their antioxidative effects.

  19. [Molecular cloning and expression of Nattokinase gene in Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Liu, B Y; Song, H Y

    2002-05-01

    In order to characterize biochemically the nattokinase,the nucleotide sequence of the nattokinase gene was amplified from the chromosomal DNA of B.subtilis (natto) by PCR. The expression plasmid pBL NK was constructed and was used to transform Bacillus subtilis containing a chromosomal deletion in its subtilisin gene. The supernatant of the culture was collected after 15 h culture. The target proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE. Nattokinase was purified by a method including ultrafiltration, Sephacryl S-100 gel filtration and S-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography, and 100 mg of purified nattokinase was obtained from one liter of culture. The purity of the protein and the specific activity were 95% and 12 000 u/mg (compared to tPA), respectively.

  20. Phosphate Starvation Induces the Sporulation Killing Factor of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Allenby, Nicholas E. E.; Watts, Carys A.; Homuth, Georg; Prágai, Zoltán; Wipat, Anil; Ward, Alan C.; Harwood, Colin R.

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces and exports a peptide sporulation killing factor (SkfA) that induces lysis of sibling cells. skfA is part of the skf operon (skfA-H), which is responsible for immunity to SkfA, as well as for production and export of SkfA. Here we report that transcription of skfA is markedly induced when cells of B. subtilis are subjected to phosphate starvation. The role of PhoP in regulation of the skf operon was confirmed by in vitro gel shift assays, which showed that this operon is a new member of the PhoP regulon. A putative stem-loop structure in the skfA-skfB intergenic region is proposed to act as a stabilizer of an skfA-specific transcript. PMID:16816204

  1. Phosphate starvation induces the sporulation killing factor of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Watts, Carys A; Homuth, Georg; Prágai, Zoltán; Wipat, Anil; Ward, Alan C; Harwood, Colin R

    2006-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces and exports a peptide sporulation killing factor (SkfA) that induces lysis of sibling cells. skfA is part of the skf operon (skfA-H), which is responsible for immunity to SkfA, as well as for production and export of SkfA. Here we report that transcription of skfA is markedly induced when cells of B. subtilis are subjected to phosphate starvation. The role of PhoP in regulation of the skf operon was confirmed by in vitro gel shift assays, which showed that this operon is a new member of the PhoP regulon. A putative stem-loop structure in the skfA-skfB intergenic region is proposed to act as a stabilizer of an skfA-specific transcript.

  2. Conditional Antifolate Resistance in Bacillus subtilis thyA

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James L.

    1979-01-01

    Resistance to antifolates in Bacillus subtilis strains results from the presence of an antifolate resistance mutation (afo). Strains which are thyA+afo are unconditionally resistant to antifolates. The conditional resistance of thyA afo strains is hypothesized to be due to the thyB+ gene product (thymidylate synthetase B) having a high Km for the folate substrate, thus leading to thymineless death in the presence of antifolates. An alternative model for conditional antifolate resistance was shown to be incorrect by analysis of folate metabolism in methotrexate-treated cells. Genetic analysis and studies of the response of afo+ cells to methotrexate suggested that most, if not all, B. subtilis thymine-requiring mutants are afo. Analysis of dihydrofolate reductase from afo cells did not reveal an obvious mechanism for antifolate resistance in those cells. PMID:111614

  3. Decolorization of indigo carmine by laccase displayed on Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Seo, Jiyoung; Lee, Dong-Woo; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2011-06-10

    Blue multicopper oxidases, laccases displayed on the surface of Bacillus spores were used to decolorize a widely used textile dyestuff, indigo carmine. The laccase-encoding gene of Bacillus subtilis, cotA, was cloned and expressed in B. subtilis DB104, and the expressed enzyme was spontaneously localized on Bacillus spores. B. subtilis spores expressing laccase exhibited maximal activity for the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) at pH 4.0 and 80°C, and for the decolorization of indigo carmine at pH 8.0 and 60°C. The displayed enzyme retained 80% of its original activity after pre-treatment with organic solvents such as 50% acetonitrile and n-hexane for 2h at 37°C. The apparent K(m) of the enzyme displayed on spores was 443±124 μM for ABTS with a V(max) of 150 ± 16 U/mg spores. Notably, 1mg of spores displaying B. subtilis laccase (3.4 × 10(2)U for ABTS as a substrate) decolorized 44.6 μg indigo carmine in 2h. The spore reactor (0.5 g of spores corresponding to 1.7×10(5)U in 50 mL) in a consecutive batch recycling mode decolorized 223 mg indigo carmine/L to completion within 42 h at pH 8.0 and 60°C. These results suggest that laccase displayed on B. subtilis spores can serve as a powerful environmental tool for the treatment of textile dye effluent.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis Strain CU1050, Which Is Sensitive to Phage SPβ

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is used as a model organism to study cellular and molecular processes. Here, we announce the complete genomic sequence of B. subtilis strain CU1050, derived from B. subtilis strain 168. CU1050 has historically been used to study suppressor mutations and phage biology, especially the lysogenic phage SPβ. PMID:27056236

  5. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-24

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning "plug-and-play" approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  6. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning ``plug-and-play'' approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  7. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning “plug-and-play” approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus. PMID:25807046

  8. 40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1209 Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713; exemption from the... the microbial pesticide Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 when used in or on all food commodities....

  9. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis... the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1209 Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713; exemption from the... the microbial pesticide Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 when used in or on all food commodities....

  11. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis... the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens...

  12. VIABILITY OF BACILLUS SUBTILIS SPORES IN ROCKET PROPELLANTS.

    PubMed

    GODDING, R M; LYNCH, V H

    1965-01-01

    The sporicidal activity of components used in liquid and solid rocket propellants was tested by use of spores of Bacillus subtilis dried on powdered glass. Liquid propellant ingredients tested were N(2)O(4), monomethylhydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine. N(2)O(4) was immediately sporicidal; the hydrazines were effective within several days. Solid propellants consisted of ammonium perchlorate in combination with epoxy resin (EPON 828), tris-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phosphine oxide, bis-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phenylphosphine oxide, and three modified polybutadiene polymers. There was no indication of appreciable sporicidal activity of these components.

  13. Viability of Bacillus subtilis Spores in Rocket Propellants

    PubMed Central

    Godding, Rogene M.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1965-01-01

    The sporicidal activity of components used in liquid and solid rocket propellants was tested by use of spores of Bacillus subtilis dried on powdered glass. Liquid propellant ingredients tested were N2O4, monomethylhydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine. N2O4 was immediately sporicidal; the hydrazines were effective within several days. Solid propellants consisted of ammonium perchlorate in combination with epoxy resin (EPON 828), tris-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phosphine oxide, bis-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phenylphosphine oxide, and three modified polybutadiene polymers. There was no indication of appreciable sporicidal activity of these components. PMID:14264838

  14. Isolation of acetyl esterase mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed Central

    Higerd, T B

    1977-01-01

    Five mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168 defective in an intracellular esterase activity were identified. By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, four of the mutants were shown to lack esterase B activity, and the fifth lacked esterase A activity. All of the back-crossed esterase mutants were able to sporulate at wild-type frequency and produce exoprotease(s) and antibiotic(s). No difference in motility could be attributed to the esterase mutation. PBS1 transduction analysis showed all the esterase B mutations to be linked to the hisA marker. Images PMID:402361

  15. Evidence for natural transformation of Bacillus subtilis in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, M; Hertel, C; Hammes, W P

    1997-10-01

    The effect of foodstuffs on the natural transformation of Bacillus subtilis was investigated. As examples of complex food matrices milk with various fat contents as well as chocolate milk were used. The frequencies of transformation varied with the fat content and ranged between 3.8 X 10(-4) and 1.4 X 10(-3). Highest frequencies of about 3 X 10(-3) were observed in chocolate milk with 1.5% fat. Development of competence was observed in chocolate milk, resulting in maximal transformation frequencies upon incubation for 10-12 h at 37 degrees C.

  16. Construction of novel shuttle expression vectors for gene expression in Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huanhuan; Cao, Qinghua; Zhao, Hongyan; Tan, Xuemei; Feng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A native plasmid (pSU01) was detected by genome sequencing of Bacillus subtilis strain S1-4. Two pSU01-based shuttle expression vectors pSU02-AP and pSU03-AP were constructed enabling stable replication in B. subtilis WB600. These vectors contained the reporter gene aprE, encoding an alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus BA06. The expression vector pSU03-AP only possessed the minimal replication elements (rep, SSO, DSO) and exhibited more stability on structure, suggesting that the rest of the genes in pSU01 (ORF1, ORF2, mob, hsp) were unessential for the structural stability of plasmid in B. subtilis. In addition, recombinant production of the alkaline protease was achieved more efficiently with pSU03-AP whose copy number was estimated to be more than 100 per chromosome. Furthermore, pSU03-AP could also be used to transform and replicate in B. pumilus BA06 under selective pressure. In conclusion, pSU03-AP is expected to be a useful tool for gene expression in Bacillus subtilis and B. pumilus. PMID:26377132

  17. Functional characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum mutanase gene induced upon co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microbial gene expression is strongly influenced by environmental growth conditions. Comparison of gene expression under different conditions is frequently used for functional analysis and to unravel regulatory networks, however, gene expression responses to co-cultivation with other microorganisms, a common occurrence in nature, is rarely studied under laboratory conditions. To explore cellular responses of the antibiotic-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum to prokaryotes, the present study investigates its transcriptional responses during co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis. Results Steady-state glucose-limited chemostats of P. chrysogenum grown under penillicin-non-producing conditions were inoculated with B. subtilis. Physiological and transcriptional responses of P. chrysogenum in the resulting mixed culture were monitored over 72 h. Under these conditions, B. subtilis outcompeted P. chrysogenum, as reflected by a three-fold increase of the B. subtilis population size and a two-fold reduction of the P. chrysogenum biomass concentration. Genes involved in the penicillin pathway and in synthesis of the penicillin precursors and side-chain were unresponsive to the presence of B. subtilis. Moreover, Penicillium polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthase genes were either not expressed or down-regulated. Among the highly responsive genes, two putative α-1,3 endoglucanase (mutanase) genes viz Pc12g07500 and Pc12g13330 were upregulated by more than 15-fold and 8-fold, respectively. Measurement of enzyme activity in the supernatant of mixed culture confirmed that the co-cultivation with B. subtilis induced mutanase production. Mutanase activity was neither observed in pure cultures of P. chrysogenum or B. subtilis, nor during exposure of P. chrysogenum to B. subtilis culture supernatants or heat-inactivated B. subtilis cells. However, mutanase production was observed in cultures of P. chrysogenum exposed to filter-sterilized supernatants

  18. Crystal Structure of the Bacillus subtilis Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, H.E.; Huang, Y.-J; Lu, C.-D.; Tai, P.C.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-01

    The sodA gene of Bacillus subtilis was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure of MnSOD was solved by molecular replacement with four dimers per asymmetric unit and refined to an R factor of 21.1% at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. The dimer structure is very similar to that of the related enzyme from B. anthracis. Larger structural differences were observed with the human MnSOD, which has one less helix in the helical domain and a longer loop between two -strands and also showed differences in three amino acids at the intersubunit interface in the dimer compared with the two bacterial MnSODs. These structural differences can be exploited in the design of drugs that selectively target the Bacillus enzymes.

  19. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles.

  20. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  1. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5–10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  2. Identification of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Nagy, P L; Zalkin, H

    1995-08-01

    Transcription of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon is repressed in response to a signal of excess adenine. We have purified the repressor protein and have identified, cloned, and overexpressed the purR regulatory gene that controls transcription initiation of the operon. B. subtilis purR encodes a 62-kDa homodimer that binds to the pur operon control region. The PurR binding site which overlaps the promoter encompasses approximately 110 bp. The protein-DNA interaction is inhibited by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. A mutation that deletes the repressor binding site or one that disrupts purR abolishes binding activity in vitro and repression of transcription in vivo in response to the excess adenine signal. These results lead to a model in which an excess-adenine signal is transmitted to PurR via the 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate pool. In addition, purR is autoregulated. There is no structural or mechanistic similarity between the B. subtilis and Escherichia coli purine repressors.

  3. An acetoin-regulated expression system of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Silbersack, Jörg; Jürgen, Britta; Hecker, Michael; Schneidinger, Bernd; Schmuck, Rainer; Schweder, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    An expression system, which is based on the promoter of the acoABCL operon of Bacillus subtilis was developed and characterized. The acoABCL operon codes for the acetoin dehydrogenase complex, which is the major enzyme system responsible for the catabolism of acetoin in B. subtilis. Besides weak organic acids, the neutral overflow metabolite acetoin is metabolized by the cells in the early stationary phase. Transcription of reporter gene fusions with the acoA promoter of this operon is strongly repressed by glucose but induced by acetoin as soon as the preferred carbon source glucose is exhausted. The co-expression of an additional copy of the regulator gene acoR led to more than twofold higher activity of the acoA promoter. It is demonstrated that the induction of this promoter in growing cells with acetoin is possible with non-phosphotransferase system sugars as carbon and energy source and in a ccpA mutant background. Moreover, it could be shown that the activity of the acoA-directed expression system correlates with the level of acetoin in the medium. During glucose limitation, the utilization of the alternative energy source acetoin keeps the protein synthesis machinery of B. subtilis cells active and thus allows for a long lasting acoA-controlled expression of recombinant genes.

  4. Initiation of decay of Bacillus subtilis trp leader RNA.

    PubMed

    Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H

    2007-07-13

    Transcription termination in the leader region of the Bacillus subtilis trp operon is regulated by binding of the 11-mer TRAP complex to nascent trp RNA, which results in formation of a terminator structure. Rapid decay of trp leader RNA, which is required to release the TRAP complex and maintain a sufficient supply of free TRAP, is mediated by polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Using purified B. subtilis PNPase, we showed that, when TRAP was present, PNPase binding to the 3' end of trp leader RNA and PNPase digestion of trp leader RNA from the 3' end were inefficient. These results suggested that initiation of trp leader RNA may begin with an endonuclease cleavage upstream of the transcription terminator structure. Such cleavage was observed in vivo. Mutagenesis of nucleotides at the cleavage site abolished processing and resulted in a 4-fold increase in trp leader RNA half-life. This is the first mapping of a decay-initiating endonuclease cleavage site on a native B. subtilis RNA. PMID:17507374

  5. Nonnative proteins induce expression of the Bacillus subtilis CIRCE regulon.

    PubMed

    Mogk, A; Völker, A; Engelmann, S; Hecker, M; Schumann, W; Völker, U

    1998-06-01

    The chaperone-encoding groESL and dnaK operons constitute the CIRCE regulon of Bacillus subtilis. Both operons are under negative control of the repressor protein HrcA, which interacts with the CIRCE operator and whose activity is modulated by the GroESL chaperone machine. In this report, we demonstrate that induction of the CIRCE regulon can also be accomplished by ethanol stress and puromycin. Introduction of the hrcA gene and a transcriptional fusion under the control of the CIRCE operator into Escherichia coli allowed induction of this fusion by heat shock, ethanol stress, and overproduction of GroESL substrates. The expression level of this hrcA-bgaB fusion inversely correlated with the amount of GroE machinery present in the cells. Therefore, all inducing conditions seem to lead to induction via titration of the GroE chaperonins by the increased level of nonnative proteins formed. Puromycin treatment failed to induce the sigmaB-dependent general stress regulon, indicating that nonnative proteins in general do not trigger this response. Reconstitution of HrcA-dependent heat shock regulation of B. subtilis in E. coli and complementation of E. coli groESL mutants by B. subtilis groESL indicate that the GroE chaperonin systems of the two bacterial species are functionally exchangeable. PMID:9603878

  6. Bacillus subtilis spores as adjuvants for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aps, Luana R M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Porchia, Bruna F M M; Sales, Natiely S; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2015-05-11

    Recently, Bacillus subtilis spores were shown to be endowed with strong adjuvant capacity when co-administered with purified antigenic proteins. In the present study we assessed whether spores possess adjuvant properties when combined with DNA vaccines. We showed that B. subtilis spores promoted the activation of dendritic cells in vitro and induced migration of pro-inflammatory cells after parenteral administration to mice. Likewise, co-administration of spores with a DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 protein enhanced the activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. Mice immunized with the DNA vaccine admixed with spores presented a protective immunity increase to previously implanted tumor cells, capable of expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Finally, we observed that the adjuvant effect can vary accordingly to the number of co-administered spores which may be ascribed with the ability to induce. Collectively, the present results demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis spores can also confer adjuvant effects to DNA vaccines.

  7. Genomic reconstruction of the transcriptional regulatory network in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Leyn, Semen A; Kazanov, Marat D; Sernova, Natalia V; Ermakova, Ekaterina O; Novichkov, Pavel S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-06-01

    The adaptation of microorganisms to their environment is controlled by complex transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), which are still only partially understood even for model species. Genome scale annotation of regulatory features of genes and TRN reconstruction are challenging tasks of microbial genomics. We used the knowledge-driven comparative-genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict Web server to infer TRN in the model Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis and 10 related Bacillales species. For transcription factor (TF) regulons, we combined the available information from the DBTBS database and the literature with bioinformatics tools, allowing inference of TF binding sites (TFBSs), comparative analysis of the genomic context of predicted TFBSs, functional assignment of target genes, and effector prediction. For RNA regulons, we used known RNA regulatory motifs collected in the Rfam database to scan genomes and analyze the genomic context of new RNA sites. The inferred TRN in B. subtilis comprises regulons for 129 TFs and 24 regulatory RNA families. First, we analyzed 66 TF regulons with previously known TFBSs in B. subtilis and projected them to other Bacillales genomes, resulting in refinement of TFBS motifs and identification of novel regulon members. Second, we inferred motifs and described regulons for 28 experimentally studied TFs with previously unknown TFBSs. Third, we discovered novel motifs and reconstructed regulons for 36 previously uncharacterized TFs. The inferred collection of regulons is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov/) and can be used in genetic experiments, metabolic modeling, and evolutionary analysis.

  8. Application of gaseous ozone for inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Ahmet; Gurol, Mirat D

    2006-02-01

    The effectiveness of gaseous ozone (O3) as a disinfectant was tested on Bacillus subtilis spores, which share the same physiological characteristics as Bacillus anthracis spores that cause the anthrax disease. Spores dried on surfaces of different carrier material were exposed to O3 gas in the range of 500-5000 ppm and at relative humidity (RH) of 70-95%. Gaseous O3 was found to be very effective against the B. subtilis spores, and at O3 concentrations as low as 3 mg/L (1500 ppm), approximately 3-log inactivation was obtained within 4 hr of exposure. The inactivation curves consisted of a short lag phase followed by an exponential decrease in the number of surviving spores. Prehydration of the bacterial spores has eliminated the initial lag phase. The inactivation rate increased with increasing O3 concentration but not >3 mg/L. The inactivation rate also increased with increase in RH. Different survival curves were obtained for various surfaces used to carry spores. Inactivation rates of spores on glass, a vinyl floor tile, and office paper were nearly the same. Whereas cut pile carpet and hardwood flooring surfaces resulted in much lower inactivation rates, another type of carpet (loop pile) showed significant enhancement in the inactivation of the spores. PMID:16568801

  9. Impact of Hfq on the Bacillus subtilis Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Hämmerle, Hermann; Amman, Fabian; Večerek, Branislav; Stülke, Jörg; Hofacker, Ivo; Bläsi, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq acts as a central player in post-transcriptional gene regulation in several Gram-negative Bacteria, whereas comparatively little is known about its role in Gram-positive Bacteria. Here, we studied the function of Hfq in Bacillus subtilis, and show that it confers a survival advantage. A comparative transcriptome analysis revealed mRNAs with a differential abundance that are governed by the ResD-ResE system required for aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Expression of resD was found to be up-regulated in the hfq− strain. Furthermore, several genes of the GerE and ComK regulons were de-regulated in the hfq− background. Surprisingly, only six out of >100 known and predicted small RNAs (sRNAs) showed altered abundance in the absence of Hfq. Moreover, Hfq positively affected the transcript abundance of genes encoding type I toxin-antitoxin systems. Taken the moderate effect on sRNA levels and mRNAs together, it seems rather unlikely that Hfq plays a central role in RNA transactions in Bacillus subtilis. PMID:24932523

  10. Cyclic Di-AMP Homeostasis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mehne, Felix M. P.; Gunka, Katrin; Eilers, Hinnerk; Herzberg, Christina; Kaever, Volkhard; Stülke, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis encodes three potential diadenylate cyclases that may synthesize the signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP). These enzymes are expressed under different conditions in different cell compartments, and they localize to distinct positions in the cell. Here we demonstrate the diadenylate cyclase activity of the so far uncharacterized enzymes CdaA (previously known as YbbP) and CdaS (YojJ). Our work confirms that c-di-AMP is essential for the growth of B. subtilis and shows that an excess of the molecule is also harmful for the bacteria. Several lines of evidence suggest that the diadenylate cyclase CdaA is part of the conserved essential cda-glm module involved in cell wall metabolism. In contrast, the CdaS enzyme seems to provide c-di-AMP for spores. Accumulation of large amounts of c-di-AMP impairs the growth of B. subtilis and results in the formation of aberrant curly cells. This phenotype can be partially suppressed by elevated concentrations of magnesium. These observations suggest that c-di-AMP interferes with the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery. The activity of the diadenylate cyclases is controlled by distinct molecular mechanisms. CdaA is stimulated by a regulatory interaction with the CdaR (YbbR) protein. In contrast, the activity of CdaS seems to be intrinsically restricted, and a single amino acid substitution is sufficient to drastically increase the activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our results support the idea of an important role for c-di-AMP in B. subtilis and suggest that the levels of the nucleotide have to be tightly controlled. PMID:23192352

  11. Nucleotide sequence and cloning in Bacillus subtilis of the Bacillus stearothermophilus pleiotropic regulatory gene degT.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, M; Takada, H; Imanaka, T

    1990-01-01

    The regulatory gene (degT) from Bacillus stearothermophilus NCA1503 which enhanced production of extracellular alkaline protease (Apr) was cloned in Bacillus subtilis with pTB53 as a vector. When B. subtilis MT-2 (Npr- [deficiency of neutral protease] Apr+) was transformed with the recombinant plasmid, pDT145, the plasmid carrier produced about three times more alkaline protease than did the wild-type strain. In contrast, when B. subtilis DB104 (Npr- Apr-) was used as a host, the transformant with pDT145 could not exhibit any protease activity. After construction of the deletion plasmids, DNA sequencing was done. A large open reading frame was found, and nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the degT gene was composed of 1,116 bases (372 amino acid residues, molecular weight of 41,244). A Shine-Dalgarno sequence was found nine bases upstream from the open reading frame. A B. subtilis strain carrying degT showed the following pleiotropic phenomena: (i) enhancement of production of extracellular enzymes such as alkaline protease and levansucrase, (ii) repression of autolysin activity, (iii) decrease of transformation efficiency for B. subtilis (competent cell procedure), (iv) altered control of sporulation, (v) loss of flagella, and (vi) abnormal cell division. When B. stearothermophilus SIC1 was transformed with the recombinant plasmid carrying degT, the transformants exhibited abnormal cell division. These phenomena are similar to those of the phenotypes of degSU(Hy) (hyperproduction), degQ(Hy), and degR mutants of B. subtilis. However, the amino acid sequence of the degT product (DegT) is different from those of the reported gene products. Furthermore, DegT includes a hydrophobic core region in the N-terminal portion (amino acid numbers 50 to 160), a consensus sequence for a DNA binding region (amino acid numbers 160 to 179), and a region homologous to transcription activator proteins (amino acid numbers 351 to 366). We discuss the possibility that the membrane

  12. Adaptor-mediated Lon proteolysis restricts Bacillus subtilis hyperflagellation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sampriti; Bree, Anna C; Liu, Jing; Patrick, Joyce E; Chien, Peter; Kearns, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease is a highly conserved intracellular protease that is considered an anticancer target in eukaryotic cells and a crucial virulence regulator in bacteria. Lon degrades both damaged, misfolded proteins and specific native regulators, but how Lon discriminates among a large pool of candidate targets remains unclear. Here we report that Bacillus subtilis LonA specifically degrades the master regulator of flagellar biosynthesis SwrA governed by the adaptor protein swarming motility inhibitor A (SmiA). SmiA-dependent LonA proteolysis is abrogated upon microbe-substrate contact causing SwrA protein levels to increase and elevate flagellar density above a critical threshold for swarming motility atop solid surfaces. Surface contact-dependent cellular differentiation in bacteria is rapid, and regulated proteolysis may be a general mechanism of transducing surface stimuli.

  13. Rec effect of certain textile dyes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M K; Sobti, R C

    2000-02-16

    A large number of compounds are toxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and/or carcinogenic. The genotoxicity of four textile dyes commonly used in India namely Sulphur Red Brown 360 (SRB), Jade Green 2G (JG), Reactofix Turquoise Blue 5GFL (RTB) and Direct Scarlet 4BS (DS) was determined by Bacillus subtilis spore Rec assay, both in the presence and absence of metabolizing activation mixture (S9 mix). Each dye was toxic at higher dose levels. A dose-dependent increase in the depth of growth inhibition zones was observed for all dyes. Zones of inhibition were usually clearer at higher doses of the dyes and with Rec- bacteria, but were translucent with Rec+ bacteria. SRB and DS were toxic to Rec+ and Rec- bacteria. JG was less genotoxic in the absence of S9 mix, however, its genotoxic potential increased in the presence of S9 mix. Reactofix T blue was more genotoxic in the absence of S9 mixture.

  14. Revival of biocide-treated spores of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Williams, N D; Russell, A D

    1993-07-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis NCTC 8236 were treated with biocides and then subjected to various revival procedures. Sodium hydroxide (optimum concentration 25 mmol l-1) revived a small portion of glutaraldehyde-treated spores but not of spores exposed to formaldehyde, polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I), Lugol's iodine, sodium hypochlorite or sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). Post-treatment heat shock (at 70 degrees or 80 degrees C) increased the numbers of colony-forming units (cfu) of formaldehyde-injured spores. Coat-extraction procedures had the greatest effect on iodine-pretreated spores. The uptake of iodine and chlorine was more rapid and occurred to a greater extent with outgrowing, germinating and especially coat-deficient spores than with mature, resting spores. PMID:7690020

  15. Cannibalism: a social behavior in sporulating Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2011-05-01

    A social behavior named cannibalism has been described during the early stages of sporulation of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. This phenomenon is based on the heterogeneity of sporulating populations, constituted by at least two cell types: (1) sporulating cells, in which the master regulator of sporulation Spo0A is active, and (2) nonsporulating cells, in which Spo0A is inactive. Sporulating cells produce two toxins that act cooperatively to kill the nonsporulating sister cells. The nutrients released by the dead cells into the starved medium are used for growth by the sporulating cells that are not yet fully committed to sporulate, and as a result, sporulation is arrested. This review outlines the molecular mechanisms of the killing and immunity to the toxins, the regulation of their production and other examples of killing of siblings in microorganisms. The biological significance of this behavior is discussed. PMID:20955377

  16. Bioproperties of potent nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis YJ1.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Jung; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Jiang, Shann-Tzong

    2010-05-12

    Fibrinolytic enzyme activity was observed during cultivation of Bacillus subtilis YJ1 in a medium containing 1% skim milk, 1% rice husk, 0.5% NaCl, and 0.25% glucose. It was purified to electrophoretical homogeneity after CM-sepharose FF chromatography. The specific activity and yield were 1791.9 FU/mg and 9.5%, respectively. This purified fibrinolytic enzyme had M of 27.5 kDa, optimal temperature and pH at 50 degrees C and 8.5, respectively. It was stable at pH 6.0-10.0 and 10-40 degrees C and inhibited by Fe(3+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and PMSF. Compared the N terminal of amino acids and full DNA sequence with those in NCBI, it was considered to be a nattokinase.

  17. The non-redundant Bacillus subtilis (NRSub) database: update 1998.

    PubMed

    Perrière, G; Gouy, M; Gojobori, T

    1998-01-01

    The non-redundant Bacillus subtilis database (NRSub) has been developed in the context of the sequencing project devoted to this bacterium. As this project has reached completion, the whole genome is now available as a single contig. Thanks to the ACNUC database management system and its associated retrieval system Query_win, each functional region of the genome can be accessed individually. Extra annotations have been added such as accession numbers for the genes, locations on the genetic map, codon adaptation index values, as well as cross-references with other collections. NRSub is distributed through anonymous FTP as a text file in EMBL format and as an ACNUC database. It is also possible to access NRSub through two dedicated World Wide Web servers located in France (http://acnuc. univ-lyon1.fr/nrsub/nrsub.html ) and in Japan (http://ddbjs4h.genes. nig.ac.jp/ ). PMID:9399801

  18. [Determining the Bacillus subtilis biomass increase coefficient in weightlessness].

    PubMed

    Bergter, F; Kharts, D; Miuller, P Iu; Mund, K; Giunter, Iu

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a microbiological experiment carried out by the Soviet and GDR scientists onboard Salyut-6. The experiment was performed using a Bacillus subtilis suspension in the Jena unit. The purpose of the experiment was to study the time-course variations of the cell biomass increase in zero-g. The cell culture development was measured with respect to the utilization rate of glucose or casein hydrolyzate in the nutrient medium and the rate of protein accumulation in cells. It has been shown that the rate of biomass increment in zero-g lags behind the 1 g level. It can be concluded that the decreased metabolic activity of bacterial cells in zero-g is associated with changes in the cell population distribution and physicochemical parameters of the nutrient medium.

  19. Fitness Trade-Offs in Competence Differentiation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Melih; Power, Jeffrey J; Ribbe, Jan; Volkmann, Thorsten; Maier, Berenike

    2016-01-01

    In the stationary phase, Bacillus subtilis differentiates stochastically and transiently into the state of competence for transformation (K-state). The latter is associated with growth arrest, and it is unclear how the ability to develop competence is stably maintained, despite its cost. To quantify the effect differentiation has on the competitive fitness of B. subtilis, we characterized the competition dynamics between strains with different probabilities of entering the K-state. The relative fitness decreased with increasing differentiation probability both during the stationary phase and during outgrowth. When exposed to antibiotics inhibiting cell wall synthesis, transcription, and translation, cells that differentiated into the K-state showed a selective advantage compared to differentiation-deficient bacteria; this benefit did not require transformation. Although beneficial, the K-state was not induced by sub-MIC concentrations of antibiotics. Increasing the differentiation probability beyond the wt level did not significantly affect the competition dynamics with transient antibiotic exposure. We conclude that the competition dynamics are very sensitive to the fraction of competent cells under benign conditions but less sensitive during antibiotic exposure, supporting the picture of stochastic differentiation as a fitness trade-off. PMID:27375604

  20. Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis growth and sporulation by threonine.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D H; Bott, K F

    1979-01-01

    A 1-mg/ml amount of threonine (8.4 mM) inhibited growth and sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168. Inhibition of sporulation was efficiently reversed by valine and less efficiently by pyruvate, arginine, glutamine, and isoleucine. Inhibition of vegetative growth was reversed by asparate and glutamate as well as by valine, arginine, or glutamine. Cells in minimal growth medium were inhibited only transiently by very high concentrations of threonine, whereas inhibition of sporulation was permanent. Addition of threonine prevented the normal increase in alkaline phosphatase and reduced the production of extracellular protease by about 50%, suggesting that threonine blocked the sporulation process relatively early. 2-Ketobutyrate was able to mimic the effect of threonine on sporulation. Sporulation in a strain selected for resistance to azaleucine was partially resistant. Seventy-five percent of the mutants selected for the ability to grow vegetatively in the presence of high threonine concentrations were found to be simultaneously isoleucine auxotrophs. In at least one of these mutants, the threonine resistance phenotpye could not be dissociated from the isoleucine requirement by transformation. This mutation was closely linked to a known ilvA mutation (recombination index, 0.16). This strain also had reduced intracellular threonine deaminase activity. These results suggest that threonine inhibits B. subtilis by causing valine starvation.

  1. Bacillus subtilis Gene Cluster Involved in Calcium Carbonate Biomineralization▿

    PubMed Central

    Barabesi, Chiara; Galizzi, Alessandro; Mastromei, Giorgio; Rossi, Mila; Tamburini, Elena; Perito, Brunella

    2007-01-01

    Calcium carbonate precipitation, a widespread phenomenon among bacteria, has been investigated due to its wide range of scientific and technological implications. Nevertheless, little is known of the molecular mechanisms by which bacteria foster calcium carbonate mineralization. In our laboratory, we are studying calcite formation by Bacillus subtilis, in order to identify genes involved in the biomineralization process. A previous screening of UV mutants and of more than one thousand mutants obtained from the European B. subtilis Functional Analysis project allowed us to isolate strains altered in the precipitation phenotype. Starting from these results, we focused our attention on a cluster of five genes (lcfA, ysiA, ysiB, etfB, and etfA) called the lcfA operon. By insertional mutagenesis, mutant strains carrying each of the five genes were produced. All of them, with the exception of the strain carrying the mutated lcfA operon, were unable to form calcite crystals. By placing transcription under IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) control, the last gene, etfA, was identified as essential for the precipitation process. To verify cotranscription in the lcfA operon, reverse transcription-PCR experiments were performed and overlapping retrocotranscripts were found comprising three adjacent genes. The genes have putative functions linked to fatty acid metabolism. A link between calcium precipitation and fatty acid metabolism is suggested. PMID:17085570

  2. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  3. Salt stress adaptation of Bacillus subtilis: a physiological proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Höper, Dirk; Bernhardt, Jörg; Hecker, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The adaptation to osmotic stress is crucial for growth and survival of Bacillus subtilis in its natural ecosystem. Dual channel imaging and warping of 2-D protein gels were used to visualize global changes in the protein synthesis pattern of cells in response to osmotic stress (6% NaCl). Many vegetative enzymes were repressed in response to salt stress and derepressed after resumption of growth. The enzymes catalyzing the metabolic steps from glucose to 2-oxoglutarate, however, were almost constantly synthesized during salt stress despite the growth arrest. This indicates an enhanced need for the proline precursor glutamate. The synthesis of enzymes involved in sulfate assimilation and in the formation of Fe-S clusters was also induced, suggesting an enhanced need for the formation or repair of Fe-S clusters in response to salt stress. One of the most obvious changes in the protein synthesis profile can be followed by the very strong induction of the SigB regulon. Furthermore, members of the SigW regulon and of the PerR regulon, indicating oxidative stress after salt challenge, were also induced. This proteomic approach provides an overview of cell adaptation to an osmotic upshift in B. subtilis visualizing the most dramatic changes in the protein synthesis pattern.

  4. Extracellular proteases modify cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, L K; Doyle, R J; Streips, U N

    1980-01-01

    The rate of turnover of peptidoglycan in exponentially growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis was observed to be sensitive to extracellular protease. In protease-deficient mutants the rates of cell wall turnover were greater than that of wild-type strain 168, whereas hyperprotease-producing strains exhibited decreased rates of peptidoglycan turnover. The rate of peptidogylcan turnover in a protease-deficient strain was decreased when the mutant was grown in the presence of a hyperprotease-producing strain. The addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, to cultures of hyperprotease-producing strains increased their rates of cell wall turnover. Isolated cell walls of all protease mutants contained autolysin levels equal to or greater than that of wild-type strain 168. The presence of filaments, or cells with incomplete septa, was observed in hyperprotease-producing strains or when a protease-deficient strain was grown in the presence of subtilisin. The results suggest that the turnover of cell walls in B. subtilis may be regulated by extracellular proteases. Images PMID:6102558

  5. NRSub: a non-redundant database for Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Perrière, G; Moszer, I; Gojobori, T

    1996-01-01

    In the context of the international project aimed at sequencing the whole genome of Bacillus subtilis we have developed a non-redundant, fully annotated database of sequences from this organism. Starting from the B.subtilis sequences available in the EMBL, GenBank and DDBJ collections we have removed all encountered duplications and then added extra annotations to the sequences (e.g. accession numbers for the genes, locations on the genetic map, codon usage, etc.) We have also added cross-references to the EMBL, MEDLINE, SWISS-PROT and ENZYME data banks. The present system results from merging of the NRSub and SubtiList databases and the sequence contigs used in the two systems are identical. NRSub is distributed as a flatfile in EMBL format (which is supported by most sequence analysis software packages) and as an ACNUC database, while SubtiList is distributed as a relational database under 4th Dimension. It is possible to access the data through two dedicated World Wide Web servers located in France and Japan. PMID:8594597

  6. Fitness Trade-Offs in Competence Differentiation of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Melih; Power, Jeffrey J.; Ribbe, Jan; Volkmann, Thorsten; Maier, Berenike

    2016-01-01

    In the stationary phase, Bacillus subtilis differentiates stochastically and transiently into the state of competence for transformation (K-state). The latter is associated with growth arrest, and it is unclear how the ability to develop competence is stably maintained, despite its cost. To quantify the effect differentiation has on the competitive fitness of B. subtilis, we characterized the competition dynamics between strains with different probabilities of entering the K-state. The relative fitness decreased with increasing differentiation probability both during the stationary phase and during outgrowth. When exposed to antibiotics inhibiting cell wall synthesis, transcription, and translation, cells that differentiated into the K-state showed a selective advantage compared to differentiation-deficient bacteria; this benefit did not require transformation. Although beneficial, the K-state was not induced by sub-MIC concentrations of antibiotics. Increasing the differentiation probability beyond the wt level did not significantly affect the competition dynamics with transient antibiotic exposure. We conclude that the competition dynamics are very sensitive to the fraction of competent cells under benign conditions but less sensitive during antibiotic exposure, supporting the picture of stochastic differentiation as a fitness trade-off. PMID:27375604

  7. Efficient binding of nickel ions to recombinant Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Hinc, Krzysztof; Ghandili, Soheila; Karbalaee, Gholamreza; Shali, Abbas; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Ricca, Ezio; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2010-11-01

    We report the use of recombinant spores of Bacillus subtilis as a potential bioremediation tool for adsorption of nickel ions. The spore surface protein CotB, previously used for the display of heterologous antigens, was engineered to express eighteen histidine residues within the spore coat. Wild type and recombinant spores were then analyzed to assess their efficiency in adsorbing nickel ions, and the latter proved to be significantly more efficient than wild type spores in metal-binding. The quantities of spores used in the adsorption reaction significantly affected nickel binding, while other factors such as pH and temperature did not show relevant effects. In addition, simple washing procedures were used to partially release spore-bound nickel ions by wild type and recombinant spores. The efficiency of nickel binding, together with the simple purification procedure, the high robustness and safety of B. subtilis spores and the possibility of recovering bound nickel, makes the recombinant spore a new and potentially powerful tool for the treatment of contaminated ecosystems.

  8. Sporicidal Activities of Various Surfactant Components against Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Il; Cheigh, Chan-Ick; Hwang, Hee-Jeong; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2015-06-01

    The sporicidal activities against Bacillus subtilis spores of surfactant components with hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties that can lead to the denaturation of various proteins comprising the spore structure were investigated. The reduction in spore numbers by each of the surfactant components bornyl acetate, geranyl acetate, pinene, p-cymene, camphene, citral, 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran, polylysine, and thiamine dilaurylsulfate at 1% was estimated at 1 to 2 log CFU/ml. The average hydrophilelipophile balance value of surfactants with sporicidal activity causing a reduction of 1 to 2 log CFU/ml was 9.3, with a range from 6.7 to 15.8, which is similar to the values of various chemical surfactants of 9.6 to 16.7. The results also showed that the surfactants that were hydrophobic were more effective than those that were hydrophilic in killing B. subtilis spores. Furthermore, the sporicidal effect of surfactants like geranyl acetate and γ-terpinene was significantly enhanced in the presence of a germinant, because L-alanine and synergistic cofactors (e.g., K(+) ions) trigger cortex hydrolysis in spores.

  9. Preparation of AN Electrode Modified with a Thermostable Enzyme BACILLUS Subtilis COTA by Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshio; Yamada, Yohei; Motonaka, Junko; Yabutani, Tomoki; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Yasuzawa, Mikito

    In this study, electrodeposition of thermostable enzyme Bacillus subtilis CotA, which is a laccase and has a bilirubin oxidase (BOD) activity, was investigated. The electrodeposition was operated in a mixture of Bacillus subtilis CotA in the PBS (pH 8.0) and TritonX-100 under applying potential (1100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl for 5 min.). The current response was measured by linear sweep voltammetry technique (LSV). The thermostable enzyme Bacillus subtilis CotA electrodeposited electrode was compared with a mesophile BOD electrodeposited electrode. As a result, the Bacillus subtilis CotA modified electrode showed better sensitivity and long-term stability than the mesophile BOD modified electrode.

  10. Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 from traditional fermented soybean food inhibits Bacillus cereus growth and toxin-related genes.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Lee, Sun Young; Choi, Hye Sun

    2014-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 isolated from buckwheat sokseongjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens, including Bacillus cereus. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial efficacy and regulation of toxin gene expression in B. cereus by B. subtilis HJ18-4. Expression of B. cereus toxin-related genes (groEL, nheA, nheC, and entFM) was downregulated by B. subtilis HJ18-4, which also exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus. We also found that water extracts of soy product fermented with B. subtilis HJ18-4 significantly inhibited the growth of B. cereus and toxin expression. These results indicate that B. subtilis HJ18-4 could be used as an antimicrobial agent to control B. cereus in the fermented soybean food industry. Our findings also provide an opportunity to develop an efficient biological control agent against B. cereus.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Krasowska, Anna; Biegalska, Anna; Augustyniak, Daria; Łoś, Marcin; Richert, Malwina; Łukaszewicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages) or noncontractile (ARπ phage) tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0) and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0) pH. PMID:26273592

  12. Scandium stimulates the production of amylase and bacilysin in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Inaoka, Takashi; Ochi, Kozo

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the effects of rare earth elements on enzyme production and secondary metabolism in Bacillus subtilis. Addition of scandium to the growth medium stimulated the production of both amylase and bacilysin at the transcriptional level, thus showing scandium to have a remarkable impact in B. subtilis.

  13. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis Strain WAUSV36

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain WAUSV36 inhibits the growth of and decreases disease symptoms caused by the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the sequence of the 4.7-Mbp genome of this strain. WAUSV36 shared very high nucleotide sequence identity with previously sequenced strains of B. subtilis. PMID:27340068

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis SG6 antagonistic against Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueju; Sangare, Lancine; Wang, Yao; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-20

    Bacillus subtilis SG6 exhibited a high antifungal effect on the mycelium growth, sporulation and DON production of F. graminearum and significantly reduced disease incidence, Fusarium head blight (FHB) index and DON in the field. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of B. subtilis SG6, providing insights into the genomic basis of its effects and facilitating its application in FHB control.

  15. Isolation of a New Mexican Strain of Bacillus subtilis with Antifungal and Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Basurto-Cadena, M. G. L.; Vázquez-Arista, M.; García-Jiménez, J.; Salcedo-Hernández, R.; Bideshi, D. K.; Barboza-Corona, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Although several strains of B. subtilis with antifungal activity have been isolated worldwide, to date there are no published reports regarding the isolation of a native B. subtilis strain from strawberry plants in Mexico. A native bacterium (Bacillus subtilis 21) demonstrated in vitro antagonistic activity against different plant pathogenic fungi. Under greenhouse conditions, it was shown that plants infected with Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium verticillioides and treated with B. subtilis 21 produced augment in the number of leaves per plant and an increment in the length of healthy leaves in comparison with untreated plants. In addition, B. subtilis 21 showed activity against pathogenic bacteria. Secreted proteins by B. subtilis 21 were studied, detecting the presence of proteases and bacteriocin-like inhibitor substances that could be implicated in its antagonistic activity. Chitinases and zwittermicin production could not be detected. Then, B. subtilis 21 could potentially be used to control phytopathogenic fungi that infect strawberry plants. PMID:22593682

  16. Isolation of a new Mexican strain of Bacillus subtilis with antifungal and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Cadena, M G L; Vázquez-Arista, M; García-Jiménez, J; Salcedo-Hernández, R; Bideshi, D K; Barboza-Corona, J E

    2012-01-01

    Although several strains of B. subtilis with antifungal activity have been isolated worldwide, to date there are no published reports regarding the isolation of a native B. subtilis strain from strawberry plants in Mexico. A native bacterium (Bacillus subtilis 21) demonstrated in vitro antagonistic activity against different plant pathogenic fungi. Under greenhouse conditions, it was shown that plants infected with Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium verticillioides and treated with B. subtilis 21 produced augment in the number of leaves per plant and an increment in the length of healthy leaves in comparison with untreated plants. In addition, B. subtilis 21 showed activity against pathogenic bacteria. Secreted proteins by B. subtilis 21 were studied, detecting the presence of proteases and bacteriocin-like inhibitor substances that could be implicated in its antagonistic activity. Chitinases and zwittermicin production could not be detected. Then, B. subtilis 21 could potentially be used to control phytopathogenic fungi that infect strawberry plants. PMID:22593682

  17. Isolation and characterization of atrazine mineralizing Bacillus subtilis strain HB-6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jun; Xie, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine is a widely used herbicide with great environmental concern due to its high potential to contaminate soil and waters. An atrazine-degrading bacterial strain HB-6 was isolated from industrial wastewater and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified HB-6 as a Bacillus subtilis. PCR assays indicated that HB-6 contained atrazine-degrading genes trzN, atzB and atzC. The strain HB-6 was capable of utilizing atrazine and cyanuric acid as a sole nitrogen source for growth and even cleaved the s-triazine ring and mineralized atrazine. The strain demonstrated a very high efficiency of atrazine biodegradation with a broad optimum pH and temperature ranges and could be enhanced by cooperating with other bacteria, suggesting its huge potential for remediation of atrazine-contaminated sites. To our knowledge, there are few Bacillus subtilis strains reported that can mineralize atrazine, therefore, the present work might provide some new insights on atrazine remediation.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Atrazine Mineralizing Bacillus subtilis Strain HB-6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhua; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jun; Xie, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine is a widely used herbicide with great environmental concern due to its high potential to contaminate soil and waters. An atrazine-degrading bacterial strain HB-6 was isolated from industrial wastewater and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified HB-6 as a Bacillus subtilis. PCR assays indicated that HB-6 contained atrazine-degrading genes trzN, atzB and atzC. The strain HB-6 was capable of utilizing atrazine and cyanuric acid as a sole nitrogen source for growth and even cleaved the s-triazine ring and mineralized atrazine. The strain demonstrated a very high efficiency of atrazine biodegradation with a broad optimum pH and temperature ranges and could be enhanced by cooperating with other bacteria, suggesting its huge potential for remediation of atrazine-contaminated sites. To our knowledge, there are few Bacillus subtilis strains reported that can mineralize atrazine, therefore, the present work might provide some new insights on atrazine remediation. PMID:25238246

  19. Diverse supramolecular structures formed by self-assembling proteins of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuo; Wan, Qiang; Krajcikova, Daniela; Tang, Jilin; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Barak, Imrich; Bullough, Per A

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial spores (endospores), such as those of the pathogens Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis, are uniquely stable cell forms, highly resistant to harsh environmental insults. Bacillus subtilis is the best studied spore-former and we have used it to address the question of how the spore coat is assembled from multiple components to form a robust, protective superstructure. B. subtilis coat proteins (CotY, CotE, CotV and CotW) expressed in Escherichia coli can arrange intracellularly into highly stable macro-structures through processes of self-assembly. Using electron microscopy, we demonstrate the capacity of these proteins to generate ordered one-dimensional fibres, two-dimensional sheets and three-dimensional stacks. In one case (CotY), the high degree of order favours strong, cooperative intracellular disulfide cross-linking. Assemblies of this kind could form exquisitely adapted building blocks for higher-order assembly across all spore-formers. These physically robust arrayed units could also have novel applications in nano-biotechnology processes.

  20. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis purine repressor with DNA.

    PubMed

    Shin, B S; Stein, A; Zalkin, H

    1997-12-01

    A purine repressor (PurR) mediates adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of transcription initiation of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon. This repressor has been purified for the first time, and binding to control site DNA was characterized. PurR binds in vitro to four operons. Apparent Kd values for binding were 7 nM for the pur operon, 8 nM for purA, 13 nM for purR, and 44 nM for the pyr operon. In each case, DNase I footprints exhibited a pattern of protected and hypersensitive sites that extended over more than 60 bp. A GAAC-N24-GTTC sequence in the pur operon was necessary but not sufficient for the PurR-DNA interaction. However, this motif, which is conserved in the four binding sites, was not required for binding of PurR to purA. Thus, the common DNA recognition element for binding of PurR to the four operons is not known. Multiple PurR-pur operon DNA complexes having a binding stoichiometry that was either approximately two or six repressor molecules per DNA fragment were detected. The results of a torsional constraint experiment suggest that control site DNA forms one right-handed turn around PurR.

  1. Novel methyl transfer during chemotaxis in Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thoelke, M.S.; Kirby, J.R.; Ordal, G.W. )

    1989-06-27

    If Bacillus subtilis is incubated in radioactive methionine in the absence of protein synthesis, the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) become radioactively methylated. If the bacteria are further incubated in excess nonradioactive methionine (cold-chased) and then given the attractant aspartate, the MCPs lose about half of their radioactivity due to turnover, in which lower specific activity methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) replace higher specific activity ones. Due to the cold-chase, the specific activity of the AdoMet pool is reduced at least 2-fold. If, later, the attractant is removed, higher specific activity methyl groups return to the MCPs. Thus, there must exist an unidentified methyl carrier than can reversibly receive methyl groups from the MCPs. In a similar experiment, labeled cells were transferred to a flow cell and exposed to addition and removal of attractant and of repellent. All four kinds of stimuli were found to cause methanol production. Bacterial with maximally labeled MCPs were exposed to many cycles of addition and removal of attractant; the maximum amount of radioactive methanol was evolved on the third, not the first, cycle. This result suggests that there is a precursor-product relationship between methyl groups on the MCPs and on the unidentified carrier, which might be the direct source of methanol. However, since no methanol was produced when a methyltransferase mutant, whose MCPs were unmethylated, was exposed to addition and removal of attractant or repellent, the methanol must ultimately derive from methylated MCPs.

  2. A novel antifungal protein of Bacillus subtilis B25.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhiqiong; Lin, Baoying; Zhang, Rongyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis B25 was isolated from banana rhizosphere soil. It has been confirmed for B25 to have stronger antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.cubense, Additionally B25 has good inhibitory to plant pathogens, including Corynespora cassiicola, Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates. The antagonistic substance can be extracted from cell-free culture broth supernatants by 70% (w/v) (NH4)2 SO4 saturation. Clear blank band was observed between the protein and a pathogen. The examination of antagonistic mechanism under light microscope showed that the antifungal protein of B25 appeared to inhibit pathogens by leading to mycelium and spores tumescence, distortion, abnormality. The isolation procedure comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex Fast Flow and gel filtration chromatography on SephadexG-100. The purified antifungal fraction showed a single band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The active fraction was identified by NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS The amino acid sequences of 17 peptides segments were obtained. The analysis of the protein suggested that it was a hypothetical protein (gi154685475), with a relative molecular mass of 38708.67 Da and isoelectric point (pI) of 5.63. PMID:24255843

  3. Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, N.; Natsume, T.; Takahashi, K.; Hieda, K.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    Bacterial spores can endure in a variety of extreme earthly environments. However, some conditions encountered during the space flight could be detrimental to DNA in the spore, delimiting the possibility of transpermia. We investigate the genetic consequences of the exposure to space environments in a series of preflight simulation project of EXPOSE. Using Bacillus subtilis spores of repair-proficient HA101 and repair-deficient TKJ6312 strains, the mutations conferring resistance to rifampicin were detected, isolated and sequenced. Most of the mutations were located in a N-terminal region of the rpoB gene encoding RNA polymerase beta-subunit. Among several potentially mutagenic factors, high vacuum, UV radiation, heat, and accelerated heavy ions induced mutations with varying efficiencies. A majority of mutations induced by vacuum exposure carried a tandem double-base change (CA to TT) at a unique sequence context of TCAGC. Results indicate that the vacuum and high temperature may act synergistically for the induction of mutations.

  4. A capillary electrophoresis assay for recombinant Bacillus subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Sun, Lu; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu; Jiang, Dong-Qing; Yan, Xiu-Ping; Yang, Xing; Li, He-Yang

    2008-12-15

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing enzyme in the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway that leads to the formation of both heme and chlorophylls, which has been identified as one of the most important action targets of commercial herbicides. The literature reports gave different PPO-catalytic kinetic parameters for the substrate protoporphyrinogen IX (K(m) of 0.1 to 10.4 miocroM) with different sources of PPO using fluorescent or HPLC methods. Herein we assayed the enzymatic activity of recombinant Bacillus subtilis PPO by using capillary electrophoresis (CE), a method with high separation efficiency, easy automation, and low sample consumption. The Michaelis constant and maximum reaction velocity were determined as 7.0+/-0.6 miocroM and 0.38+/-0.02 miocromol min(-1)miocrog(-1), respectively. The interaction between PPO and acifluorfen, a commercial PPO-inhibiting herbicide, was measured as the inhibition constant 186.9+/-9.3 miocroM EM, Cyrillic. The relationship between cofactor FAD and PPO activity can also be quantitatively studied by this CE method. The CE method used here should also be a convenient, reliable method for PPO study.

  5. Screening of Bacillus subtilis transposon mutants with altered riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Tännler, Simon; Zamboni, Nicola; Kiraly, Csilla; Aymerich, Stéphane; Sauer, Uwe

    2008-09-01

    To identify novel targets for metabolic engineering of riboflavin production, we generated about 10,000 random, transposon-tagged mutants of an industrial, riboflavin-producing strain of Bacillus subtilis. Process-relevant screening conditions were established by developing a 96-deep-well plate method with raffinose as the carbon source, which mimics, to some extent, carbon limitation in fed batch cultures. Screening in raffinose and complex LB medium identified more efficiently riboflavin overproducing and underproducing mutants, respectively. As expected for a "loss of function" analysis, most identified mutants were underproducers. Insertion mutants in two genes with yet unknown function, however, were found to attain significantly improved riboflavin titers and yields. These genes and possibly further ones that are related to them are promising candidates for metabolic engineering. While causal links to riboflavin production were not obvious for most underproducers, we demonstrated for the gluconeogenic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase GapB how a novel, non-obvious metabolic engineering strategy can be derived from such underproduction mutations. Specifically, we improved riboflavin production on various substrates significantly by deregulating expression of the gluconeogenic genes gapB and pckA through knockout of their genetic repressor CcpN. This improvement was also verified under the more process-relevant conditions of a glucose-limited fed-batch culture. PMID:18582593

  6. Elasticity and wrinkled morphology of Bacillus subtilis pellicles

    PubMed Central

    Trejo, Miguel; Douarche, Carine; Bailleux, Virginie; Poulard, Christophe; Mariot, Sandrine; Regeard, Christophe; Raspaud, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Wrinkled morphology is a distinctive phenotype observed in mature biofilms produced by a great number of bacteria. Here we study the formation of macroscopic structures (wrinkles and folds) observed during the maturation of Bacillus subtilis pellicles in relation to their mechanical response. We show how the mechanical buckling instability can explain their formation. By performing simple tests, we highlight the role of confining geometry and growth in determining the symmetry of wrinkles. We also experimentally demonstrate that the pellicles are soft elastic materials for small deformations induced by a tensile device. The wrinkled structures are then described by using the equations of elastic plates, which include the growth process as a simple parameter representing biomass production. This growth controls buckling instability, which triggers the formation of wrinkles. We also describe how the structure of ripples is modified when capillary effects are dominant. Finally, the experiments performed on a mutant strain indicate that the presence of an extracellular matrix is required to maintain a connective and elastic pellicle. PMID:23341623

  7. On growth and form of Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dervaux, Julien; Magniez, Juan Carmelo; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-01-01

    A general feature of mature biofilms is their highly heterogeneous architecture that partitions the microbial city into sectors with specific micro-environments. To understand how this heterogeneity arises, we have investigated the formation of a microbial community of the model organism Bacillus subtilis. We first show that the growth of macroscopic colonies is inhibited by the accumulation of ammoniacal by-products. By constraining biofilms to grow approximately as two-dimensional layers, we then find that the bacteria which differentiate to produce extracellular polymeric substances form tightly packed bacterial chains. In addition to the process of cellular chaining, the biomass stickiness also strongly hinders the reorganization of cells within the biofilm. Based on these observations, we then write a biomechanical model for the growth of the biofilm where the cell density is constant and the physical mechanism responsible for the spreading of the biomass is the pressure generated by the division of the bacteria. Besides reproducing the velocity field of the biomass across the biofilm, the model predicts that, although bacteria divide everywhere in the biofilm, fluctuations in the growth rates of the bacteria lead to a coarsening of the growing bacterial layer. This process of kinetic roughening ultimately leads to the formation of a rough biofilm surface exhibiting self-similar properties. Experimental measurements of the biofilm texture confirm these predictions. PMID:25485075

  8. Nutrient depletion in Bacillus subtilis biofilms triggers matrix production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Seminara, Agnese; Suaris, Melanie; Brenner, Michael P.; Weitz, David A.; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many types of bacteria form colonies that grow into physically robust and strongly adhesive aggregates known as biofilms. A distinguishing characteristic of bacterial biofilms is an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix that encases the cells and provides physical integrity to the colony. The EPS matrix consists of a large amount of polysaccharide, as well as protein filaments, DNA and degraded cellular materials. The genetic pathways that control the transformation of a colony into a biofilm have been widely studied, and yield a spatiotemporal heterogeneity in EPS production. Spatial gradients in metabolites parallel this heterogeneity in EPS, but nutrient concentration as an underlying physiological initiator of EPS production has not been explored. Here, we study the role of nutrient depletion in EPS production in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. By monitoring simultaneously biofilm size and matrix production, we find that EPS production increases at a critical colony thickness that depends on the initial amount of carbon sources in the medium. Through studies of individual cells in liquid culture we find that EPS production can be triggered at the single-cell level by reducing nutrient concentration. To connect the single-cell assays with conditions in the biofilm, we calculate carbon concentration with a model for the reaction and diffusion of nutrients in the biofilm. This model predicts the relationship between the initial concentration of carbon and the thickness of the colony at the point of internal nutrient deprivation.

  9. Activity of essential oils against Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Hayley A; Palombo, Enzo A

    2009-12-01

    Alternative methods for controlling bacterial endospore contamination are desired in a range of industries and applications. Attention has recently turned to natural products, such as essential oils, which have sporicidal activity. In this study, a selection of essential oils was investigated to identify those with activity against Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores were exposed to thirteen essential oils, and surviving spores were enumerated. Cardamom, tea tree, and juniper leaf oils were the most effective, reducing the number of viable spores by 3 logs at concentrations above 1%. Sporicidal activity was enhanced at high temperatures (60 degrees C) or longer exposure times (up to one week). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified the components of the active essential oils. However, none of the major oil components exhibited equivalent activity to the whole oils. The fact that oil components, either alone or in combination, did not show the same level of sporicidal activity as the complete oils suggested that minor components may be involved, or that these act synergistically with major components. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine spores after exposure to essential oils and suggested that leakage of spore contents was the likely mode of sporicidal action. Our data have shown that essential oils exert sporicidal activity and may be useful in applications where bacterial spore reduction is desired.

  10. Global transcriptional response of Bacillus subtilis to heat shock.

    PubMed

    Helmann, J D; Wu, M F; Kobel, P A; Gamo, F J; Wilson, M; Morshedi, M M; Navre, M; Paddon, C

    2001-12-01

    In response to heat stress, Bacillus subtilis activates the transcription of well over 100 different genes. Many of these genes are members of a general stress response regulon controlled by the secondary sigma factor, sigma(B), while others are under control of the HrcA or CtsR heat shock regulators. We have used DNA microarrays to monitor the global transcriptional response to heat shock. We find strong induction of known sigma(B)-dependent genes with a characteristic rapid induction followed by a return to near prestimulus levels. The HrcA and CtsR regulons are also induced, but with somewhat slower kinetics. Analysis of DNA sequences proximal to newly identified heat-induced genes leads us to propose ~70 additional members of the sigma(B) regulon. We have also identified numerous heat-induced genes that are not members of known heat shock regulons. Notably, we observe very strong induction of arginine biosynthesis and transport operons. Induction of several genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. In addition, the transcriptional responses measured by microarray hybridization compare favorably with the numerous previous studies of heat shock in this organism. Since many different conditions elicit both specific and general stress responses, knowledge of the heat-induced general stress response reported here will be helpful for interpreting future microarray studies of other stress responses. PMID:11717291

  11. Probing phenotypic growth in expanding Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Koehler, Stephan A; Wilking, James N; Sinha, Naveen N; Cabeen, Matthew T; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Seminara, Agnese; Rubinstein, Shmuel; Sun, Qingping; Brenner, Michael P; Weitz, David A

    2016-05-01

    We develop an optical imaging technique for spatially and temporally tracking biofilm growth and the distribution of the main phenotypes of a Bacillus subtilis strain with a triple-fluorescent reporter for motility, matrix production, and sporulation. We develop a calibration procedure for determining the biofilm thickness from the transmission images, which is based on Beer-Lambert's law and involves cross-sectioning of biofilms. To obtain the phenotype distribution, we assume a linear relationship between the number of cells and their fluorescence and determine the best combination of calibration coefficients that matches the total number of cells for all three phenotypes and with the total number of cells from the transmission images. Based on this analysis, we resolve the composition of the biofilm in terms of motile, matrix-producing, sporulating cells and low-fluorescent materials which includes matrix and cells that are dead or have low fluorescent gene expression. We take advantage of the circular growth to make kymograph plots of all three phenotypes and the dominant phenotype in terms of radial distance and time. To visualize the nonlocal character of biofilm growth, we also make kymographs using the local colonization time. Our technique is suitable for real-time, noninvasive, quantitative studies of the growth and phenotype distribution of biofilms which are either exposed to different conditions such as biocides, nutrient depletion, dehydration, or waste accumulation. PMID:27003268

  12. Dynamics of Aerial Tower Formation in Bacillus subtilis Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Wilking, James; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are highly-organized colonies of bacteria that form on surfaces. These colonies form sophisticated structures which make them robust and difficult to remove from environments such as catheters, where they pose serious infection problems. Previous work has shown that sub-mm sized aerial towers form on the surface of Bacillus subtilis colony biofilms. Spore-formation is located preferentially at the tops of these towers, known as fruiting bodies, which aid in the dispersal and propagation of the colony to new sites. The formation of towers is strongly affected by the quorum-sensing molecule surfactin and the cannibalism pathway of the bacteria. In the present work, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to study the development of individual fruiting bodies, allowing us to visualize the time-dependent spatial distribution of matrix-forming and sporulating bacteria within the towers. With this information, we investigate the physical mechanisms, such as surface tension and polymer concentration gradients, that drive the formation of these structures.

  13. Regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes in Bacillus halodurans: common elements but different strategies than those used by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Reka; Milescu, Mirela; Gollnick, Paul

    2004-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, an RNA binding protein called TRAP regulates both transcription and translation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes. Bacillus halodurans is an alkaliphilic Bacillus species that grows at high pHs. Previous studies of this bacterium have focused on mechanisms of adaptation for growth in alkaline environments. We have characterized the regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes in B. halodurans and compared it to that in B. subtilis. B. halodurans encodes a TRAP protein with 71% sequence identity to the B. subtilis protein. Expression of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme in the pathway to tryptophan, is regulated significantly less in B. halodurans than in B. subtilis. Examination of the control of the B. halodurans trpEDCFBA operon both in vivo and in vitro shows that only transcription is regulated, whereas in B. subtilis both transcription of the operon and translation of trpE are controlled. The attenuation mechanism that controls transcription in B. halodurans is similar to that in B. subtilis, but there are some differences in the predicted RNA secondary structures in the B. halodurans trp leader region, including the presence of a potential anti-antiterminator structure. Translation of trpG, which is within the folate operon in both bacilli, is regulated similarly in the two species. PMID:14729709

  14. Characterization of a mannose utilization system in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianqi; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2010-04-01

    The mannose operon of Bacillus subtilis consists of three genes, manP, manA, and yjdF, which are responsible for the transport and utilization of mannose. Upstream and in the same orientation as the mannose operon a regulatory gene, manR, codes for a transcription activator of the mannose operon, as shown in this study. Both mannose operon transcription and manR transcription are inducible by mannose. The presence of mannose resulted in a 4- to 7-fold increase in expression of lacZ from the manP promoter (P(manP)) and in a 3-fold increase in expression of lacZ from the manR promoter (P(manR)). The transcription start sites of manPA-yjdF and manR were determined to be a single A residue and a single G residue, respectively, preceded by -10 and -35 boxes resembling a vegetative sigma(A) promoter structure. Through deletion analysis the target sequences of ManR upstream of P(manP) and P(manR) were identified between bp -80 and -35 with respect to the transcriptional start site of both promoters. Deletion of manP (mannose transporter) resulted in constitutive expression from both the P(manP) and P(manR) promoters, indicating that the phosphotransferase system (PTS) component EII(Man) has a negative effect on regulation of the mannose operon and manR. Moreover, both P(manP) and P(manR) are subject to carbon catabolite repression (CCR). By constructing protein sequence alignments a DNA binding motif at the N-terminal end, two PTS regulation domains (PRDs), and an EIIA- and EIIB-like domain were identified in the ManR sequence, indicating that ManR is a PRD-containing transcription activator. Like findings for other PRD regulators, the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphorylation by the histidine protein HPr via His15 plays an essential role in transcriptional activation of P(manP) and P(manR). Phosphorylation of Ser46 of HPr or of the homologous Crh protein by HPr kinase and formation of a repressor complex with CcpA are parts of the B. subtilis CCR system. Only

  15. The Bacillus subtilis spore coat provides "eat resistance" during phagocytic predation by the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Klobutcher, Lawrence A; Ragkousi, Katerina; Setlow, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus spores are highly resistant to many environmental stresses, owing in part to the presence of multiple "extracellular" layers. Although the role of some of these extracellular layers in resistance to particular stresses is known, the function of one of the outermost layers, the spore coat, is not completely understood. This study sought to determine whether the spore coat plays a role in resistance to predation by the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena, which uses phagocytosis to ingest and degrade other microorganisms. Wild-type dormant spores of Bacillus subtilis were efficiently ingested by the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila but were neither digested nor killed. However, spores with various coat defects were killed and digested, leaving only an outer shell termed a rind, and supporting the growth of Tetrahymena. A similar rind was generated when coat-defective spores were treated with lysozyme alone. The sensitivity of spores with different coat defects to predation by T. thermophila paralleled the spores' sensitivities to lysozyme. Spore killing by T. thermophila was by means of lytic enzymes within the protozoal phagosome, not by initial spore germination followed by killing. These findings suggest that a major function of the coat of spores of Bacillus species is to protect spores against predation. We also found that indigestible rinds were generated even from spores in which cross-linking of coat proteins was greatly reduced, implying the existence of a coat structure that is highly resistant to degradative enzymes.

  16. Functional dissection of the Bacillus subtilis pur operator site.

    PubMed

    Bera, Aloke Kumar; Zhu, Jianghai; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis PurR represses transcription of several genes involved in purine synthesis, metabolism, and transport and cofactor synthesis. PurR binds specifically to DNAs containing an inverted repeat of a 14-nucleotide "PurBox" located in the upstream control regions of genes in the PurR regulon. Further biochemical investigation of the interaction of PurR with a series of shortened upstream DNA fragments of the pur operon determined the minimum length and specificity elements of the operator. The relative affinities of the two PurBoxes differ significantly, such that upstream PurBox1 (-81 to -68 relative to the transcription start site) is designated "strong" and downstream PurBox2 (-49 to -36) is designated "weak." Two PurBoxes are required for high-affinity PurR binding, and one of these must be strong. The shortest DNA construct with high affinity for PurR is a 74-bp perfect palindrome in which weak PurBox2 and its flanking sequences are replaced by strong PurBox1 and flanking sequences. Two PurR dimers bind to this symmetric construct. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP), the effector molecule that reduces affinity of PurR for DNA, requires one weak PurBox in the DNA construct to inhibit PurR binding. PRPP binds, as expected, to a PRPP-motif in PurR. A tracks outside the central conserved CGAA sequence of the PurBox may facilitate DNA bending, leading to a proposal for strong and weak designations of PurBoxes in the control regions of other genes regulated by PurR.

  17. Recombinant Bacillus subtilis that grows on untreated plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy D; Miller, J Izaak; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Clubb, Robert T

    2013-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising feedstock to produce biofuels and other valuable biocommodities. A major obstacle to its commercialization is the high cost of degrading biomass into fermentable sugars, which is typically achieved using cellulolytic enzymes from Trichoderma reesei. Here, we explore the use of microbes to break down biomass. Bacillus subtilis was engineered to display a multicellulase-containing minicellulosome. The complex contains a miniscaffoldin protein that is covalently attached to the cell wall and three noncovalently associated cellulase enzymes derived from Clostridium cellulolyticum (Cel48F, Cel9E, and Cel5A). The minicellulosome spontaneously assembles, thus increasing the practicality of the cells. The recombinant bacteria are highly cellulolytic and grew in minimal medium containing industrially relevant forms of biomass as the primary nutrient source (corn stover, hatched straw, and switch grass). Notably, growth did not require dilute acid pretreatment of the biomass and the cells achieved densities approaching those of cells cultured with glucose. An analysis of the sugars released from acid-pretreated corn stover indicates that the cells have stable cellulolytic activity that enables them to break down 62.3% ± 2.6% of the biomass. When supplemented with beta-glucosidase, the cells liberated 21% and 33% of the total available glucose and xylose in the biomass, respectively. As the cells display only three types of enzymes, increasing the number of displayed enzymes should lead to even more potent cellulolytic microbes. This work has important implications for the efficient conversion of lignocellulose to value-added biocommodities. PMID:23183968

  18. Vacuum-induced Mutations In Bacillus Subtilis Spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, N.; Maeda, M.; Hieda, K.

    During irradiation experiments with vacuum-UV radiation using synchrotron sources, we made unexpected observation that Bacillus subtilis spores of several recombination-deficient strains lost colony-forming ability by the exposure to high vacuum alone. Since this suggested the possible injury in spore DNA, we looked for mutation induction using the spores of strains HA101 (wild-type repair capability) and TKJ6312 (excision and spore repair deficient) that did not lose survivability. It was found that the frequency of nalidixic-acid resistant mutation increased several times in both of these strains by the exposure to high vacuum (10e-4 Pa after 24 hours). The analysis of sequence changes in gyrA gene showed that the majority of mutations carried a unique allele (gyrA12) of tandem double-base substitutions from CA to TT. The observation has been extended to rifampicin resistant mutations, the majority of that carried substitutions from CA to TT or AT in rpoB gene. On the other hand, when the spores of strains PS578 and PS2319 (obtained from P. Setlow) that are defective in a group of small acidic proteins (alpha/beta-type SASP) were similarly treated, none of the mutants analyzed carried such changes. This suggests that the unique mutations might be induced by the interaction of small acidic proteins with spore DNA under forced dehydration. The results indicate that extreme vacuum causes severe damage in spore DNA, and provide additional constraint to the long-term survival of bacterial spores in the space environment.

  19. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions. PMID:27258038

  20. Consolidated conversion of protein waste into biofuels and ammonia using Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwon-Young; Wernick, David G; Tat, Christine A; Liao, James C

    2014-05-01

    The non-recyclable use of nitrogen fertilizers in microbial production of fuels and chemicals remains environmentally detrimental. Conversion of protein wastes into biofuels and ammonia by engineering nitrogen flux in Escherichia coli has been demonstrated as a method to reclaim reduced-nitrogen and curb its environmental deposition. However, protein biomass requires a proteolysis process before it can be taken up and converted by any microbe. Here, we metabolically engineered Bacillus subtilis to hydrolyze polypeptides through its secreted proteases and to convert amino acids into advanced biofuels and ammonia fertilizer. Redirection of B. subtilis metabolism for amino-acid conversion required inactivation of the branched-chain amino-acid (BCAA) global regulator CodY. Additionally, the lipoamide acyltransferase (bkdB) was deleted to prevent conversion of branched-chain 2-keto acids into their acyl-CoA derivatives. With these deletions and heterologous expression of a keto-acid decarboxylase and an alcohol dehydrogenase, the final strain produced biofuels and ammonia from an amino-acid media with 18.9% and 46.6% of the maximum theoretical yield. The process was also demonstrated on several waste proteins. The results demonstrate the feasibility of direct microbial conversion of polypeptides into sustainable products.

  1. Full-length single-stranded PCR product mediated chromosomal integration in intact Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Sai; Yang, Jianguo; Tan, Tianwei

    2013-03-01

    The research introduced a novel method for gene replacement in intact Bacillus subtilis by employing full-length single-stranded (ss) DNA constructs and electro-transformation. 5' phosphorothioated lagging-strand targeting ssDNA construct was demonstrated to be highly recombinogenic, and the utility of the system was illustrated by introducing a heterologous lipase YlLip2 into amyE locus of B. subtilis through our method.

  2. Lysozyme: primary bactericidin in human plasma serum active against Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Selsted, M E; Martinez, R J

    1978-01-01

    The in vitro bactericidal reaction of human plasma serum against Bacillus subtilis was investigated. Human lysozyme was purified to homogeneity, and antiserum was prepared against the enzyme. The anti-lysozyme immunoglobulin G was used as a specific inhibitor in bactericidal and bacteriolytic reactions. It was found that at low serum concentrations lysozyme was the primary bactericide active against B. subtilis. At appreciably higher serum concentrations, a lysozyme-independent bactericidal activity was also demonstrated. Images PMID:97236

  3. Enhancing Production of Alkaline Polygalacturonate Lyase from Bacillus subtilis by Fed-Batch Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Mouyong; Guo, Fenfen; Li, Xuezhi; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline polygalacturonate lyase (PGL, EC 4.2.2.2) is an enzyme used in many industries. We developed a fed-batch fermentation process that combines the enzymatic pretreatment of the carbon source with controlling the pH of the fermentative broth to enhance the PGL production from Bacillus subtilis 7-3-3 to decrease the production cost. Maintaining the fermentation broth at pH 6.5 prior to feeding with ammonia and at pH 6.0 after feeding significantly improved PGL activity (743.5 U mL−1) compared with the control (202.5 U mL−1). The average PGL productivity reached 19.6 U mL−1 h−1 after 38 h of fermentation. The crude PGL was suitable for environmentally friendly ramie enzymatic degumming. PMID:24603713

  4. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis.

  5. Menaquinone and Iron Are Essential for Complex Colony Development in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Pelchovich, Gidi; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Gophna, Uri

    2013-01-01

    Cells of undomesticated species of Bacillus subtilis frequently form complex colonies during spreading on agar surfaces. Given that menaquinone is involved in another form of coordinated behavior, namely, sporulation, we looked for a possible role for menaquinone in complex colony development (CCD) in the B. subtilis strain NCIB 3610. Here we show that inhibition of menaquinone biosynthesis in B. subtilis indeed abolished its ability to develop complex colonies. Additionally some mutations of B. subtilis which confer defective CCD could be suppressed by menaquinone derivatives. Several such mutants mapped to the dhb operon encoding the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the iron siderophore, bacillibactin. Our results demonstrate that both menaquinone and iron are essential for CCD in B. subtilis. PMID:24223955

  6. Immobilization of cadmium in soils by UV-mutated Bacillus subtilis 38 bioaugmentation and NovoGro amendment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunxiao; Sun, Hongwen; Sun, Tieheng; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2009-08-15

    Immobilization of cadmium (10 mg Cd per kilogram soil) in soil by bioaugmentation of a UV-mutated microorganism, Bacillus subtilis 38 accompanied with amendment of a bio-fertilizer, NovoGro was investigated using extractable cadmium (E-Cd) by DTPA. B. subtilis 38, the mutant with the strongest resistance against Cd, could bioaccumulate Cd four times greater than the original wild type. Single bioaugmentation of B. subtilis 38 (SB treatment) to soil however did not reduce E-Cd significantly, while the amendment of NovoGro (SN treatment) reduced E-Cd remarkably. Simultaneous application of B. subtilis 38 and NovoGro (SNB treatment) exhibited a synergetic effect compared to the single SB and SN treatment. The immobilization effect was significantly affected by temperature, soil moisture, and pH. It seems that the immobilization on Cd reached the maximum when environmental conditions favored the activity of microorganisms. Under the optimum conditions, after 90 days incubation, E-Cd was 3.34, 3.39, 2.25 and 0.87 mg kg(-1) in the control soil, SB, SN and SNB soils, respectively. NovoGro not only showed a great capacity for Cd adsorption, but also promoted the growth of B. subtilis 38. This study provides a potential cost-effective technique for in situ remediation of Cd contaminated soils with bioaugmentation. PMID:19272704

  7. The Bacillus subtilis Acyl Lipid Desaturase Is a Δ5 Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Altabe, Silvia G.; Aguilar, Pablo; Caballero, Gerardo M.; de Mendoza, Diego

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis was recently reported to synthesize unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) with a double bond at positions Δ5, Δ7, and Δ9 (M. H. Weber, W. Klein, L. Muller, U. M. Niess, and M. A. Marahiel, Mol. Microbiol. 39:1321-1329, 2001). Since this finding would have considerable importance in the double-bond positional specificity displayed by the B. subtilis acyl lipid desaturase, we have attempted to confirm this observation. We report that the double bond of UFAs synthesized by B. subtilis is located exclusively at the Δ5 position, regardless of the growth temperature and the length chain of the fatty acids. PMID:12730185

  8. Effect of some herbicides used in Nigeria on Rhizobium phaseoli, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, I A; Okorodudu, E; Lawal, O

    2004-04-01

    The effect of three herbicides namely Agroxone, Atranex 50SC and 2,4-Damine on Azotobacter vinelandii, Rhizobium phaseoli and Bacillus subtilis were studied. These bacteria were isolated from a bean-garden in Lagos. The results revealed that 2, 4-Damine was the most toxic of the three herbicides studied and Azotobacter vinelandii was found to be most sensitive to the herbicides. There was a reduction in LC50 of herbicides with increased number of days. The percentage survival decreased with increased concentration of herbicides and days for Rhizobium phaseoli and Azotobacter vinelandii while an initial reduction in population was followed by increased percentage survival of organisms for Bacillus subtilis.

  9. Expression of the subtilisin Carlsberg-encoding gene in Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M F

    1995-01-11

    The cloning and sequence of the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the Bacillus licheniformis (Bl) 6816 subtilisin Carlsberg gene (subC) are reported here. The 5' and 3' ends of subC transcripts were characterized, and the promoter identified. Expression was studied using a fused lacZ reporter gene integrated into the chromosome of heterologous host Bacillus subtilis (Bs). beta Gal activities of mutants deleted within the promoter region identified a region which is required for stimulation by the transcriptional activator proteins, DegU and DegQ. This region is close to the transcription start point (tsp), and is adjacent to a sequence homologous to that involved in DegU/Q stimulation of the Bs subtilisin gene, aprE. Expression of subC in Bs was optimized by the use of heterologous promoter and by the deletion of UTR sequences predicted to be involved in secondary structures in the native subC mRNA. Sequence comparison with other subtilisin Carlsberg-type-encoding genes revealed a high degree of conservation of the entire 5'-UTR, including regulatory sequences and promoter, as well as part of the structural gene.

  10. Impact of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases on the Regulation of Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Pompeo, Frédérique; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess many kinases that catalyze phosphorylation of proteins on diverse amino acids including arginine, cysteine, histidine, aspartate, serine, threonine, and tyrosine. These protein kinases regulate different physiological processes in response to environmental modifications. For example, in response to nutritional stresses, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can differentiate into an endospore; the initiation of sporulation is controlled by the master regulator Spo0A, which is activated by phosphorylation. Spo0A phosphorylation is carried out by a multi-component phosphorelay system. These phosphorylation events on histidine and aspartate residues are labile, highly dynamic and permit a temporal control of the sporulation initiation decision. More recently, another kind of phosphorylation, more stable yet still dynamic, on serine or threonine residues, was proposed to play a role in spore maintenance and spore revival. Kinases that perform these phosphorylation events mainly belong to the Hanks family and could regulate spore dormancy and spore germination. The aim of this mini review is to focus on the regulation of sporulation in B. subtilis by these serine and threonine phosphorylation events and the kinases catalyzing them. PMID:27148245

  11. Cell growth and alpha-amylase production characteristics of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Dercová, K; Augustín, J; Krajcová, D

    1992-01-01

    Growth, differential rate of alpha-amylase synthesis and production characteristics of Bacillus subtilis DP 1 (isolate from starch materials) in comparison with 10 Bacillus strains were examined in batch fermentation. The effect of the carbon and nitrogen source was evaluated with regard to cell growth and enzyme production. The pH optimum of enzyme activity was 6.5 and temperature optimum of 60 degrees C.

  12. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthase Gene Clusters for Lipopeptide Biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis 916 and Their Phenotypic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuehui; Zhou, Huafei; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cyclic lipopeptides (LPs) have been well studied for their phytopathogen-antagonistic activities. Recently, research has shown that these LPs also contribute to the phenotypic features of Bacillus strains, such as hemolytic activity, swarming motility, biofilm formation, and colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis 916 not only coproduces the three families of well-known LPs, i.e., surfactins, bacillomycin Ls (iturin family), and fengycins, but also produces a new family of LP called locillomycins. The genome of B. subtilis 916 contains four nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) gene clusters, srf, bmy, fen, and loc, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of surfactins, bacillomycin Ls, fengycins, and locillomycins, respectively. By studying B. subtilis 916 mutants lacking production of one, two, or three LPs, we attempted to unveil the connections between LPs and phenotypic features. We demonstrated that bacillomycin Ls and fengycins contribute mainly to antifungal activity. Although surfactins have weak antifungal activity in vitro, the strain mutated in srfAA had significantly decreased antifungal activity. This may be due to the impaired productions of fengycins and bacillomycin Ls. We also found that the disruption of any LP gene cluster other than fen resulted in a change in colony morphology. While surfactins and bacillomycin Ls play very important roles in hemolytic activity, swarming motility, and biofilm formation, the fengycins and locillomycins had little influence on these phenotypic features. In conclusion, B. subtilis 916 coproduces four families of LPs which contribute to the phenotypic features of B. subtilis 916 in an intricate way. PMID:25362061

  13. Improved subtilisin YaB production in Bacillus subtilis using engineered synthetic expression control sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyh-Perng; Yeh, Chuan-Mei; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2006-12-13

    Alkaline elastase YaB, a favorable meat tenderizer, is an extracellular subtilisin-type protease produced by wild strain alkalophilic Bacillus YaB. The gene ale coding for subtilisin YaB with its own expression control sequence has been cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis, but at levels much lower than in the parental strain Bacillus YaB. This study investigates the influence of various expression control sequences including expression control sequences of cdd and veg from B. subtilis, a synthetic expression control sequence (SECS), and engineered synthetic expression control sequences (engineered SECSs) on the expression of subtilisin YaB in B. subtilis. The engineered SECSs were generated by using the Polymerase Chain Reaction; their UP element, Shine-Dargarno (SD) sequence, or both were different from those of the native SECS. The expression efficiencies of SECS and engineered SECSs were higher than those of expression control sequences of ale, cdd, and veg. Substitution of the SD sequence of SECS resulted in higher expression of subtilisin YaB than substitution of the UP element, whereas combined substitution of both gave the highest expression. These results demonstrate that engineering of SECSs is an approach for improving subtilisin YaB production in B. subtilis. Moreover, it is suggested that these enginnered SECSs could potentially be used to express homologous and heterologous proteins in B. subtilis at high level. PMID:17147425

  14. A microbial transformation using Bacillus subtilis B7-S to produce natural vanillin from ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Lei; Wu, Zhengrong; Li, Suyue; Bai, Zhongtian; Yan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ningbo; Liang, Ning; Li, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain B7-S screened from18 strains is an aerobic, endospore-forming, model organism of Gram-positive bacteria which is capable to form vanillin during ferulic acid bioconversion. The bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin by Bacillus subtilis B7-S (B. subtilis B7-S) was investigated. Based on our results, the optimum bioconversion conditions for the production of vanillin by B. subtilis B7-S can be summarized as follows: temperature 35 °C; initial pH 9.0; inoculum volume 5%; ferulic acid concentration 0.6 g/L; volume of culture medium 20%; and shaking speed 200 r/min. Under these conditions, several repeated small-scale batch experiments showed that the maximum conversion efficiency was 63.30% after 3 h of bioconversion. The vanillin products were confirmed by spectral data achieved from UV-vis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscope (ICP-AES) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) spectra. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) results confirmed that the cell surface of B. subtilis plays a role in the induction of ferulic acid tolerance. These results demonstrate that B. subtilis B7-S has the potential for use in vanillin production through bioconversion of ferulic acid. PMID:26841717

  15. A microbial transformation using Bacillus subtilis B7-S to produce natural vanillin from ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Lei; Wu, Zhengrong; Li, Suyue; Bai, Zhongtian; Yan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ningbo; Liang, Ning; Li, Hongyu

    2016-02-04

    Bacillus subtilis strain B7-S screened from18 strains is an aerobic, endospore-forming, model organism of Gram-positive bacteria which is capable to form vanillin during ferulic acid bioconversion. The bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin by Bacillus subtilis B7-S (B. subtilis B7-S) was investigated. Based on our results, the optimum bioconversion conditions for the production of vanillin by B. subtilis B7-S can be summarized as follows: temperature 35 °C; initial pH 9.0; inoculum volume 5%; ferulic acid concentration 0.6 g/L; volume of culture medium 20%; and shaking speed 200 r/min. Under these conditions, several repeated small-scale batch experiments showed that the maximum conversion efficiency was 63.30% after 3 h of bioconversion. The vanillin products were confirmed by spectral data achieved from UV-vis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscope (ICP-AES) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) spectra. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) results confirmed that the cell surface of B. subtilis plays a role in the induction of ferulic acid tolerance. These results demonstrate that B. subtilis B7-S has the potential for use in vanillin production through bioconversion of ferulic acid.

  16. Direct selection of cloned DNA in Bacillus subtilis based on sucrose-induced lethality.

    PubMed Central

    Bramucci, M G; Nagarajan, V

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus amyloliquefaciens sacB gene in the presence of sucrose is lethal for a variety of bacteria. Sucrose-induced lethality can be used to select for inactivation of sacB by insertion of heterologous DNA in sensitive bacteria. This procedure has not been applicable to B. subtilis heretofore because expression of wild-type sacB is not detrimental to B. subtilis. The W29 mutation in the B. amyloliquefaciens sacB gene interferes with processing of the levansucrase signal peptide. The W29 mutation does not affect growth of B. subtilis in media lacking sucrose. However, this mutation inhibited growth of B. subtilis in media containing sucrose. Inactivation of the fructose polymerase activity encoded by sacB indicated that levan production was essential for sucrose-induced lethality. As a result, it was possible to select for cloned DNA in B. subtilis by insertional inactivation of the mutant sacB gene located on a multicopy plasmid vector in medium containing sucrose. PMID:8899981

  17. A microbial transformation using Bacillus subtilis B7-S to produce natural vanillin from ferulic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Lei; Wu, Zhengrong; Li, Suyue; Bai, Zhongtian; Yan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ningbo; Liang, Ning; Li, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain B7-S screened from18 strains is an aerobic, endospore-forming, model organism of Gram-positive bacteria which is capable to form vanillin during ferulic acid bioconversion. The bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin by Bacillus subtilis B7-S (B. subtilis B7-S) was investigated. Based on our results, the optimum bioconversion conditions for the production of vanillin by B. subtilis B7-S can be summarized as follows: temperature 35 °C; initial pH 9.0; inoculum volume 5%; ferulic acid concentration 0.6 g/L; volume of culture medium 20%; and shaking speed 200 r/min. Under these conditions, several repeated small-scale batch experiments showed that the maximum conversion efficiency was 63.30% after 3 h of bioconversion. The vanillin products were confirmed by spectral data achieved from UV–vis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscope (ICP-AES) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) spectra. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) results confirmed that the cell surface of B. subtilis plays a role in the induction of ferulic acid tolerance. These results demonstrate that B. subtilis B7-S has the potential for use in vanillin production through bioconversion of ferulic acid. PMID:26841717

  18. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  19. In vivo effect of mutations at the PRPP binding site of the Bacillus subtilis purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Rappu, Pekka; Pullinen, Terhi; Mäntsälä, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    The Bacillus subtilis PurR mediates adenine repression and guanosine induction of purA. PRPP inhibits binding of PurR to DNA in vitro. Mutations in the PRPP binding motif of PurR caused strong repression regardless of purine exclusions or additions, establishing the role of PRPP as regulator of PurR.

  20. Optimization of Spore and Antifungal Lipopeptide Production during the Solid State Fermentation of Bacillus subtilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus subtilis strain TrigoCor 1448 was grown on wheat middlings in 0.5-liter solid state fermentation (SSF) bioreactors for the production of an antifungal biological control agent. Total antifungal activity was quantified using a 96-well microplate bioassay against the plant pathogen Fusarium ...

  1. Synchronous Cultures of Bacillus subtilis Obtained by Filtration with Glass Fiber Filters

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Michael G.

    1973-01-01

    A simple method of potentially wide applicability for obtaining synchronous cultures of Bacillus subtilis based on size selection is described. Using glass fiber filters, a population (about 1 to 2% of the parent population) can be obtained substantially enriched for small cells which grow synchronously. A method for rapidly concentrating dilute suspensions of cells is described. PMID:4200855

  2. The nature and site of biocide-induced sublethal injury in Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Williams, N D; Russell, A D

    1992-12-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis NCTC 8236 exposed at 22 degrees C to test biocides (alkaline glutaraldehyde, an iodophor, Lugol's solution, sodium hypochlorite and sodium dichloroisocyanurate) demonstrated varying degrees of injury to stressing agents (sodium hydroxide, sodium lauryl sulphate, polymyxin B sulphate or cetylpyridinium chloride) incorporated into a recovery agar medium. This injury to stressing agents was expressed mainly during outgrowth. PMID:1490611

  3. Mucosal immune response in broilers following vaccination with inactivated influenza and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucosal and systemic immunity were observed in broilers vaccinated with mannosylated chitosan adjuvated (MCA) inactivated A/Turkey/Virginia/158512/2002 (H7N2) and administered with and without recombinant Bacillus subtilis to elicit heterologous influenza strain protection. Previously, mucosal immu...

  4. Antagonistic activity and mechanisms of Bacillus subtilis SB1 against Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in vitro experiments. In addition to Ralstonia solanacearum, strain SB1 inhibited the growth of many other plant pathogens, including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, Phytoph...

  5. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis SB1 and its biocontrol effect on tomato bacterial wilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, isolated from tomato roots, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in in vitro experiments. It inhibited the growth of many plant pathogens, including Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Fusarium ox...

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Bacillus subtilis strains applicable to natto (fermented soybean) production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spore-forming Bacillus strains that produce extracellular poly-'-glutamic acid were screened for their application to natto (fermented soybean food) fermentation. Among the 365 strains, including B. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens, which we isolated from rice straw, 59 were capable of fermenting n...

  7. Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials augment macrophage function in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the function of Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials (DFMs) on macrophage functions, i.e., nitric oxide (NO) production and phagocytosis in broiler chickens. DFMs used in this study were eight single strains designated as Bs2084, LSSAO1, 3AP4, Bs1...

  8. Enhanced production of recombinant nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis by the elimination of limiting factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po Ting; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2006-10-01

    By systematic investigation, glutamate and a mixture of metal ions were identified as factors limiting the production of nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, in medium supplemented with these materials, the recombinant strain secreted 4 times more nattokinase (260 mg l(-1)) than when grown in the unsupplemented medium.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSD-2, a microbial germicide isolated from cultivated cotton.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Shuli; An, Likang; Zhang, Genwei; Cheng, Huicai; Xi, Yanhua; Cui, Guanhui; Zhang, Feiyan; Zhang, Liping

    2016-07-20

    Bacillus subtilis BSD-2, isolated from cotton (Gossypium spp.), had strong antagonistic activity to Verticillium dahlia Kleb and Botrytis cinerea. We sequenced and annotated the BSD-2 complete genome to help us the better use of this strain, which has surfactin, bacilysin, bacillibactin, subtilosin A, Tas A and a potential class IV lanthipeptide biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27184432

  10. Bacillus subtilis endospores at high purity and recovery yields: optimization of growth conditions and purification method.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Milene B; Souza, Renata D; Luiz, Wilson B; Cavalcante, Rafael C M; Casaroli, Caroline; Martins, Eduardo G; Ferreira, Rita C C; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis endospores have applications in different fields including their use as probiotics and antigen delivery vectors. Such specialized applications frequently require highly purified spore preparations. Nonetheless, quantitative data regarding both yields and purity of B. subtilis endospores after application of different growth conditions and purification methods are scarce or poorly reported. In the present study, we conducted several quantitative and qualitative analyses of growth conditions and purification procedures aiming generation of purified B. subtilis spores. Based on two growth media and different incubations conditions, sporulation frequencies up to 74.2 % and spore concentrations up to 7 × 10(9) spores/ml were achieved. Application of a simplified spore isolation method, in which samples were incubated with lysozyme and a detergent, resulted in preparations with highly purified spores at the highest yields. The present study represents, therefore, an important contribution for those working with B. subtilis endospores for different biotechnological purposes.

  11. Mucosal adjuvant activity of IL-2 presenting spores of bacillus subtilis in a murine model of Helicobacter pylori vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hinc, Krzysztof; Stasiłojć, Małgorzata; Piątek, Iwona; Peszyńska-Sularz, Grażyna; Isticato, Rachele; Ricca, Ezio; Obuchowski, Michał; Iwanicki, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The endospores of Bacillus subtilis are now widely used as a platform for presentation of heterologous proteins and due to their safety record and high resistance to harsh environmental conditions can be considered as potential vehicles for oral vaccination. In this research we show that recombinant B. subtilis spores presenting a fragment of the Helicobacter acinonychis UreB protein and expressing the ureB gene under vegetative promoter elicit a strong cellular immune response in orally immunized mice when co-administered with spores presenting IL-2. We show for the first time the successful application of two types of recombinant spores, one carrying an antigen and the other an adjuvant, in a single oral immunization.

  12. Transport, motility, biofilm forming potential and survival of Bacillus subtilis exposed to cold temperature and freeze-thaw.

    PubMed

    Asadishad, Bahareh; Olsson, Adam L J; Dusane, Devendra H; Ghoshal, Subhasis; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    In cold climate regions, microorganisms in upper layers of soil are subject to low temperatures and repeated freeze-thaw (FT) conditions during the winter. We studied the effects of cold temperature and FT cycles on the viability and survival strategies (namely motility and biofilm formation) of the common soil bacterium and model pathogen Bacillus subtilis. We also examined the effect of FT on the transport behavior of B. subtilis at two solution ionic strengths (IS: 10 and 100 mM) in quartz sand packed columns. Finally, to study the mechanical properties of the bacteria-surface bond, a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to monitor changes in bond stiffness when B. subtilis attached to a quartz substrate (model sand surface) under different environmental conditions. We observed that increasing the number of FT cycles decreased bacterial viability and that B. subtilis survived for longer time periods in higher IS solution. FT treatment decreased bacterial swimming motility and the transcription of flagellin encoding genes. Although FT exposure had no significant effect on the bacterial growth rate, it substantially decreased B. subtilis biofilm formation and correspondingly decreased the transcription of matrix production genes in higher IS solution. As demonstrated with QCM-D, the bond stiffness between B. subtilis and the quartz surface decreased after FT. Moreover, column transport studies showed higher bacterial retention onto sand grains after exposure to FT. This investigation demonstrates how temperature variations around the freezing point in upper layers of soil can influence key bacterial properties and behavior, including survival and subsequent transport.

  13. Effect of Bacillus subtilis Natto on Meat Quality and Skatole Content in TOPIGS Pigs.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Q K; Zhou, K F; Hu, H M; Zhao, H B; Zhang, Y; Ying, W

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) natto on meat quality and skatole in TOPIGS pigs. Sixty TOPIGS pigs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (including 5 pens per group, with 4 pigs in each pen) and fed with basic diet (control group), basic diet plus 0.1% B. subtilis natto (B group), and basic diet plus 0.1% B. subtilis natto plus 0.1% B. coagulans (BB group), respectively. All pigs were sacrificed at 100 kg. Growth performance, meat quality, serum parameters and oxidation status in the three groups were assessed and compared. Most parameters regarding growth performance and meat quality were not significantly different among the three groups. However, compared with the control group, meat pH24, fat and feces skatole and the content of Escherichia coli (E. Coli), Clostridium, NH3-N were significantly reduced in the B and BB groups, while serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, the levels of liver P450, CYP2A6, and CYP2E1, total antioxidant capability (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase and Lactobacilli in feces were significantly increased in the B and BB groups. Further, the combined supplementation of B. subtilis natto and B. coagulans showed more significant effects on the parameters above compared with B. subtilis, and Clostridium, and NH3-N. Our results indicate that the supplementation of pig feed with B. subtilis natto significantly improves meat quality and flavor, while its combination with B. coagulans enhanced these effects. PMID:26954164

  14. Effect of Feeding Bacillus subtilis natto on Hindgut Fermentation and Microbiota of Holstein Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Song, D. J.; Kang, H. Y.; Wang, J. Q.; Peng, H.; Bu, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Bacillus subtilis natto on hindgut fermentation and microbiota of early lactation Holstein dairy cows was investigated in this study. Thirty-six Holstein dairy cows in early lactation were randomly allocated to three groups: no B. subtilis natto as the control group, B. subtilis natto with 0.5×1011 cfu as DMF1 group and B. subtilis natto with 1.0×1011 cfu as DMF2 group. After 14 days of adaptation period, the formal experiment was started and lasted for 63 days. Fecal samples were collected directly from the rectum of each animal on the morning at the end of eighth week and placed into sterile plastic bags. The pH, NH3-N and VFA concentration were determined and fecal bacteria DNA was extracted and analyzed by DGGE. The results showed that the addition of B. subtilus natto at either treatment level resulted in a decrease in fecal NH3-N concentration but had no effect on fecal pH and VFA. The DGGE profile revealed that B. subtilis natto affected the population of fecal bacteria. The diversity index of Shannon-Wiener in DFM1 decreased significantly compared to the control. Fecal Alistipes sp., Clostridium sp., Roseospira sp., beta proteobacterium were decreased and Bifidobacterium was increased after supplementing with B. subtilis natto. This study demonstrated that B. subtilis natto had a tendency to change fecal microbiota balance. PMID:25049979

  15. Effect of Bacillus subtilis Natto on Meat Quality and Skatole Content in TOPIGS Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Q. K.; Zhou, K. F.; Hu, H. M.; Zhao, H. B.; Zhang, Y.; Ying, W.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) natto on meat quality and skatole in TOPIGS pigs. Sixty TOPIGS pigs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (including 5 pens per group, with 4 pigs in each pen) and fed with basic diet (control group), basic diet plus 0.1% B. subtilis natto (B group), and basic diet plus 0.1% B. subtilis natto plus 0.1% B. coagulans (BB group), respectively. All pigs were sacrificed at 100 kg. Growth performance, meat quality, serum parameters and oxidation status in the three groups were assessed and compared. Most parameters regarding growth performance and meat quality were not significantly different among the three groups. However, compared with the control group, meat pH24, fat and feces skatole and the content of Escherichia coli (E. Coli), Clostridium, NH3-N were significantly reduced in the B and BB groups, while serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, the levels of liver P450, CYP2A6, and CYP2E1, total antioxidant capability (T-AOC) and glutathione peroxidase and Lactobacilli in feces were significantly increased in the B and BB groups. Further, the combined supplementation of B. subtilis natto and B. coagulans showed more significant effects on the parameters above compared with B. subtilis, and Clostridium, and NH3-N. Our results indicate that the supplementation of pig feed with B. subtilis natto significantly improves meat quality and flavor, while its combination with B. coagulans enhanced these effects. PMID:26954164

  16. Production of Enzymes from Agroindustrial Wastes by Biosurfactant-Producing Strains of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Barros, Francisco Fábio Cavalcante; Simiqueli, Ana Paula Resende; de Andrade, Cristiano José; Pastore, Gláucia Maria

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Bacillus are the source of several enzymes of current industrial interest. Hydrolases, such as amylases, proteases, and lipases, are the main enzymes consumed worldwide and have applications in a wide range of products and industrial processes. Fermentation processes by Bacillus subtilis using cassava wastewater as a substrate are reported in the technical literature; however, the same combination of microorganisms and this culture medium is limited or nonexistent. In this paper, the amylase, protease, and lipase production of ten Bacillus subtilis strains previously identified as biosurfactant producers in cassava wastewater was evaluated. The LB1a and LB5a strains were selected for analysis using a synthetic medium and cassava wastewater and were identified as good enzyme producers, especially of amylases and proteases. In addition, the enzymatic activity results indicate that cassava wastewater was better than the synthetic medium for the induction of these enzymes. PMID:23533780

  17. Production of Enzymes from Agroindustrial Wastes by Biosurfactant-Producing Strains of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Barros, Francisco Fábio Cavalcante; Simiqueli, Ana Paula Resende; de Andrade, Cristiano José; Pastore, Gláucia Maria

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Bacillus are the source of several enzymes of current industrial interest. Hydrolases, such as amylases, proteases, and lipases, are the main enzymes consumed worldwide and have applications in a wide range of products and industrial processes. Fermentation processes by Bacillus subtilis using cassava wastewater as a substrate are reported in the technical literature; however, the same combination of microorganisms and this culture medium is limited or nonexistent. In this paper, the amylase, protease, and lipase production of ten Bacillus subtilis strains previously identified as biosurfactant producers in cassava wastewater was evaluated. The LB1a and LB5a strains were selected for analysis using a synthetic medium and cassava wastewater and were identified as good enzyme producers, especially of amylases and proteases. In addition, the enzymatic activity results indicate that cassava wastewater was better than the synthetic medium for the induction of these enzymes.

  18. Molecular cloning of Bacillus sphaericus penicillin V amidase gene and its expression in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, A; Hagström, T; Nilsson, B; Uhlén, M; Gatenbeck, S

    1985-01-01

    The Bacillus sphaericus gene coding for penicillin V amidase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of penicillin V to yield 6-aminopenicillanic acid and phenoxyacetic acid, has been isolated by molecular cloning in Escherichia coli. The gene is contained within a 2.2-kilobase HindIII-PstI fragment and is expressed when transferred into E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The expression in B. subtilis carrying the recombinant plasmid is approximately two times higher than in the original B. sphaericus strain. A comparison of the purified enzyme from B. sphaericus and the expressed gene product in E. coli minicells suggests that the native enzyme consists of four identical subunits, each with a molecular weight of 35,000. Images PMID:3923928

  19. Effects of Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water on Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus Spores in Suspension and on Carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunling; Li, Baoming; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; Hung, Yen-Con

    2016-01-01

    Spores of some Bacillus species are responsible for food spoilage and foodborne disease. These spores are highly resistant to various interventions and cooking processes. In this study, the sporicidal efficacy of acidic electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water (AEW) and slightly acidic EO water (SAEW) with available chlorine concentration (ACC) of 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mg/L and treatment time for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 min were tested on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores in suspension and on carrier with or without organics. The reduction of spore significantly increased with increasing ACC and treatment time (P < 0.05). Nondetectable level of B. cereus spore in suspension occurred within 2 min after exposure to both EO waters containing 120 mg/L ACC, while only SAEW at 120 mg/L and 2 min treatment achieved >6 log reductions of B. subtilis spore. Both types of EO water with ACC of 60 mg/L and 6 min treatment achieved a reduction of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores to nondetectable level. EO water with ACC of 80 mg/L and treatment time of 3 min on carrier test without organics addition resulted in reductions of B. subtilis spore to nondetectable level. But, addition of 0.3% organics on carrier decreased the inactivation effect of EO water. This study indicated that EO water was highly effective in inactivation of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores in suspension or on carrier, and therefore, rendered it as a promising disinfectant to be applied in food industry. PMID:26642381

  20. Effects of Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water on Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus Spores in Suspension and on Carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunling; Li, Baoming; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; Hung, Yen-Con

    2016-01-01

    Spores of some Bacillus species are responsible for food spoilage and foodborne disease. These spores are highly resistant to various interventions and cooking processes. In this study, the sporicidal efficacy of acidic electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water (AEW) and slightly acidic EO water (SAEW) with available chlorine concentration (ACC) of 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mg/L and treatment time for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 min were tested on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores in suspension and on carrier with or without organics. The reduction of spore significantly increased with increasing ACC and treatment time (P < 0.05). Nondetectable level of B. cereus spore in suspension occurred within 2 min after exposure to both EO waters containing 120 mg/L ACC, while only SAEW at 120 mg/L and 2 min treatment achieved >6 log reductions of B. subtilis spore. Both types of EO water with ACC of 60 mg/L and 6 min treatment achieved a reduction of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores to nondetectable level. EO water with ACC of 80 mg/L and treatment time of 3 min on carrier test without organics addition resulted in reductions of B. subtilis spore to nondetectable level. But, addition of 0.3% organics on carrier decreased the inactivation effect of EO water. This study indicated that EO water was highly effective in inactivation of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores in suspension or on carrier, and therefore, rendered it as a promising disinfectant to be applied in food industry.

  1. Production and antimicrobial activity of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde from Bacillus subtilis strain CU12.

    PubMed

    Wise, C; Novitsky, L; Tsopmo, A; Avis, T J

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains are known to produce a vast array of antimicrobial compounds. However, some compounds remain to be identified. Disk assays performed in vitro with Bacillus subtilis CU12 showed a significant reduction in mycelial growth of Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sambucinum, and Pythium sulcatum. Crude B. subtilis culture filtrates were subsequently extracted with ethyl acetate and butanol. A bioassay guided purification procedure revealed the presence of one major antifungal compound in the butanol extract. Purification of the compound was performed using a reverse-phase C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and flash column chromatography. NMR data showed that the main antimicrobial compound was a cyclic dimer of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (HPA). This study demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of B. subtilis strain CU12 against phytopathogenic microorganisms is mediated at least in part by the production of HPA. It also suggests that this B. subtilis strain could be effective at controlling pathogens through protection of its ecological niche by antibiosis. PMID:23179100

  2. CotA of Bacillus subtilis Is a Copper-Dependent Laccase

    PubMed Central

    Hullo, Marie-Françoise; Moszer, Ivan; Danchin, Antoine; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The spore coat protein CotA of Bacillus subtilis displays similarities with multicopper oxidases, including manganese oxidases and laccases. B. subtilis is able to oxidize manganese, but neither CotA nor other sporulation proteins are involved. We demonstrate that CotA is a laccase. Syringaldazine, a specific substrate of laccases, reacted with wild-type spores but not with ΔcotA spores. CotA may participate in the biosynthesis of the brown spore pigment, which appears to be a melanin-like product and to protect against UV light. PMID:11514528

  3. Autolysis of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Smith, E. E.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    The role of gravity in the autolysis of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli was studied by growing cells on Earth and in microgravity on Space Station Mir. Autolysis analysis was completed by examining the death phase or exponential decay of cells for approximately 4 months following the stationary phase. Consistent with published findings, the stationary-phase cell population was 170% and 90% higher in flight B. subtilis and E. coli cultures, respectively, than in ground cultures. Although both flight autolysis curves began at higher cell densities than control curves, the rate of autolysis in flight cultures was identical to that of their respective ground control rates.

  4. Comparison of plant growth-promotion with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis in three vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Adesemoye, A.O.; Obini, M.; Ugoji, E.O.

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to compare some plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) properties of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as representatives of their two genera. Solanum lycopersicum L. (tomato), Abelmoschus esculentus (okra), and Amaranthus sp. (African spinach) were inoculated with the bacterial cultures. At 60 days after planting, dry biomass for plants treated with B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa increased 31% for tomato, 36% and 29% for okra, and 83% and 40% for African spinach respectively over the non-bacterized control. Considering all the parameters tested, there were similarities but no significant difference at P < 0.05 between the overall performances of the two organisms. PMID:24031240

  5. Peptide Ligands That Bind Selectively to Spores of Bacillus subtilis and Closely Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Knurr, Jordan; Benedek, Orsolya; Heslop, Jennifer; Vinson, Robert B.; Boydston, Jeremy A.; McAndrew, Joanne; Kearney, John F.; Turnbough, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop detectors for selected species of bacterial spores, we screened phage display peptide libraries for 7- and 12-mer peptides that bind tightly to spores of Bacillus subtilis. All of the peptides isolated contained the sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu at the amino terminus and exhibited clear preferences for other amino acids, especially Pro, at positions 5 to 7. We demonstrated that the sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro (but not Asn-His-Phe-Leu) was sufficient for tight spore binding. We observed equal 7-mer peptide binding to spores of B. subtilis and its most closely related species, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, and slightly weaker binding to spores of the closely related species Bacillus globigii. These three species comprise one branch on the Bacillus phylogenetic tree. We did not detect peptide binding to spores of several Bacillus species located on adjacent and nearby branches of the phylogenetic tree nor to vegetative cells of B. subtilis. The sequence Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro was used to identify B. subtilis proteins that may employ this peptide for docking to the outer surface of the forespore during spore coat assembly and/or maturation. One such protein, SpsC, appears to be involved in the synthesis of polysaccharide on the spore coat. SpsC contains the Asn-His-Phe-Leu-Pro sequence at positions 6 to 10, and the first five residues of SpsC apparently must be removed to allow spore binding. Finally, we discuss the use of peptide ligands for bacterial detection and the use of short peptide sequences for targeting proteins during spore formation. PMID:14602648

  6. Immunomodulatory effects of Bacillus subtilis (natto) B4 spores on murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Qin; Mao, Yulong; Cui, Zhiwen; Li, Yali; Huang, Yi; Rajput, Imran Rashid; Yu, Dongyou; Li, Weifen

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) (natto) B4 spores on murine macrophage, RAW 264.7 cells were cultured alone or with B subtilis (natto) B4 spores at 37°C for 12 hrs, then both cells and culture supernatants were collected for analyses. Exposure of RAW 264.7 cells to B. subtilis (natto) B4 spores had no significant effects on macrophage viability and amounts of extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, it remarkably increased the activities of acid phosphatase (ACP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cells and the amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, interleukin [IL]-1 beta, IL-6, IL-12, IL-10 and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) in culture supernatants. These results demonstrate that B. subtilis (natto) B4 spores are harmless to murine macrophages and can stimulate their activation through up-regulation of ACP and LDH activities and enhance their immune function by increasing iNOS activity and stimulating NO and cytokine production. The above findings suggest that B. subtilis (natto) B4 spores have immunomodulatory effects on macrophages.

  7. Phagocytosis, germination and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores presenting heterologous antigens in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ceragioli, Mara; Cangiano, Giuseppina; Esin, Semih; Ghelardi, Emilia; Ricca, Ezio; Senesi, Sonia

    2009-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive spore-bearing bacterium long used as a probiotic product and more recently regarded as an attractive vehicle for delivering heterologous antigens to be used for mucosal vaccination. This report describes the in vitro interaction between human macrophages and B. subtilis spores displaying the tetanus toxin fragment C or the B subunit of the heat-labile toxin of Escherichia coli on their surface in comparison to spores of the parental strain. Recombinant and parental B. subtilis spores were similarly internalized by human macrophages, at a frequency lower than 2.5%. Inside macrophages, nearly all spores germinated and were killed within 6 h. Using germination-defective spores and inhibiting spore germination inside macrophages, evidence was produced that only germinated spores were killed by human macrophages and that intracellular spore germination was mediated by an alanine-dependent pathway. The germinated spores were killed by macrophages before any round of cell duplication, as estimated by fluorescence microscopy analysis of macrophages infected with spores carrying the gfp gene fused to abrB, a B. subtilis gene shown here to be expressed at the transition between outgrowth and vegetative growth. Monitoring of macrophage infection never revealed cytotoxic effects being exerted by B. subtilis spores. These in vitro data support the hypothesis that B. subtilis spores may potentially be used as a suitable and safe vehicle for administering heterologous antigens to humans.

  8. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto and Different Components in Culture on Rumen Fermentation and Rumen Functional Bacteria In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Li, Jinan; Bu, Dengpan; Nan, Xuemei; Du, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto, their fermented products and media on rumen fermentation and rumen functional bacteria in vitro. Rumen fluid from three multiparous lactating Holstein cows was combined and transferred into serum bottles after diluted. Fifteen serum bottles were divided into five treatments, which were designed as following: CTR (the fermentation of 0.5 g TMR and ruminal fluids from dairy cows), LBS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu live Bacillus subtilis natto), ABS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto), BSC (CTR plus 1 ml Bacillus subtilis natto fermentation products without bacteria), and BSM (CTR plus 1 ml liquid fermentation medium). When separated from the culture, live Bacillus subtilis natto individually increased the concentrations of ammonia-N (P < 0.01), MCP production (P < 0.01), and tended to elevate total VFA (P = 0.07), but decreased the ratio of acetate and propionate (P < 0.01). Autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto has the similar function with the live bacteria except for the ratio of acetate and propionate. Except B. fibrisolvens, live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto did not influence or decreased the 16S rRNA gene quantification of the detected bacteria. BSC and BSM altered the relative expression of certain functional bacteria in the rumen. These results indicated that it was Bacillus subtilis natto thalli that played the important role in promoting rumen fermentation when applied as a probiotic in dairy ration. PMID:26821238

  9. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto and Different Components in Culture on Rumen Fermentation and Rumen Functional Bacteria In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Li, Jinan; Bu, Dengpan; Nan, Xuemei; Du, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto, their fermented products and media on rumen fermentation and rumen functional bacteria in vitro. Rumen fluid from three multiparous lactating Holstein cows was combined and transferred into serum bottles after diluted. Fifteen serum bottles were divided into five treatments, which were designed as following: CTR (the fermentation of 0.5 g TMR and ruminal fluids from dairy cows), LBS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu live Bacillus subtilis natto), ABS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto), BSC (CTR plus 1 ml Bacillus subtilis natto fermentation products without bacteria), and BSM (CTR plus 1 ml liquid fermentation medium). When separated from the culture, live Bacillus subtilis natto individually increased the concentrations of ammonia-N (P < 0.01), MCP production (P < 0.01), and tended to elevate total VFA (P = 0.07), but decreased the ratio of acetate and propionate (P < 0.01). Autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto has the similar function with the live bacteria except for the ratio of acetate and propionate. Except B. fibrisolvens, live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto did not influence or decreased the 16S rRNA gene quantification of the detected bacteria. BSC and BSM altered the relative expression of certain functional bacteria in the rumen. These results indicated that it was Bacillus subtilis natto thalli that played the important role in promoting rumen fermentation when applied as a probiotic in dairy ration.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  11. [Bacillus subtilis a legislative health problem in Poland].

    PubMed

    Kozajda, Anna; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to discuss the problems related to the classification of B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis bacteria to the 2nd risk group under the 2005 decree of the Ministry of Health on hazardous biological agents (Law Gazette No. 81, item 716 with later amendments). The decree is a Polish implementation of the Directive 2000/54/EC generally consistent with its recommendations, but in the case of certain microorganisms a separate decision has been taken and having in mind the health of workers, changes in the list of hazardous agents existing in Poland have been made. The paper presents in detail the legal situation in this field, as well as current knowledge about the biology of these microorganisms, their use in the biotechnology industry and related production of allergenic proteins, and their effect on the human health. Placement ofB. subtilis and B. thuringiensis in the 2nd risk group resulted in the interpretative difficulties encountered by employers who use products containing these bacteria, institutions involved in such products trade and inspectorates supervising working conditions. Based on the literature review it is suggested to initiate actions leading to the development of hygiene norms for certain enzymes/bioinsecticides present in the air, the more that the tests to assess air concentrations of some of them are available. This solution would permit to remove B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis bacteria from the 2nd risk group without the risk for the care of workers' health. PMID:22774467

  12. Immunogenicity of recombinant Bacillus subtilis spores expressing Clonorchis sinensis tegumental protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenwen; Xia, Huimin; Hu, Xuchu; Huang, Yan; Ma, Changling; Chen, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fengyu; Xu, Jin; Lu, Fangli; Wu, Zhongdao; Yu, Xinbing

    2008-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis, which causes clonorchiasis, is of major socioeconomic importance in China. In this study, we report the use of CotC, a major component of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat, as a fusion partner for the expression of C. sinensis TP20.8 (Tegumental Protein 20.8 kDa) on the spore coat. Western blotting was used to identify TP20.8 surface expression on spores. Recombinant spores displaying the TP20.8 antigen were used for oral immunization and were shown to generate mucosal response in rats. TP20.8-specific secretory IgA in feces reached significant levels 2 weeks after oral dosing. This report shows that surface display of recombinant C. sinensis TP20.8 on B. subtilis spores was immunogenic and B. subtilis spores can be used as a mucosal immunization vehicle for parasite prevention and control.

  13. Gut adhesive Bacillus subtilis spores as a platform for mucosal delivery of antigens.

    PubMed

    Tavares Batista, Milene; Souza, Renata D; Paccez, Juliano D; Luiz, Wilson B; Ferreira, Ewerton L; Cavalcante, Rafael C M; Ferreira, Rita C C; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores have been used as safe and heat-resistant antigen delivery vectors. Nonetheless, the oral administration of spores typically induces weak immune responses to the passenger antigens, which may be attributed to the fast transit through the gastrointestinal tract. To overcome this limitation, we have developed B. subtilis spores capable of binding to the gut epithelium by means of expressing bacterial adhesins on the spore surface. The resulting spores bound to in vitro intestinal cells, showed a longer transit through the mouse intestinal tract, and interacted with Peyer's patch cells. The adhesive spores increased the systemic and secreted antibody responses to the Streptococcus mutans P1 protein, used as a model antigen, following oral, intranasal, and sublingual administration. Additionally, P1-specific antibodies efficiently inhibited the adhesion of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans to abiotic surfaces. These results support the use of gut-colonizing B. subtilis spores as a new platform for the mucosal delivery of vaccine antigens.

  14. Production, optimization and characterization of fibrinolytic enzyme by Bacillus subtilis RJAS19.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D J Mukesh; Rakshitha, R; Vidhya, M Annu; Jennifer, P Sharon; Prasad, Sandip; Kumar, M Ravi; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2014-04-01

    The present study aimed at the production, purification and characterization of fibrinolytic nattokinase enzyme from the bacteria isolated from natto food. For the purpose, a fibrinolytic bacterium was isolated and identified as Bacillus subtilis based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The strain was employed for the production and optimization of fibrinolytic enzyme. The strain showed better enzyme production during 72nd h of incubation time with 50 degrees C at the pH 9. The lactose and peptone were found to be increasing the enzyme production rate. The enzyme produced was purified and also characterized with the help of SDS-PAGE analysis. The activity and stability profile of the purified enzyme was tested against different temperature and pH. The observations suggesting that the potential of fibrinolytic enzyme produced by Bacillus subtilis RJAS 19 for its applications in preventive medicines.

  15. Effects of space environment on T-7 bacteriophage and spores of Bacillus subtilis 168

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spizizen, J.; Isherwood, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Two strains of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to components of the ultraviolet spectrum in space. Both strains possess multiple genetic markers, and one of the strains is defective in the ability to repair ultraviolet damage. The T-7 bacteriophage of Escherichia coli was also exposed to selected wavelengths and energy levels of ultraviolet light in space. Preliminary findings do not reveal anomalies in survival rates. Data are not yet available on detailed genetic analyses.

  16. Insulation of the σF Regulatory System in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Carniol, Karen; Kim, Tae-Jong; Price, Chester W.; Losick, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The transcription factors σF and σB are related RNA polymerase sigma factors that govern dissimilar networks of adaptation to stress conditions in Bacillus subtilis. The two factors are controlled by closely related regulatory pathways, involving protein kinases and phosphatases. We report that insulation of the σF pathway from the σB pathway involves the integrated action of both the cognate kinase and the cognate phosphatase. PMID:15205443

  17. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, function and structure of the biofilm matrix. PMID:24988880

  18. On the effect of N-methyl-bis (3-mesyloxypropyl) amine hydroxychloride on Bacillus subtilis cells.

    PubMed

    Shimi, I R; Shoukry, S

    1975-06-01

    N-Methyl-bis (3-mesyloxypropyl)amine hydrochloride is now in use as an antitumer drug. In view of its activity against some bacteria the present work was conducted to study its mode of action of Bacillus subtilis. The compound was found to induce irreversible damage to bacterial DNA whereas its effect on RNA was temporary and depending on maintenance of effective concentrations of the compound. PMID:168172

  19. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Márcia Aiko; Cincotto, Maria Alba; Atencio, Daniel; Gaylarde, Christine C; John, Vanderley M

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS), as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials. PMID:24031661

  20. Decolourization of 4-Chloro-2-Nitrophenol by a Soil Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) decolourizing strain RKJ 700 was isolated from soil collected from a pesticide contaminated site of India and identified as Bacillus subtilis on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 decolourized 4C2NP up to concentration of 1.5 mM in the presence of additional carbon source. The degradation pathway of 4C2NP was studied and 4-chloro-2-aminophenol, 4-chloro-2-acetaminophenol and 5-chloro-2-methylbenzoxazole (5C2MBZ) were identified as metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Resting cell studies showed that Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 depleted 4C2NP completely with stoichiometric formation of 5C2MBZ. This is the first report of (i) the degradation of 4C2NP at high concentration (1.5 mM) and, (ii) the formation of 5C2MBZ by a soil bacterium. PMID:23251673

  1. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Márcia Aiko; Cincotto, Maria Alba; Atencio, Daniel; Gaylarde, Christine C.; John, Vanderley M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS), as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials. PMID:24031661

  2. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Márcia Aiko; Cincotto, Maria Alba; Atencio, Daniel; Gaylarde, Christine C; John, Vanderley M

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS), as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials.

  3. Thrombolytic effects of Douchi Fibrinolytic enzyme from Bacillus subtilis LD-8547 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Today, thrombosis is one of the most widely occurring diseases in modern life. Drugs with thrombolytic functions are the most effective methods in the treatment of thrombosis. Among them, Douchi fibrinolytic enzyme (DFE) is a promising agent. DFE was isolated from Douchi, a typical and popular soybean-fermented food in China, and it can dissolve fibrin directly and efficiently. A strain, Bacillus subtilis LD-8547 produced DFE with high fibrinolytic activity has been isolated in our lab previously. Results In the study, thrombolytic effect of DFE from Bacillus subtilis LD-8547 was studied in vitro and in vivo systematically. The results showed that DFE played a significant role in thrombolysis and anticoagulation in vitro. And the thrombolytic effects correlated with DFE in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, the acute toxicity assay showed that DFE had no obvious acute toxicity to mice. Test of carrageenan-induced thrombosis in mice indicated that the DFE significantly prevented tail thrombosis, and arterial thrombosis model test indicated that Douchi fibrinolytic enzyme DFE had thrombolytic effect on carotid thrombosis of rabbits in vivo. Other results in vivo indicated that DFE could increase bleeding and clotting time obviously. Conclusions The DFE isolated from Bacillus subtilis LD-8547 has obvious thrombolytic effects in vitro and in vivo. This function demonstrates that this enzyme can be a useful tool for preventing and treating clinical thrombus. PMID:22748219

  4. Spore UV and acceleration resistance of endolithic Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis isolates obtained from Sonoran desert basalt: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Benardini, James N; Sawyer, John; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial spores have been used as model systems for studying the theory of interplanetary transport of life by natural processes such as asteroidal or cometary impacts (i.e., lithopanspermia). Because current spallation theory predicts that near-surface rocks are ideal candidates for planetary ejection and surface basalts are widely distributed throughout the rocky planets, we isolated spore-forming bacteria from the interior of near-subsurface basalt rocks collected in the Sonoran desert near Tucson, Arizona. Spores were found to inhabit basalt at very low concentrations (Bacillus pumilus and one Bacillus subtilis isolate were recovered from near-subsurface basalt samples. Populations of purified spores prepared from the isolated strains were subjected to 254-nm UV and ballistics tests in order to assess their resistance to UV radiation and to extreme acceleration shock, two proposed lethal factors for spores during interplanetary transfer. Specific natural isolates of B. pumilus were found to be substantially more resistant to UV and extreme acceleration than were reference laboratory strains of B. subtilis, the benchmark organism, suggesting that spores of environmental B. pumilus isolates may be more likely to survive the rigors of interplanetary transfer.

  5. Recovering organic matters and ions from wastewater by genetically engineered Bacillus subtilis biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Cao, Xia; Zhang, Sainan; Wang, Chaoyuan; Lin, Xinli

    2015-09-15

    Water pollution causes substantial damage to the environment and to human health, and the current methods to treat pollution suffer from high cost and low efficiency, resulting in increased environmental damages. Using genetic modification and functional selection, we developed a novel biosorbent from Genetically Engineered Bacillus subtilis (GEBS) cells. At a ratio of biosorbent to direct blue dye of about 1:1.25 in a water solution, the dye pigments can be completely adsorbed in 40 s, decreasing COD to zero. Contrary to other biosorbents, ions such as Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) have significant advantages in terms of the adsorbing efficiency. The GEBS biomass can therefore capture both organics and ions from wastewater simultaneously and achieve co-precipitation in 2-10 min, which are features critical for practical applications of wastewater treatment. In addition, we used six different eluting solutions to regenerate used biomass, all resulting in renewed, highly efficient color and COD elimination capacities, with the best elution solution being NaHCO3 and Na2CO3. For practical applications, we showed a high COD elimination rate when using the GEBS biomass to treat raw water from textile enterprises, paper mill, and petrochemical industries. Compared with currently available adsorbing agents, the GEBS cells can adsorb organic and ion waste much faster and with much higher efficiency, can be regenerated and recycled efficiently, and may have broad applications in treating organic water pollution.

  6. Assessing Bacillus subtilis biosurfactant effects on the biodegradation of petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Montagnolli, Renato Nallin; Lopes, Paulo Renato Matos; Bidoia, Ederio Dino

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pollutant removal capabilities can be determined and exploited to accomplish bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted environments. Thus, increasing knowledge on environmental behavior of different petroleum products can lead to better bioremediation strategies. Biodegradation can be enhanced by adding biosurfactants to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism consortia. This work aimed to improve petroleum products biodegradation by using a biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis. The produced biosurfactant was added to biodegradation assays containing crude oil, diesel, and kerosene. Biodegradation was monitored by a respirometric technique capable of evaluating CO₂ production in an aerobic simulated wastewater environment. The biosurfactant yielded optimal surface tension reduction (30.9 mN m(-1)) and emulsification results (46.90% with kerosene). Biodegradation successfully occurred and different profiles were observed for each substance. Precise mathematical modeling of biosurfactant effects on petroleum degradation profile was designed, hence allowing long-term kinetics prediction. Assays containing biosurfactant yielded a higher overall CO₂ output. Higher emulsification and an enhanced CO2 production dataset on assays containing biosurfactants was observed, especially in crude oil and kerosene.

  7. An experimentally supported model of the Bacillus subtilis global transcriptional regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario L; Hafemeister, Christoph; Bate, Ashley Rose; Chu, Timothy; Greenfield, Alex; Shuster, Bentley; Barry, Samantha N; Gallitto, Matthew; Liu, Brian; Kacmarczyk, Thadeous; Santoriello, Francis; Chen, Jie; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Sato, Tsutomu; Rudner, David Z; Driks, Adam; Bonneau, Richard; Eichenberger, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Organisms from all domains of life use gene regulation networks to control cell growth, identity, function, and responses to environmental challenges. Although accurate global regulatory models would provide critical evolutionary and functional insights, they remain incomplete, even for the best studied organisms. Efforts to build comprehensive networks are confounded by challenges including network scale, degree of connectivity, complexity of organism-environment interactions, and difficulty of estimating the activity of regulatory factors. Taking advantage of the large number of known regulatory interactions in Bacillus subtilis and two transcriptomics datasets (including one with 38 separate experiments collected specifically for this study), we use a new combination of network component analysis and model selection to simultaneously estimate transcription factor activities and learn a substantially expanded transcriptional regulatory network for this bacterium. In total, we predict 2,258 novel regulatory interactions and recall 74% of the previously known interactions. We obtained experimental support for 391 (out of 635 evaluated) novel regulatory edges (62% accuracy), thus significantly increasing our understanding of various cell processes, such as spore formation. PMID:26577401

  8. A method for extracting RNA from dormant and germinating Bacillus subtilis strain 168 endospores.

    PubMed

    Moeller, R; Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Mollenkopf, H-J; Stackebrandt, E; Nicholson, W L

    2006-09-01

    RNA was extracted from dormant and germinating Bacillus subtilis 168 spores (intact spores and chemically decoated spores) by using rapid rupture followed by acid-phenol extraction. Spore germination progress was monitored by assaying colony forming ability before and after heat shock and by reading the optical density at 600 nm. The purity, yield, and composition of the extracted RNA were determined spectrophotometrically from the ratio of absorption at 260 nm to that at 280 nm; in a 2100 BioAnalyzer, giving the RNA yield/10(8) spores or cells and the distribution pattern of rRNA components. The method reported here for the extraction of RNA from dormant spores, as well as during different phases of germination and outgrowth, has proven to be fast, efficient and simple to handle. RNA of a high purity was obtained from dormant spores and during all phases of germination and growth. There was a significant increase in RNA yield during the transition from dormant spores to germination and subsequent outgrowth. Chemically decoated spores were retarded in germination and outgrowth compared with intact spores, and less RNA was extracted; however, the differences were not significant. This method for RNA isolation of dormant, germinating, and outgrowing bacterial endospores is a valuable prerequisite for gene expression studies, especially in studies on the responses of spores to hostile environmental conditions.

  9. From Cell Differentiation to Cell Collectives: Bacillus subtilis Uses Division of Labor to Migrate

    PubMed Central

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell–cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called “van Gogh bundles”) of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity. PMID:25894589

  10. Auxotrophy-based High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of Bacillus subtilis stringent response inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Liis; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Jimmy, Steffi; Lindberg, Stina; Tenson, Tanel; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a central adaptation mechanism that allows bacteria to adjust their growth and metabolism according to environmental conditions. The functionality of the stringent response is crucial for bacterial virulence, survival during host invasion as well as antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Therefore, specific inhibitors of the stringent response hold great promise as molecular tools for disarming and pacifying bacterial pathogens. By taking advantage of the valine amino acid auxotrophy of the Bacillus subtilis stringent response-deficient strain, we have set up a High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of stringent response inhibitors. By screening 17,500 compounds, we have identified a novel class of antibacterials based on the 4-(6-(phenoxy)alkyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole core. Detailed characterization of the hit compounds as well as two previously identified promising stringent response inhibitors – a ppGpp-mimic nucleotide Relacin and cationic peptide 1018 – showed that neither of the compounds is sufficiently specific, thus motivating future application of our screening assay to larger and more diverse molecular libraries. PMID:27775002

  11. Transcriptional regulation is insufficient to explain substrate-induced flux changes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Uhr, Markus; Le Chat, Ludovic; Kleijn, Roelco J; Jules, Matthieu; Link, Hannes; Aymerich, Stephane; Stelling, Jörg; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    One of the key ways in which microbes are thought to regulate their metabolism is by modulating the availability of enzymes through transcriptional regulation. However, the limited success of efforts to manipulate metabolic fluxes by rewiring the transcriptional network has cast doubt on the idea that transcript abundance controls metabolic fluxes. In this study, we investigate control of metabolic flux in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis by quantifying fluxes, transcripts, and metabolites in eight metabolic states enforced by different environmental conditions. We find that most enzymes whose flux switches between on and off states, such as those involved in substrate uptake, exhibit large corresponding transcriptional changes. However, for the majority of enzymes in central metabolism, enzyme concentrations were insufficient to explain the observed fluxes—only for a number of reactions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were enzyme changes approximately proportional to flux changes. Surprisingly, substrate changes revealed by metabolomics were also insufficient to explain observed fluxes, leaving a large role for allosteric regulation and enzyme modification in the control of metabolic fluxes. PMID:24281055

  12. Recovering organic matters and ions from wastewater by genetically engineered Bacillus subtilis biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Cao, Xia; Zhang, Sainan; Wang, Chaoyuan; Lin, Xinli

    2015-09-15

    Water pollution causes substantial damage to the environment and to human health, and the current methods to treat pollution suffer from high cost and low efficiency, resulting in increased environmental damages. Using genetic modification and functional selection, we developed a novel biosorbent from Genetically Engineered Bacillus subtilis (GEBS) cells. At a ratio of biosorbent to direct blue dye of about 1:1.25 in a water solution, the dye pigments can be completely adsorbed in 40 s, decreasing COD to zero. Contrary to other biosorbents, ions such as Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) have significant advantages in terms of the adsorbing efficiency. The GEBS biomass can therefore capture both organics and ions from wastewater simultaneously and achieve co-precipitation in 2-10 min, which are features critical for practical applications of wastewater treatment. In addition, we used six different eluting solutions to regenerate used biomass, all resulting in renewed, highly efficient color and COD elimination capacities, with the best elution solution being NaHCO3 and Na2CO3. For practical applications, we showed a high COD elimination rate when using the GEBS biomass to treat raw water from textile enterprises, paper mill, and petrochemical industries. Compared with currently available adsorbing agents, the GEBS cells can adsorb organic and ion waste much faster and with much higher efficiency, can be regenerated and recycled efficiently, and may have broad applications in treating organic water pollution. PMID:26209762

  13. Role of the PAS Sensor Domains in the Bacillus subtilis Sporulation Kinase KinA

    PubMed Central

    Winnen, Brit; Anderson, Eric; Cole, James L.; King, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    Histidine kinases are sophisticated molecular sensors that are used by bacteria to detect and respond to a multitude of environmental signals. KinA is the major histidine kinase required for initiation of sporulation upon nutrient deprivation in Bacillus subtilis. KinA has a large N-terminal region (residues 1 to 382) that is uniquely composed of three tandem Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domains that have been proposed to constitute a sensor module. To further enhance our understanding of this “sensor” region, we defined the boundaries that give rise to the minimal autonomously folded PAS domains and analyzed their homo- and heteroassociation properties using analytical ultracentrifugation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and multiangle laser light scattering. We show that PASA self-associates very weakly, while PASC is primarily a monomer. In contrast, PASB forms a stable dimer (Kd [dissociation constant] of <10 nM), and it appears to be the main N-terminal determinant of KinA dimerization. Analysis of KinA mutants deficient for one or more PAS domains revealed a critical role for PASB, but not PASA, in autophosphorylation of KinA. Our findings suggest that dimerization of PASB is important for keeping the catalytic domain of KinA in a functional conformation. We use this information to propose a model for the structure of the N-terminal sensor module of KinA. PMID:23504013

  14. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Colony Biofilms via Mass Spectrometry and Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Yiran; Zhao, Huimin; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2016-06-01

    Colony biofilms of Bacillus subtilis are a widely used model for studying cellular differentiation. Here, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to examine cellular and molecular heterogeneity in B. subtilis colony biofilms. From B. subtilis cells cultivated on a biofilm-promoting medium, we detected two cannibalistic factors not found in previous MALDI MSI studies of the same strain under different culturing conditions. Given the importance of cannibalism in matrix formation of B. subtilis biofilms, we employed a transcriptional reporter to monitor matrix-producing cell subpopulations using fluorescence imaging. These two complementary imaging approaches were used to characterize three B. subtilis strains, the wild type isolate NCIB3610, and two mutants, Δspo0A and ΔabrB, with defective and enhanced biofilm phenotypes, respectively. Upon deletion of key transcriptional factors, correlated changes were observed in biofilm morphology, signaling, cannibalistic factor distribution, and matrix-related gene expression, providing new insights on cannibalism in biofilm development. This work underscores the advantages of using multimodal imaging to compare spatial patterns of selected molecules with the associated protein expression patterns, obtaining information on cellular heterogeneity and function not obtainable when using a single method to characterize biofilm formation. PMID:27136705

  15. Antagonistic Action of Bacillus subtilis Strain SG6 on Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yueju; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Song, Huimin; Tan, Xinxin; Sun, Lichao; Sangare, Lancine; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease that leads to extensive yield and quality loss of wheat and barley. Bacteria isolated from wheat kernels and plant anthers were screened for antagonistic activity against F. graminearum. Based on its in vitro effectiveness, strain SG6 was selected for characterization and identified as Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis SG6 exhibited a high antifungal effect on the mycelium growth, sporulation and DON production of F. graminearum with the inhibition rate of 87.9%, 95.6% and 100%, respectively. In order to gain insight into biological control effect in situ, we applied B. subtilis SG6 at anthesis through the soft dough stage of kernel development in field test. It was revealed that B. subtilis SG6 significantly reduced disease incidence (DI), FHB index and DON (P≤0.05). Further, ultrastructural examination shows that B. subtilis SG6 strain induced stripping of F. graminearum hyphal surface by destroying the cellular structure. When hypha cell wall was damaged, the organelles and cytoplasm inside cell would exude, leading to cell death. The antifungal activity of SG6 could be associated with the coproduction of chitinase, fengycins and surfactins. PMID:24651513

  16. Effects of salinomycin and Bacillus subtilis on growth performance and immune responses in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Jang, Seung I; Lee, Sung-Hyen

    2014-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the effect of salinomycin and Bacillus subtilis on growth performance, serum antibody levels against Clostridium spp. and Eimeria spp., and cytokine mRNA expression levels in broiler chickens raised in the used litter. Broiler chickens fed a diet containing salinomycin showed lower (P < 0.05) body weights compared with the control diet-fed counterparts. Serum nitric oxide levels were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in chickens fed the B. subtilis-enriched diet compared with those on either the salinomycin-fed or control diet-fed chickens. None of the dietary treatments affected (P > 0.05) serum antibody levels against Clostridium perfringens toxins. Both salinomycin and B.subtilis significantly lowered (P < 0.05) the serum levels of Eimeria-specific antibodies compared with the control group. Salinomycin, but not B. subtilis, significantly modulated (P < 0.05) the expression of cytokines encoding interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) compared with the control group. In conclusion, dietary salinomycin and B. subtilis affected serum anticoccidial antibody and intestinal cytokine expression, but failed to improve growth performance in broiler chickens. Further study is warranted to investigate the mode of action of salinomycin on host immune response and growth performance in broiler chickens. PMID:25135491

  17. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Colony Biofilms via Mass Spectrometry and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colony biofilms of Bacillus subtilis are a widely used model for studying cellular differentiation. Here, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to examine cellular and molecular heterogeneity in B. subtilis colony biofilms. From B. subtilis cells cultivated on a biofilm-promoting medium, we detected two cannibalistic factors not found in previous MALDI MSI studies of the same strain under different culturing conditions. Given the importance of cannibalism in matrix formation of B. subtilis biofilms, we employed a transcriptional reporter to monitor matrix-producing cell subpopulations using fluorescence imaging. These two complementary imaging approaches were used to characterize three B. subtilis strains, the wild type isolate NCIB3610, and two mutants, Δspo0A and ΔabrB, with defective and enhanced biofilm phenotypes, respectively. Upon deletion of key transcriptional factors, correlated changes were observed in biofilm morphology, signaling, cannibalistic factor distribution, and matrix-related gene expression, providing new insights on cannibalism in biofilm development. This work underscores the advantages of using multimodal imaging to compare spatial patterns of selected molecules with the associated protein expression patterns, obtaining information on cellular heterogeneity and function not obtainable when using a single method to characterize biofilm formation. PMID:27136705

  18. Bacillus subtilis FZB24® Affects Flower Quantity and Quality of Saffron (Crocus sativus)

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf-Eldin, Mahmoud; Elkholy, Shereen; Fernández, José-Antonio; Junge, Helmut; Cheetham, Ronald; Guardiola, José; Weathers, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Bacillus subtilis FZB24® on saffron (Crocus sativus L.) was studied using saffron corms from Spain and the powdered form of B. subtilis FZB24®. Corms were soaked in water or in B. subtilis FZB24 spore solution for 15min before sowing. Some corms were further soil drenched with the spore solution 6, 10 or 14 weeks after sowing. Growth and saffron stigma chemical composition were measured. Compared to untreated controls, application of B. subtilis FZB24 significantly increased leaf length, flowers per corm, weight of the first flower stigma, total stigma biomass; microbe addition also significantly decreased the time required for corms to sprout and the number of shoot sprouts. Compared to the controls, picrocrocin, crocetin and safranal compounds were significantly increased when the plants were soil drenched with the spore solution 14 weeks after sowing; in contrast crocin was highest in untreated controls. Results of this study suggest that application of B. subtilis FZB24® may provide some benefit to saffron growers by speeding corm growth (earlier shoot emergence) and increasing stigma biomass yield by 12%. While some treatment conditions also increased saffron chemical composition, these were generally not the same treatments that simultaneously improved growth yields and thus, more study is required. PMID:18622904

  19. Antagonistic action of Bacillus subtilis strain SG6 on Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueju; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Song, Huimin; Tan, Xinxin; Sun, Lichao; Sangare, Lancine; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum causes Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease that leads to extensive yield and quality loss of wheat and barley. Bacteria isolated from wheat kernels and plant anthers were screened for antagonistic activity against F. graminearum. Based on its in vitro effectiveness, strain SG6 was selected for characterization and identified as Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis SG6 exhibited a high antifungal effect on the mycelium growth, sporulation and DON production of F. graminearum with the inhibition rate of 87.9%, 95.6% and 100%, respectively. In order to gain insight into biological control effect in situ, we applied B. subtilis SG6 at anthesis through the soft dough stage of kernel development in field test. It was revealed that B. subtilis SG6 significantly reduced disease incidence (DI), FHB index and DON (P ≤ 0.05). Further, ultrastructural examination shows that B. subtilis SG6 strain induced stripping of F. graminearum hyphal surface by destroying the cellular structure. When hypha cell wall was damaged, the organelles and cytoplasm inside cell would exude, leading to cell death. The antifungal activity of SG6 could be associated with the coproduction of chitinase, fengycins and surfactins.

  20. An Exogenous Surfactant-Producing Bacillus subtilis Facilitates Indigenous Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peike; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study used an exogenous lipopeptide-producing Bacillus subtilis to strengthen the indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery (IMEOR) process in a water-flooded reservoir in the laboratory. The microbial processes and driving mechanisms were investigated in terms of the changes in oil properties and the interplay between the exogenous B. subtilis and indigenous microbial populations. The exogenous B. subtilis is a lipopeptide producer, with a short growth cycle and no oil-degrading ability. The B. subtilis facilitates the IMEOR process through improving oil emulsification and accelerating microbial growth with oil as the carbon source. Microbial community studies using quantitative PCR and high-throughput sequencing revealed that the exogenous B. subtilis could live together with reservoir microbial populations, and did not exert an observable inhibitory effect on the indigenous microbial populations during nutrient stimulation. Core-flooding tests showed that the combined exogenous and indigenous microbial flooding increased oil displacement efficiency by 16.71%, compared with 7.59% in the control where only nutrients were added, demonstrating the application potential in enhanced oil recovery in water-flooded reservoirs, in particular, for reservoirs where IMEOR treatment cannot effectively improve oil recovery. PMID:26925051

  1. Decrease in spermidine content during logarithmic phase of cell growth delays spore formation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, I; Takada, H; Terao, K; Kakegawa, T; Igarashi, K; Hirose, S

    1994-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis 168M contained a large amount of spermidine during the logarithmic phase of growth, but the amount decreased drastically during the stationary phase. The extracts, prepared from B. subtilis cells harvested in the logarithmic phase, contained activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) rather than the activity of ornithine decarboxylase. In the presence of alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific and irreversible inhibitor of ADC, the amount of spermidine in B. subtilis during the logarithmic phase decreased to about 25% of the control cells. Under these conditions, spore formation of B. subtilis 168M delayed greatly without significant inhibition of cell growth. The decrease in spermidine content in the logarithmic phase rather than in the stationary phase was involved in the delay of sporulation. Electron microscopy of cells at 24 hrs. of culture confirmed the delay of spore formation by the decrease of spermidine content. Furthermore, the delay of sporulation was negated by the addition of spermidine. These data suggest that a large amount of spermidine existing during the logarithmic phase plays an important role in the sporulation of B. subtilis.

  2. An Exogenous Surfactant-Producing Bacillus subtilis Facilitates Indigenous Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peike; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Tian, Huimei; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study used an exogenous lipopeptide-producing Bacillus subtilis to strengthen the indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery (IMEOR) process in a water-flooded reservoir in the laboratory. The microbial processes and driving mechanisms were investigated in terms of the changes in oil properties and the interplay between the exogenous B. subtilis and indigenous microbial populations. The exogenous B. subtilis is a lipopeptide producer, with a short growth cycle and no oil-degrading ability. The B. subtilis facilitates the IMEOR process through improving oil emulsification and accelerating microbial growth with oil as the carbon source. Microbial community studies using quantitative PCR and high-throughput sequencing revealed that the exogenous B. subtilis could live together with reservoir microbial populations, and did not exert an observable inhibitory effect on the indigenous microbial populations during nutrient stimulation. Core-flooding tests showed that the combined exogenous and indigenous microbial flooding increased oil displacement efficiency by 16.71%, compared with 7.59% in the control where only nutrients were added, demonstrating the application potential in enhanced oil recovery in water-flooded reservoirs, in particular, for reservoirs where IMEOR treatment cannot effectively improve oil recovery. PMID:26925051

  3. Bacillus subtilis spores as vaccine adjuvants: further insights into the mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Renata Damásio; Batista, Milene Tavares; Luiz, Wilson Barros; Cavalcante, Rafael Ciro Marques; Amorim, Jaime Henrique; Bizerra, Raíza Sales Pereira; Martins, Eduardo Gimenes; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores have received growing attention regarding potential biotechnological applications, including the use as probiotics and in vaccine formulations. B. subtilis spores have also been shown to behave as particulate vaccine adjuvants, promoting the increase of antibody responses after co-administration with antigens either admixed or adsorbed on the spore surface. In this study, we further evaluated the immune modulatory properties of B. subtilis spores using a recombinant HIV gag p24 protein as a model antigen. The adjuvant effects of B. subtilis spores were not affected by the genetic background of the mouse lineage and did not induce significant inflammatory or deleterious effects after parenteral administration. Our results demonstrated that co-administration, but not adsorption to the spore surface, enhanced the immunogenicity of that target antigen after subcutaneous administration to BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Spores promoted activation of antigen presenting cells as demonstrated by the upregulation of MHC and CD40 molecules and enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by murine dendritic cells. In addition, in vivo studies indicated a direct role of the innate immunity on the immunomodulatory properties of B. subtilis spores, as demonstrated by the lack of adjuvant effects on MyD88 and TLR2 knockout mouse strains.

  4. Dose-dependent reduction of replication elongation rate by (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Denapoli, Jessica; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D

    2013-04-01

    DNA replication is regulated in response to environmental constraints such as nutrient availability. While much is known about regulation of replication during initiation, little is known about regulation of replication during elongation. In the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, replication elongation is paused upon sudden amino acid starvation by the starvation-inducible nucleotide (p)ppGpp. However, in many bacteria including Escherichia coli, replication elongation is thought to be unregulated by nutritional availability. Here we reveal that the replication elongation rate in E. coli is modestly but significantly reduced upon strong amino acid starvation. This reduction requires (p)ppGpp and is exacerbated in a gppA mutant with increased pppGpp levels. Importantly, high levels of (p)ppGpp, independent of amino acid starvation, are sufficient to inhibit replication elongation even in the absence of transcription. Finally, in both E. coli and B. subtilis, (p)ppGpp inhibits replication elongation in a dose-dependent manner rather than via a switch-like mechanism, although this inhibition is much stronger in B. subtilis. This supports a model where replication elongation rates are regulated by (p)ppGpp to allow rapid and tunable response to multiple abrupt stresses in evolutionarily diverse bacteria.

  5. A time resolved metabolomics study: the influence of different carbon sources during growth and starvation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Hanna; Weidmann, Hendrikje; Mäder, Ulrike; Hecker, Michael; Völker, Uwe; Lalk, Michael

    2014-07-01

    In its natural environment, the soil, the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently encounters nutrient limitation and other stress factors. Efficient adaptation mechanisms are necessary to cope with this wide range of environmental challenges. The ability to utilize diverse carbon sources represents a key adaptation process that allows B. subtilis to thrive in its natural habitat. To gain a comprehensive insight into the metabolism of B. subtilis, global metabolite analyses were performed during growth with glucose alone or glucose with either malate, fumarate or citrate as carbon/energy sources. Furthermore, to achieve a comprehensive coverage of a wide range of chemically different metabolites, complementary GC-MS, LC-MS and (1)H-NMR analyses were applied. This study reveals that the availability of different carbon sources results in different extracellular metabolite profiles whereas a regulated intracellular metabolite equilibrium was observed. In addition, the typical energy-starvation induced activation of the general stress sigma factor σ(B) was only observed upon entry into the stationary phase with glucose or glucose and malate as carbon sources.

  6. Reconstruction of the Regulatory Network for Bacillus subtilis and Reconciliation with Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Faria, José P.; Overbeek, Ross; Taylor, Ronald C.; Conrad, Neal; Vonstein, Veronika; Goelzer, Anne; Fromion, Vincent; Rocha, Miguel; Rocha, Isabel; Henry, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a manually constructed and curated regulatory network model that describes the current state of knowledge of transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis. The model corresponds to an updated and enlarged version of the regulatory model of central metabolism originally proposed in 2008. We extended the original network to the whole genome by integration of information from DBTBS, a compendium of regulatory data that includes promoters, transcription factors (TFs), binding sites, motifs, and regulated operons. Additionally, we consolidated our network with all the information on regulation included in the SporeWeb and Subtiwiki community-curated resources on B. subtilis. Finally, we reconciled our network with data from RegPrecise, which recently released their own less comprehensive reconstruction of the regulatory network for B. subtilis. Our model describes 275 regulators and their target genes, representing 30 different mechanisms of regulation such as TFs, RNA switches, Riboswitches, and small regulatory RNAs. Overall, regulatory information is included in the model for ∼2500 of the ∼4200 genes in B. subtilis 168. In an effort to further expand our knowledge of B. subtilis regulation, we reconciled our model with expression data. For this process, we reconstructed the Atomic Regulons (ARs) for B. subtilis, which are the sets of genes that share the same “ON” and “OFF” gene expression profiles across multiple samples of experimental data. We show how ARs for B. subtilis are able to capture many sets of genes corresponding to regulated operons in our manually curated network. Additionally, we demonstrate how ARs can be used to help expand or validate the knowledge of the regulatory networks by looking at highly correlated genes in the ARs for which regulatory information is lacking. During this process, we were also able to infer novel stimuli for hypothetical genes by exploring the genome expression metadata relating to experimental

  7. Reconstruction of the Regulatory Network for Bacillus subtilis and Reconciliation with Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Faria, José P; Overbeek, Ross; Taylor, Ronald C; Conrad, Neal; Vonstein, Veronika; Goelzer, Anne; Fromion, Vincent; Rocha, Miguel; Rocha, Isabel; Henry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a manually constructed and curated regulatory network model that describes the current state of knowledge of transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis. The model corresponds to an updated and enlarged version of the regulatory model of central metabolism originally proposed in 2008. We extended the original network to the whole genome by integration of information from DBTBS, a compendium of regulatory data that includes promoters, transcription factors (TFs), binding sites, motifs, and regulated operons. Additionally, we consolidated our network with all the information on regulation included in the SporeWeb and Subtiwiki community-curated resources on B. subtilis. Finally, we reconciled our network with data from RegPrecise, which recently released their own less comprehensive reconstruction of the regulatory network for B. subtilis. Our model describes 275 regulators and their target genes, representing 30 different mechanisms of regulation such as TFs, RNA switches, Riboswitches, and small regulatory RNAs. Overall, regulatory information is included in the model for ∼2500 of the ∼4200 genes in B. subtilis 168. In an effort to further expand our knowledge of B. subtilis regulation, we reconciled our model with expression data. For this process, we reconstructed the Atomic Regulons (ARs) for B. subtilis, which are the sets of genes that share the same "ON" and "OFF" gene expression profiles across multiple samples of experimental data. We show how ARs for B. subtilis are able to capture many sets of genes corresponding to regulated operons in our manually curated network. Additionally, we demonstrate how ARs can be used to help expand or validate the knowledge of the regulatory networks by looking at highly correlated genes in the ARs for which regulatory information is lacking. During this process, we were also able to infer novel stimuli for hypothetical genes by exploring the genome expression metadata relating to experimental conditions

  8. Translationally coupled initiation of protein synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sprengel, R; Reiss, B; Schaller, H

    1985-01-01

    The neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) from Transposon Tn5 is active in Gram-negative bacteria but silent in B. subtilis since it lacks an appropriate ribosome binding site for Gram-positive bacteria. Neo translation could be reactivated by coupling its initiation to the translational termination of the highly expressed beta-lactamase gene (penP) from B. licheniformis. This initiation occurred at the authentic neo start codon. Its efficiency was independent of the nucleotide sequence 5 to the neo gene, but strongly affected by the distance between the termination and initiation codon. It was the highest if both codons overlapped in the sequence ATGA. In B. licheniformis, a translationally coupled neo gene was inducible expressed as the penP gene demonstrating the potential of the technique to monitor the activity of expression units for which no direct assays exists. Images PMID:3923434

  9. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of Bacillus subtilis strains isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Sevdalina; Kozhuharova, Lubka

    2010-07-01

    Antagonistic Bacillus strains were isolated from soil and analyzed for the purpose of determining whether they could be used as natural biological agents. Primary in vitro screening for antagonism of the isolates was performed against five phytopathogenic mould fungi. Strains TS 01 and ZR 02 exhibited the most pronounced inhibitory effects. They were identified as Bacillus subtilis on the basis of their morphological, cultural and physiology-biochemical properties as well as their hierarchical cluster analysis conducted by means of computer program SPSS. The antimicrobial activity of the strains from cultural medium and sterile filtrate were determined in vitro against a great number of predominantly phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria. TS 01 and ZR 02 strains exhibited very broad and at the same time degree varying antibiotic spectra of activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Many of them were tested against sensitivity to the antimicrobial action of B. subtilis for the very first time. B. subtilis TS 01 and ZR 02 showed highest antifungal activity (sterile zone in diameter over 37 mm) against Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea, Monilia linhartiana 869, Phytophthora cryptogea 759/1 and Rhizoctonia sp. The most sensitive bacterial species were found to be Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Ro and Xanthomonas campestris with sterile zones 48.0 and 50.0 mm in diameter, respectively. The latter draws a conclusion that the isolated and identified Bacillus subtilis strains are promising natural biocontrol agents and should be further studied and tested for control of numerous plant diseases. PMID:24026925

  10. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins. PMID:25851716

  11. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins.

  12. Production of the polyketide 6-deoxyerythronolide B in the heterologous host Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kumpfmüller, Jana; Methling, Karen; Fang, Lei; Pfeifer, Blaine A; Lalk, Michael; Schweder, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Polyketides, such as erythromycin, are complex natural products with diverse therapeutic applications. They are synthesized by multi-modular megaenzymes, so-called polyketide synthases (PKSs). The macrolide core of erythromycin, 6-deoxyerythronolide B (6dEB), is produced by the deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS) that consists of three proteins each with a size of 330-370 kDa. We cloned and investigated the expression of the corresponding gene cluster from Saccharopolyspora erythraea, which comprises more than 30 kb, in Bacillus subtilis. It is shown that the DEBS genes are functionally expressed in B. subtilis when the native eryAI-III operon was separated into three individual expression cassettes with optimized ribosomal binding sites. A synthesis of 6dEB could be detected by using the acetoin-inducible acoA promoter and a fed-batch simulating EnBase-cultivation strategy. B. subtilis was capable of the secretion of 6dEB into the medium. In order to improve the 6dEB production, several genomic modifications of this production strain were tested. This included the knockout of the native secondary metabolite clusters of B. subtilis for the synthesis of surfactin (26 kb), bacillaene (76 kb), and plipastatin (38 kb). It is revealed that the deletion of the prpBD operon, responsible for propionyl-CoA utilization, resulted in a significant increase of the 6dEB product yield when exogenous propionate is provided. Although the presented B. subtilis 6dEB production strain is not competitive with established Escherichia coli 6dEB production strains, the results of this study indicate that B. subtilis is a suitable heterologous host for the secretory production of a complex polyketide.

  13. Effects of Bacillus subtilis on the reduction of U(VI) by nano-Fe0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Sun, Yubing; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-09-01

    The effects of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis, a typical model bacterium) on the reduction of U(VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nano-Fe0) were investigated using batch techniques. The reaction products were analysed using spectroscopic techniques, and a kinetics model was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of U(VI) reduction by nano-Fe0. The presence of B. subtilis enhanced the U(VI) sorption rate at pH 3.5-9.5 but inhibited the reduction rate of U(VI) to U(IV) at pH > 4.5. According to the FTIR and XRD analysis, the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was inhibited due to the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes between the oxygen-containing functional groups of B. subtilis or extracellular polymeric substances with the Fe(II)/Fe(III) generated by nano-Fe0, which blocked electron transport from the Fe0 core to U(VI). Based on the EXAFS analysis, a fitting of U-Fe shell at ∼3.44 Å revealed inner-sphere bidentate complexes between uranyl and the oxide film of nano-Fe0. For the nano-Fe0 + B. subtilis system, the U-Fe shell (at ∼3.44 Å) and the U-C/P shell (at ∼2.90 Å) further indicated the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The kinetics model supported that U(VI) reduction was triggered by U(VI) sorption on the oxide shell of nano-Fe0. The XPS and XANES analyses showed that reductive precipitation was the main mechanism of U(VI) removal by nano-Fe0, whereas the sorption process dominated the removal of U(VI) in the presence of B. subtilis, which was further demonstrated by TEM images.

  14. Biodegradation of profenofos by Bacillus subtilis isolated from grapevines (Vitis vinifera).

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Varsha P; Sawant, Indu S; Banerjee, Kaushik; Rajguru, Yogita R; Wadkar, Pallavi N; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Naik, Dattatraya G; Sawant, Sanjay D

    2013-07-31

    The biodegradation of profenofos, an organophosphorus insecticide, by four Bacillus subtilis strains, namely, DR-39, CS-126, TL-171, and TS-204, isolated from grapevines or grape rhizosphere was studied in liquid culture, on grape berries, and in vineyard soil. Each of the four B. subtilis strains enhanced the degradation of profenofos in all three matrices. Degradation rate constants were best obtained by first + first-order kinetics module. In nutrient broth spiked with 5 μg/mL profenofos, inoculation with B. subtilis strains DR-39, CS-126, TL-171, and TS-204 reduced the half-life (DT50) of profenofos to 4.03, 3.57, 2.87, and 2.53 days, respectively, from the DT50 = 12.90 days observed in the uninoculated control. In Thompson Seedless grapes sprayed with profenofos at a field dose of 1250 mL ai/ha, the DT50 values were 1.07, 1.00, 2.13, and 2.20 days in grapes inoculated with B. subtilis strains DR-39, CS-126, TL-171, and TS-204, respectively, as compared to 2.20 days in uninoculated grapes. These four B. subtilis strains also enhanced the degradation of profenofos in autoclaved soil (DT50 = 5.93, 7.47, 6.00, and 4.37 days) and in nonautoclaved soil (DT50 = 0.87, 2.00, 2.07, and 2.43 days) amended with 5 μg/g profenofos from the half-lives of 17.37 and 14.37 days in respective uninoculated soils. Growth dynamic studies indicated that all four B. subtilis strains were able to establish and proliferate on berries and soil equally well in the presence or absence of profenofos. Degradation product 4-bromo-2-chlorophenol was identified by GC-MS. Strain DR-39 was most effective in the natural environments of grape and soil. PMID:23806113

  15. Proteome and transcriptome based analysis of Bacillus subtilis cells overproducing an insoluble heterologous protein.

    PubMed

    Jürgen, B; Hanschke, R; Sarvas, M; Hecker, M; Schweder, T

    2001-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis and related Bacillus species are frequently used as hosts for the industrial production of recombinant proteins. In this study the cellular response of B. subtilis to the overproduction of an insoluble heterologous protein was investigated. For this purpose PorA, an outer membrane protein from Neisseria meningitidis, which accumulates after overexpression in the cytoplasm of B. subtilis mainly in the form of inclusion bodies, was used. The molecular response to overexpression of porA has been analysed at the transcriptional level using the DNA macro array technique and at the translational level by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was found that the expression of the heat shock genes of class I (dnaK, groEL and grpE) and class III (clpP and clpC) are increased under overproducing conditions. Furthermore, the protein levels of the two ribosomal proteins RpsB and RplJ are increased in the PorA overproducing cells. The transcriptome analysis indicated that mRNA levels of genes encoding pyrimidine and purine synthesis enzymes but also from ribosomal protein genes have elevated levels under overproducing conditions. Finally, the association of the protease ClpP and its ATPase subunits ClpC and ClpX with the PorA inclusion bodies was demonstrated by means of the immunogold labelling technique.

  16. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Cholesterol Oxidase of Bacillus subtilis Isolated from Tiger Excreta.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Lata; Kanwar, Shamsher S

    2016-01-01

    A mesophilic Bacillus sp. initially isolated from tiger excreta and later identified as a Bacillus subtilis strain was used to produce an extracellular cholesterol oxidase (COX) in cholesterol-enriched broth. This bacterial isolate was studied for the production of COX by manipulation of various physicochemical parameters. The extracellular COX was successfully purified from the cell-free culture broth of B. subtilis by successive salting out with ammonium sulfate, dialysis, and riboflavin-affinity chromatography. The purified COX was characterized for its molecular mass/structure and stability. The enzyme possessed some interesting properties such as high native Mr (105 kDa), multimeric (pentamer of ∼21 kDa protein) nature, organic solvent compatibility, and a half-life of ∼2 h at 37 °C. The bacterial COX exhibited ∼22 % higher activity in potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) in the presence of a nonionic detergent Triton X-100 at 0.05 % (v/v). The K m and V max value of COX of B. subtilis COX were found to be 3.25 mM and 2.17 μmol min ml(-1), respectively. The purified COX showed very little cytotoxicity associated with it. PMID:26453032

  17. Galactose Metabolism Plays a Crucial Role in Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale B.; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Galactose is a common monosaccharide that can be utilized by all living organisms via the activities of three main enzymes that make up the Leloir pathway: GalK, GalT, and GalE. In Bacillus subtilis, the absence of GalE causes sensitivity to exogenous galactose, leading to rapid cell lysis. This effect can be attributed to the accumulation of toxic galactose metabolites, since the galE mutant is blocked in the final step of galactose catabolism. In a screen for suppressor mutants restoring viability to a galE null mutant in the presence of galactose, we identified mutations in sinR, which is the major biofilm repressor gene. These mutations caused an increase in the production of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) component of the biofilm matrix. We propose that UDP-galactose is the toxic galactose metabolite and that it is used in the synthesis of EPS. Thus, EPS production can function as a shunt mechanism for this toxic molecule. Additionally, we demonstrated that galactose metabolism genes play an essential role in B. subtilis biofilm formation and that the expressions of both the gal and eps genes are interrelated. Finally, we propose that B. subtilis and other members of the Bacillus genus may have evolved to utilize naturally occurring polymers of galactose, such as galactan, as carbon sources. PMID:22893383

  18. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Endogenous Respiration of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.; Cherry, John

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), and John Cherry. Influence of glutamic acid on the endogenous respiration of Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 91:546–550. 1966.—Amino acids serve as the major initial endogenous substrate for Bacillus subtilis. The endogenous activity of freshly harvested washed cells is high and falls off rapidly with time of shaking at 30 C to lower but still significant levels. The rate of O2 consumption after the addition of glutamic acid also decreases as the cells age, but more slowly than noted for endogenous respiration. When cells were fed glutamate as soon as possible after harvesting, an apparent stimulation of endogenous respiration was noted. However, endogenous activity was inhibited if the cell suspensions were shaken for at least 1 hr before addition of the glutamate. Similar results were obtained with glycerol or glucose as exogenous substrates. Variation in rates of respiration with age of the cells, inherent instability of B. subtilis, and possible utilization of substances initially excreted by the cells appear to account for the variations noted regarding the influence of an exogenous substrate on endogenous respiration. PMID:4956754

  19. Identification of Mutations Associated with Macrofiber Formation in BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    PubMed Central

    Saxe, Charles L.; Mendelson, Neil H.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for the genes responsible for the production of helical macrofibers in the original collection of macrofiber-producing strains of B. subtilis. Two loci were identified: fibA, located between hisA and tag-1, and fibB, linked to cysB. fibA governs a short-lived division suppression phenomenon associated with the production of rudimentary fibers, whereas fibB appears to be responsible for a persistent division suppression and a more highly organized helical macrofiber. Both mutations are recovered from each of the original macrofiber-producing strains which also carried the div IV-B1 mutation responsible for minicell production. The latter mutation by itself is not sufficient, however, for the production of macrofibers. Other known mutations leading to division suppression that map in the same region are shown not to be allelic to fibA or fibB. Neither fib locus appears to be responsible for helix hand determination. PMID:6430747

  20. Toxicological assessment of nattokinase derived from Bacillus subtilis var. natto.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Bradley J; English, J Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Subtilisin NAT, commonly known as "nattokinase," is a fibrinolytic enzyme produced by the bacterial strain B. subtilis var. natto, which plays a central role in the fermentation of soybeans into the popular Japanese food natto. Recent studies have reported on the potential anticoagulatory and antihypertensive effects of nattokinase administration in humans, with no indication of adverse effects. To evaluate the safety of nattokinase in a more comprehensive manner, several GLP-compliant studies in rodents and human volunteers have been conducted with the enzyme product, NSK-SD (Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd., Japan). Nattokinase was non-mutagenic and non-clastogenic in vitro, and no adverse effects were observed in 28-day and 90-day subchronic toxicity studies conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats at doses up to 167 mg/kg-day and 1000 mg/kg-day, respectively. Mice inoculated with 7.55 × 10(8) CFU of the enzyme-producing bacterial strain showed no signs of toxicity or residual tissue concentrations of viable bacteria. Additionally consumption of 10 mg/kg-day nattokinase for 4 weeks was well tolerated in healthy human volunteers. These findings suggest that the oral consumption of nattokinase is of low toxicological concern. The 90-day oral subchronic NOAEL for nattokinase in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats is 1000 mg/kg-day, the highest dose tested.

  1. [Identification and characterization of the outermost layer of Bacillus subtilis spores].

    PubMed

    Imamura, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms spores when conditions are unsuitable for growth. The spores are encased in a multilayered shell that includes a cortex and a spore coat, and remain viable for long periods in the harsh environment. In the present article, recent progress in our understanding of the outer structure of B. subtilis spores is reviewed in the Japanese language. Although spore coat assembly involves the deposition of at least 70 distinct protein species, the positions of most of such proteins have not been experimentally determined. To this end, the diameters of the protein layers and spores were measured using fluorescence microscopy and then the positions of proteins in the spore coat of B. subtilis spores were estimated. The locations of 16 proteins were determined using this method. One protein was assigned to the cortex, nine to the inner coat, and four to the outer coat. Further, two proteins, CgeA and CotZ, were assigned to a previously unidentified outermost layer. McKenney et al. have also identified the outermost layer using a similar method; the layer was termed the "crust". Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the crust is indeed the most external layer of B. subtilis spores. Mutational analysis indicated that all genes in the cotVWXYZ cluster were involved in spore crust synthesis and that CotY and CotZ played critical roles in crust formation. PMID:22864350

  2. Multigene disruption in undomesticated Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kang; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a is an undomesticated strain used in the industrial production of enzymes. Because it is poorly transformable, genetic manipulation in this strain requires a highly efficient genome editing method. In this study, a Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 system consisting of an all-in-one knockout plasmid containing a target-specific guide RNA, cas9, and a homologous repair template was established for highly efficient gene disruption in B. subtilis ATCC 6051a. With an efficiency of 33% to 53%, this system was used to disrupt the srfC, spoIIAC, nprE, aprE and amyE genes of B. subtilis ATCC 6051a, which hamper its use in industrial fermentation. Compared with B. subtilis ATCC 6051a, the final mutant, BS5 (ΔsrfC, ΔspoIIAC, ΔnprE, ΔaprE, ΔamyE), produces much less foam during fermentation, displays greater resistant to spore formation, and secretes 2.5-fold more β-cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase into the fermentation medium. Thus, the CRISPR/Cas9 system proved to be a powerful tool for targeted genome editing in an industrially relevant, poorly transformable strain. PMID:27305971

  3. An RNA pyrophosphohydrolase triggers 5′-exonucleolytic degradation of mRNA in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jamie; Liu, Quansheng; Pellegrini, Olivier; Celesnik, Helena; Yao, Shiyi; Bechhofer, David H.; Condon, Ciarán; Belasco, Joel G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY In Escherichia coli, RNA degradation often begins with conversion of the 5′-terminal triphosphate to a monophosphate, creating a better substrate for internal cleavage by RNase E. Remarkably, no homologue of this key endonuclease is present in many bacterial species, such as Bacillus subtilis and various pathogens. Here we report that the degradation of primary transcripts in B. subtilis can nevertheless be triggered by an analogous process to generate a short-lived, monophosphorylated intermediate. Like its E. coli counterpart, the B. subtilis RNA pyrophosphohydrolase that catalyzes this event is a Nudix protein that prefers unpaired 5′ ends. However, in B. subtilis this modification exposes transcripts to rapid 5′-exonucleolytic degradation by RNase J, which is absent in E. coli but present in most bacteria lacking RNase E. This pathway, which closely resembles the mechanism by which deadenylated mRNA is degraded in eukaryotic cells, explains the stabilizing influence of 5′-terminal stem-loops in such bacteria. PMID:21925382

  4. High-level extracellular production of alkaline polygalacturonate lyase in Bacillus subtilis with optimized regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjiao; Kang, Zhen; Ling, Zhenmin; Cao, Wenlong; Liu, Long; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-10-01

    The present work aims to construct a robust recombinant Bacillus subtilis to achieve secretory production of alkaline polygalacturonate lyase (PGL). First, 6 signal peptides (amyX, bpr, vpr, yvgO, wapA and nprE) were screened with a semi-rational approach and comparatively investigated their effects on the production of PGL. The signal peptide bpr directed efficient PGL secretory expression and increased PGL titer to 313.7 U mL(-1). By optimizing and applying strong promoter P43 and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, higher titer of 446.3 U mL(-1) PGL was achieved. Finally, the capacity of the recombinant B. subtilis WB43CB was evaluated with a fed-batch strategy in 3 L fermentor. The PGL titer reached 632.6 U mL(-1) with a productivity of 17.6 U mL(-1) h(-1), which was the highest secretory production of PGL by the B. subtilis system. The recombinant B. subtilis strain WB43CB constructed in the present work has great potential in production of alkaline PGL.

  5. Identification and characterization of the vanillin dehydrogenase YfmT in Bacillus subtilis 3NA.

    PubMed

    Graf, Nadja; Wenzel, Marian; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2016-04-01

    With vanillin as one of the most important flavoring agents, many efforts have been made to optimize its biotechnological production from natural abundant substrates. However, its toxicity against the hosts results in rather low yields and product concentrations. Bacillus subtilis as a soil-dwelling bacterium is a possible lignin-derived compound-degrading microorganism. Therefore, its vanillin and ferulic acid metabolism was investigated. With a rather high tolerance for vanillin up to 20 mM, it is a promising candidate to produce natural vanillin. In this study, the well-studied phenolic acid decarboxylases PadC and BsdBCD could be ascribed to function as the only enzymes in B. subtilis 3NA converting ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol and vanillic acid to guaiacol, respectively. As vanillin also becomes converted to guaiacol, a previous conversion to vanillic acid was assumed. Usage of bioinformatic tools revealed YfmT, which could be shown to function as the only vanillin dehydrogenase in B. subtilis 3NA. Thus, YfmT was further characterized regarding its temperature and pH optima as well as its substrate range. Vanillin and ferulic acid metabolic routes in the tested B. subtilis strain were revealed, a direct conversion of ferulic acid to vanillin, however, could not be found.

  6. Identification of a soluble diacylglycerol kinase required for lipoteichoic acid production in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Jerga, Agoston; Lu, Ying-Jie; Schujman, Gustavo E; de Mendoza, Diego; Rock, Charles O

    2007-07-27

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DagKs) are key enzymes in lipid metabolism that function to reintroduce diacylglycerol formed from the hydrolysis of phospholipids into the biosynthetic pathway. Bacillus subtilis is a prototypical Gram-positive bacterium with a lipoteichoic acid structure containing repeating units of sn-glycerol-1-P groups derived from phosphatidylglycerol head groups. The B. subtilis homolog of the prokaryotic DagK gene family (dgkA; Pfam01219) was not a DagK but rather was an undecaprenol kinase. The three members of the soluble DagK protein family (Pfam00781) in B. subtilis were tested by complementation of an E. coli dgkA mutant, and only the essential yerQ gene possessed DagK activity. This gene was dubbed dgkB, and the soluble protein product was purified, and its DagK activity was verified in vitro. Conditional inactivation of dgkB led to the accumulation of diacylglycerol and the cessation of lipoteichoic acid formation in B. subtilis. This study identifies a soluble protein encoded by the dgkB (yerQ) gene as an essential kinase in the diacylglycerol cycle that drives lipoteichoic acid production.

  7. Genetic modification in Bacillus subtilis for production of C30 carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu

    2012-01-01

    C30 carotenoids, which have shorter backbones than C40 carotenoids, are known to be produced in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus that causes opportunistic infection. The first committed enzyme in the C30 carotenoid synthetic pathway is dehydrosqualene synthase CrtM. CrtM converts farnesyl pyrophosphate to dehydrosqualene. Dehydrosqualene desaturase CrtN then converts dehydrosqualene to the yellow C30 carotenoid, 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. This chapter describes a method to synthesize C30 carotenoids in Bacillus subtilis, which is generally recognized as a safe (GRAS) organism. Introduction of S. aureus crtM and crtN genes into B. subtilis results in yellow pigmentation. The B. subtilis transformant accumulates two C30 carotenoids, 4,4'-diapolycopene and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. Furthermore, together with crtMN, introduction of S. aureus crtP and crtQ genes, which encode mixed function oxidase and glycosyltransferase, respectively, donates the ability to produce glycosylated C30 carotenoic acid. Thus, carotenoid biosynthesis genes of S. aureus is applicable to genetically modify B. subtilis in order to construct a safe organism producing C30 carotenoids.

  8. Metabolic pathway analysis and kinetic studies for production of nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a reaction network model of Bacillus subtilis. The model was analyzed using a pathway analysis tool called elementary mode analysis (EMA). The analysis tool was used to study the network capabilities and the possible effects of altered culturing conditions on the production of a fibrinolytic enzyme, nattokinase (NK) by B. subtilis. Based on all existing metabolic pathways, the maximum theoretical yield for NK synthesis in B. subtilis under different substrates and oxygen availability was predicted and the optimal culturing condition for NK production was identified. To confirm model predictions, experiments were conducted by testing these culture conditions for their influence on NK activity. The optimal culturing conditions were then applied to batch fermentation, resulting in high NK activity. The EMA approach was also applied for engineering B. subtilis metabolism towards the most efficient pathway for NK synthesis by identifying target genes for deletion and overexpression that enable the cell to produce NK at the maximum theoretical yield. The consistency between experiments and model predictions proves the feasibility of EMA being used to rationally design culture conditions and genetic manipulations for the efficient production of desired products.

  9. Mechanism of decay of the cry1Aa mRNA in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Cruz, C; Olmedo-Alvarez, G

    1997-01-01

    We undertook the study of the decay process of the cry1Aa mRNA of Bacillus thuringiensis expressed in B. subtilis. The cry1Aa transcript is a 3.7-kb mRNA expressed during sporulation whose transcriptional control has previously been studied in both B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. We found that the cry1Aa mRNA has a half-life of around 9 min and that its decay occurs through endoribonucleolytic cleavages which result in three groups of high-molecular-weight mRNA intermediates ranging in size from 2.7 to 0.5 kb. A comparative study carried out with Escherichia coli showed a similar pattern of degradation intermediates. Primer extension analysis carried out on RNA from B. subtilis revealed that most cleavages occur within two regions located toward the 5' and 3' ends of the mRNA. The most prominent processing site observed for the cry1Aa mRNA isolated from B. subtilis is only two bases away from that occurring on RNA isolated from E. coli. Most cleavage sites occur at seemingly single-stranded RNA segments rich in A and U nucleotides, suggesting that a common and conserved mechanism may process the cry1Aa mRNA. PMID:9335281

  10. Cloning and sequencing of the major intracellular serine protease gene of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Y; Nakamura, A; Uozumi, T; Beppu, T

    1986-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis 2.7-kilobase DNA fragment containing an intracellular protease gene was cloned into Escherichia coli. The transformants produced an intracellular protease of approximately 35,000 Mr whose activity was inhibited by both phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and EDTA. Introduction of the fragment on a multicopy vector, pUB110, into B. subtilis caused a marked increase in the level of the intracellular protease. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned fragment showed the presence of an open reading frame for a possible proenzyme of the major intracellular serine protease (ISP-I) of B. subtilis with an NH2-terminal 17- or 20-amino-acid extension. The total amino acid sequence of the protease deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed considerable homology with that of an extracellular serine protease, subtilisin. The transcriptional initiation site of the ISP-I gene was identified by nuclease S1 mapping. No typical conserved sequence for promoters was found upstream of the open reading frame. An ISP-I-negative mutant of B. subtilis was constructed by integration of artificially deleted gene into the chromosome. The mutant sporulated normally in a nutritionally rich medium but showed decreased sporulation in a synthetic medium. The chloramphenicol resistance determinant of a plasmid integrated at the ISP-I locus was mapped by PBS1 transduction and was found to be closely linked to metC (99.5%). Images PMID:3087947

  11. Microbial interactions affecting the natural transformation of Bacillus subtilis in a model aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2003-08-01

    The involvement of microbial interactions in natural transformation of bacteria was evaluated using an aquatic model system. For this purpose, the naturally transformable Bacillus subtilis was used as the model bacterium which was co-cultivated with the protist Tetrahymena thermophila (a consumer) and/or the photosynthetic alga Euglena gracilis (a producer). Co-cultivation with as few as 10(2) individuals ml(-1) of T. thermophila lowered the number of transformants to less than the detectable level (<1x10(0) ml(-1)), while co-cultivation with E. gracilis did not. Metabolites from co-cultures of T. thermophila and B. subtilis also decreased the number of transformants to less than the detectable level, while metabolites from co-culture of T. thermophila and B. subtilis with E. gracilis did not. Thus, the introduction of transformation inhibitory factor(s) by the grazing of T. thermophila and the attenuation of this inhibitory factor(s) by E. gracilis is indicated. These observations suggest that biological components do affect the natural transformation of B. subtilis. The study described is the first to suggest that ecological interactions are responsible not only for the carbon and energy cycles, but also for the processes governing horizontal transfer of genes, in microbial ecosystems.

  12. The Antimicrobial Properties of Silver Nanoparticles in Bacillus subtilis Are Mediated by Released Ag+ Ions

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Lin, Kuen-Song; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Chiang, Chao-Lung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    The superior antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are well-documented, but the exact mechanisms underlying Ag-NP microbial toxicity remain the subject of intense debate. Here, we show that Ag-NP concentrations as low as 10 ppm exert significant toxicity against Bacillus subtilis, a beneficial bacterium ubiquitous in the soil. Growth arrest and chromosomal DNA degradation were observed, and flow cytometric quantification of propidium iodide (PI) staining also revealed that Ag-NP concentrations of 25 ppm and above increased membrane permeability. RedoxSensor content analysis and Phag-GFP expression analysis further indicated that reductase activity and cytosolic protein expression decreased in B. subtilis cells treated with 10–50 ppm of Ag NPs. We conducted X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses to directly clarify the valence and fine structure of Ag atoms in B. subtilis cells placed in contact with Ag NPs. The results confirmed the Ag species in Ag NP-treated B. subtilis cells as Ag2O, indicating that Ag-NP toxicity is likely mediated by released Ag+ ions from Ag NPs, which penetrate bacterial cells and are subsequently oxidized intracellularly to Ag2O. These findings provide conclusive evidence for the role of Ag+ ions in Ag-NP microbial toxicity, and suggest that the impact of inappropriately disposed Ag NPs to soil and water ecosystems may warrant further investigation. PMID:26669836

  13. [Identification and characterization of the outermost layer of Bacillus subtilis spores].

    PubMed

    Imamura, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms spores when conditions are unsuitable for growth. The spores are encased in a multilayered shell that includes a cortex and a spore coat, and remain viable for long periods in the harsh environment. In the present article, recent progress in our understanding of the outer structure of B. subtilis spores is reviewed in the Japanese language. Although spore coat assembly involves the deposition of at least 70 distinct protein species, the positions of most of such proteins have not been experimentally determined. To this end, the diameters of the protein layers and spores were measured using fluorescence microscopy and then the positions of proteins in the spore coat of B. subtilis spores were estimated. The locations of 16 proteins were determined using this method. One protein was assigned to the cortex, nine to the inner coat, and four to the outer coat. Further, two proteins, CgeA and CotZ, were assigned to a previously unidentified outermost layer. McKenney et al. have also identified the outermost layer using a similar method; the layer was termed the "crust". Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the crust is indeed the most external layer of B. subtilis spores. Mutational analysis indicated that all genes in the cotVWXYZ cluster were involved in spore crust synthesis and that CotY and CotZ played critical roles in crust formation.

  14. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores by combined pulsed light and thermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Luz Artíguez, Mari; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2015-12-01

    The combined effect of pulsed light (PL) and heat processing was evaluated on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores. Those processes were applied separately and the time between both treatments was modified to evaluate whether the effect of the first treatment is maintained for a long time. B. subtilis spores subjected to sublethal pre-treatments were more sensitive to subsequent treatments (PL or thermal treatments) than untreated spores. Heating followed by PL was the most effective combination in reducing B. subtilis counts. Bacterial spores remained sensitized to subsequent treatment for at least 24 h of storage in water, whatever the temperature was (4 or 30°C). Sensitivity of B. subtilis cells to PL or heat processing increased after germination in a nutrient broth, being equally sensitive from 3 to 24 h. Vegetative cells maintained their enhanced sensitivity to subsequent processing after spore germination. The results of this work demonstrate that the combination of heating and PL treatment is a promising preservation method for microbial inactivation.

  15. The Antimicrobial Properties of Silver Nanoparticles in Bacillus subtilis Are Mediated by Released Ag+ Ions.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Lin, Kuen-Song; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Chiang, Chao-Lung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    The superior antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are well-documented, but the exact mechanisms underlying Ag-NP microbial toxicity remain the subject of intense debate. Here, we show that Ag-NP concentrations as low as 10 ppm exert significant toxicity against Bacillus subtilis, a beneficial bacterium ubiquitous in the soil. Growth arrest and chromosomal DNA degradation were observed, and flow cytometric quantification of propidium iodide (PI) staining also revealed that Ag-NP concentrations of 25 ppm and above increased membrane permeability. RedoxSensor content analysis and Phag-GFP expression analysis further indicated that reductase activity and cytosolic protein expression decreased in B. subtilis cells treated with 10-50 ppm of Ag NPs. We conducted X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses to directly clarify the valence and fine structure of Ag atoms in B. subtilis cells placed in contact with Ag NPs. The results confirmed the Ag species in Ag NP-treated B. subtilis cells as Ag2O, indicating that Ag-NP toxicity is likely mediated by released Ag+ ions from Ag NPs, which penetrate bacterial cells and are subsequently oxidized intracellularly to Ag2O. These findings provide conclusive evidence for the role of Ag+ ions in Ag-NP microbial toxicity, and suggest that the impact of inappropriately disposed Ag NPs to soil and water ecosystems may warrant further investigation. PMID:26669836

  16. [Suitability of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus spores as test organism bioindicators for detecting superheating of steam].

    PubMed

    Spicher, G; Peters, J

    1997-02-01

    Biological indicators used to test sterilisation procedures for their efficacy consist of a so-called germ carrier to which the microorganisms used as test organisms adhere. In previous papers we demonstrated that carriers made of filter paper on contact with saturated steam show superheating while carriers made of glass fibre fleece as well as wetted filter paper do not. Using spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus as test organisms we have now investigated whether and to what extent carrier superheating affects the characteristic values (t50%) of these biological indicators. The indicators were exposed to saturated steam at 100 degrees C (B. subtilis) or 120 degrees C (B. stearothermophilus) under three different exposure conditions: 1. dry (i.e. conditioned to 45% relative humidity before introduction into the sterilising chamber), freely accessible; 2. dry with a substratum and a cover of filter card-board; 3. wet (moistened with twice distilled water before introduction into the sterilising chamber), freely accessible. For previously selected exposure periods, the incidence of indicators with surviving test organisms was determined. The reaction pattern of bioindicators with spores of B. stearothermophilus was different from that of bioindicators with spores of B. subtilis. For B. subtilis, the incidence of bioindicators exhibiting surviving test organisms depended on the nature of the carries as well as on the exposure conditions. On filter paper carriers, t50% increased in the order "wet, freely accessible", "dry, freely accessible", "dry, between filter card-board". On dry and wetted glass fibre fleece, resistance was approximately the same; when the indicators were sandwiched between layers of filter card-board, t50% increased. For B. stearothermophilus, t50% was largely dependent on the carrier material alone. The values obtained for filter paper were invariably much lower than those for glass fibre fleece. As the results show, using

  17. Degradation of polyester polyurethane by a newly isolated soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis strain MZA-75.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ziaullah; Krumholz, Lee; Aktas, Deniz Fulya; Hasan, Fariha; Khattak, Mutiullah; Shah, Aamer Ali

    2013-11-01

    A polyurethane (PU) degrading bacterial strain MZA-75 was isolated from soil through enrichment technique. The bacterium was identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the phylogenetic analysis indicated the strain MZA-75 belonged to genus Bacillus having maximum similarity with Bacillus subtilis strain JBE0016. The degradation of PU films by strain MZA-75 in mineral salt medium (MSM) was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). SEM revealed the appearance of widespread cracks on the surface. FTIR spectrum showed decrease in ester functional group. Increase in polydispersity index was observed in GPC, which indicates chain scission as a result of microbial treatment. CO2 evolution and cell growth increased when PU was used as carbon source in MSM in Sturm test. Increase in both cell associated and extracellular esterases was observed in the presence of PU indicated by p-Nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) hydrolysis assay. Analysis of cell free supernatant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that 1,4-butanediol and adipic acid monomers were produced. Bacillus subtilis strain MZA-75 can degrade the soft segment of polyester polyurethane, unfortunately no information about the fate of hard segment could be obtained. Growth of strain MZA-75 in the presence of these metabolites indicated mineralization of ester hydrolysis products into CO2 and H2O. PMID:23536219

  18. Keratinases and sulfide from Bacillus subtilis SLC to recycle feather waste.

    PubMed

    Cedrola, Sabrina Martins Lage; de Melo, Ana Cristina Nogueira; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Lins, Ulysses; Zingali, Russolina Benedeta; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Peixoto, Raquel S; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the culture conditions of chicken feather degradation and keratinolytic enzyme production by the recently isolated Bacillus subtilis SLC and to evaluate the potential of the SLC strain to recycle feather waste discarded by the poultry industry. The SLC strain was isolated from the agroindustrial waste of a poultry farm in Brazil and was confirmed to belong to Bacillus subtilis by rDNA gene analysis. There was high keratinase production when the medium was at pH 8 (280 U ml(-1)). Activity was higher using the inoculum propagated for 72 h on 1% whole feathers supplemented with 0.1% yeast extract. In the enzymatic extract, the keratinases were active in the pH range from 2.0 to 12.0 with a maximum activity at pH 10.0 and temperature 60°C. For gelatinase the best pH was 5.0 and the best temperature was 37°C. All keratinases are serine peptidases. The crude enzymatic extract degraded keratin, gelatin, casein, and hemoglobin. Scanning electron microscopy showed Bacillus cells adhered onto feather surfaces after 98 h of culture and degraded feather filaments were observed. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showed multiple peaks from 522 to 892 m/z indicating feather degradation. The presence of sulfide was detected on extracellular medium probably participating in the breakdown of sulfide bridges of the feather keratin. External addition of sulfide increased feather degradation.

  19. CcpA-dependent regulation of Bacillus subtilis glutamate dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2004-06-01

    The Bacillus subtilis rocG gene, encoding catabolic glutamate dehydrogenase, was found to be subject to direct CcpA-dependent glucose repression. The effect of CcpA required the presence of both the HPr and Crh proteins. The primary CcpA binding site was identified by mutational analysis and DNase I footprinting. In the absence of inducers of the Roc pathway, rocG was still expressed at a low level due to readthrough transcription. CcpA-dependent repression of rocG readthrough transcription proved to contribute to the slow growth rate of B. subtilis cells in glucose-glutamate medium. Increased readthrough expression of rocG was shown to be partially responsible for the growth defect of ccpA strains in glucose-ammonium medium.

  20. Rice Seed Priming with Picomolar Rutin Enhances Rhizospheric Bacillus subtilis CIM Colonization and Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akanksha; Gupta, Rupali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    The effect of rutin, a bioflavonoid on the growth and biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis strain CIM was investigated. In addition to swimming, swarming, and twitching potentials of B. subtilis CIM (BS), one picomolar (1 pM) of rutin was also observed to boost the biofilm forming ability of the bacterium. Bio-priming of rice seeds with BS and rutin not only augmented root and shoot lengths but also the photosynthetic pigments like chlorophyll and carotenoid. Similarly, high accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid contents was observed in the leaves. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed that BS plus rutin enhanced callose deposition in the leaves. It was also established that the least formation of reactive oxygen species in BS plus rutin treated rice plants was due to higher free radicals scavenging activity and total antioxidant potential. The results highlight chemo attractant nature of BS towards rutin, which by enhancing biofilm formation and root colonization indirectly strengthened the plants’ defensive state. PMID:26742102

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides from the Aurein Family Form Ion-Selective Pores in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michaela; Senges, Christoph Helmut Rudi; Zhang, Jin; Suleman, Selina; Nguyen, Michael; Kumar, Prashant; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Stepanek, Jennifer Janina; Raatschen, Nadja; May, Caroline; Krämer, Ute; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Straus, Suzana Katarina; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of action of aurein 2.2 and aurein 2.3, antimicrobial peptides from the frog Litoria aurea, was investigated. Proteomic profiling of the Bacillus subtilis stress response indicates that the cell envelope is the main target for both aureins. Upon treatment, the cytoplasmic membrane depolarizes and cellular ATP levels decrease. Global element analysis shows that intracellular concentrations of certain metal ions (potassium, magnesium, iron, and manganese) strongly decrease. Selective translocation of some ions over others was demonstrated in vitro. The same set of ions also leaks from B. subtilis cells treated with sublethal concentrations of gramicidin S, MP196, and nisin. Aureins do not permeabilize the cell membrane for propidium iodide thus excluding formation of large, unspecific pores. Our data suggest that the aureins acts by forming small pores thereby causing membrane depolarization, and by triggering the release of certain metal ions thus disturbing cellular ion homeostasis. PMID:25821129

  2. Kinetics of p-aminoazobenzene degradation by Bacillus subtilis under denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zissi, U.S.; Kornaros, M.E.; Lyberatos, G.C.

    1999-05-01

    Bacillus subtilis is an organism capable of degrading an azo dye, such as p-aminoazobenzene (pAAB), under both aerobic and anoxic conditions. In both cases, pAAB is co-metabolized with a main carbon source and under anoxic conditions denitrification is observed. Kinetic experiments were carried out with a pure culture of B. subtilis and a mathematical model that accurately describes both biodegradation of pAAB under anoxic conditions and the denitrification process under both carbon- and nitrate- or nitrite-limited conditions is developed. Presence of pAAB in culture medium causes an inhibition of bacterial growth and of nitrite accumulation. Bacterial growth and pAAB degradation rates are found to be slower under anoxic conditions compared to the corresponding rates under aerobic conditions.

  3. Unraveling the predator-prey relationship of Cupriavidus necator and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Seccareccia, Ivana; Kovács, Ákos T; Gallegos-Monterrosa, Ramses; Nett, Markus

    2016-11-01

    Cupriavidus necator is a non-obligate bacterial predator of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we set out to determine the conditions, which are necessary to observe predatory behavior of C. necator. Using Bacillus subtilis as a prey organism, we confirmed that the predatory performance of C. necator is correlated with the available copper level, and that the killing is mediated, at least in part, by secreted extracellular factors. The predatory activity depends on the nutrition status of C. necator, but does not require a quorum of predator cells. This suggests that C. necator is no group predator. Further analyses revealed that sporulation enables B. subtilis to avoid predation by C. necator. In contrast to the interaction with predatory myxobacteria, however, an intact spore coat is not required for resistance. Instead resistance is possibly mediated by quiescence.

  4. Influence of Silica Nanoparticles on Antioxidant Potential of Bacillus subtilis IMV B-7023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorochod, Iryna O.; Roy, Alla O.; Kurdish, Ivan K.

    2016-03-01

    It was found that if introduced into a nutrient medium of 0.05-1 g/L nano-SiO2, the oxidant activity (OA) of the culture medium (CM) of bacilli increased by 43.2-60.1 % and the antioxidant activity (AA) decreased by 4.5-11.8 %. SiO2 nanoparticles had different effects on antiradical activity (ARA) of the CM of Bacillus subtilis IMV B-7023. In particular, nano-SiO2 had no significant effect on the ability of the CM of bacilli to inactivate the 2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) free radical. However, for the content of the nanomaterial of 0.01-1 g/L decreased hydroxyl radical scavenging in the CM of B. subtilis IMV B-7023 on 7.2-17.6 % compared with a control. Low doses of silica nanoparticles stimulated the reducing power of the CM of bacteria and then highly suppressed it.

  5. Adsorption of microbial esterases on Bacillus subtilis-templated cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunjin; Ryu, Bum Han; Shim, Hyun-Woo; Ju, Hansol; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, T Doohun

    2014-04-01

    Due to low diffusion rates and large surface areas, nanomaterials have received great interest as supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. Here, the preparation of a cobalt oxide nanoparticle using Bacillus subtilis as a biological template and use of the nanostructure for microbial esterase immobilization is described. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using electron microscopy (EM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Catalytic properties of enzyme-coated nanostructures were investigated using 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate and p-nitrophenyl (PNP) acetate as model substrates. Enzyme-coated nanostructures were observed to retain ∼85% of the initial activity after 15 successive reaction cycles, and enzyme immobilization processes could be repeated four times without a loss of immobilization potential. The present work demonstrates that B. subtilis-templated cobalt oxide nanoparticles have the potential to be used as biocompatible immobilization materials, and are promising candidates for the preparation of effective nanobiocatalysts.

  6. Unraveling the predator-prey relationship of Cupriavidus necator and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Seccareccia, Ivana; Kovács, Ákos T; Gallegos-Monterrosa, Ramses; Nett, Markus

    2016-11-01

    Cupriavidus necator is a non-obligate bacterial predator of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we set out to determine the conditions, which are necessary to observe predatory behavior of C. necator. Using Bacillus subtilis as a prey organism, we confirmed that the predatory performance of C. necator is correlated with the available copper level, and that the killing is mediated, at least in part, by secreted extracellular factors. The predatory activity depends on the nutrition status of C. necator, but does not require a quorum of predator cells. This suggests that C. necator is no group predator. Further analyses revealed that sporulation enables B. subtilis to avoid predation by C. necator. In contrast to the interaction with predatory myxobacteria, however, an intact spore coat is not required for resistance. Instead resistance is possibly mediated by quiescence. PMID:27664741

  7. Rice Seed Priming with Picomolar Rutin Enhances Rhizospheric Bacillus subtilis CIM Colonization and Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Gupta, Rupali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    The effect of rutin, a bioflavonoid on the growth and biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis strain CIM was investigated. In addition to swimming, swarming, and twitching potentials of B. subtilis CIM (BS), one picomolar (1 pM) of rutin was also observed to boost the biofilm forming ability of the bacterium. Bio-priming of rice seeds with BS and rutin not only augmented root and shoot lengths but also the photosynthetic pigments like chlorophyll and carotenoid. Similarly, high accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid contents was observed in the leaves. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed that BS plus rutin enhanced callose deposition in the leaves. It was also established that the least formation of reactive oxygen species in BS plus rutin treated rice plants was due to higher free radicals scavenging activity and total antioxidant potential. The results highlight chemo attractant nature of BS towards rutin, which by enhancing biofilm formation and root colonization indirectly strengthened the plants' defensive state.

  8. [An Efficient Method for Genetic Certification of Bacillus subtilis strains, Prospective Producers of Biopreparations].

    PubMed

    Terletskiy, V P; Tyshenko, V I; Novikova, I I; Boikova, I V; Tyulebaev, S D; Shakhtamirov, I Ya

    2016-01-01

    Genetic certification of commercial strains of bacteria antagonistic to phytopathogenic microorganisms guarantees their unequivocal identification and confirmation of safety. In Russia, unlike EU countries, genetic certification of Bacillus subtilis strains is not used. Based on the previously proposed double digestion selective label (DDSL) fingerprinting, a method for genetic identification and certification of B. subtilis strains was proposed. The method was tested on several strains differing in their physiological and biochemical properties and in the composition of secondary metabolites responsible for the spectrum of antibiotic activity. High resolving power of this approach was shown. Optimal restriction endonucleases (SgsI and Eco32I) were determined and validated. A detailed protocol for genetic certification of this bacterial species was developed. DDSL is a universal method, which may be adapted for genetic identification and certification of other bacterial species. PMID:27301128

  9. Mixed culture models for predicting intestinal microbial interactions between Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus in the presence of probiotic Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yang, J J; Niu, C C; Guo, X H

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus has been proposed as a probiotic due to its in vivo effectiveness in the gastrointestinal tract through antimicrobial activities. The present study investigates the effects of Lactobacillus alone or in the presence of Bacillus subtilis MA139 on the inhibition of pathogenic Escherichia coli K88. Mixed cultures were used to predict the possible interactions among these bacteria within the intestinal tract of animals. B. subtilis MA139 was first assayed for its inhibition against E. coli K88 both under shaking and static culture conditions. A co-culture assay was employed under static conditions to test the inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus reuteri on E. coli K88, with or without addition of B. subtilis MA139. The results showed that B. subtilis MA139 had marked inhibition against E. coli K88 under shaking conditions and weak inhibition under static conditions. Lactobacillus alone as well as in combination with B. subtilis MA139 spores exerted strong inhibition against E. coli K88 under static conditions. However, the inhibition by Lactobacillus in combination with B. subilis spores was much higher than that by Lactobacillus alone (P<0.01). B. subtilis MA139 significantly decreased the pH and oxidation-reduction potential values of the co-culture broth compared to that of Lactobacillus alone (P<0.05). The viability of Lactobacillus increased when co-cultured with B. subtilis MA139 because of significantly higher Lactobacillus counts and lower pH values in the broth (P<0.05). The role of Bacillus in the mixed culture models suggests that Bacillus may produce beneficial effects by increasing the viability of lactobacilli and subsequently inhibiting the growth of pathogenic E. coli. Therefore, the combination of Bacillus and Lactobacillus species as a probiotic is recommended. PMID:26259891

  10. New dye-decolorizing peroxidases from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida MET94: towards biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana; Mendes, Sónia; Brissos, Vânia; Martins, Lígia O

    2014-03-01

    This work provides spectroscopic, catalytic, and stability fingerprints of two new bacterial dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from Bacillus subtilis (BsDyP) and Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpDyP). DyPs are a family of microbial heme-containing peroxidases with wide substrate specificity, including high redox potential aromatic compounds such as synthetic dyes or phenolic and nonphenolic lignin units. The genes encoding BsDyP and PpDyP, belonging to subfamilies A and B, respectively, were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PpDyP is a 120-kDa homotetramer while BsDyP enzyme consists of a single 48-kDa monomer. The optimal pH of both enzymes is in the acidic range (pH 4-5). BsDyP has a bell-shape profile with optimum between 20 and 30 °C whereas PpDyP shows a peculiar flat and broad (10-30 °C) temperature profile. Anthraquinonic or azo dyes, phenolics, methoxylated aromatics, and also manganese and ferrous ions are substrates used by the enzymes. In general, PpDyP exhibits higher activities and accepts a wider scope of substrates than BsDyP; the spectroscopic data suggest distinct heme microenvironments in the two enzymes that might account for the distinctive catalytic behavior. However, the Bs enzyme with activity lasting for up to 53 h at 40 °C is more stable towards temperature or chemical denaturation than the PpDyP. The results of this work will guide future optimization of the biocatalytis towards their utilization in the fields of environmental or industrial biotechnology. PMID:23820555

  11. New dye-decolorizing peroxidases from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida MET94: towards biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana; Mendes, Sónia; Brissos, Vânia; Martins, Lígia O

    2014-03-01

    This work provides spectroscopic, catalytic, and stability fingerprints of two new bacterial dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from Bacillus subtilis (BsDyP) and Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpDyP). DyPs are a family of microbial heme-containing peroxidases with wide substrate specificity, including high redox potential aromatic compounds such as synthetic dyes or phenolic and nonphenolic lignin units. The genes encoding BsDyP and PpDyP, belonging to subfamilies A and B, respectively, were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PpDyP is a 120-kDa homotetramer while BsDyP enzyme consists of a single 48-kDa monomer. The optimal pH of both enzymes is in the acidic range (pH 4-5). BsDyP has a bell-shape profile with optimum between 20 and 30 °C whereas PpDyP shows a peculiar flat and broad (10-30 °C) temperature profile. Anthraquinonic or azo dyes, phenolics, methoxylated aromatics, and also manganese and ferrous ions are substrates used by the enzymes. In general, PpDyP exhibits higher activities and accepts a wider scope of substrates than BsDyP; the spectroscopic data suggest distinct heme microenvironments in the two enzymes that might account for the distinctive catalytic behavior. However, the Bs enzyme with activity lasting for up to 53 h at 40 °C is more stable towards temperature or chemical denaturation than the PpDyP. The results of this work will guide future optimization of the biocatalytis towards their utilization in the fields of environmental or industrial biotechnology.

  12. Coregulation of terpenoid pathway genes and prediction of isoprene production in Bacillus subtilis using transcriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Becky M.; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Wiley, H. S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Linggi, Bryan E.

    2013-06-19

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding the system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address this limitation, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and then determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and the pattern of gene expression. We found that terpenoid genes appeared to fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations with respect to the amount of isoprene produced. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, the gene responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, as well as ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. This analysis showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model which accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions.

  13. Coregulation of Terpenoid Pathway Genes and Prediction of Isoprene Production in Bacillus subtilis Using Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Hess, Becky M; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C; Wiley, H Steven; Ahring, Birgitte K; Linggi, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes, as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address these limitations, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and gene expression patterns. We found that with respect to the amount of isoprene produced, terpenoid genes fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, which is responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome-wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. These analyses showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model that accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions. PMID:23840410

  14. Coregulation of Terpenoid Pathway Genes and Prediction of Isoprene Production in Bacillus subtilis Using Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Becky M.; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Wiley, H. Steven; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Linggi, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes, as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address these limitations, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and gene expression patterns. We found that with respect to the amount of isoprene produced, terpenoid genes fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, which is responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome-wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. These analyses showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model that accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions. PMID:23840410

  15. Role of the ganSPQAB Operon in Degradation of Galactan by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Watzlawick, Hildegard; Morabbi Heravi, Kambiz; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2016-10-15

    Bacillus subtilis possesses different enzymes for the utilization of plant cell wall polysaccharides. This includes a gene cluster containing galactan degradation genes (ganA and ganB), two transporter component genes (ganQ and ganP), and the sugar-binding lipoprotein-encoding gene ganS (previously known as cycB). These genes form an operon that is regulated by GanR. The degradation of galactan by B. subtilis begins with the activity of extracellular GanB. GanB is an endo-β-1,4-galactanase and is a member of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 53. This enzyme was active on high-molecular-weight arabinose-free galactan and mainly produced galactotetraose as well as galactotriose and galactobiose. These galacto-oligosaccharides may enter the cell via the GanQP transmembrane proteins of the galactan ABC transporter. The specificity of the galactan ABC transporter depends on the sugar-binding lipoprotein, GanS. Purified GanS was shown to bind galactotetraose and galactotriose using thermal shift assay. The energy for this transport is provided by MsmX, an ATP-binding protein. The transported galacto-oligosaccharides are further degraded by GanA. GanA is a β-galactosidase that belongs to GH family 42. The GanA enzyme was able to hydrolyze short-chain β-1,4-galacto-oligosaccharides as well as synthetic β-galactopyranosides into galactose. Thermal shift assay as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that galactobiose is the inducer of the galactan operon regulated by GanR. DNase I footprinting revealed that the GanR protein binds to an operator overlapping the -35 box of the σ(A)-type promoter of Pgan, which is located upstream of ganS IMPORTANCE: Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive soil bacterium that utilizes different types of carbohydrates, such as pectin, as carbon sources. So far, most of the pectin degradation systems and enzymes have been thoroughly studied in B. subtilis Nevertheless, the B. subtilis utilization system of galactan, which is

  16. Characterization of a Stable L-Form of Bacillus subtilis 168

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Richard W.; Young, Frank E.; Chatterjee, Anadi N.

    1973-01-01

    A stable L-form of Bacillus subtilis 168 (sal-1) has been isolated which grows and divides logarithmically in liquid medium with a generation time of 60 min. This mutant does not synthesize cell wall as evidenced by chemical, biochemical, and morphological analyses. Antibiotics which specifically inhibit cell wall biosynthesis do not affect the growth of the L-form. Significant differences exist between the membrane proteins of the bacillary form and the L-form. The relative profile of membrane proteins varies with the salt concentration of the medium in both the L-form and the bacillary form. Images PMID:4631836

  17. Revival of Bacillus subtilis spores from biocide-induced injury in the germination process.

    PubMed

    Williams, N D; Russell, A D

    1993-07-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis NCTC 8236 were treated with glutaraldehyde, Lugol's iodine, polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I), sodium hypochlorite or sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). After exposure survivors were enumerated on nutrient agar containing potential revival agents (subtilisin, lysozyme, calcium dipicolinate, calcium lactate). Of these, only calcium lactate had any significant enhancing effect and then only with iodine-treated spores. Calcium lactate (9 mmol l-1) in nutrient broth enhanced the rate and extent of germination of iodine-treated spores but not of spores previously subjected to glutaraldehyde, hypochlorite or NaDCC. PMID:8396079

  18. Role of sugar uptake and metabolic intermediates on catabolite repression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, J M; Thoms, B

    1977-01-01

    Many phosphorylated intermediates exert catabolite repression on the enzyme acetoin dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis. This was shown with strains that are blocked at different positions in central metabolism when they receive sugars that cannot be metabolized past enzymatic block(s). In the case of sorbitol, transport events were not involved in catabolite repression, for this sugar cannot repress acetoin dehydrogenase in a strain lacking sorbitol dehydrogenase but otherwise able to take up sorbitol. The presence of glucose did not markedly influence the uptake of acetoin. PMID:401492

  19. Growth and sporulation of Bacillus subtilis under microgravity (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennigmann, Horst-Dieter

    1992-01-01

    The experiment was aimed at measuring the growth and sporulation of Bacillus subtilis under microgravity. The hardware for the experiment consists of a culture chamber (15 ml) made from titanium and closed by a membrane permeable for gases but not for water. Two variants of this basic structure were built which fit into the standard Biorack container types 1 and 2 respectively. Growth of the bacteria will be monitored by continuously measuring the optical density with a built-in miniaturized photometer. Other parameters (viability, sporulation, fine structure, size distribution of cells and spores, growth kinetics, etc.) will be measured on the fixed samples and on those where metabolism was temporarily halted, respectively.

  20. Determination of turgor pressure in Bacillus subtilis: a possible role for K+ in turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Whatmore, A M; Reed, R H

    1990-12-01

    The effects of hypersaline treatment (osmotic upshock) on cell water relations were examined in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis using particle size analysis. Application of the Boyle-van't Hoff relationship (cell volume versus reciprocal of external osmolality) permitted direct determination of turgor pressure, which was approximately 0.75 osmol kg-1 (1.9 MPa) in exponentially growing bacteria in a defined medium. The abolition of turgor pressure immediately after upshock and the subsequent recovery of turgor were investigated. Recovery of turgor was K+ dependent. Calculation of turgor by an alternative method involving spectrophotometric analysis of shrinkage gave somewhat lower estimates of turgor pressure.

  1. Sexuality in a natural population of bacteria--Bacillus subtilis challenges the clonal paradigm.

    PubMed

    Istock, C A; Duncan, K E; Ferguson, N; Zhou, X

    1992-08-01

    Reproduction by binary fission necessarily establishes a clonal genotypic structure in bacterial populations unless a high rate of genetic recombination opposes it. Several genetic properties were examined for a wild population of Bacillus subtilis in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona to assess the extent of recombination in a natural population. These properties included allozyme variation revealed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, phage and antibiotic resistance, and restriction fragment length polymorphism with Southern hybridization. Evidence of extensive genetic recombination was found along with evidence of modest clonal structure. Recombination must be frequent relative to binary fission in this population. This mixed population structure provides broader options for bacterial evolution than would a purely clonal structure.

  2. Rhizosphere Inhibition of Cucumber Fusarium Wilt by Different Surfactin- excreting Strains of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ke; Gao, Yu-Han; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Guo, Rong-Jun; Li, Shi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis B006 strain effectively suppresses the cucumber fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (Foc). The population dynamics of Foc, strain B006 and its surfactin over-producing mutant B841 and surfactin-deficient mutant B1020, in the rhizosphere were determined under greenhouse conditions to elucidate the importance of the lipopeptides excreted by these strains in suppressing Foc. Results showed that B. subtilis strain B006 effectively suppressed the disease in natural soil by 42.9%, five weeks after transplanting, whereas B841 and B1020 suppressed the disease by only 22.6% and 7.1%, respectively. Quantitative PCR assays showed that effective colonization of strain B006 in the rhizosphere suppressed Foc propagation by more than 10 times both in nursery substrate and in field-infected soil. Reduction of Foc population at the cucumber stems in a range of 0.96 log10 ng/g to 2.39 log10 ng/g was attained at the third and the fifth weeks of B006 treatment in nursery substrate. In field-infected soil, all three treatments with B. subtilis suppressed Foc infection, indicated by the reduction of Foc population at a range of 2.91 log10 ng/g to 3.36 log10 ng/g at the stem base, one week after transplanting. This study reveals that the suppression of fusarium wilt disease is affected by the effective colonization of the surfactin-producing B. subtilis strain in the rhizosphere. These results improved our understanding of the biocontrol mechanism of the B. subtilis strain B006 in the natural soil and facilitate its application as biocontrol agent in the field. PMID:26060433

  3. Bio-remediation of acephate-Pb(II) compound contaminants by Bacillus subtilis FZUL-33.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenting; Huang, Zhen; Li, Xuezhen; Liu, Minghua; Cheng, Yangjian

    2016-07-01

    Removal of Pb(2+) and biodegradation of organophosphorus have been both widely investigated respectively. However, bio-remediation of both Pb(2+) and organophosphorus still remains largely unexplored. Bacillus subtilis FZUL-33, which was isolated from the sediment of a lake, possesses the capability for both biomineralization of Pb(2+) and biodegradation of acephate. In the present study, both Pb(2+) and acephate were simultaneously removed via biodegradation and biomineralization in aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were conducted to study the influence of pH, interaction time and Pb(2+) concentration on the process of removal of Pb(2+). At the temperature of 25°C, the maximum removal of Pb(2+) by B.subtilis FZUL-33 was 381.31±11.46mg/g under the conditions of pH5.5, initial Pb(2+) concentration of 1300mg/L, and contact time of 10min. Batch experiments were conducted to study the influence of acephate on removal of Pb(2+) and the influence of Pb(2+) on biodegradation of acephate by B.subtilis FZUL-33. In the mixed system of acephate-Pb(2+), the results show that biodegradation of acephate by B.subtilis FZUL-33 released PO4(3+), which promotes mineralization of Pb(2+). The process of biodegradation of acephate was affected slightly when the concentration of Pb(2+) was below 100mg/L. Based on the results, it can be inferred that the B.subtilis FZUL-33 plays a significant role in bio-remediation of organophosphorus-heavy metal compound contamination. PMID:27372122

  4. Medium optimization for the production of recombinant nattokinase by Bacillus subtilis using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po Ting; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2007-01-01

    Nattokinase is a potent fibrinolytic enzyme with the potential for fighting cardiovascular diseases. Most recently, a new Bacillus subtilis/Escherichia coli (B. subtilis/E. coli) shuttle vector has been developed to achieve stable production of recombinant nattokinase in B. subtilis (Chen; et al. 2007, 23, 808-813). With this developed B. subtilis strain, the design of an optimum but cost-effective medium for high-level production of recombinant nattokinase was attempted by using response surface methodology. On the basis of the Plackett-Burman design, three critical medium components were selected. Subsequently, the optimum combination of selected factors was investigated by the Box-Behnken design. As a result, it gave the predicted maximum production of recombinant nattokinase with 71 500 CU/mL for shake-flask cultures when the concentrations of soybean hydrolysate, potassium phosphate, and calcium chloride in medium were at 6.100, 0.415, and 0.015%, respectively. This was further verified by a duplicated experiment. Moreover, the production scheme based on the optimum medium was scaled up in a fermenter. The batch fermentation of 3 L was carried out by controlling the condition at 37 degrees C and dissolved oxygen reaching 20% of air saturation level while the fermentation pH was initially set at 8.5. Without the need for controlling the broth pH, recombinant nattokinase production with a yield of 77 400 CU/mL (corresponding to 560 mg/L) could be obtained in the culture broth within 24 h. In particular, the recombinant B. subtilis strain was found fully stable at the end of fermentation when grown on the optimum medium. Overall, it indicates the success of this experimental design approach in formulating a simple and cost-effective medium, which provides the developed strain with sufficient nutrient supplements for stable and high-level production of recombinant nattokinase in a fermenter.

  5. Strategy to approach stable production of recombinant nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po Ting; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) is widely accepted as an excellent host cell for the secretory production of recombinant proteins. In this study, a shuttle vector was constructed by fusion of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) plasmid pUB110 with Escherichia coli (E. coli) plasmid pUC18 and used for the expression of nattokinase in B. subtilis. The pUB110/pUC-based plasmid was found to exhibit high structural instability with the identification of a DNA deletion between two repeated regions. An initial attempt was made to eliminate the homologous site in the plasmid, whereas the stability of the resulting plasmid was not improved. In an alternative way, the pUC18-derived region in this hybrid vector was replaced by the suicidal R6K plasmid origin of E. coli. As a consequence, the pUB110/R6K-based plasmid displayed full structural stability, leading to a high-level production of recombinant nattokinase in the culture broth. This was mirrored by the detection of a very low level of high molecular weight DNAs generated by the plasmid. Moreover, 2-fold higher nattokinase production was obtained by B. subtilis strain carrying the pUB110/R6K-based plasmid as compared to the cell with the pAMbeta1-derived vector, a plasmid known to have high structural stability. Overall, it indicates the feasibility of the approach by fusing two compatible plasmid origins for stable and efficient production of recombinant nattokinase in B. subtilis.

  6. Fractionation of Natural Organic Matter Upon Adsorption to the Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manecki, M.; Maurice, P. A.; Fein, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    High pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was used to measure changes in molecular weight distribution and average molecular weight upon adsorption of fulvic acid onto Bacillus subtilis at pH 3-7. The FA was an XAD-8 extract from a stream in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA), and had a weight average molecular weight of 1890 Da. Adsorption of aqueous FA onto B.subtilis was relatively fast, with steady state attained within 2 hours. An adsorption isotherm at pH 4.5 revealed a strong affinity of FA for the B.subtilis surface. The maximum adsorption capacity of a 20g bacteria/L suspension was greater than 9 mg C/L of FA at pH 4.5. Adsorption of FA onto B.subtilis was strongly pH dependent, increasing markedly with decreasing pH over the pH range 3-7. Comparison of HPSEC analysis of control (FA not reacted with bacteria) versus reacted samples showed that in all experiments, the weight average molecular weight (Mw) of FA remaining in solution decreased by several hundred Da. The observed decrease in solution Mw upon adsorption indicated that the higher molecular weight FA components adsorbed preferentially to the bacterial surfaces, at all studied pH values (3-7). Additionally, there was a low molecular weight FA fraction that did not adsorb, even at low pH. Our results suggest that hydrophobic interactions may be important for FA sorption to B.subtilis and that low molecular weight, more hydrophilic components may thus be less likely to adsorb than higher molecular weight, more hydrophobic components.

  7. Medium optimization for the production of recombinant nattokinase by Bacillus subtilis using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po Ting; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2007-01-01

    Nattokinase is a potent fibrinolytic enzyme with the potential for fighting cardiovascular diseases. Most recently, a new Bacillus subtilis/Escherichia coli (B. subtilis/E. coli) shuttle vector has been developed to achieve stable production of recombinant nattokinase in B. subtilis (Chen; et al. 2007, 23, 808-813). With this developed B. subtilis strain, the design of an optimum but cost-effective medium for high-level production of recombinant nattokinase was attempted by using response surface methodology. On the basis of the Plackett-Burman design, three critical medium components were selected. Subsequently, the optimum combination of selected factors was investigated by the Box-Behnken design. As a result, it gave the predicted maximum production of recombinant nattokinase with 71 500 CU/mL for shake-flask cultures when the concentrations of soybean hydrolysate, potassium phosphate, and calcium chloride in medium were at 6.100, 0.415, and 0.015%, respectively. This was further verified by a duplicated experiment. Moreover, the production scheme based on the optimum medium was scaled up in a fermenter. The batch fermentation of 3 L was carried out by controlling the condition at 37 degrees C and dissolved oxygen reaching 20% of air saturation level while the fermentation pH was initially set at 8.5. Without the need for controlling the broth pH, recombinant nattokinase production with a yield of 77 400 CU/mL (corresponding to 560 mg/L) could be obtained in the culture broth within 24 h. In particular, the recombinant B. subtilis strain was found fully stable at the end of fermentation when grown on the optimum medium. Overall, it indicates the success of this experimental design approach in formulating a simple and cost-effective medium, which provides the developed strain with sufficient nutrient supplements for stable and high-level production of recombinant nattokinase in a fermenter. PMID:17914859

  8. High-level expression and characterization of the Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. BSP1 YwaD aminopeptidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Li, Zhezhe; Li, Chunhua; Yu, Xianhong; Wang, Fei; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yaping; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Aminopeptidases are widely used for creating protein hydrolysates and peptide sequencing. The ywaD gene from a new Bacillus isolate, named Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. BSP1, was cloned into the yeast expression vector pHBM905A and expressed and secreted by Pichia pastoris strain GS115. The deduced amino acid sequence of the aminopeptidase encoded by the ywaD gene shared up to 98% identity with aminopeptidases from B. subtilis strains 168 and zj016. The yield (3.81 g/l) and specific activity (788 U/mg) of recombinant YwaD in high-density fermentation were extremely high. And 829.83 mg of the purified enzyme (4089.72 U/mg) were harvested. YwaD was glycosylated, and its activity decreased after deglycosylation, which was similar to that of the aminopeptidase from B. subtilis strain zj016. YwaD was most active toward l-arginine-4-nitroanilide. Moreover, it exhibited high resistance to carbamide, which was not true for aminopeptidases from B. subtilis strains 168 and zj016, which could simplify the purification of YwaD. Moreover, the expression and parts of characterization of the aminopeptidase from B. subtilis strain 168 in Pichia pastoris were added as supplementary material. The sequence and other characteristics of YwaD were compared with those of aminopeptidases from B. subtilis strains 168 and zj016, and they will provide a solid foundation for further research on the influence of amino acid mutations on the function of aminopeptidases.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Commercial Textile Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Bacillus subtilis Strain C3 Isolated in India.

    PubMed

    Kunadia, Khushbu; Nathani, Neelam M; Kothari, Vishal; Kotadia, Rohit J; Kothari, Charmy R; Joshi, Anjali; Rank, Jalpa K; Faldu, Priti R; Shekar, M Chandra; Viroja, Mitkumar J; Patel, Priyank A; Jadeja, Divyarajsinh; Reddy, Bhaskar; Pal Singh, Ravindra; Koringa, Prakash G; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Kothari, Ramesh K

    2016-03-10

    Bacillus subtilis C3, a commercial textile dye-decolorizing and -degrading bacterium, was isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CEPT) of the Jetpur textile dyeing and printing industrial sector situated in the district of Rajkot, Gujarat, India. Here, we present the annotated 4.18-Mb draft genome sequence of B. subtilis C3, providing information about the metabolic pathways involved in decolorization and degradation of several commercial textile azo dyes. Thus, we confirm B. subtilis C3 as a potential candidate for bioremediation of textile effluents.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Commercial Textile Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Bacillus subtilis Strain C3 Isolated in India.

    PubMed

    Kunadia, Khushbu; Nathani, Neelam M; Kothari, Vishal; Kotadia, Rohit J; Kothari, Charmy R; Joshi, Anjali; Rank, Jalpa K; Faldu, Priti R; Shekar, M Chandra; Viroja, Mitkumar J; Patel, Priyank A; Jadeja, Divyarajsinh; Reddy, Bhaskar; Pal Singh, Ravindra; Koringa, Prakash G; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Kothari, Ramesh K

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis C3, a commercial textile dye-decolorizing and -degrading bacterium, was isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CEPT) of the Jetpur textile dyeing and printing industrial sector situated in the district of Rajkot, Gujarat, India. Here, we present the annotated 4.18-Mb draft genome sequence of B. subtilis C3, providing information about the metabolic pathways involved in decolorization and degradation of several commercial textile azo dyes. Thus, we confirm B. subtilis C3 as a potential candidate for bioremediation of textile effluents. PMID:26966205

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Commercial Textile Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Bacillus subtilis Strain C3 Isolated in India

    PubMed Central

    Kunadia, Khushbu; Nathani, Neelam M.; Kothari, Vishal; Kotadia, Rohit J.; Kothari, Charmy R.; Joshi, Anjali; Rank, Jalpa K.; Faldu, Priti R.; Shekar, M. Chandra; Viroja, Mitkumar J.; Patel, Priyank A.; Jadeja, Divyarajsinh; Reddy, Bhaskar; Pal Singh, Ravindra; Koringa, Prakash G.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis C3, a commercial textile dye-decolorizing and -degrading bacterium, was isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CEPT) of the Jetpur textile dyeing and printing industrial sector situated in the district of Rajkot, Gujarat, India. Here, we present the annotated 4.18-Mb draft genome sequence of B. subtilis C3, providing information about the metabolic pathways involved in decolorization and degradation of several commercial textile azo dyes. Thus, we confirm B. subtilis C3 as a potential candidate for bioremediation of textile effluents. PMID:26966205

  12. Application of Bacillus subtilis 168 as a multifunctional agent for improvement of the durability of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Jong-Myong; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-11-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar. However, very few strains have been applied to crack remediation and strengthening of cementitious materials. In this study, we report the biodeposition of Bacillus subtilis 168 and its ability to enhance the durability of cement material. B. subtilis 168 was applied to the surface of cement specimens. The results showed a new layer of deposited organic-inorganic composites on the surface of the cement paste. In addition, the water permeability of the cement paste treated with B. subtilis 168 was lower than that of non-treated specimens. Furthermore, artificial cracks in the cement paste were completely remediated by the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168. The compressive strength of cement mortar treated with B. subtilis 168 increased by about 19.5% when compared with samples completed with only B4 medium. Taken together, these findings suggest that the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168 could be used as a sealing and coating agent to improve the strength and water resistance of concrete. This is the first paper to report the application of Bacillus subtilis 168 for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar through calcium carbonate precipitation.

  13. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  14. Evaluation of germination, distribution, and persistence of Bacillus subtilis spores through the gastrointestinal tract of chickens.

    PubMed

    Latorre, J D; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Kallapura, G; Menconi, A; Pumford, N R; Morgan, M J; Layton, S L; Bielke, L R; Hargis, B M; Téllez, G

    2014-07-01

    Spores are popular as direct-fed microbials, though little is known about their mode of action. Hence, the first objective of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro germination and growth rate of Bacillus subtilis spores. Approximately 90% of B. subtilis spores germinate within 60 min in the presence of feed in vitro. The second objective was to determine the distribution of these spores throughout different anatomical segments of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in a chicken model. For in vivo evaluation of persistence and dissemination, spores were administered to day-of-hatch broiler chicks either as a single gavage dose or constantly in the feed. During 2 independent experiments, chicks were housed in isolation chambers and fed sterile corn-soy-based diets. In these experiments one group of chickens was supplemented with 10(6) spores/g of feed, whereas a second group was gavaged with a single dose of 10(6) spores per chick on day of hatch. In both experiments, crop, ileum, and cecae were sampled from 5 chicks at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. Viable B. subtilis spores were determined by plate count method after heat treatment (75°C for 10 min). The number of recovered spores was constant through 120 h in each of the enteric regions from chickens receiving spores supplemented in the feed. However, the number of recovered B. subtilis spores was consistently about 10(5) spores per gram of digesta, which is about a 1-log10 reduction of the feed inclusion rate, suggesting approximately a 90% germination rate in the GIT when fed. On the other hand, recovered B. subtilis spores from chicks that received a single gavage dose decreased with time, with only approximately 10(2) spores per gram of sample by 120 h. This confirms that B. subtilis spores are transiently present in the GIT of chickens, but the persistence of vegetative cells is presently unknown. For persistent benefit, continuous administration of effective B. subtilis direct-fed microbials as vegetative

  15. Dispersal of Bacillus subtilis and its effect on strawberry phyllosphere microbiota under open field and protection conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Feng; Hu, Xiaoping; Xu, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Using biological control agents (BCAs) is an essential component of integrated pest and diseases management. Despite much research on biocontrol of plant diseases, success in field crops has been limited with most successes being achieved in greenhouse cultivation. This lack of success is often attributed to the complex ecological processes involved in biocontrol. We used next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to study environmental fate of Bacillus subtilis, a widely used BCA, focusing on its dispersal aspect in open field and under protection. The dispersal of B. subtilis was very limited, particularly under protection. The reduction in the BCA population size was relatively small within 8 days; indeed, no overall reduction in the relative abundance was observed under the protected condition. These results suggested that limited dispersal is probably the main reason for its variable (and often low) control efficacy under field conditions. Thus to increase biocontrol efficacy, it is necessary to frequently apply this BCA with the application interval depending on the growth rate of target host tissues. Phyllosphere microbiota differed significantly between plants grown in open field and under protection but were not greatly affected by the introduced BCA. PMID:26936109

  16. Direct surfactin-gramicidin S antagonism supports detoxification in mixed producer cultures of Bacillus subtilis and Aneurinibacillus migulanus.

    PubMed

    Rautenbach, Marina; Eyéghé-Bickong, Hans André; Vlok, Nicolas Maré; Stander, Marietjie; de Beer, Abré

    2012-12-01

    Antibiotic production as a defence mechanism is a characteristic of a wide variety of organisms. In natural evolutionary adaptation, cellular events such as sporulation, biofilm formation and resistance to antibiotics enable some micro-organisms to survive environmental and antibiotic stress conditions. The two antimicrobial cyclic peptides in this study, gramicidin S (GS) from Aneurinibacillus migulanus and the lipopeptide surfactin (Srf) from Bacillus subtilis, have been shown to affect both membrane and intercellular components of target organisms. Many functions, other than that of antimicrobial activity, have been assigned to Srf. We present evidence that an additional function may exist for Srf, namely that of a detoxifying agent that protects its producer from the lytic activity of GS. We observed that Srf producers were more resistant to GS and could be co-cultured with the GS producer. Furthermore, exogenous Srf antagonized the activity of GS against both Srf-producing and non-producing bacterial strains. A molecular interaction between the anionic Srf and the cationic GS was observed with circular dichroism and electrospray MS. Our results indicate that the formation of an inactive complex between GS and Srf supports resistance towards GS, with the anionic Srf forming a chemical barrier to protect its producer. This direct detoxification combined with the induction of protective stress responses in B. subtilis by Srf confers resistance toward GS from A. migulanus and allows survival in mixed cultures.

  17. Formulation of stable Bacillus subtilis AH18 against temperature fluctuation with highly heat-resistant endospores and micropore inorganic carriers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soohee; Lim, Hyung Mi; Kim, Sang-Dal

    2007-08-01

    To survive the commercial market and to achieve the desired effect of beneficial organisms, the strains in microbial products must be cost-effectively formulated to remain dormant and hence survive through high and low temperatures of the environment during transportation and storage. Dormancy and stability of Bacillus subtilis AH18 was achieved by producing endospores with enhanced heat resistance and using inorganic carriers. Heat stability assays, at 90 degrees C for 1 h, showed that spores produced under a sublethal temperature of 57 degrees C was 100 times more heat-resistant than the ones produced by food depletion at the growing temperature of 37 degrees C. When these highly heat-resistant endospores were formulated with inorganic carriers of natural and synthetic zeolite or kaolin clay minerals having substantial amount of micropores, the dormancy of the endospores was maintained for 6 months at 15-25 degrees C. Meanwhile, macroporous perlite carriers with average pore diameter larger than 3.7 microm stimulated the germination of the spores and rapid proliferation of the bacteria. These results indicated that a B. subtilis AH18 product that can remain dormant and survive through environmental temperature fluctuation can be formulated by producing heat-stressed endospores and incorporating inorganic carriers with micropores in the formulation step.

  18. Enantioselective transesterification of glycidol catalysed by a novel lipase expressed from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Tai, Jian-Dong; Wang, Ren; Xun, Er-Na; Wei, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhi

    2010-05-01

    A novel plasmid (pBSR2) was constructed by incorporating a strong lipase promoter and a terminator into the original pBD64. The lipase gene from Bacillus subtilis strain IFFI10210 was cloned into the plasmid pBSR2 and transformed into B. subtilis A.S.1.1655 to obtain an overexpression strain. The recombinant lipase [BSL2 (B. subtilis lipase 2)] has been expressed from the novel constructed strain and used in kinetic resolution of glycidol through enantioselective transesterification. The effects of reaction conditions on the activity as well as enantioselectivity were investigated. BSL2 showed a satisfying enantioselectivity (E>30) under the optimum conditions [acyl donor: vinyl butyrate; the mole ratio of vinyl butyrate to glycidol was 3:1; organic medium: 1,2-dichloroethane with water activity (a(w))=0.33; temperature 40 degrees C]. The remaining (R)-glycidol with a high enantiomeric purity [ee (enantiomeric excess) >99%] could be obtained when the conversion was approx. 60%. The results clearly show a good potential for industrial application of BSL2 in the resolution of glycidol through enantioselective transesterification.

  19. Elucidation of the multiple roles of CheD in Bacillus subtilis chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Glekas, George D; Plutz, Matthew J; Walukiewicz, Hanna E; Allen, George M; Rao, Christopher V; Ordal, George W

    2012-11-01

    Chemotaxis by Bacillus subtilis requires the CheD protein for proper function. In a cheD mutant when McpB was the sole chemoreceptor in B. subtilis, chemotaxis to asparagine was quite good. When McpC was the sole chemoreceptor in a cheD mutant, chemotaxis to proline was very poor. The reason for the difference between the chemoreceptors is because CheD deamidates Q609 in McpC and does not deamidate McpB. When mcpC-Q609E is expressed as the sole chemoreceptor in a cheD background, chemotaxis is almost fully restored. Concomitantly, in vitro McpC activates the CheA kinase poorly, whereas McpC-Q609E activates it much more. Moreover, CheD, which activates chemoreceptors, binds better to McpC-Q609E compared with unmodified McpC. Using hydroxyl radical susceptibility in the presence or absence of CheD, the most likely sites of CheD binding were the modification sites where CheD, CheB and CheR carry out their catalytic activities. Thus, CheD appears to have two separate roles in B. subtilis chemotaxis - to bind to chemoreceptors to activate them as part of the CheC/CheD/CheYp adaptation system and to deamidate selected residues to activate the chemoreceptors and enable them to mediate amino acid chemotaxis.

  20. Microbial Activation of Bacillus subtilis-Immobilized Microgel Particles for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Son, Han Am; Choi, Sang Koo; Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Hyun Tae; Sung, Won Mo; Kim, Jin Woong

    2016-09-01

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microorganisms to extract oil remaining in reservoirs. Here, we report fabrication of microgel particles with immobilized Bacillus subtilis for application to microbially enhanced oil recovery. Using B. subtilis isolated from oil-contaminated soils in Myanmar, we evaluated the ability of this microbe to reduce the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface via production of biosurfactant molecules, eventually yielding excellent emulsification across a broad range of the medium pH and ionic strength. To safely deliver B. subtilis into a permeable porous medium, in this study, these bacteria were physically immobilized in a hydrogel mesh of microgel particles. In a core flooding experiment, in which the microgel particles were injected into a column packed with silica beads, we found that these particles significantly increased oil recovery in a concentration-dependent manner. This result shows that a mesh of microgel particles encapsulating biosurfactant-producing microorganisms holds promise for recovery of oil from porous media.

  1. Kinetic study of biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis LAMI005 grown in clarified cashew apple juice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Darlane Wellen Freitas; França, Italo Waldimiro Lima; Félix, Anne Kamilly Nogueira; Martins, João Jeferson Lima; Giro, Maria Estela Aparecida; Melo, Vânia Maria M; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros

    2013-01-01

    In this work a low cost medium for the production of a biosurfactant by Bacillus subtilis LAMI005 and the kinetics of surfactin production considering the effect of initial substrate concentration were investigated. First, cashew apple juice supplementation for optimal production of biosurfactant by B. subtilis LAMI005 was studied. The medium formulated with clarified cashew apple juice and distilled water, supplemented with 1.0 g/L of (NH(4))(2)SO(4), proved to be the best among the nutrients evaluated. The crude biosurfactant had the ability to decrease the surface tension of water to 30 dyne/cm, with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 63.0 mg/L. Emulsification experiments indicated that this biosurfactant effectively emulsified kerosene (IE(24)=67%) and soybean oil (IE(24)=64%). Furthermore, the emulsion stability was always very high. It was shown by biochemical analysis, IR spectra, that there is no qualitative differences in the composition of the crude biosurfactant from a standard sample of surfactin from B. subtilis.

  2. Replication fork arrest and termination of chromosome replication in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wake, R G

    1997-08-15

    Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis provided the first evidence for the presence of sequence-specific replication fork arrest (Ter) sites in the terminus region of the bacterial chromosome. These sites, when complexed with the replication terminator protein (RTP), block movement of a replication fork in a polar manner. The Ter sites are organized into two opposed groups which force the approaching forks to meet and fuse within a restricted terminus region. While the precise advantage provided to the cell through the presence of the so-called replication fork trap is not patently obvious, the same situation appears to have evolved independently in Escherichia coli. The molecular mechanism by which the RTP-Ter complex of B. subtilis (or the analogous but apparently unrelated complex in E. coli) functions is currently unresolved and subject to intense investigation. Replication fork arrest in B. subtilis, requiring RTP, also occurs under conditions of the stringent response at so-called STer sites that lie close to and on both sides of oriC. These sites are yet to be identified and characterized. How they are induced to function under stringent conditions is of considerable interest, and could provide vital clues about the mechanism of fork arrest by RTP-terminator complexes in general.

  3. Investigating the Inactivation Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis Spores by High Pressure CO2.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lei; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yongtao; Chen, Fang; Hu, Xiaosong; Liao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inactivation mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 (HPCD) processing. The spores of B. subtilis were subjected to heat at 0.1 MPa or HPCD at 6.5-20 MPa, and 64-86°C for 0-120 min. The germination, the permeability of inner membrane (IM) and cortex, the release of pyridine-2, 6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), and changes in the morphological and internal structures of spores were investigated. The HPCD-treated spores did not lose heat resistance and their DPA release was lower than the inactivation, suggesting that spores did not germinate during HPCD. The flow cytometry analysis suggested that the permeability of the IM and cortex of HPCD-treated spores was increased. Furthermore, the DPA of the HPCD-treated spores were released in parallel with their inactivation and the fluorescence photomicrographs showed that these treated spores were stained by propidium iodide, ensuring that the permeability of IM of spores was increased by HPCD. The scanning electron microscopy photomicrographs showed that spores were crushed into debris or exhibited a hollowness on the surface, and the transmission electron microscopy photomicrographs exhibited an enlarged core, ruptured and indistinguishable IM and a loss of core materials in the HPCD-treated spores, indicating that HPCD damaged the structures of the spores. These findings suggested that HPCD inactivated B. subtilis spores by directly damaging the structure of the spores, rather than inducing germination of the spores. PMID:27656175

  4. Investigating the Inactivation Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis Spores by High Pressure CO2

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Lei; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yongtao; Chen, Fang; Hu, Xiaosong; Liao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inactivation mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 (HPCD) processing. The spores of B. subtilis were subjected to heat at 0.1 MPa or HPCD at 6.5-20 MPa, and 64-86°C for 0-120 min. The germination, the permeability of inner membrane (IM) and cortex, the release of pyridine-2, 6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), and changes in the morphological and internal structures of spores were investigated. The HPCD-treated spores did not lose heat resistance and their DPA release was lower than the inactivation, suggesting that spores did not germinate during HPCD. The flow cytometry analysis suggested that the permeability of the IM and cortex of HPCD-treated spores was increased. Furthermore, the DPA of the HPCD-treated spores were released in parallel with their inactivation and the fluorescence photomicrographs showed that these treated spores were stained by propidium iodide, ensuring that the permeability of IM of spores was increased by HPCD. The scanning electron microscopy photomicrographs showed that spores were crushed into debris or exhibited a hollowness on the surface, and the transmission electron microscopy photomicrographs exhibited an enlarged core, ruptured and indistinguishable IM and a loss of core materials in the HPCD-treated spores, indicating that HPCD damaged the structures of the spores. These findings suggested that HPCD inactivated B. subtilis spores by directly damaging the structure of the spores, rather than inducing germination of the spores.

  5. Physiology and metabolic fluxes of wild-type and riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, U; Hatzimanikatis, V; Hohmann, H P; Manneberg, M; van Loon, A P; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Continuous cultivation in a glucose-limited chemostat was used to determine the growth parameters of wild-type Bacillus subtilis and of a recombinant, riboflavin-producing strain. Maintenance coefficients of 0.45 and 0.66 mmol of glucose g-1 h-1 were determined for the wild-type and recombinant strains, respectively. However, the maximum molar growth yield of 82 to 85 g (cell dry weight)/mol of glucose was found to be almost identical in both strains. A nonlinear relationship between the specific riboflavin production rate and the dilution rate was observed, revealing a coupling of product formation and growth under strict substrate-limited conditions. Most prominently, riboflavin formation completely ceased at specific growth rates below 0.15 h-1. For molecular characterization of B. subtilis, the total amino acid composition of the wild type was experimentally determined and the complete building block requirements for biomass formation were derived. In particular, the murein sacculus was found to constitute approximately 9% of B. subtilis biomass, three- to fivefold more than in Escherichia coli. Estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes by a refined mass balance approach revealed a substantial, growth rate-dependent flux through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, this flux is indicated to be increased in the strain engineered for riboflavin formation. Glucose catabolism at low growth rates with reduced biomass yields was supported mainly by the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:8837424

  6. Microbial Activation of Bacillus subtilis-Immobilized Microgel Particles for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Son, Han Am; Choi, Sang Koo; Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Hyun Tae; Sung, Won Mo; Kim, Jin Woong

    2016-09-01

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microorganisms to extract oil remaining in reservoirs. Here, we report fabrication of microgel particles with immobilized Bacillus subtilis for application to microbially enhanced oil recovery. Using B. subtilis isolated from oil-contaminated soils in Myanmar, we evaluated the ability of this microbe to reduce the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface via production of biosurfactant molecules, eventually yielding excellent emulsification across a broad range of the medium pH and ionic strength. To safely deliver B. subtilis into a permeable porous medium, in this study, these bacteria were physically immobilized in a hydrogel mesh of microgel particles. In a core flooding experiment, in which the microgel particles were injected into a column packed with silica beads, we found that these particles significantly increased oil recovery in a concentration-dependent manner. This result shows that a mesh of microgel particles encapsulating biosurfactant-producing microorganisms holds promise for recovery of oil from porous media. PMID:27506231

  7. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis isocitrate dehydrogenase gene causes a block at stage I of sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S; Levin, P A; Matsuno, K; Grossman, A D; Sonenshein, A L

    1997-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis mutant with a deletion of citC, the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase, the third enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid branch of the Krebs cycle, had a greatly reduced ability to sporulate. Analysis of expression of lacZ fusions to various sporulation gene promoters revealed that in the citC mutant development is probably blocked between stage 0 and stage II. That is, genes expressed very early in sporulation, under the direct control of the Spo0A transcription factor, were induced normally in the citC mutant. However, genes expressed after asymmetric septation (stage II) in wild-type cells were not induced in the citC mutant. Analysis of cell morphology by thin-section electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the mutant formed axial chromosomal filaments and accumulated rings of FtsZ protein at potential polar division sites but failed to form asymmetric division septa, indicating that sporulation is blocked at stage I. The growth and sporulation defects of the B. subtilis citC mutant were fully overcome by introduction and expression of the Escherichia coli icd gene, encoding an isocitrate dehydrogenase similar to the enzyme from B. subtilis. PMID:9244258

  8. Three biotechnical processes using Ashbya gossypii, Candida famata, or Bacillus subtilis compete with chemical riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Stahmann, K P; Revuelta, J L; Seulberger, H

    2000-05-01

    Chemical riboflavin production, successfully used for decades, is in the course of being replaced by microbial processes. These promise to save half the costs, reduce waste and energy requirements, and use renewable resources like sugar or plant oil. Three microorganisms are currently in use for industrial riboflavin production. The hemiascomycetes Ashbya gossypii, a filamentous fungus, and Candida famata, a yeast, are naturally occurring overproducers of this vitamin. To obtain riboflavin production with the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis requires at least the deregulation of purine synthesis and a mutation in a flavokinase/FAD-synthetase. It is common to all three organisms that riboflavin production is recognizable by the yellow color of the colonies. This is an important tool for the screening of improved mutants. Antimetabolites like itaconate, which inhibits the isocitrate lyase in A. gossypii, tubercidin, which inhibits purine biosynthesis in C. famata, or roseoflavin, a structural analog of riboflavin used for B. subtilis, have been applied successfully for mutant selections. The production of riboflavin by the two fungi seems to be limited by precursor supply, as was concluded from feeding and gene-overexpression experiments. Although flux studies in B. subtilis revealed an increase both in maintenance metabolism and in the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, the major limitation there seems to be the riboflavin pathway. Multiple copies of the rib genes and promoter replacements are necessary to achieve competitive productivity. PMID:10855708

  9. Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells Operates by Mfd-Dependent Mutagenic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marroquín, Martha; Martin, Holly A.; Pepper, Amber; Girard, Mary E.; Kidman, Amanda A.; Vallin, Carmen; Yasbin, Ronald E.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario; Robleto, Eduardo A.

    2016-01-01

    In replication-limited cells of Bacillus subtilis, Mfd is mutagenic at highly transcribed regions, even in the absence of bulky DNA lesions. However, the mechanism leading to increased mutagenesis through Mfd remains currently unknown. Here, we report that Mfd may promote mutagenesis in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cells by coordinating error-prone repair events mediated by UvrA, MutY and PolI. Using a point-mutated gene conferring leucine auxotrophy as a genetic marker, it was found that the absence of UvrA reduced the Leu+ revertants and that a second mutation in mfd reduced mutagenesis further. Moreover, the mfd and polA mutants presented low but similar reversion frequencies compared to the parental strain. These results suggest that Mfd promotes mutagenic events that required the participation of NER pathway and PolI. Remarkably, this Mfd-dependent mutagenic pathway was found to be epistatic onto MutY; however, whereas the MutY-dependent Leu+ reversions required Mfd, a direct interaction between these proteins was not apparent. In summary, our results support the concept that Mfd promotes mutagenesis in starved B. subtilis cells by coordinating both known and previously unknown Mfd-associated repair pathways. These mutagenic processes bias the production of genetic diversity towards highly transcribed regions in the genome. PMID:27399782

  10. Investigating the Inactivation Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis Spores by High Pressure CO2

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Lei; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yongtao; Chen, Fang; Hu, Xiaosong; Liao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inactivation mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 (HPCD) processing. The spores of B. subtilis were subjected to heat at 0.1 MPa or HPCD at 6.5-20 MPa, and 64-86°C for 0-120 min. The germination, the permeability of inner membrane (IM) and cortex, the release of pyridine-2, 6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), and changes in the morphological and internal structures of spores were investigated. The HPCD-treated spores did not lose heat resistance and their DPA release was lower than the inactivation, suggesting that spores did not germinate during HPCD. The flow cytometry analysis suggested that the permeability of the IM and cortex of HPCD-treated spores was increased. Furthermore, the DPA of the HPCD-treated spores were released in parallel with their inactivation and the fluorescence photomicrographs showed that these treated spores were stained by propidium iodide, ensuring that the permeability of IM of spores was increased by HPCD. The scanning electron microscopy photomicrographs showed that spores were crushed into debris or exhibited a hollowness on the surface, and the transmission electron microscopy photomicrographs exhibited an enlarged core, ruptured and indistinguishable IM and a loss of core materials in the HPCD-treated spores, indicating that HPCD damaged the structures of the spores. These findings suggested that HPCD inactivated B. subtilis spores by directly damaging the structure of the spores, rather than inducing germination of the spores. PMID:27656175

  11. Purification and characterization of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto B-12.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Du, Ming; Zheng, Dongmei; Kong, Fandong; Zu, Guoren; Feng, Yibing

    2009-10-28

    Bacillus subtilis natto B-12 was isolated from natto, a traditional fermented soybean food in Japan. A fibrinolytic enzyme (B-12 nattokinase) was purified from the supernatant of B. subtilis natto B-12 culture broth and showed strong fibrinolytic activity. The enzyme was homogenously purified to 56.1-fold, with a recovery of 43.2% of the initial activity. B-12 nattokinase was demonstrated to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE and was identified as a monomer of 29000 +/- 300 Da in its native state by SDS-PAGE and size exclusion methods. The optimal pH value and temperature were 8.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Purified nattokinase showed high thermostability at temperatures from 30 to 50 degrees C and alkaline stability within the range of pH 6.0-9.0. The enzyme activity was activated by Zn(2+) and obviously inhibited by Fe(3+) and Al(3+). This study provides some important information for the effect factors of fibrinolytic activity, the purification methods, and characterization of nattokinase from B. subtilis natto B-12, which enriches the theoretical information of nattokinase for the research and development of nattokinase as a functional additive of food.

  12. Production of nattokinase by batch and fed-batch culture of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Han; Song, Jae Yong; Kim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, In Young; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Hyeon Shup; Han, Nam Soo; Lee, Bong Hee; Kim, Beom Soo

    2010-09-30

    Nattokinase was produced by batch and fed-batch culture of Bacillus subtilis in flask and fermentor. Effect of supplementing complex media (peptone, yeast extract, or tryptone) was investigated on the production of nattokinase. In flask culture, the highest cell growth and nattokinase activity were obtained with 50 g/L of peptone supplementation. In this condition, nattokinase activity was 630 unit/ml at 12 h. In batch culture of B. subtilis in fermentor, the highest nattokinase activity of 3400 unit/ml was obtained at 10h with 50 g/L of peptone supplementation. From the batch kinetics data, it was shown that nattokinase production was growth-associated and culture should be harvested before stationary phase for maximum nattokinase production. In fed-batch culture of B. subtilis using pH-stat feeding strategy, cell growth (optical density monitored at 600 nm) increased to ca. 100 at 22 h, which was 2.5 times higher than that in batch culture. The highest nattokinase activity was 7100 unit/ml at 19 h, which was also 2.1 times higher than that in batch culture.

  13. Localization of Components of the RNA-Degrading Machine in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Cascante-Estepa, Nora; Gunka, Katrin; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the control of mRNA stability is crucial to allow rapid adaptation to changing conditions. In most bacteria, RNA degradation is catalyzed by the RNA degradosome, a protein complex composed of endo- and exoribonucleases, RNA helicases, and accessory proteins. In the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, the existence of a RNA degradosome assembled around the membrane-bound endoribonuclease RNase Y has been proposed. Here, we have studied the intracellular localization of the protein that have been implicated in the potential B. subtilis RNA degradosome, i.e., polynucleotide phosphorylase, the exoribonucleases J1 and J2, the DEAD-box RNA helicase CshA, and the glycolytic enzymes enolase and phosphofructokinase. Our data suggests that the bulk of these enzymes is located in the cytoplasm. The RNases J1 and J2 as well as the RNA helicase CshA were mainly localized in the peripheral regions of the cell where also the bulk of messenger RNA is localized. We were able to demonstrate active exclusion of these proteins from the transcribing nucleoid. Taken together, our findings suggest that the interactions of the enzymes involved in RNA degradation in B. subtilis are rather transient. PMID:27708634

  14. Interactions between Streptomyces coelicolor and Bacillus subtilis: Role of Surfactants in Raising Aerial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Straight, Paul D.; Willey, Joanne M.; Kolter, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Using mixed-species cultures, we have undertaken a study of interactions between two common spore-forming soil bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces coelicolor. Our experiments demonstrate that the development of aerial hyphae and spores by S. coelicolor is inhibited by surfactin, a lipopeptide surfactant produced by B. subtilis. Current models of aerial development by sporulating bacteria and fungi postulate a role for surfactants in reducing surface tension at air-liquid interfaces, thereby removing the major barrier to aerial growth. S. coelicolor produces SapB, an amphipathic peptide that is surface active and required for aerial growth on certain media. Loss of aerial hyphae in developmental mutants can be rescued by addition of purified SapB. While a surfactant from a fungus can substitute for SapB in a mutant that lacks aerial hyphae, not all surfactants have this effect. We show that surfactin is required for formation of aerial structures on the surface of B. subtilis colonies. However, in contrast to this positive role, our experiments reveal that surfactin acts antagonistically by arresting S. coelicolor aerial development and causing altered expression of developmental genes. Our observations support the idea that surfactants function specifically for a given organism regardless of their shared ability to reduce surface tension. Production of surfactants with antagonistic activity could provide a powerful competitive advantage during surface colonization and in competition for resources. PMID:16788200

  15. Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells Operates by Mfd-Dependent Mutagenic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marroquín, Martha; Martin, Holly A; Pepper, Amber; Girard, Mary E; Kidman, Amanda A; Vallin, Carmen; Yasbin, Ronald E; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario; Robleto, Eduardo A

    2016-01-01

    In replication-limited cells of Bacillus subtilis, Mfd is mutagenic at highly transcribed regions, even in the absence of bulky DNA lesions. However, the mechanism leading to increased mutagenesis through Mfd remains currently unknown. Here, we report that Mfd may promote mutagenesis in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cells by coordinating error-prone repair events mediated by UvrA, MutY and PolI. Using a point-mutated gene conferring leucine auxotrophy as a genetic marker, it was found that the absence of UvrA reduced the Leu⁺ revertants and that a second mutation in mfd reduced mutagenesis further. Moreover, the mfd and polA mutants presented low but similar reversion frequencies compared to the parental strain. These results suggest that Mfd promotes mutagenic events that required the participation of NER pathway and PolI. Remarkably, this Mfd-dependent mutagenic pathway was found to be epistatic onto MutY; however, whereas the MutY-dependent Leu⁺ reversions required Mfd, a direct interaction between these proteins was not apparent. In summary, our results support the concept that Mfd promotes mutagenesis in starved B. subtilis cells by coordinating both known and previously unknown Mfd-associated repair pathways. These mutagenic processes bias the production of genetic diversity towards highly transcribed regions in the genome. PMID:27399782

  16. Proteomics Analyses of Bacillus subtilis after Treatment with Plumbagin, a Plant-Derived Naphthoquinone

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Ray, Sandipan; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Rapole, Srikanth; Panda, Dulal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infectious diseases and increasing antibiotic resistance among diverse classes of microbes are global health concerns and a prime focus of omics systems science applications in novel drug discovery. Plumbagin is a plant-derived naphthoquinone, a natural product that exhibits antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the antimicrobial effects of plumbagin against Bacillus subtilis using two complementary proteomics techniques: two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Comparative quantitative proteomics analysis of plumbagin treated and untreated control samples identified differential expression of 230 proteins (1% FDR, 1.5 fold-change and ≥2 peptides) in B. subtilis after plumbagin treatment. Pathway analysis involving the differentially expressed proteins suggested that plumbagin effectively increases heme and protein biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid synthesis was significantly reduced. Gene expression and metabolic activity assays further corroborated the proteomics findings. We anticipate that plumbagin blocks the cell division by altering the membrane permeability required for energy generation. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, offering new insights, at proteome level, for the putative mode(s) of action of plumbagin and attendant cellular targets in B. subtilis. The findings also suggest new ways forward for the modern omics-guided drug target discovery, building on traditional plant medicine. PMID:25562197

  17. Production of Surfactant from Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332 using Potato substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Sandra Lynn; Bala, Greg Alan

    2000-12-01

    Surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis is known to reduce the surface tension of water from 72 to 27 mN/m. Potato substrates were evaluated as a carbon source for surfactant production by B. subtilis ATCC 21332. An established potato medium, simulated liquid and solid potato waste media, and a commercially prepared potato starch in a mineral salts medium were evaluated in shake flask experiments to verify growth, surface tension reduction, and carbohydrate reduction capabilities. Total carbohydrate assays and glucose monitoring indicated that B. subtilis was able to degrade potato substrates to produce surfactant. Surface tensions dropped from 71.3±0.1 to 28.3±0.3 mN/m (simulated solid potato medium) and to 27.5±0.3 mN/m (mineral salts medium). A critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.10 g/l was obtained from a methylene chloride extract of the simulated solid potato medium.

  18. Effect of ethanol perturbation on viscosity and permeability of an inner membrane in Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Loison, Pauline; Gervais, Patrick; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Kuimova, Marina K

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we investigated how a combination of ethanol and high temperature (70°C), affect the properties of the inner membrane of Bacillus subtilis spores. We observed membrane permeabilization for ethanol concentrations ≥50%, as indicated by the staining of the spores' DNA by the cell impermeable dye Propidium Iodide. The loss of membrane integrity was also confirmed by a decrease in the peak corresponding to dipicolinic acid using infrared spectroscopy. Finally, the spore refractivity (as measured by phase contrast microscopy) was decreased after the ethanol-heat treatment, suggesting a partial rehydration of the protoplast. Previously we have used fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) combined with the fluorescent molecular rotor Bodipy-C12 to study the microscopic viscosity in the inner membrane of B. subtilis spores, and showed that at normal conditions it is characterized by a very high viscosity. Here we demonstrate that the ethanol/high temperature treatment led to a decrease of the viscosity of the inner membrane, from 1000cP to 860cP for wild type spores at 50% of ethanol. Altogether, our present work confirms the deleterious effect of ethanol on the structure of B. subtilis spores, as well as demonstrates the ability of FLIM - Bodipy-C12 to measure changes in the microviscosity of the spores upon perturbation. PMID:27267704

  19. Bacillus subtilis attachment to Aspergillus niger hyphae results in mutually altered metabolism.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Isabelle; van den Esker, Marielle H; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Mattern, Derek J; Blei, Felix; Zhou, Miaomiao; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Brakhage, Axel A; Kuipers, Oscar P; de Vries, Ronald P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between microbes affects the growth, metabolism and differentiation of members of the microbial community. While direct and indirect competition, like antagonism and nutrient consumption have a negative effect on the interacting members of the population, microbes have also evolved in nature not only to fight, but in some cases to adapt to or support each other, while increasing the fitness of the community. The presence of bacteria and fungi in soil results in various interactions including mutualism. Bacilli attach to the plant root and form complex communities in the rhizosphere. Bacillus subtilis, when grown in the presence of Aspergillus niger, interacts similarly with the fungus, by attaching and growing on the hyphae. Based on data obtained in a dual transcriptome experiment, we suggest that both fungi and bacteria alter their metabolism during this interaction. Interestingly, the transcription of genes related to the antifungal and putative antibacterial defence mechanism of B. subtilis and A. niger, respectively, are decreased upon attachment of bacteria to the mycelia. Analysis of the culture supernatant suggests that surfactin production by B. subtilis was reduced when the bacterium was co-cultivated with the fungus. Our experiments provide new insights into the interaction between a bacterium and a fungus.

  20. Protective role of bacillithiol in superoxide stress and Fe–S metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong; Dos Santos, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) serves as the prime thiol in most organisms as its depletion increases antibiotic and metal toxicity, impairs oxidative stress responses, and affects Fe and Fe–S cluster metabolism. Many gram-positive bacteria lack GSH, but instead produce other structurally unrelated yet functionally equivalent thiols. Among those, bacillithiol (BSH) has been recently identified in several low G+C gram-positive bacteria. In this work, we have explored the link between BSH and Fe–S metabolism in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified that B. subtilis lacking BSH is more sensitive to oxidative stress (paraquat), and metal toxicity (Cu(I) and Cd(II)), but not H2O2. Furthermore, a slow growth phenotype of BSH null strain in minimal medium was observed, which could be recovered upon the addition of selected amino acids (Leu/Ile and Glu/Gln), supplementation of iron, or chemical complementation with BSH disulfide (BSSB) to the growth medium. Interestingly, Fe–S cluster containing isopropylmalate isomerase (LeuCD) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) showed decreased activities in BSH null strain. Deficiency of BSH also resulted in decreased levels of intracellular Fe accompanied by increased levels of manganese and altered expression levels of Fe–S cluster biosynthetic SUF components. Together, this study is the first to establish a link between BSH and Fe–S metabolism in B. subtilis. PMID:25988368

  1. Surface display of Clonorchis sinensis enolase on Bacillus subtilis spores potentializes an oral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Tian, Yanli; Mao, Qiang; Lv, Xiaoli; Shang, Mei; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing; Huang, Yan

    2014-03-10

    Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) infections remain the common public health problem in freshwater fish consumption areas. New effective prevention strategies are still the urgent challenges to control this kind of foodborne infectious disease. The biochemical importance and biological relevance render C. sinensis enolase (Csenolase) as a potential vaccine candidate. In the present study, we constructed Escherichia coli/Bacillus subtilis shuttle genetic engineering system and investigated the potential of Csenolase as an oral vaccine candidate for C. sinensis prevention in different immunization routes. Our results showed that, compared with control groups, both recombinant Csenolase protein and nucleic acid could induce a mixed IgG1/IgG2a immune response when administrated subcutaneously (P<0.001), intraperitoneally (P<0.01) and intramuscularly (P<0.001) with worm reduction rate of 56.29%, 15.38% and 37.42%, respectively. More importantly, Csenolase could be successfully expressed as a fusion protein (55kDa) on B. subtilis spore indicated by immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays. Killed spores triggered reactive Th1/Th2 immune response and exhibited protective efficacy against C. sinensis infection. Csenolase derived oral vaccine conferred worm reduction rate and egg reduction rate at 60.07% (P<0.001) and 80.67% (P<0.001), respectively. The shuttle genetic engineering system facilitated the development of oral vaccine with B. subtilis stably overexpressing target protein. Comparably vaccinal trails with Csenolase in different immunization routes potentialize Csenolase an oral vaccine candidate in C. sinensis prevention.

  2. Presence and function of a thick mucous layer rich in polysaccharides around Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Faille, Christine; Ronse, Annette; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Maes, Emmanuel; Krzewinski, Frédéric; Guerardel, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to establish the presence and function of the mucous layer surrounding spores of Bacillus subtilis. First, an external layer of variable thickness and regularity was often observed on B. subtilis spores. Further analyses were performed on B. subtilis 98/7 spores surrounded by a thick layer. The mechanical removal of the layer did not affect their resistance to heat or their ability to germinate but rendered the spore less hydrophilic, more adherent to stainless steel, and more resistant to cleaning. This layer was mainly composed of 6-deoxyhexoses, ie rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-rhamnose and quinovose, but also of glucosamine and muramic lactam, known also to be a part of the bacterial peptidoglycan. The specific hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan using lysozyme altered the structure of the required mucous layer and affected the physico-chemical properties of the spores. Such an outermost mucous layer has also been seen on spores of B. licheniformis and B. clausii isolated from food environments.

  3. Effect of ethanol perturbation on viscosity and permeability of an inner membrane in Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Loison, Pauline; Gervais, Patrick; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Kuimova, Marina K

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we investigated how a combination of ethanol and high temperature (70°C), affect the properties of the inner membrane of Bacillus subtilis spores. We observed membrane permeabilization for ethanol concentrations ≥50%, as indicated by the staining of the spores' DNA by the cell impermeable dye Propidium Iodide. The loss of membrane integrity was also confirmed by a decrease in the peak corresponding to dipicolinic acid using infrared spectroscopy. Finally, the spore refractivity (as measured by phase contrast microscopy) was decreased after the ethanol-heat treatment, suggesting a partial rehydration of the protoplast. Previously we have used fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) combined with the fluorescent molecular rotor Bodipy-C12 to study the microscopic viscosity in the inner membrane of B. subtilis spores, and showed that at normal conditions it is characterized by a very high viscosity. Here we demonstrate that the ethanol/high temperature treatment led to a decrease of the viscosity of the inner membrane, from 1000cP to 860cP for wild type spores at 50% of ethanol. Altogether, our present work confirms the deleterious effect of ethanol on the structure of B. subtilis spores, as well as demonstrates the ability of FLIM - Bodipy-C12 to measure changes in the microviscosity of the spores upon perturbation.

  4. Presence and function of a thick mucous layer rich in polysaccharides around Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Faille, Christine; Ronse, Annette; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Maes, Emmanuel; Krzewinski, Frédéric; Guerardel, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to establish the presence and function of the mucous layer surrounding spores of Bacillus subtilis. First, an external layer of variable thickness and regularity was often observed on B. subtilis spores. Further analyses were performed on B. subtilis 98/7 spores surrounded by a thick layer. The mechanical removal of the layer did not affect their resistance to heat or their ability to germinate but rendered the spore less hydrophilic, more adherent to stainless steel, and more resistant to cleaning. This layer was mainly composed of 6-deoxyhexoses, ie rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-rhamnose and quinovose, but also of glucosamine and muramic lactam, known also to be a part of the bacterial peptidoglycan. The specific hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan using lysozyme altered the structure of the required mucous layer and affected the physico-chemical properties of the spores. Such an outermost mucous layer has also been seen on spores of B. licheniformis and B. clausii isolated from food environments. PMID:25115519

  5. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion–reaction based continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion–reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm’s shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here.

  6. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion-reaction based continuum model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-01-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion-reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm's shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here. PMID:27434099

  7. Induced sensitivity of Bacillus subtilis colony morphology to mechanical media compression

    PubMed Central

    Polka, Jessica K.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria from several taxa, including Kurthia zopfii, Myxococcus xanthus, and Bacillus mycoides, have been reported to align growth of their colonies to small features on the surface of solid media, including anisotropies created by compression. While the function of this phenomenon is unclear, it may help organisms navigate on solid phases, such as soil. The origin of this behavior is also unknown: it may be biological (that is, dependent on components that sense the environment and regulate growth accordingly) or merely physical. Here we show that B. subtilis, an organism that typically does not respond to media compression, can be induced to do so with two simple and synergistic perturbations: a mutation that maintains cells in the swarming (chained) state, and the addition of EDTA to the growth media, which further increases chain length. EDTA apparently increases chain length by inducing defects in cell separation, as the treatment has only marginal effects on the length of individual cells. These results lead us to three conclusions. First, the wealth of genetic tools available to B. subtilis will provide a new, tractable chassis for engineering compression sensitive organisms. Second, the sensitivity of colony morphology to media compression in Bacillus can be modulated by altering a simple physical property of rod-shaped cells. And third, colony morphology under compression holds promise as a rapid, simple, and low-cost way to screen for changes in the length of rod-shaped cells or chains thereof. PMID:25289183

  8. Simulation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate by diffusion-reaction based continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiaoling; Nie, Kai; Li, Mingpeng; Sun, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Various species of bacteria form highly organized spatially-structured aggregates known as biofilms. To understand how microenvironments impact biofilm growth dynamics, we propose a diffusion-reaction continuum model to simulate the formation of Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar plate. The extended finite element method combined with level set method are employed to perform the simulation, numerical results show the quantitative relationship between colony morphologies and nutrient depletion over time. Considering that the production of polysaccharide in wild-type cells may enhance biofilm spreading on the agar plate, we inoculate mutant colony incapable of producing polysaccharide to verify our results. Predictions of the glutamate source biofilm’s shape parameters agree with the experimental mutant colony better than that of glycerol source biofilm, suggesting that glutamate is rate limiting nutrient for Bacillus subtilis biofilm growth on agar plate, and the diffusion-limited is a better description to the experiment. In addition, we find that the diffusion time scale is of the same magnitude as growth process, and the common-employed quasi-steady approximation is not applicable here.

  9. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis HC8, a novel plant‐beneficial endophytic strain from giant hogweed

    PubMed Central

    Malfanova, Natalia; Kamilova, Faina; Validov, Shamil; Shcherbakov, Andrey; Chebotar, Vladimir; Tikhonovich, Igor; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Summary Thirty endophytic bacteria were isolated from various plant species growing near Saint‐Petersburg, Russia. Based on a screening for various traits, including plant‐beneficial properties and DNA fragment patterns, potential siblings were removed. The remaining isolates were taxonomically identified using 16S rDNA sequences and potential human and plant pathogens were removed. The remaining strains were tested for their ability to promote radish root growth and to protect tomato plants against tomato foot and root rot. One strain, Bacillus subtilis HC8, isolated from the giant hogweed Heracleum sosnowskyi Manden, significantly promoted plant growth and protected tomato against tomato foot and root rot. Metabolites possibly responsible for these plant‐beneficial properties were identified as the hormone gibberellin and (lipo)peptide antibiotics respectively. The antibiotic properties of strain HC8 are similar to those of the commercially available plant‐beneficial strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42. However, thin layer chromatography profiles of the two strains differ. It is speculated that endophytes such as B. subtilis HC8 contribute to the fast growth of giant hogweed. PMID:21366893

  10. Role of spore coat proteins in the resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to Caenorhabditis elegans predation.

    PubMed

    Laaberki, Maria-Halima; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to a wide range of chemical and physical insults that are normally lethal for the vegetative form of the bacterium. While the integrity of the protein coat of the spore is crucial for spore survival in vitro, far less is known about how the coat provides protection in vivo against predation by ecologically relevant hosts. In particular, assays had characterized the in vitro resistance of spores to peptidoglycan-hydrolyzing enzymes like lysozyme that are also important effectors of innate immunity in a wide variety of hosts. Here, we use the bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a likely predator of Bacillus spores in the wild, to characterize the role of the spore coat in an ecologically relevant spore-host interaction. We found that ingested wild-type Bacillus subtilis spores were resistant to worm digestion, whereas vegetative forms of the bacterium were efficiently digested by the nematode. Using B. subtilis strains carrying mutations in spore coat genes, we observed a correlation between the degree of alteration of the spore coat assembly and the susceptibility to the worm degradation. Surprisingly, we found that the spores that were resistant to lysozyme in vitro can be sensitive to C. elegans digestion depending on the extent of the spore coat structure modifications.

  11. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Xin-Li; Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Glucose, xylose and arabinose are the three most abundant monosaccharide found in lignocellulosic biomass. Effectively and simultaneously utilization of these sugars by microorganisms for production of the biofuels and bio-chemicals is essential toward directly fermentation of the lignocellulosic biomass. In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose. In the current study, the Bacillus subtilis168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was further engineered to produce acetoin from a glucose, xylose, and arabinose mixtures. To accomplish this, the endogenous xylose transport protein AraE, the exogenous xylose isomerase gene xylA and the xylulokinase gene xylB from E. coli were co-overexpressed in the Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain, which enabled the resulting strain, denoted ZB02, to simultaneously utilize glucose and xylose. Unexpectedly, the ZB02 strain could simultaneously utilize glucose and arabinose also. Further results indicated that the transcriptional inhibition of the arabinose transport protein gene araE was the main limiting factor for arabinose utilization in the presence of glucose. Additionally, the arabinose operon in B. subtilis could be activated by the addition of arabinose, even in the presence of glucose. Through fed-batch fermentation, strain ZB02 could simultaneously utilize glucose, xylose, and arabinose, with an average sugar consumption rate of 3.00 g/l/h and an average production of 62.2 g/l acetoin at a rate of 0.864 g/l/h. Finally, the strain produced 11.2 g/l acetoin from lignocellulosic hydrolysate (containing 20.6g/l glucose, 12.1 g/l xylose and 0.45 g/l arabinose) in flask cultivation, with an acetoin yield of 0.34 g/g total sugar. The result demonstrates that this strain has good potential for the utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysate for production of acetoin. PMID:27467131

  12. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Glucose, xylose and arabinose are the three most abundant monosaccharide found in lignocellulosic biomass. Effectively and simultaneously utilization of these sugars by microorganisms for production of the biofuels and bio-chemicals is essential toward directly fermentation of the lignocellulosic biomass. In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose. In the current study, the Bacillus subtilis168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was further engineered to produce acetoin from a glucose, xylose, and arabinose mixtures. To accomplish this, the endogenous xylose transport protein AraE, the exogenous xylose isomerase gene xylA and the xylulokinase gene xylB from E. coli were co-overexpressed in the Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain, which enabled the resulting strain, denoted ZB02, to simultaneously utilize glucose and xylose. Unexpectedly, the ZB02 strain could simultaneously utilize glucose and arabinose also. Further results indicated that the transcriptional inhibition of the arabinose transport protein gene araE was the main limiting factor for arabinose utilization in the presence of glucose. Additionally, the arabinose operon in B. subtilis could be activated by the addition of arabinose, even in the presence of glucose. Through fed-batch fermentation, strain ZB02 could simultaneously utilize glucose, xylose, and arabinose, with an average sugar consumption rate of 3.00 g/l/h and an average production of 62.2 g/l acetoin at a rate of 0.864 g/l/h. Finally, the strain produced 11.2 g/l acetoin from lignocellulosic hydrolysate (containing 20.6g/l glucose, 12.1 g/l xylose and 0.45 g/l arabinose) in flask cultivation, with an acetoin yield of 0.34 g/g total sugar. The result demonstrates that this strain has good potential for the utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysate for production of acetoin. PMID:27467131

  13. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Xin-Li; Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Glucose, xylose and arabinose are the three most abundant monosaccharide found in lignocellulosic biomass. Effectively and simultaneously utilization of these sugars by microorganisms for production of the biofuels and bio-chemicals is essential toward directly fermentation of the lignocellulosic biomass. In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose. In the current study, the Bacillus subtilis168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was further engineered to produce acetoin from a glucose, xylose, and arabinose mixtures. To accomplish this, the endogenous xylose transport protein AraE, the exogenous xylose isomerase gene xylA and the xylulokinase gene xylB from E. coli were co-overexpressed in the Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain, which enabled the resulting strain, denoted ZB02, to simultaneously utilize glucose and xylose. Unexpectedly, the ZB02 strain could simultaneously utilize glucose and arabinose also. Further results indicated that the transcriptional inhibition of the arabinose transport protein gene araE was the main limiting factor for arabinose utilization in the presence of glucose. Additionally, the arabinose operon in B. subtilis could be activated by the addition of arabinose, even in the presence of glucose. Through fed-batch fermentation, strain ZB02 could simultaneously utilize glucose, xylose, and arabinose, with an average sugar consumption rate of 3.00 g/l/h and an average production of 62.2 g/l acetoin at a rate of 0.864 g/l/h. Finally, the strain produced 11.2 g/l acetoin from lignocellulosic hydrolysate (containing 20.6g/l glucose, 12.1 g/l xylose and 0.45 g/l arabinose) in flask cultivation, with an acetoin yield of 0.34 g/g total sugar. The result demonstrates that this strain has good potential for the utilization of lignocellulosic hydrolysate for production of acetoin.

  14. Evolution of Bacillus subtilis to enhanced hypobaric growth: global alterations in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Wayne; Robles-Martinez, Jose; Rivas-Castillo, Andrea; Schuerger, Andrew

    Much astrobiology research is concerned with defining the environmental limits for life in the universe. Because Mars currently is the primary target for life detection missions, it is important to understand how terrestrial microbes might survive, proliferate, and evolve in martian envi-ronments. This issue is relevant in three distinct but related contexts: (i) testing panspermia hypotheses [1], (ii) mitigating the forward contamination of Mars [2], and (iii) understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to microbial growth in extreme extraterrestrial environments [3]. Prime candidates for Earth-to-Mars transfer include bacteria of the genus Bacillus, spores of which are significant contaminants of Mars-bound spacecraft and which are considered good candidates for lithopanspermia [1-4]. It is thus relevant to assess the potential for such microbes to survive and proliferate in the martian environment. The martian atmosphere poses a significant barrier to growth of terrestrial microbes, due to its low pressure (1-10 mbar; average 7 mbar) and anoxic (˜95% CO2) composition. In an earlier study [5] we showed that low pressures approaching those found on the surface of Mars exhibited an inhibitory effect on the germination and vegetative growth of several Bacillus spp. isolated from spacecraft or their assembly facilities. Even in an Earth-like 80%N2/20%O2 atmosphere, growth of B. subtilis cells was nearly completely inhibited at pressures below 35 mbar, well above the highest pressure on the martian surface [5]. The purpose of the present investigation was to use low pressure as a selective agent to test the hypothesis that a terrestrial microorganism, Bacillus subtilis, could evolve the ability for enhanced growth under hypobaric conditions approaching those of Mars. B. subtilis wild-type strains WN624 (SpcR) and WN628 (CmR) have been described previously [6] and were used as ancestral strains. Strains were propagated in LB liquid medium containing the appropriate

  15. Evolution of Bacillus subtilis to enhanced hypobaric growth: global alterations in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Wayne; Robles-Martinez, Jose; Rivas-Castillo, Andrea; Schuerger, Andrew

    Much astrobiology research is concerned with defining the environmental limits for life in the universe. Because Mars currently is the primary target for life detection missions, it is important to understand how terrestrial microbes might survive, proliferate, and evolve in martian envi-ronments. This issue is relevant in three distinct but related contexts: (i) testing panspermia hypotheses [1], (ii) mitigating the forward contamination of Mars [2], and (iii) understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to microbial growth in extreme extraterrestrial environments [3]. Prime candidates for Earth-to-Mars transfer include bacteria of the genus Bacillus, spores of which are significant contaminants of Mars-bound spacecraft and which are considered good candidates for lithopanspermia [1-4]. It is thus relevant to assess the potential for such microbes to survive and proliferate in the martian environment. The martian atmosphere poses a significant barrier to growth of terrestrial microbes, due to its low pressure (1-10 mbar; average 7 mbar) and anoxic (˜95% CO2) composition. In an earlier study [5] we showed that low pressures approaching those found on the surface of Mars exhibited an inhibitory effect on the germination and vegetative growth of several Bacillus spp. isolated from spacecraft or their assembly facilities. Even in an Earth-like 80%N2/20%O2 atmosphere, growth of B. subtilis cells was nearly completely inhibited at pressures below 35 mbar, well above the highest pressure on the martian surface [5]. The purpose of the present investigation was to use low pressure as a selective agent to test the hypothesis that a terrestrial microorganism, Bacillus subtilis, could evolve the ability for enhanced growth under hypobaric conditions approaching those of Mars. B. subtilis wild-type strains WN624 (SpcR) and WN628 (CmR) have been described previously [6] and were used as ancestral strains. Strains were propagated in LB liquid medium containing the appropriate

  16. Regulatory regions that control expression of two chloramphenicol-inducible cat genes cloned in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, E J; Williams, D M; Mongkolsuk, S; Lovett, P S

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid pPL603 is a promoter cloning vector for Bacillus subtilis and consists of a 1.1-kilobase fragment of Bacillus pumilus DNA inserted between the EcoRI and BamHI sites of pUB110. The gene cat-86, specifying chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, is located on the 1.1-kilobase cloned DNA. When pPL603 is present in B. subtilis, cat-86 is unexpressed during vegetative growth but expressed during sporulation. The regulation of cat-86 in pPL603 is due to sequences within two restriction fragments, designated P1 and R1, that precede the main coding portion of the gene. The P1 fragment promotes transcription of cat-86 only during sporulation, whereas the adjacent R1 fragment lacks promoter function but contains sequences essential to chloramphenicol inducibility. A second B. pumilus gene, cat-66, was cloned in B. subtilis and is expressed throughout the vegetative growth and sporulation cycle. The cat-66 coding region is preceded by two adjacent restriction fragments designated as P2 and R2. P1 and P2 are identical in size and share 95% conservation of base sequence. R1 and R2 are also identical in size and share 91% conservation of base sequence. Fragment substitution experiments demonstrate that R2 can functionally replace R1. The substitution of P2 for P1 promotes cat-86 expression throughout vegetative growth and sporulation. Analysis of a derivative of pPL603 in which P2 has replaced P1 demonstrates that P2 promotes transcription of cat-86 during vegetative growth and that P2 contains the start site for transcription of cat-86. Thus, P1 and P2 differ strikingly in vegetative promoter function, yet they differ by single-base substitutions at only 11 positions of 203. Images PMID:6327638

  17. SpoVT: From Fine-Tuning Regulator in Bacillus subtilis to Essential Sporulation Protein in Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Eijlander, Robyn T.; Holsappel, Siger; de Jong, Anne; Ghosh, Abhinaba; Christie, Graham; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation is a highly sophisticated developmental process adopted by most Bacilli as a survival strategy to withstand extreme conditions that normally do not support microbial growth. A complicated regulatory cascade, divided into various stages and taking place in two different compartments of the cell, involves a number of primary and secondary regulator proteins that drive gene expression directed toward the formation and maturation of an endospore. Such regulator proteins are highly conserved among various spore formers. Despite this conservation, both regulatory and phenotypic differences are observed between different species of spore forming bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the regulatory sporulation protein SpoVT results in a severe sporulation defect in Bacillus cereus, whereas this is not observed in Bacillus subtilis. Although spores are initially formed, the process is stalled at a later stage in development, followed by lysis of the forespore and the mother cell. A transcriptomic investigation of B. cereus ΔspoVT shows upregulation of genes involved in germination, potentially leading to premature lysis of prespores formed. Additionally, extreme variation in the expression of species-specific genes of unknown function was observed. Introduction of the B. subtilis SpoVT protein could partly restore the sporulation defect in the B. cereus spoVT mutant strain. The difference in phenotype is thus more than likely explained by differences in promoter targets rather than differences in mode of action of the conserved SpoVT regulator protein. This study stresses that evolutionary variances in regulon members of sporulation regulators can have profound effects on the spore developmental process and that mere protein homology is not a foolproof predictor of similar phenotypes. PMID:27790204

  18. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of the Bacillus subtilis gene (infB) encoding protein synthesis initiation factor 2.

    PubMed Central

    Shazand, K; Tucker, J; Chiang, R; Stansmore, K; Sperling-Petersen, H U; Grunberg-Manago, M; Rabinowitz, J C; Leighton, T

    1990-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of Bacillus subtilis cell extracts detected two proteins that cross-reacted with monospecific polyclonal antibody raised against Escherichia coli initiation factor 2 alpha (IF2 alpha). Subsequent Southern blot analysis of B. subtilis genomic DNA identified a 1.3-kilobase (kb) HindIII fragment which cross-hybridized with both E. coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus IF2 gene probes. This DNA was cloned from a size-selected B. subtilis plasmid library. The cloned HindIII fragment, which was shown by DNA sequence analysis to encode the N-terminal half of the B. subtilis IF2 protein and 0.2 kb of upstream flanking sequence, was utilized as a homologous probe to clone an overlapping 2.76-kb ClaI chromosomal fragment containing the entire IF2 structural gene. The HindIII fragment was also used as a probe to obtain overlapping clones from a lambda gt11 library which contained additional upstream and downstream flanking sequences. Sequence comparisons between the B. subtilis IF2 gene and the other bacterial homologs from E. coli, B. stearothermophilus, and Streptococcus faecium displayed extensive nucleic acid and protein sequence homologies. The B. subtilis infB gene encodes two proteins, IF2 alpha (78.6 kilodaltons) and IF2 beta (68.2 kilodaltons); both were expressed in B. subtilis and E. coli. These two proteins cross-reacted with antiserum to E. coli IF2 alpha and were able to complement in vivo an E. coli infB gene disruption. Four-factor recombination analysis positioned the infB gene at 145 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, between the polC and spcB loci. This location is distinct from those of the other major ribosomal protein and rRNA gene clusters of B. subtilis. Images PMID:2110148

  19. Moderate hydrostatic pressure-temperature combinations for inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaidat, Rana; Yu, Darryl; Aljawhiri, Steve; Macgregor, Robert, Jr.

    2015-07-01

    We report the effect of using moderate hydrostatic pressure, 40-140 MPa, at moderate temperature (38-58°C) to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores in McIlvaine's citric phosphate buffer at pH 6. We have investigated several parameters: pressure applied, holding time, pressure cycling, and temperature. The kinetics of spore inactivation is reported. The results show that spore inactivation is exponentially proportional to the time the sample is exposed to pressure. Spore germination and inactivation occur at the hydrostatic pressures/temperature combinations we explored. Cycling the pressure while keeping the total time at high pressure constant does not significantly increase spore inactivation. We show that temperature increases spore inactivation at two different rates; a slow rate below 33°C, and at a more rapid rate at higher temperatures. Increasing pressure leads to an increase in spore inactivation below 95 MPa; however, further increases in pressure give a similar rate kill. The time dependence of the effect of pressure is consistent with the first-order model (R2 > 0.9). The thermal resistance values (ZT) of B. subtilis spores are 30°C, 37°C, and 40°C at 60, 80, 100 MPa. The increase in ZT value at higher pressures indicates lower temperature sensitivity. The pressure resistance values (ZP) are 125, 125 and 143 MPa at 38°C, 48°C, and 58°C. These ZP values are lower than those reported for B. subtilis spores in the literature, which indicates higher sensitivity at pressures less than about 140 MPa. We show that at temperatures <60°C, B. subtilis spores are inactivated at pressures below 100 MPa. This finding could have implications for the design of the sterilization equipment.

  20. Functional Expression of Enterobacterial O-Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Enzymes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Messner, Paul; Whitfield, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The expression of heterologous bacterial glycosyltransferases is of interest for potential application in the emerging field of carbohydrate engineering in gram-positive organisms. To assess the feasibility of using enzymes from gram-negative bacteria, the functional expression of the genes wbaP (formerly rfbP), wecA (formerly rfe), and wbbO (formerly rfbF) from enterobacterial lipopolysaccharide O-polysaccharide biosynthesis pathways was examined in Bacillus subtilis. WbaP and WecA are initiation enzymes for O-polysaccharide formation, catalyzing the transfer of galactosyl 1-phosphate from UDP-galactose and N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, to undecaprenylphosphate. The WecA product (undecaprenylpyrophosphoryl GlcNAc) is used as an acceptor to which the bifunctional wbbO gene product sequentially adds a galactopyranose and a galactofuranose residue from the corresponding UDP sugars to form a lipid-linked trisaccharide. Genes were cloned into the shuttle vectors pRB374 and pAW10. In B. subtilis hosts, the genes were effectively transcribed under the vegII promoter control of pRB374, but the plasmids were susceptible to rearrangements and deletion. In contrast, pAW10-based constructs, in which genes were cloned downstream of the tet resistance cassette, were stable but yielded lower levels of enzyme activity. In vitro glycosyltransferase assays were performed in Escherichia coli and B. subtilis, using membrane preparations as sources of enzymes and endogenous undecaprenylphosphate as an acceptor. Incorporation of radioactivity from UDP-α-d-14C-sugar into reaction products verified the functionality of WbaP, WecA, and WbbO in either host. Enzyme activities in B. subtilis varied between 20 and 75% of those measured in E. coli. PMID:12324313

  1. Promoter Screening from Bacillus subtilis in Various Conditions Hunting for Synthetic Biology and Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yafeng; Nikoloff, Jonas M; Fu, Gang; Chen, Jingqi; Li, Qinggang; Xie, Nengzhong; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    The use of Bacillus subtilis in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering is highly desirable to take advantage of the unique metabolic pathways present in this organism. To do this, an evaluation of B. subtilis' intrinsic biological parts is required to determine the best strategies to accurately regulate metabolic circuits and expression of target proteins. The strengths of promoter candidates were evaluated by measuring relative fluorescence units of a green fluorescent protein reporter, integrated into B. subtilis' chromosome. A total of 84 predicted promoter sequences located upstream of different classes of proteins including heat shock proteins, cell-envelope proteins, and proteins resistant against toxic metals (based on similarity) and other kinds of genes were tested. The expression levels measured ranged from 0.0023 to 4.53-fold of the activity of the well-characterized strong promoter P43. No significant shifts were observed when strains, carrying different promoter candidates, were cultured at high temperature or in media with ethanol, but some strains showed increased activity when cultured under high osmotic pressure. Randomly selected promoter candidates were tested and found to activate transcription of thermostable β-galactosidase (bgaB) at a similar level, implying the ability of these sequences to function as promoter elements in multiple genetic contexts. In addition, selected promoters elevated the final production of both cytoplasmic bgaB and secreted protein α-amylase to about fourfold and twofold, respectively. The generated data allows a deeper understanding of B. subtilis' metabolism and will facilitate future work to develop this organism for synthetic biology. PMID:27380260

  2. Changes in the Acetylome and Succinylome of Bacillus subtilis in Response to Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    Kosono, Saori; Tamura, Masaru; Suzuki, Shota; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Lysine residues can be post-translationally modified by various acyl modifications in bacteria and eukarya. Here, we showed that two major acyl modifications, acetylation and succinylation, were changed in response to the carbon source in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Acetylation was more common when the cells were grown on glucose, glycerol, or pyruvate, whereas succinylation was upregulated when the cells were grown on citrate, reflecting the metabolic states that preferentially produce acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA, respectively. To identify and quantify changes in acetylation and succinylation in response to the carbon source, we performed a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic analysis of cells grown on glucose or citrate. We identified 629 acetylated proteins with 1355 unique acetylation sites and 204 succinylated proteins with 327 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation targeted different metabolic pathways under the two growth conditions: branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis and purine metabolism in glucose and the citrate cycle in citrate. Succinylation preferentially targeted the citrate cycle in citrate. Acetylation and succinylation mostly targeted different lysine residues and showed a preference for different residues surrounding the modification sites, suggesting that the two modifications may depend on different factors such as characteristics of acyl-group donors, molecular environment of the lysine substrate, and/or the modifying enzymes. Changes in acetylation and succinylation were observed in proteins involved in central carbon metabolism and in components of the transcription and translation machineries, such as RNA polymerase and the ribosome. Mutations that modulate protein acylation affected B. subtilis growth. A mutation in acetate kinase (ackA) increased the global acetylation level, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is common in B. subtilis

  3. Direct Comparison of Physical Properties of Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 and B-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kesel, Sara; Grumbein, Stefan; Gümperlein, Ina; Tallawi, Marwa; Marel, Anna-Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria form surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Due to the extreme resistance of these bacterial biofilms to antibiotics and mechanical stresses, biofilms are of growing interest not only in microbiology but also in medicine and industry. Previous studies have determined the extracellular polymeric substances present in the matrix of biofilms formed by Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610. However, studies on the physical properties of biofilms formed by this strain are just emerging. In particular, quantitative data on the contributions of biofilm matrix biopolymers to these physical properties are lacking. Here, we quantitatively investigated three physical properties of B. subtilis NCIB 3610 biofilms: the surface roughness and stiffness and the bulk viscoelasticity of these biofilms. We show how specific biomolecules constituting the biofilm matrix formed by this strain contribute to those biofilm properties. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface roughness and surface elasticity of 1-day-old NCIB 3610 biofilms are strongly affected by the surface layer protein BslA. For a second strain, B. subtilis B-1, which forms biofilms containing mainly γ-polyglutamate, we found significantly different physical biofilm properties that are also differently affected by the commonly used antibacterial agent ethanol. We show that B-1 biofilms are protected from ethanol-induced changes in the biofilm's stiffness and that this protective effect can be transferred to NCIB 3610 biofilms by the sole addition of γ-polyglutamate to growing NCIB 3610 biofilms. Together, our results demonstrate the importance of specific biofilm matrix components for the distinct physical properties of B. subtilis biofilms. PMID:26873313

  4. Anaerobic transcription activation in Bacillus subtilis: identification of distinct FNR-dependent and -independent regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Ramos, H; Boursier, L; Moszer, I; Kunst, F; Danchin, A; Glaser, P

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is able to grow anaerobically using alternative electron acceptors, including nitrate or fumarate. We characterized an operon encoding the dissimilatory nitrate reductase subunits homologous to the Escherichia coli narGHJI operon and the narK gene encoding a protein with nitrite extrusion activity. Downstream from narK and co-transcribed with it a gene (fnr) encoding a protein homologous to E.coli FNR was found. Disruption of fnr abolished both nitrate and fumarate utilization as electron acceptors and anaerobic induction of narK. Four putative FNR binding sites were found in B.subtilis sequences. The consensus sequence, centred at position -41.5, is identical to the consensus for the DNA site for E.coli CAP. Bs-FNR contained a four cysteine residue cluster at its C-terminal end. This is in contrast to Ec-FNR, where a similar cluster is present at the N-terminal end. It is possible that oxygen modulates the activity of both activators by a similar mechanism involving iron. Unlike in E.coli, where fnr expression is weakly repressed by anaerobiosis, fnr gene expression in B.subtilis is strongly activated by anaerobiosis. We have identified in the narK-fnr intergenic region a promotor activated by anaerobiosis independently of FNR. Thus induction of genes involved in anaerobic respiration requires in B.subtilis at least two levels of regulation: activation of fnr transcription and activation of FNR to induce transcription of FNR-dependent promoters. Images PMID:8846791

  5. Expression of Helicobacter pylori urease B on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenwen; Gong, Sitang; Li, Xiu-Min; Yang, Yiyu; Guan, Ruili; Zhou, Shuai; Yao, Shuwen; Xie, Yongqiang; Ou, Zhiying; Zhao, Junhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major risk factor for chronic gastritis, digestive ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. Due to the decreasing efficacy of anti-H. pylori antibiotic therapy in clinical practice, there is renewed interest in the development of anti-H. pylori vaccines. Bacillus subtilis is non-pathogenic and can produce endospores, which can survive under extreme conditions. These features make the B. subtilis spore an ideal vehicle for delivery of heterologous antigens to extreme environments such as the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we displayed H. pylori urease B protein on the B. subtilis spore coat using the spore coat protein CotC as a fusion partner. Western blot analyses were used to verify urease B surface expression on spores. Recombinant spores displaying the urease B antigen were used for oral immunization and were shown to generate humoral response in mice. Urease B-specific secretory IgA in faeces and IgG in serum reached significant levels 2 weeks after oral dosing. In addition, oral immunization of recombinant urease B spores induced a significant reduction (84 %) in the stomach bacterial load (0.25±0.13×10(6) c.f.u.) compared to that in the non-recombinant spores treated group (1.56±0.3×10(6) c.f.u.; P<0.01). This report shows that urease B expressed on B. subtilis spores was immunogenic, and oral administration of urease B spores can provide protection against H. pylori infection.

  6. CodY Regulates Expression of the Bacillus subtilis Extracellular Proteases Vpr and Mpr

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Giulia; Voigt, Birgit; Albrecht, Dirk; Hecker, Michael; Albertini, Alessandra M.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Ferrari, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CodY is a global transcriptional regulator in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria that is responsive to GTP and branched-chain amino acids. By interacting with its two cofactors, it is able to sense the nutritional and energetic status of the cell and respond by regulating expression of adaptive genetic programs. In Bacillus subtilis, more than 200 genes, including those for peptide transporters, intracellular proteolytic enzymes, and amino acid degradative pathways, are controlled by CodY. In this study, we demonstrated that expression of two extracellular proteases, Vpr and Mpr, is negatively controlled by CodY. By gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays, we showed that CodY binds to the regulatory regions of both genes, in the vicinity of their transcription start points. The mpr gene is also characterized by the presence of a second, higher-affinity CodY-binding site located at the beginning of its coding sequence. Using strains carrying vpr- or mpr-lacZ transcriptional fusions in which CodY-binding sites were mutated, we demonstrated that repression of both protease genes is due to the direct effect by CodY and that the mpr internal site is required for regulation. The vpr promoter is a rare example of a sigma H-dependent promoter that is regulated by CodY. In a codY null mutant, Vpr became one of the more abundant proteins of the B. subtilis exoproteome. IMPORTANCE CodY is a global transcriptional regulator of metabolism and virulence in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria. In B. subtilis, more than 200 genes, including those for peptide transporters, intracellular proteolytic enzymes, and amino acid degradative pathways, are controlled by CodY. However, no role for B. subtilis CodY in regulating expression of extracellular proteases has been established to date. In this work, we demonstrate that by binding to the regulatory regions of the corresponding genes, B. subtilis CodY negatively controls expression of Vpr and Mpr, two extracellular

  7. [Comparison of susceptibility of spores of Bacillus subtilis and Czech strains of Clostridium difficile to disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Votava, M; Slitrová, B

    2009-02-01

    An important factor in the prevention of nosocomial outbreaks caused by Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 is the disinfection of a patient environment by reliable sporicidal disinfectants. Sporicidal activity of particular agents is tested on spores of Bacillus subtilis. Questions are brought up if the disinfectant which works on B. subtilis spores will be equally effective on the spores of C. difficile. Therefore we have compared the effects of five disinfectants available on the Czech market on the spores of collection strains of both microbes and on the spores of ten C. difficile field strains isolated from feces of hospitalized patients. The effective substances were: disinfectant No. 1 chloramine B, No. 2 chlorine dioxide, No. 3 formaldehyde and ethan-2-dion, No. 4 peracetic and acetic acids and hydrogen peroxide, No. 5 ethanol and propan-2-ol. The testing was performed using the dilution neutralization method according to (SN EN 13704, the agent reducing the number of spores by more than 3 orders was considered sporicidal. In addition to the standard time 60 min a 15-minutes exposition was used and the effect was tested also under the protein burden. Disinfectant No. 1 showed better effect on the C. difficile than B. subtilis spores, even in lower (1%) concentration. Similarly, the sensitivity of the C. difficile spores to disinfectants No. 2 and 3 was somewhat higher. The sporicidity of the disinfectant No. 4 was so high that it reduced the number of spores of all strains within 15 minutes by more than 4 orders; possible difference in the susceptibility of spores was not observed. Whereas the disinfectant No. 5 was not reliably effective on the spores of B. subtilis, surprisingly it showed the sporicidal effect on the spores of field C. difficile strains. We conclude that spores of field C. difficile strains in particular turned out to be more sensitive to disinfectants than the spores of the collection strain ofB. subtilis. Therefore B. subtilis remains

  8. [Comparison of susceptibility of spores of Bacillus subtilis and Czech strains of Clostridium difficile to disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Votava, M; Slitrová, B

    2009-02-01

    An important factor in the prevention of nosocomial outbreaks caused by Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 is the disinfection of a patient environment by reliable sporicidal disinfectants. Sporicidal activity of particular agents is tested on spores of Bacillus subtilis. Questions are brought up if the disinfectant which works on B. subtilis spores will be equally effective on the spores of C. difficile. Therefore we have compared the effects of five disinfectants available on the Czech market on the spores of collection strains of both microbes and on the spores of ten C. difficile field strains isolated from feces of hospitalized patients. The effective substances were: disinfectant No. 1 chloramine B, No. 2 chlorine dioxide, No. 3 formaldehyde and ethan-2-dion, No. 4 peracetic and acetic acids and hydrogen peroxide, No. 5 ethanol and propan-2-ol. The testing was performed using the dilution neutralization method according to (SN EN 13704, the agent reducing the number of spores by more than 3 orders was considered sporicidal. In addition to the standard time 60 min a 15-minutes exposition was used and the effect was tested also under the protein burden. Disinfectant No. 1 showed better effect on the C. difficile than B. subtilis spores, even in lower (1%) concentration. Similarly, the sensitivity of the C. difficile spores to disinfectants No. 2 and 3 was somewhat higher. The sporicidity of the disinfectant No. 4 was so high that it reduced the number of spores of all strains within 15 minutes by more than 4 orders; possible difference in the susceptibility of spores was not observed. Whereas the disinfectant No. 5 was not reliably effective on the spores of B. subtilis, surprisingly it showed the sporicidal effect on the spores of field C. difficile strains. We conclude that spores of field C. difficile strains in particular turned out to be more sensitive to disinfectants than the spores of the collection strain ofB. subtilis. Therefore B. subtilis remains

  9. Protective role of spore structural components in determining Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to simulated mars surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-12-01

    Spores of wild-type and mutant Bacillus subtilis strains lacking various structural components were exposed to simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. Spore survival and mutagenesis were strongly dependent on the functionality of all of the structural components, with small acid-soluble spore proteins, coat layers, and dipicolinic acid as key protectants.

  10. 77 FR 73934 - Bacillus subtilis Strain QST 713 Variant Soil; Amendment to an Exemption From the Requirement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 55329) (FRL- 8886-7), the EPA issued a notice pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3), 21 U.S.C... toxicological profile of Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 in the Federal Register of July 5, 2000 (65 FR 41365... to move over solid substances, and by a phenotype associated with enhanced biofilm formation,...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1209 Section 180.1209... strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil when used in or on all food commodities....

  12. 40 CFR 180.1209 - Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1209 Section 180.1209... strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713 and strain QST 713 variant soil when used in or on all food commodities....

  13. Protective Role of Spore Structural Components in Determining Bacillus subtilis Spore Resistance to Simulated Mars Surface Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Spores of wild-type and mutant Bacillus subtilis strains lacking various structural components were exposed to simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. Spore survival and mutagenesis were strongly dependent on the functionality of all of the structural components, with small acid-soluble spore proteins, coat layers, and dipicolinic acid as key protectants. PMID:23064347

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis Strain D7XPN1, Isolated from Commercial Bioreactor-Degrading Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Adelskov, Joseph; Patel, Bharat K C

    2014-10-02

    The analysis of the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, and facultatively anaerobic bacterium, Bacillus subtilis strain D7XPN1, identified genes for a range of enzymes with potential in the biodegradation of food waste, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate.

  15. Protective role of spore structural components in determining Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to simulated mars surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-12-01

    Spores of wild-type and mutant Bacillus subtilis strains lacking various structural components were exposed to simulated Martian atmospheric and UV irradiation conditions. Spore survival and mutagenesis were strongly dependent on the functionality of all of the structural components, with small acid-soluble spore proteins, coat layers, and dipicolinic acid as key protectants. PMID:23064347

  16. Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis CBMDC3f with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive foodborne pathogenic bacteria: UV-MALDI-TOF MS analysis of its bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Petroselli, G; Daz, M; Erra-Balsells, R; Audisio, M C

    2015-06-01

    In this work a new Bacillus sp. strain, isolated from honey, was characterized phylogenetically. Its antibacterial activity against three relevant foodborne pathogenic bacteria was studied; the main bioactive metabolites were analyzed using ultraviolet matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI MS). Bacillus CBMDC3f was phylogenetically characterized as Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis after rRNA analysis of the 16S subunit and the gyrA gene (access codes Genbank JX120508 and JX120516, respectively). Its antibacterial potential was evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes (9 strains), B. cereus (3 strains) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Its cell suspension and cell-free supernatant (CFS) exerted significant anti-Listeria and anti-S. aureus activities, while the lipopeptides fraction (LF) also showed anti-B. cereus effect. The UV-MALDI-MS analysis revealed surfactin, iturin and fengycin in the CFS, whereas surfactin predominated in the LF. The CFS from CBMDC3f contained surfactin, iturin and fengycin with four, two and four homologues per family, respectively, whereas four surfactin, one iturin and one fengycin homologues were identified in the LF. For some surfactin homologues, their UV-MALDI-TOF/TOF (MS/MS; Laser Induced Decomposition method, LID) spectra were also obtained. Mass spectrometry analysis contributed with relevant information about the type of lipopeptides that Bacillus strains can synthesize. From our results, surfactin would be the main metabolite responsible for the antibacterial effect. PMID:25820813

  17. HtrC is involved in proteolysis of YpeB during germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Bernhards, Casey B; Chen, Yan; Toutkoushian, Hannah; Popham, David L

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endospores can remain dormant for decades yet can respond to nutrients, germinate, and resume growth within minutes. An essential step in the germination process is degradation of the spore cortex peptidoglycan wall, and the SleB protein in Bacillus species plays a key role in this process. Stable incorporation of SleB into the spore requires the YpeB protein, and some evidence suggests that the two proteins interact within the dormant spore. Early during germination, YpeB is proteolytically processed to a stable fragment. In this work, the primary sites of YpeB cleavage were identified in Bacillus anthracis, and it was shown that the stable products are comprised of the C-terminal domain of YpeB. Modification of the predominant YpeB cleavage sites reduced proteolysis, but cleavage at other sites still resulted in loss of full-length YpeB. A B. anthracis strain lacking the HtrC protease did not generate the same stable YpeB products. In B. anthracis and Bacillus subtilis htrC mutants, YpeB was partially stabilized during germination but was still degraded at a reduced rate by other, unidentified proteases. Purified HtrC cleaved YpeB to a fragment similar to that observed in vivo, and this cleavage was stimulated by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+) ions. A lack of HtrC did not stabilize YpeB or SleB during spore formation in the absence of the partner protein, indicating other proteases are involved in their degradation during sporulation.

  18. Impact of a Bacterial Volatile 2,3-Butanediol on Bacillus subtilis Rhizosphere Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Ahn, Yeo-Rim; Song, Geun C.; Ghim, Sa-Youl; Lee, Soohyun; Lee, Gahyung; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds, such as short chain alcohols, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol, produced by certain strains of root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) elicit induced systemic resistance in plants. The effects of bacterial volatile compounds (BVCs) on plant and fungal growth have been extensively studied; however, the impact of bacterial BVCs on bacterial growth remains poorly understood. In this study the effects of a well-characterized bacterial volatile, 2,3-butanediol, produced by the rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis, were examined in the rhizosphere. The nature of 2,3-butanediol on bacterial cells was assessed, and the effect of the molecule on root colonization was also determined. Pepper roots were inoculated with three B. subtilis strains: the wild type, a 2,3-butanediol overexpressor, and a 2,3-butanediol null mutant. The B. subtilis null strain was the first to be eliminated in the rhizosphere, followed by the wild-type strain. The overexpressor mutant was maintained at roots for the duration of the experiment. Rhizosphere colonization by a saprophytic fungus declined from 14 days post-inoculation in roots treated with the B. subtilis overexpressor strain. Next, exudates from roots exposed to 2,3-butanediol were assessed for their impact on fungal and bacterial growth in vitro. Exudates from plant roots pre-treated with the 2,3-butanediol overexpressor were used to challenge various microorganisms. Growth was inhibited in a saprophytic fungus (Trichoderma sp.), the 2,3-butanediol null B. subtilis strain, and a soil-borne pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum. Direct application of 2,3-butanediol to pepper roots, followed by exposure to R. solanacearum, induced expression of Pathogenesis-Related (PR) genes such as CaPR2, CaSAR8.2, and CaPAL. These results indicate that 2,3-butanediol triggers the secretion of root exudates that modulate soil fungi and rhizosphere bacteria. These data broaden our knowledge regarding bacterial volatiles in the rhizosphere and

  19. Impact of a Bacterial Volatile 2,3-Butanediol on Bacillus subtilis Rhizosphere Robustness.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Ahn, Yeo-Rim; Song, Geun C; Ghim, Sa-Youl; Lee, Soohyun; Lee, Gahyung; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds, such as short chain alcohols, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol, produced by certain strains of root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) elicit induced systemic resistance in plants. The effects of bacterial volatile compounds (BVCs) on plant and fungal growth have been extensively studied; however, the impact of bacterial BVCs on bacterial growth remains poorly understood. In this study the effects of a well-characterized bacterial volatile, 2,3-butanediol, produced by the rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis, were examined in the rhizosphere. The nature of 2,3-butanediol on bacterial cells was assessed, and the effect of the molecule on root colonization was also determined. Pepper roots were inoculated with three B. subtilis strains: the wild type, a 2,3-butanediol overexpressor, and a 2,3-butanediol null mutant. The B. subtilis null strain was the first to be eliminated in the rhizosphere, followed by the wild-type strain. The overexpressor mutant was maintained at roots for the duration of the experiment. Rhizosphere colonization by a saprophytic fungus declined from 14 days post-inoculation in roots treated with the B. subtilis overexpressor strain. Next, exudates from roots exposed to 2,3-butanediol were assessed for their impact on fungal and bacterial growth in vitro. Exudates from plant roots pre-treated with the 2,3-butanediol overexpressor were used to challenge various microorganisms. Growth was inhibited in a saprophytic fungus (Trichoderma sp.), the 2,3-butanediol null B. subtilis strain, and a soil-borne pathogen, Ralstonia solanacearum. Direct application of 2,3-butanediol to pepper roots, followed by exposure to R. solanacearum, induced expression of Pathogenesis-Related (PR) genes such as CaPR2, CaSAR8.2, and CaPAL. These results indicate that 2,3-butanediol triggers the secretion of root exudates that modulate soil fungi and rhizosphere bacteria. These data broaden our knowledge regarding bacterial volatiles in the rhizosphere and

  20. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto on milk production, rumen fermentation and ruminal microbiome of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Wang, J Q; Deng, L F

    2013-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of Bacillus subtilis natto, which was initially isolated from fermented soybeans on milk production, rumen fermentation and ruminal microbiome in dairy cows. In Experiment 1, 36 early lactation Chinese Holstein dairy cows (56 ± 23 days in milk) were randomly assigned to three groups: Control, cows were fed total mixed ration (TMR); BSNLOW, TMR plus 0.5 × 1011 colony-forming units (cfu) of B. subtilis natto/cow per day; and BSNHIGH, TMR plus 1.0 × 1011 cfu of B. subtilis natto/cow per day. During the 70-day treatment period, daily milk production and daily milk composition were determined in individual cows. The results showed that supplementing dairy cows with 0.5 × 1011 and 1.0 × 1011 cfu of B. subtilis natto linearly increased (P < 0.01) milk production (25.2 and 26.4 kg/day v. 23.0 kg/day), 4% fat-corrected milk (27.3 and 28.1 kg/day v. 24.2 kg/day), energy-corrected milk (27.3 and 28.2 kg/day v. 24.2 kg/day), as well as milk fat (1.01 and 1.03 kg/day v. 0.88 kg/day), protein (0.77 and 0.82 kg/day v. 0.69 kg/day) and lactose yield (1.16 and 1.22 kg/day v. 1.06 kg/day) but decreased milk somatic cell counts (SCC) by 3.4% to 5.5% (P < 0.01) in BSNLOW and BSNHIGH treatments compared with Control. In Experiment 2, four rumen-cannulated dairy cows were fed the basal diet from 1 to 7 days (pre-trial period) and rumen samples were collected on days 6 and 7; the same cows then were fed 1.0 × 1011 cfu/day B. subtilis natto from days 8 to 21 (trial period) and rumen samples were collected on days 20 and 21. B. subtilis natto was discontinued from days 22 to 28 (post-trial period) and rumen samples were collected on days 27 and 28. Compared with the pre- and post-periods, ruminal pH decreased by 2.7% to 3.0% during the trial period (P < 0.01), whereas ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), total volatile fatty acids and molar proportion of propionate (P < 0.01) and valerate (P < 0.05) increased. Molar proportion of acetate

  1. [Mutation analysis of the purine operon leader region in Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, K V; korol'kova, N V; Eremina, S Iu; Érrais Lopes, L; Mironov, A S

    2011-07-01

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis purine (purE) operon is a subject of double negative control involving repressor protein PurR and a transcription terminator located in the operon leader region. We have performed site-directed mutagenesis of the specific motives, which are involved in formation of alternative hairpin structures, one of which produces transcription termination at the leader region ofpurEoperon. In vivo and in vitro analyses of the generated mutants have shown that purine bases, guanine and hypoxantine, serve as effector metabolites capable of increasing stability of terminating hairpin within the leader mRNA. Therefore, the leader RNA of purE operon serves as a sensor towards these metabolites and a riboswitch that provides premature termination of the operon transcription. The synergistic effect of the PurR repressor protein and a transcription terminator located at the leader region on the expression of purE operon was also revealed.

  2. Crystallographic Snapshots of the Complete Catalytic Cycle of the Unregulated Aspartate Transcarbamoylase from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    K Harris; G Cockrell; D Puleo; E Kantrowitz

    2011-12-31

    Here, we report high-resolution X-ray structures of Bacillus subtilis aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase), an enzyme that catalyzes one of the first reactions in pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. Structures of the enzyme have been determined in the absence of ligands, in the presence of the substrate carbamoyl phosphate, and in the presence of the bisubstrate/transition state analog N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. Combining the structural data with in silico docking and electrostatic calculations, we have been able to visualize each step in the catalytic cycle of ATCase, from the ordered binding of the substrates, to the formation and decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate, to the ordered release of the products from the active site. Analysis of the conformational changes associated with these steps provides a rationale for the lack of cooperativity in trimeric ATCases that do not possess regulatory subunits.

  3. Methyl group turnover on methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins during chemotaxis by Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thoelke, M.S.; Casper, J.M.; Ordal, G.W. )

    1990-02-05

    The addition of attractant to Bacillus subtilis briefly exposed to radioactive methionine causes an increase of labeling of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. The addition of attractant to cells radiolabeled for longer times shows no change in the extent of methylation. Therefore, the increase in labeling for the briefly labeled cells is due to an increased turnover of methyl groups caused by attractant. All amino acids gave enhanced turnover. This turnover lasted for a prolonged time, probably spanning the period of smooth swimming caused by the attractant addition. Repellent did not affect the turnover when added alone or simultaneously with attractant. Thus, for amino acid attractants, the turnover is probably the excitatory signal, which is seen to extend long into or throughout the adaptation period, not just at the start of it.

  4. Genetic Analysis of Fusion Recombinants in Bacillus Subtilis: Function of the Rece Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ftouhi, N.; Guillen, N.

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis protoplast fusion allows the study of the genetic recombination of an entire procaryotic genome. Protoplasts from bacterial strains marked genetically by chromosomal mutations were fused using polyethylene glycol and the regenerated cells analyzed. Recombinants represent 19.3% of heterozygotic cells; they are haploids. Individual characterization of clones show a unique particular phenotype in each colony suggesting that recombination takes place immediately after fusion, probably before the first cellular division. Recombination occurs in the whole chromosome; in one-third of the cases both reciprocal recombinants could be shown in the colony. The genetic interval that includes the chromosome replication origin shows the highest recombination level. Our results suggest that the RecE protein accounts for most of the fused protoplast recombination; however, some ``replication origin-specific'' recombination events were independent of the recE gene product. PMID:2123461

  5. Exploring the protein stability landscape: Bacillus subtilis lipase A as a model for detergent tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Alexander; Frauenkron-Machedjou, Victorine Josiane; Skoczinski, Pia; Wilhelm, Susanne; Zhu, Leilei; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2015-04-13

    A systematic study was conducted with Bacillus subtilis lipase A (BSLA) to determine the effect of every single amino acid substitution on detergent tolerance. BSLA is a minimal α/β-hydrolase of 181 amino acids with a known crystal structure. It can be expressed in Escherichia coli and is biochemically well characterized. Site saturation mutagenesis resulted in a library of 3439 variants, each with a single amino acid exchange as confirmed by DNA sequencing. The library was tested against four detergents, namely SDS, CTAB, Tween 80, and sulfobetaine. Surface remodeling emerged as an effective engineering strategy to increase tolerance towards detergents. Amino acid residues that significantly affect the tolerance for each of the four detergents were identified. In summary, this systematic analysis provides an experimental dataset to help derive novel protein engineering strategies as well as to direct modeling efforts.

  6. Optimizing Carbon/Nitrogen Ratio for Biosurfactant Production by a Bacillus subtilis Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. R.; Silva, A. J. R.; de Franca, F. P.; Cardoso, V. L.; Sérvulo, E. F. C.

    A Bacillus subtilis strain isolated from contaminated soil from a refinery has been screened for biosurfactant production in crystal sugar (sucrose) with different nitrogen sources (NaNO3' (NH4)2SO4' urea, and residual brewery yeast). The highest reduction in surface tension was achieved with a 48-h fermentation of crystal sugar and ammonium nitrate. Optimization of carbon/nitrogen ratio (3,9, and 15) and agitation rate (50, 150, and 250 rpm) for biosurfactant production was carried out using complete factorial design and response surface analysis. The condition of C/N 3 and 250 rpm allowed the maximum increase in surface activity of biosurfactant. A suitable model has been developed, having presented great accordance experimental data. Preliminary characterization of the bioproduct suggested it to be a lipopeptide with some isomers differing from those of a commercial surfactin.

  7. Physical and enzymological interaction of Bacillus subtilis proteins required for de novo pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R

    2004-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis synthesizes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the active form of vitamin B(6), by a poorly characterized pathway involving the yaaD and yaaE genes. The pdxS (yaaD) mutant was confirmed to be a strict B(6) auxotroph, but the pdxT (yaaE) mutant turned out to be a conditional auxotroph depending on the availability of ammonium in the growth medium. The PdxS and PdxT proteins copurified during affinity chromatography and apparently form a complex that has glutaminase activity. PdxS and PdxT appear to encode the synthase and glutaminase subunits, respectively, of a glutamine amidotransferase of as-yet-unknown specificity essential for B(6) biosynthesis.

  8. Changes in penicillin-binding proteins during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sowell, M O; Buchanan, C E

    1983-01-01

    The penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of Bacillus subtilis were examined in samples collected at various times from sporulating cultures and compared with the PBPs in a presporulation sample. Large increases in vegetative PBPs 2B and 3 and the appearance of at least one new PBP (42,000 daltons) occurred at reproducible times during sporulation. In some strains a second new PBP (60,000 daltons) was also produced. By comparing the PBP activities in sporulating cells and two spo0 mutants we have classified these changes as sporulation-related events rather than the consequences of stationary-phase aging. The other vegetative PBPs (PBPs 1, 2A, 4, and 5) decreased during sporulation, but not in sufficient amount or at the appropriate time to account for the appearance of the new proteins. A possible connection between specific PBP changes and the penicillin-sensitive stages of sporulation is suggested. Images PMID:6402492

  9. Involvement of the stringent response in degradation of glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ruppen, M E; Switzer, R L

    1983-01-01

    Glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase, the first enzyme of purine biosynthesis, has previously been shown to be rapidly inactivated and degraded in Bacillus subtilis cells at the end of growth. The loss of enzyme activity appears to involve the oxidation of an iron-sulfur cluster in the enzyme. The degradation of the inactive enzyme involves some elements of the stringent response because it is inhibited in relA and relC mutants. Intracellular pools of guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphate were measured by an improved extraction procedure in cells that had been manipulated in various ways to induce or inhibit amidotransferase degradation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that one or both of these nucleotides stimulates the synthesis of a protein involved in degradation. An elevated level of these nucleotides was not required for the continued degradation of amidotransferase once it had begun. PMID:6408067

  10. Radiobiological results from the Bacillus subtilis Biostack experiments within the Apollo and the ASTP space flights.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Bucker, H; Hildebrand, D; Horneck, G; Holtz, G; Reitz, G; Schafer, M; Toth, B

    1978-01-01

    In order to check the results of earlier Biostack experiments, new experimental techniques were developed for the Biostack III experiment in the Apollo-Soyuz test project (ASTP). These techniques resulted in an increased accuracy of localization down to 0.2 micrometers for the determination of the impact parameter, accompanied by an increase in the sample size available for biological investigation. In addition, colony forming ability, metabolic mutations, and mutations affecting UV- and x-ray sensitivity were rendered observable by these methods. The biological and physical results obtained so far from the evaluation of the Bacillus subtilis experiment within Biostack III confirm and extend the findings of the previous Biostack experiments. They also add to the questions about the mechanisms of action of the radiation field under investigation, since the observed effects cannot be interpreted in terms of standard concepts.

  11. Numerical simulation of wrinkle morphology formation and the evolution of different Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Hao, Mudong; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Wrinkle morphology is a distinctive phenomenon observed in mature biofilms that are produced by a great number of bacteria. The wrinkle pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the agar substrate and the biofilm itself, governed by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we study the macroscopic structures and the evolution of Bacillus subtilis biofilm wrinkles using the commercial finite element software ABAQUS. A mechanical model and simulation are set up to analyze and evaluate bacteria biofilm's wrinkle characteristics. We uncover the wrinkle formation mechanism and enumerate the quantitative relationship between wrinkle structure and mechanical properties of biofilm and its substrate. Our work can be used to modify the wrinkle pattern and control the biofilm size. PMID:26877034

  12. Rheology, oxygen transfer, and molecular weight characteristics of poly(glutamic acid) fermentation by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Andrew; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2003-05-01

    Poly(glutamic acid) (PGA) is a water-soluble, biodegradable biopolymer that is produced by microbial fermentation. Recent research has shown that PGA can be used in drug delivery applications for the controlled release of paclitaxel (Taxol) in cancer treatment. A fundamental understanding of the key fermentation parameters is necessary to optimize the production and molecular weight characteristics of poly(glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis for paclitaxel and other applications of pharmaceuticals for controlled release. Because of its high molecular weight, PGA fermentation broths exhibit non-Newtonian rheology. In this article we present experimental results on the batch fermentation kinetics of PGA production, mass transfer of oxygen, specific oxygen uptake rate, broth rheology, and molecular weight characterization of the PGA biopolymer.

  13. A dual control mechanism synchronizes riboflavin and sulphur metabolism in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Pedrolli, Danielle Biscaro; Kühm, Christian; Sévin, Daniel C; Vockenhuber, Michael P; Sauer, Uwe; Suess, Beatrix; Mack, Matthias

    2015-11-10

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitches are genetic elements, which in many bacteria control genes responsible for biosynthesis and/or transport of riboflavin (rib genes). Cytoplasmic riboflavin is rapidly and almost completely converted to FMN by flavokinases. When cytoplasmic levels of FMN are sufficient ("high levels"), FMN binding to FMN riboswitches leads to a reduction of rib gene expression. We report here that the protein RibR counteracts the FMN-induced "turn-off" activities of both FMN riboswitches in Bacillus subtilis, allowing rib gene expression even in the presence of high levels of FMN. The reason for this secondary metabolic control by RibR is to couple sulfur metabolism with riboflavin metabolism.

  14. [Influence of silicon dioxide and saponite on growth of Bacillus subtilis IMV B-7023].

    PubMed

    Chobotar'ov, A Iu; Hordiienko, A S; Samchuk, A I; Kurdysh, I K

    2010-01-01

    Growth of Bacillus subtilis IMV B-7023 was studied under the presence of silicon dioxide and saponite cultivation in the medium. It was established that the adding ofthese materials into the medium affects significantly the bacteria growth activity. Efficiency and orientation of the process depends on the type of dispersed material and contents of phosphate in the cultivation medium. Thus, under the concentration of 0.6 g/l PO4(3-) saponite stimulates the growth of bacteria but at a lower concentration (0.1 g/l PO4(3-)) growth activity of microorganisms becomes lower. At the same time in the presence of silicon dioxide the stimulation of bacterial growth is observed at different concentrations of phosphate in the medium. It is shown that the present effect is not the result of the phosphate sorption on the surface of the investigated dispersed materials. The contact interaction of solid particles with bacterial cells was found.

  15. Noise Expands the Response Range of the Bacillus subtilis Competence Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Luke; Liu, Jintao; Wiggins, Chris H.; Süel, Gürol M.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory circuits must contend with intrinsic noise that arises due to finite numbers of proteins. While some circuits act to reduce this noise, others appear to exploit it. A striking example is the competence circuit in Bacillus subtilis, which exhibits much larger noise in the duration of its competence events than a synthetically constructed analog that performs the same function. Here, using stochastic modeling and fluorescence microscopy, we show that this larger noise allows cells to exit terminal phenotypic states, which expands the range of stress levels to which cells are responsive and leads to phenotypic heterogeneity at the population level. This is an important example of how noise confers a functional benefit in a genetic decision-making circuit. PMID:27003682

  16. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiations on Bacillus subtilis spores and T-7 bacteriophage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spizizen, J.; Isherwood, J. E.; Taylor, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis HA 101 and the DNA polymerase I-defective mutant HA 101 (59)F were exposed to selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet light and space vacuum during the return of Apollo 16. In addition, coliphage T-7 suspensions were exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation as part of the Microbial Response to Space Environment Experiment. Optical filters were employed to provide different energy levels at wavelengths 254 nm and 280 nm. Dose-response curves for lethal and mutagenic effects were compared with ground-based data. A close parallel was observed between the results of solar radiation and ground tests with spores of the two strains. However, significantly greater inactivation of T-7 bacteriophage was observed after exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation.

  17. A large dispersed chromosomal region required for chromosome segregation in sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling Juan; Errington, Jeff

    2002-08-01

    The cis-acting sequences required for chromosome segregation are poorly understood in most organisms, including bacteria. Sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis undergo an unusual asymmetric cell division during which the origin of DNA replication (oriC) region of the chromosome migrates to an extreme polar position. We have now characterized the sequences required for this migration. We show that the previously characterized soj-spo0J chromosome segregation system is not essential for chromosome movement to the cell pole, so this must be driven by an additional segregation mechanism. Observations on a large set of precisely engineered chromosomal inversions and translocations have identified a polar localization region (PLR), which lies approximately 150-300 kbp to the left of oriC. Surprisingly, oriC itself has no involvement in this chromosome segregation system. Dissection of the PLR showed that it has internal functional redundancy, reminiscent of the large diffuse centromeres of most eukaryotic cells.

  18. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiations on Bacillus subtilis spores and T7 bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Spizizen, J; Isherwood, J E; Taylor, G R

    1975-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis HA 101 and the DNA polymerase I-defective mutant HA 101 (59) F were exposed to selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet light and space vacuum during the return of Apollo 16. In addition, coliphage T7 suspensions were exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation as part of the Microbial Response to Space Environment Experiment. Optical filters were employed to provide different energy levels at wavelengths 254 nm and 280 nm. Dose-response curves for lethal and mutagenic effects were compared with ground-based data. A close parallel was observed between the results of solar radiation and ground tests with spores of the two strains. However, significantly greater inactivation of T7 bacteriophage was observed after exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation.

  19. Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus subtilis Isolated from Agaricus bisporus Mushroom Compost Against Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Yanyan; Lee, David Yue Wei; Yang, Yang; Xu, Mingshuang; Shen, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain B154, isolated from Agaricus bisporus mushroom compost infected by red bread mold, exhibited antagonistic activities against Neurospora sitophila. Antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi was also observed. The maximum antifungal activity was reached during the stationary phase. This antifungal activity was stable over a wide pH and temperature range and was not affected by proteases. Assay of antifungal activity in vitro indicated that a purified antifungal substance could strongly inhibit mycelia growth and spore germination of N. sitophila. In addition, treatment with strain B154 in A. bisporus mushroom compost infected with N. sitophila significantly increased the yield of bisporus mushrooms. Ultraviolet scan spectroscopy, tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-associated laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed a molecular weight consistent with 1498.7633 Da. The antifungal compound might belong to a new type of lipopeptide fengycin. PMID:26050784

  20. Biosynthesis of riboflavin in Bacillus subtilis: origin of the four-carbon moiety.

    PubMed Central

    Le Van, Q; Keller, P J; Bown, D H; Floss, H G; Bacher, A

    1985-01-01

    We studied the incorporation of [1-13C]ribose and [1,3-13C2]glycerol into the riboflavin precursor 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, using a riboflavin-deficient mutant of Bacillus subtilis. The formation of the pyrazine ring requires the addition of a four-carbon moiety to a pyrimidine precursor. The results show that C-6 alpha, C-6, C-7, and C-7 alpha of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine were biosynthetically equivalent to C-1, C-2, C-3, and C-5 of a pentose phosphate. C-4 of the pentose precursor was lost through an intramolecular skeletal rearrangement. Thus, the last steps in the biosynthesis of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine apparently involve the same mechanism in bacteria as in fungi. PMID:3922947

  1. Responses of Bacillus subtilis spores to space environment: results from experiments in space.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G

    1993-02-01

    Onboard of several spacecrafts (Apollo 16, Spacelab 1, LDEF), spores of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to selected parameters of space, such as space vacuum, different spectral ranges of solar UV-radiation and cosmic rays, applied separately or in combination, and we have studied their survival and genetic changes after retrieval. The spores survive extended periods of time in space--up to several years--, if protected against the high influx of solar UV-radiation. Water desorption caused by the space vacuum leads to structural changes of the DNA; the consequences are an increased mutation frequency and altered photobiological properties of the spores. UV-effects, such as killing and mutagenesis, are augmented, if the spores are in space vacuum during irradiation. Vacuum-specific photoproducts which are different from the 'spore photoproduct' may cause the synergistic response of spores to the simultaneous action of UV and vacuum. The experiments provide an experimental test of certain steps of the panspermia hypothesis.

  2. Chromosomal Location and Properties of Radiation Sensitivity Mutations in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, James A.; Anagnostopoulos, C.

    1970-01-01

    Transformation and transduction crosses involving recA1, recB2, and urv-1 mutations have shown that these mutations belong to three distinct unlinked genetic loci. The precise position of these loci on the Bacillus subtilis chromosome map has been determined. The behavior of recB2 strains in transformation studies suggested a dominance of recB2+ function over recB2 and an early expression of this phenotype during transformation. Strains bearing two ultraviolet sensitivity markers possess a phenotype characteristic of the marker with the most adverse effect on recombination. The possibility that the effects of the two mutations are additive was also considered. Results are also presented which show that a phage-induced enzyme is not responsible for the high transducibility of recA1 strains. PMID:4988238

  3. CdSe quantum dot internalization by Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloepfer, Jeremiah A.; Mielke, Randall E.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2004-06-01

    Biological labeling has been demonstrated with CdSe quantum dots in a variety of animal cells, but bacteria are harder to label because of their cell walls. We discuss the challenges of using minimally coated, bare CdSe quantum dots as luminescent internal labels for bacteria. These quantum dots were solubilized with mercaptoacetic acid and conjugated to adenine. Significant evidence for the internal staining of Bacillus subtilis (Gram positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram negative) using these structures is presented via steady-state emission, epifluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, the E. coli adenine auxotroph, and not the wild type, took up adenine coated quantum dots, and this only occurred in adenine deficient growth media. Labeling strength was enhanced by performing the incubation under room light. This process was examined with steady-state emission spectra and time-resolved luminescence profiles obtained from time-correlated-single-photon counting.

  4. Production of nattokinase by high cell density fed-batch culture of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eun-Yeong; Kim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, In Young; Kim, Beom Soo

    2011-09-01

    Bacillus subtilis was cultivated to high cell density for nattokinase production by pH-stat fed-batch culture. A concentrated mixture solution of glucose and peptone was automatically added by acid-supplying pump when culture pH rose above high limit. Effect of the ratio of glucose to peptone in feeding solution was investigated on cell growth and nattokinase production by changing the ratio from 0.2 to 5 g glucose/g peptone. The highest cell concentration was 77 g/L when the ratio was 0.2 g glucose/g peptone. Cell concentration decreased with increasing the ratio of glucose to peptone in feeding solution, while the optimum condition existed for nattokinase production. The highest nattokinase activity was 14,500 unit/mL at a ratio of 0.33 g glucose/g peptone, which was 4.3 times higher than that in batch culture.

  5. Optimization of media composition for Nattokinase production by Bacillus subtilis using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Deepak, V; Kalishwaralal, K; Ramkumarpandian, S; Babu, S Venkatesh; Senthilkumar, S R; Sangiliyandi, G

    2008-11-01

    Response surface methodology and central composite rotary design (CCRD) was employed to optimize a fermentation medium for the production of Nattokinase by Bacillus subtilis at pH 7.5. The four variables involved in this study were Glucose, Peptone, CaCl2, and MgSO4. The statistical analysis of the results showed that, in the range studied; only peptone had a significant effect on Nattokinase production. The optimized medium containing (%) Glucose: 1, Peptone: 5.5, MgSO4: 0.2 and CaCl2: 0.5 resulted in 2-fold increased level of Nattokinase (3194.25U/ml) production compared to initial level (1599.09U/ml) after 10h of fermentation. Nattokinase production was checked with fibrinolytic activity.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27,724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=74.3, b=49.9, c=56.3 Å, β=95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an Rmerge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase.

  7. Bacillus subtilis α-Phosphoglucomutase Is Required for Normal Cell Morphology and Biofilm Formation†

    PubMed Central

    Lazarevic, Vladimir; Soldo, Blazenka; Médico, Noël; Pooley, Harold; Bron, Sierd; Karamata, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Mutations designated gtaC and gtaE that affect α-phosphoglucomutase activity required for interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate were mapped to the Bacillus subtilis pgcA (yhxB) gene. Backcrossing of the two mutations into the 168 reference strain was accompanied by impaired α-phosphoglucomutase activity in the soluble cell extract fraction, altered colony and cell morphology, and resistance to phages φ29 and ρ11. Altered cell morphology, reversible by additional magnesium ions, may be correlated with a deficiency in the membrane glycolipid. The deficiency in biofilm formation in gtaC and gtaE mutants may be attributed to an inability to synthesize UDP-glucose, an important intermediate in a number of cell envelope biosynthetic processes. PMID:15640167

  8. Hydraphiles enhance antimicrobial potency against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit B; Garrad, Evan C; Stavri, Ariel; Gokel, Michael R; Negin, Saeedeh; Meisel, Joseph W; Cusumano, Zachary; Gokel, George W

    2016-06-15

    Hydraphiles are synthetic amphiphiles that form ion-conducting pores in liposomal membranes. These pores exhibit open-close behavior when studied by planar bilayer conductance techniques. In previous work, we showed that when co-administered with various antibiotics to the DH5α strain of Escherichia coli, they enhanced the drug's potency. We report here potency enhancements at low concentrations of hydraphiles for the structurally and mechanistically unrelated antibiotics erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, and tetracycline against Gram negative E. coli (DH5α and K-12) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as Gram positive Bacillus subtilis. Earlier work suggested that potency increases correlated to ion transport function. The data presented here comport with the function of hydraphiles to enhance membrane permeability in addition to, or instead of, their known function as ion conductors. PMID:27166575

  9. [Effect of argillaceous minerals on the growth of phosphate-mobilizing bacteria Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Kudrish, I K; Bega, Z T

    2006-01-01

    It was shown that the argillaceous minerals montmorillonite and palygorskite at concentrations within 0.2-1.0% considerably accelerate the growth of phosphate-mobilizing bacteria Bacillus subtilis grown in media with hardly soluble Ca3(PO4)2 as the sole source of phosphorus. The most notable effect of these minerals was recorded at concentrations within 0.5-1.0%. The effect of argillaceous minerals in the colloidal form on bacterial growth was more pronounced than that of the powdered ones. An increase in montmorillonite or palygorskite concentrations to 2% is accompanied by the inhibition of the growth of the phosphate-mobilizing strain. At such concentrations the minerals adsorb ca. 22% of the glucose and 11.3% of the phosphate added to the nutrition medium. PMID:17022453

  10. Inactivation of individual Bacillus subtilis spores in dependence on their distance to single cosmic heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Reitz, G; Schafer, M

    1994-10-01

    For radiobiological experiments in space, designed to investigate biological effects of the heavy ions of the cosmic radiation field, a mandatory requirement is the possibility to spatially correlate the observed biological response of individual test organisms to the passage of single heavy ions. Among several undertakings towards this goal, the BIOSTACK experiments in the Apollo missions achieved the highest precision and therefore the most detailed information on this question. Spores of Bacillus subtilis as a highly radiation resistant and microscopically small test organism yielded these quantitative results. This paper will focus on experimental and procedural details, which must be included for an interpretation and a discussion of these findings in comparison to control experiments with accelerated heavy ions. PMID:11539939

  11. Radiobiological results from the Bacillus subtilis Biostack experiments within the Apollo and the ASTP space flights.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Bucker, H; Hildebrand, D; Horneck, G; Holtz, G; Reitz, G; Schafer, M; Toth, B

    1978-01-01

    In order to check the results of earlier Biostack experiments, new experimental techniques were developed for the Biostack III experiment in the Apollo-Soyuz test project (ASTP). These techniques resulted in an increased accuracy of localization down to 0.2 micrometers for the determination of the impact parameter, accompanied by an increase in the sample size available for biological investigation. In addition, colony forming ability, metabolic mutations, and mutations affecting UV- and x-ray sensitivity were rendered observable by these methods. The biological and physical results obtained so far from the evaluation of the Bacillus subtilis experiment within Biostack III confirm and extend the findings of the previous Biostack experiments. They also add to the questions about the mechanisms of action of the radiation field under investigation, since the observed effects cannot be interpreted in terms of standard concepts. PMID:11965659

  12. Crystallographic snapshots of the complete catalytic cycle of the unregulated aspartate transcarbamoylase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Katharine M; Cockrell, Gregory M; Puleo, David E; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2011-08-01

    Here, we report high-resolution X-ray structures of Bacillus subtilis aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase), an enzyme that catalyzes one of the first reactions in pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. Structures of the enzyme have been determined in the absence of ligands, in the presence of the substrate carbamoyl phosphate, and in the presence of the bisubstrate/transition state analog N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. Combining the structural data with in silico docking and electrostatic calculations, we have been able to visualize each step in the catalytic cycle of ATCase, from the ordered binding of the substrates, to the formation and decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate, to the ordered release of the products from the active site. Analysis of the conformational changes associated with these steps provides a rationale for the lack of cooperativity in trimeric ATCases that do not possess regulatory subunits. PMID:21663747

  13. Production and properties of a surfactant obtained from Bacillus subtilis grown on cassava wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Marcia; Pastore, Glaucia Maria

    2006-01-01

    The production and properties of a biosurfactant, synthesized by Bacillus subtilis LB5a strain, using cassava wastewater as substrate were investigated. The microorganism was able to grow and to produce surfactant on cassava waste, reducing the surface tension of medium to 26.6 mN/m and giving a crude surfactant concentration of 3.0 g/L after 48 h. The surface-active compound retained its properties during exposure to elevate temperatures (100 degrees C), high salinity (20% NaCl) and a wide range of pH values. The surfactant was capable of forming stable emulsions with various hydrocarbons. Preliminary chemical characterization revealed that the surfactant has a lipopeptide composition with a CMC value of about 33 mg/L. Cassava wastewater proved to be a suitable substrate for biosurfactant biosynthesis, providing not only bacterial growth and product accumulation but also a surfactant that has interesting and useful properties with potential for many industrial applications.

  14. Bacillus subtilis 168 levansucrase (SacB) activity affects average levan molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Porras-Domínguez, Jaime R; Ávila-Fernández, Ángela; Miranda-Molina, Afonso; Rodríguez-Alegría, María Elena; Munguía, Agustín López

    2015-11-01

    Levan is a fructan polymer that offers a variety of applications in the chemical, health, cosmetic and food industries. Most of the levan applications depend on levan molecular weight, which in turn depends on the source of the synthesizing enzyme and/or on reaction conditions. Here we demonstrate that in the particular case of levansucrase from Bacillus subtilis 168, enzyme concentration is also a factor defining the molecular weight levan distribution. While a bimodal distribution has been reported at the usual enzyme concentrations (1 U/ml equivalent to 0.1 μM levansucrase) we found that a low molecular weight normal distribution is solely obtained al high enzyme concentrations (>5 U/ml equivalent to 0.5 μM levansucrase) while a high normal molecular weight distribution is synthesized at low enzyme doses (0.1 U/ml equivalent to 0.01 μM of levansucrase).

  15. Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus subtilis Isolated from Agaricus bisporus Mushroom Compost Against Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Yanyan; Lee, David Yue Wei; Yang, Yang; Xu, Mingshuang; Shen, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain B154, isolated from Agaricus bisporus mushroom compost infected by red bread mold, exhibited antagonistic activities against Neurospora sitophila. Antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi was also observed. The maximum antifungal activity was reached during the stationary phase. This antifungal activity was stable over a wide pH and temperature range and was not affected by proteases. Assay of antifungal activity in vitro indicated that a purified antifungal substance could strongly inhibit mycelia growth and spore germination of N. sitophila. In addition, treatment with strain B154 in A. bisporus mushroom compost infected with N. sitophila significantly increased the yield of bisporus mushrooms. Ultraviolet scan spectroscopy, tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-associated laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed a molecular weight consistent with 1498.7633 Da. The antifungal compound might belong to a new type of lipopeptide fengycin.

  16. Intrinsic Levanase Activity of Bacillus subtilis 168 Levansucrase (SacB).

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lorenzo, Luz; Porras-Domínguez, Jaime R; Raga-Carbajal, Enrique; Olvera, Clarita; Rodríguez-Alegría, Maria Elena; Carrillo-Nava, Ernesto; Costas, Miguel; López Munguía, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    Levansucrase catalyzes the synthesis of fructose polymers through the transfer of fructosyl units from sucrose to a growing fructan chain. Levanase activity of Bacillus subtilis levansucrase has been described since the very first publications dealing with the mechanism of levan synthesis. However, there is a lack of qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the importance of the intrinsic levan hydrolysis of B. subtilis levansucrase and its role in the levan synthesis process. Particularly, little attention has been paid to the long-term hydrolysis products, including its participation in the final levan molecules distribution. Here, we explored the hydrolytic and transferase activity of the B. subtilis levansucrase (SacB) when levans produced by the same enzyme are used as substrate. We found that levan is hydrolyzed through a first order exo-type mechanism, which is limited to a conversion extent of around 30% when all polymer molecules reach a structure no longer suitable to SacB hydrolysis. To characterize the reaction, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was employed and the evolution of the hydrolysis products profile followed by HPLC, GPC and HPAEC-PAD. The ITC measurements revealed a second step, taking place at the end of the reaction, most probably resulting from disproportionation of accumulated fructo-oligosaccharides. As levanase, levansucrase may use levan as substrate and, through a fructosyl-enzyme complex, behave as a hydrolytic enzyme or as a transferase, as demonstrated when glucose and fructose are added as acceptors. These reactions result in a wide variety of oligosaccharides that are also suitable acceptors for fructo-oligosaccharide synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that SacB in the presence of levan and glucose, through blastose and sucrose synthesis, results in the same fructooligosaccharides profile as that observed in sucrose reactions. We conclude that SacB has an intrinsic levanase activity that contributes to the final

  17. Characterization of single strand origins of cryptic rolling-circle plasmids from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, W J; Venema, G; Bron, S

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we describe the isolation and characterization of single strand origins (SSOs) of several cryptic Bacillus subtilis plasmids which use the rolling-circle mechanism of replication. The plasmids used in this study involved pTA1015, pTA1020, pTA1030, pTA1040, pTA1050 and pTA1060. The SSO of pTA1015 was isolated by shotgun cloning in a specially designed vector, pWM100, which has no SSO of its own. Sequence analysis revealed that the SSO of pTA1015 is almost identical to formerly described palT type SSOs. Also pTA1020 and pTA1060 were shown to contain SSOs highly homologous to palT. Using Southern hybridization with the palT of pTA1015 as a probe, the SSO of pTA1040 was cloned. Sequence analysis revealed a region of 200 bp which is 77% identical to the palT of pTA1015. The plasmids pTA1030 and pTA1050 contain an SSO which is highly homologous to the SSO of pTA1040. The majority of the SSOs of rolling-circle plasmids from B.subtilis seem to belong to two related families which we denote as palT1 (present on pTA1015, pTA1020 and pTA1060) and palT2 (present on pTA1030, pTA1040 and pTA1050). Both families of SSOs are highly efficient single-strand-conversion signals in B.subtilis. Images PMID:7899081

  18. Cloning, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative pyridoxal kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Joseph A.; Das, Sanjan K.; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rice, David W.

    2006-10-01

    A putative pyridoxal kinase from B. subtilis has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized and data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Pyridoxal kinases (PdxK) are able to catalyse the phosphorylation of three vitamin B{sub 6} precursors, pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine, to their 5′-phosphates and play an important role in the vitamin B{sub 6} salvage pathway. Recently, the thiD gene of Bacillus subtilis was found to encode an enzyme which has the activity expected of a pyridoxal kinase despite its previous assignment as an HMPP kinase owing to higher sequence similarity. As such, this enzyme would appear to represent a new class of ‘HMPP kinase-like’ pyridoxal kinases. B. subtilis thiD has been cloned and the protein has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and subsequently crystallized in a binary complex with ADP and Mg{sup 2+}. X-ray diffraction data have been collected from crystals to 2.8 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals belong to a primitive tetragonal system, point group 422, and analysis of the systematic absences suggest that they belong to one of the enantiomorphic pair of space groups P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. Consideration of the space-group symmetry and unit-cell parameters (a = b = 102.9, c = 252.6 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) suggest that the crystals contain between three and six molecules in the asymmetric unit. A full structure determination is under way to provide insights into aspects of the enzyme mechanism and substrate specificity.

  19. Synthesis, Release, and Recapture of Compatible Solute Proline by Osmotically Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Tamara; von Blohn, Carsten; Stanek, Agnieszka; Moses, Susanne; Barzantny, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis synthesizes large amounts of the compatible solute proline as a cellular defense against high osmolarity to ensure a physiologically appropriate level of hydration of the cytoplasm and turgor. It also imports proline for this purpose via the osmotically inducible OpuE transport system. Unexpectedly, an opuE mutant was at a strong growth disadvantage in high-salinity minimal media lacking proline. Appreciable amounts of proline were detected in the culture supernatant of the opuE mutant strain, and they rose concomitantly with increases in the external salinity. We found that the intracellular proline pool of severely salinity-stressed cells of the opuE mutant was considerably lower than that of its opuE+ parent strain. This loss of proline into the medium and the resulting decrease in the intracellular proline content provide a rational explanation for the observed salt-sensitive growth phenotype of cells lacking OpuE. None of the known MscL- and MscS-type mechanosensitive channels of B. subtilis participated in the release of proline under permanently imposed high-salinity growth conditions. The data reported here show that the OpuE transporter not only possesses the previously reported role for the scavenging of exogenously provided proline as an osmoprotectant but also functions as a physiologically highly important recapturing device for proline that is synthesized de novo and subsequently released by salt-stressed B. subtilis cells. The wider implications of our findings for the retention of compatible solutes by osmotically challenged microorganisms and the roles of uptake systems for compatible solutes are considered. PMID:22685134

  20. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore.

    PubMed

    Zawadzka, Anna M; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Nichiporuk, Rita; Fan, Yao; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB(nu)) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB(nu) with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-A crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two alpha/beta/alpha sandwich domains connected by a long alpha-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  1. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Nichiporuk, Rita; Fan, Yao; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePBν) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePBν with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a Gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-Å crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two α/β/α sandwich domains connected by a long α-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies. PMID:19955416

  2. One-Step Chromatographic Purification of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein Expressed in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Kuo-Shun; Lin, Chih-Chang; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Yang, Yu-Chi; Wang, Chung-An; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), is capable of activating human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secrete inammatory mediators. HP-NAP is a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential in vitro diagnostic marker for H. pylori infection. HP-NAP has also been shown to be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma and bladder cancer. Hence, an efficient way to obtain pure HP-NAP needs to be developed. In this study, one-step anion-exchange chromatography in negative mode was applied to purify the recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). This purification technique was based on the binding of host cell proteins and/or impurities other than HP-NAP to DEAE Sephadex resins. At pH 8.0, almost no other proteins except HP-NAP passed through the DEAE Sephadex column. More than 60% of the total HP-NAP with purity higher than 91% was recovered in the flow-through fraction from this single-step DEAE Sephadex chromatography. The purified recombinant HP-NAP was further demonstrated to be a multimeric protein with a secondary structure of α-helix and capable of activating human neutrophils to stimulate ROS production. Thus, this one-step negative chromatography using DEAE Sephadex resin can efficiently yield functional HP-NAP from B. subtilis in its native form with high purity. HP-NAP purified by this method could be further utilized for the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for H. pylori infection. PMID:23577158

  3. Cyclic lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis activate distinct patterns of defence responses in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Farace, Giovanni; Fernandez, Olivier; Jacquens, Lucile; Coutte, François; Krier, François; Jacques, Philippe; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaid Ait; Jacquard, Cédric; Dorey, Stéphan

    2015-02-01

    Non-self-recognition of microorganisms partly relies on the perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and leads to the activation of an innate immune response. Bacillus subtilis produces three main families of cyclic lipopeptides (LPs), namely surfactins, iturins and fengycins. Although LPs are involved in induced systemic resistance (ISR) activation, little is known about defence responses induced by these molecules and their involvement in local resistance to fungi. Here, we showed that purified surfactin, mycosubtilin (iturin family) and plipastatin (fengycin family) are perceived by grapevine plant cells. Although surfactin and mycosubtilin stimulated grapevine innate immune responses, they differentially activated early signalling pathways and defence gene expression. By contrast, plipastatin perception by grapevine cells only resulted in early signalling activation. Gene expression analysis suggested that mycosubtilin activated salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways, whereas surfactin mainly induced an SA-regulated response. Although mycosubtilin and plipastatin displayed direct antifungal activity, only surfactin and mycosubtilin treatments resulted in a local long-lasting enhanced tolerance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea in grapevine leaves. Moreover, challenge with specific strains overproducing surfactin and mycosubtilin led to a slightly enhanced stimulation of the defence response compared with the LP-non-producing strain of B. subtilis. Altogether, our results provide the first comprehensive view of the involvement of LPs from B. subtilis in grapevine plant defence and local resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Bo. cinerea. Moreover, this work is the first to highlight the ability of mycosubtilin to trigger an immune response in plants. PMID:25040001

  4. Intrinsic Levanase Activity of Bacillus subtilis 168 Levansucrase (SacB)

    PubMed Central

    Raga-Carbajal, Enrique; Olvera, Clarita; Rodríguez-Alegría, Maria Elena; Carrillo-Nava, Ernesto; Costas, Miguel; López Munguía, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    Levansucrase catalyzes the synthesis of fructose polymers through the transfer of fructosyl units from sucrose to a growing fructan chain. Levanase activity of Bacillus subtilis levansucrase has been described since the very first publications dealing with the mechanism of levan synthesis. However, there is a lack of qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding the importance of the intrinsic levan hydrolysis of B. subtilis levansucrase and its role in the levan synthesis process. Particularly, little attention has been paid to the long-term hydrolysis products, including its participation in the final levan molecules distribution. Here, we explored the hydrolytic and transferase activity of the B. subtilis levansucrase (SacB) when levans produced by the same enzyme are used as substrate. We found that levan is hydrolyzed through a first order exo-type mechanism, which is limited to a conversion extent of around 30% when all polymer molecules reach a structure no longer suitable to SacB hydrolysis. To characterize the reaction, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was employed and the evolution of the hydrolysis products profile followed by HPLC, GPC and HPAEC-PAD. The ITC measurements revealed a second step, taking place at the end of the reaction, most probably resulting from disproportionation of accumulated fructo-oligosaccharides. As levanase, levansucrase may use levan as substrate and, through a fructosyl-enzyme complex, behave as a hydrolytic enzyme or as a transferase, as demonstrated when glucose and fructose are added as acceptors. These reactions result in a wide variety of oligosaccharides that are also suitable acceptors for fructo-oligosaccharide synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that SacB in the presence of levan and glucose, through blastose and sucrose synthesis, results in the same fructooligosaccharides profile as that observed in sucrose reactions. We conclude that SacB has an intrinsic levanase activity that contributes to the final

  5. Protein-protein interaction domains of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA.

    PubMed

    van Baarle, Suey; Celik, Ilkay Nazli; Kaval, Karan Gautam; Bramkamp, Marc; Hamoen, Leendert W; Halbedel, Sven

    2013-03-01

    DivIVA proteins are curvature-sensitive membrane binding proteins that recruit other proteins to the poles and the division septum. They consist of a conserved N-terminal lipid binding domain fused to a less conserved C-terminal domain. DivIVA homologues interact with different proteins involved in cell division, chromosome segregation, genetic competence, or cell wall synthesis. It is unknown how DivIVA interacts with these proteins, and we used the interaction of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA with MinJ and RacA to investigate this. MinJ is a transmembrane protein controlling division site selection, and the DNA-binding protein RacA is crucial for chromosome segregation during sporulation. Initial bacterial two-hybrid experiments revealed that the C terminus of DivIVA appears to be important for recruiting both proteins. However, the interpretation of these results is limited since it appeared that C-terminal truncations also interfere with DivIVA oligomerization. Therefore, a chimera approach was followed, making use of the fact that Listeria monocytogenes DivIVA shows normal polar localization but is not biologically active when expressed in B. subtilis. Complementation experiments with different chimeras of B. subtilis and L. monocytogenes DivIVA suggest that MinJ and RacA bind to separate DivIVA domains. Fluorescence microscopy of green fluorescent protein-tagged RacA and MinJ corroborated this conclusion and suggests that MinJ recruitment operates via the N-terminal lipid binding domain, whereas RacA interacts with the C-terminal domain. We speculate that this difference is related to the cellular compartments in which MinJ and RacA are active: the cell membrane and the cytoplasm, respectively.

  6. Protein-Protein Interaction Domains of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA

    PubMed Central

    van Baarle, Suey; Celik, Ilkay Nazli; Kaval, Karan Gautam; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    DivIVA proteins are curvature-sensitive membrane binding proteins that recruit other proteins to the poles and the division septum. They consist of a conserved N-terminal lipid binding domain fused to a less conserved C-terminal domain. DivIVA homologues interact with different proteins involved in cell division, chromosome segregation, genetic competence, or cell wall synthesis. It is unknown how DivIVA interacts with these proteins, and we used the interaction of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA with MinJ and RacA to investigate this. MinJ is a transmembrane protein controlling division site selection, and the DNA-binding protein RacA is crucial for chromosome segregation during sporulation. Initial bacterial two-hybrid experiments revealed that the C terminus of DivIVA appears to be important for recruiting both proteins. However, the interpretation of these results is limited since it appeared that C-terminal truncations also interfere with DivIVA oligomerization. Therefore, a chimera approach was followed, making use of the fact that Listeria monocytogenes DivIVA shows normal polar localization but is not biologically active when expressed in B. subtilis. Complementation experiments with different chimeras of B. subtilis and L. monocytogenes DivIVA suggest that MinJ and RacA bind to separate DivIVA domains. Fluorescence microscopy of green fluorescent protein-tagged RacA and MinJ corroborated this conclusion and suggests that MinJ recruitment operates via the N-terminal lipid binding domain, whereas RacA interacts with the C-terminal domain. We speculate that this difference is related to the cellular compartments in which MinJ and RacA are active: the cell membrane and the cytoplasm, respectively. PMID:23264578

  7. Antimicrobial, antiadhesive and antibiofilm potential of lipopeptides synthesised by Bacillus subtilis, on uropathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Moryl, Magdalena; Spętana, Magdalena; Dziubek, Klaudia; Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Różalska, Sylwia; Płaza, Grażyna A; Różalski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of lipopeptide biosurfactants from surfactin, iturin and fengycin families, synthesised by the Bacillus subtilis I'1a strain, on uropathogenic bacteria, including the effects on planktonic growth, processes of biofilm formation and dislodging. Antimicrobial activity was tested against 32 uropathogenic strains belonging to 12 different species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The sensitivity of 25 tested bacterial strains to the B. subtilis I'1a filtrate was confirmed by an agar diffusion assay. None of the strains seemed to be sensitive to pure surfactin at concentrations ranging from 0.1 mg × ml(-1) to 0.4 mg ml(-1). After the treatment of uropathogens with B. subtilis lipopeptides, the metabolic activity of planktonic cells was inhibited by 88.05±3.96% in the case of 21 studied uropathogens, the process of biofilm formation was reduced by 88.15±4.77% in the case of 24 uropathogens and mature biofilms of 18 strains were dislodged by about 81.20±4.72%. Ten strains of uropathogenic bacteria were selected to study the antimicrobial activity of surfactin (concentrations 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg × ml(-1)). Surfactin had no influence on the metabolic activity of planktonic forms of uropathogens, however, biofilms of 5 tested strains were reduced by 64.77±9.05% in the presence of this biosurfactant at the concentration 0.1 mg × ml(-1). The negative effect of the compound on the biofilm formation process was observed at all concentrations used. The above-described results were fully confirmed by CLSM. It could suggest that synergistic application of biosurfactants could be efficient in uropathogen eradication. PMID:26505130

  8. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore

    SciTech Connect

    Zawadzka, A. M.; Kim, Y.; Maltseva, N; Nichiporuk, R; Fan, Y; Joachimiak, A; Raymond, KN

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB{sup {nu}}) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB{sup {nu}} with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a Gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich domains connected by a long {alpha}-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of Temporal Alterations in Cellular Proteome of Bacillus subtilis under Curcumin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Sinha, Sneha; Ray, Sandipan; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Dhali, Snigdha; Srikanth, Rapole; Panda, Dulal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a natural dietary compound with antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and negative bacteria. This study aims to investigate the proteome level alterations in Bacillus subtilis due to curcumin treatment and identification of its molecular/cellular targets to understand the mechanism of action. We have performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of B. subtilis AH75 strain at different time intervals of curcumin treatment (20, 60 and 120 min after the drug exposure, three replicates) to compare the protein expression profiles using two complementary quantitative proteomic techniques, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive longitudinal investigation describing the effect of curcumin treatment on B. subtilis proteome. The proteomics analysis revealed several interesting targets such UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase 1, putative septation protein SpoVG and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit. Further, in silico pathway analysis using DAVID and KOBAS has revealed modulation of pathways related to the fatty acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis, which are crucial for cell viability. Our findings revealed that curcumin treatment lead to inhibition of the cell wall and fatty acid synthesis in addition to differential expression of many crucial proteins involved in modulation of bacterial metabolism. Findings obtained from proteomics analysis were further validated using 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) assay for respiratory activity, resazurin assay for metabolic activity and membrane integrity assay by potassium and inorganic phosphate leakage measurement. The gene expression analysis of selected cell wall biosynthesis enzymes has strengthened the proteomics findings and indicated the major effect of curcumin on cell division. PMID:25874956

  10. Role of the Fur Regulon in Iron Transport in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ollinger, Juliane; Song, Kyung-Bok; Antelmann, Haike; Hecker, Michael; Helmann, John D.

    2006-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein mediates the iron-dependent repression of at least 20 operons encoding ∼40 genes. We investigated the physiological roles of Fur-regulated genes by the construction of null mutations in 14 transcription units known or predicted to function in siderophore biosynthesis or iron uptake. We demonstrate that ywbLMN, encoding an elemental iron uptake system orthologous to the copper oxidase-dependent Fe(III) uptake system of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is essential for growth in low iron minimal medium lacking citric acid. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoyl-glycine (Itoic acid), the siderophore precursor produced by laboratory strains of B. subtilis, is of secondary importance. In the presence of citrate, the YfmCDEF ABC transporter is required for optimal growth. B. subtilis is unable to grow in minimal medium containing the iron chelator EDDHA unless the ability to synthesize the intact bacillibactin siderophore is restored (by the introduction of a functional sfp gene) or exogenous siderophores are provided. Utilization of the catecholate siderophores bacillibactin and enterobactin requires the FeuABC importer and the YusV ATPase. Utilization of hydroxamate siderophores requires the FhuBGC ABC transporter together with the FhuD (ferrichrome) or YxeB (ferrioxamine) substrate-binding proteins. Growth with schizokinen or arthrobactin is at least partially dependent on the YfhA YfiYZ importer and the YusV ATPase. We have also investigated the effects of a fur mutation on the proteome and documented the derepression of 11 Fur-regulated proteins, including a newly identified thioredoxin reductase homolog, YcgT. PMID:16672620

  11. Enhanced inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores during solar photolysis of free available chlorine.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Jenna E; Zhou, Peiran; Mao, Quanxin; Asato, Shelby S; Meschke, John S; Dodd, Michael C

    2013-11-19

    Aqueous free available chlorine (FAC) can be photolyzed by sunlight and/or artificial UV light to generate various reactive oxygen species, including HO(•) and O((3)P). The influence of this chemistry on inactivation of chlorine-resistant microorganisms was investigated using Bacillus subtilis endospores as model microbial agents and simulated and natural solar radiation as light sources. Irradiation of FAC solutions markedly enhanced inactivation of B. subtilis spores in 10 mM phosphate buffer; increasing inactivation rate constants by as much as 600%, shortening inactivation curve lag phase by up to 73% and lowering CTs required for 2 log10 inactivation by as much as 71% at pH 8.0 and 10 °C. Similar results were observed at pH 7.4 and 10 °C in two drinking water samples with respective DOC concentrations and alkalinities of 0.6 and 1.2 mg C/L and 81.8 and 17.1 mg/L as CaCO3. Solar radiation alone did not inactivate B. subtilis spores under the conditions investigated. A variety of experimental data indicate that the observed enhancements in spore inactivation can be attributed to the concomitant attack of spores by HO(•) and O3, the latter of which was found to accumulate to micromolar concentrations during simulated solar irradiation of 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 8, 10 °C) containing [FAC]0 = 8 mg/L as Cl2.

  12. Proteins involved in formation of the outermost layer of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Daisuke; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the outermost structure of the Bacillus subtilis spore, we analyzed the accessibility of antibodies to proteins on spores of B. subtilis. Anti-green fluorescent protein (GFP) antibodies efficiently accessed GFP fused to CgeA or CotZ, which were previously assigned to the outermost layer termed the spore crust. However, anti-GFP antibodies did not bind to spores of strains expressing GFP fused to 14 outer coat, inner coat, or cortex proteins. Anti-CgeA antibodies bound to spores of wild-type and CgeA-GFP strains but not cgeA mutant spores. These results suggest that the spore crust covers the spore coat and is the externally exposed, outermost layer of the B. subtilis spore. We found that CotZ was essential for the spore crust to surround the spore but not for spore coat formation, indicating that CotZ plays a critical role in spore crust formation. In addition, we found that CotY-GFP was exposed on the surface of the spore, suggesting that CotY is an additional component of the spore crust. Moreover, the localization of CotY-GFP around the spore depended on CotZ, and CotY and CotZ depended on each other for spore assembly. Furthermore, a disruption of cotW affected the assembly of CotV-GFP, and a disruption of cotX affected the assembly of both CotV-GFP and CgeA-GFP. These results suggest that cgeA and genes in the cotVWXYZ cluster are involved in spore crust formation.

  13. Directed evolution of CotA laccase for increased substrate specificity using Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nirupama; Farinas, Edgardo T

    2010-08-01

    Directed evolution is an effective strategy to engineer and optimize protein properties, and microbial cell-surface display is a successful method to screen protein libraries. Protein surface display on Bacillus subtilis spores is demonstrated as a tool for screening protein libraries for the first time. Spore display offers advantages over more commonly utilized microbe cell-surface display systems, which include gram-negative bacteria, phage and yeast. For instance, protein-folding problems associated with the expressed recombinant polypeptide crossing membranes are avoided. Hence, a different region of protein space can be explored that previously was not accessible. In addition, spores tolerate many physical/chemical extremes; hence, the displayed proteins are "preimmobilized" on the inherently inert spore surface. Immobilized proteins have several advantages when used in industrial processes. The protein stability is increased and separations are simplified. Finally, immobilized proteins can be used in a wide array of simple device applications and configurations. The substrate specificity of the enzyme CotA is narrowed. CotA is a laccase and it occurs naturally on the outer coat of B. subtilis spores. A library of CotA genes were expressed in the spore coat, and it was screened for activity toward ABTS [diammonium 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate)] over SGZ (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-benzaldehyde azine). A mutant CotA was found to be 120-fold more specific for ABTS. This research demonstrates that B. subtilis spores can be a useful platform for screen protein libraries.

  14. Engineering of Bacillus subtilis Strains To Allow Rapid Characterization of Heterologous Diguanylate Cyclases and Phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohui; Dong, Xiao; Subramanian, Sundharraman; Matthews, Paige M.; Cooper, Caleb A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence, are often regulated by changes in the available concentration of cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Generally, high c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with decreased motility and increased biofilm formation and low c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with an increase in motility and activation of virulence pathways. The study of c-di-GMP is complicated, however, by the fact that organisms often encode dozens of redundant enzymes that synthesize and hydrolyze c-di-GMP, diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs); thus, determining the contribution of any one particular enzyme is challenging. In an effort to develop a facile system to study c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes, we have engineered a suite of Bacillus subtilis strains to assess the effect of individual heterologously expressed proteins on c-di-GMP levels. As a proof of principle, we characterized all 37 known genes encoding predicted DGCs and PDEs in Clostridium difficile using parallel readouts of swarming motility and fluorescence from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed under the control of a c-di-GMP-controlled riboswitch. We found that 27 of the 37 putative C. difficile 630 c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes had either active cyclase or phosphodiesterase activity, with agreement between our motility phenotypes and fluorescence-based c-di-GMP reporter. Finally, we show that there appears to be a threshold level of c-di-GMP needed to inhibit motility in Bacillus subtilis. PMID:25085482

  15. Effects of thermoradiation treatments on the DNA of Bacillus subtilis endospores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2001-12-01

    Endospores of the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, have been shown to exhibit a synergistic rate of cell death when treated with particular levels of heat and ionizing radiation in combination. This synergism has been documented for a number of different organisms at various temperatures and radiation doses (Sivinski, H. D., D. M. Garst, M. C. Reynolds, C. A. Trauth, Jr., R. E. Trujillo, and W. J. Whitfield, ``The Synergistic Inactivation of Biological Systems by Thermoradiation,'' Industrial Sterilization, International Symposium, Amsterdam, 1972, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, pp. 305-335). However, the mechanism of the synergistic action is unknown. This study attempted to determine whether the mechanism of synergism was specifically connected to the DNA strand breakage-either single strand breakage or double strand breakage. Some work was also done to examine the effect of free radicals and ions created in the spore body by the radiation treatments, as well as to determine the functionality of repair enzymes following heat, radiation, and thermoradiation treatments. Bacillus subtilis spores were treated at combinations of 33 kr/hr, 15 kr/hr, 105°C, 85°C, 63°C, and room temperature. Some synergistic correlation was found with the number of double strand breaks, and a strong correlation was found with the number of single strand breaks. DNA was damaged more by irradiation in the naked state than when encased within the spore, indicating that the spore encasement provides an overall protective effect from radiation damage in spite of free radicals and ions which may be created from molecules other than the DNA molecule within the spore body. Repair enzymes appeared to be functional in their ability to repair single and double strand breaks following treatments by radiation only, heat only, and thermoradiation.

  16. Bacillus subtilis 6S-2 RNA serves as a template for short transcripts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Philipp G; Schlereth, Julia; Lechner, Marcus; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-04-01

    The global transcriptional regulator 6S RNA is abundant in a broad range of bacteria. The RNA competes with DNA promoters for binding to the housekeeping RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme. When bound to RNAP, 6S RNA serves as a transcription template for RNAP in an RNA-dependent RNA polymerization reaction. The resulting short RNA transcripts (so-called product RNAs = pRNAs) can induce a stable structural rearrangement of 6S RNA when reaching a certain length. This rearrangement leads to the release of RNAP and thus the recovery of transcription at DNA promoters. While most bacteria express a single 6S RNA, some harbor a second 6S RNA homolog (termed 6S-2 RNA in Bacillus subtilis). Bacillus subtilis 6S-2 RNA was recently shown to exhibit essentially all hallmark features of a bona fide 6S RNA in vitro, but evidence for the synthesis of 6S-2 RNA-derived pRNAs in vivo has been lacking so far. This raised the question of whether the block of RNAP by 6S-2 RNA might be lifted by a mechanism other than pRNA synthesis. However, here we demonstrate that 6S-2 RNA is able to serve as a template for pRNA synthesis in vivo. We verify this finding by using three independent approaches including a novel primer extension assay. Thus, we demonstrate the first example of an organism that expresses two distinct 6S RNAs that both exhibit all mechanistic features defined for this type of regulatory RNA.

  17. Water and Small-Molecule Permeation of Dormant Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Nathan; Feijó Delgado, Francisco; Setlow, Barbara; Setlow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We use a suspended microchannel resonator to characterize the water and small-molecule permeability of Bacillus subtilis spores based on spores' buoyant mass in different solutions. Consistent with previous results, we found that the spore coat is not a significant barrier to small molecules, and the extent to which small molecules may enter the spore is size dependent. We have developed a method to directly observe the exchange kinetics of intraspore water with deuterium oxide, and we applied this method to wild-type spores and a panel of congenic mutants with deficiencies in the assembly or structure of the coat. Compared to wild-type spores, which exchange in approximately 1 s, several coat mutant spores were found to have relatively high water permeability with exchange times below the ∼200-ms temporal resolution of our assay. In addition, we found that the water permeability of the spore correlates with the ability of spores to germinate with dodecylamine and with the ability of TbCl3 to inhibit germination with l-valine. These results suggest that the structure of the coat may be necessary for maintaining low water permeability. IMPORTANCE Spores of Bacillus species cause food spoilage and disease and are extremely resistant to standard decontamination methods. This hardiness is partly due to spores' extremely low permeability to chemicals, including water. We present a method to directly monitor the uptake of molecules into B. subtilis spores by weighing spores in fluid. The results demonstrate the exchange of core water with subsecond resolution and show a correlation between water permeability and the rate at which small molecules can initiate or inhibit germination in coat-damaged spores. The ability to directly measure the uptake of molecules in the context of spores with known structural or genetic deficiencies is expected to provide insight into the determinants of spores' extreme resistance. PMID:26483518

  18. Degradation of soil cyanide by single and mixed cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nwokoro, Ogbonnaya; Dibua, Marie Esther Uju

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study whether certain bacteria could be used for cyanide degradation in soil. The bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis were selected based on their good growth in a minimal medium containing 0.8 mg mL-1 potassium cyanide (KCN). In this study we tested their ability to reduce cyanide levels in a medium containing 1.5 mg mL-1 of KCN. Although both microorganisms reduced cyanide levels, Pseudomonas stutzeri was the more effective test organism. Later on, the selected cultures were grown, diluted and their various cell concentrations were used individually and in combination to test their ability of cyanide degradation in soil samples collected around a cassava processing mill. Bacillus subtilis caused degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil immediately with an inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) to 0.072 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) implying a 66.9 % reduction. Pseudomonas stutzeri cell concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) decreased soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil initially to 0.061 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) (72 % reduction). The mixed culture of the two bacteria produced the best degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil sample with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) initially to 0.025 mg g-1 soil with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) after 10 days incubation resulting in an 88.5 % degradation of soil cyanide. The analysed bacteria displayed high cyanide degradation potential and may be useful for efficient decontamination of cyanide contaminated sites.

  19. Transcriptome analysis guided metabolic engineering of Bacillus subtilis for riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Zhigang; Chen, Xun; Zhao, Xueming

    2009-01-01

    A comparative transcriptome profiling between a riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis strain RH33 and the wild-type strain B. subtilis 168 was performed, complemented with metabolite pool and nucleotide sequence analysis, to rationally identify new targets for improving riboflavin production. The pur operon (purEKBCSQLFMNHD) together with other PurR-regulated genes (glyA, guaC, pbuG, xpt-pbuX, yqhZ-folD, and pbuO) was all down-regulated in RH33, which consequently limited the supply of the riboflavin precursors. As 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(a)-pyrophosphate (PRPP) strongly inhibits the binding of PurR to its targets, it was inferred that the reduced expression of PurR-regulated genes might be caused by a low PRPP pool, which was subsequently confirmed by metabolite analysis. Thus, we selected and co-overexpressed prs and ywlF genes in RH33, which are involved in the biosynthetic pathway of PRPP from ribulose-5-phosphate. This co-amplification led to an elevated PRPP pool and thus the increased transcript abundances of PurR-regulated genes participated in riboflavin precursor biosynthesis. The riboflavin titer was increased by 25% (up to 15 g l(-1)) in fed-batch fermentation.

  20. Evaluation of cashew apple juice for surfactin production by Bacillus subtilis LAMI008.

    PubMed

    Ponte Rocha, Maria Valderez; Gomes Barreto, Raphaela V; Melo, Vânia Maria M; Barros Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha

    2009-05-01

    Bacillus subtilis LAMI008 strain isolated from the tank of Chlorination at the Wastewater Treatment Plant on Campus do Pici in Federal University of Ceará, Brazil has been screened for surfactin production in mineral medium containing clarified cashew apple juice (MM-CAJC). Results were compared with the ones obtained using mineral medium with glucose PA as carbon source. The influence on growth and surfactin production of culture medium supplementation with yeast extract was also studied. The substrate concentration analysis indicated that B. subtilis LAMI008 was able to degrade all carbon sources studied and produce biosurfactant. The highest reduction in surface tension was achieved with the fermentation of MM-CAJC, supplemented with yeast extract, which decreased from 58.95 +/- 0.10 to 38.10 +/- 0.81 dyn cm(-1). The biosurfactant produced was capable of emulsifying kerosene, achieving an emulsification index of 65%. Surfactin concentration of 3.5 mg L(-1) was obtained when MM-CAJC, supplemented with yeast extract, was used, thus indicating that it is feasible to produce surfactin from clarified cashew apple juice, a renewable and low-cost carbon source.

  1. SubtiList: the reference database for the Bacillus subtilis genome.

    PubMed

    Moszer, Ivan; Jones, Louis M; Moreira, Sandrine; Fabry, Cécilia; Danchin, Antoine

    2002-01-01

    SubtiList is the reference database dedicated to the genome of Bacillus subtilis 168, the paradigm of Gram-positive endospore-forming bacteria. Developed in the framework of the B.subtilis genome project, SubtiList provides a curated dataset of DNA and protein sequences, combined with the relevant annotations and functional assignments. Information about gene functions and products is continuously updated by linking relevant bibliographic references. Recently, sequence corrections arising from both systematic verifications and submissions by individual scientists were included in the reference genome sequence. SubtiList is based on a generic relational data schema and a World Wide Web interface developed for the handling of bacterial genomes, called GenoList. The World Wide Web interface was designed to allow users to easily browse through genome data and retrieve information according to common biological queries. SubtiList also provides more elaborate tools, such as pattern searching, which are tightly connected to the overall browsing system. SubtiList is accessible at http://genolist.pasteur.fr/SubtiList/. Similar bacterial databases are accessible at http://genolist.pasteur.fr/. PMID:11752255

  2. [Adhesion of Bacillus subtilis on the surface of pectin-calcium gel].

    PubMed

    Gunter, E A; Melekhin, A K

    2015-01-01

    Pectin-calcium gels obtained based on pectins of callus cultures are able to adhere to the surface of cells of Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis to various degrees and this is thanks to the structural features of pectin. Rapid adhesion of the cells to gels obtained from the pectin of Tanacetum vulgare (TVC) callus cultures is associated with a high content of the linear region in the carbohydrate chain of pectin, a high molecular weight, and a low degree of methyl etherification of pectin. The number of adherent cells on the surface of gels obtained from pectins of Silene vulgaris callus cultures (SVC), TVC, and Lemna minor (LMC) after 8 h of incubation was close, whereas the number of cells was minimal on a gel produced using the pectin of Silene tatarica (STC) callus culture. This was due to the higher degree of methyl etherification of STC pectin (45%) compared to other pectins (4-12%). The adhesion rate constant (k) of B. subtilis for TCV gel during the first 120 min was the highest in comparison with other gels; the k value for SVC, STC and LMC gels was similar. The lowest level of k was characteristic for the gel from commercial apple pectin. The obtained data can beused for the production of gels with adhesive and antiadhesive properties. PMID:25842905

  3. [Proteomic analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 transforming cis-propenylphosphonic acid to fosfomycin].

    PubMed

    Xie, Fuhong; Chao, Yapeng; Shi, Jiaji; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Jing; Qian, Shijun

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanism of transformation by Bacillus subtilis strain 168 by proteomic analysis. B. subtilis strain 168 was able to stereoselectively transform cis-propenylphosphonic acid (cPPA) to fosfomycin. The maximal fosfomycin production was 816.6 microg/mL after two days cultivation, with a conversion rate of 36.05%. We separated the whole cellular proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) method, and 562 protein spots were detected in the presence of cPPA in the medium, while 527 protein spots were detected in the absence of cPPA. Of them, 98 differentially expressed protein spots were found. Among them, 52 proteins were up-regulated whereas 20 were down-regulated in the presence of cPPA in the medium, and 26 induced at the presence of cPPA. The differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by combined MS and MS/MS methods. Eighty protein spots, including 45 up-regulated proteins, 17 down-regulated proteins, and 18 induced by cPPA were identified. Based on the results of proteomic analysis, we postulated two steps of transformation: in the first step, cPPA was hydrated to 2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid; in the second step, 2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid was transformed to fosfomycin via a dehydrogenation reaction. PMID:24063234

  4. Characterization of a cloned Bacillus subtilis gene that inhibits sporulation in multiple copies.

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, N K; Dubnau, E; Smith, I

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated a 1.0-kilobase fragment of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome which, when present in high-copy-number plasmids, caused a sporulation-proficient strain to become phenotypically sporulation deficient. This is referred to as the sporulation inhibition (Sin) phenotype. This DNA fragment, in multicopy, also inhibited the production of extracellular protease activity, which normally appears at the beginning of stationary growth. The origin of the fragment was mapped between the dnaE and spo0A genes on the B. subtilis chromosome, and its complete DNA sequence has been determined. By analysis of various deletions and a spontaneous mutant the Sin function was localized to an open reading frame (ORF) predicted from the DNA sequence. Inactivation of this ORF in the chromosome did not affect the ability of cells to sporulate. However, the late-growth-associated production of proteases and alpha-amylase was elevated in these cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by this ORF had a DNA-binding domain, typically present in several regulatory proteins. We propose that the sin ORF encodes a regulatory protein that is involved in the transition from vegetative growth to sporulation. PMID:3096962

  5. Purification and properties of a manganese-stimulated deoxyribonuclease produced during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Akrigg, A

    1978-01-01

    A DNAase (deoxyribonuclease) was isolated from culture supernatants of sporulating Bacillus subtilis 168. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band during polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The enzyme differs from other DNAases of B. subtilis in molecular weight, metal-ion requirement and mode of action. The enzyme was inactive in the absence of metal ions, and exhibited optimum activity with 10 mM-Mn2+, although Mg2+, Cd2+ and Co2+ could also permit some activity. The pH optimum for the enzyme was pH 7.5, and it degraded linear-duplex DNA or closed-circular-duplex DNA to acid-soluble material. There was little or no activity on single-stranded DNA or rRNA. Sucrose-gradient analysis of the products of DNAase action on bacteriophage T7 DNA showed that endonucleolytic cleavage had occurred by the introduction of single-strand breaks in both strands of the duplex. The molecular weight of the enzyme was determined, by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75, to be 12000. Images Fig. 1. PMID:26339

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of Bacillus subtilis endospore protonation using isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial proton and metal adsorption reactions have the capacity to affect metal speciation and transport in aqueous environments. We coupled potentiometric titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses to study Bacillus subtilis spore-proton adsorption. We modeled the potentiometric data using a four and five-site non-electrostatic surface complexation model (NE-SCM). Heats of spore surface protonation from coupled ITC analyses were used to determine site specific enthalpies of protonation based on NE-SCMs. The five-site model resulted in a substantially better model fit for the heats of protonation but did not significantly improve the potentiometric titration model fit. The improvement observed in the five-site protonation heat model suggests the presence of a highly exothermic protonation reaction circa pH 7 that cannot be resolved in the less sensitive potentiometric data. From the log Ks and enthalpies we calculated corresponding site specific entropies. Log Ks and site concentrations describing spore surface protonation are statistically equivalent to B. subtilis cell surface protonation constants. Spore surface protonation enthalpies, however, are more exothermic relative to cell based adsorption suggesting a different bonding environment. The thermodynamic parameters defined in this study provide insight on molecular scale spore-surface protonation reactions. Coupled ITC and potentiometric titrations can reveal highly exothermic, and possibly endothermic, adsorption reactions that are overshadowed in potentiometric models alone. Spore-proton adsorption NE-SCMs derived in this study provide a framework for future metal adsorption studies.

  7. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  8. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  9. The role of thioredoxin TrxA in Bacillus subtilis: a proteomics and transcriptomics approach.

    PubMed

    Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko; Jürgen, Britta; Schweder, Thomas; Hecker, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases of the thioredoxin superfamily are crucial for maintaining the thiol redox state in living organisms. For the bacterium Bacillus subtilis thioredoxin A (TrxA) was described as the product of an essential gene indicating a key role during growth. By means of mRNA profiling Smits et al. (J. Bacteriol. 2005, 187, 3921-3930) suggested a critical function for TrxA in sulfur utilization during stationary phase. We extended the analysis of TrxA to exponential growth and characterized a trxA conditional mutant by proteome analysis complemented by transcriptomics. After TrxA-depletion, the growth rate was dramatically decreased. The cells responded at mRNA and protein level by the increased expression of genes involved in the utilization of sulfur, which represents the most obvious response as visualized by gel-based proteomics. Furthermore, several genes of the antioxidant response were found at higher expression levels after TrxA-depletion. When sulfate was replaced by thiosulfate or methionine as sulfur source, the growth inhibition was abolished. In the presence of thiosulfate but in the absence of TrxA, the induction of the sulfur limitation response and the oxidative stress response was not observed. Our results show that the global change of gene expression is primarily caused by the interruption of the sulfate utilization after TrxA depletion. Thus, its function in sulfate assimilation renders TrxA an essential protein in growing B. subtilis cells.

  10. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of penicillin V acylase from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Rathinaswamy, Priya; Pundle, Archana V.; Prabhune, Asmita A.; SivaRaman, Hepzibah; Brannigan, James A. Dodson, Guy G.; Suresh, C. G.

    2005-07-01

    An unannotated protein reported from B. subtilis has been expressed in E. coli and identified as possessing penicillin V acylase activity. The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of this penicillin V acylase is presented. Penicillin acylase proteins are amidohydrolase enzymes that cleave penicillins at the amide bond connecting the side chain to their β-lactam nucleus. An unannotated protein from Bacillus subtilis has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and confirmed to possess penicillin V acylase activity. The protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from a solution containing 4 M sodium formate in 100 mM Tris–HCl buffer pH 8.2. Diffraction data were collected under cryogenic conditions to a spacing of 2.5 Å. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.0, b = 308.0, c = 56.0 Å. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 3.23 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to 62% solvent content. The structure has been solved using molecular-replacement methods with B. sphaericus penicillin V acylase (PDB code 2pva) as the search model.

  11. Biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis using corn steep liquor as culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Gudiña, Eduardo J.; Fernandes, Elisabete C.; Rodrigues, Ana I.; Teixeira, José A.; Rodrigues, Lígia R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis #573 was evaluated using corn steep liquor (CSL) as culture medium. The best results were obtained in a culture medium consisting of 10% (v/v) of CSL, with a biosurfactant production of about 1.3 g/l. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing biosurfactant production by B. subtilis using CSL as culture medium. Subsequently, the effect of different metals (iron, manganese, and magnesium) on biosurfactant production was evaluated using the medium CSL 10%. It was found that for all the metals tested, the biosurfactant production was increased (up to 4.1, 4.4, and 3.5 g/l for iron, manganese, and magnesium, respectively). When the culture medium was supplemented with the optimum concentration of the three metals simultaneously, the biosurfactant production was increased up to 4.8 g/l. Furthermore, the biosurfactant exhibited a good performance in oil recovery assays when compared with chemical surfactants, which suggests its possible application in microbial enhanced oil recovery or bioremediation. PMID:25705209

  12. Defects in the Flagellar Motor Increase Synthesis of Poly-γ-Glutamate in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jia Mun; Guttenplan, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis swims in liquid media and swarms over solid surfaces, and it encodes two sets of flagellar stator homologs. Here, we show that B. subtilis requires only the MotA/MotB stator during swarming motility and that the residues required for stator force generation are highly conserved from the Proteobacteria to the Firmicutes. We further find that mutants that abolish stator function also result in an overproduction of the extracellular polymer poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) to confer a mucoid colony phenotype. PGA overproduction appeared to be the result of an increase in the expression of the pgs operon that encodes genes for PGA synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis was conducted to identify insertions that abolished colony mucoidy and disruptions in known transcriptional regulators of PGA synthesis (Com and Deg two-component systems) as well as mutants defective in transcription-coupled DNA repair (Mfd)-reduced expression of the pgs operon. A final class of insertions disrupted proteins involved in the assembly of the flagellar filament (FliD, FliT, and FlgL), and these mutants did not reduce expression of the pgs operon, suggesting a second mechanism of PGA control. PMID:24296669

  13. Proteomic Response of Bacillus subtilis to Lantibiotics Reflects Differences in Interaction with the Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Kohl, Bastian; Münch, Daniela; Raatschen, Nadja; Albada, H. Bauke; Hamoen, Leendert; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Mersacidin, gallidermin, and nisin are lantibiotics, antimicrobial peptides containing lanthionine. They show potent antibacterial activity. All three interfere with cell wall biosynthesis by binding lipid II, but they display different levels of interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. On one end of the spectrum, mersacidin interferes with cell wall biosynthesis by binding lipid II without integrating into bacterial membranes. On the other end of the spectrum, nisin readily integrates into membranes, where it forms large pores. It destroys the membrane potential and causes leakage of nutrients and ions. Gallidermin, in an intermediate position, also readily integrates into membranes. However, pore formation occurs only in some bacteria and depends on membrane composition. In this study, we investigated the impact of nisin, gallidermin, and mersacidin on cell wall integrity, membrane pore formation, and membrane depolarization in Bacillus subtilis. The impact of the lantibiotics on the cell envelope was correlated to the proteomic response they elicit in B. subtilis. By drawing on a proteomic response library, including other envelope-targeting antibiotics such as bacitracin, vancomycin, gramicidin S, or valinomycin, YtrE could be identified as the most reliable marker protein for interfering with membrane-bound steps of cell wall biosynthesis. NadE and PspA were identified as markers for antibiotics interacting with the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:22926563

  14. Role of Rabbit Lysozyme in In Vitro Serum and Plasma Serum Bactericidal Reactions Against Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Stephen F.; Martinez, Rafael J.

    1979-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of purified rabbit lysozyme was kinetically investigated at concentrations comparable to those in normal rabbit serum and plasma serum. The bactericidal capability, lysozyme content, and electrophoretic composition of “purified β-lysin,” fractionated from normal rabbit serum, were also examined. In contrast to the extensive antibacterial activity of dilute normal rabbit serum observed in vitro, rabbit lysozyme was only weakly bactericidal for Bacillus subtilis. Inhibition of lysozyme enzymatic and bactericidal activities in normal rabbit serum by antilysozyme immunoglobulin G slightly reduced the initial rate of killing. The addition of neutralizing antibody or histamine (another lysozyme inhibitor) to partially purified bactericidal serum fractions had no effect on killing kinetics. Increasing the ionic strength of reaction mixtures containing normal serum or partially purified bactericidal fractions to levels which completely inhibited lysozyme activity resulted in stimulation of their respective killing kinetics. The addition of inhibitors to normal rabbit plasma serum completely eliminated its bactericidal activity. With regard to the killing of B. subtilis by rabbit and human blood fractions, these analyses clearly demonstrated that (i) although lysozyme is not a significant antibacterial component of normal rabbit serum, it represents the principal factor in normal rabbit plasma serum; (ii) different primary bactericidal mechanisms which are not detectable by singlepoint analyses operate in the sera of different species; and (iii) purified β-lysin isolated from normal rabbit serum by the classical procedure is a heterogenous mixture of components. Images PMID:115789

  15. A microsuspension adaptation of the Bacillus subtilis ''rec'' assay. [Detection of chemically induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    McCarroll, N.E.; Keech, B.H.; Piper, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    We have demonstrated the utility of an Escherichia coli microsuspension assay to detect and characterize chemical mediation of DNA damage by a wide variety of mutagens and carcinogens. The assay have been improved by the development of a microsuspension modification to the Bacillus subtilis ''rec'' assay. The addition of these gram-positive organisms has allowed detection of DNA damage induced by benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), 3-aminopyrene (3-AP), 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthrancene (DMBA), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), and 4-nitrobiphenyl (4-NBP). Data presented in this paper from tests of 61 additional compounds, including a representative number of direct and promutagenic agents, indicate that the B subtilis H17 and M45 strains provide an effective microbial system for identification of DNA damage susceptible to postreplicational repair. The results of this study further suggests that the inclusion of these strains in the microsuspension assay for DNA damage will markedly enhance the detection of agents which cannot readily penetrate the intact cell wall of E coli.

  16. Oxygen-controlled regulation of the flavohemoglobin gene in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    LaCelle, M; Kumano, M; Kurita, K; Yamane, K; Zuber, P; Nakano, M M

    1996-01-01

    A gene, hmp, which encodes a ubiquitous protein homologous to hemoglobin was isolated among genes from Bacillus subtilis that are induced under anaerobic conditions. The hmp protein belongs to the family of two-domain flavohemoproteins, homologs of which have been isolated from various organisms such as Escherichia coli, Alcaligenes eutrophus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These proteins consist of an amino-terminal hemoglobin domain and a carboxy-terminal redox active site domain with potential binding sites for NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide. The expression of hmp is strongly induced upon oxygen limitation, and the induction is dependent on a two-component regulatory pair, ResD and ResE, an anaerobic regulator, FNR, and respiratory nitrate reductase, NarGHJI. The requirement of FNR and NarGHJI for hmp expression is completely bypassed by the addition of nitrite in the culture medium, indicating that fnr is required for transcriptional activation of narGHJI, which produces nitrite, leading to induction of hmp expression. In contrast, induction of hmp was still dependent on resDE in the presence of nitrite. A defect in hmp in B. subtilis has no significant effect on anaerobic growth. PMID:8682784

  17. Structure of the Bacillus subtilis 70S ribosome reveals the basis for species-specific stalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohmen, Daniel; Chiba, Shinobu; Shimokawa-Chiba, Naomi; Innis, C. Axel; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Ito, Koreaki; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2015-04-01

    Ribosomal stalling is used to regulate gene expression and can occur in a species-specific manner. Stalling during translation of the MifM leader peptide regulates expression of the downstream membrane protein biogenesis factor YidC2 (YqjG) in Bacillus subtilis, but not in Escherichia coli. In the absence of structures of Gram-positive bacterial ribosomes, a molecular basis for species-specific stalling has remained unclear. Here we present the structure of a Gram-positive B. subtilis MifM-stalled 70S ribosome at 3.5-3.9 Å, revealing a network of interactions between MifM and the ribosomal tunnel, which stabilize a non-productive conformation of the PTC that prevents aminoacyl-tRNA accommodation and thereby induces translational arrest. Complementary genetic analyses identify a single amino acid within ribosomal protein L22 that dictates the species specificity of the stalling event. Such insights expand our understanding of how the synergism between the ribosome and the nascent chain is utilized to modulate the translatome in a species-specific manner.

  18. FlgN Is Required for Flagellum-Based Motility by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Lynne S.; Marlow, Victoria L.; Kiley, Taryn B.; Birchall, Christopher; Ostrowski, Adam; Aldridge, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of the bacterial flagellum is exquisitely controlled. Flagellar biosynthesis is underpinned by a specialized type III secretion system that allows export of proteins from the cytoplasm to the nascent structure. Bacillus subtilis regulates flagellar assembly using both conserved and species-specific mechanisms. Here, we show that YvyG is essential for flagellar filament assembly. We define YvyG as an orthologue of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium type III secretion system chaperone, FlgN, which is required for the export of the hook-filament junction proteins, FlgK and FlgL. Deletion of flgN (yvyG) results in a nonmotile phenotype that is attributable to a decrease in hag translation and a complete lack of filament polymerization. Analyses indicate that a flgK-flgL double mutant strain phenocopies deletion of flgN and that overexpression of flgK-flgL cannot complement the motility defect of a ΔflgN strain. Furthermore, in contrast to previous work suggesting that phosphorylation of FlgN alters its subcellular localization, we show that mutation of the identified tyrosine and arginine FlgN phosphorylation sites has no effect on motility. These data emphasize that flagellar biosynthesis is differentially regulated in B. subtilis from classically studied Gram-negative flagellar systems and questions the biological relevance of some posttranslational modifications identified by global proteomic approaches. PMID:24706744

  19. Electrical wiring of live, metabolically enhanced Bacillus subtilis cells with flexible osmium-redox polymers.

    PubMed

    Coman, Vasile; Gustavsson, Tobias; Finkelsteinas, Arnonas; von Wachenfeldt, Claes; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Gorton, Lo

    2009-11-11

    The present study explores genetic engineering of the respiratory chain and the application of two different flexible osmium redox polymers to achieve efficient electric communication between the gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis and an electrode. Poly(1-vinylimidazole)(12)-[Os-(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)(2)Cl(2)](+/2+) (osmium redox polymer I) and poly(vinylpyridine)-[Os-(N,N'-methylated-2,2'-biimidazole)(3)](2+/3+) (osmium redox polymer II) were investigated for efficient electrical "wiring" of viable gram-positive bacterial cells to electrodes. Using a B. subtilis strain that overproduces succinate/quinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex II), we were able to improve the current response several fold using succinate as substrate, in both batch and flow analysis modes, and using gold and graphite electrodes. The efficiency of the osmium redox polymer, working as electron transfer mediator between the cells and the electrode, was compared with that of a soluble mediator (hexacyanoferrate). The results demonstrated that mediators did not have to pass the cytosolic membrane to bring about an efficient electronic communication between bacterial cells with a thick cell wall and electrodes.

  20. Surfactin from Bacillus subtilis displays an unexpected anti-Legionella activity.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Clémence; Schlusselhuber, Margot; Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Verdon, Julien

    2015-06-01

    A contaminant bacterial strain was found to exhibit an antagonistic activity against Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. The bacterial strain was identified as a Bacillus subtilis and named B. subtilis AM1. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the sfp gene, involved in the biosynthesis of surfactin, a lipopeptide with versatile bioactive properties. The bioactive substances were extracted from AM1 cell-free supernatant with ethyl acetate and purified using reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Subsequent ESI-MS analyses indicated the presence of two active substances with protonated molecular ions at m/z 1008 and 1036 Da, corresponding to surfactin isoforms. Structures of lipopeptides were further determined by tandem mass spectrometry and compared to the spectra of a commercially available surfactin mixture. Surfactin displays an antibacterial spectrum almost restricted to the Legionella genus (MICs range 1-4 μg/mL) and also exhibits a weak activity toward the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, known to be the natural reservoir of L. pneumophila. Anti-biofilm assays demonstrated that 66 μg/mL of surfactin successfully eliminated 90 % of a 6-day-old biofilm. In conclusion, this study reveals for the first time the potent activity of surfactin against Legionella sp. and preformed biofilms thus providing new directions toward the use and the development of lipopeptides for the control of Legionella spread in the environment.

  1. Biosynthesis of riboflavin in Bacillus subtilis: function and genetic control of the riboflavin synthase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, A; Mailänder, B

    1978-01-01

    Two riboflavin synthase activities (heavy and light) have been observed in earlier studies with Bacillus subtilis. The heavy enzyme is a complex of one molecule of light enzyme (consisting of three alpha subunits) and approximately 60 beta subunits (A. Bacher, R. Bauer, U. Eggers, H. Harders, and H. Schnepple, p. 729--732, in T. P. Singer (ed.), Flavins and Flavoproteins, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1976). The formation of alpha and beta subunits is coordinately controlled. Mutants apparently deficient in beta subunits were isolated as riboflavin requires after mutagenesis of B. subtilis with ICR 191. The mutants could grow with diacetyl instead of riboflavin. Growth with diacetyl was associated with the accumulation of substantial amounts of the riboflavin precursor, 6,7-dimethyl-8-(D-ribityl)lumazine. It follows that the mutants are deficient in an enzyme activity required for the formation of the lumazine from the pyrimidine precursor. We conclude that heavy riboflavin synthase is a bifunctional enzyme. The riboflavin synthase activity is mediated by the alpha subunits, whereas the beta subunits are necessary for an earlier biosynthetic step. Images PMID:96090

  2. Enhanced production of poly-γ-glutamic acid by a newly-isolated Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wan-Taek; Song, Yong-Su; Jung, Woo-Jin; Park, Ro-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Application of poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), an unusual macromolecular anionic polypeptide, is limited due to the high cost associated with its low productivity. Screening bacterial strains to find a more efficient producer is one approach to overcome this limitation. Strain MJ80 was isolated as a γ-PGA producer among 1,500 bacterial colonies obtained from soil samples. It was identified as Bacillus subtilis, based on the biochemical and morphological properties and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. It produced γ-PGA from both glutamic acid and soybean powder, identifying it as a facultative glutamic acid-metabolizing bacterium. After optimization of its culture conditions, B. subtilis MJ80 showed γ-PGA productivity of 75.5 and 68.7 g/l in 3 and 300 l jar fermenters for 3 days cultivation, respectively, the highest productivity reported to date, suggesting MJ80 to be a promising strain for γ-PGA production.

  3. Lipopeptides as main ingredients for inhibition of fungal phytopathogens by Bacillus subtilis/amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Cawoy, Hélène; Debois, Delphine; Franzil, Laurent; De Pauw, Edwin; Thonart, Philippe; Ongena, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Some isolates of the Bacillus subtilis/amyloliquefaciens species are known for their plant protective activity against fungal phytopathogens. It is notably due to their genetic potential to form an impressive array of antibiotics including non-ribosomal lipopeptides (LPs). In the work presented here, we wanted to gain further insights into the relative role of these LPs in the global antifungal activity of B. subtilis/amyloliquefaciens. To that end, a comparative study was conducted involving multiple strains that were tested against four different phytopathogens. We combined various approaches to further exemplify that secretion of those LPs is a crucial trait in direct pathogen ward off and this can actually be generalized to all members of these species. Our data illustrate that for each LP family, the fungitoxic activity varies in function of the target species and that the production of iturins and fengycins is modulated by the presence of pathogens. Our data on the relative involvement of these LPs in the biocontrol activity and modulation of their production are discussed in the context of natural conditions in the rhizosphere. PMID:25529983

  4. Condensin promotes the juxtaposition of DNA flanking its loading site in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xindan; Le, Tung B.K.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Dekker, Job; Laub, Michael T.; Rudner, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in compacting and resolving replicated chromosomes in virtually all organisms, yet how they accomplish this remains elusive. In Bacillus subtilis, condensin is loaded at centromeric parS sites, where it encircles DNA and individualizes newly replicated origins. Using chromosome conformation capture and cytological assays, we show that condensin recruitment to origin-proximal parS sites is required for the juxtaposition of the two chromosome arms. Recruitment to ectopic parS sites promotes alignment of large tracks of DNA flanking these sites. Importantly, insertion of parS sites on opposing arms indicates that these “zip-up” interactions only occur between adjacent DNA segments. Collectively, our data suggest that condensin resolves replicated origins by promoting the juxtaposition of DNA flanking parS sites, drawing sister origins in on themselves and away from each other. These results are consistent with a model in which condensin encircles the DNA flanking its loading site and then slides down, tethering the two arms together. Lengthwise condensation via loop extrusion could provide a generalizable mechanism by which condensin complexes act dynamically to individualize origins in B. subtilis and, when loaded along eukaryotic chromosomes, resolve them during mitosis. PMID:26253537

  5. Enhancement of a high efficient autoinducible expression system in Bacillus subtilis by promoter engineering.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jintao; Guan, Chengran; Cui, Wenjing; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zhongmei; Li, Weijiang; Zhou, Zhemin

    2016-11-01

    Quorum-sensing related promoter srfA (PsrfA) was used to construct autoinducible expression system for production of recombinant proteins in Bacillus subtilis. PsrfA was prominent in the unique property of inducer-free activity that is closely correlated with cell density. Here, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the reporter protein, PsrfA was optimized by shortening its sequences and changing the nucleotides at the conserved regions of -35 -15 and -10 regions, obtaining a library of PsrfA derivatives varied in the strength of GFP production. Among all the promoter mutants, the strongest promoter P10 was selected and the strength in GFP expression was 150% higher than that of PsrfA. Heterologous protein of aminopeptidase and nattokinase could be overexpressed by P10, the activities of which were 360% and 50% higher than that of PsrfA, respectively. These results suggested that the enhanced promoter P10 could be used to develop autoinducible expression system for overexpression of heterologous proteins in B. subtilis.

  6. [Impact of biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis on bacterial communities in tobacco rhizospheric soil].

    PubMed

    You, Cai; Zhang, Li-Meng; Ji, Si-Gui; Gao, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Cheng-Sheng; Kong, Fan-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The impact of inoculation with the biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis on bacterial communities and bacterial diversity in rhizospheric soil of Nicotiana tabacum was assessed by constructing a 16S rRNA gene clone library and conducting amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The bacterial diversity was evaluated by coverage value (C), Shannon index (H), Pielou evenness index (E) and Margalef richness index (R). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the inoculation significantly affected the composition of bacterial communities in tobacco rhizospheric soil. A total of twelve bacterial groups including Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria (including α-, β-, δ-, γ-Proteobacteria) , Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Gemmatimonadetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes were detected to be shared by inoculated soil and control soil. The community composition and proportions of different bacteria in the communities showed significant variations between the two samples. The dominant bacteria were Acidobacteria (27.1%) and Proteobacteria (26.5%) in control soil, while in the inoculated soil Proteobacteria (38.0%) and Acidobacteria (29.6%) were dominant. B. subtilis inoculation increased the numbers of γ-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria but reduced the numbers of bacterial groups such as β-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes. Diversity analysis showed that bacterial diversity was rich for both soil samples, and soil bacterial Shannon index and Margalef richness index were promoted after inoculation.

  7. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements.

  8. Gene position in a long operon governs motility development in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Cozy, Loralyn M.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis bifurcate into subpopulations of motile individuals and non-motile chains of cells that are differentiated at the level of gene expression. The motile cells are ON and the chaining cells are OFF for transcription that depends on RNA polymerase and the alternative sigma factor σD. Here we show that chaining cells were OFF for σD-dependent gene expression because σD levels fell below a threshold, and σD activity was inhibited by the anti-sigma factor FlgM. The probability that σD exceeded the threshold was governed by the position of the sigD genes. The proportion of ON cells increased when sigD was artificially moved forward in the 27kb fla/che operon. In addition, we identified a new σD-dependent promoter that increases sigD expression and may provide positive feedback to stabilize the ON state. Finally, we demonstrate that ON/OFF motility states in B. subtilis are a form of development because mosaics of stable and differentiated epigenotypes were evident when the normally dispersed bacteria were forced to grow in one dimension. PMID:20233303

  9. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23794223

  10. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani Damping-Off of Tomato with Bacillus subtilis RB14.

    PubMed

    Asaka, O; Shoda, M

    1996-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14, which showed antibiotic activities against several phytopathogens in vitro by producing the antibiotics iturin A and surfactin, was subjected to a pot test to investigate its ability to suppress damping-off of tomato seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. To facilitate recovery from soil, B. subtilis RB14-C, a spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutant of RB14, was used. Damping-off was suppressed when the culture broth, cell suspension, or cell-free culture broth of RB14-C was inoculated into soil. Iturin A and surfactin were recovered from the soils inoculated with the cell suspension of RB14-C, confirming that RB14-C produced them in soil. The gene lpa-14, which was cloned from RB14 and required for the production of both antibiotics, was mutated in RB14-C, and a mutant, R(Delta)1, was constructed. The level of disease suppressibility of R(Delta)1 was low, but R(Delta)1(pC115), a transformant of R(Delta)1 with the plasmid pC115 carrying lpa-14, was restored in suppressibility. These results show that the antibiotics iturin A and surfactin produced by RB14 play a major role in the suppression of damping-off caused by R. solani. RB14-C, R(Delta)1, and R(Delta)1(pC115) persisted in soil during the experimental period and were recovered from the soil, mostly as spores.

  11. Role of Hsp100/Clp Protease Complexes in Controlling the Regulation of Motility in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Molière, Noël; Hoßmann, Jörn; Schäfer, Heinrich; Turgay, Kürşad

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp100/Clp protease complexes of Bacillus subtilis ClpXP and ClpCP are involved in the control of many interconnected developmental and stress response regulatory networks, including competence, redox stress response, and motility. Here we analyzed the role of regulatory proteolysis by ClpXP and ClpCP in motility development. We have demonstrated that ClpXP acts on the regulation of motility by controlling the levels of the oxidative and heat stress regulator Spx. We obtained evidence that upon oxidative stress Spx not only induces the thiol stress response, but also transiently represses the transcription of flagellar genes. Furthermore, we observed that in addition to the known impact of ClpCP via the ComK/FlgM-dependent pathway, ClpCP also affects flagellar gene expression via modulating the activity and levels of the global regulator DegU-P. This adds another layer to the intricate involvement of Clp mediated regulatory proteolysis in different gene expression programs, which may allow to integrate and coordinate different signals for a better-adjusted response to the changing environment of B. subtilis cells. PMID:27014237

  12. Role of Hsp100/Clp Protease Complexes in Controlling the Regulation of Motility in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Molière, Noël; Hoßmann, Jörn; Schäfer, Heinrich; Turgay, Kürşad

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp100/Clp protease complexes of Bacillus subtilis ClpXP and ClpCP are involved in the control of many interconnected developmental and stress response regulatory networks, including competence, redox stress response, and motility. Here we analyzed the role of regulatory proteolysis by ClpXP and ClpCP in motility development. We have demonstrated that ClpXP acts on the regulation of motility by controlling the levels of the oxidative and heat stress regulator Spx. We obtained evidence that upon oxidative stress Spx not only induces the thiol stress response, but also transiently represses the transcription of flagellar genes. Furthermore, we observed that in addition to the known impact of ClpCP via the ComK/FlgM-dependent pathway, ClpCP also affects flagellar gene expression via modulating the activity and levels of the global regulator DegU-P. This adds another layer to the intricate involvement of Clp mediated regulatory proteolysis in different gene expression programs, which may allow to integrate and coordinate different signals for a better-adjusted response to the changing environment of B. subtilis cells.

  13. Highly Precise Quantification of Protein Molecules per Cell During Stress and Starvation Responses in Bacillus subtilis *

    PubMed Central

    Maaβ, Sandra; Wachlin, Gerhild; Bernhardt, Jörg; Eymann, Christine; Fromion, Vincent; Riedel, Katharina; Becher, Dörte; Hecker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology based on high quality absolute quantification data, which are mandatory for the simulation of biological processes, successively becomes important for life sciences. We provide protein concentrations on the level of molecules per cell for more than 700 cytosolic proteins of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis during adaptation to changing growth conditions. As glucose starvation and heat stress are typical challenges in B. subtilis' natural environment and induce both, specific and general stress and starvation proteins, these conditions were selected as models for starvation and stress responses. Analyzing samples from numerous time points along the bacterial growth curve yielded reliable and physiologically relevant data suitable for modeling of cellular regulation under altered growth conditions. The analysis of the adaptational processes based on protein molecules per cell revealed stress-specific modulation of general adaptive responses in terms of protein amount and proteome composition. Furthermore, analysis of protein repartition during glucose starvation showed that biomass seems to be redistributed from proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis to enzymes of the central carbon metabolism. In contrast, during heat stress most resources of the cell, namely those from amino acid synthetic pathways, are used to increase the amount of chaperones and proteases. Analysis of dynamical aspects of protein synthesis during heat stress adaptation revealed, that these proteins make up almost 30% of the protein mass accumulated during early phases of this stress. PMID:24878497

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel thermostable β-glucosidase from Bacillus subtilis SU40.

    PubMed

    Asha, B M; Pathma, J; Sakthivel, N

    2015-01-01

    A new bacterial strain SU40 with ability to produce thermostable β-glucosidase was isolated from soil located at Puducherry (India) and identified as Bacillus subtilis. The conditions like temperature, pH, carbon and nitrogen sources were optimized conditions for the maximum production of β-glucosidase. The enzyme was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and BioSep and HPLC chromatography. Purified enzyme was found to be a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of 38.3 kDa. The enzyme was stable over a wide range of pH and temperatures and exhibited maximal activity at 75°C and pH 12.0. The enzyme was found to retain approximately 60% of maximal activity for 1 h at 70°C and hydrolyzed a wide range of aryl-β-D-glucosides and β-linked oligosaccharides with highest activity towards cellobiose and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme were 0.21 μM and 9.38 μmoles mg(-1) min(-1), respectively. The enzyme demonstrated stability in the presence of 0.5% surfactants and was completely inhibited after addition of EDTA and Hg2+ ions. Synergistic action of β-glucosidase from B. subtilis SU40 with endoglucanase from Paenibacillus barcinonensis MG7 completely degraded the rice straw.

  15. Hematopoietic effect of deer antler extract fermented by Bacillus subtilis on murine marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yooheon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Hyun-Sun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES We examined the chemical composition and the effect of fermented deer antler on hematopoietic factors in bone marrow cells. MATERIALS/METHODS For the preparation of fermented deer antler extract (FAB), fermentation was carried out using Bacillus subtilis at 30℃ for 7 days. The hematopoietic effect of FAB was investigated hematopoietic factors in marrow cells. RESULTS The contents of total sugar, sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and uronic acid and the dry weight gradually increased with fermentation time. The sialic acid content (from 0.14 mg/mL to 0.54 mg/mL) was the highest on the 4th day of fermentation after which it decreased. The proliferating activity of bone marrow cells increased with fermentation times. The levels of various hematopoietic growth factors were determined to verify the beneficial effect of deer antler extract fermented by B. subtilis on hematopoiesis. FAB increased the number of stem cell factors and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in bone marrow cells. In addition, FAB augmented the burst-forming unit erythroid and total colonies in splenocyte-conditioned medium compared with non-fermented antler extract (NFA). However, FAB did not affect the mRNA levels of erythropoietin, an important factor for erythropoiesis. CONCLUSIONS FAB, like NFA, did not directly affect hematopoiesis, but contributed to hematopoiesis by stimulating the production of hematopoietic factors. PMID:26425273

  16. Directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis and its application in metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Guanglu; Li, Xinli; Fu, Jing; Chen, Tao; Wang, Zhiwen; Zhao, Xueming

    2016-08-10

    Adenylosuccinate synthetase (EC. 6.3.4.4) encoded by purA in Bacillus subtilis, catalyzing the first step of the conversion of IMP to AMP, plays an important role in flux distribution in the purine biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we described the use of site saturation mutagenesis to obtain a desired enzyme activity of adenylosuccinate synthetase and its application in flux regulation. Based on sequence alignment and structural modeling, a library of enzyme variants was created by a semi-rational evolution strategy in position Thr238 and Pro242. Other than purA deletion, the leaky mutation purA(P242N) partially reduced the flux towards AMP derived from IMP and increased the riboflavin synthesis precursor GTP, while also kept the requirement of ATP synthesis for cell growth. PurA(P242N) was introduced into an inosine-producing strain and resulted in an approximately 4.66-fold increase in inosine production, from 0.088±0.009g/L to 0.41±0.051g/L, in minimal medium without hypoxanthine accumulation. These results underline that the directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase could tailor its activities and adjust metabolic flux. This mutation may provide a promising application in purine-based product accumulation, like inosine, guanosine and folate which are directly stemming from purine pathway in B. subtilis. PMID:27234879

  17. Enhancement of a high efficient autoinducible expression system in Bacillus subtilis by promoter engineering.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jintao; Guan, Chengran; Cui, Wenjing; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zhongmei; Li, Weijiang; Zhou, Zhemin

    2016-11-01

    Quorum-sensing related promoter srfA (PsrfA) was used to construct autoinducible expression system for production of recombinant proteins in Bacillus subtilis. PsrfA was prominent in the unique property of inducer-free activity that is closely correlated with cell density. Here, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the reporter protein, PsrfA was optimized by shortening its sequences and changing the nucleotides at the conserved regions of -35 -15 and -10 regions, obtaining a library of PsrfA derivatives varied in the strength of GFP production. Among all the promoter mutants, the strongest promoter P10 was selected and the strength in GFP expression was 150% higher than that of PsrfA. Heterologous protein of aminopeptidase and nattokinase could be overexpressed by P10, the activities of which were 360% and 50% higher than that of PsrfA, respectively. These results suggested that the enhanced promoter P10 could be used to develop autoinducible expression system for overexpression of heterologous proteins in B. subtilis. PMID:27426133

  18. Effect of nanocomposite packaging containing ZnO on growth of Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Esmailzadeh, Hakimeh; Sangpour, Parvaneh; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Hejazi, Jalal; Khaksar, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened new windows in active food packaging. Nano-sized ZnO is an inexpensive material with potential antimicrobial properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antibacterial effect of low density Polyethylene (LDPE) containing ZnO nanoparticles on Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by facil molten salt method and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite films containing 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder. The growth of both microorganisms has decreased in the presence of ZnO containing nanocomposites compared with controls. Nanocomposites with 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles had stronger antibacterial effect against both bacteria in comparison with the 2 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites. B. subtilis as Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ZnO containing nanocomposite films compared with E. aerogenes as Gram-negative bacteria. There were no significant differences between the migration of Zn ions from 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites and the released Zn ions were not significantly increased in both groups after 14 days compared with the first. Regarding the considerable antibacterial effects of ZnO nanoparticles, their application in active food packaging can be a suitable solution for extending the shelf life of food.

  19. Production of surfactin and fengycin by Bacillus subtilis in a bubbleless membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Coutte, François; Lecouturier, Didier; Yahia, Saliha Ait; Leclère, Valérie; Béchet, Max; Jacques, Philippe; Dhulster, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    Surfactin and fengycin are lipopeptide biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis. This work describes for the first time the use of bubbleless bioreactors for the production of these lipopeptides by B. subtilis ATCC 21332 with aeration by a hollow fiber membrane air-liquid contactor to prevent foam formation. Three different configurations were tested: external aeration module made from either polyethersulfone (reactor BB1) or polypropylene (reactor BB2) and a submerged module in polypropylene (reactor BB3). Bacterial growth, glucose consumption, lipopeptide production, and oxygen uptake rate were monitored during the culture in the bioreactors. For all the tested membranes, the bioreactors were of satisfactory bacterial growth and lipopeptide production. In the three configurations, surfactin production related to the culture volume was in the same range: 242, 230, and 188 mg l(-1) for BB1, BB2, and BB3, respectively. Interestingly, high differences were observed for fengycin production: 47 mg l(-1) for BB1, 207 mg l(-1) for BB2, and 393 mg l(-1) for BB3. A significant proportion of surfactin was adsorbed on the membranes and reduced the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The degree of adsorption depended on both the material and the structure of the membrane and was higher with the submerged polypropylene membrane.

  20. Identification of a Bacillus subtilis secretion mutant using a beta-galactosidase screening procedure.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M F; Andersen, J B; Borchert, T V; Kontinen, V P

    1995-07-01

    High-level synthesis of exportable beta-galactosidase (LacZ) fusion proteins in Bacillus subtilis results in a lethal phenotype, and has been suggested as a tool for the selection of secretion mutants. We tested a plasmid-based, inducible lacZ fusion gene system for this purpose, but frequent mutations in cis, which reduced expression of the fusion gene, forced abandonment of the induction-selection strategy. Instead, after modification of the indicator plasmid, a screening procedure for increased basal LacZ activity levels was adopted. This led to the identification of a conditional B. subtilis secretion mutant after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. At 42 degrees C, but not at 30 degrees C, this mutant displayed extreme growth retardation when the LacZ fusion protein was produced, and and was also defective in the secretion of subtilisin Carlsberg. The processing kinetics and secretion of a subtilisin Carlsberg-alkaline phosphatase fusion derivative were found to be defective specifically at the non-permissive temperature. The secretion defect was not linked to the secA/div locus.

  1. Metabolic flux analysis with a comprehensive isotopomer model in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Dauner, M; Bailey, J E; Sauer, U

    2001-09-01

    Fluxes in central carbon metabolism of a genetically engineered, riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis strain were investigated in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at low (0.11 h(-1)) and high (0.44 h(-1)) dilution rates. Using a mixture of 10% [U-(13)C] and 90% glucose labeled at natural abundance, (13)C-labeling experiments were carried out to provide additional information for metabolic flux balancing. The resulting labeling pattern in the proteinogenic amino acids were analyzed by two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. To account rigorously for all available data from these experiments, we developed a comprehensive isotopomer model of B. subtilis central metabolism. Using this model, intracellular carbon net and exchange fluxes were estimated on the basis of validated physiological data and biomass composition in combination with 2D NMR data from 45 individual carbon atom spectra in the amino acids. Glucose catabolism proceeded primarily via glycolysis but pentose phosphate pathway fluxes increased with increasing growth rate. Moreover, significant back fluxes from the TCA cycle to the lower part of glycolysis via the gluconeogenic PEP carboxykinase were detected. The malic enzyme reaction, in contrast, was found to be inactive. A thorough statistical analysis was performed to prove the reliability of the isotopomer balance model and the obtained results. Specifically, a chi(2) test was applied to validate the model and the chi-square criterion was used to explore the sensitivity of model predictions to the experimental data.

  2. ComGA-RelA interaction and persistence in the Bacillus subtilis K-State

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J.; Tanner, A. W.; Carabetta, V. J.; Cristea, I. M.; Dubnau, D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The bistably expressed K-state of Bacillus subtilis is characterized by two distinct features; transformability and arrested growth when K-state cells are exposed to fresh medium. The arrest is manifested by a failure to assemble replisomes and by decreased rates of cell growth and rRNA synthesis. These phenotypes are all partially explained by the presence of the AAA+ protein ComGA, which is also required for the binding of transforming DNA to the cell surface and for the assembly of the transformation pilus that mediates DNA transport. We have discovered that ComGA interacts with RelA and that the ComGA-dependent inhibition of rRNA synthesis is largely bypassed in strains that cannot synthesize the alarmone (p)ppGpp. We propose that the interaction of ComGA with RelA prevents the hydrolysis of (p)ppGpp in K-state cells, which are thus trapped in a non-growing state until ComGA is degraded. We show that some K-state cells exhibit tolerance to antibiotics, a form of type 1 persistence, and we propose that the bistable expression of both transformability and the growth arrest are bet-hedging adaptations that improve fitness in the face of varying environments, such as those presumably encountered by B. subtilis in the soil. PMID:25899641

  3. Two-Step Assembly Dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis Divisome▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Pamela; Veening, Jan-Willem; Saunders, Nigel J.; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Daniel, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by about a dozen proteins which assemble at midcell and form a complex known as the divisome. To study the dynamics and temporal hierarchy of divisome assembly in Bacillus subtilis, we have examined the in vivo localization pattern of a set of division proteins fused to green fluorescent protein in germinating spores and vegetative cells. Using time series and time-lapse microscopy, we show that the FtsZ ring assembles early and concomitantly with FtsA, ZapA, and EzrA. After a time delay of at least 20% of the cell cycle, a second set of division proteins, including GpsB, FtsL, DivIB, FtsW, Pbp2B, and DivIVA, are recruited to midcell. Together, our data provide in vivo evidence for two-step assembly of the divisome. Interestingly, overproduction of FtsZ advances the temporal assembly of EzrA but not of DivIVA, suggesting that a signal different from that of FtsZ polymerization drives the assembly of late divisome proteins. Microarray analysis shows that FtsZ depletion or overexpression does not significantly alter the transcription of division genes, supporting the hypothesis that cell division in B. subtilis is mainly regulated at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:19429628

  4. Magnetic immobilization of Bacillus subtilis natto cells for menaquinone-7 fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Varma, Vikas; Yang, Shuyi; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Production of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) by Bacillus subtilis natto is associated with major drawbacks. To address the current challenges in MK-7 fermentation, studying the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the bacterial cells can open up a new domain for intensified bioprocesses. This article introduces the new concept of application of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) as a pioneer tool for MK-7 process intensification. In this order, IONs with the average size of 11 nm were successfully fabricated and characterized for possible in situ removal of target substances from the fermentation media. The prepared particles were used for decoration and immobilization of B. subtilis natto cells. Presence of iron oxide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the MK-7 specific yield (15 %) as compared to the control samples. In addition, fabricated IONs showed a promising ability for in situ recovery of bacterial cells from the fermentation media with more than 95 % capture efficiency. Based on the results, IONs can be implemented successfully as a novel tool for MK-7 production. This study provides a considerable interest for industrial application of magnetic nanoparticles and their future role in designing an intensified biological process.

  5. Adsorption-based immobilization of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus cellobiose 2-epimerase on Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junyan; Yang, Ruijin; Hua, Xiao; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Nonrecombinant spore was examined as a novel immobilization support to adsorb enzymes. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus cellobiose 2-epimerase (CsCE), efficiently producing lactulose using lactose as a single substrate, was immobilized on Bacillus subtilis spores via adsorption. The immobilization process was optimized, and the properties of immobilized CsCE and the interactions between the enzyme and spores were also investigated. Under the optimized conditions (pH 4.5, temperature 4 °C, reaction time 2 H, and initial enzyme concentration 2.4 mg/mL), the maximum adsorbed amount of CsCE was 1.47 mg/10(11) spores, and the enzyme activity recovery was 79.4%. The spore-immobilized CsCE presented a higher pH and thermal stability than a free enzyme. Total desorption of the immobilized enzyme was only achieved by treatment with 1.0 M NaCl at pH 1.0, indicating a strong adsorption between CsCE and B. subtilis spores. Efficient binding may require a potent combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between spores and an enzyme. The immobilized CsCE was applied to produce 395 g/L lactulose after 4 H. Moreover, the spores could be regenerated and the spore-immobilized enzyme showed good reusability as it retained approximately 70% of its initial activity after eight recycles.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic detection of Bacillus subtilis spores using gold nanoparticle based substrates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Xin-Xin; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Wu, Hai-Long; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-11-30

    The detection of bacterial spores requires the capability of highly sensitive and biocompatible probes. This report describes the findings of an investigation of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) detection of Bacillus subtilis spores using gold-nanoparticle (Au NP) based substrates as the spectroscopic probe. The SERS substrates are shown to be highly sensitive for the detection of B. subtilis spores, which release calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA) as a biomarker. The SERS bands of CaDPA released from the spores by extraction using nitric acid provide the diagnostic signal for the detection, exhibiting a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.5×10(9) spores L(-1) (or 2.5×10(-14) M). The LOD for the Au NP based substrates is quite comparable with that reported for Ag nanoparticle based substrates for the detection of spores, though the surface adsorption equilibrium constant is found to be smaller by a factor of 1-2 orders of magnitude than the Ag nanoparticle based substrates. The results have also revealed the viability of SERS detection of CaDPA released from the spores under ambient conditions without extraction using any reagents, showing a significant reduction of the diagnostic peak width for the detection. These findings have demonstrated the viability of Au NP based SERS substrates for direct use with high resolution and sensitivity as a biocompatible probe for the detection of bacterial spores.

  7. Levels of germination proteins in Bacillus subtilis dormant, superdormant, and germinating spores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Melville, Stephen B; Popham, David L

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endospores exhibit extreme resistance to most conditions that rapidly kill other life forms, remaining viable in this dormant state for centuries or longer. While the majority of Bacillus subtilis dormant spores germinate rapidly in response to nutrient germinants, a small subpopulation termed superdormant spores are resistant to germination, potentially evading antibiotic and/or decontamination strategies. In an effort to better understand the underlying mechanisms of superdormancy, membrane-associated proteins were isolated from populations of B. subtilis dormant, superdormant, and germinated spores, and the relative abundance of 11 germination-related proteins was determined using multiple-reaction-monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays. GerAC, GerKC, and GerD were significantly less abundant in the membrane fractions obtained from superdormant spores than those derived from dormant spores. The amounts of YpeB, GerD, PrkC, GerAC, and GerKC recovered in membrane fractions decreased significantly during germination. Lipoproteins, as a protein class, decreased during spore germination, while YpeB appeared to be specifically degraded. Some protein abundance differences between membrane fractions of dormant and superdormant spores resemble protein changes that take place during germination, suggesting that the superdormant spore isolation procedure may have resulted in early, non-committal germination-associated changes. In addition to low levels of germinant receptor proteins, a deficiency in the GerD lipoprotein may contribute to heterogeneity of spore germination rates. Understanding the reasons for superdormancy may allow for better spore decontamination procedures.

  8. Investigation of the molecular mechanism of thermal tolerance in bacillus subtilis. Final report, August 15, 1980-August 14, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, N.; Alexander, J.; Ch'ih, J.

    1981-08-14

    We have studied Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus caldolyticus to ascertain the molecular mechanism of the ability to growth at high temperatures. B. subtilus wild type strains grow in minimal salts medium at a mesophilic temperature (37/sup 0/C) but not at a thermophilic temperature (56/sup 0/C). However, they do grow at 56/sup 0/C in complex rich media. Analysis of their nutritional requirements revealed that these bacteria require pyridoxine or aspartic acid and threonine to grow at 56/sup 0/C indicating that they are temperature sensitive mutants. Furthermore, mutants of B. subtilis which are able to grow on minimal salts media at 56/sup 0/C can be readily isolated. Therefore, it appears that the lack of growth of the wild type strain in minimal salts media at 56/sup 0/C is due to the instability of an anabolic enzyme. In contrast to B. subtilis, B. pumilus has never been observed to growth above 50/sup 0/C. However, our studies show that mutants of B. pumilus and B. subtilis which grow at 68/sup 0/C can be easily isolated. The isolation of such mutants strongly supports the idea that one gene can determine the ability to grow at extreme temperatures.

  9. COMPARISON OF UV INACTIVATION OF SPORES OF THREE ENCEPHALITOZOON SPECIES WITH THAT OF SPORES OF TWO DNA REPAIR-DEFICIENT BACILLUS SUBTILIS BIODOSIMETRY STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of three Encephalitozoon spp. to ultraviolet (UV) inactivation was determined. Encephalitozoon intestinalis is a contaminant listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Also, use of DNA repair deficient strains of Bacillus subtilis were evaluat...

  10. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides are essential metabolites for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and biosynthesis of several amino acids and riboflavin. Owing to the pivotal roles of purines in cell physiology, the pool of intracellular purine nucleotides must be maintained under strict control, and hence the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway is tightly regulated by transcription repression and inhibition mechanism. Deregulation of purine pathway is essential for this pathway engineering in Bacillus subtilis. Results Deregulation of purine pathway was attempted to improve purine nucleotides supply, based on a riboflavin producer B. subtilis strain with modification of its rib operon. To eliminate transcription repression, the pur operon repressor PurR and the 5’-UTR of pur operon containing a guanine-sensing riboswitch were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the relative transcription levels of purine genes were up-regulated about 380 times. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was successfully introduced into PRPP amidotransferase (encoded by purF) to remove feedback inhibition by homologous alignment and analysis. Overexpression of the novel mutant PurF (D293V, K316Q and S400W) significantly increased PRPP amidotransferase activity and triggered a strong refractory effect on purine nucleotides mediated inhibition. Intracellular metabolite target analysis indicated that the purine nucleotides supply in engineered strains was facilitated by a stepwise gene-targeted deregulation. With these genetic manipulations, we managed to enhance the metabolic flow through purine pathway and consequently increased riboflavin production 3-fold (826.52 mg/L) in the purF-VQW mutant strain. Conclusions A sequential optimization strategy was applied to deregulate the rib operon and purine pathway of B. subtilis to create genetic diversities and to improve riboflavin production

  11. Expression of a cloned Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin determinant in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, N; Kennedy, S; Foster, T J; Kehoe, M; Dougan, G

    1983-01-01

    A DNA sequence encoding Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin, which had been previously cloned and mapped in Escherichia coli K-12, was introduced into Bacillus subtilis BD170 and several strains of S. aureus by using plasmid vectors, some of which could replicate in all three organisms. The determinant was cloned on a 3.3-kilobase pair DNA fragment into B. subtilis by using the vector plasmid pXZ105 to form the hybrid plasmid pXZ111. B. subtilis cells harboring pXZ111 produced large zones of alpha-hemolysis after 18 h of growth at 37 degrees C on rabbit blood agar plates, and alpha-hemolysin activity was detected in supernatants prepared from growing cultures of this strain. The alpha-hemolysin was apparently secreted across the B. subtilis cell envelope. Polypeptides of molecular weights 34,000 and 33,000 were precipitated with anti-alpha-hemolysin serum from lysates prepared from BD170 cells harboring pXZ111. A hybrid replicon which could replicate in both E. coli and S. aureus was constructed in E. coli by ligating a HindIII fragment encoding the replication functions and chloramphenicol resistance genes of S. aureus plasmid pCW59 to the pBR322 alpha-hemolysin hybrid plasmid pDU1150. The DNA of this plasmid, pDU1212, was prepared in E. coli and used to transform protoplasts prepared from a non-alpha-hemolytic, nonrestricting strain of S. aureus RN4220. Some of the transformants contained plasmids which had suffered extensive deletions. Some plasmids, however, were transformed intact into RN4220. Such plasmids were subsequently maintained in a stable manner. pDU1212 DNA was prepared from RN4220 and transformed into alpha-hemolytic S. aureus 8325-4 and two mutant derivatives defective in alpha-hemolysin synthesis. All three strains expressed alpha-hemolysin when harboring pDU1212. Images PMID:6411618

  12. Bacillus subtilis EdmS (formerly PgsE) participates in the maintenance of episomes.

    PubMed

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Yamashiro, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kento

    2013-09-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA maintenance (EDM) is an important process in molecular breeding and for various applications in the construction of genetically engineered microbes. Here we describe a novel Bacillus subtilis gene involved in EDM function called edmS (formerly pgsE). Functional gene regions were identified using molecular genetics techniques. We found that EdmS is a membrane-associated protein that is crucial for EDM. We also determined that EdmS can change a plasmid vector with an unstable replicon and worse-than-random segregation into one with better-than-random segregation, suggesting that the protein functions in the declustering and/or partitioning of episomes. EdmS has two distinct domains: an N-terminal membrane-anchoring domain and a C-terminal assembly accelerator-like structure, and mutational analysis of edmS revealed that both domains are essential for EDM. Further studies using cells of Bacillus megaterium and itsedmS (formerly capE) gene implied that EdmS has potential as a molecular probe for exploring novel EDM systems.

  13. Crystal Structure of the GerBC Component of a Bacillus Subtilis Spore Germinant Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Setlow, B; Setlow, P; Hao, B

    2010-01-01

    The nutrient germinant receptors (nGRs) of spores of Bacillus species are clusters of three proteins that play a critical role in triggering the germination of dormant spores in response to specific nutrient molecules. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C protein of the GerB germinant receptor, so-called GerBC, of Bacillus subtilis spores at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The GerBC protein adopts a previously uncharacterized type of protein fold consisting of three distinct domains, each of which is centered by a beta sheet surrounded by multiple alpha helices. Secondary-structure prediction and structure-based sequence alignment suggest that the GerBC structure represents the prototype for C subunits of nGRs from spores of all Bacillales and Clostridiales species and defines two highly conserved structural regions in this family of proteins. GerBC forms an interlocked dimer in the crystalline state but is predominantly monomeric in solution, pointing to the possibility that GerBC oligomerizes as a result of either high local protein concentrations or interaction with other nGR proteins in spores. Our findings provide the first structural view of the nGR subunits and a molecular framework for understanding the architecture, conservation, and function of nGRs.

  14. Optimal secretion of alkali-tolerant xylanase in Bacillus subtilis by signal peptide screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Mingming; Yang, Yuedong; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Xylanases are industrially important enzymes for xylan digestion. We experimentally screened over 114 Sec and 24 Tat pathway signal peptides, with two different promoters, for optimal production of an alkaline active xylanase (XynBYG) from Bacillus pumilus BYG in a Bacillus subtilis host. Though both promoters yielded highly consistent secretion levels (0.97 Pearson correlation coefficient), the Sec pathway was found to be more efficient than the Tat pathway for XynBYG secretion. Furthermore, the optimal signal peptide (phoB) for XynBYG secretion was found to be different from the optimal peptides for cutinase and esterase reported in previous studies. A partial least squares regression analysis further identified several statistically important variables: helical properties, amino acid composition bias, and the discrimination score in Signal P. These variables explain the observed 23 % variance in the secretion yield of XynBYG by the different signal peptides. The results also suggest that the helical propensity of a signal peptide plays a significant role in the beta-rich xylanase, but not in the helix-rich cutinase, suggesting a coupling of the conformations between the signal peptide and its cargo protein for optimal secretion. PMID:27225471

  15. Immune responses induced by recombinant Bacillus subtilis expressing the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Mou, Chunxiao; Zhu, Liqi; Xing, Xianping; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) causes severe diarrhea in suckling piglets, results in enormous economic loss in swine-producing areas of the world. To develop an effective, safe, and convenient vaccine for the prevention of TGE, we have constructed a recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain (B. subtilis CotGSG) displaying the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) spike (S) protein and discussed its immune function to intestinal submucosal dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that the recombinant B. subtilis had the ability to recruit more DCs to sample B. subtilis CotGSG, migrate to MLNs, and induce immune responses. Immunized piglets with B. subtilis CotGSG could significantly elevate the specific SIgA titers in feces, IgG titers and neutralizing antibodies in serum. Collectively, our results suggested that recombinant B. subtilis CotGSG expressing the TGEV S protein could effectively induce immune responses via DCs, and provided a perspective on potential novel strategy and approach that may be applicable to the development of the next generation of TGEV vaccines. PMID:26988122

  16. Synthetic operon for (R,R)-2,3-butanediol production in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rafael R; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    To reduce dependence on petroleum, an alternative route to production of the chemical feedstock 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from renewable lignocellulosic sources is desirable. In this communication, the genes encoding the pathway from pyruvate to 2,3-BD (alsS, alsD, and bdhA encoding acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and butanediol dehydrogenase, respectively) from Bacillus subtilis were engineered into a single tricistronic operon under control of the isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible Pspac promoter in a shuttle plasmid capable of replication and expression in either B. subtilis or Escherichia coli. We describe the construction and performance of a shuttle plasmid carrying the IPTG-inducible synthetic operon alsSDbdhA coding for 2,3-BD pathway capable of (i) expression in two important representative model microorganisms, the gram-positive B. subtilis and the gram-negative E. coli; (ii) increasing 2,3-BD production in B. subtilis; and (iii) successfully introducing the B. subtilis 2,3-BD pathway into E. coli. The synthetic alsSDbdhA operon constructed using B. subtilis native genes not only increased the 2,3-BD production in its native host but also efficiently expressed the pathway in the heterologous organism E. coli. Construction of an efficient shuttle plasmid will allow investigation of 2,3-BD production performance in related organisms with industrial potential for production of bio-based chemicals. PMID:26454865

  17. Synthetic operon for (R,R)-2,3-butanediol production in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rafael R; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    To reduce dependence on petroleum, an alternative route to production of the chemical feedstock 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from renewable lignocellulosic sources is desirable. In this communication, the genes encoding the pathway from pyruvate to 2,3-BD (alsS, alsD, and bdhA encoding acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and butanediol dehydrogenase, respectively) from Bacillus subtilis were engineered into a single tricistronic operon under control of the isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible Pspac promoter in a shuttle plasmid capable of replication and expression in either B. subtilis or Escherichia coli. We describe the construction and performance of a shuttle plasmid carrying the IPTG-inducible synthetic operon alsSDbdhA coding for 2,3-BD pathway capable of (i) expression in two important representative model microorganisms, the gram-positive B. subtilis and the gram-negative E. coli; (ii) increasing 2,3-BD production in B. subtilis; and (iii) successfully introducing the B. subtilis 2,3-BD pathway into E. coli. The synthetic alsSDbdhA operon constructed using B. subtilis native genes not only increased the 2,3-BD production in its native host but also efficiently expressed the pathway in the heterologous organism E. coli. Construction of an efficient shuttle plasmid will allow investigation of 2,3-BD production performance in related organisms with industrial potential for production of bio-based chemicals.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genome Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Strains Isolated from Non-Salted Fermented Soybean Foods

    PubMed Central

    Kamada, Mayumi; Hase, Sumitaka; Fujii, Kazushi; Miyake, Masato; Sato, Kengo; Kimura, Keitarou; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is the main component in the fermentation of soybeans. To investigate the genetics of the soybean-fermenting B. subtilis strains and its relationship with the productivity of extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid (γPGA), we sequenced the whole genome of eight B. subtilis stains isolated from non-salted fermented soybean foods in Southeast Asia. Assembled nucleotide sequences were compared with those of a natto (fermented soybean food) starter strain B. subtilis BEST195 and the laboratory standard strain B. subtilis 168 that is incapable of γPGA production. Detected variants were investigated in terms of insertion sequences, biotin synthesis, production of subtilisin NAT, and regulatory genes for γPGA synthesis, which were related to fermentation process. Comparing genome sequences, we found that the strains that produce γPGA have a deletion in a protein that constitutes the flagellar basal body, and this deletion was not found in the non-producing strains. We further identified diversity in variants of the bio operon, which is responsible for the biotin auxotrophism of the natto starter strains. Phylogenetic analysis using multilocus sequencing typing revealed that the B. subtilis strains isolated from the non-salted fermented soybeans were not clustered together, while the natto-fermenting strains were tightly clustered; this analysis also suggested that the strain isolated from “Tua Nao” of Thailand traces a different evolutionary process from other strains. PMID:26505996

  19. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genome Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Strains Isolated from Non-Salted Fermented Soybean Foods.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Mayumi; Hase, Sumitaka; Fujii, Kazushi; Miyake, Masato; Sato, Kengo; Kimura, Keitarou; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is the main component in the fermentation of soybeans. To investigate the genetics of the soybean-fermenting B. subtilis strains and its relationship with the productivity of extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid (γPGA), we sequenced the whole genome of eight B. subtilis stains isolated from non-salted fermented soybean foods in Southeast Asia. Assembled nucleotide sequences were compared with those of a natto (fermented soybean food) starter strain B. subtilis BEST195 and the laboratory standard strain B. subtilis 168 that is incapable of γPGA production. Detected variants were investigated in terms of insertion sequences, biotin synthesis, production of subtilisin NAT, and regulatory genes for γPGA synthesis, which were related to fermentation process. Comparing genome sequences, we found that the strains that produce γPGA have a deletion in a protein that constitutes the flagellar basal body, and this deletion was not found in the non-producing strains. We further identified diversity in variants of the bio operon, which is responsible for the biotin auxotrophism of the natto starter strains. Phylogenetic analysis using multilocus sequencing typing revealed that the B. subtilis strains isolated from the non-salted fermented soybeans were not clustered together, while the natto-fermenting strains were tightly clustered; this analysis also suggested that the strain isolated from "Tua Nao" of Thailand traces a different evolutionary process from other strains.

  20. [Sporulation or competence development? A genetic regulatory network model of cell-fate determination in Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Yuling; Zhang, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Guimin

    2015-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) strain that has been widely used in industries including fodder, food, and biological control. In addition, B. subtilis expression system also plays a significant role in the production of industrial enzymes. However, its application is limited by its low sporulation frequency and transformation efficiency. Immense studies have been done on interpreting the molecular mechanisms of sporulation and competence development, whereas only few of them were focused on improving sporulation frequency and transformation efficiency of B. subtilis by genetic modification. The main challenge is that sporulation and competence development, as the two major developmental events in the stationary phase of B. subtilis, are regulated by the complicated intracellular genetic regulatory systems. In addition, mutual regulatory mechanisms also exist in these two developmental events. With the development of genetic and metabolic engineering, constructing genetic regulatory networks is currently one of the most attractive research fields, together with the genetic information of cell growth, metabolism, and development, to guide the industrial application. In this review, the mechanisms of sporulation and competence development of B. subtilis, their interactions, and the genetic regulation of cell growth were interpreted. In addition, the roles of these regulatory networks in guiding basic and applied research of B. subtilis and its related species were discussed. PMID:26939438