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Sample records for environmental estrogenic compounds

  1. Performance of the flow cytometric E-screen assay in screening estrogenicity of pure compounds and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vanparys, Caroline; Depiereux, Sophie; Nadzialek, Stéphanie; Robbens, Johan; Blust, Ronny; Kestemont, Patrick; De Coen, Wim

    2010-09-15

    In vitro estrogenicity screens are believed to provide a first prioritization step in hazard characterization of endocrine disrupting chemicals. When applied to complex environmental matrices or mixture samples, they have been indicated valuable in estimating the overall estrogen-mimicking load. In this study, the performance of an adapted format of the classical E-screen or MCF-7 cell proliferation assay was profoundly evaluated to rank pure compounds as well as influents and effluents of sewage treatment plants (STPs) according to estrogenic activity. In this adapted format, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis was used to allow evaluation of the MCF-7 cell proliferative effects after only 24 h of exposure. With an average EC(50) value of 2 pM and CV of 22%, this assay appears as a sensitive and reproducible system for evaluation of estrogenic activity. Moreover, estrogenic responses of 17 pure compounds corresponded well, qualitatively and quantitatively, with other in vitro and in vivo estrogenicity screens, such as the classical E-screen (R(2)=0.98), the estrogen receptor (ER) binding (R(2)=0.84) and the ER transcription activation assay (R(2)=0.87). To evaluate the applicability of this assay for complex samples, influents and effluents of 10 STPs covering different treatment processes, were compared and ranked according to estrogenic removal efficiencies. Activated sludge treatment with phosphorus and nitrogen removal appeared most effective in eliminating estrogenic activity, followed by activated sludge, lagoon and filter bed. This is well in agreement with previous findings based on chemical analysis or biological activity screens. Moreover, ER blocking experiments indicated that cell proliferative responses were mainly ER mediated, illustrating that the complexity of the end point, cell proliferation, compared to other ER screens, does not hamper the interpretation of the results. Therefore, this study, among other E-screen studies, supports the use of

  2. Assessing the energy and environmental performance of algae-mediated tertiary treatment of estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Colosi, Lisa M; Resurreccion, Eleazer P; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-02-01

    This study uses a systems-level modeling approach to illustrate a novel synergy between municipal wastewater treatment and large-scale algaculture for production of bio-energy, whereby algae-mediated tertiary treatment provides efficient removal of unregulated, strongly estrogenic steroid hormones from the secondary effluent. Laboratory results from previously published studies suggested that algae-mediated treatment could deliver roughly 75-85% removal of a model estrogen (17β-estradiol) within typical algae pond residence times. As such, experimental results are integrated into a comprehensive life cycle assessment (LCA) framework, to assess the environmental performance of an algae-based tertiary treatment system relative to three conventional tertiary treatments: ozonation, UV irradiation, and adsorption onto granular activated carbon. Results indicate that the algae-mediated tertiary treatment is superior to the selected benchmarks on the basis of raw energy return on investment (EROI) and normalized energy use per mass of estrogenic toxicity removed. It is the only tertiary treatment system that creates more energy than it consumes, and it delivers acceptable effluent quality for nutrient and coliform concentrations while rendering a significant reduction in estrogenic toxicity. These results highlight the dual water and energy sustainability benefits that accrue from the integration of municipal wastewater treatment and large-scale algae farming.

  3. Environmental Estrogens and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, Retha R.; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Jefferson, Wendy N.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemicals in the environment, in particular those with estrogenic activity, can disrupt the programming of endocrine signaling pathways that are established during development and result in adverse consequences that may not be apparent until much later in life. Most recently, obesity and diabetes join the growing list of adverse consequences that have been associated with developmental exposure to environmental estrogens during critical stages of differentiation. These diseases are quickly becoming significant public health issues and are fast reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. In this review, we summarize the literature from experimental animal studies documenting an association of environmental estrogens and the development of obesity, and further describe an animal model of exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) that has proven useful in studying mechanisms involved in abnormal programming of various differentiating estrogen- target tissues. Other examples of environmental estrogens including the phytoestrogen genistein and the environmental contaminant Bisphenol A are also discussed. Together, these data suggest new targets (i.e., adipocyte differentiation and molecular mechanisms involved in weight homeostasis) for abnormal programming by estrogenic chemicals, and provide evidence that support the scientific hypothesis termed “the developmental origins of adult disease”. The proposal of an association of environmental estrogens with obesity and diabetes expands the focus on the diseases from intervention/treatment to include prevention/avoidance of chemical modifiers especially during critical windows of development. PMID:19433252

  4. The role of environmental estrogens and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, Cecilia; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the recent years. It has been proposed that this epidemiological evidence could be in part attributable to environmental estrogens, compounds that display estrogen-like activity and are ubiquitously present in the environment. Environmental estrogens can be found in a wide variety of foods: phytoestrogens occur in plants such as clover and soy, while mycoestrogens are food contaminants produced by fungi. Meat, eggs and dairy products from animals given exogenous hormones contain relatively high concentration of estrogens. Among xenoestrogens, industrial estrogens are synthetic chemicals produced for specific purposes (pesticides, plastics, surfactants and detergents) while metalloestrogens are found in heavy metals. Estrogens can be also administered through medications (contraceptive pill, hormone replacement therapy, genistein, cimetidine, creams). There is a considerable burden of evidence in vitro and in animal models that these compounds may exert immunotoxic effects. However, to date there is no convincing data that exposure to environmental estrogens can be regarded as a risk for human health. In particular, there is no consensus whether prolonged exposure to relatively low concentrations of different estrogenic chemicals can affect the human immune system and induce clinically evident diseases in real-life scenario. Moreover, the effects on human health of the synergistic interactions between natural, medical, dietary and environmental estrogens have not been fully elucidated yet. Here we provide an extensive review of the in vivo and in vitro effects of environmental estrogens on the immune system, focusing on the evidences of association between exposure and autoimmune disorders.

  5. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  6. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  7. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  8. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  9. Synergistic activation of estrogen receptor with combinations of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.F.; Klotz, D.M.; Collins, B.M.

    1996-06-07

    Certain chemicals in the environment are estrogenic. The low potencies of the compounds, when studied singly, suggest that they may have little effect on biological systems. The estrogenic potencies of combinations of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen potencies of combination of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen systems (YES) containing human estrogen receptor (hER). Combinations of two weak environmental estrogens, such as dieldrin, endosulfan, or toxaphene, were 100 times as potent in hER-mediated transactivation as any chemical alone. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls shown previously to synergistically alter sexual development in turtles also synergized in the YES. The synergistic interaction of chemical mixtures with the estrogen receptor may have profound environmental implications. These results may represent a previously uncharacterized level of regulation of estrogen-associated responses. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  11. Characterizing the Estrogenic Potential of 1060 Environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to detect environmental chemicals that pose a risk of endocrine disruption, high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals are needed. Alteration of estrogen signaling has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including cancer promotion, reproductive deficits, and vascular effects. Here we investigate the estrogenic potential of 1060 chemicals of environmental relevance using a real-time measure of growth kinetics by electrode impedance in the estrogen-responsive human ductal carcinoma, T47D cell line. Cells were treated in concentration response and measurements of cellular impedance were recorded every hour for six days. Progestens, androgens, and mineralocortocoids (progesterone, dihydrotestosterone, aldosterone) invoked a biphasic impedance signature that contrasted with the anticipated exponential impedance observed in response to known estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genestein, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol-A, and genestein caused impedance comparable to that of 17β-estradiol, although at much higher concentrations. Additionally, trenbolone and cyproterone acetate invoked the characteristic biphasic signature observed with other endogenous steroid hormones. The continuous real-time nature of this assay allows for the rapid detection of differential growth characteristics not easily detected by traditional cell prol

  12. Prediction of Estrogenic Bioactivity of Environmental Chemical Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline L; Mansouri, Kamel; Judson, Richard; Browne, Patience

    2016-09-19

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is using in vitro data generated from ToxCast/Tox21 high-throughput screening assays to assess the endocrine activity of environmental chemicals. Considering that in vitro assays may have limited metabolic capacity, inactive chemicals that are biotransformed into metabolites with endocrine bioactivity may be missed for further screening and testing. Therefore, there is a value in developing novel approaches to account for metabolism and endocrine activity of both parent chemicals and their associated metabolites. We used commercially available software to predict metabolites of 50 parent compounds, out of which 38 chemicals are known to have estrogenic metabolites, and 12 compounds and their metabolites are negative for estrogenic activity. Three ER QSAR models were used to determine potential estrogen bioactivity of the parent compounds and predicted metabolites, the outputs of the models were averaged, and the chemicals were then ranked based on the total estrogenicity of the parent chemical and metabolites. The metabolite prediction software correctly identified known estrogenic metabolites for 26 out of 27 parent chemicals with associated metabolite data, and 39 out of 46 estrogenic metabolites were predicted as potential biotransformation products derived from the parent chemical. The QSAR models estimated stronger estrogenic activity for the majority of the known estrogenic metabolites compared to their parent chemicals. Finally, the three models identified a similar set of parent compounds as top ranked chemicals based on the estrogenicity of putative metabolites. This proposed in silico approach is an inexpensive and rapid strategy for the detection of chemicals with estrogenic metabolites and may reduce potential false negative results from in vitro assays.

  13. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  14. Nonylphenol and estrogenic activity in aquatic environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tanghe, T.; Devriese, G.; Verstraete, W.

    1999-03-01

    The authors surveyed a series of surface waters and sewage treatment plants in Flanders (north of Belgium) for the presence of estrogenic activity and a xeno-estrogenic compound para-nonylphenol (NP), respectively. The surface waters of rural origin, used for drinking water production were free of significant levels of estrogenic activity and NP. Domestic sewage, after proper treatment, appeared to be no major source of this chemical. Yet, in some industrial effluents and surface waters of highly industrialized regions, NP and/or estrogenic activity was prominent, that is, <1 to 122 {micro}g NP/L and 11 to 42 {micro}g NP/L, respectively. This is because of the ongoing use of NP polyethoxylates in industry. The response of the recombinant yeast estrogen assay to the environmental samples tested was not consistent with the detected concentrations of NP. Standard addition of a natural estrogen, 17{beta}-estradiol, generated no or a reduced response compared to the standard curve concentration. Application of humic acids to standard series of NP and 17{beta}-estradiol resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of the estrogenic response. It appears that this bioassay is subject to considerable interferences due to the complexity of environmental samples. Parallel implementation of extensive chemical screening for xenobiotics and use of the bioassay are needed for adequate assessment of the potential estrogenic hazard to avoid false negative evaluations.

  15. Functional associations between two estrogen receptors, environmental estrogens, and sexual disruption in the roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Lange, Anke; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Rie; Paull, Gregory C; Cahill, Laura L; Jobling, Susan; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2007-05-01

    Wild male roach (Rutilus rutilus) living in U.K. rivers contaminated with estrogenic effluents from wastewater treatment works show feminized responses and have a reduced reproductive capability, but the chemical causation of sexual disruption in the roach has not been established. Feminized responses were induced in male roach exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of the pharmaceutical estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, EE2 (up to 4 ng/ L), during early life (from fertilization to 84 days posthatch, dph), and these effects were signaled by altered patterns of expression of two cloned roach estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERalpha. and ERbeta, in the brain and gonad/ liver. Transactivation assays were developed for both roach ER subtypes and the estrogenic potencies of steroidal estrogens differed markedly at the different ER subtypes. EE2 was by far the most potent chemical, and estrone (E1, the most prevalent environmental steroid in wastewater discharges) was equipotent with estradiol (E2) in activating the ERs. Comparison of the EC50 values for the compounds tested showed that ERbeta was 3-21-fold more sensitive to natural steroidal estrogens and 54-fold more sensitive to EE2 as compared to ERalpha. These findings add substantial support to the hypothesis that steroidal estrogens play a significant role in the induction of intersex in roach populations in U.K. rivers and that the molecular approach described could be usefully applied to understand interspecies sensitivity to xenoestrogens.

  16. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS.

    Robert J. Kavlock, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.

    Over the past several decades a hypothesis has been put forth that a numb...

  17. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUMAN HEALTH IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS.

    Robert J. Kavlock, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.

    Over the past several decades a hypothesis has been put forth that a numb...

  18. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Caroline; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Pakdel, Farzad; Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Bourguet, William; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; and others

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  19. PCBs as environmental estrogens: Turtle sex determination as a biomarker of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, J.M.; Crews, D. ); McLachlan, J.A. )

    1994-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread, low-level environmental pollutants associated with adverse health effects such as immune suppression and teratogenicity. There is increasing evidence that some PCB compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans, particularly during development. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds act to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, whereby the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. Here we demonstrate the estrogenic effect of some PCBs by reversing gonadal sex in a reptile species that exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Effects of Estrogens and Estrogenic Disrupting Compounds on Fish Mineralized Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patricia I. S.; Estêvão, Maria D.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities. PMID:25196834

  1. Effects of estrogens and estrogenic disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia I S; Estêvão, Maria D; Power, Deborah M

    2014-08-15

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities.

  2. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Pakdel, Farzad; Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim; Cavaillès, Vincent; Bourguet, William; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Bondesson, Maria; Balaguer, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28°C as compared to 37°C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology.

  3. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  4. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  5. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  6. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  7. Immunomodulation of Mytilus hemocytes by individual estrogenic chemicals and environmentally relevant mixtures of estrogens: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura; Lorusso, Lucia Cecilia; Ciacci, Caterina; Betti, Michele; Rocchi, Marco; Pojana, Giulio; Marcomini, Antonio

    2007-02-15

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are almost ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. In the marine bivalve Mytilus the natural estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E2) and different EDCs have been recently demonstrated to affect the function of the immune cells, the hemocytes. The effects were Tamoxifen-sensitive and were mediated by rapid modulation of kinase-mediated transduction pathways. In this work we compared the in vitro effects of individual estrogenic chemicals (E2, EE: 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol; MES: mestranol; NP: nonylphenol; NP1EC: nonylphenol monoethoxylate carboxylate; BPA: bisphenol A; BP: benzophenone) on hemocyte parameters: lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), phagocytosis, lysozyme release. LMS was the most sensitive effect parameter, showing a decreasing trend at increasing concentrations of estrogens. EC50 values obtained from LMS data were utilized to calculate the estradiol equivalency factor (EEF) for each compound; these EEFs allowed for an estimation of the estrogenic potential of a synthetic mixture with a composition very similar to that previously found in waters of the Venice lagoon. Concentrated mixtures significantly affected hemocyte parameters in vitro and the effects were prevented by Tamoxifen. Significant effects of the mixture were also observed in vivo, at longer exposure times and at concentrations comparable with environmental exposure levels. The results indicate that Mytilus immune parameters can be suitably utilized to evaluate the estrogenic potential of environmental samples.

  8. A variety of environmentally persistent chemicals, including some phthalate plasticizers, are weakly estrogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, S; Reynolds, T; White, R; Parker, M G; Sumpter, J P

    1995-01-01

    Sewage, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic chemicals, is considered to be a major source of environmental pollution. A random screen of 20 organic man-made chemicals present in liquid effluents revealed that half appeared able to interact with the estradiol receptor. This was demonstrated by their ability to inhibit binding of 17 beta-estradiol to the fish estrogen receptor. Further studies, using mammalian estrogen screens in vitro, revealed that the two phthalate esters butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and a food antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were estrogenic; however, they were all less estrogenic than the environmental estrogen octylphenol. Phthalate esters, used in the production of various plastics (including PVC), are among the most common industrial chemicals. Their ubiquity in the environment and tendency to bioconcentrate in animal fat are well known. Neither BBP nor DBP were able to act as antagonists, indicating that, in the presence of endogenous estrogens, their overall effect would be cumulative. Recently, it has been suggested that environmental estrogens may be etiological agents in several human diseases, including disorders of the male reproductive tract and breast and testicular cancers. The current finding that some phthalate compounds and some food additives are weakly estrogenic in vitro, needs to be supported by further studies on their effects in vivo before any conclusions can be made regarding their possible role in the development of these conditions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7556011

  9. Biochar as potential adsorptive media for estrogenic compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an emerging problem in water pollution due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife. Estrogenic compounds are a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are particularly dangerous since they are very potent and can affect fish at concentrations as low as ...

  10. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  11. Environmental signaling: from environmental estrogens to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and beyond.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, J A

    2016-07-01

    The landmark report (Herbst et al. 1971) linking prenatal treatment with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), to cancer at puberty in women whose mothers took the drug while pregnant ushered in an era of research on delayed effects of such exposures on functional outcomes in offspring. An animal model developed in our laboratory at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences confirmed that DES was the carcinogen and exposure to DES caused, as well, functional alterations in the reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems of male and female mice treated in utero. DES was also being used in agriculture and we discovered, at the first meeting on Estrogens in the Environment in 1979 (Estrogens in the Environment, 1980), that many environmental contaminants were also estrogenic. Many laboratories sought to discern the basis for estrogenicity in environmental chemicals and to discover other hormonally active xenobiotics. Our laboratory elucidated how DES and other estrogenic compounds worked by altering differentiation through epigenetic gene imprinting, helping explain the transgenerational effects found in mice and humans. At the Wingspread Conference on the Human-Wildlife Connection in 1991 (Advances in Modern Environmental Toxicology, 1992), we learned that environmental disruption of the endocrine system occurred in many species and phyla, and the term endocrine disruption was introduced. Further findings of transgenerational effects of environmental agents that mimicked or blocked various reproductive hormones and the ubiquity of environmental signals, such as bisphenol A increased concern for human and ecological health. Scientists began to look at other endocrine system aspects, such as cardiovascular and immune function, and other nuclear receptors, with important observations regarding obesity and metabolism. Laboratories, such as ours, are now using stem cells to try to understand the mechanisms by which various environmental signals

  12. Modulation of estrogenic effects by environmental temperature and food availability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in combination with environmental influences, interfere with endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Estrogens are a type of EDC that may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. The impact of estrogens on P...

  13. Modeling environmental loading rates of municipal wastewater contaminants: steroidal estrogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds in municipal wastewater are of substantial interest because of suspicion that they may cause reproductive disruption in aquatic invertebrates, and because of their potential to contaminate human drinking water sources. Previous work suggests the primary contr...

  14. Modeling environmental loading rates of municipal wastewater contaminants: steroidal estrogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds in municipal wastewater are of substantial interest because of suspicion that they may cause reproductive disruption in aquatic invertebrates, and because of their potential to contaminate human drinking water sources. Previous work suggests the primary contr...

  15. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  16. Impact of estrogenic compounds on DNA integrity in human spermatozoa: evidence for cross-linking and redox cycling activities.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, L E; De Iuliis, G N; Nixon, B; Kime, M; Zelski, K; McVicar, C M; Lewis, S E; Aitken, R J

    2008-05-10

    A great deal of circumstantial evidence has linked DNA damage in human spermatozoa with adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced fertility and high rates of miscarriage. Although oxidative stress is thought to make a significant contribution to DNA damage in the male germ line, the factors responsible for creating this stress have not been elucidated. One group of compounds that are thought to be active in this context are the estrogens, either generated as a result of the endogenous metabolism of androgens within the male reproductive tract or gaining access to the latter as a consequence of environmental exposure. In this study, a wide variety of estrogenic compounds were assessed for their direct effects on human spermatozoa in vitro. DNA integrity was assessed using the Comet and TUNEL assays, lesion frequencies were quantified by QPCR using targets within the mitochondrial and nuclear (beta-globin) genomes, DNA adducts were characterized by mass spectrometry and redox activity was monitored using dihydroethidium (DHE) as the probe. Of the estrogenic and estrogen analogue compounds evaluated, catechol estrogens, quercetin, diethylstilbestrol and pyrocatechol stimulated intense redox activity while genistein was only active at the highest doses tested. Other estrogens and estrogen analogues, such as 17beta-estradiol, nonylphenol, bisphenol A and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene were inactive. Estrogen-induced redox activity was associated with a dramatic loss of motility and, in the case of 2-hydroxyestradiol, the induction of significant DNA fragmentation. Mass spectrometry also indicated that catechol estrogens were capable of forming dimers that can cross-link the densely packed DNA strands in sperm chromatin, impairing nuclear decondensation. These results highlight the potential importance of estrogenic compounds in creating oxidative stress and DNA damage in the male germ line and suggest that further exploration of these compounds in the aetiology of male

  17. Analysis and occurrence of endocrine-disrupting compounds and estrogenic activity in the surface waters of Central Spain.

    PubMed

    Esteban, S; Gorga, M; Petrovic, M; González-Alonso, S; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) are chemical compounds with the ability to alter the hormonal systems of organisms. Such compounds are used in several industrial and domestic activities and reach the aquatic environment via wastewater discharge. The aim of this study is to assess the occurrence of 30 EDCs and related compounds in the surface waters of central Spain and to determine the overall estrogenic activity of environmental samples. This study analyzed a large number of EDCs and other emergent or suspected compounds with endocrine-disrupting activity. The results have shown the presence of 19 EDCs at concentrations ranging from 2 to 5928 ng L(-1). Organophosphorus-based flame retardants, alkylphenolic compounds and anticorrosives were found at the highest concentrations. Furthermore, although insufficient data are available to calculate an average over time, these preliminary results show the need to monitor the waters in both rivers studied. Alkylphenolic compounds, particularly nonylphenol, were the main contributors to overall estrogenicity. A higher concentration of the compounds studied was detected in the river Jarama, although the estrogenicity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was higher in the river Manzanares due to a higher concentration of nonylphenol. However, the total estrogenicity did not exceed 1 ng L(-1) (EEQ), which is the level that may cause estrogenic effects in aquatic organisms, in any of the samples. In conclusion, the potential estrogenic risk in both rivers is low, although organophosphorus-based flame retardants may increase this risk as they were found at high levels in all samples. Unfortunately, these compounds could not be taken into account when calculating the estrogenic activity due to the lack of activity data for them. For future investigations, it will be important to assess the estrogenicity provided by these flame retardants. Due to the significant concentrations of EDCs detected in both rivers, further

  18. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BLYES Expressing Bacterial Bioluminescence for Rapid, Sensitive Detection of Estrogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sanseverino, John; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Layton, Alice C.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven A.; Saidak, Leslie; Simpson, Michael L.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    An estrogen-inducible bacterial lux-based bioluminescent reporter was developed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for applications in chemical sensing and environmental assessment of estrogen disruptor activity. The strain, designated S. cerevisiae BLYES, was constructed by inserting tandem estrogen response elements between divergent yeast promoters GPD and ADH1 on pUTK401 (formerly pUA12B7) that constitutively express luxA and luxB to create pUTK407. Cotransformation of this plasmid with a second plasmid (pUTK404) containing the genes required for aldehyde synthesis (luxCDE) and FMN reduction (frp) yielded a bioluminescent bioreporter responsive to estrogen-disrupting compounds. For validation purposes, results with strain BLYES were compared to the colorimetric-based estrogenic assay that uses the yeast lacZ reporter strain (YES). Strains BLYES and YES were exposed to 17β-estradiol over the concentration range of 1.2 × 10−8 through 5.6 × 10−12 M. Calculated 50% effective concentration values from the colorimetric and bioluminescence assays (n = 7) were similar at (4.4 ± 1.1) × 10−10 and (2.4 ± 1.0) × 10−10 M, respectively. The lower and upper limits of detection for each assay were also similar and were approximately 4.5 × 10−11 to 2.8 × 10−9 M. Bioluminescence was observed in as little as 1 h and reached its maximum in 6 h. In comparison, the YES assay required a minimum of 3 days for results. Strain BLYES fills the niche for rapid, high-throughput screening of estrogenic compounds and has the ability to be used for remote, near-real-time monitoring of estrogen-disrupting chemicals in the environment. PMID:16085836

  19. Environmental estrogens and reproductive health: a discussion of the human and environmental data.

    PubMed

    Daston, G P; Gooch, J W; Breslin, W J; Shuey, D L; Nikiforov, A I; Fico, T A; Gorsuch, J W

    1997-01-01

    Estrogenic activity of certain xenobiotics is an established mechanism of toxicity that can impair reproductive function in adults of either sex, lead to irreversible abnormalities when administered during development, or cause cancer. The concern has been raised that exposure to ambient levels of estrogenic xenobiotics may be having widespread adverse effects on reproductive health of humans and wildlife. The purpose of this review is to evaluate (a) the nature of the evidence supporting this concern, and (b) the adequacy of toxicity screening to detect, and risk assessment procedures to establish safe levels for, agents acting by this mechanism. Observations such as adverse developmental effects after maternal exposure to therapeutic levels of the potent estrogen diethylstilbestrol or male fertility problems after exposure to high levels of the weak estrogen chlordecone clearly demonstrate that estrogenicity is active as a toxic mechanism in humans. High level exposures to estrogenic compounds have also been shown to affect specific wildlife populations. However, there is little direct evidence to indicate that exposures to ambient levels of estrogenic xenobiotics are affecting reproductive health. Reports of historical trends showing decreasing reproductive capacity (e.g., decreased sperm production over the last 50 years) are either inconsistent with other data or have significant methodologic inadequacies that hinder interpretation. More reliable historical trend data show an increase in breast cancer rate, but the most comprehensive epidemiology study to data failed to show an association between exposure to persistent, estrogenic organochlorine compounds and breast cancer. Clearly, more work needs to be done to characterize historical trends in humans and background incidence of abnormalities in wildlife populations, and to test hypotheses about ambient exposure to environmental contaminants and toxic effects, before conclusions can be reached about the

  20. Environmental estrogens in a drinking water reservoir area in Shanghai: occurrence, colloidal contribution and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Nie, Minghua; Yang, Yi; Liu, Min; Yan, Caixia; Shi, Hao; Dong, Wenbo; Zhou, John L

    2014-07-15

    The occurrence and multi-phase distribution of six environmental estrogen compounds were investigated in a drinking water reservoir area by analyzing estrogens in suspended particulate matter (SPM), filtrate (conventional dissolved phase, <1 μm), permeate (truly soluble phase, <1 kDa) and retentate (colloidal phase, 1 kDa to 1 μm). The estrogen concentrations at different sites occurred in the following order: animal feed operation (AFO) wastewater-affected streams>tributaries>main stream channel. Correlation analysis showed that organic carbon (OC) contents had significantly positive correlations with environmental estrogens in filtrate, SPM and colloidal phases, respectively, indicating the important role played by OC. Aquatic colloids, often neglected, showed a much higher sorption capability of environmental estrogens compared to SPM. Similar Kcoc values in three types of sampling sites showed that colloids could be transported from AFO wastewater to tributaries and further into the main river channel. Mass balance calculations showed that 14.5-68.4% of OP, 4.5-32.1% of BPA, 2.0-58.4% of E1, 8.36-72.0% of E2, 0-20.6% of EE2, 3.4-62.7% of E3 and 8.3-36.1% of total estrogens were associated with colloidal fractions, suggesting that the colloids could act as a significant sink for environmental estrogens. Risk assessment demonstrated that the occurrence of environmental estrogens might pose a risk to aquatic organisms in the study area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of environmental estrogens on IL-1beta promoter activity in a macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Ruh, M F; Bi, Y; Cox, L; Berk, D; Howlett, A C; Bellone, C J

    1998-10-01

    Environmental estrogens or estrogen disrupters have recently received a great deal of attention because of their potential health impact on reproductive tissues. Few, if any, studies have been made on the impact of these compounds on the immune system. We sought to determine the activities of various environmental estrogens on the modulation of the interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) gene in a model monocytic cell line, hER + IL-1beta-CAT+. This cell line stably transfected with the human estrogen receptor, and an IL-1beta promoter construct fused to the CAT reporter gene allows us to monitor the effect of estrogenic compounds on IL-1beta promoter activity. 17beta-estradiol (E2) markedly enhanced lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) induced IL-1beta promoter-driven CAT activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mycotoxins alpha-zearalenol and zearalenone both exhibited full agonist activity, but at lower potencies, with EC50 values of 1.8 and 54 nM, respectively, compared with E2 at 0.5 nM. In addition, genistein was a very low-potency agonist, having an EC50 of 1.5 microM. Similar to the E2 response, the slope factors for alpha-zearalenol, zearalenone, and genistein were close to 3.0, suggesting positive cooperativity in the estrogenic response. The activity of the mycotoxins appeared to be mediated through the estrogen receptor, since both the antiestrogens H1285 and ICI 182,780 effectively inhibited their agonist activity in a dose-dependent manner. Representative environmental estrogenic compounds both from plant and industrial sources were also tested. Unlike the mycoestrogens, none of the compounds, with the exception of genistein, synergized with LPS to enhance IL-1beta promoter activity. When tested for antiestrogenic activity, the industrial compound 4-octylphenol was able to antagonize the response to E2; however, the response was three orders of magnitude less potent than H 1285. Naringenin, a plant flavonoid, showed little or no ability to antagonize the response to E2

  2. COMPARISON OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have the potential to disrupt endocrine function in a myriad of species. However, in vitro assays designed to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) typically utilize mammalian estrogen receptors. Our overall objective is to charac...

  3. COMPARISON OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have the potential to disrupt endocrine function in a myriad of species. However, in vitro assays designed to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) typically utilize mammalian estrogen receptors. Our overall objective is to charac...

  4. Effect of combining in vitro estrogenicity data with kinetic characteristics of estrogenic compounds on the in vivo predictive value.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ans; Brand, Walter; Murk, Albertinka J; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Schriks, Merijn; Heringa, Minne B

    2013-02-01

    With the ultimate aim of increasing the utility of in vitro assays for toxicological risk assessment, a method was developed to calculate in vivo estrogenic potencies from in vitro estrogenic potencies of compounds by taking into account systemic availability. In vitro estrogenic potencies of three model compounds (bisphenol A, genistein, and 4-nonylphenol) relative to ethinylestradiol (EE2), determined with the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) transcriptional activation assay using hER-HeLa-9903 cells, were taken from literature and used to calculate the EE2 equivalent (EE2EQ) effect doses in the predominantly ERα-dependent rat uterotrophic assay. Compound-specific differences in hepatic clearance relative to the reference compound EE2 were determined in vitro to examine whether in vivo estrogenic potencies reported in literature could be more accurately estimated. The EE2EQ doses allowed to predict in vivo uterotrophic responses within a factor of 6-25 and the inclusion of the hepatic clearance further improved the prediction with a factor 1.6-2.1 for especially genistein and bisphenol A. Yet, the model compounds still were less potent in vivo than predicted based on their EE2 equivalent estrogenic potency and hepatic clearance. For further improvement of the in vitro to in vivo predictive value of in vitro assays, the relevance of other kinetic characteristics should be studied, including binding to carrier proteins, oral bioavailability and the formation of estrogenic metabolites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potencies of estrogenic compounds in in vitro screening assays and in life cycle tests with zebrafish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Segner, H; Navas, J M; Schäfers, C; Wenzel, A

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the estrogenic potency of environmental estrogens at two testing tiers: at the initial level of in vitro screening assays, and at the level of definitive fish reproduction tests in vivo. The in vitro tests included a recombinant yeast estrogen receptor (ER) assay, a competitive radioreceptor assay using the hepatic ER of carp (Cyprinus carpio), and assays on vitellogenin induction in cultured hepatocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and carp. In vivo, full life cycle tests with zebrafish (Danio rerio) were performed, using fertilization success as estrogen-sensitive reproductive endpoint. The test compounds included the natural estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E2) (only applied in the in vitro assays); the synthetic estrogen ethynylestradiol (EE2); and two xenoestrogens, 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and bisphenol A (BPA). Among the in vitro assays, differences were observed in the relative ranking of the test substances, and in the absolute sensitivity (EC50 values), although the interassay differences of EC50 values were within one order of magnitude. The in vivo activity of the test compounds was not accurately predicted by the in vitro assays, with respect to neither sensitivity nor ranking. The in vitro assays tended to overestimate the relative potency of the xenoestrogens; i.e. the ratio between the activity of the reference compound, EE2, and that of the test compound. The best prediction of the in vivo fish test results was obtained from the recombinant yeast assay.

  6. Environmental factors affecting ultraviolet photodegradation rates and estrogenicity of estrone and ethinylestradiol in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Susanna K; Marlatt, Vicki L; Kimpe, Lynda E; Lean, David R S; Trudeau, Vance L; Blais, Jules M

    2011-01-01

    The environmental fate and persistence of steroidal estrogens is influenced by their photodegradation. This can potentially occur both in the presence of the ultraviolet (UV) portion of solar radiation and in tertiary wastewater treatment plants that use UV radiation for disinfection purposes. To determine patterns of UV photodegradation for estrone (E1) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), water samples containing these compounds were exposed to levels of UVB radiation that would simulate exposure to ambient sunlight. E1 degraded with a pseudo-first-order rate law constant that was directly proportional to UVB radiation intensity (R² = 0.999, P < 0.001) and inversely proportional to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R² = 0.812, P = 0.037). DOC acted as a competitive inhibitor to direct photolysis of E1 by UV. In contrast to E1, EE2 was more persistent under similar UVB treatment. A reporter gene assay showed that the estrogenicity of UVB-exposed estrogens did not decrease relative to non-UVB-exposed estrogens, suggesting that some of the photoproducts may also have estrogenic potency. These results show that environmental degradation rates of steroidal estrogens are predictable from the UV intensity reaching surface waters, and the DOC concentrations in these surface waters.

  7. [Estrogenic activity of ultraviolet absorbers and the related compounds].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisashi; Adachi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of ultraviolet absorbers and their related compounds were investigated using MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Nine of 33 chemicals (benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone, 4-hydroxybenzophenone, 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor, ethyl 2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (etocrylene) and 2-ethylhexyl-2-cyano-3,3-diphenylacrylate (octocrylene)) were positive compared with the vehicle control. Benzhydrol, ethyl cinnamate and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone were weakly active. When each xenoestrogen was added to the cells along with ICI 182780, an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, the cell growth was reduced according to its doses. Therefore, the cell proliferation was suggested to generate through ER. Most of these chemicals were also positive using CHOOSER assay, a new method of testing estrogenic activity of xenoestrogen. Each xenoestrogen was also confirmed to bind to ERalpha and ERbeta using a human ER competitive binding assay against 17beta-estradiol. The concentration order of the strength of its inhibitory effect using both ERalpha and ERbeta was similar to that of MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, except for benzyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (B4HB). B4HB showed a stronger activity on CHOOSER assay and the competitive binding assay using both ERalpha and ERbeta, although there was no activity observed on MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. Our findings were to detect the estrogenic activity of etocrylene and octocrylene in vitro, in addition to confirming the activities of some ultraviolet absorbers as previously reported.

  8. Estrogenic & antiestrogenic properties of e-492, a nonsteroidal compound.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, P K; Karkun, J N

    1975-01-01

    Estrogenic and antiestrogenic properties of E-492, a nonsteroidal compound (3 methyl-4'-(beta-pyrrolidinoethoxy)-2,3-diphenyl propiophenone), were assessed on the basis of ponderal, histologic, and biochemical changes in the uterus, cervix, and vagina of ovariectomized adult rats. This compound was studied at its maximum effective antifertility dose of .5 mg/kg/day for 5 days. Estradiol-dipropionate (EDP) was studied at a dose of 1 mcg/kg/day. EDP and E-492 separately increased the weight of the 3 genital accessories. Histologically, the organs presented an infantile condition characterized by atrophic epithelia, compact stroma, and inconspicious muscularis. The uterine glycogen level was raised by EDP (p less than .01) but not by E-492 (p greater than .05). Lactic acid was increased by EDP in all target organs (p less than .01) and by E-492 in the uterus and vagina (p less than .01) but not in the cervix (p greater than .05). Combined therapy antagonized EDP effect at the uterine and vaginal levels. Alkaline phosphatase was enhanced by EDP in all 3 organs (p less than .01) and by E-492 in the uterus and cervix (p less than .01). These results indicate that on the basis of changes in weight and histology, E-492 has both estrogenic and antiestrogenic potencies.

  9. Binding and transactivation of the largemouth bass estrogen receptors by model compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens (EEs) are chemicals in the environment that can elicit adverse effects on estrogen (E2) signaling by binding with the estrogen receptors (ERs). In largemouth bass (LMB), the physiological actions of E2 are primarily mediated via three receptors (ERα, ERßb ...

  10. Binding and transactivation of the largemouth bass estrogen receptors by model compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens (EEs) are chemicals in the environment that can elicit adverse effects on estrogen (E2) signaling by binding with the estrogen receptors (ERs). In largemouth bass (LMB), the physiological actions of E2 are primarily mediated via three receptors (ERα, ERßb ...

  11. Analytical strategies based on chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of estrogen-mimicking compounds in food.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Colapicchioni, Valentina; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2013-10-25

    Food safety can be compromised by the presence of a wide variety of substances, deriving from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these substances, compounds exhibiting various degrees of estrogenic activity have been widely studied in environmental samples, whereas less attention has been devoted to food matrices. The aim of the present review is to give a general overview on the recent analytical methods based on gas or liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for the determination of estrogen-like compounds in foods, including new developments, improvements and upcoming trends in the field. Attention will be focused on four representative groups of compounds, i.e. natural and synthetic estrogens, mycoestrogens, phytoestrogens, and alkylphenols.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT REDUCES THE MNEMONIC AND NEURAL BENEFITS OF ESTROGEN

    PubMed Central

    GRESACK, J. E.; FRICK, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The degree to which memory is enhanced by estrogen replacement in postmenopausal women may depend on environmental factors such as education. The present study utilized an animal model of environmental enrichment to determine whether environmental factors influence the mnemonic and neural response to estrogen. Female mice were raised in standard (SC) or enriched (EC) conditions from weaning until adulthood (7 months). All mice were ovariectomized at 10 weeks, and tested in object recognition and water-escape motivated radial arm maze (WRAM) tasks at 6 months. Each day at the completion of training, mice received injections of 0.1 mg/kg cyclodextrin-encapsulated 17-β-estradiol (E2), 0.2 mg/kg E2, or cyclodextrin vehicle (VEH). At the completion of behavioral testing, hippocampal levels of the presynaptic protein synaptophysin and of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. Enrichment effects were evident in VEH-treated mice; relative to SC-VEH females, EC-VEH females committed fewer working memory errors in the WRAM and exhibited increased hippocampal synaptophysin levels. Estrogen effects depended on environmental conditions. E2 (0.2 mg/kg) improved object memory only in SC females. The same dose improved working memory in SC females, but somewhat impaired working memory in EC females. Furthermore, both doses reduced hippocampal synaptophysin levels in EC, but not SC, females. In contrast, E2 reduced hippocampal BDNF levels in SC, but not EC, females. This study is the first to compare the effects of estrogen on memory and hippocampal function in enriched and non-enriched female mice. The results suggest that: (1) estrogen benefits object and working memory more in mice raised in non-enriched environments than in those raised in enriched environments, and (2) the changes induced by estrogen and/or enrichment may be associated with alterations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:15381276

  13. Biomonitoring of estrogenic exposure and identification of responsible compounds in bream from Dutch surface waters.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Booij, Petra; van der Valk, Karin M; van Bodegom, Peter M; van den Ende, Frank; Gerritsen, Anton A M; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette; Brouwer, Abraham

    2007-05-01

    The exposure to and effects of estrogenic compounds in male breams from Dutch freshwater locations were investigated. Ovotestis was observed infrequently (maximum frequency 16%). However, plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentration was elevated highly at some locations. Estrogenic activities in male bream plasma, liver, and in gastrointestinal content were measured in the estrogen-responsive chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay. Plasma concentrations of vitellogenin correlated very well with the estrogenic activities in gastrointestinal content. The ER-CALUX activity in gastrointestinal content thus could provide a biomarker for recent exposure to estrogenic compounds, and the gastrointestinal content was chosen as investigative matrix for the toxicity identification and evaluation ([TIE]; bioassay-directed fractionation) of estrogenic compounds in bream. The approach consisted of a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of gastrointestinal content extract, directed by ER-CALUX and followed by gas chromatography analysis. The estrogenic hormones 17beta-estradiol and its metabolite estrone were identified as major contributors to the activity at all locations (except the reference location), independent of the presence or absence of a known source of estrogenic activity, such as a sewage treatment plant. Chemical screening showed the presence of other pollutants, such as a lower chlorinated dioxin and the disinfectants clorophene and triclosan. However, these compounds did not have high estrogenic potencies and their concentrations were not high enough to contribute significantly to the observed estrogenic activity.

  14. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  15. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  16. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  17. In vitro assessment of estrogenic bioactivity in complex environmental effluents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental effluents contain a diversity of chemicals, can originate from a variety of sources, and have been found to contain estrogenic and/or androgenic activity. In this study, samples were collected from targeted sites or as runoff from an agriculture field that was spray...

  18. Zearalenone, an estrogenic mycotoxin, is an immunotoxic compound.

    PubMed

    Hueza, Isis M; Raspantini, Paulo Cesar F; Raspantini, Leonila Ester R; Latorre, Andreia O; Górniak, Silvana L

    2014-03-13

    The aim of this study was to assess the toxic effects of zearalenone (ZEA) on the immune function. Ovariectomised rats were treated daily by gavage with 3.0 mg/kg of ZEA for 28 days. Body weight gain, food consumption, haemotological parameters, lymphoid organs, and their cellularities were evaluated. Moreover, acquired immune responses and macrophage activity were also assessed. ZEA promoted reduction in body weight gain, which is not fully explained by diminished food consumption. Despite no effect on haematological parameters, ZEA caused thymic atrophy with histological and thymocyte phenotype changes and decrease in the B cell percentage in the spleen. With respect to acquired and innate immune responses, no statistically significant differences in delayed-type hypersensitivity were noticed; however, in the ZEA-treated rats, antibody production and peroxide release by macrophages were impaired. The observed results could be related to ZEA activity on ERs; thus, ZEA is an immunotoxic compound similar to estrogen and some endocrine disruptors.

  19. Analysis of phytoestrogens, progestogens and estrogens in environmental waters from Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Kuster, M; Azevedo, D A; López de Alda, M J; Aquino Neto, F R; Barceló, D

    2009-10-01

    The environment is currently exposed to a large variety of man-made chemicals (e.g. for industrial, medicinal use) which have potential adverse effects to its ecological status. In addition, the densely populated areas represent local high emissions of those chemicals leading to more aggravating consequences. Estrogenic compounds that end-up in environmental water directly affect living organisms by interfering with their endocrine metabolism. The assessment of their presence in the environment requires sensitive and selective analytical methods. Nineteen estrogenic compounds belonging to different classes (5 free estrogens, 6 conjugated estrogens, 3 progestogens and 5 phytoestrogens) have been studied. The analytical methodology developed is based on solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and has been applied to study the occurrence of the above mentioned analytes in environmental waters from the state of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Due to insufficient infra-structure in this region, waste waters are released onto the environment without or with incomplete previous treatment. The results show that high levels of the phytoestrogens daidzein, coumestrol and genistein of up to 366 ng/L and progesterone of up to 47 ng/L could be found in river water. Estrogens and their conjugated derivatives were detected in the lower ng/L range up to 7 ng/L. The main estrogens estrone, estradiol and the synthetic ethinyl estradiol could not be detected. The developed method showed overall good performance with recoveries above 80% (with one exception), limits of detection < or =2 ng/L, good linearity and reproducibility.

  20. Identification of estrogenic compounds in fish bile using bioassay-directed fractionation.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Van Oostveen, Annemiek M; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette

    2004-12-01

    Conjugates of estrogenic chemicals, endogenous as well as xenobiotic, are mainly excreted via bile into the intestine. Therefore, measurement of estrogenic activity in bile yields useful information about an organism's internal exposure to (xeno-)estrogens. Although previous studies in The Netherlands have reported estrogenic activity in male fish bile, the contribution of natural hormones and xenobiotic substances to this activity is unknown. To identify compounds responsible for estrogenic activity in fish bile, we developed a bioassay-directed fractionation method for estrogenic chemicals. In this approach, the in vitro reporter gene assay ER-CALUX (Estrogen Responsive Chemical Activated Luciferase Gene Expression) was used to assess estrogenic activity in deconjugated bile samples and to direct RP-HPLC fractionation and chemical analysis (by GC-MS) of estrogenic compounds. The method was applied to bile from male breams (Abramis brama) collected at three locations in The Netherlands. At one of these locations, the River Dommel, extremely high levels of plasma vitellogenin and a high incidence of intersex gonads in these male breams have previously been observed, indicating the exposure to estrogens. In this study, the natural hormones 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and estriol accounted for the majority of estrogenic activity in male bream bile. At the River Dommel, the synthetic contraceptive pill component ethynylestradiol was found in effective concentrations as well. The detected natural and synthetic hormones may be responsible forthe estrogenic effects observed in wild bream from this location. Furthermore, a large number of xenobiotic chemicals was detected at relatively high levels in bile, including triclosan, chloroxylenol, and clorophene. Although chloroxylenol was shown for the first time to be weakly estrogenic, these compounds did not contribute significantly to the estrogenic activity observed.

  1. Estrogenicity of food-associated estrogenic compounds in the fetuses of female transgenic mice upon oral and IP maternal exposure.

    PubMed

    Ter Veld, Marcel G R; Zawadzka, E; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigated to what extent seven food-associated in vitro estrogenic compounds can induce estrogenic effects in the fetuses of pregnant female mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc-induction was determined either 8h after maternal dosing with a single intraperitoneal (IP) dose or 24h after the last of a series of 8 daily oral dosages. Three known estrogens, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE) and 17beta-estradiol 3,17-dipropionate (EP) were used as positive controls at 1mg/kgbw and DMSO as solvent control. The food-associated estrogenic compounds tested were: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP) both at 50mg/kgbw, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) at 50mg/kgbw, quercetin at 16.6 mg/kgbw, and di-isoheptyl phthalate (DIHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) all at 100mg/kgbw. Exposure to E(2), EE and EP resulted in significant luc inductions upon both oral and/or IP dosing in a variety of tissues including liver, tibia and femurs, and upon IP dosing also in fetuses. BPA, NP, DEHA, DEHP, DIHP, DDE and quercetin were unable to significantly induce luc activity in fetuses. However, after maternal oral exposure during gestation to NP, BPA and DIHP placental luc activity was significantly lowered. The results indicate that at the current levels of exposure to food-associated estrogenic compounds, estrogenic effects to the fetus are not expected. The significant luc reduction in the placenta, should be further studied for its significance for fetal development and relevance for the human situation.

  2. Comparative responses of molluscs and fish to environmental estrogens and an estrogenic effluent.

    PubMed

    Jobling, S; Casey, D; Rodgers-Gray, T; Oehlmann, J; Schulte-Oehlmann, U; Pawlowski, S; Baunbeck, T; Turner, A P; Tyler, C R

    2003-10-29

    . Plasma vitellogenin concentrations in two species of male fish (the rainbow trout and the carp) also increased over the same time period. These data indicate that both the nature of the response and the relative sensitivities to environmental estrogens in P. antipodarum and three different fish species fish are comparable. P. antipodarum is thus, potentially a sensitive test organism for assessing estrogenicity of chemicals with a relevance to their activity in vertebrates.

  3. Environmental estrogen(s) induced swimming behavioural alterations in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Goundadkar, Basavaraj B; Katti, Pancharatna

    2017-09-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the effects of long-term (75days) exposure to environmental estrogens (EE) on the swimming behaviour of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Adult zebrafish were exposed semi-statically to media containing commonly detected estrogenic water contaminants (EE2, DES and BPA) at a concentration (5ng/L) much lower than environmentally recorded levels. Time spent in swimming, surface preference, patterns and path of swimming were recorded (6mins) for each fish using two video cameras on day 15, 30 60 and 75. Video clips were analysed using a software program. Results indicate that chronic exposure to EE leads to increased body weight and size of females, reduced (P<0.05) swimming time, delay in latency, increased (P<0.05) immobility, erratic movements and freezing episodes. We conclude that estrogenic contamination of natural aquatic systems induces alterations in locomotor behaviour and associated physiological disturbances in inhabitant fish fauna. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... life', the end of monthly menstrual periods). Some brands of estrogen are also used to treat vaginal ... prevent osteoporosis should consider a different treatment. Some brands of estrogen are also to relieve symptoms of ...

  5. Rapid Signaling Actions of Environmental Estrogens in Developing Granule Cell Neurons Are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4′,4′-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling. PMID:20926581

  6. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  7. Estrogenic compounds, estrogen receptors and vascular cell signaling in the aging blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Dia A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2009-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) remain controversial. The earlier clinical observations that cardiovascular disease (CVD) was less common in MHT users compared to non-users suggested cardiovascular benefits of MHT. Also, experimental studies have identified estrogen receptors ERalpha, ERbeta and GPR30, which mediate genomic or non-genomic effects in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix (ECM). However, data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), most notably the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, have challenged the cardiovascular benefits and highlighted adverse cardiovascular events with MHT. The discrepancies have been attributed to the design of RCTs, the subjects' advanced age and preexisting CVD, and the form of estrogen used. The discrepancies may also stem from age-related changes in vascular ER amount, distribution, integrity, and post-receptor signaling pathways as well as structural changes in the vasculature. Age-related changes in other sex hormones such as testosterone may also alter the hormonal environment and influence the cardiovascular effects of estrogen. Investigating the chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and pharmacology of natural and synthetic estrogens should improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT. Further characterization of phytoestrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and specific ER agonists may provide substitutes to conventional MHT. Conditions with excess or low estrogen levels such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Turner syndrome may provide insight into the development and regulation of ER and the mechanisms of aberrant estrogen-ER interactions. The lessons learned from previous RCTs have led to more directed studies such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). Careful design of experimental models and RCTs, coupled with the development of specific ER modulators, hold the promise of improving the actions of

  8. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  9. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: I. Spatial and temporal occurrence of estrogenic activity in effluent-dominated systems.

    PubMed

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Minarik, Thomas A; Curran, Erin M; Marchuk, Jascha S; Pazderka, Matt J; Smith, Eric A; Goldenstein, Rachel L; Miresse, Christine L; Matlon, Thomas J; Schultz, Melissa M; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigated occurrence of environmental estrogens (EEs) in waterways managed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago ('District') - one of the largest and most complex water districts in the United States. The objectives of the study were: (i) to document spatial and temporal occurrence of EEs in the Chicago Area Waterways (CAWs); (ii) to determine whether water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents contribute to estrogenic pollution of the receiving streams; (iii) to determine whether the mandated water quality monitoring data could be used to predict estrogenic pollution in the receiving streams; and (iv) to determine whether snow melt, storm runoff and combined sewer overflows may also be contributors of estrogenic activity to these systems. The estrogenic potency of the waterways was assessed using a cell-based reporter gene assay. The water quality data was readily available as part of the District's regular monitoring program. Our findings indicate that EEs are commonly found in the CAWs, and that WRP effluents are one of, but not the only important contributor to estrogenic activity. Mean estrogenic activities in CAWs (11ng estradiol equivalents (EEQs/L)) are well within the values reported for other urban areas and WRP effluents. The estrogenic activity exhibited significant seasonal variation with highest values noted during the spring and summer months. When comparing the mean estrogenic activity of general use waters, secondary contact waters and WRP effluents, we found that general use waters had significantly lower estrogenic activity (ca 5ng EEQ/L) than the other two matrices (ca 15 and 17ng EEQ/L respectively). Our analyses indicate that estrogenic activity of the waterways was not reliably associated with mandated water quality parameters, and that such measurements may not be useful for predicting estrogenic activity, especially so in the complex urban systems. One of the prominent findings of this study is

  10. Biosensor Zebrafish Provide New Insights into Potential Health Effects of Environmental Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Okhyun; Takesono, Aya; Tada, Masazumi; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Environmental estrogens alter hormone signaling in the body that can induce reproductive abnormalities in both humans and wildlife. Available testing systems for estrogens are focused on specific systems such as reproduction. Crucially, however, the potential for significant health impacts of environmental estrogen exposures on a variety of body systems may have been overlooked. Objective: Our aim was to develop and apply a sensitive transgenic zebrafish model to assess real-time effects of environmental estrogens on signaling mechanisms in a whole body system for use in integrated health assessments. Methods: We created a novel transgenic biosensor zebrafish containing an estrogen-inducible promoter derived with multiple tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) and a Gal4ff-UAS system for enhanced response sensitivity. Results: Using our novel estrogen-responsive transgenic (TG) zebrafish, we identified target tissues for environmental estrogens; these tissues have very high sensitivity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Exposure of the TG fish to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) induced specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a wide variety of tissues including the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, otic vesicle, forebrain, lateral line, and ganglions, most of which have not been established previously as targets for estrogens in fish. Furthermore, we found that different EDCs induced GFP expression with different tissue response patterns and time trajectories, suggesting different potential health effects. Conclusion: We have developed a powerful new model for understanding toxicological effects, mechanisms, and health impacts of environmental estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:22510978

  11. Food-associated estrogenic compounds induce estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase gene expression in transgenic male mice.

    PubMed

    Ter Veld, Marcel G R; Zawadzka, E; van den Berg, J H J; van der Saag, Paul T; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-07-30

    The present paper aims at clarifying to what extent seven food-associated compounds, shown before to be estrogenic in vitro, can induce estrogenic effects in male mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc induction was determined in different tissues 8h after dosing the ER-luc male mice intraperitoneally (IP) or 14h after oral dosing. Estradiol-propionate (EP) was used as a positive control at 0.3 and 1mg/kg bodyweight (bw), DMSO as solvent control. The food-associated estrogenic compounds tested at non-toxic doses were bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (both at 10 and 50mg/kgbw), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE; at 5 and 25mg/kgbw), quercetin (at 1.66 and 16.6mg/kgbw), di-isoheptyl phthalate (DIHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) all at 30 and 100mg/kgbw. In general IP dosing resulted in higher luc inductions than oral dosing. EP induced luc activity in the liver in a statistically significant dose-related way with the highest induction of all compounds tested which was 20,000 times higher than the induction by the DMSO-control. NP, DDE, DEHA and DIHP did not induce luc activity in any of the tissues tested. BPA induced luc in the liver up to 420 times via both exposure routes. BPA, DEHP and quercetin induced luc activity in the liver after oral exposure. BPA (50mg/kgbw IP) also induced luc activity in the testis, kidneys and tibia. The current study reveals that biomarker-responses in ER-luc male mice occur after a single oral exposure to food-associated estrogenic model compounds at exposure levels 10 to 10(4) times higher than the established TDI's for some of these compounds. Given the facts that (i) the present study did not include chronic exposure and that (ii) simultaneous exposure to multiple estrogenic compounds may be a realistic exposure scenario, it remains to be seen whether this margin is sufficiently high.

  12. A computational approach predicting CYP450 metabolism and estrogenic activity of an endocrine disrupting compound (PCB-30).

    PubMed

    Harris, Jason B; Eldridge, Melanie L; Sayler, Gary; Menn, Fu-Min; Layton, Alice C; Baudry, Jerome

    2014-07-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals influence growth and development through interactions with the hormone system, often through binding to hormone receptors such as the estrogen receptor. Computational methods can predict endocrine disrupting chemical activity of unmodified compounds, but approaches predicting activity following metabolism are lacking. The present study uses a well-known environmental contaminant, PCB-30 (2,4,6-trichlorobiphenyl), as a prototype endocrine disrupting chemical and integrates predictive (computational) and experimental methods to determine its metabolic transformation by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) into estrogenic byproducts. Computational predictions suggest that hydroxylation of PCB-30 occurs at the 3- or 4-phenol positions and leads to metabolites that bind more strongly than the parent molecule to the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER-α). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments confirmed that the primary metabolite for CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 is 4-hydroxy-PCB-30, and the secondary metabolite is 3-hydroxy-PCB-30. Cell-based bioassays (bioluminescent yeast expressing hER-α) confirmed that hydroxylated metabolites are more estrogenic than PCB-30. These experimental results support the applied model's ability to predict the metabolic and estrogenic fate of PCB-30, which could be used to identify other endocrine disrupting chemicals involved in similar pathways. © 2014 SETAC.

  13. Modeling mixtures of environmental estrogens found in U.S. surface waters with an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptionai activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipa...

  14. Modeling mixtures of environmental estrogens found in U.S. surface waters with an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptionai activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipa...

  15. Missing links in our understanding of estrogenic compounds; chemical quantitation vs. biological assessment – where do we go from here?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The literature has become replete with reports quantifying estrogenic chemicals in the environment ranging from natural hormones to plasticizers. Laboratories have developed in vitro assays to assess estrogenic activity of both environmental samples and pure chemicals. Information pertaining to th...

  16. Environmental impact of estrogens on human, animal and plant life: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Adeel, Muhammad; Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Francis, Dennis; Yang, Yuesuo

    2017-02-01

    Since the inception of global industrialization, steroidal estrogens have become an emerging and serious concern. Worldwide, steroid estrogens including estrone, estradiol and estriol, pose serious threats to soil, plants, water resources and humans. Indeed, estrogens have gained notable attention in recent years, due to their rapidly increasing concentrations in soil and water all over the world. Concern has been expressed regarding the entry of estrogens into the human food chain which in turn relates to how plants take up and metabolism estrogens. In this review we explore the environmental fate of estrogens highlighting their release through effluent sources, their uptake, partitioning and physiological effects in the ecological system. We draw attention to the potential risk of intensive modern agriculture and waste disposal systems on estrogen release and their effects on human health. We also highlight their uptake and metabolism in plants. We use MEDLINE and other search data bases for estrogens in the environment from 2005 to the present, with the majority of our sources spanning the past five years. Published acceptable daily intake of estrogens (μg/L) and predicted no effect concentrations (μg/L) are listed from published sources and used as thresholds to discuss reported levels of estrogens in the aquatic and terrestrial environments. Global levels of estrogens from river sources and from Waste Water Treatment Facilities have been mapped, together with transport pathways of estrogens in plants. Estrogens at polluting levels have been detected at sites close to waste water treatment facilities and in groundwater at various sites globally. Estrogens at pollutant levels have been linked with breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men. Estrogens also perturb fish physiology and can affect reproductive development in both domestic and wild animals. Treatment of plants with steroid estrogen hormones or their precursors can affect root and shoot

  17. Anti-proliferative effects of estrogen receptor-modulating compounds isolated from Rheum palmatum.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se Chan; Lee, Chang Min; Choung, Eui Su; Bak, Jong Phil; Bae, Jong Jin; Yoo, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Zee, Ok Pyo

    2008-06-01

    The Rheum palmatum L., a traditional medicine in Korea, was screened for their estrogenic activity in a recombinant yeast system with a human estrogen receptor (ER) expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid used in a previous study. The EC50 values of the n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water fractions of the methanolic extract of R. palmatum in the yeast-based estrogenicity assay system were 0.145, 0.093, 0.125, 1.459, 2.853 microg/mL, respectively, with marked estrogenic activity in the dichloromethane fraction. Using an activity-guided fractionation approach, five known anthraquinones, chrysophanol (1), physcion (2), emodin (3), aloe-emodin (4) and rhein (5), were isolated from the dichloromethane fraction. Compound 3 had the highest estrogenic relative potency (RP, 17bestradiol = 1.00) (6.3 x 10(-2)), followed by compound 4 (3.8 x 10(-3)), compound 5 (2.6 x 10(-4)), a compound 1 (2.1 x 10(-4)). Also, compound 3 and fraction 3 (which contained compound 3) of the dichloromethane fraction of R. palmatum showed strong cytotoxicity in both ER-positive (MCF-7) and-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines.

  18. [Mixture effects to vitellogenin induction by four environmental estrogens in freshwater fish].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Kong, Fan-Xiang; Wang, Shi-He; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min; Chen, Mei-Jun; Tan, Xiao; Qian, Shan-Qin

    2008-07-01

    Combined effects of estrogenic compounds to high risk life-form were demonstrated, and the study method on combined effects of environmental contaminant mixture and environmental risk assessment were also discussed. A nonlinear aggression was determined on the changes of plasma vitellogenin concentration in crucian carp via the environmental pollutant exposure concentration, and the concentration-response relationship was determined for the single chemical of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, bisphenol A, and octylphenol, and that of the mixed compounds at equipotent concentrations. The combined effects of the four xenoestrogens were tested using indices of mixture toxicity and the biomathematical models of concentration addition or independent action. Weibull function was indicated as the best-fit function (R2 > or = 0.92) with curve estimation, the 95% confidence limits of effect concentration was achieved using the bootstrap method, the media effective concentration (EC50) with 95% confidence interval was 0.007 9 (0.006 8-0.010 0), 0.098 7 (0.090 0-0.111 0), 63.50 (56.58-70.62) and 250.59 (228.46-271.99) Mg x L(-1) respectively. Results suggested that estrogenic chemicals acted together in an additive manner and the combined effects can be accurately predicted in whole range of exposure concentration by the concept of similar joint action or concentration addition.It is proved as a scientific and feasible method to apply the model of joint action whereas the outcome of indices with a great deal of indetermination.

  19. Universal assay of vitellogenin as a biomarker for environmental estrogens.

    PubMed Central

    Heppell, S A; Denslow, N D; Folmar, L C; Sullivan, C V

    1995-01-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG), the serum phospholipoglycoprotein precursor to egg yolk, is potentially an ideal biomarker for environmental estrogens. This study was undertaken to develop antibodies against conserved regions on the VTG molecule that could form the basis for establishing bioassays to detect estrogen exposure in any oviparous vertebrate. We developed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated against purified rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) VTG and selected for the property of specifically recognizing VTG purified from two phylogenetically distant vertebrates, trout and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting indicated that these mAbs specifically recognize purified VTG and VTG or other estrogen-inducible proteins in plasma or serum from representative species of four vertebrate classes (fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds). All of the mAbs generated were IgM class. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against a synthetic consensus peptide representing the conserved N-terminal amino acid sequence of VTG. The results of Western blotting indicate that this antiserum specifically recognizes VTG in plasma or serum from teleost fish of diverse families. It was used to detect VTG in Western blots of serum from brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) with cancer (hepatocellular and cholangio-carcinoma) collected from a contaminated industrial site outside of their normal vitellogenic season. Our results indicate that it is feasible to generate antibodies capable of recognizing VTG without regard to species and that development of a universal VTG assay is an achievable goal. Images Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8593883

  20. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  1. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  2. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  3. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  4. Gene expression profiling in Ishikawa cells: A fingerprint for estrogen active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, Kathleen; Simon, Stephanie

    2009-04-01

    Several anthropogenous and naturally occurring substances, referred to as estrogen active compounds (EACs), are able to interfere with hormone and in particular estrogen receptor signaling. EACs can either cause adverse health effects in humans and wildlife populations or have beneficial effects on estrogen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to examine global gene expression profiles in estrogen receptor (ER)-proficient Ishikawa plus and ER-deficient Ishikawa minus endometrial cancer cells treated with selected well-known EACs (Diethylstilbestrol, Genistein, Zearalenone, Resveratrol, Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT). We also investigated the effect of the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) on the expression patterns caused by these compounds. Transcript levels were quantified 24 h after compound treatment using Illumina BeadChip Arrays. We identified 87 genes with similar expression changes in response to all EAC treatments in Ishikawa plus. ICI lowered the magnitude or reversed the expression of these genes, indicating ER dependent regulation. Apart from estrogenic gene regulation, Bisphenol A, o,p'-DDT, Zearalenone, Genistein and Resveratrol displayed similarities to ICI in their expression patterns, suggesting mixed estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. In particular, the predominant antiestrogenic expression response of Resveratrol could be clearly distinguished from the other test compounds, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Divergent gene expression patterns of the phytoestrogens, as well as weaker estrogenic gene expression regulation determined for the anthropogenous chemicals Bisphenol A and o,p'-DDT, warrants a careful assessment of potential detrimental and/or beneficial effects of EACs. The characteristic expression fingerprints and the identified subset of putative marker genes can be used for screening chemicals with an unknown mode of action and for predicting their potential to exert endocrine disrupting effects.

  5. Balancing the budget of environmental estrogen exposure: the contribution of recycled water.

    PubMed

    Leusch, Frederic D L; Moore, Michael R; Chapman, Heather F

    2009-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds (e-EDCs) are present in treated sewage and there is concern about estrogenicity of potable recycled water. However e-EDCs are also present in other environmental media and intake from water needs to be considered in relation to these other sources. The concentrations of 13 e-EDCs in foodstuffs and drinking water are reviewed, their predicted concentrations in recycled water are estimated, and the daily estrogenic intake as 17beta-estradiol equivalent (EEq) based on both in vitro and in vivo potencies is calculated as 1.39 and 9.65 microg EEq/d, respectively. Dietary intake accounts for more than 99.8% of that total, and more than 84.2% is due to phytosterols. Drinking 2 L of recycled water per day is expected to add 0.001 to 0.016 microg EEq/d based on in vitro and in vivo potencies, respectively. Exposure to e-EDCs in recycled water is therefore likely to be insignificant compared to current dietary intakes.

  6. Occurrence of compounds estrogenic to freshwater mussels in surface waters in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Marcogliese, D J; Blaise, C; Gendron, A D

    2001-06-01

    Estrogens play a major role in the sexual differentiation, gonad development, and oocyte growth of most oviparous organisms. They also stimulate vitellogenesis, the formation of high-density glycolipophosphoprotein that serves as an energy source for the developing embryo. Surface waters from the St. Lawrence River, obtained in the vicinity of an urban area (Montreal, Quebec, Canada), were studied with respect to their estrogenic potential to the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata. Estrogenicity was measured in water extracts by means of a competitive assay of estradiol binding to cytosolic proteins and by the vitellin-inducing ability of mussel hemolymph following direct extract injection. Surface-water samples drawn downstream of a municipal outfall plume and in a river draining a large farming and agricultural area had high levels of total and fecal coliform bacteria. High levels of estrogen competitors were also found and were able to induce vitellins in injected mussels. Moreover, the estrogen-competing potential of the extracts was found to be significantly correlated with total and fecal coliform bacteria (R = 0.9, p < 0.01) and with the levels of vitellins in the hemolymph (R = 0.62, p = 0.03). The results indicate that water samples drawn from within the municipal effluent plume and from a river draining an agricultural area are estrogenic to freshwater mussels. Thus, the environmental inputs of estrogens are likely to be associated with human sewage and pesticide products.

  7. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS USING A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larkin, Patrick, Leroy C. Folmar, Michael J. Hemmer, Arianna J. Poston and Nancy D. Denslow. 2003. Expression Profiling of Estrogenic Compounds Using a Sheepshead Minnow cDNA Macroarray. Environ. Health Perspect. 111(6):839-846. (ERL,GB 1171).

    A variety of anthropogenic c...

  8. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS USING A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larkin, Patrick, Leroy C. Folmar, Michael J. Hemmer, Arianna J. Poston and Nancy D. Denslow. 2003. Expression Profiling of Estrogenic Compounds Using a Sheepshead Minnow cDNA Macroarray. Environ. Health Perspect. 111(6):839-846. (ERL,GB 1171).

    A variety of anthropogenic c...

  9. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  10. Removal of estrogenic compounds from filtered secondary wastewater effluent in a continuous enzymatic membrane reactor. Identification of biotransformation products.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Lucia; Eibes, Gemma; Moreira, M Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Lema, Juan M

    2013-05-07

    In the present study, a novel and efficient technology based on the use of an oxidative enzyme was developed to perform the continuous removal of estrogenic compounds from polluted wastewaters. A 2 L enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) was successfully operated for 100 h with minimal requirements of laccase for the transformation of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)from both buffer solution and real wastewater (filtered secondary effluent). When the experiments were performed at high and low concentrations of the target compounds, 4 mg/L and 100 μg/L, not only high removal yields (80-100%) but also outstanding reduction of estrogenicity (about 84-95%) were attained. When the EMR was applied for the treatment of municipal wastewaters with real environmental concentrations of the different compounds (0.29-1.52 ng/L), excellent results were also achieved indicating the high efficiency and potential of the enzymatic reactor system. A second goal of this study relied on the identification of the transformation products to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of estrogens' transformation by laccase. The formation of dimers and trimers of E1, E2, and EE2, as well as the decomposition of E2 into E1 by laccase-catalyzed treatment, has been demonstrated by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC-APCI) analysis and confirmed by determination of accurate masses through liquid chromatography electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-TOF). Dimeric products of E2 and EE2 were found even when operating at environmental concentrations. Moreover, the reaction pathways of laccase-catalyzed transformation of E2 were proposed.

  11. Comparison of five in vitro bioassays to measure estrogenic activity in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Leusch, Frederic D L; de Jager, Christiaan; Levi, Yves; Lim, Richard; Puijker, Leo; Sacher, Frank; Tremblay, Louis A; Wilson, Vickie S; Chapman, Heather F

    2010-05-15

    Bioassays are well established in the pharmaceutical industry and single compound analysis, but there is still uncertainty about their usefulness in environmental monitoring. We compared the responses of five bioassays designed to measure estrogenic activity (the yeast estrogen screen, ER-CALUX, MELN, T47D-KBluc, and E-SCREEN assays) and chemical analysis on extracts from four different water sources (groundwater, raw sewage, treated sewage, and river water). All five bioassays displayed similar trends and there was good agreement with analytical chemistry results. The data from the ER-CALUX and E-SCREEN bioassays were robust and predictable, and well-correlated with predictions from chemical analysis. The T47D-KBluc appeared likewise promising, but with a more limited sample size it was less compelling. The YES assay was less sensitive than the other assays by an order of magnitude, which resulted in a larger number of nondetects. The MELN assay was less predictable, although the possibility that this was due to laboratory-specific difficulties cannot be discounted. With standardized bioassay data analysis and consistency of operating protocols, bioanalytical tools are a promising advance in the development of a tiered approach to environmental water quality monitoring.

  12. Rapid effects of estrogens on behavior: environmental modulation and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Laredo, Sarah A; Villalon Landeros, Rosalina; Trainor, Brian C

    2014-10-01

    Estradiol can modulate neural activity and behavior via both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. Environmental cues have a major impact on the relative importance of these signaling pathways with significant consequences for behavior. First we consider how photoperiod modulates nongenomic estrogen signaling on behavior. Intriguingly, short days permit rapid effects of estrogens on aggression in both rodents and song sparrows. This highlights the importance of considering photoperiod as a variable in laboratory research. Next we review evidence for rapid effects of estradiol on ecologically-relevant behaviors including aggression, copulation, communication, and learning. We also address the impact of endocrine disruptors on estrogen signaling, such as those found in corncob bedding used in rodent research. Finally, we examine the biochemical mechanisms that may mediate rapid estrogen action on behavior in males and females. A common theme across these topics is that the effects of estrogens on social behaviors vary across different environmental conditions.

  13. Rapid effects of estrogens on behavior: environmental modulation and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Landeros, Rosalina Villalon; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol can modulate neural activity and behavior via both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. Environmental cues have a major impact on the relative importance of these signaling pathways with significant consequences for behavior. First we consider how photoperiod modulates nongenomic estrogen signaling on behavior. Intriguingly, short days permit rapid effects of estrogens on aggression in both rodents and song sparrows. This highlights the importance of considering photoperiod as a variable in laboratory research. Next we review evidence for rapid effects of estradiol on ecologically-relevant behaviors including aggression, copulation, communication, and learning. We also address the impact of endocrine disruptors on estrogen signaling, such as those found in corncob bedding used in rodent research. Finally, we examine the biochemical mechanisms that may mediate rapid estrogen action on behavior in males and females. A common theme across these topics is that the effects of estrogens on social behaviors vary across different environmental conditions. PMID:24685383

  14. In vitro screening for estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds using Mozambique tilapia and sea bass scales.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Santos, Soraia; Andrade, André; Power, Deborah M

    2017-09-01

    A wide range of estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EDCs) are accumulating in the environment and may disrupt the physiology of aquatic organisms. The effects of EDCs on fish have mainly been assessed using reproductive endpoints and in vivo animal experiments. We used a simple non-invasive assay to evaluate the impact of estrogens and EDCs on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) scales. These were exposed to estradiol (E2), two phytoestrogens and six anthropogenic estrogenic/anti-estrogenic EDCs and activities of enzymes related to mineralized tissue turnover (TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and ALP, alkaline phosphatase) were measured. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR detected the expression of both membrane and nuclear estrogen receptors in the scales of both species, confirming scales as a target for E2 and EDCs through different mechanisms. Changes in TRAP or ALP activities after 30minute and 24h exposure were detected in sea bass and tilapia scales treated with E2 and three EDCs, although compound-, time- and dose-specific responses were observed for the two species. These results support again that the mineralized tissue turnover of fish is regulated by estrogens and reveals that the scales are a mineralized estrogen-responsive tissue that may be affected by some EDCs. The significance of these effects for whole animal physiology needs to be further explored. The in vitro fish scale bioassay is a promising non-invasive screening tool for E2 and EDCs effects, although the low sensitivity of TRAP/ALP quantification limits their utility and indicates that alternative endpoints are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. FIELD DEPLOYABLE TECHNIQUES TO MONITOR EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS THROUGHOUT THE REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE OF WILD BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife prompted this study of effects of exposure to environmental estrogens during the breeding cycle of wild birds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as...

  16. FIELD DEPLOYABLE TECHNIQUES TO MONITOR EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS THROUGHOUT THE REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE OF WILD BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife prompted this study of effects of exposure to environmental estrogens during the breeding cycle of wild birds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as...

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE ASSAY FOR VITELLOGENIN TO MONITOR ESTROGEN-LIKE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmental contaminants have the potential to disrupt endocrine systems of wildlife and humans resulting in impairment of reproductive and other systems. A subset of these contaminants may initiate these effects by binding to the estrogen receptor. In oviparous vertebrate...

  18. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  19. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE ASSAY FOR VITELLOGENIN TO MONITOR ESTROGEN-LIKE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmental contaminants have the potential to disrupt endocrine systems of wildlife and humans resulting in impairment of reproductive and other systems. A subset of these contaminants may initiate these effects by binding to the estrogen receptor. In oviparous vertebrate...

  1. Rapid yeast estrogen bioassays stably expressing human estrogen receptors alpha and beta, and green fluorescent protein: a comparison of different compounds with both receptor types.

    PubMed

    Bovee, Toine F H; Helsdingen, Richard J R; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Keijer, Jaap; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P

    2004-07-01

    Previously, we described the construction of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor (hERalpha) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) in response to estrogens. In the present study, the properties of this assay were further studied by testing a series of estrogenic compounds. Furthermore, a similar assay was developed based on the stable expression of human estrogen receptor beta (hERbeta). When exposed to 17beta-estradiol, the maximum transcriptional activity of the ERbeta cytosensor was only about 40% of the activity observed with ERalpha, but the concentration where half-maximal activation is reached (EC50), was about five times lower. The relative estrogenic potencies (REP), defined as the ratio between the EC50 of 17beta-estradiol and the EC50 of the compound, of the synthetic hormones dienestrol, hexestrol and especially mestranol were higher with ER, while DES was slightly more potent with ERbeta. The gestagens progesterone and medroxyprogesterone-acetate showed no response, whereas the androgen testosterone showed a very weak response. The anabolic agent, 19-nortestosterone showed a clear dose-related response with estrogen receptor but not beta. The phytoestrogens coumestrol, genistein, genistin, daidzein, daidzin and naringenin were relatively more potent with ERbeta. Ranking of the estrogenic potency with ER was: 17beta-estradiol > 8-prenylnaringenin > coumestrol > zearalenone > genistein > genistin > naringenin. The ranking with the ERbeta was: 17beta-estradiol > coumestrol > genistein > zearalenone > 8-prenylnaringen > daidzein > naringenin > genistin > daidzin. The hop estrogen 8-prenylnaringenin is relatively more potent with ERalpha. These data show that the newly developed bioassays are valuable tools for the rapid and high-throughput screening for estrogenic activity.

  2. Effect of estrogenic compounds (estrogen or phytoestrogens) combined with exercise on bone and muscle mass in older individuals.

    PubMed

    Chilibeck, Philip D; Cornish, Stephen M

    2008-02-01

    Exercise has a beneficial effect on bone, possibly by stimulating estrogen receptor alpha. Because estrogen up-regulates this receptor, estrogen therapy combined with exercise training may be optimal for increasing bone mineral density. Studies combining estrogen therapy and exercise training in postmenopausal women show mixed results, but indicate that the combination of interventions may be more effective for increasing bone mass than either intervention alone. Plant-like estrogens (i.e phytoestrogens such as soy isoflavones) may act as weak estrogen agonists or antagonists, have small beneficial effects on bone, and may interact with exercise for increasing bone mineral density. Phytoestrogen derived from flaxseed (flax lignans) has not been evaluated as extensively as soy isoflavones and thus its effect on bone is difficult to determine. Estrogen or soy isoflavones given to postmenopausal women results in a small increase in lean tissue mass that may be mediated through estrogen receptor alpha on muscle or through decreased inflammation.

  3. Occurrence and in vitro bioactivity of estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid compounds in a nationwide screen of United States stream waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conley, Justin M.; Evans, Nicola; Cardon, Mary C.; Rosenblum, Laura; Iwanowicz, Luke; Hartig, Phillip C.; Schenck, Kathleen M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Wilson, Vickie S.

    2017-01-01

    In vitro bioassays are sensitive, effect-based tools used to quantitatively screen for chemicals with nuclear receptor activity in environmental samples. We measured in vitro estrogen (ER), androgen (AR), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity, along with a broad suite of chemical analytes, in streamwater from 35 well-characterized sites (3 reference and 32 impacted) across 24 states and Puerto Rico. ER agonism was the most frequently detected with nearly all sites (34/35) displaying activity (range, 0.054–116 ng E2Eq L–1). There was a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.917) between in vitro ER activity and concentrations of steroidal estrogens after correcting for the in vitro potency of each compound. AR agonism was detected in 5/35 samples (range, 1.6–4.8 ng DHTEq L–1) but concentrations of androgenic compounds were largely unable to account for the in vitro activity. Similarly, GR agonism was detected in 9/35 samples (range, 6.0–43 ng DexEq L–1); however, none of the recognized GR-active compounds on the target-chemical analyte list were detected. The utility of in vitro assays in water quality monitoring was evident from both the quantitative agreement between ER activity and estrogen concentrations, as well as the detection of AR and GR activity for which there were limited or no corresponding target-chemical detections to explain the bioactivity. Incorporation of in vitro bioassays as complements to chemical analyses in standard water quality monitoring efforts would allow for more complete assessment of the chemical mixtures present in many surface waters.

  4. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: effect of soil type and macropores.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  5. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: Effect of soil type and macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  6. Estrogenic effects of natural and synthetic compounds including tibolone assessed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the human estrogen alpha and beta receptors.

    PubMed

    Hasenbrink, Guido; Sievernich, André; Wildt, Ludwig; Ludwig, Jost; Lichtenberg-Fraté, Hella

    2006-07-01

    The human estrogen receptors (hER)alpha and hERbeta, differentially expressed and localized in various tissues and cell types, mediate transcriptional activation of target genes. These encode a variety of physiological reproductive and nonreproductive functions involved in energy metabolism, salt balance, immune system, development, and differentiation. As a step toward developing a screening assay for the use in applications where significant numbers of compounds or complex matrices need to be tested for (anti) estrogenic bioactivity, hERalpha and hERbeta were expressed in a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, devoid of three endogenous xenobiotic transporters (PDR5, SNQ2, and YOR1). By using receptor-mediated transcriptional activation of the green fluorescent protein optimized for expression in yeast (yEGFP) as reporter 17 natural, comprising estrogens and phytoestrogens or synthetic compounds among which tibolone with its metabolites, gestagens, and antiestrogens were investigated. The reporter assay deployed a simple and robust protocol for the rapid detection of estrogenic effects within a 96-well microplate format. Results were expressed as effective concentrations (EC50) and correlated to other yeast based and cell line assays. Tibolone and its metabolites exerted clear estrogenic effects, though considerably less potent than all other natural and synthetic compounds. For the blood serum of two volunteers, considerable higher total estrogenic bioactivity than single estradiol concentrations as determined by immunoassay was found. Visualization of a hERalpha/GFP fusion protein in yeast revealed a sub cellular cytosolic localization. This study demonstrates the versatility of (anti) estrogenic bioactivity determination using sensitized S. cerevisiae cells to assess estrogenic exposure and effects.

  7. Isolation and identification of novel estrogenic compounds in yam tuber (Dioscorea alata Cv. Tainung No. 2).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Yi; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Huang, Ching-Jang

    2007-09-05

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a common food in tropical areas and has been shown to improve the status of sex hormone in postmenopausal women. In this study, the estrogenic activity of yam was examined and active compounds were isolated and identified based on ligand-dependent transcriptional activation through estrogen receptors. Ethyl acetate extracts of various species/varieties of yam were found to activate estrogen receptors alpha and beta to various extents. The extract of Dioscorea alata cv. Tainung No. 2 tuber was fractionated by repeated silica gel column chromatography. The active compounds were isolated and purified by preparative HPLC. Based on NMR and mass spectrometry, two new compounds, hydro-Q(9) chromene (1) and gamma-tocopherol-9 (2), together with three known compounds, RRR-alpha-tocopherol (3), coenzyme Q(9) (4), and 1-feruloylglycerol (5), were identified and shown to activate human ERalpha and beta. These results provide basic evidence for the beneficial effect of yam for menopausal women.

  8. Estrogenic potencies of several environmental pollutants, as determined by vitellogenin induction in a carp hepatocyte assay.

    PubMed

    Smeets, J M; van Holsteijn, I; Giesy, J P; Seinen, W; van den Berg, M

    1999-08-01

    Estrogenic potencies of several xenoestrogens were determined in vitro, using cultured hepatocytes from a genetically uniform male carp strain (Cyprinus carpio). Estrogenicity was measured as induction of the yolk protein precursor vitellogenin (Vtg), and compared to Vtg induction by 17beta-estradiol (E2). The order of estrogenic potency was: methoxychlor (MXCL) > o,p-DDT > chlordecone approximately/= bisphenol-A approximately/= 4-t-pentylphenol. Estrogenic potencies of these compounds varied from 1 x 10(-3) to 1 x 10(-4) relative to E2. The synthetic estrogen DES had a relative estrogenic potency of 0.5, whereas dieldrin, beta-endosulfan, o,p-DDE, and toxaphene (technical mixture) did not induce vitellogenesis at concentrations up to 100 microM. Experiments in which cells were simultaneously exposed to E2 and these xenoestrogens showed that the Vtg-inducing activities of E2 and 4-t-pentylphenol or bisphenol-A were (partially) additive, whereas E2 antagonized the estrogenic effects of MXCL and o,p-DDT. The effect of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A)-induction on the estrogenicity of MXCL was studied by co-exposing cells to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD (10 pM) caused a greater than 50-fold induction of CYP1A, measured as ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, but Vtg induction by MXCL was not significantly affected. This indicates that CYP1A is not involved in the bioactivation of MXCL to more potent estrogenic metabolites in carp. The CARP-HEP (hepatocyte) assay can detect xenoestrogens with a potency > or = 2 x 10(-5) relative to E2. It allows simultaneous testing of more than 10 compounds for both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects, which makes it a promising tool for the screening of suspected xenoestrogens.

  9. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Yumiko . E-mail: Iwase.Yumiko@mg.m-pharma.co.jp; Fukata, Hideki . E-mail: fukata@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Mori, Chisato . E-mail: cmori@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2006-05-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 {mu}M DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 {mu}M E{sub 2} and 25 {mu}M GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at {mu}M level between DES and E{sub 2} on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E{sub 2}. DES and E{sub 2} showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 {mu}M was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E{sub 2} (10 pM and 20 {mu}M) and GEN (25 {mu}M) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E{sub 2} and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development.

  10. Assessment of source water contamination by estrogenic disrupting compounds in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiwei; Yan, Ye; Ma, Mei; Wang, Donghong; Luo, Qian; Wang, Zijian; Satyanarayanan, Senthil Kumaran

    2012-01-01

    Detection of estrogenic disrupting compounds (EDCs) in drinking waters around China has led to rising concerns about health risks associated with these compounds. There is, however, a paucity of studies on the occurrence and identification of the main compounds responsible for this pollution in the source waters. To fill this void, we screened estrogenic activities of 23 source water samples from six main river systems in China, using a recombinant two-hybrid yeast assay. All sample extracts induced significant estrogenic activity, with E2 equivalents (EEQ) of raw water ranging from 0.08 to 2.40 ng/L. Additionally, 16 samples were selected for chemical analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The EDCs of most concern, including estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), estriol (E3), diethylstilbestrol (DES), estradiol valerate (EV), 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-nonylphenols (4-NP) and bisphenol A (BPA), were determined at concentrations of up to 2.98, 1.07, 2.67, 4.37, 2.52, 1.96, 89.52, 280.19 and 710.65 ng/L, respectively. Causality analysis, involving comparison of EEQ values from yeast assay and chemical analysis identified E2, EE2 and 4-NP as the main responsible compounds, accounting for the whole estrogenic activities (39.74% to 96.68%). The proposed approach using both chemical analysis and yeast assay could be used for the identification and evaluation of EDCs in source waters of China.

  11. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: II. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Melissa M; Minarik, Thomas A; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Curran, Erin M; Bartell, Stephen E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    Urban aquatic ecosystems are often overlooked in toxicological studies even though they serve many ecosystem functions and sustain fish populations despite large-scale habitat alterations. However, urban fish populations are likely exposed to a broad range of stressors, including environmental estrogens (EEs) that may affect anatomy, physiology and reproduction of exposed fish. Although significant progress has been made in establishing ecological consequences of EE exposure, these studies have focused largely on hydrologically simple systems that lack the complexity of urban aquatic environments. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the occurrence and biological effects of EEs across a large urbanized aquatic ecosystem. A multi-pronged study design was employed relying on quantitative determination of select EEs by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and repeated biological monitoring of wild-caught and caged fish for indications of endocrine disruption. Over three years, EEs were measured in aqueous samples (n=42 samples) and biological effects assessed in >1200 male fish across the 2000km(2) aquatic ecosystems of the Greater Metropolitan Area of Chicago, IL. Our study demonstrated that in addition to water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents, non-WRP sources contribute significant EE loads to the aquatic ecosystem. While resident and caged male fish responded with the induction of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin, an indicator of EE exposure, neither resident nor caged sunfish exhibited prevalent histopathological changes to their reproductive organs (i.e., intersex) that have been reported in other studies. Vitellogenin induction was greater in spring than the fall and was not correlated with body condition factor, gonadosomatic index or hepatosomatic index. Exposure effects were not correlated with sites downstream of treated effluent discharge further affirming the complexity of sources and effects of EEs in urban aquatic ecosystems

  12. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, {beta}-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of {beta}-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but {beta}-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the

  13. Interference of Paraben Compounds with Estrogen Metabolism by Inhibition of 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Engeli, Roger T.; Rohrer, Simona R.; Vuorinen, Anna; Herdlinger, Sonja; Kaserer, Teresa; Leugger, Susanne; Schuster, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Parabens are effective preservatives widely used in cosmetic products and processed food, with high human exposure. Recent evidence suggests that parabens exert estrogenic effects. This work investigated the potential interference of parabens with the estrogen-activating enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) 1 and the estrogen-inactivating 17β-HSD2. A ligand-based 17β-HSD2 pharmacophore model was applied to screen a cosmetic chemicals database, followed by in vitro testing of selected paraben compounds for inhibition of 17β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD2 activities. All tested parabens and paraben-like compounds, except their common metabolite p-hydroxybenzoic acid, inhibited 17β-HSD2. Ethylparaben and ethyl vanillate inhibited 17β-HSD2 with IC50 values of 4.6 ± 0.8 and 1.3 ± 0.3 µM, respectively. Additionally, parabens size-dependently inhibited 17β-HSD1, whereby hexyl- and heptylparaben were most active with IC50 values of 2.6 ± 0.6 and 1.8 ± 0.3 µM. Low micromolar concentrations of hexyl- and heptylparaben decreased 17β-HSD1 activity, and ethylparaben and ethyl vanillate decreased 17β-HSD2 activity. However, regarding the very rapid metabolism of these compounds to the inactive p-hydroxybenzoic acid by esterases, it needs to be determined under which conditions low micromolar concentrations of these parabens or their mixtures can occur in target cells to effectively disturb estrogen effects in vivo. PMID:28925944

  14. In vitro estrogenicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, hydroxylated PDBEs, and polybrominated bisphenol A compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Meerts, I A; Letcher, R J; Hoving, S; Marsh, G; Bergman, A; Lemmen, J G; van der Burg, B; Brouwer, A

    2001-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used in large quantities as additive flame retardants in plastics and textile materials. PBDEs are persistent compounds and have been detected in wildlife and in human adipose tissue and plasma samples. In this study, we investigated the (anti)estrogenic potencies of several PBDE congeners, three hydroxylated PBDEs (HO-PBDEs), and differently brominated bisphenol A compounds in three different cell line assays based on estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent luciferase reporter gene expression. In human T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an estrogen-responsive luciferase reporter gene construct (pEREtata-Luc), 11 PBDEs showed estrogenic potencies, with concentrations leading to 50% induction (EC(50)) varying from 2.5 to 7.3 microM. The luciferase induction of the most potent HO-PBDE [2-bromo-4-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)phenol] exceeded that of estradiol (E(2)), though at concentrations 50,000 times higher. As expected, brominated bisphenol A compounds with the lowest degree of bromination showed highest estrogenic potencies (EC(50) values of 0.5 microM for 3-monobromobisphenol A). In an ER alpha-specific, stably transfected human embryonic kidney cell line (293-ER alpha-Luc), the HO-PBDE 4-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)phenol was a highly potent estrogen with an EC(50) < 0.1 microM and a maximum 35- to 40-fold induction, which was similar to E(2). In an analogous ER beta-specific 293-ER betas-Luc cell line, the agonistic potency of the 4-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)phenol was much lower (maximum 50% induction compared to E(2)), but EC(50) values were comparable. These results indicate that several pure PBDE congeners, but especially HO-PBDEs and brominated bisphenol A-analogs, are agonists of both ER alpha and ER beta receptors, thus stimulating ER-mediated luciferase induction in vitro. These data also suggest that in vivo metabolism of PBDEs may produce more potent pseudoestrogens. PMID:11335189

  15. A low-density DNA microchip for the detection of (anti-)estrogenic compounds and their relative potencies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Pen, Marieke J; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bovee, Toine F H

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, a set of 12 reference compounds was tested in a low-density DNA microchip that contains probes for 11 different estrogen-responsive marker genes. Our results show that the seven most informative marker genes on the chip resulted in fingerprints that correctly predicted the (anti-)estrogenic activity of the model compounds except that of the negative control testosterone. Two marker genes, myeloid leukemia factor-1 interacting protein and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C, were even capable of correctly predicting the estrogenic potency of all five estrogen receptor (ER) agonists tested and correlated well with the potencies as determined in the MCF-7/BOS proliferation assay and the in vivo uterotrophic assay. In addition, it was demonstrated that the estrogenic responses of testosterone, both in the array tube assay and in the proliferation assay, were partially due to the conversion of testosterone into 17β-estradiol by aromatase but also due to formation of other estrogenic metabolites, the presence and estrogenic potency of which were confirmed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and a yeast-based reporter gene assay, respectively. It is concluded that low-density DNA microchip-based fingerprinting in MCF-7/BOS cells for estrogenicity marker genes provides a faster in vitro alternative to the current MCF-7/BOS cell proliferation assay (E-screen).

  16. Rapid assessment of estrogenic compounds by CXCL-test illustrated by the screening of the UV-filter derivative benzophenones.

    PubMed

    Habauzit, Denis; Martin, Catherine; Kerdivel, Gwenneg; Pakdel, Farzad

    2017-04-01

    CXCL-test is a method that uses the estrogen-dependent secretion of the natural endogenous chemokine CXCL12 to evaluate the estrogenic activity of molecules. CXCL12 chemokine is involved in the estrogen dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells. Its measure is an indicator of cell proliferation and is used as an alternative test to classical proliferation test. Here we aimed to optimize this test, first to increase the number of tested molecules in a single assay and then to decrease the number of intermediate steps. The optimized CXCL-test was finally used for the evaluation of the estrogenic potency of emerging chemical pollutants: the UV filter benzophenones (BPs). The effect of BPs on CXCL12 secretion was also validated by real time quantitative RT-PCR. The optimized CXCL-test allowed a fast and direct assessment of estrogenic potency of molecules. The estrogenic activities of benzophenones were characterized and divided in two groups. The first one contains weak estrogenic compounds (BP, BP1, BP2, BP3, 234BP and 2344'BP). The second one contains medium estrogenic compounds (4BP, 44'BP, BP8, THB).

  17. The Natural Estrogenic Compound Diarylheptanoid (D3): In Vitro Mechanisms of Action and in Vivo Uterine Responses via Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Burns, Katherine A.; Arao, Yukitomo; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diarylheptanoid (D3) isolated from the medicinal plant, Curcuma comosa, has estrogenic activity. Objective: We aimed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of D3 action and compare it with that of 17β-estradiol (E2) using both in vitro and in vivo uterine models. Methods: We used human uterine (Ishikawa) cells to determine the estrogenic action of D3 on the activation and nuclear translocation of estrogen receptor α (ERα). In addition, we further characterized the uterine response to D3 treatment in vivo. Results: D3 activated an estrogen responsive element (ERE) luciferase reporter through ERα, and molecular modeling suggested that D3 could be accommodated in the ERα binding pocket. Using modified ERα to assay ligand-dependent nuclear translocation, we observed D3-dependent ERα interaction and translocation. In mouse uteri, early- and late-phase estrogen-regulated gene responses were increased in D3-treated ovariectomized wild-type animals, in a manner similar to that of E2; no response was seen in ERα knockout animals. We observed a divergence in estrogen responses after D3 treatment: D3 induced robust DNA synthesis in uterine epithelial cells, linked to an increase in cell-cycle–related genes; however, no increase in uterine weight was observed 24 hr after treatment. D3 also affected uterine progesterone receptor expression patterns similar to E2. When D3 and E2 were administered together, we observed no additive or antagonistic effects of D3 on E2. Our findings suggest that D3 is a weak estrogenic agonist compound. Conclusion: D3 is a weakly acting phytoestrogen that mimics the mitogenic responses produced by E2 in an ERα-dependent manner, but it is unable to increase uterine weight or enhance or antagonize the effects of estrogen. PMID:23552522

  18. Estrogenic activity of isolated compounds and essential oils of Pimpinella species from Turkey, evaluated using a recombinant yeast screen.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Khan, Shabana I; Bedir, Erdal; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Willett, Kristine; Khan, Ikhlas A; Kirimer, Nese; Baser, K Husnu Can

    2004-08-01

    Several plants and plant-derived pure compounds, designated as phytoestrogens, have been reported to cause estrogenic effects. They have been used for alleviation of menopausal symptoms, prevention of osteoporosis, heart disease and cancer. There is an increased interest in studying phytoestrogens such as isoflavones and lignans for their use as replacements for synthetic estrogens. In this study, the estrogenic activity of essential oils of eleven Pimpinella species and the compounds isolated from these species were evaluated using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. The essential oils containing (E)-anethole as major compound showed estrogenic activity in the YES assay, except for the aerial parts without fruits of P. anisetum and P. flabellifolia. The percent maximal response produced by most anethole-containing oils was 30-50%. Fruits of P. isaurica and P. peucedanifolia were estrogenic in spite of the absence or trace amount of anethole, respectively. This study indicates that the estrogenic activity of Pimpinella oils is not solely due to the presence of anethole. Components other than anethole may be responsible for contributing towards the estrogenic activity. The essential oils from different species varied in their estrogenic potencies (relative potency from 8.3 x 10(-8) to 1.2 x 10(-6) compared to 17 beta-estradiol) and among the different plant parts, the fruit oils of most species were estrogenic followed by the aerial parts without fruits and the root oils and their EC50 values varied from 45 micrograms/mL to 650 micrograms/mL.

  19. ASSAYS FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: BEYOND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent popular and scientific articles have reported the presence of estrogenic and other hormone mimicking chemicals in the environment and their potential for causing reproductive dysfunction in humans and wildlife. The purpose of this session was to present the best available,...

  20. In vitro biomonitoring in polar extracts of solid phase matrices reveals the presence of unknown compounds with estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Legler, J; Leonards, P; Spenkelink, A; Murk, A J

    2003-01-01

    Determination of estrogenic activity has so far mainly concentrated on the assessment of compounds in surface water and effluent. This study is one of the first to biomonitor (xeno-)estrogens in sediment, suspended particulate matter and aquatic organisms. The relatively polar acetone extracts from these solid phase matrices do not contain the well-known estrogenic compounds such as hormones, alkylphenols and phthalates. An in vitro 'estrogen receptor-mediated chemical activated luciferase gene expression' (ER-CALUX) assay was applied to samples from various locations in the Netherlands. Estrogenic activity measured in polar fractions of particulate matter and sediment extracts ranged from below detection limit to up to 4.5 pmol estradiol equivalents (EEQ)/g dry weight. Estrogenic activity in freshwater river sediments was up to five times higher compared to sediments from large lakes and coastal locations. Tissue extracts EEQs were determined in bream (Abramis brama), flounder (Platichthysflesus), freshwater mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and marine mussels (Mytilus edulis). The highest biota EEQ levels were found in the freshwater zebra mussel (30 pmol EEQ/g lipid). One sample site showed greatly elevated EEQs in sediment and biota, which correlated with effects found in the wild populations of bream. The EEQ activity of the unknown compounds in the polar fraction mostly was much higher than the calculated EEQ levels based on known estrogens in the non-polar fraction (previously published data).

  1. Occurrence of pharmaceutically active and non-steroidal estrogenic compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia.

    PubMed

    Al-Rifai, Jawad H; Gabelish, Candace L; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2007-10-01

    The discovery that natural and synthetic chemicals, in the form of excreted hormones and pharmaceuticals, as well as a vast array of compounds with domestic and industrial applications, can enter the environment via wastewater treatment plants and cause a wide variety of environmental and health problems even at very low concentrations, suggests the need for improvement of water recycling. Three Australian wastewater recycling schemes, two of which employ reverse osmosis (RO) technology, the other applying ozonation and biological activated carbon filtration, have been studied for their ability to remove trace organic contaminants including 11 pharmaceutically active compounds and two non-steroidal estrogenic compounds. Contaminant concentrations were determined using a sensitive analytical method comprising solid phase extraction, derivatization and GC with MS using selected ion monitoring. In raw wastewater, concentrations of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications were comparable to those found in wastewaters around the world. Remarkably, removal efficiencies for the three schemes were superior to literature values and RO was responsible for the greatest proportion of contaminant removal. The ability of RO membranes to concentrate many of the compounds was demonstrated and highlights the need for continued research into monitoring wastewater treatment, concentrate disposal, improved water recycling schemes and ultimately, safer water and a cleaner environment.

  2. Assays for endocrine-disrupting chemicals: Beyond environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Folmar, L.C.

    1999-07-01

    Recent popular and scientific articles have reported the presence of estrogenic and other hormone mimicking chemicals in the environment and their potential for causing reproductive dysfunction in humans and wildlife. The purpose of this session was to present the best available, if not standard, analytical methods to assay for the effects of xenobiotic chemicals on a broad range of endocrine-mediated events, including reproduction, growth, development and stress responses in aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate animals.

  3. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of the Estrogenic and Proliferative Properties of Vitamin E Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Khallouki, Farid; de Medina, Philippe; Caze-Subra, Stéphanie; Bystricky, Kerstin; Balaguer, Patrick; Poirot, Marc; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Tocols are vitamin E compounds that include tocopherols (TPs) and tocotrienols (TTs). These lipophilic compounds are phenolic antioxidants and are reportedly able to modulate estrogen receptor β (ERβ). We investigated the molecular determinants that control their estrogenicity and effects on the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Docking experiments highlighted the importance of the tocol phenolic groups for their interaction with the ERs. Binding experiments confirmed that they directly interact with both ERα and ERβ with their isoforms showing potencies in the following order: δ-tocols > γ-tocols > α-tocols. We also found that tocols activated the transcription of an estrogen-responsive reporter gene that had been stably transfected into cells expressing either ERα or ERβ. The role of the phenolic group in tocol–ER interaction was further established using δ-tocopherylquinone, the oxidized form of δ-TP, which had no ER affinity and did not induce ER-dependent transcriptional modulation. Tocol activity also required the AF1 transactivation domain of ER. We found that both δ-TP and δ-TT stimulated the expression of endogenous ER-dependent genes. However, whereas δ-TP induced the proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells but not ER-negative breast cancer cells, δ-TT inhibited the proliferation of both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells. These effects of δ-TT were found to act through the down regulation of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity, establishing that ERs are not involved in this effect. Altogether, these data show that the reduced form of δ-TP has estrogenic properties which are lost when it is oxidized, highlighting the importance of the redox status in its estrogenicity. Moreover, we have shown that δ-TT has antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells independently of their ER status through the inhibition of HMGR. These data clearly show that TPs can be discriminated from TTs according to their

  4. Egg wash wastewater: estrogenic risk or environmental asset?

    PubMed

    Shappell, Nancy W

    2013-07-01

    Commercial production of eggs and egg products requires the washing of eggs to remove urinary-fecal material and broken egg residue. In the case of one Ohio farming facility, 1.6 million birds produce 1.4 million eggs per day, using approximately 50 mL of wash water/egg or approximately 70,000 L per day. The aqueous waste stream was evaluated for estrogenicity to determine if potential for endocrine disruption would result from agricultural application of such wastewater. Samples collected the Fall (October) of 2010 included: water from 2 egg washers operating in series, inlet pipe to the treatment lagoon, a lagoon composite, and products used within the facility in the cleaning of equipment and treatment of the waste. In February 2011, the treatment lagoon was fitted with an extensive aeration system and subsequent sample sets were collected on 3 consecutive days in May and November. Samples were extracted by solid phase extraction and assayed for estrogenic activity using the in vitro E-Screen assay. Raw untreated wastewater from the egg washers contained 17β-estradiol equivalents (E2 Eqs) ranging from 9 to 18 ng/L, pipe grab samples entering into the treatment lagoon ranged from <0.14 to 4.4 ng/L (variability related to time of emptying of egg wash tanks), whereas treatment lagoon water contained 0.3 to 4.0 ng/L E2 Eq. Addition of an aeration system to the treatment lagoon eliminated surface "frothing," reduced noxious odor emission, and E2 Eqs were lower than the pre-aeration concentrations (4 ng/L [n = 1, no statistical comparison possible] vs 0.3 to 1.4 ng/L in 2011). Because of matrix effects, estrogens were not quantifiable by LC-MS2 in even egg washwater extracts, at concentrations in which internal deuterated estrogen standards were quantifiable. Estrone and E2 parent ions were detected in egg washwater samples only, and confirmatory ion fragments were detected in only one of these samples. Estrogenicity of the wastewater from the treatment lagoon was

  5. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended.

  6. Estrogen mediated effects in the Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, following field exposures to sewage effluent containing estrogenic compounds and activity.

    PubMed

    Andrew-Priestley, M N; O'Connor, W A; Dunstan, R H; Van Zwieten, L; Tyler, T; Kumar, A; MacFarlane, G R

    2012-09-15

    The Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, has been demonstrated as a useful biomonitor of estrogenic compounds following laboratory exposures, yet its utility in the assessment of estrogenic exposure and effects under field conditions requires investigation. To achieve this aim, S. glomerata were deployed in Newcastle, Australia in the effluent receiving marine waters of Burwood Beach WWTP (Burwood Beach "near", <50 m from outfall and Burwood Beach "far", 100-150 m from outfall) and reference locations (Redhead, Fingal Island 1 and Fingal Island 2) at depths of 4, 8 and 12 m for six weeks. Effluent receiving waters of Burwood Beach WWTP were found to be a suitable impact location, demonstrated via measurement of estrogenic compounds and activity throughout the deployment. Estrogenic compounds were detected (average of combined solids and liquid fractions) at average concentrations of: 1.42 ng/L for estrone, 0.69 ng/L for 17β estradiol, 3.83 ng/L for estriol (E3), 0.56 ng/L for 17α-ethynylestradiol, 64.2 ng/L for bisphenol A, 7.51 ng/L for 4-nonylphenol and 5.93 ng/L for 4-tert-octylphenol. Total estrogenic activity was estimated at 4.48 ng/L EEQ via the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES(®)) assay (average of combined solid and liquid fractions). Female vitellogenin gene expression was highest at Burwood Beach locations, yet no significant differences were detected among locations for either sex. Vitellogenin protein was significantly higher (p<0.05) in S. glomerata at Burwood Beach Near compared to reference locations for the 4 and 12 m depths. Increased proportions of females were found at Burwood Beach Near, at 4m depth (p<0.05). Both Burwood Beach locations had higher proportions of mature female gonadal development stages compared to reference locations (p<0.05). Oocyte area was highest at both Burwood Beach locations, but no significant differences were detected among locations. Findings provided further evidence that female S. glomerata may be a suitable

  7. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  8. Environmental Estrogens Differentially Engage the Histone Methyltransferase EZH2 to Increase Risk of Uterine Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greathouse, K. Leigh; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Everitt, Jeffrey I.; Lin, Kevin; Berry, Tia; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Mittelstadt, Megan L.; Ho, Shuk-mei; Walker, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental exposures during sensitive windows of development can reprogram normal physiological responses and alter disease susceptibility later in life in a process known as developmental reprogramming. For example, exposure to the xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) during reproductive tract development can reprogram estrogen-responsive gene expression in the myometrium, resulting in hyper-responsiveness to hormone in the adult uterus and promotion of hormone-dependent uterine leiomyoma. We show here that the environmental estrogens genistein (GEN), a soy phytoestrogen, and the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA), differ in their pattern of developmental reprogramming and promotion of tumorigenesis (leiomyomas) in the uterus. While both GEN and BPA induce genomic estrogen receptor (ER) signaling in the developing uterus, only GEN induced PI3K/AKT non-genomic ER signaling to the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). As a result, this “pre-genomic” signaling phosphorylates and represses EZH2, and reduces levels of H3K27 repressive mark in chromatin. Furthermore, only GEN caused estrogen-responsive genes in the adult myometrium to become hyper-responsive to hormone; estrogen-responsive genes were repressed in BPA exposed uteri. Importantly, this pattern of EZH2 engagement to decrease versus increase H3K27 methylation correlated with the effect of these xenoestrogens on tumorigenesis. Developmental reprogramming by GEN promoted development of uterine leiomyomas, increasing tumor incidence and multiplicity, while BPA did not. These data demonstrate that environmental estrogens have distinct non-genomic effects in the developing uterus that determines their ability to engage the epigenetic regulator EZH2, decrease levels of the repressive epigenetic histone H3K27 methyl mark in chromatin during developmental reprogramming, and promote uterine tumorigenesis. PMID:22504913

  9. Optimization and prevalidation of the in vitro ERalpha CALUX method to test estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity of compounds.

    PubMed

    van der Burg, Bart; Winter, Roos; Weimer, Marc; Berckmans, Pascale; Suzuki, Go; Gijsbers, Linda; Jonas, Arjen; van der Linden, Sander; Witters, Hilda; Aarts, Jac; Legler, Juliette; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Bremer, Susanne

    2010-08-01

    Estrogenicity of chemicals has received significant attention and is linked to endocrine-disrupting activities. However, there is a paucity of validated methods to assess estrogenicity in vitro. We have established a robust method to test estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity of compounds in vitro, as an alternative to using animal models such as the uterotrophic assay. To this end we optimized protocols to be used in combination with CALUX reporter gene assays and carried out an in house prevalidation, followed by two rounds of tests to establish transferability. Problems in the initial test with transferability were solved by isolation of a novel cell clone of the ERalpha CALUX line with greatly improved stability and luciferase levels. This cell line proved to be a very suitable and reliable predictor of estrogenicity of chemicals and was able to readily rank a range of chemicals on the basis of their EC50 values.

  10. Growth hormone secretion and clearance rates in growing beef steers implanted with estrogenic anabolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, R; Kitts, W D

    1984-01-01

    The effect of estrogenic anabolic compounds on the kinetic parameters of metabolism of growth hormone (GH) was studied in growing beef steers. Twenty-four beef steers were randomly placed into four groups and assigned to one of the following four treatment groups: zeranol, diethylstilbestrol (DES), Synovex-S and an unimplanted control. GH metabolism was studied from eight steers on day 20 following the implantation of anabolic compounds. The animals were rapidly injected with a solution of bGH (NIH-GH-B18) and the disappearance of injected GH from the plasma was monitored up to 120 min following the injection. The plasma GH disappearance curve displayed an initial rapid phase lasting 5 min and a slow disappearance phase lasting 42 min; the fractional turnover rate from the two compartments were 0.167 and 0.017 min-1, respectively. The average volume of distribution of GH in steers was 6% of the body weight. Mean values of metabolic clearance and secretion rates of GH in steers were 21 liters/h and 252 micrograms/h or 74.5 ml/kg/h and 0.91 microgram/kg/h, respectively. Steers implanted with anabolic compounds gained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) than the controls. Plasma basal GH concentration appeared to be higher in all the implanted than in the control steers. The secretion rate of GH was increased (P less than 0.05) in steers implanted with anabolic compounds when compared to control steers. The secretion rate (microgram/kg/h) was about 96% (P less than 0.05), 107% (P less than 0.05) and 81% (P less than 0.05) higher in steers implanted with DES, zeranol and Synovex-S, respectively, than in the control steers. All the compounds studied were equally effective in increasing the secretion of GH on day 20 following their implantation. Metabolic clearance rate of GH was not affected by anabolic compound implantation in steers. There was, however, a slight reduction in metabolic clearance rate due to DES and a slight elevation due to zeranol and Synovex-S when

  11. Biodegradation of endocrine-disrupting compounds and suppression of estrogenic activity by ligninolytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Cajthaml, Tomás; Kresinová, Zdena; Svobodová, Katerina; Möder, Monika

    2009-05-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) represent a large group of substances of natural and anthropogenic origin. They are widely distributed in the environment and can pose serious risks to aquatic organisms and to public health. In this study, 4-n-nonylphenol, technical 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, and triclosan were biodegraded by eight ligninolytic fungal strains (Irpex lacteus 617/93, Bjerkandera adusta 606/93, Phanerochaete chrysosporium ME 446, Phanerochaete magnoliae CCBAS 134/I, Pleurotus ostreatus 3004 CCBAS 278, Trametes versicolor 167/93, Pycnoporus cinnabarinus CCBAS 595, Dichomitus squalens CCBAS 750). The results show that under the used conditions the fungi were able to degrade the EDCs within 14d of cultivation with exception of B. adusta and P. chrysosporium in the case of triclosane and bisphenol A, respectively. I. lacteus and P. ostreatus were found to be most efficient EDC degraders with their degradation efficiency exceeding 90% or 80%, respectively, in 7d. Both fungi degraded technical 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol-A, and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol below the detection limit within first 3d of cultivation. In general, estrogenic activities assayed with a recombinant yeast test decreased with advanced degradation. However, in case of I. lacteus, P. ostreatus, and P. chrysosporium the yeast assay showed a residual estrogenic activity (28-85% of initial) in 17alpha-ethinylestradiol cultures. Estrogenic activity in B. adusta cultures temporally increased during degradation of technical 4-nonylphenol, suggesting a production of endocrine-active intermediates. Attention was paid also to the effects of EDCs on the ligninolytic enzyme activities of the different fungi strains to evaluate their possible stimulation or suppression of activities during the biodegradation processes.

  12. New insights into fetal mammary gland morphogenesis: differential effects of natural and environmental estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Speroni, Lucia; Voutilainen, Maria; Mikkola, Marja L.; Klager, Skylar A.; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    An increased breast cancer risk during adulthood has been linked to estrogen exposure during fetal life. However, the impossibility of removing estrogens from the feto-maternal unit has hindered the testing of estrogen’s direct effect on mammary gland organogenesis. To overcome this limitation, we developed an ex vivo culture method of the mammary gland where the direct action of estrogens can be tested during embryonic days (E)14 to 19. Mouse mammary buds dissected at E14 and cultured for 5 days showed that estrogens directly altered fetal mammary gland development. Exposure to 0.1 pM, 10 pM, and 1 nM 17 β-estradiol (E2) resulted in monotonic inhibition of mammary buds ductal growth. In contrast, Bisphenol-A (BPA) elicited a non-monotonic response. At environmentally relevant doses (1 nM), BPA significantly increased ductal growth, as previously observed in vivo, while 1 μM BPA significantly inhibited ductal growth. Ductal branching followed the same pattern. This effect of BPA was blocked by Fulvestrant, a full estrogen antagonist, while the effect of estradiol was not. This method may be used to study the hormonal regulation of mammary gland development, and to test newly synthesized chemicals that are released into the environment without proper assessment of their hormonal action on critical targets like the mammary gland. PMID:28102330

  13. Estrogen-like activity of seafood related to environmental chemical contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Garritano, Sonia; Pinto, Barbara; Calderisi, Marco; Cirillo, Teresa; Amodio-Cocchieri, Renata; Reali, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background A wide variety of environmental pollutants occur in surface waters, including estuarine and marine waters. Many of these contaminants are recognised as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which can adversely affect the male and female reproductive system by binding the estrogen receptor and exhibiting hormone-like activities. In this study the estrogenic activity of extracts of edible marine organisms for human consumption from the Mediterranean Sea was assayed. Methods Marine organisms were collected in two different areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The estrogenic activity of tissues was assessed using an in vitro yeast reporter gene assay (S. cerevisiae RMY 326 ER-ERE). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (congeners 28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, 180) in fish tissue was also evaluated. Results Thirty-eight percent of extracts showed a hormone-like activity higher than 10% of the activity elicited by 10 nM 17b-estradiol (E2) used as control. Total PCB concentrations ranged from 0.002 up to 1.785 ng/g wet weight. Chemical analyses detected different levels of contamination among the species collected in the two areas, with the ones collected in the Adriatic Sea showing concentrations significantly higher than those collected in the Tyrrhenian Sea (p < 0.01). Conclusion The more frequent combination of chemicals in the samples that showed higher estrogenic activity was PCB 28, PCB 101, PCB 153, PCB 180. The content of PCBs and estrogenic activity did not reveal any significant correlation. PMID:16573822

  14. Freeze-drying as suitable method to achieve ready-to-use yeast biosensors for androgenic and estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Bittner, Michal; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-04-01

    Recombinant yeast assays (RYAs) have been proved to be a suitable tool for the fast screening of compounds with endocrine disrupting activities. However, ready-to-use versions more accessible to less equipped laboratories and field studies are scarce and far from optimal throughputs. Here, we have applied freeze-drying technology to optimize RYA for the fast assessment of environmental compounds with estrogenic and androgenic potencies. The effects of different cryoprotectants, initial optical density and long-term storage were evaluated. The study included detailed characterization of sensitivity, robustness and reproducibility of the new ready-to-use versions, as well as comparison with the standard assays. Freeze-dried RYAs showed similar dose-responses curves to their homolog standard assays, with Lowest Observed Effect Concentration (LOEC) and Median effective Concentration (EC50) of 1 nM and 7.5 nM for testosterone, and 0.05 nM and 0.5 nM for 17β-estradiol, respectively. Freeze-dried cells stored at 4 °C retained maximum sensitivity up to 2 months, while cells stored at -18 °C showed no decrease in sensitivity throughout the study (10 months). This ready-to-use RYA is easily accessible and may be potentially used for on-site applications.

  15. Spatiotemporal variations in estrogenicity, hormones, and endocrine-disrupting compounds in influents and effluents of selected wastewater-treatment plants and receiving streams in New York, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Ernst, Anne G.; Gray, James L.; Hemming, Jocelyn D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in wastewater effluents have been linked to changes in sex ratios, intersex (in males), behavioral modifications, and developmental abnormalities in aquatic organisms. Yet efforts to identify and regulate specific EDCs in complex mixtures are problematic because little is known about the estrogen activity (estrogenicity) levels of many common and emerging contaminants. The potential effects of EDCs on the water quality and health of biota in streams of the New York City water supply is especially worrisome because more than 150 wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) are permitted to discharge effluents into surface waters and groundwaters of watersheds that provide potable water to more than 9 million people. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), and New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) began a pilot study to increase the understanding of estrogenicity and EDCs in effluents and receiving streams mainly in southeastern New York. The primary goals of this study were to document and assess the spatial and temporal variability of estrogenicity levels; the effectiveness of various treatment-plant types to remove estrogenicity; the concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs); and the relations between estrogenicity and concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and PPCPs. The levels of estrogenicity and selected hormones, non-hormone EDCs, and PPCPs were characterized in samples collected seasonally in effluents from 7 WWTPs, once or twice in effluents from 34 WWTPs, and once in influents to 6 WWTPs. Estrogenicity was quantified, as estradiol equivalents, using both the biological e-screen assay and a chemical model. Results generally show that (1) estrogenicity levels in effluents varied spatially and seasonally, (2) a wide range of known and unknown EDCs

  16. Long-term effects of early life exposure to environmental estrogens on ovarian function: Role of epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Gonzalo; Foster, Warren; Paredes, Alfonso; Yi, Kun Don; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in development and function of the brain and reproductive tract. Accordingly, it is thought that developmental exposure to environmental estrogens can disrupt neural and reproductive tract development potentially resulting in long-term alterations in neurobehavior and reproductive function. Many chemicals have been shown to have estrogenic activity whereas others affect estrogen production and turnover resulting in disruption of estrogen signaling pathways. However, these mechanisms and the concentrations required to induce these effects cannot account for the myriad adverse effects of environmental toxicants on estrogen sensitive target tissues. Hence, alternative mechanisms are thought to underlie the adverse effects documented in experimental animal models and thus could be important to human health. In this review, the epigenetic regulation of gene expression is explored as a potential target of environmental toxicants including estrogenic chemicals. We suggest that toxicant-induced changes in epigenetic signatures are important mechanisms underlying disruption of ovarian follicular development. In addition, we discuss how exposure to environmental estrogens during early life can alter gene expression through effects on epigenetic control potentially leading to permanent changes in ovarian physiology. PMID:25040227

  17. Profiling of the Tox21 10K compound library for agonists and antagonists of the estrogen receptor alpha signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Martin, Matt T.; Reif, David M.; Judson, Richard S.; Houck, Keith A.; Casey, Warren; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Shockley, Keith R.; Ceger, Patricia; Fostel, Jennifer; Witt, Kristine L.; Tong, Weida; Rotroff, Daniel M.; Zhao, Tongan; Shinn, Paul; Simeonov, Anton; Dix, David J.; Austin, Christopher P.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Tice, Raymond R.; Xia, Menghang

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Tox21 program has screened a library of approximately 10,000 (10K) environmental chemicals and drugs in three independent runs for estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonist and antagonist activity using two types of ER reporter gene cell lines, one with an endogenous full length ERα (ER-luc; BG1 cell line) and the other with a transfected partial receptor consisting of the ligand binding domain (ER-bla; ERα β-lactamase cell line), in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format. The ability of the two assays to correctly identify ERα agonists and antagonists was evaluated using a set of 39 reference compounds with known ERα activity. Although both assays demonstrated adequate (i.e. >80%) predictivity, the ER-luc assay was more sensitive and the ER-bla assay more specific. The qHTS assay results were compared with results from previously published ERα binding assay data and showed >80% consistency. Actives identified from both the ER-bla and ER-luc assays were analyzed for structure-activity relationships (SARs) revealing known and potentially novel ERα active structure classes. The results demonstrate the feasibility of qHTS to identify environmental chemicals with the potential to interact with the ERα signaling pathway and the two different assay formats improve the confidence in correctly identifying these chemicals. PMID:25012808

  18. Physiological and biochemical perturbations in Daphnia magna following exposure to the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, W.S.; Milam, D.L.; LeBlanc, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The estrogenic properties of many environmental contaminants, such as DDE and PCBs, have been associated with reproductive failure in a variety of vertebrate species. While estrogens have been measured in many invertebrate species, the function of this hormone in invertebrates is controversial. The objective of the present study was to identify possible physiological and biochemical target sites for the estrogenic effects of some xenobiotics on the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna using the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). Chronic exposure of daphnids to 0.50 mg/L DES reduced molting frequency among first-generation juveniles and decreased fecundity of second-generation daphnids. Adult first-generation daphnids chronically exposed to DES, as well as adult daphnids acutely exposed to DES for only 48 h, were examined for steroid hormone metabolic capabilities using testosterone as the model steroid. The rate of elimination of two major hydroxylated metabolites of testosterone was significantly reduced, and elimination of glucose conjugates of testosterone was significantly elevated from exposure to 0.50 mg/L DES. These results demonstrate that multigeneration exposure of daphnids to DES results in reduced fecundity and altered steroid metabolic capabilities. Thus, some arthropods, like vertebrates, are sensitive to the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

  19. Alkyllead compounds and their environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Abadin, Henry G; Pohl, Hana R

    2010-01-01

    Alkyllead compounds are man-made compounds in which a carbon atom of one or more organic molecules is bound to a lead atom. Tetraethyllead and tetramethyllead are the most common alkyllead compounds that were used primarily as gasoline additives for many years. Consequently, auto emissions have accounted for a major part of lead environmental pollution. Alkyllead compounds can readily enter living organisms as they are well absorbed via all major routes of entry. Because of their lipid solubility, the alkylleads can also readily cross the blood-brain barrier. The toxicokinetic information on organic lead can be used as biomarkers of exposure for monitoring exposed individuals. The organic alkyllead compounds are more toxic than the inorganic forms of lead. Neurotoxicity is the predominant effect of lead (both for organic and inorganic forms), although lead affects almost every organ of the body. The use of alkyllead compounds has declined over the last 20 years, due to the worldwide effort to eliminate the use of leaded gasoline. This achievement can be viewed as a great accomplishment of public health preventive measures.

  20. INTRODUCTION OF THE VITELLOGENIN GENE IN EARLY LIFE STAGE FATHEAD MINNOWS AS AN EFFECTIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR FOR ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression in adult male fathead minnows (FHM) has previously been used successfully to detect exposures to estrogenic compounds in aquatic systems; however, sample volume(s)required for >24h exposure durations and the logistics of sampling pose some limita...

  1. INTRODUCTION OF THE VITELLOGENIN GENE IN EARLY LIFE STAGE FATHEAD MINNOWS AS AN EFFECTIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR FOR ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression in adult male fathead minnows (FHM) has previously been used successfully to detect exposures to estrogenic compounds in aquatic systems; however, sample volume(s)required for >24h exposure durations and the logistics of sampling pose some limita...

  2. INTERACTION OF PAH-RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ALPHA AND BETA ISOFORMS OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. (R826192)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of several 4- and 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic PAHs, and their monohydroxy derivatives to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta isoforms was examined. Only compounds possessing a hydroxyl group were able to compete wit...

  3. INTERACTION OF PAH-RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ALPHA AND BETA ISOFORMS OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. (R826192)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of several 4- and 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic PAHs, and their monohydroxy derivatives to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta isoforms was examined. Only compounds possessing a hydroxyl group were able to compete wit...

  4. RAPID SCREENING OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS FOR ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last few years, an increased awareness of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their potential to affect wildlife and humans has produced a demand for practical screening methods to identify endocrine activity in a wide range of environmental and industrial chemical...

  5. RAPID SCREENING OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS FOR ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last few years, an increased awareness of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their potential to affect wildlife and humans has produced a demand for practical screening methods to identify endocrine activity in a wide range of environmental and industrial chemical...

  6. Estradiol and endocrine disrupting compounds adversely affect development of sea urchin embryos at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Troy A; Snyder, Mark J; Cherr, Gary N

    2005-01-26

    Environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are a wide variety of chemicals that typically exert effects, either directly or indirectly, through receptor-mediated processes, thus mimicking endogenous hormones and/or inhibiting normal hormone activities and metabolism. Little is known about the effects of EDCs on echinoderm physiology, reproduction and development. We exposed developing sea urchin embryos (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus anamesus) to two known EDCs (4-octylphenol (OCT), bisphenol A (BisA)) and to natural and synthetic reproductive hormones (17beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), progesterone (P4) and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2)). In addition, we studied two non-estrogenic EDCs, tributyltin (TBT) and o,p-DDD. Successful development to the pluteus larval stage (96 h post-fertilization) was used to define EDC concentration-response relationships. The order of compound potency based on EC50 values for a reduction in normal development was as follows: TBT(L. anamesus)>OCT>TBT(S. purpuratus)>E2>EE2>DDD>BisA>P4>E1>E3. The effect of TBT was pronounced even at concentrations substantially lower than those commonly reported in heavily contaminated areas, but the response was significantly different in the two model species. Sea urchin embryos were generally more sensitive to estrogenic EDCs and TBT than most other invertebrate larvae. Stage-specific exposure experiments were conducted to determine the most sensitive developmental periods using blastula, gastrula and post-gastrula (pluteus) stages. The stage most sensitive to E2, OCT and TBT was the blastula stage with less overall sensitivity in the gastrula stage, regardless of concentration. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) were added to the experiments individually and in combination with estrogenic EDCs to interfere with potential receptor-mediated actions. Tamoxifen, a partial ER agonist, alone inhibited development at concentrations as low as 0.02 ng

  7. DNA damage and estrogenic activity induced by the environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene and its metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chigusa; Egami, Takashi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene (2-NO2-T) is carcinogenic and reproductively toxic in animals. In this study, we elucidated the mechanisms of its carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Methods We examined DNA damage induced by 2-NO2-T and its metabolite, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), using 32P-5′-end-labeled DNA. We measured 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA and cellular DNA in cultured human leukemia (HL-60) cells treated with 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression in HL-60 cells was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We examined estrogenic activity using an E-screen assay and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Results In experiments with isolated DNA fragments, 2-NO-T induced oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (reduced form) (NADH), while 2-NO2-T did not. 2-NO-T significantly increased levels of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed upregulation of OGG1 gene expression induced by 2-NO-T. An E-screen assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed that 2-NO2-T induced estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. In contrast, 2-NO-T decreased the cell number and suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation. The data obtained with the SPR sensor using estrogen receptor α and the estrogen response element supported the results of the E-screen assay. Conclusions Oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NO-T and estrogen-disrupting effects caused by 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T may play a role in the reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity of these entities. PMID:21432561

  8. BPA and environmental estrogen in potable water sources in Enugu municipality, South-East, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ignatius, C Maduka; Francis, E Ezeonu; Emeka, E Neboh; Elvis, N Shu; Ebele, J Ikekpeazu

    2010-11-01

    BPA and environmental estrogen levels were assayed in potable water samples (38 tap water, 36 well water, 18 river water and 24 rain water samples) that were randomly collected from the different parts of Enugu metropolis, south-east Nigeria. The mean ± SD estrogen levels in tap, well, river and rain water samples were 0.10 ± 0.09, 0.05 ± 0.02, 0.05 ± 0.02 and 0.05 ± 0.02 μg/L respectively. Also, the mean BPA levels (μg/L) in the different water sources were 0.20 ± 0.07, 0.21 ± 0.07, 0.18 ± 0.04, and 0.40 ± 0.16, respectively. There was statistically significant difference (p = 0.0227) in BPA levels between the harvested rain water and the drinking tap water.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of New Phenolic Compounds with Estrogen Biosynthesis-Inhibiting and Antioxidation Activities from Broussonetia papyrifera Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Fu; Du, Baowen; Chen, Bin; Wang, Fei; Wang, Mingkui

    2014-01-01

    Broussonetia papyrifera leaves (BPL) as a traditional Chinese medicine are also used in livestock feed for stimulating reproduction, adipose tissue and muscle development; however, the mechanism of their action is still unknown. Through estrogen biosynthesis-guided fractionation in human ovarian granulosa-like KGN cells, five new phenolic glycosides, broussoside A–E(1–5), along with fifteen known dietary phenolic compounds, were isolated from the n-butanol extract of BPL, and their structures were elucidated on the basis of NMR spectra analysis and chemical evidence. New compounds 3, 4, 5 and the known compounds 9 and 10 were found to potently inhibit estrogen biosynthesis in KGN cells. In addition, compounds 9, 17, 18, and 20 showed strong antioxidant activity against ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt) and DPPH (1, 1′-diphenyl -2-picryl-hydrazyl radical) assays. These findings suggest that BPL may improve meat quality through the regulation of estrogen biosynthesis. Furthermore, they may be useful for the discovery of potential aromatase modulators from natural products. Finally, they could be considered as a new source for natural antioxidants. PMID:24714659

  10. Electrochemical detection of phenolic estrogenic compounds at clay modified carbon paste electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkamssa, N.; Ouattara, L.; Kawachi, A.; Tsujimura, M.; Isoda, H.; Chtaini, A.; Ksibi, M.

    2015-04-01

    A simple and sensitive electroanalytical method was developed to determine the Endocrine Disrupting chemical 4-tert-octylphenol on clay modified carbon paste electrode (Clay/CPE). The electrochemical response of the proposed electrode was studied by means of cyclic and square wave voltammetry. It has found that the oxidation of 4-tert-octylphenol on the clay/CPE displayed a well-defined oxidation peak. Under these optimal conditions, a linear relation between concentrations of 4-tert-octylphenol current response was obtained over range of 7.26×10-6 to 3.87×10-7 with a detection and quantification limit of 9.2×10-7 M and 3.06×10-6 M, respectively. The correlation coefficient is 0.9963. The modified electrode showed suitable sensitivity, high stability and an accurate detection of 4-tert-octylphenol. The modified electrode also relevant suitable selectivity for various phenolic estrogenic compounds.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of eight phenolic environmental estrogens in blood using dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction combined with ultra fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Zhu, Hao; Shen, Hao-Yu; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2013-10-15

    A novel, simple and sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous determination of eight phenolic environmental estrogens in blood by using the dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (d-µ-SPE) procedure combined with ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS). The excellent nanomaterials tetraethylenepentamine-functionalized magnetic polymer was used as an adsorbent, and the main factors affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. All target compounds showed good linearities in the tested range with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.999. The mean recoveries were in the range of 85.0-105.0%. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 4.9% and 5.2%, respectively. The limits of quantification for the eight phenolic environmental estrogens were between 0.075 and 0.42 µg L(-1). The developed method can be applied to the routine analyses for the determination of the eight phenolic environmental estrogens in blood samples. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethanolic extract of Coelogyne cristata Lindley (Orchidaceae) and its compound coelogin promote osteoprotective activity in ovariectomized estrogen deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chetan; Mansoori, Mohd Nizam; Dixit, Manisha; Shukla, Priyanka; Kumari, Tejaswita; Bhandari, S P S; Narender, T; Singh, Divya; Arya, K R

    2014-10-15

    Coelogyne cristata Lindley (CC) family Orchidaceae is an Indian medicinal plant used for the treatment of fractured bones in folk-tradition of Kumaon region, Uttarakhand, India. In continuation of our drug discovery program, feeding of ethanolic extract to ovariectomized estrogen deficient mice led to significant restoration of trabecular micro architecture in both femoral and tibial bones, better bone quality and also devoid of any uterine estrogenicity. Subsequently, coelogin, a pure compound was isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of C. cristata and evaluated in in vitro osteoblast cell cultures. Treatment of coelogin to osteoblasts led to enhanced ALP activity (a marker of osteoblast differentiation), mineral nodule formation and mRNA levels of osteogenic markers like BMP-2, Type 1 Collagen and RUNX-2. Based on these results, we propose that ethanolic extract of C. cristata and its pure compound coelogin have potential in the management of post menopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Review of Bioassays for Monitoring Fate and Transport ofEstrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    SciTech Connect

    CGCampbell@lbl.gov

    2004-01-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are recognizedcontaminants threatening water quality. Despite efforts in sourceidentification, few strategies exist for characterization or treatment ofthis environmental pollution. Given that there are numerous EDCs that cannegatively affect humans and wildlife, general screening techniques likebioassays and biosensors provide an essential rapid and intensiveanalysis capacity. Commonly applied bioassays include the ELISA and YESassays, but promising technologies include ER-CALUXa, ELRA, Endotecta,RIANA, and IR-bioamplification. Two biosensors, Endotecta and RIANA, arefield portable using non-cellular biological detection strategies.Environmental management of EDCs in water requires integration ofbiosensors and bioassays for monitoring and assessment.

  14. From pure compounds to complex exposure: Effects of dietary cadmium and lignans on estrogen, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Hurmerinta, Teija; Nurmi, Tarja; Berglund, Marika; Rüegg, Joelle; Poutanen, Matti; Halldin, Krister; Mäkelä, Sari; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina

    2016-06-24

    Exposure to environmental endocrine active compounds correlates with altered susceptibility to disease in human populations. Chemical risk assessment is single compound based, although exposure often takes place as heterogeneous mixtures of man-made and natural substances within complex matrices like diet. Here we studied whether the effects of cadmium and enterolactone on endocrine endpoints in dietary exposure can be predicted based on pure compound effects. Ovariectomized estrogen reporter ERE-luciferase (ERE-luc) mice were maintained on diets that intrinsically contain increasing concentrations of cadmium and enterolactone precursors for three and 21 days. The activation of the ERE-luc, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-ERK1/2, and classical estrogen responses were measured. Interactions between the diets and endogenous hormone were evaluated by challenging the animals with 17β-estradiol. Compared to animals on basal purified diet, mice consuming experimental diets were exposed to significantly higher levels of cadmium and enterolactone, yet the exposure remained comparable to typical human dietary intake. Surprisingly, we could not detect effects on endpoints regulated by pure enterolactone, such as ERE-luc activation. However, cadmium accumulation in the liver was accompanied with activation of EGFR and MAPK-ERK1/2 in line with our earlier CdCl2 studies. Further, attenuation of 17β-estradiol-induced ERE-luc response in liver by experimental diets was observed. Our findings indicate that the exposure context can have substantial effects on the activity of endocrine active compounds in vivo. Thus, whenever possible, a context that mimics human exposure should be tested along with pure compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of estrogenic, antiestrogenic and genotoxic activity of nemorosone, the major compound found in brown Cuban propolis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brown propolis is the major type of propolis found in Cuba; its principal component is nemorosone, the major constituent of Clusia rosea floral resins. Nemorosone has received increasing attention due to its strong in vitro anti-cancer action. The citotoxicity of nemorosone in several human cancer cell lines has been reported and correlated to the direct action it has on the estrogen receptor (ER). Breast cancer can be treated with agents that target estrogen-mediated signaling, such as antiestrogens. Phytoestrogen can mimic or modulate the actions of endogenous estrogens and the treatment of breast cancer with phytoestrogens may be a valid strategy, since they have shown anti-cancer activity. Methods The aim of the present investigation was to assess the capacity of nemorosone to interact with ERs, by Recombinant Yeast Assay (RYA) and E-screen assays, and to determine by comet assay, if the compound causes DNA-damaging in tumoral and non-tumoral breast cells. Results Nemorosone did not present estrogenic activity, however, it inhibited the 17-β-estradiol (E2) action when either of both methods was used, showing their antiestrogenicity. The DNA damage induced by the benzophenone in cancer and normal breast cells presented negative results. Conclusion These findings suggest that nemorosone may have therapeutic application in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23902919

  16. Estrogen receptor positive breast cancers and their association with environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies to assess risk factors for breast cancer often do not differentiate between different types of breast cancers. We applied a general linear model to determine whether data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program on annual county level age-adjusted incidence rates of breast cancer with and without estrogen receptors (ER+ and ER-) were associated with environmental pollutants. Results Our final model explained approximately 38% of the variation in the rate of ER+ breast cancer. In contrast, we were only able to explain 14% of the variation in the rate of ER- breast cancer with the same set of environmental variables. Only ER+ breast cancers were positively associated with the EPA's estimated risk of cancer based on toxic air emissions and the proportion of agricultural land in a county. Meteorological variables, including short wave radiation, temperature, precipitation, and water vapor pressure, were also significantly associated with the rate of ER+ breast cancer, after controlling for age, race, premature mortality from heart disease, and unemployment rate. Conclusions Our findings were consistent with what we expected, given the fact that many of the commonly used pesticides and air pollutants included in the EPA cancer risk score are classified as endocrine disruptors and ER+ breast cancers respond more strongly to estrogen than ER- breast cancers. The findings of this study suggest that ER+ and ER- breast cancers have different risk factors, which should be taken into consideration in future studies that seek to understand environmental risk factors for breast cancer. PMID:21569288

  17. Characterizing the Estrogenic Potential of 1060 Environmental Chemicals by Assessing Growth Kinetics in T47D Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to detect environmental chemicals that pose a risk of endocrine disruption, high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals are needed. Alteration of estrogen signaling has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effec...

  18. Characterizing the Estrogenic Potential of 1060 Environmental Chemicals by Assessing Growth Kinetics in T47D Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to detect environmental chemicals that pose a risk of endocrine disruption, high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals are needed. Alteration of estrogen signaling has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effec...

  19. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water sources are increasingly impacted by upstream anthropogenic activities, including wastewater discharge, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and landfill leachate. Androgenic and estrogenic activities have been detected in surface waters downstream from ...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water sources are increasingly impacted by upstream anthropogenic activities, including wastewater discharge, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and landfill leachate. Androgenic and estrogenic activities have been detected in surface waters downstream from ...

  1. Estrogenic compounds determination in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Asensio-Ramos, María; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Fanali, Salvatore; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2014-05-30

    In this work, a group of 12 estrogenic compounds, i.e., four natural sexual hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol and estriol), an exoestrogen (17α-ethynylestradiol), a synthetic stilbene (dienestrol), a mycotoxin (zearalenone) and some of their major metabolites (2-methoxyestradiol, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol) have been separated and determined by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) coupled to electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry. For this purpose, a background electrolyte containing an aqueous solution of 45 mM of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) adjusted to pH 9.0 with an ammonia solution, as MS friendly surfactant, and methanol (10% (v/v)), as organic modifier, was used. To further increase the sensitivity, normal stacking mode was applied by injecting the sample dissolved in an aqueous solution of 11.5mM of ammonium PFO (APFO) at pH 9.0 containing 10% (v/v) of methanol for 25s. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, using 110 μL of chloroform and 500 μL of acetonitrile as extraction and dispersion solvents, respectively, was employed to extract and preconcentrate the target analytes from different types of environmental water samples (mineral, run-off and wastewater) containing 30% (w/v) NaCl and adjusted to pH 3.0 with 1M HCl. The limits of detection achieved were in the range 0.04-1.10 μg/L. The whole method was validated in terms of linearity, precision, recovery and matrix effect for each type of water, showing determination coefficients higher than 0.992 for matrix-matched calibration and absolute recoveries in the range 43-91%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Estrogenic compounds in Tunisian urban sewage treatment plant: occurrence, removal and ecotoxicological impact of sewage discharge and sludge disposal.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Dalel; Athmouni, Khaled; Jerbi, Bouthaina; Kallel, Monem; Ayadi, Habib; Zhou, John L

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence, fate and ecotoxicological assessment of selected estrogenic compounds were investigated at Tunisian urban sewage treatment plant. The influents, effluents, as well as primary, secondary and dehydrated sludge, were sampled and analyzed for the target estrogens to evaluate their fate. All target compounds were detected in both sewage and sludge with mean concentrations from 0.062 to 0.993 μg L(-1) and from 11.8 to 792.9 μg kg(-1)dry weight, respectively. A wide range of removal efficiencies during the treatment processes were observed, from 6.3 % for estrone to 76.8 % for estriol. Ecotoxicological risk assessment revealed that the highest ecotoxicological risk in sewage effluent and dehydrated sludge was due to 17β-estradiol with a risk quotient (RQ) of 4.6 and 181.9, respectively, and 17α-ethinylestradiol with RQ of 9.8 and 14.85, respectively. Ecotoxicological risk after sewage discharge and sludge disposal was limited to the presence of 17β-estradiol in dehydrated-sludge amended soil with RQ of 1.38. Further control of estrogenic hormones in sewage effluent and sludge is essential before their discharge and application in order to prevent their introduction into the natural environment.

  3. Vitamin D modulation of the activity of estrogenic compounds in bone cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Somjen, Dalia

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin D analogs modulate different organs, including modulation of energy metabolism, through the induction of creatine kinase (CK) activity. Skeletal organs from vitamin D-depleted rats showed lower constituent CK than those from vitamin D-replete rats. Moreover, estradiol-17beta (E2) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which increased CK in organs from intact female or male rats, respectively, stimulated much less CK in vitamin D-depleted rats. Treatment of intact female rats with noncalcemic vitamin D analogs significantly upregulated E2- and DHT-induced CKresponse. These analogs upregulated the CK response to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) in organs from intact or ovariectomized (Ovx) female rats but abolished SERMs' inhibitory effect on E2-induced CK. These analogs significantly increased estradiol receptor alpha (ERalpha) protein in skeletal organs as well as histomorphological and biochemical changes due to this treatment followed by E2 or DHT. The analogs alone markedly altered the growth plate and the trabeculae and increased trabecular bone volume (%TB V) and trabecular width. The addition of E2 or DHT to this treatment restored all parameters as well as increased %TBV and cell proliferation. Treatment of Ovx female rats with JK 1624 F2-2 (JKF) decreased growth-plate width and increased %TB V, whereas QW1624 F2-2 (QW) restored growth-plate width and %TB V. Treatment of E2 with JKF restored %TBV and growth-plate width, whereas E2 with QW restored all parameters, including cortical width. There was also upregulation of the response of CK to E2 in both combined treatments. Our human-derived osteoblast (hObs)-like cell cultures respond to estrogenic compounds, and pretreating them with JKF upregulated the CK response to E2, raloxifene (Ral), and some phytoestrogens. ERalpha and ERbeta proteins, as well as mRNA, were modulated by CB 1093 (CB) and JKF. JKF increased specific nuclear E2 binding in female hObs but inhibited specific membranal E2

  4. A Sensitive and Inexpensive Yeast Bioassay for the Mycotoxin Zearalenone and Other Compounds with Estrogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mitterbauer, Rudolf; Weindorfer, Hanna; Safaie, Naser; Krska, Rudolf; Lemmens, Marc; Ruckenbauer, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Adam, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZON) is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin produced by plant-pathogenic species of Fusarium. As a consequence of infection with Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum, ZON can be found in cereals and derived food products. Since ZON is suspected to be a cause of human disease, including premature puberty syndrome, as well as hyperestrogenism in farm animals, several countries have established monitoring programs and guidelines for ZON levels in grain intended for human consumption and animal feed. We developed a low-cost method for monitoring ZON contamination in grain based on a sensitive yeast bioassay. The indicator Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YZRM7 is unable to grow unless an engineered pyrimidine biosynthetic gene is activated by the expressed human estrogen receptor in the presence of exogenous estrogenic substances. Deletion of the genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters Pdr5p and Snq2p increases net ZON uptake synergistically. Less than 1 μg of ZON per liter of medium is sufficient to allow growth of the indicator strain. To prevent interference with pyrimidines potentially present in biological samples, we also disrupted the genes FUR1 and URK1, blocking the pyrimidine salvage pathway. The bioassay strain YZRM7 allows qualitative detection and quantification of total estrogenic activity in cereal extracts without requiring further cleanup steps. Its high sensitivity makes this assay suitable for low-cost monitoring of contamination of maize and small grain cereals with estrogenic Fusarium mycotxins. PMID:12570998

  5. Calculation methods to perform mass balance of endocrine disrupting compounds in a submerged membrane bioreactor: fate and distribution of estrogens during the biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Arriaga, E B; Mijaylova, P

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the study of the fate and distribution of three endocrine disrupting compounds (estrogens); Estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in a laboratory scale submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR). For this matter, both aqueous and solids phases were analyzed for the presence of E1, E2 and EE2. The outcome of this study was that three SMBRs showed enhanced elimination of estrogens in different operational conditions; the estrogen removal was close to 100% in SMBR. Additionally, E1, E2 and EE2 were detected in SMBR sludge at concentrations of up to 41.2, 37.3 and 36.9 ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively. The estrogen removal in the SMBRs was directly influenced by a combination of simultaneous biodegradation-adsorption processes, indicating that the main removal mechanism of the estrogens in the SMBRs is the biodegradation process. The E1, E2 and EE2 were biologically degraded in the SMBR (87-100%). The sorption of estrogens onto activated sludge was from 2%. Therefore, a high potential for estrogen removal by biodegradation in the SMBR was observed, allowing less estrogen concentration in the dissolved phase available for the adsorption of these compounds onto biological flocs. Two different methods were carried out for mass balance calculations of estrogens in SMBR. For the first method, the measured data was used in both liquid and solid phases, whereas for the second one, it was in aqueous phase and solid-water distribution coefficients (K(d)) value of E1, E2 and EE2. The purpose of these methodologies is to make easier the identification of the main mechanisms involved in the removal of E1, E2 and EE2 in a SMBR. Both methods can be applied in order to determine the mechanism, fate and distribution of estrogens in a SMBR.

  6. Effects of natural and synthetic estrogens and various environmental contaminants on vitellogenesis in fish primary hepatocytes: comparison of bream (Abramis brama) and carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Rankouhi, T Rouhani; Sanderson, J T; van Holsteijn, I; van Leeuwen, C; Vethaak, A D; van den Berg, M

    2004-09-01

    Interaction of environmental estrogens with the estrogen receptor (ER) has been shown in various fish species. Our objective was to compare the sensitivity of bream (Abramis brama) to (xeno-)estrogens with that of the carp (Cyprinus carpio), by measuring the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), ethynylestradiol (EE2), bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), methoxychlor (MXCL), and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB126, PCB118), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-dioxin (TCDD), and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PCDF) on vitellogenesis in primary hepatocytes. Comparing the EC50 values in bream hepatocytes: EE2 (0.1-0.2 microM) < E1 (0.6-0.2 microM) < E2 (1.9 microM) with those of carp hepatocytes EE2 (0.03-0.06 microM) < E2 (0.3 microM) approximately E1 (0.2-0.3 microM) we found differences in sensitivity and ranking of the estrogenic potency of E2 and E1, indicating interspecies differences. Exposure to BPA, NP, MXCL, and HAHs did not or only weakly induce vitellogenesis. Bream hepatocytes coexposed to E2 and TCDD, PCB126 or PCDF showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of E2-induced vitellogenesis. IC50 (concentration of a compound that elicits 50% inhibition of E2-induced vitellogenesis) values determined in bream were: TCDD (0.02-0.09 nM) < PCB126 (0.35-0.1 nM) < PCDF (2.0-0.1) and in carp were: TCDD (0.01 nM) < PCB126 (0.4 nM). PCB118 showed no (anti-)estrogenic response. IC50 values and benchmark-concentration for TCDD and PCB126 in bream and carp hepatocytes were in the same range, indicating similar sensitivity to these compounds. Due to their anti-estrogenic capacity with benchmark-concentrations in the pM range TCDD, PCDF, and PCB126 may form a potential hazard for the reproductive success of fish species by inhibition of vitellogenesis.

  7. Preparation of magnetic multi-functional molecularly imprinted polymer beads for determining environmental estrogens in water samples.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenkun; He, Qiaoya; Wang, Lituo; Wang, Xuedong; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Huang, Changjiang

    2013-05-15

    Magnetic multi-functional molecularly imprinted polymer (mag-MFMIP) beads were prepared for determining environmental estrogens in water samples. This novel material adopted a superparamagnetic microparticle as the supporter and used 17β-estradiol (E2) as the imprinting template, aiming for recognizing many kinds of environmental estrogens simultaneously. Characterization analysis and binding experiments revealed that mag-MFMIP beads had outstanding magnetic property, large adsorption capacity and high competitive selectivity to most of the commonly seen environmental estrogens. When mag-MFMIP beads were used as dispersed solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbents in water samples, the recoveries of estriol (E3), bisphenol A (BPA), E2 and ethynylestradiol (EE) were 72.2 - 92.1%, 89.3 - 96.0%, 93.3 - 102% and 89.7 - 95.9%, respectively with relative standard deviation (RSD) lower than 7.0%. These results indicated that mag-MFMIP beads had the potential to be the common adsorbents for many kinds of environmental estrogens, representing a novel application of MIPs in the field of environmental chemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurodifferentiating potential of 8-prenylnaringenin and related compounds in neural precursor cells and correlation with estrogen-like activity.

    PubMed

    Urmann, Corinna; Oberbauer, Eleni; Couillard-Després, Sébastien; Aigner, Ludwig; Riepl, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are an increasing burden for our ageing societies; there is an as yet unmet need for the development of effective therapies. Neurogenesis, i.e., the generation of new neurons in the adult brain from neural stem cells, has received increasing attention since it offers the potential for endogenous brain repair and functional regeneration. Adult neurogenesis is partially under the control of sex hormones such as estradiol, and boosting neurogenesis with estradiol in animals correlates with cognitive improvement. 8-Prenylnaringenin imitates as highly potent phytoestrogen the effects of estradiol. Here, we studied the potential of 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and related compounds on differentiation induction in vitro using neural precursor cells transiently transfected with a doublecortin promoter luciferase construct, which was recently shown to indicate neuronal fate and differentiation. The flavanones 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin showed slight activity in this assay but significant activity by immunostaining. Although the estrogen-like activities of 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin are very different, the activity in differentiation induction is similar. Interestingly, also some prenylflavonoids with extended prenyl groups, e.g., a geranyl group, showed increased differentiation activity, while estrogen-like activity is decreased. This allows the conclusion that estrogen-like activity of prenylflavanones does not correlate directly with the activity of differentiation induction in neural precursor cells. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Is there an association between exposure to environmental estrogens and breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Safe, S H

    1997-01-01

    It was initially reported that levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or p,p'-DDE were elevated in breast cancer patients (serum or tissue) versus controls. These results, coupled with reports that selected environmental estrogens decreased 17beta-estradiol (E2) 2-hydroxylase activity and increased the ratio of 16alpha-hydroxyestrone/2-hydroxyestrone metabolites in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, have led to the hypothesis that xenoestrogens are a preventable cause of breast cancer. More recent studies and analysis of organochlorine levels in breast cancer patients versus controls show that these contaminants are not elevated in the latter group. Moreover, occupational exposure to relatively high levels of PCBs and DDT/DDE are not associated with an increased incidence of breast cancer. A reexamination of the radiometric E2 2-hydroxylase assay in MCF-7 cells with diverse estrogens, antiestrogens, and carcinogens showed that the mammary carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene induced this response and the antiestrogen ICI 164,384 decreased E2 2-hydroxylase activity. Thus, E2 2-hydroxylase activity and the 16alpha-hydroxyestrone/2-hydroxyestrone metabolite ratio in MCF-7 cells does not predict xenoestrogens or mammary carcinogens. PMID:9168013

  10. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Penza, M.; Jeremic, M.; Marrazzo, E.; Maggi, A.; Ciana, P.; Rando, G.; Grigolato, P.G.; Di Lorenzo, D.

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5 {mu}g/kg). At higher doses (50-500 {mu}g/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ER{alpha} or ER{beta}, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100 nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ER{alpha} in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ER{beta} in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. - Research Highlights: > The environmental organotin tributyltin chloride shows dose-dependent estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice. > The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and the dose of the compound. > The estrogenic and adipogenic effects of TBT occur at doses closed to

  11. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS- Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to investigate chlorinated by-products of a selected number of steroids representing both estrogens and androgens. Highly controlled reaction conditions were used to ascertain product distribution. Bench-scale studies were conducted to identify...

  12. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS- Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to investigate chlorinated by-products of a selected number of steroids representing both estrogens and androgens. Highly controlled reaction conditions were used to ascertain product distribution. Bench-scale studies were conducted to identify...

  13. Environmentally friendly organic synthesis using bismuth(III) compounds.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Scott W; Mohan, Ram S

    2012-01-01

    With increasing environmental concerns, the need for environmentally friendly organic synthesis has gained increased importance. In this regard, bismuth(III) compounds are especially attractive as "green" reagents and catalysts for organic synthesis. Bismuth(III) compounds are remarkably nontoxic, relatively air and moisture stable, and easy to handle. The contributions from our laboratory in the last 5 years in the field of applications of bismuth(III) compounds as catalysts are presented.

  14. Analytical Methodologies for the Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Biological and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs) can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented. PMID:23738329

  15. ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN FISH EXPOSED TO NATURAL PHARMACEUTICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS USING GENE ARRAYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denslow, N.D., P. Larkin, T.L. Sabo-Attwood, J. Kocerha, K.J. Kroll, M.J. Hemmer and L.C. Folmar. 2004. Analysis of Changes in Gene Expression Patterns in Fish Exposed to Natural, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Estrogens Using Gene Arrays (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):...

  16. Characterizing the Growth Kinetics in Estrogen Responsive T47D Cells After Exposure to 2000 Environmental Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals for endocrine disrupting potential. The estrogen signaling pathway is a known xenobiotic target that has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects...

  17. ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN FISH EXPOSED TO NATURAL PHARMACEUTICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS USING GENE ARRAYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denslow, N.D., P. Larkin, T.L. Sabo-Attwood, J. Kocerha, K.J. Kroll, M.J. Hemmer and L.C. Folmar. 2004. Analysis of Changes in Gene Expression Patterns in Fish Exposed to Natural, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Estrogens Using Gene Arrays (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):...

  18. Characterizing the Growth Kinetics in Estrogen Responsive T47D Cells After Exposure to 2000 Environmental Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need to develop high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals for endocrine disrupting potential. The estrogen signaling pathway is a known xenobiotic target that has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects...

  19. Magnetic solid-phase extraction based on a triethylenetetramine-functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite for the detection of ten trace phenolic environmental estrogens in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Hong; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Ye, Mei-Jun; Li, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-02-01

    A novel triethylenetetramine-functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite was prepared and used as a magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the fast detection of ten trace-level phenolic environmental estrogens in environmental water. The synthesized material was carefully characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the structure and components. The adsorption and desorption conditions of the adsorbent toward phenolic environmental estrogens were optimized in detailed to obtain the best extraction recovery and elution efficiency. Under the optimum conditions, the limits of detection of the method for ten phenolic environmental estrogens were in range of 0.15-1.5 ng/L, which was lower than the reported methods for phenolic environmental estrogens detection in literatures. This could be contributed to the unique structure and property of the as-prepared material. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of environmental water samples with recoveries ranging from 88.5 to 105.6%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The OECD program to validate the rat uterotrophic bioassay to screen compounds for in vivo estrogenic responses: phase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, J; Onyon, L; Haseman, J; Fenner-Crisp, P; Ashby, J; Owens, W

    2001-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has completed the first phase of an international validation program for the rodent uterotrophic bioassay. This uterotrophic bioassay is intended to identify the in vivo activity of compounds that are suspected agonists or antagonists of estrogen. This information could, for example, be used to help prioritize positive compounds for further testing. Using draft protocols, we tested and compared two model systems, the immature female rat and the adult ovariectomized rat. Data from 19 participating laboratories using a high-potency reference agonist, ethinyl estradiol (EE), and an antagonist, ZM 189,154, indicate no substantive performance differences between models. All laboratories and all protocols successfully detected increases in uterine weights using EE in phase 1. These significant uterine weight increases were achieved under a variety of experimental conditions (e.g., strain, diet, housing protocol, bedding, vehicle). For each protocol, there was generally good agreement among laboratories with regard to the actual EE doses both in producing the first significant increase in uterine weights and achieving the maximum uterine response. Furthermore, the Hill equation appears to model the dose response satisfactorily and indicates general agreement based on calculated effective dose (ED)(10) and ED(50) within and among laboratories. The feasibility of an antagonist assay was also successfully demonstrated. Therefore, both models appear robust, reproducible, and transferable across laboratories for high-potency estrogen agonists such as EE. For the next phase of the OECD validation program, both models will be tested against a battery of weak, partial estrogen agonists. PMID:11564613

  1. Environmental exposure to preformed nitroso compounds.

    PubMed

    Tricker, A R; Spiegelhalder, B; Preussmann, R

    1989-01-01

    In the human environment, nitrosatable amine precursors to N-nitroso compounds and nitrosating species such as nitrite and oxides of nitrogen are abundant. As a result, the formation of N-nitroso compounds and human exposure to these compounds show a rather complex pattern. The largest known human exposures to exogenous N-nitrosamines occur in the work place. This is particularly evident in the rubber and tyre manufacturing industry and in metal cutting and grinding shops. Nearly all industries which are concerned with the production and/or use of amines have a related nitrosamine problem. Outside the industrial environment, commodities such as cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, rubber and household products, which are either prepared from amines or contain high concentrations of amino compounds, may be subject to contamination by low concentrations of N-nitroso compounds. This contamination may result from the use of contaminated starting materials, in particular amines, or from the formation of N-nitroso compounds during manufacturing processes. A similar problem exists with agricultural chemicals. As our knowledge of the occurrence and formation of N-nitroso compounds in the environment increases, preventive measures can be introduced, particularly in manufacturing industries, to reduce the levels of human exposure to nitrosamines in the work place and to protect the consumer from nitrosamine exposure from household commodities.

  2. Development of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area and the influence of estrogen-like compounds.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Ferguson, Sherry Ann; Cui, Li; Greenfield, Lazar John; Paule, Merle Gale

    2013-10-15

    One of the well-defined sexually dimorphic structures in the brain is the sexually dimorphic nucleus, a cluster of cells located in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. The rodent sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area can be delineated histologically using conventional Nissl staining or immunohistochemically using calbindin D28K immunoreactivity. There is increasing use of the bindin D28K-delineated neural cluster to define the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in rodents. Several mechanisms are proposed to underlie the processes that contribute to the sexual dimorphism (size difference) of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Recent evidence indicates that stem cell activity, including proliferation and migration presumably from the 3(rd) ventricle stem cell niche, may play a critical role in the postnatal development of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area and its distinguishing sexually dimorphic feature: a signifi-cantly larger volume in males. Sex hormones and estrogen-like compounds can affect the size of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Despite considerable research, it remains un-clear whether estrogen-like compounds and/or sex hormones increase size of the sexually dimor-phic nucleus of the preoptic area via an increase in stem cell activity originating from the 3(rd) ventricle stem cell niche.

  3. A 155-plex high-throughput in vitro coregulator binding assay for (anti-)estrogenicity testing evaluated with 23 reference compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Houtman, René; Melchers, Diana; Aarts, Jac; Peijnenburg, Ad; van Beuningen, Rinie; Rietjens, Ivonne; Bovee, Toine F

    2013-01-01

    To further develop an integrated in vitro testing strategy for replacement of in vivo tests for (anti-)estrogenicity testing, the ligand-modulated interaction of coregulators with estrogen receptor α was assessed using a PamChip® plate. The relative estrogenic potencies determined, based on ERα binding to coregulator peptides in the presence of ligands on the PamChip® plate, were compared to the relative estrogenic potencies as determined in the in vivo uterotrophic assay. The results show that the estrogenic potencies predicted by the 57 coactivators on the peptide microarray for 18 compounds that display a clear E2 dose-dependent response (goodness of fit of a logistic dose-response model of 0.90 or higher) correlated very well with their in vivo potencies in the uterotrophic assay, i.e., coefficient of determination values for 30 coactivators higher than or equal to 0.85. Moreover, this coregulator binding assay is able to distinguish ER agonists from ER antagonists: profiles of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as tamoxifen, were distinct from those of pure ER agonists, such as dienestrol. Combination of this coregulator binding assay with other types of in vitro assays, e.g., reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay, will frame an in vitro test panel for screening and prioritization of chemicals, thereby contributing to the reduction and ultimately the replacement of animal testing for (anti-)estrogenic effects.

  4. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of estrogenic compounds in soil and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zulin; Rhind, Stewart M; Kerr, Christine; Osprey, Mark; Kyle, Carol E

    2011-01-24

    A selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) method, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), for the simultaneous extraction and clean-up of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), estriol (E3) and bisphenol A (BPA) from soil samples is described. The on-line clean-up of soil by SPLE was achieved using different organic matter retainers, including silica, alumina and Florisil, the most effective being silica. Thus, different amounts of silica, in conjunction with different extraction solvents (acetone, ethyl acetate, isohexane and dichloromethane), either alone or in combination, were used to extract the target chemicals from spiked soil samples. It was shown that 3g silica resulted in satisfactory rates of recovery of target compounds and acetone:dichloromethane (1:3, v/v) was efficient in extracting and eluting estrogenic compounds for SPLE. Variables affecting the SPLE efficiency, including temperature and pressure were studied; the optimum parameters were 60°C and 1500 psi, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) of the proposed method were 0.02-0.37 ng g(-1) for the different estrogenic chemicals studied. The outputs using the proposed method were linear over the range from 0.1 to 120 ng g(-1) for E1, E2, EE2, 0.2-120 ng g(-1) for E3, and 0.5-120 ng g(-1) for BPA. The optimized method was further verified by performing spiking experiments in natural soil matrices; good rates of recovery and reproducibility were achieved for all selected compounds and the method was successfully applied to soil samples from Northeast Scotland, for the determination of the target compounds.

  5. GC/MS identification of organosulphur compounds in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Headley, J V

    1987-06-01

    Twenty-one organosulphur compounds were detected in a survey of water, industrial effluent, sediment and fish samples, using automated gas chromatography/mass spectrometry developed for the identification of forty target semi-volatile and volatile organosulphur compounds. The compound classes detected in the environmental samples are three allotropes of sulphur, three thioethers, five sulphones, six thiophenes, one thiol, two sulphonamides and one thiazole. The compounds were detected in the approximate concentration range 0.1 to 2000 parts per billion (ppb). alpha,alpha-Dichlorodimethyl sulphone was detected in environmental samples subjected to biodegradation and chemical treatment.

  6. [Comparison of the estrogenic activity of organic compounds in source water and finished water from the Yangtze River and Taihu Lake in certain areas of Jiangsu Province].

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Lü, Xue-Min; Zeng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Bing-Bing; Ma, Kun-Peng; Jiang, Pu; Tang, Fei

    2013-04-01

    A total of 43 source water and finished water samples were collected from the Yangtze River and Taihu Lake in WX and SZ areas of Jiangsu Province from October 2010 to March 2012. The XAD-2 resin was applied to absorb the organic compounds in each water sample respectively. After the procedure of elution, concentration and drying, nonvolatile organic compounds (NVOCs) were obtained. The recombinant yeast estrogen screen test was then applied to evaluate the estrogenic activities of NVOCs in each water sample. The results showed that all of the source water collected from the Yangtze River and Taihu Lake possessed estrogenic activities. The EEQ values of source water from Taihu Lake were 0.04-2.07 ng x L(-1), and the volume of EC(25-E2) were 9.06-31.62 mL; the EEQ values of source water from Yangtze River were 0.69-1.15 ng x L(-1), and the volume of EC(25-E2) were 9.06-31.62 mL. The samples from Taihu Lake in SZ area had higher estrogenic activities than the samples collected from WX area. No estrogenic activity was detected in 58.3% of the finished water samples after the treatment in water plants. The water plants which collected source water from the Yangtze River and from Taihu Lake reduced the estrogenic activities by 80.3% -100% and 55.5% -100%, respectively.

  7. Emerging Estrogenic Pollutants in the Aquatic Environment and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Sylvain; Habauzit, Denis; Charlier, Thierry D; Pakdel, Farzad

    2017-09-15

    The number and amount of man-made chemicals present in the aquatic environment has increased considerably over the past 50 years. Among these contaminants, endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) represent a significant proportion. This family of compounds interferes with normal hormonal processes through multiple molecular pathways. They represent a potential risk for human and wildlife as they are suspected to be involved in the development of diseases including, but not limited to, reprotoxicity, metabolic disorders, and cancers. More precisely, several studies have suggested that the increase of breast cancers in industrialized countries is linked to exposure to EDCs, particularly estrogen-like compounds. Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are the two main transducers of estrogen action and therefore important targets for these estrogen-like endocrine disrupters. More than 70% of human breast cancers are ERα-positive and estrogen-dependent, and their development and growth are not only influenced by endogenous estrogens but also likely by environmental estrogen-like endocrine disrupters. It is, therefore, of major importance to characterize the potential estrogenic activity from contaminated surface water and identify the molecules responsible for the hormonal effects. This information will help us understand how environmental contaminants can potentially impact the development of breast cancer and allow us to fix a maximal limit to the concentration of estrogen-like compounds that should be found in the environment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of emerging estrogen-like compounds in the environment, sum up studies demonstrating their direct or indirect interactions with ERs, and link their presence to the development of breast cancer. Finally, we emphasize the use of in vitro and in vivo methods based on the zebrafish model to identify and characterize environmental estrogens.

  8. Environmental signals: synthetic humic substances act as xeno-estrogen and affect the thyroid system of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Ilka; Jie, Zhang; Opitz, Robert; Kloas, Werner; Ying, Xu; Menzel, Ralph; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2005-12-01

    According to outdated paradigms humic substances (HS) are considered to be refractory or inert that do not directly interact with aquatic organisms. However, they are taken up and induce biotransformation activities and may act as hormone-like substances. In the present study, we tested whether HS can interfere with endocrine regulation in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. In order to exclude contamination with phyto-hormones, which may occur in environmental isolates, the artificial HS1500 was applied. The in vivo results showed that HS1500 causes significant estrogenic effects on X. laevis during its larval development and results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed a marked increase of the estrogenic biomarker estrogen receptor mRNA (ER-mRNA). Furthermore, preliminary RT-PCR results showed that the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHbeta-mRNA) is enhanced after exposure to HS1500, indicating a weak adverse effect on T3/T4 availability. Hence, HS may have estrogenic and anti-thyroidal effects on aquatic animals, and therefore may influence the structure of aquatic communities and they may be considered environmental signaling chemicals.

  9. Environmental Exposure, Estrogen and Two X Chromosomes are Required for Disease Development in an Epigenetic Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Faith M.; Hewagama, Anura; Lu, Qianjian; Wu, Ailing; Hinderer, Robert; Webb, Ryan; Johnson, Kent; Sawalha, Amr H.; Delaney, Colin; Yung, Raymond; Richardson, Bruce C.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease primarily afflicting women. The reason for the gender bias is unclear, but genetic susceptibility, estrogen and environmental agents appear to play significant roles in SLE pathogenesis. Environmental agents can contribute to lupus susceptibility through epigenetic mechanisms. We used (C57BL/6 × SJL)F1 mice transgenic for a dominant-negative MEK (dnMEK) that was previously shown to be inducibly and selectively expressed in T cells. In this model, induction of the dnMEK by doxycycline treatment suppresses T cell ERK signaling, decreasing DNA methyltransferase expression and resulting in DNA demethylation, overexpression of immune genes Itgal (CD11a) and Tnfsf7 (CD70), and anti-dsDNA antibody. To examine the role of gender and estrogen in this model, male and female transgenic mice were neutered and implanted with time-release pellets delivering placebo or estrogen. Doxycycline induced IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies in intact and neutered, placebo-treated control female but not male transgenic mice. Glomerular IgG deposits were also found in the kidneys of female but not male transgenic mice, and not in the absence of doxycycline. Estrogen enhanced anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies only in transgenic, ERK-impaired female mice. Decreased ERK activation also resulted in overexpression and demethylation of the X-linked methylation-sensitive gene CD40lg in female but not male mice, consistent with demethylation of the second X chromosome in the females. The results show that both estrogen and female gender contribute to the female predisposition in lupus susceptibility through hormonal and epigenetic X chromosome effects and through suppression of ERK signaling by environmental agents. PMID:22142890

  10. Environmental exposure, estrogen and two X chromosomes are required for disease development in an epigenetic model of lupus.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Faith M; Hewagama, Anura; Lu, Qianjian; Wu, Ailing; Hinderer, Robert; Webb, Ryan; Johnson, Kent; Sawalha, Amr H; Delaney, Colin; Yung, Raymond; Richardson, Bruce C

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease primarily afflicting women. The reason for the gender bias is unclear, but genetic susceptibility, estrogen and environmental agents appear to play significant roles in SLE pathogenesis. Environmental agents can contribute to lupus susceptibility through epigenetic mechanisms. We used (C57BL/6xSJL)F1 mice transgenic for a dominant-negative MEK (dnMEK) that was previously shown to be inducibly and selectively expressed in T cells. In this model, induction of the dnMEK by doxycycline treatment suppresses T cell ERK signaling, decreasing DNA-methyltransferase expression and resulting in DNA demethylation, overexpression of immune genes Itgal (CD11a) and Tnfsf7 (CD70), and anti-dsDNA antibody. To examine the role of gender and estrogen in this model, male and female transgenic mice were neutered and implanted with time-release pellets delivering placebo or estrogen. Doxycycline induced IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies in intact and neutered, placebo-treated control female but not male transgenic mice. Glomerular IgG deposits were also found in the kidneys of female but not male transgenic mice, and not in the absence of doxycycline. Estrogen enhanced anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies only in transgenic, ERK-impaired female mice. Decreased ERK activation also resulted in overexpression and demethylation of the X-linked methylation-sensitive gene CD40lg in female but not male mice, consistent with demethylation of the second X chromosome in the females. The results show that both estrogen and female gender contribute to the female predisposition in lupus susceptibility through hormonal and epigenetic X-chromosome effects and through suppression of ERK signaling by environmental agents.

  11. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE PARAMETERS IN A MARINE FISH, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estradiol (E2), ethynylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E4) are steroidal estrogens that are released into the aquatic environment in sewage treatment effluent. To determine whether these estrogens could impact reproductive parameters in a model fish species, actively spawning male ...

  12. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE PARAMETERS IN A MARINE FISH, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estradiol (E2), ethynylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E4) are steroidal estrogens that are released into the aquatic environment in sewage treatment effluent. To determine whether these estrogens could impact reproductive parameters in a model fish species, actively spawning male ...

  13. Environmental Chemistry Compound Identification Using High ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a growing need for rapid chemical screening and prioritization to inform regulatory decision-making on thousands of chemicals in the environment. We have previously used high-resolution mass spectrometry to examine household vacuum dust samples using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF/MS). Using a combination of exact mass, isotope distribution, and isotope spacing, molecular features were matched with a list of chemical formulas from the EPA’s Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) database. This has further developed our understanding of how openly available chemical databases, together with the appropriate searches, could be used for the purpose of compound identification. We report here on the utility of the EPA’s iCSS Chemistry Dashboard for the purpose of compound identification using searches against a database of over 720,000 chemicals. We also examine the benefits of QSAR prediction for the purpose of retention time prediction to allow for alignment of both chromatographic and mass spectral properties. This abstract does not reflect U.S. EPA policy presentation at the Eastern Analytical Symposium.

  14. Endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure and the American alligator: a review of the potential role of environmental estrogens on the immune system of a top trophic carnivore.

    PubMed

    Finger, John W; Gogal, Robert M

    2013-11-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alter cellular and organ system homeostasis by interfering with the body's normal physiologic processes. Numerous studies have identified environmental estrogens as modulators of EDC-related processes in crocodilians, notably in sex determination. Other broader studies have shown that environmental estrogens dysregulate normal immune function in mammals, birds, turtles, lizards, fish, and invertebrates; however, the effects of such estrogenic exposures on alligator immune function have not been elucidated. Alligators occupy a top trophic status, which may give them untapped utility as indicators of environmental quality. Environmental estrogens are also prevalent in the waters they occupy. Understanding the effects of these EDCs on alligator immunity is critical for managing and assessing changes in their health and is thus the focus of this review.

  15. No evidence of exposure to environmental estrogens in two feral fish species sampled from the Yarra River, Australia: A comparison with Northern Hemisphere studies.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kathryn; Pettigrove, Vincent; Beresford, Nicola; Jobling, Susan; Kumar, Anu

    2016-09-01

    Environmental estrogens originate from a variety of sources including sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents and adverse physiological effects (endocrine disruption) have been observed in several fish species sampled downstream of STP discharges. In this study we examined common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and roach (Rutilis rutilis) for signs of exposure to environmental estrogens in the iconic Yarra River, Melbourne, Australia. The Yarra River flows through the city of Melbourne and more than 2 million people live within the catchment. Two STPs discharge water into the Yarra River within the middle reaches, and the areas immediately downstream of these discharge locations were the focus of this study. Carp and roach were chosen as test species since both have been utilised extensively for endocrine disruption research throughout Europe, North America and Asia, and data from various international studies was used for comparison with the results of the present study. Neither species showed evidence of exposure to environmental estrogens, with no elevation of plasma vitellogenin levels in males and no incidence of intersex gonads. Most physiological endpoints in both species from this study were within ranges reported in carp and roach from reference sites in other studies, however some degenerative histological changes in both male and female gonads were observed. Surface water samples showed no estrogenic activity (measured by the yeast-estrogen screen, YES), but did display strong anti-estrogenic and weak androgenic activity (measured by the yeast-androgen screen, YAS). Whilst the results show no evidence of impacts from environmental estrogens in the Yarra River, the presence of both anti-estrogenic and androgenic activity in water samples, as well as some gonadal changes in carp is concerning and indicates that our focus needs to broaden, in order to look for biological impacts in resident fauna that might be due to environmental pollutants other than environmental

  16. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS AND THE SUBSEQUENT EFFECTS ON THE PROSTRATE OF THE ADULT RAT: EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATION IN THE VENTRAL AND LATERAL LOBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perinatal exposure to estrogenic compounds and the subsequent effects on the prostate of the adult rat: evaluation of inflammation in the ventral and lateral lobes.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National ...

  17. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS AND THE SUBSEQUENT EFFECTS ON THE PROSTRATE OF THE ADULT RAT: EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATION IN THE VENTRAL AND LATERAL LOBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perinatal exposure to estrogenic compounds and the subsequent effects on the prostate of the adult rat: evaluation of inflammation in the ventral and lateral lobes.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National ...

  18. Estrogenic and dioxin-like compounds in sediment from Zierikzee harbour identified with CALUX assay-directed fractionation combined with one and two dimensional gas chromatography analyses.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Booij, Petra; Jover, Eric; Pascual del Rio, David; Swart, Kees; van Velzen, Martin; Vreuls, Rene; Legler, Juliette; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H

    2006-12-01

    The identity of compounds responsible for estrogenic and dioxin-like activities in sediment from the harbour of the small town Zierikzee in Zeeland, The Netherlands, was investigated using a bioassay directed fractionation approach with the in vitro estrogen and dioxin responsive reporter gene assays ER- and DR-CALUX. For identification of compounds exhibiting activity in the bioassays, either one or two-dimensional GC in combination with quadrupole (MSD), ion trap (ITD) or time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (ToF-MS) was used, depending on the biological and chemical characteristics and the complexity of the fractions. The natural estrogenic hormone 17-beta-estradiol and its metabolite estrone were identified with GC-ITD as the main contributors to the estrogenic activity. After successive rounds of fractionation, the dioxin-like activity could be explained by the presence of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons identified with GC-MSD and two-dimensional comprehensive GC x GC-ToF-MS. Some estrogenic activity of a relatively non-polar nature remained unidentified.

  19. [Environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors with estrogenic activity and the association with pubertal disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio; Flores, Lindiana Chagas; Cerqueira, Taís Souza; Toralles, Maria Betânia P

    2007-05-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous substances with adverse health effects in intact organisms or their progeny, secondary to changes in endocrine function. Recent years have witnessed constant reports of environmental factors with hormone-like effects causing pubertal or reproductive abnormalities in animals. The few cases proven to be associated with pubertal disorders in humans have been related to accidental exposure. Nevertheless, pediatricians and parents recommend suspending all possible estrogen-contaminated food, especially meat (poultry, beef) and soy products, when the child presents with a pubertal disorder. These recommendations, if not scientifically sound, may have deleterious consequences by eliminating sources of dietary protein and possibly delaying the investigation of other potential and treatable causes. On the other hand, not investigating potential side effects of these products could have similar harmful effects. The current article describes the main endocrine disruptors associated with pubertal disorders in humans and concludes that except for accidental exposure to high doses, more research is needed on the effects of chronic and low-dose exposures in altering human pubertal development.

  20. Small proline-rich protein 2 family is a cluster of genes induced by estrogenic compounds through nuclear estrogen receptors in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok-Ho; Lee, Jae Eun; Jeong, Jin Ju; Hwang, Soo Jin; Bae, Se Na; Choi, Ji Young; Song, Haengseok

    2010-11-01

    We have investigated the potential actions of E(2) and endocrine disruptors (EDs) with estrogenic activity, such as bisphenol A, on the regulation of the Sprr2 family of genes in the mouse uterus using real-time RT-PCR, RT-PCR and Western blotting. Most members of Sprr2 genes that are induced by E(2), such as Sprr2a, 2b and 2e, showed E(2) dose-dependent increase at mRNA levels. Sprr2 expression was considerably reduced by pretreatment with ICI 182,780, an antagonist for nuclear estrogen receptors. Progesterone moderately dampened E(2)-induced Sprr2 expression. Furthermore, EDs comparably induced the expression of Sprr2 genes in a dose-dependent manner and EDs-induced Sprr2 expression was similarly modulated by ICI 182,780 and progesterone, strongly suggesting that they are, indeed, an estrogen-responsive gene family. Collectively, dose-dependent induction of Sprr2 genes by estrogen and EDs is primarily mediated via the genomic actions of estrogen signaling in the uterus, but not in other reproductive tracts, in mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol, an estrogenic-like compound, on catecholamine secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Haoping; Wang, Hong; Ma, Shangwei; Xu, Yantong; Zhang, Han; Wang, Yuefei; Niu, Zichang; Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu Mei

    2014-01-01

    Excess or deficiency of catecholamine (CA) secretion was related with several diseases. Recently, estrogen and phytoestrogens were reported to regulate the activity of CA system. Bakuchiol is a phytoestrogen isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Leguminosae) which has been used in Traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic or aphrodisiac. In the present study, bovine adrenal medullary cells were employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of bakuchiol on the regulation of CA secretion. Further, its anti-depressant like and anti-stress effects were evaluated by using behavioral despair and chronic immobilization stress models. Our results indicated that bakuchiol showed bidirectional regulation on CA secretion. It stimulated basal CA secretion in a concentration dependent manner (p < 0.01), while it reduced 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) (p < 0.01), 100 μM veratridine (Ver) (p < 0.01) and 56 mM K{sup +} (p < 0.05) induced CA secretion, respectively. We also found that the stimulation of basal CA secretion by bakuchiol may act through estrogen-like effect and the JNK pathway in an extra-cellular calcium independent manner. Further, bakuchiol elevated tyrosine hydroxylase Ser40 and Ser31 phosphorylation (p < 0.01) through the PKA and ERK1/2 pathways, respectively. Bakuchiol inhibited ACh, Ver and 56 mM K{sup +} induced CA secretion was related with reduction of intracellular calcium rise. In vivo experiments, we found that bakuchiol significantly reduced immobilization time in behavioral despair mouse (p < 0.05 or 0.01), and plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in chronic immobilization stress (p < 0.05). Overall, these results present a bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol on CA secretion which indicated that bakuchiol may exert anti-stress and the potential anti-depressant-like effects. - Highlights: • Bakuchiol stimulated basal catecholamine secretion. • Bakuchiol inhibited various secretagogues induced catecholamine secretion

  2. Effects of Environmental Estrogens on Apoptosis in Normal and Cancerous Breast Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Endocrinology 139, 4252^263, 1998. 28. Zava, DT, and Duwe, G: Estrogenic and antiproliferative properties of genistein and other flavonoids in human...herbivores, act as antibacterial/ antifungal agents, and stimulate the formation of symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing bacteria (1-3). The...large ex- tent, be attributed to DES. Diethylstilbestrol is a chemical with potent estrogenic properties synthesized by Dodds and colleagues in 1938

  3. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for isolation and enrichment of estrogenic compounds from surface water samples followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens may enter into the surface waters from different sources, such as effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants, industrial plants, and animal farms and runoff from agricultural areas. In this work, a multiresidue analytical method for the determination of 17 natural estrogenic compounds, including four steroid estrogens, six mycoestrogens, and seven phytoestrogens, in river water samples has been developed. (Fe3O4)-based magnetic nanoparticles coated by polydopamine (Fe3O4@pDA) were used for dispersive solid-phase extraction, and the final extract was analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation procedure, coated by pDA, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The sample preparation method was optimized in terms of extraction recovery, matrix effect, selectivity, trueness, precision, method limits of detection, and method limits of quantification (MLOQs). For all the 17 analytes, recoveries were >70 % and matrix effects were below 30 % when 25 mL of river water sample was treated with 90 mg of Fe3O4@pDA nanoparticles. Selectivity was tested by spiking river water samples with 50 other compounds (mycotoxins, antibacterials, conjugated hormones, UV filters, alkylphenols, etc.), and only aflatoxins and some benzophenones showed recoveries >60 %. This method proved to be simple and robust and allowed the determination of natural estrogenic compounds belonging to different classes in surface waters with MLOQs ranging between 0.003 and 0.1 μg L(-1). Graphical Abstract Determination of natural estrogenic compounds in water by magnetic solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

  4. Regulation of progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in the rat medial preoptic nucleus by estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Shughrue, P J; Lane, M V; Merchenthaler, I

    1997-12-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) messenger RNA (mRNA) is concentrated in neurons of the preoptic area and other regions of the rat hypothalamus where it is colocalized with the estrogen receptor and regulated by changes in the steroid hormonal milieu. To date, little is known about the regulation of PR mRNA by estrogens and whether antiestrogenic compounds are capable of modulating its expression. The present studies used in situ hybridization to ascertain the time course of PR mRNA regulation in the medial preoptic nucleus by 17beta-estradiol, determine the effective dose required to elicit a response, and compare the efficacy of 17beta-estradiol with a variety of estrogenic or antiestrogenic compounds. The first series of studies revealed that the treatment of ovariectomized rats with 17beta-estradiol resulted in an increase in PR expression within 2 h, after which it remained elevated until 10 h postinjection and then returned to baseline levels. When ovariectomized rats were injected with 25-1000 ng/kg of 17beta-estradiol and euthanized 6 h later, a dose-dependent increase in the level of PR mRNA was observed, with a maximal response at 1000 ng/kg and an EC50 of 93.5 ng/kg. Subsequent studies evaluated the efficacy of a variety of estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the rat preoptic nucleus. 17Beta-estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, and 17alpha-estradiol all significantly increased the level of PR mRNA, although the degree of induction varied with each compound. The injection of tamoxifen, raloxifene, toremifene, droloxifene, clomiphene, GW 5638, or ICI 182,780 had no significant estrogenic effect on PR gene expression at the dose evaluated. In contrast, when tamoxifen or raloxifene, but not ICI 182,780, was administered in the antagonist mode, a significant dose-related decrease in the estradiol-induced level of PR mRNA was seen in the preoptic area. The results of these studies clearly demonstrate that PR mRNA expression in the rat preoptic area is rapidly

  5. Interference of xenoestrogen o,p'-DDT on the action of endogenous estrogens at environmentally realistic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lingying; Xiang, Xiao; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Pei; Wang, Lumei

    2013-05-01

    Estrogenic effects of individual chemicals and mixtures of 17β-estradiol (E2) and o,p'-DDT were examined using pS2 and PR gene expressions in MCF-7 cells. Interactions between E2 and o,p'-DDT were evaluated by a statistical method based on factorial design. At levels close to environmentally realistic concentrations, no significant interactions between E2 and o,p'-DDT were observed, suggesting that the xenoestrogen (o,p'-DDT) could act in an additive way with the endogenous estrogen (E2). These results demonstrated the utility of this statistical method in a mixture study, and highlight the potential interference and health risk of low-level xenoestrogens, such as o,p'-DDT.

  6. Construction of a Bacterial Assay for Estrogen Detection Based on an Estrogen-Sensitive Intein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rubing; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain DIER was constructed for estrogen detection by inserting an estrogen-sensitive intein (VMAER intein) into the specific site of the constitutively expressed chromosomal lacZ gene. This VMAER intein was generated by replacing the endonuclease region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VMA intein with the estrogen binding region of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα). When there were estrogens or analogs, the splicing of the VMAER intein was induced to produce the mature LacZ protein, which was detected through a β-galactosidase colorimetric assay. Eight typical chemicals (17-β-estradiol, bisphenol A, chrysene, 6-OH-chrysene, benz[a]anthracene, pyrene, progesterone, and testosterone) were detected using this DIER strain, and the whole detection procedure was accomplished in 2 h. Their 50% effective concentrations (EC50), relative estrogenic activities, and estradiol equivalency factors were calculated and were quite consistent with those detected with the yeast estrogen screening (YES) system. Furthermore, the estrogenic activities of the synthetic musk samples extracted from the wastewater and waste sludge of a sewage treatment plant of Shanghai (China) were detected, and their results were comparable to those obtained from the YES system and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In conclusion, the DIER bioassay could fill a niche for the efficient, rapid, high-throughput screening of estrogenic compounds and has potential for the remote, near-real-time monitoring of environmental estrogens. PMID:21317264

  7. Adventures in the Environmental World and Environmental Microbiology Sampling of Air for Pharmaceutical Sterile Compounding.

    PubMed

    Ligugnana, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Chapter <797> issued by the United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Inc. is the standard for sterile compounding. It is designed to reduce the number of patient infections due to contaminated pharmaceutical preparation. This regulation applies to all staff who prepare compounded sterile preparations and all places where they are produced, including hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and physician's offices. This article provides the history of environmental microbiology and provides a discussion on environmental microbiology sampling of air for pharmaceutical sterile compounding. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  8. Highly Selective Screening of Estrogenic Compounds in Consumer-Electronics Plastics by Liquid Chromatography in Parallel Combined with Nanofractionation-Bioactivity Detection and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Willem; Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Hamers, Timo; Somsen, Govert W; Lamoree, Marja H; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-11-15

    The chemical safety of consumer products is an issue of emerging concern. Plastics are widely used, e.g. as casings of consumer electronics (TVs, computers, routers, etc.), which are present in houses and offices in continuously increasing numbers. In this study, we investigate the estrogenic activity of components of plastics coming from electronics' casings. A recently developed fractionation platform for effect-directed analysis (EDA) was used. This platform combines reversed-phase liquid chromatography in parallel with bioassay detection via nanofractionation and with online high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the identification of bioactives. Four out of eight of the analyzed plastics samples showed the presence of estrogenic compounds. Based on the MS results these were assigned to bisphenol A (BPA), 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, and a possible bisphenol A analog. All samples contained flame retardants, but these did not show any estrogenicity. The observed BPA, however, could be an impurity of tetrabromo-BPA (TBBPA) or TBBPA-based flame retardants. Due to the plausible migration of additives from plastics into the environment, plastics from consumer electronics likely constitute a source of estrogenic compound contamination in the indoor environment.

  9. Regulation of Growth and Metastases in an Estrogen Independent Breast Cancer Cell by Vitamin D Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    micrometastases in the nude mouse, we used the EGFP fluorescent marker gene, cloned from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea Victoria (previously...Utilizing our SUM-159PT GFP model system in vivo we can more efficiently examine the effects of vitamin D compounds to modulate invasion and metastasis...cells in nude mice. We previously reported that use of SUM-159PT cells expressing GFP enabled visualization of cancer cells in the mammary fat pad as

  10. Identification of alkylphenols and other estrogenic compounds in wastewater, septage, and groundwater on Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudel, Ruthann A.; Melly, Steven J.; Geno, Paul W.; Sun, Gang; Brody , Julia G.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a larger effort to characterize the impacts to Cape Cod drinking water supplies from on-site wastewater disposal, we developed two analytical methods using HPLC and GC/MS for a range of compounds identified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including the nonionic surfactants alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) and their degradation products. We analyzed samples for nonylphenol, octylphenol, and their ethoxylates up to the hexaethoxylate using an HPLC method, with detection limits ranging from 2 to 6 μg/L. A set of phenolic compounds including bisphenol A and nonylphenol were derivatized and analyzed by GC/MS with detection limits from 0.001 to 0.02 μg/L. Total APEOs in untreated wastewater and septage samples ranged from 1350 to 11 000 μg/L by the HPLC method. Nonylphenol was detected in all septage samples at concentrations above 1000 μg/L. Phenylphenol and bisphenol A were detected in septage and wastewater at about 1 μg/L. In groundwater downgradient of an infiltration bed for secondary treated effluent, nonyl/octylphenol and ethoxylates were present at about 30 μg/L. Bisphenol A, nonylphenol monoethoxycarboxylate, and nonyl/octylphenol tetraethoxylate were detected in some drinking water wells at concentrations ranging from below the quantitation limit to 32.9 μg/L. Results suggest that septic systems may be a significant source of APEOs to groundwater.

  11. Environmental occurrence, analysis, and toxicology of toxaphene compounds.

    PubMed Central

    de Geus, H J; Besselink, H; Brouwer, A; Klungsøyr, J; McHugh, B; Nixon, E; Rimkus, G G; Wester, P G; de Boer, J

    1999-01-01

    Toxaphene production, in quantities similar to those of polychlorinated biphenyls, has resulted in high toxaphene levels in fish from the Great Lakes and in Arctic marine mammals (up to 10 and 16 microg g-1 lipid). Because of the large variabiliity in total toxaphene data, few reliable conclusions can be drawn about trends or geographic differences in toxaphene concentrations. New developments in mass spectrometric detection using either negative chemical ionization or electron impact modes as well as in multidimensional gas chromatography recently have led researchers to suggest congener-specific approaches. Recently, several nomenclature systems have been developed for toxaphene compounds. Although all systems have specific advantages and limitations, it is suggested that an international body such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry make an attempt to obtain uniformity in the literature. Toxicologic information on individual chlorobornanes is scarce, but some reports have recently appeared. Neurotoxic effects of toxaphene exposure such as those on behavior and learning have been reported. Technical toxaphene and some individual congeners were found to be weakly estrogenic in in vitro test systems; no evidence for endocrine effects in vivo has been reported. In vitro studies show technical toxaphene and toxaphene congeners to be mutagenic. However, in vivo studies have not shown genotoxicity; therefore, a nongenotoxic mechanism is proposed. Nevertheless, toxaphene is believed to present a potential carcinogenic risk to humans. Until now, only Germany has established a legal tolerance level for toxaphene--0.1 mg kg-1 wet weight for fish. PMID:10229713

  12. Environmental occurrence, analysis, and toxicology of toxaphene compounds.

    PubMed

    de Geus, H J; Besselink, H; Brouwer, A; Klungsøyr, J; McHugh, B; Nixon, E; Rimkus, G G; Wester, P G; de Boer, J

    1999-02-01

    Toxaphene production, in quantities similar to those of polychlorinated biphenyls, has resulted in high toxaphene levels in fish from the Great Lakes and in Arctic marine mammals (up to 10 and 16 microg g-1 lipid). Because of the large variabiliity in total toxaphene data, few reliable conclusions can be drawn about trends or geographic differences in toxaphene concentrations. New developments in mass spectrometric detection using either negative chemical ionization or electron impact modes as well as in multidimensional gas chromatography recently have led researchers to suggest congener-specific approaches. Recently, several nomenclature systems have been developed for toxaphene compounds. Although all systems have specific advantages and limitations, it is suggested that an international body such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry make an attempt to obtain uniformity in the literature. Toxicologic information on individual chlorobornanes is scarce, but some reports have recently appeared. Neurotoxic effects of toxaphene exposure such as those on behavior and learning have been reported. Technical toxaphene and some individual congeners were found to be weakly estrogenic in in vitro test systems; no evidence for endocrine effects in vivo has been reported. In vitro studies show technical toxaphene and toxaphene congeners to be mutagenic. However, in vivo studies have not shown genotoxicity; therefore, a nongenotoxic mechanism is proposed. Nevertheless, toxaphene is believed to present a potential carcinogenic risk to humans. Until now, only Germany has established a legal tolerance level for toxaphene--0.1 mg kg-1 wet weight for fish.

  13. THE USE OF DNA MACROARRAYS TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON WILDLIFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the mid-1990s, several investigations in the United States and United Kingdom showed that wild fish of several species collected downstream of sewage treatment plants or industrial discharges presented expression of estrogen-responsive genes, or phenotypic sex reversal. Su...

  14. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  15. Removal of Estrogens and Estrogenicity through Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drining waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conven...

  16. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  17. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  18. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-05

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment.

  19. Occupational asphyxiation by unknown compound(s): environmental and toxicological approach.

    PubMed

    Poli, D; Solarino, B; Di Vella, G; Tattoli, L; Strisciullo, G; Goldoni, M; Mutti, A; Gagliano-Candela, R

    2010-04-15

    During a routine truck-tank washing operation, five healthy workers were found motionless inside an empty tanker. Four of them died inside the tanker while the fifth died the following day in hospital. Since the true nature of the fatal compound(s) were not known, a rigorous environmental and toxicological approach supported by autopsy findings was essential to clarify the cause of death. Environmental results indicated that H(2)S fumes arising from the liquid sulfur previously shipped were responsible for the serial deaths, also confirmed by a simulation performed on two similar truck-tanks. These environmental findings were supported by toxicological analyses through the measurement of thiosulfate, one of the main H(2)S metabolites. Abnormal thiosulfate concentrations from 1.1 to 186.2 mg/kg were revealed in all post-mortem biological samples (blood, lung, liver, kidney, brain and fat). Finally, the cluster analysis performed on thiosulfate body distribution contributed to establishing the time of death according to the accident scene reconstruction. This report presents valuable findings in correctly identifying the cause of death in gas asphyxiation cases by unknown compound(s).

  20. Intestinal Bacterial Communities That Produce Active Estrogen-Like Compounds Enterodiol and Enterolactone in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Thomas; Henderson, Gemma; Alpert, Carl-Alfred; Philippe, Catherine; Rigottier-Gois, Lionel; Doré, Joël; Blaut, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Lignans are dietary diphenolic compounds which require activation by intestinal bacteria to exert possible beneficial health effects. The intestinal ecosystem plays a crucial role in lignan metabolism, but the organisms involved are poorly described. To characterize the bacterial communities responsible for secoisolariciresinol (SECO) activation, i.e., the communities that produce the enterolignans enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone (EL), a study with 24 human subjects was undertaken. SECO activation was detected in all tested fecal samples. The intestinal bacteria involved in ED production were part of the dominant microbiota (6 × 108 CFU g−1), as revealed by most-probable-number enumerations. Conversely, organisms that catalyzed the formation of EL occurred at a mean concentration of approximately 3 × 105 CFU g−1. Women tended to have higher concentrations of both ED- and EL-producing organisms than men. Significantly larger amounts of EL were produced by fecal dilutions from individuals with moderate to high concentrations of EL-producing bacteria. Two organisms able to demethylate and dehydroxylate SECO were isolated from human feces. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, they were named Peptostreptococcus productus SECO-Mt75m3 and Eggerthella lenta SECO-Mt75m2. A new 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe specific for P. productus and related species was designed and further used in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments, along with five additional group-specific probes. Significantly higher proportions of P. productus and related species (P = 0.012), as well as bacteria belonging to the Atopobium group (P = 0.035), were typical of individuals with moderate to high concentrations of EL-producing communities. PMID:16204524

  1. Transient exposure to environmental estrogen affects embryonic development of brown trout (Salmo trutta fario).

    PubMed

    Schubert, Sara; Peter, Armin; Schönenberger, René; Suter, Marc J-F; Segner, Helmut; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Transient exposure of brown trout embryos from fertilization until hatch (70 days) to 17β-estradiol (E2) was investigated. Embryos were exposed to 3.8 and 38.0 ng/L E2 for 2h, respectively, under four scenarios: (A) exposure once at the day of fertilization (0 days post-fertilization, dpf), (B) once at eyeing stage (38 dpf), (C) weekly exposure until hatch or (D) bi-weekly exposure until hatch. Endpoints to assess estrogen impact on embryo development were fertilization success, chronological sequence of developmental events, hatching process, larval malformations, heart rate, body length and mortality. Concentration-dependent acceleration of development until median hatch was observed in all exposure scenarios with the strongest effect observed for embryos exposed once at 0 dpf. In addition, the hatching period was significantly prolonged by 4-5 days in groups receiving single estrogen exposures (scenarios A and B). Heart rate on hatching day was significantly depressed with increasing E2 concentrations, with the strongest effect observed for embryos exposed at eyeing stage. Estrogenic exposure at 0 dpf significantly reduced body length at hatch, not depending on whether this was a single exposure or the first of a series (scenarios A and D). The key finding is that even a single, transient E2 exposure during embryogenesis had significant effects on brown trout development. Median hatch, hatching period, heart rate and body length at hatch were found to be highly sensitive biomarkers responsive to estrogenic exposure during embryogenesis. Treatment effects were observable only at the post-hatch stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of estrogenic compounds in milk and yogurt samples by hollow-fibre liquid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Herrera-Herrera, Antonio Vicente; Fanali, Salvatore; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2016-10-01

    An environmentally friendly method based on hollow-fibre liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) was developed for the extraction of selected estrogenic compounds (i.e. four natural sexual hormones: estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol and estriol; two exoestrogens: 17α-ethynylestradiol and 2-methoxyestradiol; two synthetic stilbenes: dienestrol and hexestrol; and five resorcylic acid lactones: zearalenone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol), from whole cow and semi-skimmed goat milk and whole natural yogurt. After the optimization of the sample preparation procedure, spiked extracts were derivatized to their trimethylsilyl products using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide reagent and then analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Once optimum extraction conditions were established (protein precipitation with acetonitrile, extraction and the back-extraction in acetonitrile following the HF-LPME procedure), the method was validated and the calibration range, precision and accuracy were studied. The RSD values for the intra- and inter-day precision of the peak areas were in the range 0.65-9.69 and 1.00-11.47 %, respectively. The determination coefficients were higher than 0.991 for method calibration curves while LOD and LOQ values were between 0.06-2.55 and 0.16-6.11 μg/L for whole cow milk, 0.04-1.70 and 0.11-4.86 μg/L for semi-skimmed goat milk and 0.07-3.73 and 0.23-9.81 μg/L for natural yogurt, respectively. Finally, the accuracy and precision of the method were evaluated, obtaining a value in the range 84 81-119 % and RSD values lower than 20 % in all cases.

  3. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose.

    PubMed

    Penza, M; Jeremic, M; Marrazzo, E; Maggi, A; Ciana, P; Rando, G; Grigolato, P G; Di Lorenzo, D

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5μg/kg). At higher doses (50-500μg/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ERα or ERβ, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ERα in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ERβ in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed.

  4. Do estrogenic compounds in drinking water migrating from plastic pipe distribution system pose adverse effects to human? An analysis of scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Yin, Hua; Dang, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    With the widespread application of plastic pipes in drinking water distribution system, the effects of various leachable organic chemicals have been investigated and their occurrence in drinking water supplies is monitored. Most studies focus on the odor problems these substances may cause. This study investigates the potential endocrine disrupting effects of the migrating compound 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol (2,4-d-t-BP). The summarized results show that the migration of 2,4-d-t-BP from plastic pipes could result in chronic exposure and the migration levels varied greatly among different plastic pipe materials and manufacturing brands. Based on estrogen equivalent (EEQ), the migrating levels of the leachable compound 2,4-d-t-BP in most plastic pipes were relative low. However, the EEQ levels in drinking water migrating from four out of 15 pipes may pose significant adverse effects. With the increasingly strict requirements on regulation of drinking water quality, these results indicate that some drinking water transported with plastic pipes may not be safe for human consumption due to the occurrence of 2,4-d-t-BP. Moreover, 2,4-d-t-BP is not the only plastic pipe-migrating estrogenic compound, other compounds such as 2-tert-butylphenol (2-t-BP), 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), and others may also be leachable from plastic pipes.

  5. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  6. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  7. Estimation of environmental properties for inorganic compounds using LSER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has devised values for inorganic species for use in the environmental property- predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER). Property estimation has been difficult for inorganic species. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing LSER equations. The best estimations arise from the most accurate description of predominant solution species, many within an order of magnitude. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  8. Removal of estrogens and estrogenicity through drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura; Wiese, Thomas E; Wymer, Larry; Dugan, Nicholas; Williams, Daniel; Mash, Heath; Merriman, Betty; Speth, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over their possible presence in finished drinking waters. In this work, two in vitro human cell line bioassays for estrogenicity were used to evaluate the removal of estrogens through conventional drinking water treatment using a natural water. Bench-scale studies utilizing chlorine, alum coagulation, ferric chloride coagulation, and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were conducted using Ohio River water spiked with three estrogens, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, and estriol. Treatment of the estrogens with chlorine, either alone or with coagulant, resulted in approximately 98% reductions in the concentrations of the parent estrogens, accompanied by formation of by-products. The MVLN reporter gene and MCF-7 cell proliferation assays were used to characterize the estrogenic activity of the water before and after treatment. The observed estrogenic activities of the chlorinated samples showed that estrogenicity of the water was reduced commensurate with removal of the parent estrogen. Therefore, the estrogen chlorination by-products did not contribute appreciably to the estrogenic activity of the water. Coagulation alone did not result in significant removals of the estrogens. However, addition of PAC, at a typical drinking water plant dose, resulted in removals ranging from approximately 20 to 80%.

  9. Toxicity identification fractionation of environmental estrogens in waste water and sludge using gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and recombinant yeast assay.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Marc P; Noguerol, Tania-Noelia; Lacorte, Silvia; Buchanan, Ian; Piña, Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    We developed a toxicity identification fractionation (TIF) procedure to determine estrogenic compounds in wastewaters and sludge. The procedure consisted in fractionation of samples through a C(18) solid-phase extraction cartridge, in which Fraction I contained nonylphenol (NP) and its mono (NPEO(1)) and diethoxylate (NPEO(2)) and the markers of faecal exposure, Fraction II contained bisphenol A (BPA) and synthetic and natural hormones, and Fraction III contained the hormone conjugates. These three fractions were analyzed in parallel using gas or liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and recombinant yeast assay (RYA). Water samples collected daily throughout a whole week contained from 0.45 to 7.22 microg L(-1) of NP > NPEO(1) > NPEO(2) and were responsible for the estrogenicity of these samples. Fractions II and III were not estrogenic and that was due to the low ng L(-1) level of hormones and hormone conjugates found, respectively. The biological treatment sewage treatment plant (STP) was capable to eliminate from 52 to 100% of the compounds, with bisphenol A being the least removed. Only alkylphenols were accumulated in sludge with concentrations from 8.69 to 26.3 mg kg(-1) dw of NPEO(1) > NPEO(2) > NP. The integrated procedure herein proposed can be used as a screening method to evaluate estrogenic compounds in STPs and to survey faecal elimination.

  10. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds for Ground Support Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery Eliza L.; Calle, Luz, Marina; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  11. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds for Ground Support Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery Eliza L.; Calle, Luz, Marina; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The need to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. CPCs are used as temporary protective coatings and must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different oily film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing. The results for the fifteen CPC systems are presented in this paper.

  12. Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting compounds and men's health.

    PubMed

    Meeker, John D

    2010-07-01

    Human exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have received increased attention in recent years due to the documentation of widespread exposure to a number of EDCs among the general population, experimental data demonstrating endocrine-related effects on reproduction, development, metabolism, and cancer, and observations for increasing trends (as well as geographic trends) in endocrine-related disorders among populations. However, human studies of exposure to most environmental EDCs in relation to adverse health outcomes remain limited. This review focuses on the human data generated to date on the relationship between exposures to environmental EDCs and men's health. The agents discussed here, which include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were chosen based on their exposure prevalence and the presence of existing human data in studies of male reproductive health, altered reproductive and thyroid hormone levels, diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome, and endocrine-related cancers. Taken together, the epidemiologic data on the environmental EDCs suggest that there may be associations between exposure and adverse health outcomes in men. However, the limited human data, and in many instances inconsistent data across studies, highlight the need for further research on these chemicals. Future longitudinal molecular epidemiology studies with appropriately designed exposure assessments are needed to determine potential causal relationships, to identify the most important time windows/life stages of exposure, and to define individual susceptibility factors for adverse effects on men's health in response to exposure.

  13. Relationship between sex steroid and vitellogenin concentrations in flounder (Platichthys flesus) sampled from an estuary contaminated with estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander P; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kirby, Mark F; Thain, John

    2006-04-01

    High concentrations of vitellogenin (VTG; egg yolk protein) have previously been found in male flounder (Platichthys flesus) from several UK estuaries; these levels have been ascribed to the presence of estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs). Gonadal abnormalities, including intersex, have also been recorded in these estuaries. However, there is no firm evidence to date that these two findings are causally linked or that the presence of estrogenic EDCs has any adverse population effects. In the present study, we examined the relationship between concentrations of VTG and sex steroids (11-oxo-testosterone in males and 17beta-estradiol in females) in specimens of flounder captured from the estuary of the River Mersey. We first questioned whether the high concentrations of VTG in male and immature female flounder were indeed caused by a direct effect of exogenous EDCs and not indirectly via the endogenous secretion of 17beta-estradiol. The data favored the direct involvement of estrogenic EDCs. We then questioned whether the presence of estrogenic EDCs not only stimulated inappropriate VTG synthesis but whether it might also have had a negative effect on endogenous steroid secretion. It should be noted that the predicted consequences of a drop in steroid secretion include smaller gonads, smaller oocytes, fewer numbers of sperm, and depressed spawning behavior. This question was more difficult to answer because of the strong effect of the seasonal reproductive cycle and stage of maturation on steroid concentrations. However, matched by month of capture and stage of maturation, both 17beta-estradiol in females and 11-keto-testosterone in males were in most cases significantly lower in those years when VTG concentrations were higher.

  14. The coordinated p53 and estrogen receptor cis-regulation at an FLT1 promoter SNP is specific to genotoxic stress and estrogenic compound.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Andreotti, Virginia; Menendez, Daniel; Langen, Jan-Stephan; Schoenfelder, Gilbert; Resnick, Michael A; Inga, Alberto

    2010-04-21

    Recently, we established that a C>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter of the VEGF receptor FLT1 gene generates a (1/2) site p53 response element (RE-T) that results in p53 responsiveness of the promoter. The transcriptional control required an estrogen receptor (ER) (1/2) site response element (ERE1) 225 nt upstream to the RE-T. Here we report the identification of a second ER (1/2) site (ERE2) located 145 bp downstream of the RE-T and establish that both EREs can impact p53-mediated transactivation of FLT1-T in a manner that is cell type and ER level dependent. Gene reporter assays and ChIP experiments conducted in the breast cancer-derived MCF7 cells revealed that the ERE2 site was sufficient for p53-mediated ERalpha recruitment and transactivation of the FLT1-T promoter/reporter construct. Surprisingly, unlike the case for other p53 target promoters, p53-mediated transactivation of FLT1-T constructs or expression of the endogenous FLT1 gene, as well as binding of p53 and ER at the promoter constructs, was inducible by doxorubicin but not by 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, ER activity at FLT1-T was differentially affected by ER ligands, compared to a control TFF1/pS2 ER target promoter. The p53-related transcription factors (TFs) p73 and p63 had no effect on FLT1 transactivation. We establish a new dimension to the p53 master regulatory network where p53-mediated transcription from a (1/2) site RE can be determined by ER binding at one or more cis-acting EREs in manner that is dependent on level of ER protein, the type of ER ligand and the specific p53-inducing agent.

  15. The use of a whole animal biophotonic model as a screen for the angiogenic potential of estrogenic compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for normal vascular growth and development during wound repair. VEGF is estrogen responsive and capable of regulating its own receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Several agricultural pesticides (e.g., methoxychlor)...

  16. Comparison of the in vitro estrogenic activities of compounds from hops (Humulus lupulus) and red clover (Trifolium pratense).

    PubMed

    Overk, Cassia R; Yao, Ping; Chadwick, Lucas R; Nikolic, Dejan; Sun, Yongkai; Cuendet, Muriel A; Deng, Yunfan; Hedayat, A S; Pauli, Guido F; Farnsworth, Norman R; van Breemen, Richard B; Bolton, Judy L

    2005-08-10

    Because the prevailing form of hormone replacement therapy is associated with the development of cancer in breast and endometrial tissues, alternatives are needed for the management of menopausal symptoms. Formulations of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) are being used to alleviate menopause-associated hot flashes but have shown mixed results in clinical trials. The strobiles of Humulus lupulusL. (hops) have been reported to contain the prenylflavanone, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), as the most estrogenic constituent, and this was confirmed using an estrogen receptor ligand screening assay utilizing ultrafiltration mass spectrometry. Extracts of hops and red clover and their individual constituents including 8-PN, 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XN) from hops and daidzein, formononetin, biochanin A, and genistein from red clover were compared using a variety of in vitro estrogenic assays. The IC50 values for the estrogen receptor alpha and beta binding assays were 15 and 27 microg/mL, respectively, for hops and 18.0 and 2.0 microg/mL, respectively, for the red clover extract. Both of the extracts, genistein, and 8-PN activated the estrogen response element (ERE) in Ishikawa cells while the extracts, biochanin A, genistein, and 8-PN, significantly induced ERE-luciferase expression in MCF-7 cells. Hop and red clover extracts as well as 8-PN up-regulated progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA in the Ishikawa cell line. In the MCF-7 cell line, PR mRNA was significantly up-regulated by the extracts, biochanin A, genistein, 8-PN, and IX. The two extracts had EC50 values of 1.1 and 1.9 microg/mL, respectively, in the alkaline phosphatase induction assay. On the basis of these data, hops and red clover could be attractive for the development as herbal dietary supplements to alleviate menopause-associated symptoms.

  17. Comparison of the In Vitro Estrogenic Activities of Compounds from Hops (Humulus lupulus) and Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)

    PubMed Central

    Overk, Cassia R.; Yao, Ping; Chadwick, Lucas R.; Nikolic, Dejan; Sun, Yongkai; Cuendet, Muriel A.; Deng, Yunfan; Hedayat, A.S.; Pauli, Guido F.; Farnsworth, Norman R.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2006-01-01

    Since the prevailing form of hormone replacement therapy is associated with the development of cancer in breast and endometrial tissues, alternatives are needed for the management of menopausal symptoms. Formulations of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) are being used to alleviate menopause-associated hot flashes but have shown mixed results in clinical trials. The strobiles of Humulus lupulus L. (hops) have been reported to contain the prenylflavanone, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) as the most estrogenic constituent, and this was confirmed using an estrogen receptor ligand screening assay utilizing ultrafiltration mass spectrometry. Extracts of hops and red clover and their individual constituents including 8-PN, 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XN) from hops, and daidzein, formononetin, biochanin A, and genistein from red clover, were compared using a variety of in vitro estrogenic assays. The IC50 values for the estrogen receptor α and β binding assays were 15 and 27 μg/mL, respectively, for hops and 18.0 and 2.0 μg/mL, respectively, for the red clover extract. Both of the extracts, genistein, and 8-PN activated the estrogen response element (ERE) in Ishikawa cells while the extracts, biochanin A, genistein, and 8-PN significantly induced ERE-luciferase expression in MCF-7 cells. Hop and red clover extracts, as well as 8-PN upregulated progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA in the Ishikawa cell line. In the MCF-7 cell line, PR mRNA was significantly upregulated by the extracts, biochanin A, genistein, 8-PN, and IX. The two extracts had EC50 values of 1.1 and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively, in the alkaline phosphatase induction assay. Based on these data, hops and red clover could be attractive for development as herbal dietary supplements to alleviate menopause-associated symptoms. PMID:16076101

  18. Fate and removal of estrogens in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Racz, LeeAnn; Goel, Ramesh K

    2010-01-01

    Natural and synthetic estrogens are some of the most potent endocrine disrupting compounds found in municipal wastewater. Much research has been conducted on the source and fate of estrogens in wastewater treatment plants. Sorption and biodegradation are the primary removal mechanisms for estrogens in activated sludge systems, which are widely used biological treatment techniques for municipal wastewater treatment. However, when removal of estrogens in a wastewater treatment plant is incomplete, these compounds enter the environment through wastewater discharges or waste activated sludge at concentrations that can cause endocrine-reproductive system alterations in birds, reptiles and mammals. Therefore, studies have also focused on potential advanced treatment technologies with the aim of removing the compounds before discharging wastewater effluent or disposing waste sludge. This review discusses the physiological effects of these estrogens and the degree of problems estrogens pose as they enter the wastewater stream. Thereafter, this review also analyzes their fate in wastewater treatment systems and how they may reach drinking water sources. Furthermore, this review includes a discussion on various treatment technologies being investigated and future research trends for this pressing environmental issue.

  19. Nitroaromatic munition compounds: environmental effects and screening values.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Opresko, D M; Maxwell, C J; Welsh, C J; Cretella, F M; Reno, P H; Daniel, F B

    1999-01-01

    Available data on the occurrence, transport, transformation, and toxicity of eight nitroaromatic munition compounds and their degradation products, TNT, TNB, DNB, DNA, 2-ADNT, RDX, HMX, and tetryl were used to identify potential fate in the environment and to calculate screening benchmarks or safe environmental levels for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Results of monitoring studies revealed that some of these compounds persist at sites where they were produced or processed. Most of the compounds are present in soil, sediment, and surface water or groundwater at military sites. Soil adsorption coefficients indicate that these chemicals are only moderately adsorbed to soil and may leach to groundwater. Most of these compounds are transformed by abiotic or biotic mechanisms in environmental media. Primary transformation mechanisms involve photolysis (TNT, RDX, HMX, tetryl), hydrolysis (tetryl), and microbial degradation (TNT, TNB, DNB, DNA, 2-ADNT, and HMX). Microbial degradation for both nitro and nitramine aromatic compounds involves rapid reduction of nitro groups to amino groups, but further metabolism is slow. With the exception of DNB, complete mineralization did not usually occur under the conditions of the studies. RDX was resistant to microbial degradation. Available ecotoxicological data on acute and chronic studies with freshwater fish and invertebrates were summarized, and water quality criteria or ecotoxicological screening benchmarks were developed. Depending on the available data, criteria/benchmarks were calculated according to USEPA Tier I or Tier II guidelines. The munitions chemicals are moderately to highly toxic to freshwater organisms, with chronic screening values < 1 mg/L. For some chemicals, these low values are caused by inherent toxicity; in other cases, they result from the conservative methods used in the absence of data. For nonionic organic munitions chemicals, sediment quality benchmarks were calculated (based on Kow values and the

  20. Detecting estrogenic activity in water samples withestrogen-sensitive yeast cells using spectrophotometry and fluorescencemicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wozei, E.; Holman, H-Y.N.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Borglin S.

    2006-03-15

    Environmental estrogens are environmental contaminants that can mimic the biological activities of the female hormone estrogen in the endocrine system, i.e. they act as endocrine disrupters. Several substances are reported to have estrogen-like activity or estrogenic activity. These include steroid hormones, synthetic estrogens (xenoestrogens), environmental pollutants and phytoestrogens (plant estrogens). Using the chromogenic substrate ortho-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) we show that an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE, with human estrogen receptor (hER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes the enzyme {beta}-galactosidase, is able to detect estrogenic activity in water samples over a wide range of spiked concentrations of the hormonal estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Ortho-nitrophenol (ONP), the yellow product of this assay can be detected using spectrophotometry but requires cell lysis to release the enzyme and allow product formation. We improved this aspect in a fluorogenic assay by using fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) as a substrate. The product was visualized using fluorescence microscopy without the need to kill, fix or lyse the cells. We show that in live yeast cells, the uptake of E2 and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximum enzyme-catalyzed fluorescent product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. The fluorogenic assay was applied to a selection of estrogenic compounds and the Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of the cells obtained to better understand the yeast whole cell response to the compounds. The fluorogenic assay is most sensitive to E2, but the SR-FTIR spectra suggest that the cells respond to all the estrogenic compounds tested even when no fluorescent response was detected. These findings are promising and may shorten the duration of environmental water screening and monitoring regimes using

  1. Estrogenic compound profiles in an urbanized industry-impacted coastal bay and potential risk assessment by pollution indices and multivariative statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Li, Rui; Wu, Fengchang; Feng, Chenglian; Ye, Chun; Yan, Changzhou

    2017-01-15

    The occurrence and distribution of target estrogenic compounds in a highly urbanized industry-impacted coastal bay were investigated, and contamination profiles were evaluated by estimating total estradiol equivalents (∑EEQs) and risk quotients (RQs). Phenolic compounds were the most abundant xenoestrogens, but seldom showed contribution to the ∑EEQs. The diethylstilbestrol (DES) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were the major contributors followed by 17β-estradiol (E2) in comparison with a slight contribution from estrone (E1) and estriol (E3). Both ∑EEQs and RQs indicated likely adverse effects posed on resident organisms. Further, multivariate statistical method comprehensively revealed pollution status by visualized factor scores and identified multiple "hotspots" of estrogenic sources, demonstrating the presence of complex pollution risk gradients inside and particularly outside of bay area. Overall, this study favors the integrative utilization of pollution indices and factor analysis as powerful tool to scientifically diagnose the pollution characterization of human-derived chemicals for better management decisions in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vitro Assessment of Estrogenic Activity in Source and Treated Drinking Water Extracts from 25 U.S. Drinking Water Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of estrogenic compounds in environmental water samples and their potential impact on fish, wildlife and human reproductive health has been of concern for some time. In vitro assays have been successfully used to screen for estrogenic activity in many types of water s...

  3. In Vitro Assessment of Estrogenic Activity in Source and Treated Drinking Water Extracts from 25 U.S. Drinking Water Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of estrogenic compounds in environmental water samples and their potential impact on fish, wildlife and human reproductive health has been of concern for some time. In vitro assays have been successfully used to screen for estrogenic activity in many types of water s...

  4. Quaternary Triphenylphosphonium Compounds: A New Class of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Schlüsener, Michael P; Kunkel, Uwe; Ternes, Thomas A

    2015-12-15

    A nontarget screening using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was established to identify industrial emerging contaminants in the Rhine River. With this approach, quaternary triphenylphosphonium compounds (R-Ph3P(+)) were identified as new emerging contaminants in the aquatic environment. The suggested chemical structures were elucidated by MS fragmentation and chemical databank searches and eventually confirmed via authentic standards. R-Ph3P(+) are used worldwide by the chemical industry to synthesize alkenes via the Wittig reaction. In total, five compounds [R = butyl (Bu), R = ethyl (Et), R = methoxymethyl (MeOMe), R = methyl (Me), and R = phenyl (Ph)] were found in German rivers and streams. R-Ph3P(+) were detected only in those rivers and streams that received an appreciable portion of wastewater from the chemical industry. Up to 2.5 μg/L Et-Ph3P(+) was quantified in a small stream from the Hessian Ried, and in the Rhine, up to 0.56 μg/L Me-Ph3P(+) was detected. R-Ph3P(+) were also identified in suspended particulate matter and sediments in the Rhine catchment, with MeOMe-Ph3P(+) concentrations of up to 0.75 mg/kg and up to 0.21 mg/kg, respectively. Because of the lack of ecotoxicological studies, the environmental risks caused by R-Ph3P(+) can be assessed for neither pelagic nor benthic organisms.

  5. The Measurement of Estrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Geoff; Makin, Hugh L. J.; Bradlow, H. Leon

    Biologists use the word ‘estrogen' when referring to molecules which have the ability to induce uterine growth or vaginal cornification in the immature or ovariectomized rodent. The word estrogen was derived from two Greek words - oistros meaning frenzy and gennein - to beget. Chemists and biochemists, however, often restrict their use of this term to molecules that contain a characteristic 18-carbon steroid nucleus with an aromatic (phenolic) A-ring, both those that are biologically active estrogens and those without biologic activity but which are of intrinsic interest, such as the estrogen conjugates. This chapter is concerned only with these steroid compounds. The structure and inter-relationship of some common estrogens are given in Fig. 8.1. In addition to the biological estrogens, there are a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds which have estrogenic activity when measured by one or another parameter. While many of the assay procedures described in this review are applicable to these compounds, their application to non C18-steroids will not be discussed here. Methodology for these non-steroidal compounds can be found in reviews by Wang et al. (2002), Wu et al. (2004), Muir (2006), and Delmonte and Rader (2006). While not wishing to downgrade the importance of previous work in the estrogen field, the authors have taken a deliberate decision to exclude most publications prior to 1975, not because these do not have value but simply because space is not unlimited and readers of the present chapter might be expected to be seeking information about methodology which is less than 30 years old. Readers seeking pre-1975 information in this area can find it in Oakey and Holder (1995).

  6. Environmental estrogen Bisphenol A adsorption/oxidation on Graphene oxide/MnO2 (GO/MnO2) nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bele, Sotiria I.; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    The environmental fate and decontamination of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen that is used as a monomer in plastic industry, are of emerging concern. This study focused on the kinetics, influencing factors and pathways of its adsorption and oxidative decomposition by MnO2. Additionally, Graphene oxide/MnO2 (GO/MnO2) nanocomposite was prepared and tested as a kind of adsorbent and/or catalysts for oxidative decomposition of Bisphenol A (BPA). A suspension of graphene oxide/manganese sulfate (GO/MnSO4) produced by the modified Hummers method was in situ transformed into GO/MnO2 nanocomposite in combination with KMnO4. It is found that MnO2 nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in the structure of GO. The surface chemistry and the porous texture of the prepared nanocomposite were characterized by thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen adsorption (BET). The nanocomposite presented superior catalytic activities, much higher than that of the bare MnO2 for the decomposition of BPA in the presence of H2O2. The high activity of GO/MnO2 nanocomposite for the decomposition of BPA could be related to the synergistic effect of GO and MnO2 with the assistance of H2O2 according to the adsorption-oxidation-desorption mechanism.

  7. Probing the human estrogen receptor-α binding requirements for phenolic mono- and di-hydroxyl compounds: a combined synthesis, binding and docking study.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Christopher; Neumann, Terrence S; Gone, Jayapal Reddy; He, Zhengjie; Herrild, Christian; Wondergem Nee Lukesh, Julie; Pandey, Rajesh K; Donaldson, William A; Sem, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Various estrogen analogs were synthesized and tested for binding to human ERα using a fluorescence polarization displacement assay. Binding affinity and orientation were also predicted using docking calculations. Docking was able to accurately predict relative binding affinity and orientation for estradiol, but only if a tightly bound water molecule bridging Arg394/Glu353 is present. Di-hydroxyl compounds sometimes bind in two orientations, which are flipped in terms of relative positioning of their hydroxyl groups. Di-hydroxyl compounds were predicted to bind with their aliphatic hydroxyl group interacting with His524 in ERα. One nonsteroid-based dihdroxyl compound was 1000-fold specific for ERβ over ERα, and was also 25-fold specific for agonist ERβ versus antagonist activity. Docking predictions suggest this specificity may be due to interaction of the aliphatic hydroxyl with His475 in the agonist form of ERβ, versus with Thr299 in the antagonist form. But, the presence of this aliphatic hydroxyl is not required in all compounds, since mono-hydroxyl (phenolic) compounds bind ERα with high affinity, via hydroxyl hydrogen bonding interactions with the ERα Arg394/Glu353/water triad, and van der Waals interactions with the rest of the molecule. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing the human estrogen receptor-α binding requirements for phenolic mono- and di-hydroxyl compounds: A combined synthesis, binding and docking study

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Christopher; Neumann, Terrence S.; Gone, Jayapal Reddy; He, Zhengjie; Herrild, Christian; Wondergem, Julie; Pandey, Rajesh K.; Donaldson, William A.; Sem, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Various estrogen analogs were synthesized and tested for binding to human ERα using a fluorescence polarization displacement assay. Binding affinity and orientation were also predicted using docking calculations. Docking was able to accurately predict relative binding affinity and orientation for estradiol, but only if a tightly bound water molecule bridging Arg394/Glu353 is present. Di-hydroxyl compounds sometimes bind in two orientations, which are flipped in terms of relative positioning of their hydroxyl groups. Di-hydroxyl compounds were predicted to bind with their aliphatic hydroxyl group interacting with His524 in ERα. One nonsteroid-based dihdroxyl compound was 1000-fold specific for ERβ over ERα, and was also 25-fold specific for agonist ERβ versus antagonist activity. Docking predictions suggest this specificity may be due to interaction of the aliphatic hydroxyl with His475 in the agonist form of ERβ, versus with Thr299 in the antagonist form. But, the presence of this aliphatic hydroxyl is not required in all compounds, since mono-hydroxyl (phenolic) compounds bind ERα with high affinity, via hydroxyl hydrogen bonding interactions with the ERα Arg394/Glu353/water triad, and van der Waals interactions with the rest of the molecule. PMID:24315190

  9. Integration of GC-MSD and ER-Calux® assay into a single protocol for determining steroid estrogens in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Avberšek, Miha; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka; Heath, Ester

    2011-11-01

    There are many published studies that use either chemical or biological methods to investigate steroid estrogens in the aquatic environment, but rarer are those that combine both. In this study, gas chromatography with mass selective detection (GC-MSD) and the ER-Calux(®) estrogenicity assay were integrated into a single protocol for simultaneous determination of natural (estrone--E1, 17β-estradiol--E2, estriol--E3) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol--EE2) steroid estrogens concentrations and the total estrogenic potential of environmental samples. For integration purposes, several solvents were investigated and the commonly used dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) in the ER-Calux(®) assay was replaced by ethyl acetate, which is more compatible with gas chromatography and enables the same sample to be analysed by both GC-MSD and the ER-Calux(®) assay. The integrated protocol was initially tested using a standard mixture of estrogens. The results for pure standards showed that the estrogenicity calculated on the basis of GC-MSD and the ER-Calux(®) assay exhibited good correlation (r(2)=0.96; α=0.94). The result remained the same when spiked waste water extracts were tested (r(2)=0.92, α=1.02). When applied to real waste water influent and effluent samples the results proved (r(2)=0.93; α=0.99) the applicability of the protocol. The main advantages of this newly developed protocol are simple sample handling for both methods, and reduced material consumption and labour. In addition, it can be applied as either a complete or sequential analysis where the ER-Calux(®) assay is used as a pre-screening method prior to the chemical analysis.

  10. Differential Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on Genetic and Environmental Risk for Emotional Eating in Women

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kelly L.; O’Connor, Shannon M.; Hildebrandt, Britny A.; Keel, Pamela K.; Neale, Michael; Sisk, Cheryl L.; Boker, Steven; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent data show shifts in genetic and environmental influences on emotional eating across the menstrual cycle, with significant shared environmental influences during pre-ovulation, and primarily genetic effects during post-ovulation. Factors driving differential effects are unknown, although increased estradiol during pre-ovulation and increased progesterone during post-ovulation are thought to play a role. We indirectly investigated this possibility by examining whether overall levels of estradiol and progesterone differentially impact genetic and environmental risk for emotional eating in adult female twins (N = 571) drawn from the MSU Twin Registry. Emotional eating, estradiol levels, and progesterone levels were assessed daily and then averaged to create aggregate measures for analysis. As predicted, shared environmental influences were significantly greater in twins with high estradiol levels, whereas additive genetic effects increased substantially across low versus high progesterone groups. Results highlight significant and differential effects of ovarian hormones on etiologic risk for emotional eating in adulthood. PMID:27747142

  11. Environmental Fate of Organophosphorus Compounds Related to Chemical Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L; Love, A H; Vance, A; Reynolds, J G

    2005-02-08

    Man-made organophosphorus compounds have been widely distributed throughout our environment as pesticides since their development during and after WWII. Many important studies have documented their relative persistence and toxicity. Development and use of some organophosphorus compounds as nerve agents gave rise to a separate but parallel effort to understand environmental persistence. In this latter case, the experiments have focused mainly on evaporation rates and first-order reaction kinetics. However, because organophosphorus compounds are easily polarized, the ionic content of a surrounding media directly factors into these reaction rates, but limited work in this regard has been done under environmentally relevant conditions. Furthermore, limited experiments investigating persistence of these agents on soil has resulted in widely varying degradation rates. Not surprisingly, no studies have investigated affinities of organophosphorus nerve agents to mineral or organic matter typically found in soil. As a result, we initiated laboratory experiments on dilute concentrations of nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX) to quantify persistence in simulated environmental aqueous conditions. A quantitative analytical method was developed for VX and its degradation products using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). VX hydrolysis rate is known to have a pH-dependency, however, the type of buffer and the relative proportion of different nucleophiles in solution significantly affect the overall rate and mechanism of degradation. For example, dissolved carbonate, a weak nucleophile dominating natural water, yielded pseudo-first order rate constants of {approx} 8 x 10{sup -3}/hr at pH 5 and 2 x 10{sup -2}/hr at pH 11. This small pH-dependent variation departs significantly from widely accepted rates at this pH range (4 x 10{sup -4}/hr to 8 x 10{sup -2}/hr) that were based on

  12. The influence of a surfactant, linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, on the estrogenic response to a mixture of (xeno)estrogens in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Harris, Catherine A; Brian, Jayne V; Pojana, Giulio; Lamoree, Marja; Booy, Petra; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P

    2009-01-18

    The effect of the presence of a surfactant on the activity of a mixture of environmental estrogens was assessed. In their natural habitat, fish are subject not only to exposure to mixtures of estrogenic compounds, as has been addressed in previous publications, but also to other confounding factors (chemical, physical and biological), which may, in theory, affect their responses to such compounds. To assess the potential for such interference, the commonly occurring surfactant, linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), was applied to the yeast estrogen screen at various concentrations, independently and together with a mixture of estrogens at constant concentrations. LAS enhanced the estrogenic activity of the mixture, an effect which became less pronounced over the course of time. This information was used to design an in vivo study to assess induction of vitellogenin in fathead minnows exposed to the same mixture of estrogens plus LAS. A similar trend was observed, that is, the response was enhanced, but the effect became less pronounced as the study progressed. However, the enhanced response in vivo occurred only at the highest concentration of LAS tested (362microg/L), and was transient because it was no longer apparent by the end of the study. Although LAS is a significant contaminant in terms of both concentration and frequency of detection in the aquatic environment, these data do not suggest that it will have a significant impact on the response of fish to environmental estrogens.

  13. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  14. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of polynuclear aromatic compounds in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kumke, M U; Löhmannsröben, H G; Roch, T

    1995-06-01

    The occurrence of polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAC) in the environment and experimental techniques suitable for the detection of PAC in environmental compartments are briefly reviewed. The specific requirements for on-site andin situ environmental analysis are outlined. Particular emphasis is given to fluorescence spectroscopic techniques for the investigation of humic acid- and soil-containing samples. Some examples of studies in the literature on Shpol'skii and jet spectroscopy and on laser-induced fluorescence (OF) measurements of PAC and mineral oils are highlighted. Contaminants in the environment are usually encountered as multicomponent mixtures in very complex matrices. Total fluorescence analysis in combination with the chemometrical technique of rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA) was employed for the evaluation of a six-component PAC mixture in toluene. It was shown that even in the presence of strong spectral overlap the qualitative identification of all compounds and the reliable quantification of five substances was possible. Results are presented from our stationary and time-resolved fluorescence investigations of the interactions between pyrene and humic acid in water. The Stern-Volmer analysis showed a significant effect of pH on the static quenching efficiency which can be explained by the pH-dependent macromolecular structure of humic acids. Preliminary results from studies of the deactivation of triplet PAC and quenching of delayed fluorescence by humic acid are reported. LIF measurements of mineral oils directly from soil surfaces and of a model oil in a soil column were performed with a fiber-optic coupled multichannel spectrometer. The fluorescence intensity/ concentration relationships were established for a crude and a fuel oil; the corresponding lower limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be 0.025 and 0.125% m/m (mass/mass percentages). These detection limits are compared with realistic oil contaminations of soils. In a soil

  16. Detection of an estrogen receptor in two nematode species and inhibition of binding and development by environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hood, T E; Calabrese, E J; Zuckerman, B M

    2000-09-01

    The presence of estrogen receptors or binding proteins was demonstrated in the free-living nematode species Panagrellus redivivus and Caenorhabditis elegans by radioimmunoassay. Twenty-five nanomolar concentrations of toxaphene, dieldrin, and dieldrin plus nonylphenol significantly inhibited estrogen binding to the receptor in P. redivivus. Binding was inhibited but not significantly by 25 nM nonylphenol, toxaphene plus dieldrin, or toxaphene plus nonylphenol. The current research supports the hypothesis that dieldrin, nonylphenol, and toxaphene may mimic estrogen, altering the normal pathways of estrogen metabolism. Based on observations of secondary sex structures, estrogenic chemicals had no effect on sex ratios or growth in Panagrellus redivivus, but caused a reduction of fecundity in this nematode. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Polydimethylsiloxane/metal-organic frameworks coated stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detector for the determination of estrogens in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Cong; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-04

    In this work, three kinds of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MOF-5, MOF-199 and IRMOF-3, were introduced in stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and novel polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/MOFs (including PDMS/MOF-5, PDMS/MOF-199 and PDMS/IRMOF-3) coated stir bars were prepared by sol-gel technique. These PDMS/MOFs coatings were characterized and critically compared for the extraction of seven target estrogens (17-β-estradiol, dienestrol, diethylstilbestrol, estrone, 4-t-octylphenol, bisphenol-A and 17α-ethynylestradiol) by SBSE, and the results showed that PDMS/IRMOF-3 exhibited highest extraction efficiency. Based on the above facts, a novel method of PDMS/IRMOF-3 coating SBSE-high performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was developed for the determination of seven target estrogens in environmental waters. Several parameters affecting extraction of seven target estrogens by SBSE (PDMS/IRMOF-3) including extraction time, stirring rate, pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time were investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.15-0.35 μg/L. The linear range was 2-2,500 μg/L for 17α-ethynylestradiol and 1-2,500 μg/L for other estrogens. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 3.7-9.9% (n=8, c=20 μg/L) and the enrichment factors were from 30.3 to 55.6-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 100-fold). The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of estrogens in environmental water samples, and quantitative recoveries were obtained for the spiking experiments.

  18. Selective estrogen receptor-beta (SERM-beta) compounds modulate raphe nuclei tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1) mRNA expression and cause antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Clark, J A; Alves, S; Gundlah, C; Rocha, B; Birzin, E T; Cai, S-J; Flick, R; Hayes, E; Ho, K; Warrier, S; Pai, L; Yudkovitz, J; Fleischer, R; Colwell, L; Li, S; Wilkinson, H; Schaeffer, J; Wilkening, R; Mattingly, E; Hammond, M; Rohrer, S P

    2012-11-01

    Estrogen acts through two molecularly distinct receptors termed estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) which bind estradiol with similar affinities and mediate the effects of estrogen throughout the body. ERα plays a major role in reproductive physiology and behavior, and mediates classic estrogen signaling in such tissues as the uterus, mammary gland, and skeleton. ERβ, however, modulates estrogen signaling in the ovary, the immune system, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and hypothalamus, and there is some evidence that ERβ can regulate ERα activity. Moreover, ERβ knockout studies and receptor distribution analyses in the CNS suggest that this receptor may play a role in the modulation of mood and cognition. In recent years several ERβ-specific compounds (selective estrogen receptor beta modulators; SERM-beta) have become available, and research suggests potential utility of these compounds in menopausal symptom relief, breast cancer prevention, diseases that have an inflammatory component, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease, as well as modulation of mood, and anxiety. Here we demonstrate an antidepressant-like effect obtained using two SERM-beta compounds, SERM-beta1 and SERM-beta2. These compounds exhibit full agonist activity at ERβ in a cell based estrogen response element (ERE) transactivation assay. SERM-beta1 and 2 are non-proliferative with respect to breast as determined using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell-based assay and non-proliferative in the uterus as determined by assessing the effects of SERM-beta compounds on immature rat uterine weight and murine uterine weight. In vivo SERM-beta1 and 2 are brain penetrant and display dose dependent efficacy in the murine dorsal raphe assays for induction of tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA and progesterone receptor protein. These compounds show activity in the murine forced swim test and promote hippocampal neurogenesis acutely in rats. Taken

  19. Characterizing the Growth Kinetics in Estrogen Responsive ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is a need to develop high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals for endocrine disrupting potential. The estrogen signaling pathway is a known xenobiotic target that has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including reproductive deficits and cancer promotion. Using real-time measurements of growth kinetics by electrode impedance, the estrogen-responsive human ductal carcinoma cell line, T47D, was treated with 2000 chemicals of environmental relevance. Cells were treated in concentration response and measurements of cellular impedance were recorded every hour for six days. Exponential impedance, signifying increased proliferation, was observed by prototypical estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genestein, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol-A and genestein, induced cell proliferation at comparable levels to 17β-estradiol, although at much higher concentrations. Progestins, and mineralocortocoids (progesterone, dihydrotestosterone, aldosterone) invoked a biphasic impedance signature. In conclusion, the real-time nature of this assay allows for rapid detection of differential growth characteristics shows potential, in combination with other ToxCast HTS assays, to detect environmental chemicals with potential endocrine activity. [This abstract does not necessarily reflect Agency policy]. Several compounds, including bisphenol-A and

  20. Exposure to an environmental estrogen breaks down sexual isolation between native and invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jessica L; Blum, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Environmental change can increase the likelihood of interspecific hybridization by altering properties of mate recognition and discrimination between sympatric congeners. We examined how exposure to an environmentally widespread endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), bisphenol A (BPA), affected visual communication signals and behavioral isolation between an introduced freshwater fish and a native congener (genus: Cyprinella). Exposure to BPA induced changes in the expression of male secondary traits as well as male and female mate choice, leading to an overall reduction in prezygotic isolation between congeners. Changes in female mate discrimination were not tightly linked to changes in male phenotypic traits, suggesting that EDC exposure may alter female choice thresholds independently of the effects of exposure on males. These findings indicate that environmental exposure to EDCs can lead to population declines via the erosion of species boundaries and by promoting the establishment and spread of non-native species via hybridization. PMID:23346234

  1. Evaluating Cost when Selecting Performance Reference Compounds for the Environmental Deployment of Polyethylene Passive Samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge in environmental passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampler, target contaminants, and environmental phases. A common approach is the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to indicate degree of equilibrium. One logistical...

  2. Evaluating Cost when Selecting Performance Reference Compounds for the Environmental Deployment of Polyethylene Passive Samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge in environmental passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampler, target contaminants, and environmental phases. A common approach is the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to indicate degree of equilibrium. One logistical...

  3. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for four phenolic environmental estrogens in water samples followed by determination using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junying; Lu, Wenhui; Liu, Huitao; Wu, Xiaqing; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-10-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with CE was successfully developed for simultaneous determination of four types of phenolic environmental estrogens (PEEs), namely hexestrol (HS), bisphenol A (BPA), diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dienestrol (DS). Several parameters affecting DLLME and CE conditions were systematically investigated including the type and volume of extraction solvent and dispersive solvent, extraction time, salt, pH value, surfactant, buffer solution and so on. Under the optimal conditions, DLLME-CE exhibited strong enrichment ability, presenting high enrichment factors of 467, 241, 367 and 362 for HS, BPA, DES and DS, respectively, as well as low detection limits of 0.3, 0.6, 0.6 and 0.3 μg/L, respectively. Excellent linearity was achieved in the range of 2.0-150 μg/L for HS and DS, and 4.0-300 μg/L for BPA and DES, with correlation coefficients R>0.9983. Recoveries ranging from 70.4 to 108.1% were obtained with tap water, lake water and seawater samples spiked at three concentration levels and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, for n = 5) were 2.1-9.7%. This DLLME-CE method with high selectivity and sensitivity, high stability, simplicity, cost-effectiveness, eco-friendliness was proved potentially applicable for the rapid and simultaneous determination of PEEs in complicated water samples.

  4. Population responses of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) to an environmental estrogen, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Watts, Matthew M; Pascoe, David; Carroll, Kathleen

    2002-02-01

    The effects of the environmental estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE) on mixed populations of 90 individual Gammarus pulex were examined following a 100-d exposure in a flow-through system. Counts of total animal numbers revealed that, in all treatment groups, population size dramatically increased due to recruitment, with neonate and juvenile gammarids the most abundant. At concentrations of 1 and 10 microg/L EE, the recorded mean population sizes of 385 and 411, respectively, were significantly greater (p = 0.018) than the control (169). Mean population sizes in the solvent control (257) and 100 ng/L EE treatment (267) were not significantly different (p > 0.05) from the control. In addition to total counts, detailed image analysis of each individual animal allowed the assessment of length-frequency distributions, adult sex ratio, number of precopula pairs/ovigerous females, and measurement of secondary antenna and gnathopod length (secondary sex characteristics). The sex ratio of adults at 100 ng, 1 microg, and 10 microg/L EE was greater than 2:1 (female:male), and significantly more females (p = 0.008) were recorded at these concentrations compared with the control. The number of male adults, precopula guarding pairs, and ovigerous females did not differ between treatments (p > 0.05). Secondary antennal and gnathopod length in males was consistently greater than in females (p < or = 0.001), but comparison between groups revealed no difference in these parameters.

  5. Molecular Modeling for Screening Environmental Chemicals for Estrogenicity: Use of the Toxicant-Target Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of relevant experimental information available for the evaluation of the potential health and environmental effects of many man made chemicals. Knowledge of the potential pathways for activity provides a rational basis for the extrapolations inherent in the pre...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PRC) are sensitive methods for assessing exposure of fish and other wildlife to environmental contaminants by measuring changes in gene expression. Several genes normally induced by estradiol in female fish, those for vitellogenins (...

  7. Molecular Modeling for Screening Environmental Chemicals for Estrogenicity: Use of the Toxicant-Target Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of relevant experimental information available for the evaluation of the potential health and environmental effects of many man made chemicals. Knowledge of the potential pathways for activity provides a rational basis for the extrapolations inherent in the pre...

  8. ASSESSMENT OF DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PRC) are sensitive methods for assessing exposure of fish and other wildlife to environmental contaminants by measuring changes in gene expression. Several genes normally induced by estradiol in female fish, those for vitellogenins (...

  9. Binary classification of a large collection of environmental chemicals from estrogen receptor assays by quantitative structure-activity relationship and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Rotroff, Daniel M; Judson, Richard S

    2013-12-23

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals subject to regulatory decisions for endocrine disrupting potential. The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ∼8200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large data set to develop in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using machine learning (ML) methods and a novel approach to manage the imbalanced data distribution. Training compounds from the ToxCast project were categorized as active or inactive (binding or nonbinding) classes based on a composite ER Interaction Score derived from a collection of 13 ER in vitro assays. A total of 1537 chemicals from ToxCast were used to derive and optimize the binary classification models while 5073 additional chemicals from the Tox21 project, evaluated in 2 of the 13 in vitro assays, were used to externally validate the model performance. In order to handle the imbalanced distribution of active and inactive chemicals, we developed a cluster-selection strategy to minimize information loss and increase predictive performance and compared this strategy to three currently popular techniques: cost-sensitive learning, oversampling of the minority class, and undersampling of the majority class. QSAR classification models were built to relate the molecular structures of chemicals to their ER activities using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), classification and regression trees (CART), and support vector machines (SVM) with 51 molecular descriptors from QikProp and 4328 bits of structural fingerprints as explanatory variables. A random forest (RF) feature selection method was employed to extract the structural features most relevant to the ER activity. The best model was obtained using SVM in combination with a subset of descriptors identified from a large set via the RF algorithm, which recognized the active and

  10. Formation of estrogenic brominated ethinylestradiol in drinking water: implications for aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Flores, Anel; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2008-10-01

    17alpha-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen which is thought to contribute the feminisation of fish exposed to wastewater effluents. During laboratory exposure studies of fish to EE2, it was observed that the estrogen in the aquarium water was rapidly transformed (within 10 min) to mono- and di-brominated A-ring products. Exposure of roach (Rutilis rutilus) to 30 ng L(-1) EE2 resulted in accumulation of dibrominated EE2 in ovaries (apparent bioconcentration factor, BCF 130) and liver (apparent BCF 7894) at concentrations which were 18-67-fold greater than the test EE2 compound. The estrogenic activities of brominated EE2 compounds were tested in an in vitro yeast recombinant estrogen receptor transcription screen (YES). All the brominated products of EE2 were estrogenic, however monobrominated isomers of EE2 were 18-105-fold less estrogenic, and dibrominated EE2 2058-fold less active in the YES than EE2 itself. This study reveals the importance of using chemical methods to verify exposure concentrations of waterborne test chemicals and suggests that bromination of estrogens may occur during water treatment, potentially resulting in the formation of bioavailable estrogenic environmental contaminants.

  11. Estrogenic flavonoids: structural requirements for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1995-01-01

    A systematic survey of polycyclic phenols has been performed to identify members of this chemical group with estrogenic activity. Twelve compounds were found to be able to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the human estrogen receptor expressed in cultured cells by transient transfection. These natural estrogens belong to several distinct, but chemically related classes including chalcones, flavanones, flavones, flavonols, and isoflavones. Selected examples of estrogenic flavonoids were further analyzed to determine their biological potencies and their relative affinities for binding to the estrogen receptor. These data are interpreted with respect to the molecular structure of polycyclic phenols required for hormonal activity as nonsteroidal estrogens.

  12. Estrogenic effects from household stoves.

    PubMed

    Wu, W Z; Chen, J; Rehmann, K; Schramm, K W; Kettrup

    2002-09-01

    With the application of a genetically modified yeast, estrogen receptor-activating compounds were detected in the soot and emission gas of a wood-burning household stove. The EC50 value of 17beta-estradiol was divided by the EC50 value of soot, and the obtained relative estrogenic value for raw soot was 2.37E-5, indicating that soot was about 100,000 times less estrogenic than 17beta-estradiol. Chemical analysis revealed that alkyl phenol, benzonic acid, and PAHs represented the major constituents in the most potent fractions of the soot. Along with PAHs, other constituents might also contribute to the estrogenicity of soot.

  13. Capillary electrochromatography and nano-liquid chromatography coupled to nano-electrospray ionization interface for the separation and identification of estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Asensio-Ramos, María; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel; Fanali, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Nano-LC and CEC were coupled to MS through a nanospray or a pressurized liquid-junction interface for the simultaneous separation and determination of 11 estrogenic compounds. Different stationary phases, that is, phenyl, C18, and C18 bidentate silica hydrate, were studied. For both techniques, the phenyl stationary phase was the best option, considering separation efficiency, selectivity, and resolution. Under the optimized conditions, the baseline separation of the target compounds (including estradiol and zearalanol epimers) was achieved in less than 20 min in nano-LC-MS and less than 13 min in CEC-MS. Molecular imprinted polymer SPE was used for extracting the target compounds from mineral water samples with the analysis of nano-LC-MS. The whole molecular imprinted polymer SPE nano-LC-MS method was validated through a recovery study at two levels of concentration. Sensitivity was improved by on-column focusing technique obtaining LODs in the range 1.4-55.4 ng/L. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Environmental estrogens inhibit growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by modulating the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea M; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Martin, Lincoln E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2014-01-15

    Although environmental estrogens (EE) have been found to disrupt a wide variety of developmental and reproductive processes in vertebrates, there is a paucity of information concerning their effects on organismal growth, particularly postembryonic growth. In this study, we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol (E2) β-sitosterol (βS), or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) to assess the effects of EE on overall organismal growth and on the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth factor (GH-IGF) system. EE treatment significantly reduced food conversion, body condition, and body growth. EE-inhibited growth resulted from alterations in peripheral elements of the GH-IGF system, which includes multiple GH receptors (GHRs), IGFs, and IGF receptors (IGFRs). In general, E2, βS, and NP reduced the expression of GHRs, IGFs, and IGFRs; however, the effects varied in an EE-, tissue-, element type-specific manner. For example, in liver, E2 was more efficacious than either βS, and NP in reducing GHR expression, and the effect of E2 was greater on GHR 1 than GHR2 mRNA. By contrast, in gill, all EEs affected GHR expression in a similar manner and there was no difference in the effect on GHR1 and GHR 2 mRNA. With regard to IGF expression, all EEs reduced hepatic IGF1 and IGF2 mRNA levels, whereas as in gill, only E2 and NP significantly reduced IGF1 and IGF2 expression. Lastly, E2 and NP reduced the expression of IGFR1A and IGFR1B mRNA expression similarly in gill and red and white muscle, whereas βS had no effect on expression of IGFR mRNAs. These findings indicate that EEs disrupt post-embryonic growth by reducing GH sensitivity, IGF production, and IGF sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EMISSION OF VOLATILE COMPOUNDS BY SEEDS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small mammals locate buried wet seeds more efficiently than buried dry seeds. This may be attributable to emission of volatile compounds by the seeds. To test this hypothesis I measured emission of volatile compounds from seeds of three plant species (Pinus contorta, Purshia tr...

  16. EMISSION OF VOLATILE COMPOUNDS BY SEEDS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small mammals locate buried wet seeds more efficiently than buried dry seeds. This may be attributable to emission of volatile compounds by the seeds. To test this hypothesis I measured emission of volatile compounds from seeds of three plant species (Pinus contorta, Purshia tr...

  17. Establishment of a transgenic yeast screening system for estrogenicity and identification of the anti-estrogenic activity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Baowei; Yeung, Eric K C; Chan, Chi Bun; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-12-15

    Endocrine disruptors refer to chemical compounds in the environment which interfere with the endocrine systems of organisms. Among them, environmental estrogens pose serious problems to aquatic organisms, in particular fish. It is therefore important and necessary to have a fast and low-cost system to screen the large number of different chemical compounds in the aquatic environment for their potential endocrine disrupting actions. In this study, a screening platform was developed to detect xenoestrogens in the aquatic environment using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and applied for compound screening. The aim was to demonstrate any significant potential differences between the fish screening system and the human screening system. To this end, a yeast expression vector harboring a fish estrogen receptor alpha and a reporter vector containing the estrogen responsive element fused with the Escherichia coli LacZ gene were constructed. After transformation with these two vectors, the transformed yeast clones were confirmed by Western blotting and selected on the basis of the beta-galactosidase activity. In this transgenic yeast system, the natural estrogen (estradiol) and other known xenoestrogens such as diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A, genistein and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane exhibited dose-dependent activities. Using this system, more than 40 putative endocrine disruptors including phytoestrogens, pesticides, herbicides, industrial dyes and other industrial chemicals were screened. Ten of them were demonstrated to exhibit estrogenic actions. Industrial dyes such as malachite green (MG) that disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis are extensively used and are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Using this system, MG did not show any estrogenic action, but was demonstrated to exhibit anti-estrogenic activity.

  18. Detection and occurrence of chlorinated byproducts of bisphenol a, nonylphenol, and estrogens in drinking water of china: comparison to the parent compounds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhanlan; Hu, Jianying; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2013-10-01

    This study applied a sensitive dansylation LC-MS/MS method to the investigation on the occurrence of bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), estrogens (E1 and E2), and their 11 chlorinated byproducts in 62 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) of 31 major cities across China. BPA (4.7-512 ng/L), NP (8.2-918 ng/L), and E1 (ND-9.9 ng/L) were widely detected in source waters, E2 was detected in less than half of the samples (ND-3.2 ng/L), while chlorinated byproducts were only detected in source waters of two DWTPs. In drinking water, chlorinated BPAs and monochloro-NP (MCNP) were detected in more than half of the samples with concentrations of 0.2-26.7 ng/L for monochloro-BPA (MCBPA), ND-6.3 ng/L for dichloro-BPA (DCBPA), ND-7.7 ng/L for trichloro-BPA (TCBPA), ND-4.8 ng/L for tetrachloro-BPA (TBBPA), and ND-13.3 ng/L for MCNP, while dichloro-E1 (DCE1, ND-0.2 ng/L) and dichloro-NP (DCNP, ND-1.6 ng/L) were less frequently detected (10/62 and 4/62). The production of chlorinated NPs in DWTPs was mainly influenced by the amount of NP in source water and chlorine added, while the concentrations of chlorinated BPAs in drinking waters were only found to be significantly correlated with those of BPA in source waters. Advanced treatment processes could be effective techniques for reducing target chlorinated byproducts in drinking water. This is the first report on the occurrence of chlorinated byproducts of BPA, NP, and estrogens in drinking water, and these chemicals should be considered when assessing the human risk of their parent compounds.

  19. Effects of several dioxin-like compounds on estrogen metabolism in the malignant MCF-7 and nontumorigenic MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, Majorie B M; Sanderson, J Thomas; van der Bruggen, Marieke; van der Linden, Jeroen; van den Berg, Martin

    2003-08-01

    In human breast tissue, estrone (E(1)) and estradiol (E(2)) are mainly hydroxylated by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1B1 (CYP1B1) to 2-hydroxyestrogens (2-OHE(1/2)) and 4-hydroxyestrogens (4-OHE(1/2)), respectively. Several studies show that 4-OHE(1/2), but not 2-OHE(1/2), may act as a carcinogen and a high estrogen 4-/2-hydroxylation ratio appears to be a marker for the presence of neoplasms. In this study, we investigated the effects of several dioxin-like compounds on estrogen 2- and 4-hydroxylation in a malignant (MCF-7) and a nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) human mammary epithelial cell line. 2- and 4-methoxyestrogen (MeOE(1/2)) formations were used as measures of the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PCDF), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), and 3,3'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 169) concentration dependently induced 2-MeOE(1/2) formation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) activity through induced CYP1A1 expression in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 118) had no such effect. Effects on CYP1B1 expression and 4-MeOE(1/2) formation were less pronounced; only TCDD caused an induction, whereas PCB 169 was a potent and selective inhibitor of 4-MeOE(1/2) formation (IC(50) 0.7 and 2.2 nM PCB 169 in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells, respectively). MCF-10A cells were less responsive toward dioxin-like compounds and the apparent EC(50) values for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction in this study were 10-100 fold higher than in MCF-7 cells. The constitutive 4-/2-MeOE(1/2) ratios were 2.99 +/- 0.78 and 0.93 +/- 0.40 in MCF-7 and MCF-10A, respectively. Incubation with dioxin-like compounds resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the 4-/2-MeOE(1/2) ratio, but an increase in potentially carcinogenic estrogen metabolites in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. This indicates that even though the 4-/2-OHE(1/2) ratio may be used as indicator for the presence

  20. Sex differences and effects of estrogenic compounds on the expression of inflammatory molecules by astrocytes exposed to the insecticide dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Astiz, Mariana; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2014-04-01

    A low dose of the organophosphorus insecticide dimethoate (DMT) produces oxidation of lipids and proteins and impairs mitochondrial function in the brain of male rats, together with a reduction of gonadal hormones in plasma. Here, we have assessed whether DMT affected the expression of inflammatory molecules, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of steroidogenic proteins and estrogen receptors in cortical astrocyte-enriched cultures obtained separately from male and female CD1 mice pups. Furthermore, we have analyzed whether estradiol may counteract the effects of DMT. A dose of DMT (2 μg/mL) did not affect cell viability, increased interleukin (IL) 6, IL1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP10), ERβ, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and aromatase mRNA levels and ERα protein levels in male but not in female cultures. Estradiol decreased the mRNA levels of IL6, IP10, TNFα, and IL1β in male but not in female cultures treated with DMT. The effect of estradiol was prevented by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780, fully imitated by an ERβ agonist and partially imitated by an ERα agonist. Furthermore, DMT increased the production of ROS in male astrocytes while estradiol reduced ROS production to control levels. These findings indicate that a sublethal dose of DMT alters astrocyte function. The selective action of estradiol on male astrocytes and the sexually dimorphic action of DMT suggest that the pesticide may have different neurological outcomes in males and females.

  1. Estrogen supplements in menopause.

    PubMed

    Booher, D L

    1990-01-01

    The number of women aged 65 and older is expected to double by the year 2000, increasing the need for effective management of symptoms related to menopause. Contemporary management of menopause addresses the continuum of events associated with the effects of estrogen deprivation on quality and duration of life, including neuroendocrine changes, urogenital atrophy, sexual dysfunction, skin and hair changes, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. The risks and benefits of management strategies, including hormone replacement therapy, must be weighted carefully by both physician and patient. The use of estrogens and progestins, alterative compounds, dosages, routes of administration, and their advantages and disadvantages must be analyzed.

  2. Vitellogenin, a biomarker for environmental estrogenic pollution, of Reeves' pond turtles: analysis of similarity for its amino acid sequence and cognate mRNA expression after exposure to estrogen.

    PubMed

    Tada, Noriko; Nakao, Aya; Hoshi, Hidenobu; Saka, Masahiro; Kamata, Yoichi

    2008-03-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG), a biomarker for environmental estrogenic pollution, can be detected in the bloodstream of oviparous animals before morphological and functional abnormalities appear due to exposure to environmental estrogens. Reports observing VTG in turtles have been limited. We therefore cloned and sequenced a partial cDNA of VTG in Reeves' pond turtle, Chinemys reevesii. The cloned cDNA fragment possessed the start codon and 2,229 bp, encoding 743 amino acid residues. A sequence of deduced amino acid from the cDNA did not contain a high serine content, such as that which exists in phosvitin. Two N-glycosylation sites were found in the sequence. The sequence was compared to those of two birds (chicken and herring gull), one amphibian (Xenopus), and five fishes (carp, zebrafish, eel, haddock, and red seabream). The C. reevesii VTG was similar to that of herring gull (78%, value of positives), chicken (76%), Xenopus (69%), eel (63%), red seabream (62%), haddock (62%), carp (62%), and zebrafish (61%). The phylogenetic tree showed that C. reevesii VTG existed between the amphibian and birds, and it was present far from fish VTGs. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method was employed to detect the mRNA expression of the C. reevesii VTG through the use of primers designed from our sequence. The VTG mRNA expression (292 bp) was proven in the total RNA extraction from the liver of the juvenile turtles which were treated with estradiol-17beta. The information herein would be useful for ecotoxicological studies using freshwater turtles and these findings are expected to contribute positively towards wildlife conservation.

  3. Haloethylene-related compounds of industrial, environmental, and medical significance

    PubMed Central

    Posner, Herbert S.; Falk, Hans L.

    1977-01-01

    A broad-based literature survey was made for chemicals that contain either a haloethylene or a related substructure. Two hundred and sixty-two compounds, including synthetic intermediates, pesticides, solvents, drugs, food components, natural products, and metabolites, are grouped by their structures. Some are in current use or are bioavailable while little exposure is expected from others. As more biologic-response information is reported for small compounds of these types, it should become possible to select others for research on additional questions of structure–activity relationships. Some of the compounds are widespread while others are not. Some are used or found in large amounts while others may be trace contaminants, minor or more major by-products of synthesis or isolation. The pesticides and solvents, for example, are knowingly and often deliberately released to the environment, sometimes in very large quantities. Inadvertent release also occurs, sometimes referred to as fugitive emission. Food contaminants and drugs are directly accessible to humans. Sparsely distributed natural products could be accessible to humans, for example, via the food chain. Some of the compounds in food may be formed during preparation, storage or metabolically. Last, the haloethylene function has often been synthesized into compounds in order to achieve desired biologic activities. There are many types and degrees of relatedness of structure, depending upon atomic dimensions and stereochemical, polar, resonance, and other factors. Furthermore, for some chemical series, biologic responses are continuously variable while, in other cases, it is not uncommon that qualitatively different types of response occur with apparently very close homologs. Genetic, metabolic, and behavioral factors affecting response must also be considered. Thus, safety or hazard cannot yet be predicted conclusively by apparent relatedness of structure alone. Also, since the tables are noncomprehensive

  4. Early cerebral activities of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A appear to act via the somatostatin receptor subtype sst(2).

    PubMed

    Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Madeo, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco

    2002-06-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been aroused by the specific actions of bisphenol A (BPA). The present investigation represents a first study dealing with the interaction of BPA with the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtype (sst(2)) in the rat limbic circuit. After treating pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats with two doses (400 microg/kg/day; 40 microg/kg/day) of BPA, the binding activity of the above receptor subtype was evaluated in some limbic regions of the offspring. The higher dose proved to be the more effective one, as demonstrated by the elevated affinity of sst(2) with its specific radioligand, [(125)I]-Tyr(0)somatostatin-14. The most dramatic effects of BPA on sst(2) levels occurred at the low-affinity states of such a subtype in some telencephalic limbic areas of postnatal rats (10 days of age; postnatal day [PND] 10). These included lower (p < 0.05) sst(2) levels in the gyrus dentate of the hippocampus and basomedial nucleus of the amygdala; significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels were observed only for the high-affinity states of the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. A similar trend was maintained in PND 23 rats with the exception of much lower levels of the high-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in the amygdala nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. However, greater changes produced by this environmental estrogen were reported when the binding activity of sst(2) was checked in the presence of the two more important selective agonists (zolpidem and Ro 15-4513) specific for the alpha-containing Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor complex. In this case, an even greater potentiating effect (p < 0.001) was mainly obtained for the low-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in PND 10 animals, with the exception of the high-affinity type in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and gyrus dentate. These results support the contention that an sst(2) subtype alpha-containing GABA type A receptor system might

  5. Preferential epigenetic programming of estrogen response after in utero xenoestrogen (bisphenol-A) exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Elisa M.; Alderman, Myles H.; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an environmentally ubiquitous estrogen-like endocrine-disrupting compound. Exposure to BPA in utero has been linked to female reproductive disorders, including endometrial hyperplasia and breast cancer. Estrogens are an etiological factor in many of these conditions. We sought to determine whether in utero exposure to BPA altered the global CpG methylation pattern of the uterine genome, subsequent gene expression, and estrogen response. Pregnant mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of BPA or DMSO control. Uterine DNA and RNA were examined by using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation methylation microarray, expression microarray, and quantitative PCR. In utero BPA exposure altered the global CpG methylation profile of the uterine genome and subsequent gene expression. The effect on gene expression was not apparent until sexual maturation, which suggested that estrogen response was the primary alteration. Indeed, prenatal BPA exposure preferentially altered adult estrogen-responsive gene expression. Changes in estrogen response were accompanied by altered methylation that preferentially affected estrogen receptor-α (ERα)–binding genes. The majority of genes that demonstrated both altered expression and ERα binding had decreased methylation. BPA selectively altered the normal developmental programming of estrogen-responsive genes via modification of the genes that bind ERα. Gene–environment interactions driven by early life xenoestrogen exposure likely contributes to increased risk of estrogen-related disease in adults.—Jorgensen, E. M., Alderman, M. H., III, Taylor, H. S. Preferential epigenetic programming of estrogen response after in utero xenoestrogen (bisphenol-A) exposure. PMID:27312807

  6. The environmental impact of growth-promoting compounds employed by the United States beef cattle industry: history, current knowledge, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kolok, Alan S; Sellin, Marlo K

    2008-01-01

    The current state of knowledge regarding the environmental impact of growth-promoting compounds associated with the U.S. beef cattle industry is extensive in some areas but virtually nonexistent in others. The compounds administered to the cattle are quite well understood, as are bovine metabolism and excretion. If the sex and age of the cattle on the feedlot are known, the metabolites excreted by the cattle should be predictable with a great deal of accuracy. The fate, transport, and biological effects of growth-promoting compounds are just beginning to be studied. Most of the research conducted on the fate and transport of growth-promoting compounds has focused on 17beta-E2; however, much of this research was not conducted using feedlot runoff or manure. Studies are needed that focus specifically on manures and runoff from experimental or commercial feedlots. To date, the degree to which growth-promoting compounds are released from feedlots in a bioavailable form remains a point of speculation. The environmental fate and transport of TBA, P, and MGA have not been well studied. Comparisons between the fate and transport of T and 17beta-E2, however, make it clear that compounds with similar structure may behave very differently once released into the environment. Considering that 17beta-E2 is a naturally occurring estrogen and that TBA is a nonaromatizable androgen, it is not surprising that these compounds directly impact the reproductive physiology of fishes. The effects of these two compounds have been well documented, as has been described here; however, the effects of P and MGA exposures have gone largely uninvestigated. This is a serious critical gap in our knowledge base because progestogins play an important role in sex steroid synthesis and reproduction. Clearly, additional research on the consequences of exposures to P and MGA is warranted. The majority of research investigating the effects of 17beta-E2 and TBA metabolites on fish has been conducted in

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS AND CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    One in eight women is predicted to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. Of those afflicted with the disease, only about one-quarter will have a family history that helps to explain their diagnosis. The rest have what is termed sporadic cancer, potentially influenced by l...

  8. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  9. Mathematical classification of regulatory logics for compound environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Reiko J; Kimura, Hidenori

    2008-03-21

    This paper is concerned with biological regulatory mechanisms in response to the simultaneous occurrence of a huge number of environmental changes. The restricted resources of cells strictly limit the number of their regulatory methods; hence, cells must adopt, as compensation, special mechanisms to deal with the simultaneous occurrence of environmental changes. We hypothesize that cells use various control logics to integrate information about independent environmental changes related to a cell task and represent the resulting effects of the different ways of integration by logical functions. Using the notion of equivalence classes in set theory, we describe the mathematical classification of the effects into biologically unequivalent ones realized by different control logics. Our purely mathematical and systematic classification of logical functions reveals three elementary control logics with different biological relevance. To better understand their biological significance, we consider examples of biological systems that use these elementary control logics.

  10. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  11. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  12. Estrogenic compounds, chemical quantitation, biological assessment – What we know, what we don’t, and what should our future priorities be?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last two decades, the literature has become replete with reports quantifying estrogenic chemicals in the environment ranging from natural hormones to plasticizers. In addition to measuring concentrations, laboratories have developed various in vitro assays to assess estrogenic activity of ...

  13. Improved removal of estrogenic and pharmaceutical compounds in sewage effluent by full scale granular activated carbon: impact on receiving river water.

    PubMed

    Grover, D P; Zhou, J L; Frickers, P E; Readman, J W

    2011-01-30

    Sewage effluents are widely recognised as the main source of emerging contaminants, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals in surface waters. A full-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) plant has been installed as an advanced technology for the removal of these contaminants, in a major sewage treatment works (STW) in South-West England as part of the UK National Demonstration Programme for EDCs. This study presented for the first time, an assessment of the impact of a recently commissioned, post-tertiary GAC plant in the removal of emerging contaminants in a working STW. Through regular sampling followed by solid-phase extraction and analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), a significant reduction in the concentrations of steroidal estrogens was observed (>43-64%). In addition, significant reductions were observed for many of the pharmaceutical compounds such as mebeverine (84-99%), although the reduction was less dramatic for some of the more widely used pharmaceuticals analysed, including carbamazepine and propranolol (17-23%). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influences of sex, incubation temperature, and environmental quality on gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor messenger RNA expression in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Milnes, Matthew R; Kohno, Satomi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J

    2010-01-01

    Gonadal steroid hormone receptors play a vital role in transforming ligand signals into gene expression. We have shown previously that gonads from wild-caught juvenile alligators express greater levels of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) than estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2). Furthermore, sexually dimorphic ESR2 mRNA expression (female > male) observed in animals from the reference site (Lake Woodruff, FL, USA) was lost in alligators from the contaminated Lake Apopka (FL, USA). We postulated that environmental contaminant exposure could influence gonadal steroid hormone receptor expression. Here, we address questions regarding gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in 1-yr-old, laboratory-raised alligators. What are relative expression levels within gonads? Do these levels vary between sexes or incubation temperatures? Can contaminant exposure change these levels? We observed a similar pattern of expression (ESR1 > AR > ESR2) in ovary and testis. However, both incubation temperature and environment modulated expression. Males incubated at 33.5 degrees C expressed greater AR levels than females incubated at 30 degrees C; dimorphic expression was not observed in animals incubated at 32 degrees C. Compared to Lake Woodruff alligators, Lake Apopka animals of both sexes showed lesser ESR2 mRNA expression levels. Employing cluster analyses, we integrated these receptor expression patterns with those of steroidogenic factors. Elevated ESR2 and CYP19A1 expressions were diagnostic of alligator ovary, whereas elevated HSD3B1, CYP11A1, and CYP17A1 expressions were indicative of testis. In contrast, AR, ESR1, and NR5A1 showed variable expressions that were not entirely associated with sex. These findings demonstrate that the mRNA expression of receptors required for steroid hormone signaling are modified by exposure to environmental factors, including temperature and contaminants.

  15. Influences of Sex, Incubation Temperature, and Environmental Quality on Gonadal Estrogen and Androgen Receptor Messenger RNA Expression in Juvenile American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon C.; Milnes, Matthew R.; Kohno, Satomi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Iguchi, Taisen; Guillette, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Gonadal steroid hormone receptors play a vital role in transforming ligand signals into gene expression. We have shown previously that gonads from wild-caught juvenile alligators express greater levels of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) than estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2). Furthermore, sexually dimorphic ESR2 mRNA expression (female > male) observed in animals from the reference site (Lake Woodruff, FL, USA) was lost in alligators from the contaminated Lake Apopka (FL, USA). We postulated that environmental contaminant exposure could influence gonadal steroid hormone receptor expression. Here, we address questions regarding gonadal estrogen and androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in 1-yr-old, laboratory-raised alligators. What are relative expression levels within gonads? Do these levels vary between sexes or incubation temperatures? Can contaminant exposure change these levels? We observed a similar pattern of expression (ESR1 > AR > ESR2) in ovary and testis. However, both incubation temperature and environment modulated expression. Males incubated at 33.5°C expressed greater AR levels than females incubated at 30°C; dimorphic expression was not observed in animals incubated at 32°C. Compared to Lake Woodruff alligators, Lake Apopka animals of both sexes showed lesser ESR2 mRNA expression levels. Employing cluster analyses, we integrated these receptor expression patterns with those of steroidogenic factors. Elevated ESR2 and CYP19A1 expressions were diagnostic of alligator ovary, whereas elevated HSD3B1, CYP11A1, and CYP17A1 expressions were indicative of testis. In contrast, AR, ESR1, and NR5A1 showed variable expressions that were not entirely associated with sex. These findings demonstrate that the mRNA expression of receptors required for steroid hormone signaling are modified by exposure to environmental factors, including temperature and contaminants. PMID:19759368

  16. Validation and application of a rapid in vitro assay for assessing the estrogenic potency of halogenated phenolic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Körner, W; Hanf, V; Schuller, W; Bartsch, H; Zwirner, M; Hagenmaier, H

    1998-01-01

    The E-Screen assay serves as an in vitro tool for the detection of estrogenic activity of chemicals and extracts of environmental samples. Based on the induction of proliferation in human estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells we could substantially simplify the assay. As one important step of validation we applied the modified assay for testing nine known xenoestrogens. We could confirm the results of other groups assuring the reproducibility of the E-Screen assay. The results provide evidence that the E-Screen assay is suitable for determination of estradiol equivalency factors (EEFs) for environmental estrogens to rank their estrogenic potency relative to the natural estrogen 17 beta-estradiol. Further, we used the optimized proliferation test to screen nine halogenated phenolic compounds for their possible estrogenic potency. Three widely applied chemicals expressed a weak receptor-mediated estrogenic activity: the flame retardant Tetrabromo-Bisphenol-A, the disinfectant 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, and the herbicide educt 4-chloro-2-methylphenol. Their estrogenic potencies were five to six orders of magnitude lower than that of 17 beta-estradiol.

  17. Co-occurrence of estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in wastewater: quantitative evaluation of balance by in vitro ERα reporter gene assay and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masaru; Ihara, Mariko O; Kumar, Vimal; Narumiya, Masanori; Hanamoto, Seiya; Nakada, Norihide; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-06-03

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals are exogenous substances that alter the function of the endocrine system, with adverse health effects on organisms or their progeny. In vitro estrogen receptor (ER) reporter gene assays have long been used to measure estrogenic activity in wastewater. Nevertheless, there is still uncertainty about their usefulness in environmental monitoring on account of a discrepancy between the estrogenic response of the in vitro assay and concentrations of estrogenic compounds determined by chemical analysis. Here, we measured estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in wastewater by ERα reporter gene assay. All samples were simultaneously analyzed for estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol, and 17α-ethynylestradiol, and the concentrations were used to predict estrogenic activity. All samples in which measured estrogenic activity was significantly lower than predicted showed strong antiestrogenic activity. In addition, we confirmed that the fraction that did not have antiestrogenic activity showed stronger estrogenic activity than the unfractionated wastewater extract. These results indicate that antiestrogenic compounds in wastewater suppress the activity of natural estrogens, and the reporter gene assay represents the net activity.

  18. Commonly occurring plant flavonoids have estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1993-07-01

    A remarkable diversity of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds have been shown to mimic the biological effects of 17 beta-estradiol by virtue of their ability to bind to and activate the nuclear estrogen receptor. This report extends the family of nonsteroidal estrogens to include several multiply hydroxylated chalcones, flavanones, and flavones. The hormone-like activity of these natural plant products is indicated by their ability to stimulate an estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional response and to promote growth of estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells in culture. The transcriptional response can be inhibited by the steroidal estrogen antagonist ICI-164,384 and is specific for the estrogen receptor. Evidence is presented to show that selected hydroxylated flavonoids interact directly with the estrogen receptor, based on their ability to compete for the binding of 17 beta-[3H]estradiol to the receptor in cell-free extracts. These compounds are less active, on a molar basis, than 17 beta-estradiol or the synthetic dihydroxystilbene estrogens, but they have potencies comparable to those of other known phytoestrogens. Together, these findings broaden our understanding of the structure-activity relationships for nonsteroidal estrogens and present a series of new chemical prototypes for the future development of potentially useful agonists and antagonists for this nuclear receptor. The wide distribution of weakly estrogenic flavonoid pigments in food crops and medicinal plants raises additional questions about the possible health risks and benefits of these compounds, meriting closer examination of their presence in the human diet.

  19. Modeling the photocatalytic mineralization in water of commercial formulation of estrogens 17-β estradiol (E2) and nomegestrol acetate in contraceptive pills in a solar powered compound parabolic collector.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, José; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2015-07-22

    Endocrine disruptors in water are contaminants of emerging concern due to the potential risks they pose to the environment and to the aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a solar photocatalytic treatment process in a pilot-scale compound parabolic collector (CPC) was used to remove commercial estradiol formulations (17-β estradiol and nomegestrol acetate) from water. Photolysis alone degraded up to 50% of estradiol and removed 11% of the total organic carbon (TOC). In contrast, solar photocatalysis degraded up to 57% of estrogens and the TOC removal was 31%, with 0.6 g/L of catalyst load (TiO2 Aeroxide P-25) and 213.6 ppm of TOC as initial concentration of the commercial estradiols formulation. The adsorption of estrogens over the catalyst was insignificant and was modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The TOC removal via photocatalysis in the photoreactor was modeled considering the reactor fluid-dynamics, the radiation field, the estrogens mass balance, and a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law, that was expressed in terms of the rate of photon adsorption. The optimum removal of the estrogens and TOC was achieved at a catalyst concentration of 0.4 g/L in 29 mm diameter tubular CPC reactors which approached the optimum catalyst concentration and optical thickness determined from the modeling of the absorption of solar radiation in the CPC, by the six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM).

  20. Effect of diet on fecal and urinary estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Tucker, H A; Knowlton, K F; Meyer, M T; Khunjar, W O; Love, N G

    2010-05-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has identified estrogens from animal feeding operations as a major environmental concern, but few data are available to quantify the excretion of estrogenic compounds by dairy cattle. The objectives of this study were to quantify variation in estrogenic activity in feces and urine due to increased dietary inclusion of phytoestrogens. Ten Holstein heifers were assigned to 2 groups balanced for age and days pregnant; groups were randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a 2-period crossover design. Dietary treatments consisted of grass hay or red clover hay, and necessary supplements. Total collection allowed for sampling of feed refusals, feces, and urine during the last 4 d of each period. Feces and urine samples were pooled by heifer and period, and base extracts were analyzed for estrogenic activity (estrogen equivalents) using the yeast estrogen screen bioassay. Feces and urine samples collected from 5 heifers were extracted and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to quantify excretion of 7 phytoestrogenic compounds. Excretion of 17-beta estradiol equivalents in urine was higher and tended to be higher in feces for heifers fed red clover hay (84.4 and 120.2 mg/d for feces and urine, respectively) compared with those fed grass hay (57.4 and 35.6 mg/d). Analysis by LC-MS/MS indicated greater fecal excretion of equol, genistein, daidzein, coumestrol, and formononetin by heifers fed red clover hay (1634, 29.9, 96.3, 27.8, and 163 mg/d, respectively) than heifers fed grass hay (340, 3.0, 46.2, 8.8, and 18.3 mg/d, respectively). Diet had no effect on fecal biochanin A or 2-carbethoxy-5, 7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone. Four phytoestrogens were detected in urine (2-carbethoxy-5, 7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyisoflavone, daidzein, equol, and formononetin) and their excretion was not affected by diet. Identifying sources of variation in estrogenic activity of manure will aid in the

  1. Environmental fate of the antifouling compound zinc pyrithione in seawater.

    PubMed

    Grunnet, Katja S; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2005-12-01

    To perform a thorough risk assessment of the new antifouling compound zinc pyrithione (ZnPT2), additional information regarding the fate of the compound is needed. The present study examined the recovery and transchelation of ZnPT2 in controlled laboratory experiments, photodegradation experiments, and a fate study in a large-scale field experiment. Chemical analyses were performed using a newly developed method for simultaneous analyses of ZnPT2 and copper pyrithione (CuPT2). Furthermore, two antifouling paints containing ZnPT2 were examined for the fate of leaching biocide. Naturally occurring ligands and metals in seawater influence the stability of ZnPT2. The presence of free Cu2+, which is present naturally in the seawater or is released from copper-containing paints, results in a partial transchelation of ZnPT2 into CuPT2. A complete transchelation of ZnPT2 into CuPT2 was observed when Cu2+ was present at an equimolar concentration in the absence of interfering ligands. When ZnPT2 was leached from antifouling paints containing both ZnPT2 and Cu2O, CuPT2 was found, with no trace of ZnPT2. Photodegradation was low in natural waters and absent from 1 m or more below the surface. The results show that ZnPT2 has a low persistence in seawater when leached from antifouling paints. However, the more stable and toxic transchelation product CuPT2 is formed, which has the potential to accumulate in the sediments and, therefore, should be included in both chemical analysis and risk assessment of ZPT2.

  2. BIOCHEMICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ESTROGENICALLY ACTIVE WASTEWATER: COMPARISON OF FIELD EXTRAPOLATIONS TO THE MEASURED CONCENTRATION OF ESTROGENS IN SEWAGE EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenically active wastewater was observed at two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) utilizing caged male channel catfish in a previous study. The focus of this investigation was to identify and characterize the compound(s) responsible for this estrogenic response. ...

  3. Transport capabilities of environmental Pseudomonads for sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Korajczyk, Peter J; Noirot, Philippe H; Collart, Frank R

    2017-04-01

    Sulfur is an essential element in plant rhizospheres and microbial activity plays a key role in increasing the biological availability of sulfur in soil environments. To better understand the mechanisms facilitating the exchange of sulfur-containing molecules in soil, we profiled the binding specificities of eight previously uncharacterized ABC transporter solute-binding proteins from plant-associated Pseudomonads. A high-throughput screening procedure indicated eighteen significant organosulfur binding ligands, with at least one high-quality screening hit for each protein target. Calorimetric and spectroscopic methods were used to validate the best ligand assignments and catalog the thermodynamic properties of the protein-ligand interactions. Two novel high-affinity ligand-binding activities were identified and quantified in this set of solute-binding proteins. Bacteria were cultured in minimal media with screening library components supplied as the sole sulfur sources, demonstrating that these organosulfur compounds can be metabolized and confirming the relevance of ligand assignments. These results expand the set of experimentally validated ligands amenable to transport by this ABC transporter family and demonstrate the complex range of protein-ligand interactions that can be accomplished by solute-binding proteins. Characterizing new nutrient import pathways provides insight into Pseudomonad metabolic capabilities which can be used to further interrogate bacterial survival and participation in soil and rhizosphere communities.

  4. Transport capabilities of environmental Pseudomonads for sulfur compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Zerbs, Sarah; Korajczyk, Peter J.; Noirot, Philippe H.; ...

    2017-01-27

    Sulfur is an essential element in plant rhizospheres and microbial activity plays a key role in increasing the biological availability of sulfur in soil environments. To better understand the mechanisms facilitating the exchange of sulfur-containing molecules in soil, we profiled the binding specificities of eight previously uncharacterized ABC transporter solute-binding proteins from plant-associated Pseudomonads. A high-throughput screening procedure indicated eighteen significant organosulfur binding ligands, with at least one high-quality screening hit for each protein target. Calorimetric and spectroscopic methods were used to validate the best ligand assignments and catalog the thermodynamic properties of the protein-ligand interactions. Two novel high-affinity ligandmore » binding activities were identified and quantified in this set of solute binding proteins. Bacteria were cultured in minimal media with screening library components supplied as the sole sulfur sources, demonstrating that these organosulfur compounds can be metabolized and confirming the relevance of ligand assignments. These results expand the set of experimentally validated ligands amenable to transport by this ABC transporter family and demonstrate the complex range of protein-ligand interactions that can be accomplished by solute-binding proteins. As a result, characterizing new nutrient import pathways provides insight into Pseudomonad metabolic capabilities which can be used to further interrogate bacterial survival and participation in soil and rhizosphere communities.« less

  5. Interferences of an environmental pollutant with estrogen-like action in the male reproductive system of the terrestrial vertebrate Podarcis sicula.

    PubMed

    Verderame, Mariailaria; Limatola, Ermelinda

    2015-03-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is classified among the endocrine disruptor chemicals with estrogen-like properties. It is widely used in many industries and to dilute pesticides in agriculture, and is known to affect the reproductive system of many aquatic and semi-aquatic organisms. This study aimed to verify how NP, administered via food and water, may interfere with the reproductive cycle of a terrestrial vertebrate. Our model was the male Italian wall lizard Podarcis sicula, a seasonal breeding species that may be naturally exposed to environmental pollution. From our findings it emerges that an NP-polluted diet administered during the mating period causes in this lizard a slowdown of spermatogenesis and affects the testicular and epididymal structure, making it similar to that of the non-reproductive period. The distribution in the testis and epididymis of mRNA for steroid hormone receptors, i.e., estrogen α and β and androgen receptors, was also investigated. NP treatment inhibits the expression of AR, ERα, and ERβ-mRNA in spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes and causes a switch-off of the secretory activity of the epididymal corpus by inducing the expression of ERα. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological validation of a sample preparation method for ER-CALUX bioanalysis of estrogenic activity in sediment using mixtures of xeno-estrogens.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Van Houten, Yoni K; Leonards, Pim E G; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette

    2006-04-01

    The combined estrogenic effects of mixtures of environmental pollutants in the in vitro ER-CALUX (chemical activated luciferase gene expression) bioassaywere examined to biologically validate a sample preparation method for the analysis of estrogenic compounds in sediment. The method used accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and was validated with respect to recovery of biological response taking mixture effects into account. Four mixtures of three to six xenoestrogenic compounds (bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, (4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)trichloroethane, (2,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)trichloroethane, dieldrin, 4-n-octylphenol, alpha-chlordane, dibutylphthalate, (4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)dichloroethylene, and 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl) were prepared. Experimentally determined mixture effects were well described by the concept of concentration addition (CA), as expected for similarly acting compounds. Observed estradiol equivalence factors of the mixtures (on average 1.2 +/- 0.3) agreed very well with the value predicted according to CA. The sample preparation method was then applied to pure mixtures of standards and to sediment spiked with one of the mixtures. Recoveries of estrogenic compounds were estimated by determination of their mixture potencies in ER-CALUX and compared to the mixture effects predicted by CA. Recoveries of estrogenic activity were between 80 and 129%, indicating that the additive behavior of mixtures of xeno-estrogens is well conserved during sample preparation. Together with an average repeatability of 18.3%, low average limit of detection (2.6 +/- 1.8 pg of EEQ/ g), and coefficient of variance (3.5 +/- 3.3%),this demonstrated the suitability of the sample preparation method for the analysis of mixtures of (xeno-)estrogenic compounds in sediment with the ER-CALUX assay.

  7. Urine and serum biomonitoring of exposure to environmental estrogens II: Soy isoflavones and zearalenone in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Teeguarden, Justin G

    2016-09-01

    Urine and serum biomonitoring was used to measure internal exposure to selected dietary estrogens in a cohort of 30 pregnant women. Exposure was measured over a period comprising one-half day in the field (6 h) and one day in a clinic (24 h). Biomonitoring of the dietary phytoestrogens genistein (GEN), daidzein (DDZ) and equol (EQ), as well as the mycoestrogen, zearalenone (ZEN) and its congeners, was conducted using UPLC-MS/MS. Biomonitoring revealed evidence of internal exposure to naturally occurring dietary estrogens during pregnancy. Urinary concentrations of total GEN, DDZ and EQ were similar to levels reported for general adult U.S. Measurable concentrations of total (parent and metabolites) GEN, DDZ and EQ were present in 240, 207 and 2 of 270 serum samples, respectively. Six out of 30 subjects had measurable concentrations of unconjugated GEN and/or DDZ in serum between 0.6 and 7.1 nM. Urine to serum total isoflavone ratios for GEN, DDZ and EQ were 13, 47, and 180, respectively. ZEN and its reductive metabolite, α-zearalenol (α-ZEL), were present in pregnant women (11 out of 30 subjects) as conjugates at levels near the limit of quantification. The average total urinary concentration was 0.10 μg/L for ZEN and 0.11 μg/L for α-ZEL. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The Expression of Leptin, Estrogen Receptors, and Vitellogenin mRNAs in Migrating Female Chum Salmon, Oncorhynchus keta: The Effects of Hypo-osmotic Environmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Na Na; Shin, Hyun Suk; Choi, Cheol Young

    2014-04-01

    Leptin plays an important role in energy homeostasis and reproductive function in fish, especially in reproduction. Migrating fish, such as salmonoids, are affected by external environmental factors, and salinity changes are a particularly important influence on spawning migrations. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in salinity affect the expression of leptin, estrogen receptors (ERs), and vitellogenin (VTG) in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). The expression and activity of leptin, the expression of ERs and VTG, and the levels of estradiol-17β and cortisol increased after the fish were transferred to FW, demonstrating that changes in salinity stimulate the HPG axis in migrating female chum salmon. These findings reveal details about the role of elevated leptin levels and sex steroid hormones in stimulating sexual maturation and reproduction in response to salinity changes in chum salmon.

  9. Separations of compounds of biological and environmental interest by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Balchunas, A.T.; Swaile, D.F.; Powell, A.C.; Sepaniak, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Important criteria for the effective separation of compounds of biological or environmental interest by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography are discussed. Efficiencies of approximately 100,000 plates/meter are achieved in the separations of samples of derivatized amines, aflatoxins, and hydroxy aromatic compounds. Laser fluorometric detection is shown to be capable of detecting subpicogram injected quantities. Organic solvents such as 2-propanol and acetonitrile are added to the aqueous mobile phases normally used to improve the separation of hydrophobic compounds, impart different selectivities, and provide a means for gradient programming. Column diameter is found to influence efficiency, analysis time, and detection.

  10. Research and Development of Methods for Estimating Physicochemical Properties of Organic Compounds of Environmental Concern

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    Trangport and Transformation of Pollutants an Land and Warer : Processes and Critical Data Required for Predictive Description; May 11-13, 1976: National...one of these goals is for the model to act as a " monitoring "’ instrument. If information is available concerning the source inputs, environmental...pathways. and sensitive environmental targets of a certain compound, a model can be used to monitor the effectiveness of chemical control programs

  11. Rapid CE-UV binding tests of environmentally hazardous compounds with polymer-modified magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Alsudir, Samar; Miah, Musharraf; Lai, Edward P C

    2011-08-01

    Hazardous compounds and bacteria in water have an adverse impact on human health and environmental ecology. Polydopamine (or polypyrrole)-coated magnetic nanoparticles and polymethacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate submicron particles were investigated for their fast binding kinetics with bisphenol A, proflavine, naphthalene acetic acid, and Escherichia coli. A new method was developed for the rapid determination of % binding by sequential injection of particles first and compounds (or E. coli) next into a fused-silica capillary for overlap binding during electrophoretic migration. Only nanolitre volumes of compounds and particles were sufficient to complete a rapid binding test. After heterogeneous binding, separation of the compounds from the particles was afforded by capillary electrophoresis. % binding was influenced by applied voltage but not current flow. In-capillary coating of particles affected the % binding of compounds.

  12. Post-refining removal of organic nitrogen compounds from diesel fuels to improve environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Mushrush, George W; Quintana, Marian A; Bauserman, Joy W; Willauer, Heather D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to remove the organic nitrogen compounds from petroleum-derived diesel fuels. These nitrogen compounds can cause environmental problems, as well as fuel instability problems that can degrade fuels and affect engine performance. Fuels were treated with two different filtering media, activated clay and silica tel. The methylene chloride extracts from both the activated clay and silica gel were subjected to GC/MS analysis. Close to 99% of the total organic nitrogen compounds were removed. About 60% of the nitrogen compounds identified consisted of pyridines, quinolines and tetra-hydroquinolines made up 26%, while indoles and carbazoles about 10% of the total nitrogen compounds. Of the nitrogen heterocyclics identified, indoles and carbazoles were linked to fuel instability reactions. The proposed method was tested on diesels fuels from a variety of countries and found to remove between 97.8 and 99.9% of the N-compounds. The results of this study showed that both of these filtering materials were effective in removing the organic nitrogen compounds and resulted in fuels that exhibited excellent storage stability. These simple filtering methods can be independent of the refining process and do result in an environmentally cleaner burning fuel.

  13. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX EXTRACTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Unidentified Organic Compounds. For target analytes, standards are purchased, extraction and clean-up procedures are optimized, and mass spectra and retention times for the chromatographic separation are obtained for comparison to the target compounds in environmental sample ...

  14. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX EXTRACTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Unidentified Organic Compounds. For target analytes, standards are purchased, extraction and clean-up procedures are optimized, and mass spectra and retention times for the chromatographic separation are obtained for comparison to the target compounds in environmental sample ...

  15. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... carefully for side effects.tell your doctor what herbal products you are taking, especially St. John's wort.tell your doctor if you have or have ever had yellowing of the skin or eyes during pregnancy or during your treatment with an estrogen product, endometriosis (a condition in ...

  16. HOMOLOGY MODELING OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR SUBTYPE BETA (ER-BETA) AND CALCULATION OF LIGAND BINDING AFFINITIES. (R826133)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone playing critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development, female and male reproductive processes, and bone health. Numerous natural and synthetic environmental compounds have been shown capa...

  17. HOMOLOGY MODELING OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR SUBTYPE BETA (ER-BETA) AND CALCULATION OF LIGAND BINDING AFFINITIES. (R826133)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone playing critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development, female and male reproductive processes, and bone health. Numerous natural and synthetic environmental compounds have been shown capa...

  18. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for brown trout vitellogenin for use in the detection of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, A.; Solomon, K.; Sherry, J.; Fielden, M.; Hodson, P.

    1995-12-31

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is a phospholipoprotein egg yolk precursor found in females of most oviparous vertebrates. Vitellogenin induction in male teleosts is known to result from exposure to xenoestrogens. Using antisera for brown trout Vg, the authors adapted an (ELISA) for in vivo Vg in brown trout (Salmo trutta). The authors will use the Vg bioassay to detect the estrogenic effects of effluents, contaminated sediments and suspect chemicals. Vg production in male fish was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 11-B estradiol. Harvested and purified Vg was used in an assay based on competition between soluble Vg and Vg adsorbed in microtitre wells for binding sites on rabbit anti-Vg antibody. Adsorbed Vg-antibody complexes were subsequently revealed by an alkaline phosphatase technique. The reaction intensity was measured as absorbance and used to quantify the amount of antibody bound to adsorbed Vg. The amount of bound antibody was inversely proportional to the amount of vitellogenin in the fish plasma. Preliminary results show that the assay`s working range, corresponding to 80--20% binding, was 14--355 ng/ml, with 50% binding (IC{sub 50}) around 71 ng/mi. Calculated at 50% binding, the intra-assay variation was less than 8% (n = 9) and the inter-assay variation was also less than 8% (n =4). The assay`s sensitivity was 0.067 ng/mi and the limit of detection was 0.134 ng/ml. The authors will present the results of Vg bioassays for the presence of estrogen mimics in industrial effluent.

  19. Occurrence, fate and environmental risk assessment of endocrine disrupting compounds at the wastewater treatment works in Pietermaritzburg (South Africa).

    PubMed

    Manickum, T; John, W

    2014-01-15

    Steroid hormone Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) (natural estrogens (17-β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), synthetic estrogen (17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)), natural androgen (testosterone) (tes) and natural progestogen (progesterone) (pro)) at an activated sludge wastewater works (WWW), were quantitated using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The steroid hormone profile in the adjacent surface water was also determined. Pro was the most abundant (41%, 408 ng/L) in the influent, followed by tes (35%, 343 ng/L) and E2 (12%, 119 ng/L). E1 was the most abundant (35%, 23 ng/L) in effluent, followed by E2 (30%, 20 ng/L) and tes (17%, 11 ng/L). Chemical removal efficiencies of the steroid hormones by the WWW averaged 92%. High removal efficiency was observed for pro (98% ± 2) and tes (96% ± 1), compared to natural (72-100%) and synthetic estrogen (90% ± 3), with biodegradation being the major removal route for pro and tes. The lowest removal for E2 is in spring (65%), and maximum removal is in winter (95%). Natural (E2, E1) and synthetic estrogen (EE2) were major contributors to influent (E2 = 69%) and effluent (E2 = 73%) estrogenic potency. The estrogenic potency removal averaged 85% (range: 73-100). Risk assessment of the steroid hormones present in wastewater effluent, and surface water, indicated that EE2 and E2 pose the highest risk to human health and fish. EE2 was found to be much more resistant to biodegradation, compared to E2, in surface water. Estrone, as the breakdown product of E2 and EE2 in wastewater, appears to be suitable as an indicator of EDCs. The study suggests that a battery of tests: quantitative chemical assay, bioassay for estrogenic activity and risk assessment methods, collectively, are preferred in order to make meaningful, accurate conclusions regarding potential adverse effects of EDCs present in treated wastewater effluent or surface water, to the aquatic environment, human health, and wildlife systems.

  20. Assessment of Environmental Effects of Ordnance Compounds and their Transformation Products in Coastal Ecosystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    common sediment bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp. and Aeromonas sp. before and after... Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp. and Aeromonas sp. are known important decomposers in sediments and...including some compounds of environmental concern such as substituted azobenzenes or phenazines (Haderlein and Schwarzenbach 1995). Aminonitrotoluenes

  1. Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds of Environmental Interest: Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Thomas G.; Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) have been assigned environmental roles in global warming, acid precipitation, and cloud formation where two important members dimethyl sulfide (CH3)2 S, DMS, and methanethiol, CH3SH, MT, of VOSC group are involved.

  2. Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds of Environmental Interest: Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Thomas G.; Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) have been assigned environmental roles in global warming, acid precipitation, and cloud formation where two important members dimethyl sulfide (CH3)2 S, DMS, and methanethiol, CH3SH, MT, of VOSC group are involved.

  3. Investigation of the estrogenic activities of pesticides from Pal-dang reservoir by in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Jin; Jung, Yeon Jung; Kang, Joon-Wun; Yoo, Young Sook

    2007-12-15

    Endocrine disruptors, when absorbed into the body, interfere with the normal function by mimicking or blocking the hormone system. To investigate compounds mimicking estrogen in the drinking water source of the residence of Seoul, the Pal-dang reservoir was monitored over a period of 5 years, between 2000 and 2004. Nine kinds of pesticide (carbaryl, DBCP, diazinon, fenitrothion, fenobucarb, flutolanil, iprobenphos, isoprothiolane and parathion) were found to exist in the river water sample. These compounds were detected at low concentrations in the water samples. The total concentration and those of each of these pesticides were below the permissible limits of the National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER), Korea. The estrogenic potencies of the nine pesticides were examined using an E-screen assay with MCF-7 BUS estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast cancer cells, with ER-negative MDA MB 231 cell lines also used to compare the results. From this, flutolanil and isoprothiolane were confirmed to have estrogenic activities as shown by the increasing MCF-7 BUS cell growth on their addition. In addition, the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) protein, estrogen receptor-regulated progesterone receptor (PR) and pS2 mRNA levels on the addition of flutolanil and isoprothiolane were measured with MCF-7 BUS cells. It was observed that the levels of ERalpha protein decreased and those of the PR and pS2 genes increased on the addition of either flutolanil or isoprothiolane at concentrations of 10(-4) M, in the same manner as with the addition of 17beta-estradiol, which was used as the positive control. From these results, it was confirmed that flutolanil and isoprothiolane exhibit estrogenic activities, suggesting they might act through estrogen receptors.

  4. Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds of Environmental Interest: Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol. An Introductory Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasteen, Thomas G.; Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    Volatile organic sulfur compounds and their degradation products play important environmental roles in global warming, acid precipitation, and cloud formation. Two important members of this group, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and methanethiol, MT, are formed by living organisms as well as by abiotic processes. DMS is synthesized by various organisms in the marine environment and large quantities of it are released to the atmosphere. One key precursor for DMS synthesis is the sulfonium salt, dimethylsulfoniopropionate. MT, also formed in marine environments, can be further converted to DMS. The chemical reactions responsible for the biosynthesis of DMS and MT are emphasized here, as well as means for their degradation. Since sulfur compounds are often ignored in normal course work, this article provides a basic foundation for an understanding of these interesting and environmentally significant compounds.

  5. Clinical breath analysis: discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Risby, Terence H

    2013-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic (anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous have been proposed to be useful as preclinical biomarkers of various undiagnosed diseases including lung cancer, breast cancer, and cardio-pulmonary disease. The usual approach is to develop difference algorithms comparing VOC profiles from nominally healthy controls to cohorts of patients presenting with a documented disease, and then to apply the resulting rules to breath profiles of subjects with unknown disease status. This approach to diagnosis has a progression of sophistication; at the most rudimentary level, all measurable VOCs are included in the model. The next level corrects exhaled VOC concentrations for current inspired air concentrations. At the highest level, VOCs exhibiting discriminatory value also require a plausible biochemical pathway for their production before inclusion. Although these approaches have all shown some level of success, there is concern that pattern recognition is prone to error from environmental contamination and between-subject variance. In this paper, we explore the underlying assumptions for the interpretation and assignment of endogenous compounds with probative value for assessing changes. Specifically, we investigate the influence of previous exposures, elimination mechanisms and partitioning of exogenous compounds as confounders of true endogenous compounds. We provide specific examples based on a simple classical pharmacokinetic approach to identify potential misinterpretations of breath data and propose some remedies.

  6. Estrogenic activity in sediments from European mountain lakes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Piña, Benjamin; Grimalt, Joan O; Fernández, Pilar; Fonts, Roger; Polvillo, Oliva; Martrat, Belen

    2005-03-15

    Superficial and bottom sediment samples from 83 European mountain lakes, ranging from Norway to the Pyrenees and East Europe, were tested for estrogenic compounds by the recombinant yeast assay. The results showed widespread potential estrogenic activity arriving at remote lakes. Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) and Scotland Highlands were the regions with the highest prevalence of lakes with high estrogenic values. Comparison of the estrogenic activity in the superficial layer of sediments with pre-industrial age sections showed that estrogenic compounds were predominantly deposited in recent times. Chemical analysis showed that highly estrogenic sediments were significantly enriched in both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and organochlorine compounds. For PAH, enrichment ratios in highly estrogenic samples versus nonestrogenic ones were inversely correlated with the vapor pressure value for each compound, indicating a significant relationship between estrogenicity and accumulation of less volatile PAH. Two PAH of predominantly diagenetic origin, retene and perylene, did not show specific enrichment in estrogenic samples. Principal component analysis revealed a strong correlation between estrogenic activity and the presence of contaminants of anthropogenic origin. These data reveal significant amounts of estrogenic compounds in remote lakes, relate them to the overall human activity, and suggest that they may affect organisms inhabiting these ecosystems.

  7. Enzymatic electrochemical detection coupled to multivariate calibration for the determination of phenolic compounds in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Silvia R; Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel

    2013-03-15

    An approach based on the electrochemical detection of the horseradish peroxidase enzymatic reaction by means of square wave voltammetry was developed for the determination of phenolic compounds in environmental samples. First, a systematic optimization procedure of three factors involved in the enzymatic reaction was carried out using response surface methodology through a central composite design. Second, the enzymatic electrochemical detection coupled with a multivariate calibration method based in the partial least-squares technique was optimized for the determination of a mixture of five phenolic compounds, i.e. phenol, p-aminophenol, p-chlorophenol, hydroquinone and pyrocatechol. The calibration and validation sets were built and assessed. In the calibration model, the LODs for phenolic compounds oscillated from 0.6 to 1.4 × 10(-6) mol L(-1). Recoveries for prediction samples were higher than 85%. These compounds were analyzed simultaneously in spiked samples and in water samples collected close to tanneries and landfills.

  8. Comparison of in vitro cytotoxicity, estrogenicity and anti-estrogenicity of triclosan, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Henry, Natasha D; Fair, Patricia A

    2013-04-01

    Concern with increasing levels of emerging contaminants exists on a global scale. Three commonly observed emerging environmental contaminants: triclosan (2,4,4-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether), a synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), used in stain- and water-resistant treatments, have become distributed ubiquitously across ecosystems and have been detected in wildlife and humans. MCF-7 BOS human breast cancer cells were used to investigate the potential for cytotoxicity, estrogenicity and anti-estrogenicity of these three compounds at environmentally relevant concentrations using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt assay (MTS) and the E-SCREEN bioassay. The doses used were 0.002-200 µg ml(-1) for triclosan and 0.03-30 µg ml(-1) for PFOS and PFOA. Quantitative results from the MTS assay revealed no significant cytotoxicity at lower concentrations for any of the test compounds; however, both triclosan and PFOA were cytotoxic at the highest concentrations examined (100-200 and 30 µg ml(-1), respectively), while PFOS showed no significant cytotoxicity at any of the concentrations tested. Positive estrogenic responses (P < 0.05) were elicited from the E-SCREEN at all concentrations examined for triclosan and PFOA and at 30 µg ml(-1) for PFOS. Further, significant anti-estrogenic activity (P < 0.05) was detected for all compounds tested at all concentrations when cells were co-exposed with 10(-9) m 17-β estradiol (E(2)). The overall results demonstrated that triclosan, PFOS and PFOA have estrogenic activities and that co-exposure to contaminants and E(2) produced anti-estrogenic effects. Each of these compounds could provide a source of xenoestrogens to humans and wildlife in the environment. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2011. This article is

  9. Detection, transport and degradation of free and conjugated estrogens in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeppert, Nadine; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The behavior of Estradiol (E2), Estrone (E1) and Estrone-Sulfate (E1-3S) in a natural soil is analyzed in terms of transport and metabolic degradation properties. These compounds are released into the environment in significant amounts and have been shown to potentially contribute to endocrine disruption in humans and wildlife. Although literature data demonstrate that hormones sorb strongly to soil and also degrade quickly, significant amounts, especially of conjugated estrogens, can be still detected in various environmental media. Moreover, several recent studies note that hormones bind to colloidal organic carbon, which can facilitate hormone transport and decrease the degree of hormone degradation. These findings thus suggest a moderate mobility and persistence of estrogen compounds and their metabolites. However, many uncertainties regarding the transport and fate of estrogen compounds remain, which are complicated by difficulties in sampling and detection. Most research is performed at the catchment scale where large volumes of water are available for analysis. In addition, laboratory batch tests usually involve estrogen concentrations that are large and unrealistic for environmental conditions, or require use of labeled compounds for which it is unclear whether the substance measured is parent or metabolite. There is a serious lack of transport studies under controlled conditions, using small water volumes and low detection limits, which are crucial to understand the basic transport processes of estrogen transport and degradation. Here, we present a protocol for hormone measurement using an online-SPE LC-MS/MS for detection. We use the method to quantify free estrogens and metabolites at low concentrations in small sample volumes (~mL) of water and soil extracts. The study includes batch (sorption) and transport tests in flow-through columns, using natural clay-rich soil from Bet Dagan, Israel. Consideration of sorption and transport experiments using both

  10. Determination of estrogenic activity by LYES-assay (yeast estrogen screen-assay assisted by enzymatic digestion with lyticase).

    PubMed

    Schultis, T; Metzger, J W

    2004-12-01

    In order to enhance the sensitivity and the speed of the yeast estrogen screen (YES)-assay, which has been established in many laboratories for the determination of estrogenic activity of compounds and environmental samples, the LYES-assay, a modified version of the YES-assay including a digestion step with the enzyme lyticase, was developed. With the LYES-assay the estrogenic activities of natural (17beta-estradiol E2 and estrone), synthetic (17alpha-ethinylestradiol EE2) and pharmaceutical estrogens (diethylstilbestrol DES) as well as xenoestrogens (4-nonylphenol NP and five parabens) were determined and compared with the results obtained by other in vitro-assays namely the conventional YES-assay, the E-Screen-assay (MCF-7 breast tumor cell proliferation) and a receptor binding-assay (RB) with human estrogen receptors hER-alpha and hER-beta. In the case of E2 the LYES-assay had a significantly lower limit of quantification (LOQ) than the conventional YES-assay and even two orders of magnitude lower than the RB-assay. Compared to the E-Screen-assay the LOQ of the LYES-assay was almost one order of magnitude higher. The time required to perform the LYES-assay was as little as seven hours compared to three to five days for the conventional YES-assay. Thus, the LYES-assay is a very good alternative to existing estrogenic in vitro-assays, since it has a good sensitivity, is cheap and much faster than the other assays.

  11. The anti-estrogenic activity of sediments from agriculturally-intense watersheds: Assessment using in vivo and in vitro assays

    PubMed Central

    Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K.; Conoan, Nicholas H.; Cox, Marc B.; Sangster, Jodi L.; Balsiger, Heather A.; Bridges, Andrew A.; Cowman, Tim; Knight, Lindsey A.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Kolok, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    compound in these extracts. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of a variety of steroid hormones, including those associated with the production of beef cattle (ie: β-trenbolone, α-zearalanol and α-zearalenol), in sediments indicating that compounds utilized by local beef cattle operations are capable of entering nearby watersheds. Overall, the results of this study indicate that an environmentally-relevant anti-estrogenic compound is present in sediments from agriculturally-intense watersheds and that this compound is bioavailable to fish. Furthermore, the presence of steroid hormones in sediments from these watersheds provides evidence indicating that steroids are capable of sorbing to sediments. Clearly, sediments are capable of acting as a source of endocrine-disrupting compounds in the aquatic environment. PMID:21723217

  12. Occurrence and analysis of estrogens and progestogens in river sediments by liquid chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López de Alda, Maria J; Gil, Asunción; Paz, Esther; Barceló, Damià

    2002-10-01

    In this study, an analytical procedure for the determination in sediment of the most abundant and/or physiological active estrogens (estradiol, estriol, estrone, ethynyl estradiol, and diethylstilbestrol) and progestogens (progesterone, norethindrone. and levonorgestrel) is described. The procedure includes ultrasonic extraction of the lyophilized sediment, clean-up with octadecylsilica cartridges, and analysis by liquid chromatography-diode array detection-mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-MS). MS detection is performed with an electrospray interface in the positive ion mode for determination of the progestogens and in the negative ion mode for determination of the estrogens. The method was applied to the determination of the target compounds in river sediments from the area of Catalonia. Estrogens and progestogens were found at concentrations usually in the low ng g(-1) range. Estriol and norethindrone were the compounds most frequently found whereas maximum concentrations in all sediment samples were obtained for ethynyl estradiol (22.8 ng g(-1)) and estrone (11.9 ng g(-1)). Detection limits were in the range of 0.04-1.00 ng g(-1). Preliminary conjectures with regards to the environmental behavior and impact of estrogens and progestogens in rivers are made. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first work reporting a detailed method for the analysis of estrogens and progestogens in river sediments and data on the environmental occurrence of both groups of compounds.

  13. Detection of immunotoxic effects of estrogenic and androgenic endocrine disrupting compounds using splenic immune cells of the female three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus (L.).

    PubMed

    Bado-Nilles, A; Techer, R; Porcher, J M; Geffard, A; Gagnaire, B; Betoulle, S; Sanchez, W

    2014-09-01

    Today, the list of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in freshwater and marine environments that mimic or block endogenous hormones is expanding at an alarming rate. As immune and reproductive systems may interact in a bidirectional way, some authors proposed the immune capacities as attractive markers to evaluate the hormonal potential of environmental samples. Thus, the present work proposed to gain more knowledge on direct biological effects of natural and EDCs on female fish splenic leucocyte non-specific immune activities by using ex vivo assays. After determining the optimal required conditions to analyze splenic immune responses, seven different EDCs were tested ex vivo at 0.01, 1 and 100nM over 12h on the leucocyte functions of female three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. In summary, we found that natural hormones acted as immunostimulants, whilst EDCs were immunosuppressive.

  14. Solving practical problems in environmental sampling for chemical agents and their degradation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.E.; Sheely, M.V.

    1995-06-01

    The analyses of environmental samples for chemical agent degradation products were conducted using analytical test methods designed for evaluation of solid waste samples. All methods are found in the 3rd Edition of EPA`s compendium of analytical methods (SW-846) dated July 1992. These EPA methods are recommended for compliance testing required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and are routinely used for the analysis of environmental samples. In the past several years, these same methods were used to support the survey of areas suspected of having chemical agent or chemical agent degradation compound contamination. An overview is presented of the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine`s (previously the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency) involvement with the analysis of samples for chemical agents and their degradation compounds collected from sites such as Tooele Army Depot, Rocky Mt. Arsenal, Newport Army Depot, Johnston Island, and Spring Valley, (a residential site near American University in Washington D.C.) Discussed are practical problems encountered during a quick response of a non-surety laboratory to analyze environmental samples for agents and their degradation compounds.

  15. Genetic and environmental factors affecting host response to drugs and other chemical compounds in our environment.

    PubMed Central

    Vesell, E S; Passananti, G T

    1977-01-01

    Compared to laboratory animals, humans are extremely heterogenous with respect to the many factors that can influence the distribution and biological effects of toxic chemicals. This heterogeneity can prevent an accurate assessment of the impact of a particular toxic compound on the health of an individual subject. Some of the factors that can significantly modify the host response to certain drugs, which serve in this review as a model for environmental chemicals, are enumerated and discussed. Although the mechanisms by which many of these factors modify the biological effects of certain environmental chemicals and drugs have been determined in some cases, better definition of the nature of interactions between these factors and environmental chemicals in a particular individual is required at a biochemical and molecular level. Recommendations are offered for the further development of our knowledge concerning interactions between environmental chemicals and such factors in a particular individual. PMID:598349

  16. Estrogens in the daily diet: in vitro analysis indicates that estrogenic activity is omnipresent in foodstuff and infant formula.

    PubMed

    Behr, Maximilian; Oehlmann, Jörg; Wagner, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Food is a main source of exposure to endocrine active compounds, many of which have been linked to adverse health effects. Phytoestrogens, especially from soy, are the major dietary source of estrogenicity. However, foodstuff contains a variety of estrogen-like compounds that might not be detected analytically. To assess the total estrogenic activity of foodstuff, we employed the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES). We analyzed 18 food samples and five milk-based infant formulas. Soy-based products contained potent estrogenicity of 100-1500ng estradiol equivalents per kilogram (EEQ/kg). The estrogenicity in soy-free products was far lower (10-40ng EEQ/kg). We also detected significant estrogenic activity in three infant formulas (14-22ng EEQ/kg). Furthermore, we found soy lecithin to be strongly estrogenic. It might, therefore, be a major contributor to total estrogenicity. We conclude that dietary estrogens are omnipresent and not limited to soy-based food. In an exposure assessment we calculated a total dietary intake of 27.5 and 34.0ng EEQ/d for adults and 1.46ng EEQ/d for infants. While the dietary exposure to estrogenic activity is lower than previously estimated, our results demonstrate that many food types are a source of unidentified estrogen-like compounds still awaiting toxicological evaluation.

  17. Methodologies for the extraction of phenolic compounds from environmental samples: new approaches.

    PubMed

    Mahugo Santana, Cristina; Sosa Ferrera, Zoraida; Esther Torres Padrón, M; Juan Santana Rodríguez, José

    2009-01-09

    Phenolic derivatives are among the most important contaminants present in the environment. These compounds are used in several industrial processes to manufacture chemicals such as pesticides, explosives, drugs and dyes. They also are used in the bleaching process of paper manufacturing. Apart from these sources, phenolic compounds have substantial applications in agriculture as herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. However, phenolic compounds are not only generated by human activity, but they are also formed naturally, e.g., during the decomposition of leaves or wood. As a result of these applications, they are found in soils and sediments and this often leads to wastewater and ground water contamination. Owing to their high toxicity and persistence in the environment, both, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Union have included some of them in their lists of priority pollutants. Current standard methods of phenolic compounds analysis in water samples are based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) while Soxhlet extraction is the most used technique for isolating phenols from solid matrices. However, these techniques require extensive cleanup procedures that are time-intensive and involve expensive and hazardous organic solvents, which are undesirable for health and disposal reasons. In the last years, the use of news methodologies such as solid-phase extraction (SPE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) have increased for the extraction of phenolic compounds from liquid samples. In the case of solid samples, microwave assisted extraction (MAE) is demonstrated to be an efficient technique for the extraction of these compounds. In this work we review the developed methods in the extraction and determination of phenolic derivatives in different types of environmental matrices such as water, sediments and soils. Moreover, we present the new approach in the use of micellar media coupled with SPME process for the extraction of phenolic

  18. Bioactivation of dibrominated biphenyls by cytochrome P450 activity to metabolites with estrogenic activity and estrogen sulfotransferase inhibition capacity.

    PubMed

    van Lipzig, Marola M H; Commandeur, Jan N; de Kanter, Frans J J; Damsten, Micaela C; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Maat, Evelina; Groot, Ed J; Brouwer, Abraham; Kester, Monique H A; Visser, Theo J; Meerman, John H N

    2005-11-01

    Exposure of humans and wildlife to xenobiotics, such as halogenated biphenyls, that interfere with the endogenous estrogen balance may lead to endocrine disruption. Such compounds may either mimic or block estradiol's action by agonistic or antagonistic action, respectively. They may also affect endogenous estradiol concentrations by induction or inhibition of enzymes that metabolize estradiol. In the present study, we demonstrate that estrogenic metabolites of two brominated biphenyls, 2,2'-dibromobiphenyl (2,2'-DBB) and 4,4'-dibromobiphenyl (4,4'-DBB), are formed by rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity. Bioactivation of 2,2'-DBB and 4,4'-DBB yielded various mono- and dihydroxylated bromobiphenyl metabolites, which were collected by preparative HPLC and analyzed by LC/MS. Several of the metabolites bound to the estrogen receptor (ER) activated the ER and inhibited human estrogen sulfotransferase (hEST). Seven monohydroxylated metabolites were positively identified using synthetic monohydroxylated reference compounds. These synthetic monohydroxylated bromobiphenyls also bound to and activated the ER and inhibited hEST. The highest ER affinity was observed for 4-OH-2,2'-DBB, with an EC50 of 6.6 nM. The highest ER activation was observed for 4-OH-3,4'-DBB (EC50 of 74 nM) while 4-OH-4'-MBB and 4-OH-2,2'-DBB induced a supramaximal (as compared to estradiol) ER activation. The strongest hEST inhibition was found with 4-OH-3,4'-DBB (EC50 = 40 nM). In conclusion, we show that two dibrominated biphenyls are bioactivated by CYP activity into very potent estrogenic metabolites and inhibitors of hEST. These findings are of vital importance for accurate risk assessment of exposure to environmental contaminants, such as halogenated biphenyls. Neglecting bioactivation through biotransformation will lead to underestimation of health risks of this class of xenobiotics.

  19. Determination of estrogenic activity in the river Chienti (Marche Region, Italy) by using in vivo and in vitro bioassays.

    PubMed

    Cocci, Paolo; Palermo, Francesco Alessandro; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Miano, Antonino; Mosconi, Gilberto

    2016-05-01

    Environmental estrogen-like compounds (i.e. xenoestrogens) are a variety of pollutants, ranging from synthetic to natural occurring molecules, that are found in surface and waste waters over a wide range of concentrations. In aquatic environment, the overall estrogenic activity is often due to the presence of a mixture of chemicals and their degraded products which can induce synergistic effects. Current strategies for monitoring estrogen-like chemicals are based on the use of a battery of in vivo and in vitro ecotoxicological tests. In this regard, the aim of the present work was to carry out a bio-monitoring study for testing estrogenicity of the Chienti river (Marche Region, Italy) by using both an E-screen and a vitellogenin (Vtg) induction assay in juvenile goldfish. Three sites were used for analysis, localized at the mouth (sampling point 1), in the middle (sampling point 2) and at the origin (sampling point 3) of Chienti river. For most of the water samples (i.e. samples collected at sampling points 2 and 3), clear estrogenic activity was detected in the E-screen assay suggesting different proliferation activities in function of the collecting site. In contrast, the Vtg ELISA demonstrated that water samples collected from each sampling point were estrogenic. Overall, we showed for the first time that the estrogenic activities in water samples from the Chienti river were significant in both in vivo and in vitro; we also observed a different sensitivity between bioassays.

  20. The Behavior of Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds in an Aggressive Coastal Marine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The shift to use environmentally friendly technologies throughout future space-related launch programs prompted a study aimed at replacing current petroleum and solvent-based Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) with environmentally friendly alternatives. The work in this paper focused on the identification and evaluation of environmentally friendly CPCs for use in protecting flight hardware and ground support equipment from atmospheric corrosion. The CPCs, while a temporary protective coating, must survive in the aggressive coastal marine environment that exists throughout the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The different protection behaviors of fifteen different soft film CPCs, both common petroleum-based and newer environmentally friendly types, were evaluated on various steel and aluminum substrates. The CPC and substrate systems were subjected to atmospheric testing at the Kennedy Space Center's Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site, as well as cyclic accelerated corrosion testing. Each CPC also underwent physical characterization and launch-related compatibility testing . The initial results for the fifteen CPC systems are reported : Key words: corrosion preventive compound, CPC, spaceport, environmentally friendly, atmospheric exposure, marine, carbon steel, aluminum alloy, galvanic corrosion, wire on bolt.

  1. A ternary classification using machine learning methods of distinct estrogen receptor activities within a large collection of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Yan, Lu; Wu, Yan; Ji, Li; Chen, Yuanchen; Zhao, Meirong; Dong, Xiaowu

    2017-02-15

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which can threaten ecological safety and be harmful to human beings, have been cause for wide concern. There is a high demand for efficient methodologies for evaluating potential EDCs in the environment. Herein an evaluation platform was developed using novel and statistically robust ternary models via different machine learning models (i.e., linear discriminant analysis, classification and regression tree, and support vector machines). The platform is aimed at effectively classifying chemicals with agonistic, antagonistic, or no estrogen receptor (ER) activities. A total of 440 chemicals from the literature were selected to derive and optimize the three-class model. One hundred and nine new chemicals appeared on the 2014 EPA list for EDC screening, which were used to assess the predictive performances by comparing the E-screen results with the predicted results of the classification models. The best model was obtained using support vector machines (SVM) which recognized agonists and antagonists with accuracies of 76.6% and 75.0%, respectively, on the test set (with an overall predictive accuracy of 75.2%), and achieved a 10-fold cross-validation (CV) of 73.4%. The external predicted accuracy validated by the E-screen assay was 87.5%, which demonstrated the application value for a virtual alert for EDCs with ER agonistic or antagonistic activities. It was demonstrated that the ternary computational model could be used as a faster and less expensive method to identify EDCs that act through nuclear receptors, and to classify these chemicals into different mechanism groups.

  2. Fate of Estrogens in Soils and Detection by ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Emmanuelle; Sheedy, Claudia; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Zvomuya, Francis; Gaultier, Jeanette; Goddard, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Land application of manure can contribute to the release of estrogenic compounds in the environment. Estrogens may move from soils to water by processes such as runoff and leaching. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fate of estrogens in soils and to develop a detection method for these compounds. The sorption (soil sorption coefficient (Kd) and sorption coefficient per unit organic carbon (Koc)) of 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol and equol were studied, using batch equilibrium experiments, in 121 surface soils from Alberta, Canada. The mineralization of [4-14C] 17β-estradiol was determined in soil microcosms in a subset of 36 samples. Quantitative relationships at the regional level were explored using partial least squares regression (PLS) (between Kd or Koc values and soil properties) and by ordinary least squares regression (between Kd or Koc values of different estrogens). Soil properties (r2 0.51-0.87 for Kd and 0.32-0.44 for Koc) provided better prediction models than using the data of different estrogens (r2 0.38-0.71 for Kd and 0.18-0.40 for Koc). PLS regression models for mineralization parameters of 17ß-estradiol had lower predictive power (lower r2)than models developed for sorption parameters. In addition, it has become of primary importance to develop sensitive detection methods that are able to detect low estrogen concentrations (ng L-1) in a wide variety of environmental matrices in order to validate the prediction of their fate and to study their presence in affected ecosystems. Conjugates were synthesized using a mixed anhydride reaction and two Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) were developed using polyclonal antibodies. One ELISA was highly specific for 17β-estradiol (with an IC50 of 243 ng mL-1) and the second allowed for the broader detection of 17β-estradiol, estrone and estriol (with an IC50 of 18 ng mL-1 for 17β-estradiol). The cross-reactivity of both ELISAs was studied against 13 compounds (natural

  3. The anti-estrogenic activity of sediments from agriculturally intense watersheds: assessment using in vivo and in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K; Conoan, Nicholas H; Cox, Marc B; Sangster, Jodi L; Balsiger, Heather A; Bridges, Andrew A; Cowman, Tim; Knight, Lindsey A; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Kolok, Alan S

    2011-09-01

    compound in these extracts. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of a variety of steroid hormones, including those associated with the production of beef cattle (i.e. β-trenbolone, α-zearalanol and α-zearalenol), in sediments indicating that compounds utilized by local beef cattle operations are capable of entering nearby watersheds. Overall, the results of this study indicate that an environmentally relevant anti-estrogenic compound is present in sediments from agriculturally intense watersheds and that this compound is bioavailable to fish. Furthermore, the presence of steroid hormones in sediments from these watersheds provides evidence indicating that steroids are capable of sorbing to sediments.

  4. In Vitro Assays for Assessment of Androgenic and Estrogenic Activity of Defined Mixtures and Complex Environmental Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point sources of endocrine active compounds to aquatic environments such as waste water treatment plants, pulp and paper mills, and animal feeding operations invariably contain complex mixtures of chemicals. The current study investigates the use of targeted in vitro assays des...

  5. In Vitro Assays for Assessment of Androgenic and Estrogenic Activity of Defined Mixtures and Complex Environmental Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point sources of endocrine active compounds to aquatic environments such as waste water treatment plants, pulp and paper mills, and animal feeding operations invariably contain complex mixtures of chemicals. The current study investigates the use of targeted in vitro assays des...

  6. Estrogens and Cognition: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Korol, Donna L.; Pisani, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings that show the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. PMID:26149525

  7. Estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1975-01-01

    The estrogen potencies of 9 oral contraceptive pills, Enovid-E, Enovid-5, Ovulen, Demulen, Norinyl+80, Norinyl+50, Ovral, Norlestrin 1 mg. and Norlestrin 2.5 mg., were determined by bioassay. Relative estrogen potency was determined by analysis of variance. Enovid-5, the most estrogenic compound, had a potency of 4.88 compared to ethinyl estradiol, 50 mcg. equal 1.00; Ovral, the least estrogenic compound, had a potency of 0.81, a sixfold difference. Estrogen potencies at a fractional dose of 0.00155 correlate with reports of the incidence of minor side effects and thromboembolic disease. The effect of progestins on estrogen potency was purely additive (norgestrel and norethynodrel), purely antagonistic, or additive at low concentrations and antagonistic at high concentrations (norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, and ethynodiol diacetate). These results suggest that pills with a greater margin of safety might be developed by utilizing greater ratios of progestin to estrogen. In addition, differences in relative estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills may be used as a basis for better clinical selection.

  8. Is there a role for estrogen activity assays? Recombinant cell bioassay for estrogen: Development and applications.

    PubMed

    Klein, Karen Oerter

    2015-07-01

    There are many questions which cannot be answered without a very sensitive estradiol assay. A recombinant cell bioassay (RCBA) for estradiol was developed in 1994. The sensitivity of the bioassay is 0.02-0.2 pg/ml (0.07-0.7 pmol/L), more than 20 times more sensitive than commercial RIAs and 10 times more sensitive than newer mass spectrometry assays. The RCBA for estradiol opened the door to study low levels of estradiol equivalents (EE) across the physiological spectrum of life from prepubertal children through menopause and across the spectrum from normal physiology, in boys as well as girls, to pathology, including: premature thelarche; estradiol suppression in children treated with GnRH analogues for precocious puberty; aromatase inhibition in boys with growth hormone deficiency; the differences between oral and transdermal routes of estrogen administration in girls with Turner's syndrome; women with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors; and women with urogenital atrophy treated with low dose vaginal estrogen. A bioassay also allows study of endocrine disruptors, like phytoestrogens and other environmental compounds, which are relevant to public health and alternative medicine options. This paper reviews the assay and the last 20 years of applications. A bioassay for estrogen has a role because measuring biological effect is theoretically useful, increasing the understanding of physiology in addition to biochemical levels, giving different information than other assays, and opening the door to measure very low levels of estrogen activity in both humans and the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A structural perspective on nuclear receptors as targets of environmental compounds

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Maire, Albane le; Balaguer, Patrick; Bourguet, William

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily related transcription factors that control a plethora of biological processes. NRs orchestrate complex events such as development, organ homeostasis, metabolism, immune function, and reproduction. Approximately one-half of the 48 human NRs have been shown to act as ligand-regulated transcription factors and respond directly to a large variety of endogenous hormones and metabolites that are generally hydrophobic and small in size (eg, retinoic acid or estradiol). The second half of the NR family comprises the so-called orphan receptors, for which regulatory ligands are still unknown or may not exist despite the presence of a C-terminal ligand-binding domain, which is the hallmark of all NRs. Several chemicals released into the environment (eg, bisphenols, phthalates, parabens, etc) share some physicochemical properties with natural ligands, allowing them to bind to NRs and activate or inhibit their action. Collectively referred to as endocrine disruptors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), these environmental pollutants are highly suspected to cause a wide range of developmental, reproductive, neurological, or metabolic defects in humans and wildlife. Crystallographic studies are revealing unanticipated mechanisms by which chemically diverse EDCs interact with the ligand-binding domain of NRs. These studies thereby provide a rational basis for designing novel chemicals with lower impacts on human and animal health. In this review, we provide a structural and mechanistic view of endocrine disrupting action using estrogen receptors α and β, (ERα/β), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and their respective environmental ligands as representative examples. PMID:25500867

  10. Detection of estrogenic activity in Flemish surface waters using an in vitro recombinant assay with yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Witters, H E; Vangenechten, C; Berckmans, P

    2001-01-01

    Numerous environmental chemicals possess estrogen-like properties. At elevated doses, natural estrogens and environmental estrogen-like chemicals are known to produce adverse effects on humans and wildlife. Sources of potential exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds have to be identified for risk and hazard assessment. Extracts prepared from 16 selected water samples taken in Flemish rivers, effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and reservoirs for drinking water production were analysed for estrogenic activity with a cellular bioassay. Yeast cells, which are stably transfected with the DNA sequence of hER and which contain expression plasmids with the reporter gene lac-Z, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase, were used to measure receptor binding. Flemish rivers showed the highest estrogenic potency, compared to effluents of waste water treatment plants and reservoirs which showed low induction factors (beta-galactosidase production) relative to solvent control conditions. By comparison with a standard curve for 17 beta-estradiol (E2), estrogenic potency in water samples was calculated as E2-equivalents and ranged from below detection limit (approximately 2.75 ng E2/l) up to 81.4 ng/l E2-equivalents. About 7 water samples had more than 10 ng/l E2-equivalents. These elevated levels of E2-equivalents are likely to exert significant adverse effects on reproduction success of wildlife, which should be verified with in vivo studies.

  11. Comparison of European and American techniques for the analysis of volatile organic compounds in environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Voice, T C; Kolb, B

    1994-08-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated methods for analysis of volatile organic compounds by purge and trap, or dynamic headspace, gas chromatography. In western Europe, where environmental analyses are less heavily regulated, static headspace is widely used. In this paper, these two approaches are compared and contrasted for use with different environmental matrices. The theoretical basis and state of application for purge and trap and headspace analysis are discussed, and data are presented on the accuracy and precision of both approaches. Data are reported on the use of headspace analysis for different aqueous matrix types with different sample preparation procedures. A new method for direct headspace analysis of soil samples is presented and compared with the EPA-approved purge and trap method.

  12. Nanostructured copper-coated solid-phase microextraction fiber for gas chromatographic analysis of dibutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-01-01

    A novel nanostructured copper-based solid-phase microextraction fiber was developed and applied for determining the two most common types of phthalate environmental estrogens (dibutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate) in aqueous samples, coupled to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The copper film was coated onto a stainless-steel wire via an electroless plating process, which involved a surface activation process to improve the surface properties of the fiber. Several parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as extraction time, extraction temperature, ionic strength, desorption temperature, and desorption time were optimized by a factor-by-factor procedure to obtain the highest extraction efficiency. The as-established method showed wide linear ranges (0.05-250 μg/L). Precision of single fiber repeatability was <7.0%, and fiber-to-fiber repeatability was <10%. Limits of detection were 0.01 μg/L. The proposed method exhibited better or comparable extraction performance compared with commercial and other lab-made fibers, and excellent thermal stability and durability. The proposed method was applied successfully for the determination of model analytes in plastic soaking water. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. [Corrected Title: Solid-Phase Extraction of Polar Compounds from Water] Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard; Rutz, Jeffrey; Schultz, John

    2005-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) process has been developed for removing alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and other polar organic compounds from water. This process can be either a subprocess of a water-reclamation process or a means of extracting organic compounds from water samples for gas-chromatographic analysis. This SPE process is an attractive alternative to an Environmental Protection Administration liquid-liquid extraction process that generates some pollution and does not work in a microgravitational environment. In this SPE process, one forces a water sample through a resin bed by use of positive pressure on the upstream side and/or suction on the downstream side, thereby causing organic compounds from the water to be adsorbed onto the resin. If gas-chromatographic analysis is to be done, the resin is dried by use of a suitable gas, then the adsorbed compounds are extracted from the resin by use of a solvent. Unlike the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process works in both microgravity and Earth gravity. In comparison with the liquid-liquid process, the SPE process is more efficient, extracts a wider range of organic compounds, generates less pollution, and costs less.

  14. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  15. New indexes for compound prioritization and complexity quantification on environmental monitoring inventories.

    PubMed

    Ginebreda, Antoni; Jelić, Aleksandra; Petrović, Mira; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2012-05-01

    Lists of compounds resulting from environmental monitoring may be conveniently represented in a very general way using Pareto distributions, after ranking them on descending order according to their concentration or hazard quotient expressed as percentages, depending on whether the objective of the monitoring is focussed on mass load occurrence or risk assessment respectively. Ranked distributions are characterized using appropriate indexes, such as h (Hirsch), well known in other disciplines like bibliometry. Furthermore, to such ordered distributions, simple numerical power type equations relating rank order and occurrence probability can be fitted, following the so-called power or Zipf law. Both h indices and the characteristic power law exponents are interpreted as measures of complexity of the overall mixture. On the other hand, compounds included within the h index may be seen as the most relevant in the mixture, thus providing a reasonable indication of what is worth analyzing. These concepts have been applied, as case study, to the characterization of the pharmaceutical compounds found in the input and output streams of wastewater treatment plants. Whereas both the concentration load and ecotoxicity of pharmaceuticals in WWTPs obviously decrease in the output of the treatment (influent > effluent, sludge), complexity quantified using the proposed indexes does not follow the same trend, being this behaviour common to the three plants examined. The joint combination of h compounds of the three plants studied allowed optimizing the list of compounds to be analyzed, which must be considered the key ones for the scenario under study.

  16. Toxic volatile organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke: Emission factors for modeling exposures of California populations

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air contaminants in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including, 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosamines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors ({mu}g/cigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were Generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  17. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharewski, T.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  18. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  19. [Estrogen receptors and the mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Barrón, A; Bermejo, L; Castro, I

    1997-01-01

    For several decades it has been known that steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, regulate some genes involved in the growth, proliferation and differentiation of the mammary-gland in animals and humans. In the last years, the presence or absence of the nuclear estrogen receptor has been used by clinicians as a marker for tumor malignancy, as a prognostic index or as an important parameter for hormonal therapy with anti-estrogenic compounds of some hormone-dependent breast cancers. This review shows some advances in the knowledge of the structure, function, molecular mechanisms of estrogenic activity, and interaction with proteins like protooncogenes and growth factors. Also, we refer to the role of the estrogen receptor in the physiophatology of breast cancer.

  20. Detection of estrogenic activity from kraft mill effluents by the yeast estrogen screen.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, S; Hernández, V; Monsalvez, E; Becerra, J; Mondaca, M A; Piña, B; Vidal, G

    2010-02-01

    Estrogenic activity of kraft pulp mill effluents (P. radiata, E. globulus and mixed -50% E. globulus and 50% P. radiata) was evaluated by the yeast estrogen screen assay. The estrogenic activity values were relatively low, ranking between 1.475 and 0.383 ng/L of EE2 eq. (Estrogenic equivalent of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol), where the highest value corresponds to the E. globulus effluent and the lowest value to the P. radiata effluent. Analysis by solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of chemical compounds present in all three effluents detected at least five major groups of organic compounds, corresponding to fatty acids, hydrocarbons, phenols, sterols and triterpenes. Comparison of analytical and biological data suggests that sterols could be the cause of the estrogenic activity in the evaluated effluent.

  1. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    PubMed

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  2. Different formats of imprinted polymers for determining organotin compounds in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gallegos, Mercedes; Muñoz-Olivas, Riansares; Cámara, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    Organotin compounds and their degradation products enter the environment mainly as a result of their use as biocides and antifouling paints. Analysis of these compounds in environmental samples has to be very sensitive and selective so that their concentrations corresponding to the low environmental target values can also be detected. Generally, analysis of a complex matrix leads to high interferences during the different process steps; clean-up procedures are recommended to overcome this problem. For the past many years, solid phase extraction by employing imprinted materials has been extensively used for many organic substances that are used for pre-concentration and clean-up purposes with excellent results. Here, we present three different imprinted polymers prepared via bulk, precipitation, and emulsion polymerization methods that use similar compositions. The synthesized polymer particles were characterized morphologically by employing scanning electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. Binding properties were calculated using the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm. Depending on the properties of the materials, different analytical applications for complex matrices are proposed. These applications are mainly used on tributyltin and its degradation products for environmental analysis.

  3. Degradation of estrogenic hormones in a silt loam soil.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Richeng; Blassengale, Alma A; Wang, Qiquan

    2008-10-08

    Estrogenic hormones are endocrine-disrupting compounds, which disrupt the endocrine system function of animals and humans by mimicking and/or antagonizing endogenous hormones. With the application of sludge biosolid and animal manure as alternative fertilizers in agricultural lands, estrogens enter the soil and become an environmental concern. The degradation kinetics of 17beta-estradiol, an estrogenic hormone of major concern, in a silt loam soil were investigated in this study. It was found that 17beta-estradiol degraded rapidly in nonsterilized soil with a half-life of 0.17 day. The degradation rate constant was proportional to the percentage of nonsterilized soil, indicating that microorganisms are directly responsible for the rapid degradation of 17beta-estradiol in soil. The half-life of 17beta-estradiol in 20% nonsterilized soil was slightly shortened from 1.3 to 0.69 day with the increase of soil moisture from 10 to 20% and was greatly decreased from 4.9 to 0.92 day with the increase of temperature from 15 to 25 degrees C. The coexistence of 40 micromol kg (-1) sulfadimethoxine, a veterinary antibiotic, decreased the degradation rate constant of 17beta-estradiol from 0.750 +/- 0.038 to 0.492 +/- 0.016 day (-1). The degradation kinetics of another three estrogenic hormones, including 17alpha-estradiol, estrone, and estriol, were also investigated and compared. Estrone was identified as a degradation product of 17beta-estradiol and the most persistent hormone among the four investigated estrogens. Estriol was observed in the degradation of estrone and 17alpha-estradiol.

  4. In Vivo Imaging of Activated Estrogen Receptors in Utero by Estrogens and Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Lemmen, Josephine G.; Arends, Roel J.; van der Saag, Paul T.; van der Burg, Bart

    2004-01-01

    Environmental estrogens are of particular concern when exposure occurs during embryonic development. Although there are good models to study estrogenic activity of chemicals in adult animals, developmental exposure is much more difficult to test. The weak estrogenic activity of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) in embryos is controversial. We have recently generated transgenic mice that carry a reporter construct with estrogen-responsive elements coupled to luciferase. We show that, using this in vivo model in combination with the IVIS imaging system, activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by maternally applied BPA and other estrogens can be detected in living embryos in utero. Eight hours after exposure to 1 mg/kg BPA, ER transactivation could be significantly induced in the embryos. This was more potent than would be estimated from in vitro assays, although its intrinsic activity is still lower than that of diethylstilbestrol and 17β-estradiol dipropionate. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the estrogenic potency of BPA estimated using in vitro assays might underestimate its estrogenic potential in embryos. PMID:15531440

  5. In vivo imaging of activated estrogen receptors in utero by estrogens and bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Lemmen, Josephine G; Arends, Roel J; van der Saag, Paul T; van der Burg, Bart

    2004-11-01

    Environmental estrogens are of particular concern when exposure occurs during embryonic development. Although there are good models to study estrogenic activity of chemicals in adult animals, developmental exposure is much more difficult to test. The weak estrogenic activity of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) in embryos is controversial. We have recently generated transgenic mice that carry a reporter construct with estrogen-responsive elements coupled to luciferase. We show that, using this in vivo model in combination with the IVIS imaging system, activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by maternally applied BPA and other estrogens can be detected in living embryos in utero. Eight hours after exposure to 1 mg/kg BPA, ER transactivation could be significantly induced in the embryos. This was more potent than would be estimated from in vitro assays, although its intrinsic activity is still lower than that of diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol dipropionate. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the estrogenic potency of BPA estimated using in vitro assays might underestimate its estrogenic potential in embryos.

  6. Environmental chamber study of maximum incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, William P. L.; Pierce, John A.; Luo, Dongmin; Malkina, Irina L.

    The effects of 26 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on ozone formation, NO oxidation, and OH radical levels were measured by adding them to reactive organic gas (ROG)-NO x-air environmental chamber irradiations representing a simplified model photochemical smog system. These experiments had relatively low ROG/NOx ratios to represent conditions where ozone formation is most sensitive to VOC additions. The compounds studied included representative alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, and CO. The addition of formaldehyde, methylbenzenes, alkenes and methanol all caused increased integrated OH radical concentrations, and caused the most NO oxidation and ozone formation per molecule reacted. The C 6+n-alkanes had the most inhibiting effects on OH radicals, and caused reduced NO oxidation and ozone formation in these experiments. The other compounds had smaller negative effects on OH radicals, but moderate positive effects on ozone formed and NO oxidized. The implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric reaction mechanisms of these compounds are discussed.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-17 - EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of performance criteria for US Environmental Protection Agency Compendium Method TO-17 for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air has been accomplished. The method is a solid adsorbent-based sampling and analytical procedure including performance crit...

  8. MEASUREMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-17 - EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of performance criteria for US Environmental Protection Agency Compendium Method TO-17 for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air has been accomplished. The method is a solid adsorbent-based sampling and analytical procedure including performance crit...

  9. Environmental signaling and evolutionary change: can exposure of pregnant mammals to environmental estrogens lead to epigenetically induced evolutionary changes in embryos?

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Sabat, Pablo; Valladares, Luis

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the epigenetic and hereditary mechanisms regulating genetic expression in mammalian cells. In this review, we propose how certain natural agents, through their dietary consumption, could induce changes in physiological aspects in mammalian mothers, leading to alterations in DNA methylation patterns of the developing fetus and to the emergence of new phenotypes and evolutionary change. Nevertheless, we hypothesize that this process would require (i) certain key periods in the ontogeny of the organism where the environmental stimuli could produce effects, (ii) particular environmental agents as such stimuli, and (iii) that a genomic persistent change be consequently produced in a population. Depending on the persistence of the environmental stimuli and on whether the affected genes are imprinted genes, induced changes in DNA methylation patterns could become persistent. Moreover, some fragments could be more frequently methylated than others over several generations, leading to biased base change and evolutionary consequences.

  10. Structure and estrogenic activity of new lignans from Iryanthera lancifolia.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Siverio, Dulce; Machín, Rubén P; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Ravelo, Angel G; Lock, Olga

    2008-03-15

    Five new dibenzylbutane type lignans (1-5) were isolated from the stem bark of Iryanthera lancifolia. Their structures were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies and chemical evidence. Seventeen of the isolated compounds were tested for their estrogenic activities in the estrogen responsive human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 BUS using the E-Screen proliferation assay. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the SRB assay to calculate the estrogenic parameters. The majority of the compounds induced a mitogenic response. This effect, given as Relative Proliferative Effect (RPE) to reference estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), ranged between 14% and 84%.

  11. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  12. Reduced embryonic survival in rainbow trout resulting from paternal exposure to the environmental estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol during late sexual maturation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kim H; Schultz, Irvin R; Nagler, James J

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of fishes to environmental estrogens is known to affect sexual development and spawning, but little information exists regarding effects on gametes. This study evaluated embryonic survival of offspring from male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) using an in vitro fertilization protocol. Males were exposed at either 1800 or 6700 degree days (°d) (i.e. 161 or 587 days post-fertilization (dpf)) to test for effects on testes linked to reproductive ontogeny. At 1800°d, fish were beginning testicular differentiation and were exposed to 109 ng EE2/l for 21 days. At 6700°d, fish have testes containing spermatocytes and spermatids and were exposed for 56 days to either 0.8, 8.3, or 65 ng EE2/l. Semen was collected at full sexual maturity in each group and used to fertilize eggs pooled from several non-exposed females. Significant decreases in embryonic survival were observed only with the 6700°d exposure. In 0.8 and 8.3 ng EE2/l treatments, embryo survival was significantly reduced at 19 dpf when compared with the control. In contrast, an immediate decrease in embryonic survival at 0.5 dpf was observed in the 65 ng EE2/l treatment. Blood samples collected at spawning from 6700°d exposed males revealed a significant decrease in 11-ketotestosterone and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone levels for the 65 ng EE2/l treatment when compared with the other treatment groups. Results indicate that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to EE2 exposure with these fish exhibiting two possible mechanisms of reduced embryonic survival through sperm varying dependant on EE2 exposure concentrations experienced. PMID:17965256

  13. Reduced embryonic survival in rainbow trout resulting from paternal exposure to the environmental estrogen 17 alpha- ethynylestradiol during late sexual maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kim H.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Nagler, James J.

    2007-11-01

    Exposure of fishes to environmental estrogens is known to affect sexual development and spawning, but little information exists regarding effects on gametes. This study evaluated embryonic survival of offspring from male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2)using an in vitro fertilization protocol. Males were exposed at either 1800 or 6700 degree days (8d) (i.e. 161 or 587 days post-fertilization (dpf)) to test for effects on testes linked to reproductive ontogeny. At 18008d, fish were beginning testicular differentiation and were exposed to 109 ng EE2/l for 21 days. At 67008d, fish have testes containing spermatocytes and spermatids and were exposed for 56 days to either 0.8, 8.3, or 65 ng EE2/l. Semen was collected at full sexual maturity in each group and used to fertilize eggs pooled from several non-exposed females. Significant decreases in embryonic survival were observed only with the 67008d exposure. In 0.8 and 8.3 ng EE2/l treatments, embryo survival was significantly reduced at 19 dpf when compared with the control. In contrast, an immediate decrease in embryonic survival at 0.5 dpf was observed in the 65 ng EE2/l treatment. Blood samples collected at spawning from 67008d exposed males revealed a significant decrease in 11-ketotestosterone and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone levels for the 65 ng EE2/l treatment when compared with the other treatment groups. Results indicate that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to EE2 exposure with these fish exhibiting two possible mechanisms of reduced embryonic survival through sperm varying dependant

  14. Estrogenic Potentials of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2017-09-25

    Estrogen, a steroid hormone, is associated with several human activities, including environmental, industrial, agricultural, pharmaceutical and medical fields. In this review paper, estrogenic activity associated with traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) is discussed first by focusing on the assays needed to detect estrogenic activity (animal test, cell assay, ligand-binding assay, protein assay, reporter-gene assay, transcription assay and yeast two-hybrid assay), and then, their sources, the nature of activities (estrogenic or anti-estrogenic, or other types), and pathways/functions, along with the assay used to detect the activity, which is followed by a summary of effective chemicals found in or associated with TCM. Applications of estrogens in TCM are then discussed by a comprehensive search of the literature, which include basic study/pathway analysis, cell functions, diseases/symptoms and medicine/supplements. Discrepancies and conflicting cases about estrogenicity of TCM among assays or between TCM and their effective chemicals, are focused on to enlarge estrogenic potentials of TCM by referring to omic knowledge such as transcriptome, proteome, glycome, chemome, cellome, ligandome, interactome and effectome.

  15. Vitellogenin induction by xenobiotic estrogens in the red-eared turtle and African clawed frog.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, B D; Palmer, S K

    1995-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants have estrogenic activity in animals. Xenobiotic estrogens include many pesticides and industrial chemicals that biocumulate. The impact of these common pollutants on the reproductive success of wildlife may be considerable, particularly in threatened or endangered species. This research examined the use of plasma vitellogenin in males as a biomarker for estrogenic xenobiotics in reptiles and amphibians. Adult male turtles (Trachemys scripta) and frogs (Xenopus laevis) were given ip injections of estradiol-17 beta (E2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), or o,p'-DDT (1-chloro-2-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl)benzene) daily for 7 days, and plasma was collected on day 14. The estrogenic activity of each compound was determined by measuring the induction of plasma vitellogenin. Vitellogenin was identified by precipitation, electrophoresis, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). In both species, estradiol and DES treatments induced the most vitellogenin, whereas DDT treatments induced smaller amounts of vitellogenin in a dose-dependent fashion. These data indicate that induction of plasma vitellogenin in males may be a useful biomarker of xenobiotic estrogen activity in wild populations of reptiles and amphibians. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:7556019

  16. Environmental behavior of organotin compounds in the coastal environment of Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhong; Hong, Huasheng; Zhao, Dongmei; Hong, Liyu

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, organotins pollution were investigated in the coastal environment of Xiamen, China. Six species of organotin compounds including tributyltin, triphenyltin and their degradation compounds were quantified in the dissolved and particulate phases of the water, and in the sediment using GC-FPD. The concentrations of organotin compounds ranged from 2.2 to 160 ng (Sn) L(-1) dissolved in the water, 0.14-6.7 ng (Sn) L(-1) in suspended particulate matter and nd approximately 26 ng (Sn) g(-1) (dry weight) in the sediment. The highest concentration of total organotin or tributyltin in water was found in a shipyard and at a station near the inlet of the harbor, indicating fresh inputs of antifouling paints to Xiamen's coastal environment. Organotin speciation was performed on sediment cores to investigate contamination trends over the past ten years in the harbor. The results of (210)Pb dating indicated that Xiamen western harbor suffered contamination during 2000. The environmental behavior of organotins such as the enhancement of the microlayer, partitioning between water/suspended particulate matter and between water/sediment are also discussed in this paper.

  17. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wear, J.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  18. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wear, Jr., John Edmund

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  19. Survey of estrogenic activity in fish feed by yeast estrogen-screen assay.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeru; Kobayashi, Makito; Moriwaki, Toshihisa; Kawai, Shin'ichiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2004-10-01

    Fishes have been used as laboratory animal for research of estrogenic endocrine disrupters by many researchers. However, much less attention was paid to the possibility that compounds with estrogenic activity are present in fish diets. In order to examine this possibility, we measured the estrogenic activity in commercial fish feed by in vitro yeast estrogen-screen (YES) assay based on the binding ability of tested compounds to estrogen receptors. Estrogenic activity was detected in all the commercial fish feed examined (0.2-6.2 ng estradiol equivalent/g fish feed), some phytoestrogens (genistein, formononetin, equol and coumestrol; relative activity to estradiol, 8.6 x 10(-6)-1.1 x 10(-4) by giving a value of 1.0 to estradiol) and some androgens (testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone; relative activity to estradiol, 3.0 x 10(-6)-1.2 x 10(-4)). Therefore, it is possible that these compounds could affect the results of in vivo estrogen assay, such as vitellogenin production in male fish, especially when fish are fed commercial feed.

  20. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides.

    PubMed

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 -lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu-lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  1. Novel Promising Estrogenic Receptor Modulators: Cytotoxic and Estrogenic Activity of Benzanilides and Dithiobenzanilides

    PubMed Central

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Giron, Maria-Dolores; Piotrowska, Hanna; Lisiak, Natalia; Granig, Walter H.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco-Javier; Salto, Rafael; Murias, Marek; Erker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 27 benzanilides and dithiobenzanilides built on a stilbene scaffold and possessing various functional groups in aromatic rings previously described for their spasmolytic properties was assayed on three human cancer cell lines (A549 –lung adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 estrogen dependent breast adenocarcinoma and MDA-MB-231 estrogen independent breast adenocarcinoma) and 2 non-tumorigenic cell lines (CCD39Lu–lung fibroblasts, MCF-12A - breast epithelial). Three compounds (6, 15 and 18) showed selective antiproliferative activity against estrogen dependent MCF-7 cancer cells and their estrogenic activity was further confirmed in MCF-7 transfected with an estrogen receptor reporter plasmid and in HEK239 cells over-expressing the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Compound 18 is especially interesting as a potential candidate for therapy since it is highly toxic and selective towards estrogen dependent MCF7 cell lines (IC50 = 5.07 μM versus more than 100 μM for MDA-MB-231) and almost innocuous for normal breast cells (IC50 = 91.46 μM for MCF-12A). Docking studies have shown that compound 18 interacts with the receptor in the same cavity as estradiol although the extra aromatic ring is involved in additional binding interactions with residue W383. The role of W383 and the extended binding mode were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:26730945

  2. Bioluminescent yeast estrogen assay (BLYES) as a sensitive tool to monitor surface and drinking water for estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bergamasco, Ana Marcela Di Dea; Eldridge, Melanie; Sanseverino, John; Sodré, Fernando Fabriz; Montagner, Cassiana Carolina; Pescara, Igor Cardoso; Jardim, Wilson Figueiredo; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de Aragão

    2011-11-01

    Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) are a concern due to their ubiquity and recognized adverse effects to humans and wildlife. Methods to assess exposure to and associated risks of their presence in aquatic environment are still under development. The aim of this work is to assess estrogenicity of raw and treated waters with different degrees of pollution. Chemical analyses of selected EDCs were performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and estrogenic activity was evaluated using in vitro bioluminescent yeast estrogen assay (BLYES). Most raw water samples (18/20) presented at least one EDC and 16 rendered positive in BLYES. When EDCs were detected, the bioassay usually provided a positive response, except when only bisphenol A was detected at low concentrations. The highest values of estrogenic activity were detected in the most polluted sites. The maximum estrogenic activity observed was 8.7 ng equiv. of E2 L(-1). We compared potencies observed in the bioassay to the relative potency of target compounds and their concentrations failed to fully explain the biological response. This indicates that bioassay is more sensitive than the chemical approach either detecting estrogenic target compounds at lower concentrations, other non-target compounds or even synergistic effects, which should be considered on further investigations. We have not detected either estrogenic activity or estrogenic compounds in drinking water. BLYES showed good sensitivity with a detection limit of 0.1 ng equiv. E2 L(-1) and it seems to be a suitable tool for water monitoring.

  3. Country-specific chemical signatures of persistent environmental compounds in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Krysiak-Baltyn, K; Toppari, J; Skakkebaek, N E; Jensen, T S; Virtanen, H E; Schramm, K-W; Shen, H; Vartiainen, T; Kiviranta, H; Taboureau, O; Brunak, S; Main, K M

    2010-04-01

    Recent reports have confirmed a worldwide increasing trend of testicular cancer incidence, and a conspicuously high prevalence of this disease and other male reproductive disorders, including cryptorchidism and hypospadias, in Denmark. In contrast, Finland, a similarly industrialized Nordic country, exhibits much lower incidences of these disorders. The reasons behind the observed trends are unexplained, but environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that affect foetal testis development are probably involved. Levels of persistent chemicals in breast milk can be considered a proxy for exposure of the foetus to such agents. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive ecological study of 121 EDCs, including the persistent compounds dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides and flame retardants, and non-persistent phthalates, in 68 breast milk samples from Denmark and Finland to compare exposure of mothers to this environmental mixture of EDCs. Using sophisticated, bioinformatic tools in our analysis, we reveal, for the first time, distinct country-specific chemical signatures of EDCs with Danes having generally higher exposure than Finns to persistent bioaccumulative chemicals, whereas there was no country-specific pattern with regard to the non-persistent phthalates. Importantly, EDC levels, including some dioxins, PCBs and some pesticides (hexachlorobenzene and dieldrin) were significantly higher in Denmark than in Finland. As these classes of EDCs have been implicated in testicular cancer or in adversely affecting development of the foetal testis in humans and animals, our findings reinforce the view that environmental exposure to EDCs may explain some of the temporal and between-country differences in incidence of male reproductive disorders.

  4. Estrogenic activity in Finnish municipal wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Välitalo, Pia; Perkola, Noora; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Sillanpää, Markus; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Mikola, Anna; Hollert, Henner; Schultz, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a major source of estrogenic compounds to the aquatic environment. In the present work, estrogenic activities of effluents from eight municipal WWTPs in Finland were studied. The main objectives of the study were to quantify the concentrations of selected estrogenic compounds, to evaluate their contribution to estrogenic potency and to test the feasibility of the commercial bioassays for wastewater analysis. The effluent samples were analyzed by two in vitro tests, i.e. ERα-CALUX(®) and ELISA-E2, and by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for six estrogenic compounds: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17α-estradiol and bisphenol A (BPA). Estrogenic effects were found in all of the effluent samples with both of the bioassays. The concentrations measured with ELISA-E2 (8.6-61.6 ng/L) were clearly higher but exhibited a similar pattern than those with chemical analysis (E2 estrogenic potency was possible only for E1 and BPA, which contributed less than 10% to the observed effects, except in one sample with a high BPA contribution (17%). The contribution of E2 was significant in two samples where it was detected (28% and 67%). The results demonstrated that more comprehensive information on potential estrogenic activity of wastewater effluents can be achieved by using in vitro biotests in addition to chemical analysis and their use would be beneficial in monitoring and screening purposes.

  5. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  6. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  7. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  8. Comparison of the sensitivities of common in vitro and in vivo assays of estrogenic activity: application of chemical toxicity distributions.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Laura L; Brain, Richard A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2008-12-01

    A number of contaminants in municipal effluent discharges are estrogen agonists to fish. Whereas several in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess the estrogenic activity of these compounds or ambient environmental samples, previous comparisons of the relative sensitivities of these approaches remain inconclusive. We employed a probabilistic hazard assessment approach using chemical toxicity distributions (CTDs) to perform a novel evaluation of relative sensitivities of six common in vitro and in vivo assays. We predicted that there was an 8.3% (human breast ademocarcinoma cell line, MCF-7, assay), 6.3% (yeast estrogen screen assay), or 1.9% (fish hepatocyte vitellogenin, VTG, assay) probability of detecting a compound in aquatic systems that will elicit an estrogenic response at concentrations at or below 0.1 microg/L, suggesting that the MCF-7 assay was the most sensitive in vitro assay evaluated in this study. The probabilities of eliciting the estrogenic response of VTG induction at a concentration less than 0.1 microg/L in rainbow trout, fathead minnow, and Japanese medaka were determined at 29.9, 26.2, and 18.8%, respectively. Thus, rainbow trout VTG induction was the most sensitive in vivo assay assessed. Subsequently, CTDs may provide a useful technique for hazard assessment of chemical classes for which exposure data are limited and for chemicals with common toxicological mechanisms and modes of action.

  9. ESTROGEN INDUCED VITELLOGENIN MRNA AND PROTEIN IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally persistent xenobiotic chemicals appear to disrupt normal endocrine function by acting as ligands for endogenous steroid receptors, including the estrogen receptor. Xenobiotics that bind to the estrogen receptor may elicit several effects, one of which is acti...

  10. Adaptive Significance of ERα Splice Variants in Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) Resident in an Estrogenic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility that chronic, multigenerational exposure to environmental estrogens selects for adaptive hormone response phenotypes is a critical unanswered question. Embryos/larvae of killifish from an estrogenic polluted environment (New Bedford Harbor, NBH), as compared to th...

  11. ESTROGEN INDUCED VITELLOGENIN MRNA AND PROTEIN IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally persistent xenobiotic chemicals appear to disrupt normal endocrine function by acting as ligands for endogenous steroid receptors, including the estrogen receptor. Xenobiotics that bind to the estrogen receptor may elicit several effects, one of which is acti...

  12. Adaptive Significance of ERα Splice Variants in Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) Resident in an Estrogenic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility that chronic, multigenerational exposure to environmental estrogens selects for adaptive hormone response phenotypes is a critical unanswered question. Embryos/larvae of killifish from an estrogenic polluted environment (New Bedford Harbor, NBH), as compared to th...

  13. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPOUNDS ON STEROID HORMONE PRODUCTION IN H295R CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    H295R cells constitute a pluripotent cell line that has retained the enzymatic ability to produce steroids along the entire steroidogenic pathway, including C19 androgens and C18 estrogens. For this reason, they have been a valued research tool, and have been employed in an ever...

  14. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPOUNDS ON STEROID HORMONE PRODUCTION IN H295R CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    H295R cells constitute a pluripotent cell line that has retained the enzymatic ability to produce steroids along the entire steroidogenic pathway, including C19 androgens and C18 estrogens. For this reason, they have been a valued research tool, and have been employed in an ever...

  15. Environmental Forensics : Compound Specific Isotope Analysis Of PAHs. Study Of A Former Coal Tar Plant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assal, A.; Doherty, R.; Dickson, K.; Kalin, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fingerprints of PAHs obtained by GC-IRMS have often been used in source apportionment studies. The use of PAHs in environmental forensics relies on the assumption that carbon isotopic fractionation caused by microbial degradation is less significant for these heavy molecular weight compounds than for lighter molecules such as chlorinated solvents or BTEX. Carbon isotopic fractionation of PAHs during degradation is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of CSIA of PAHs for environmental forensics applications at a complex (hydrogeology affected by tidal fluxes) former coal tar plant. In this work, soil samples from a tar works site were analyzed. The tar works operated on the site over a period of sixty years. A source apportionment study was first carried out based on 90 target PAHs quantified by GC-MS. These results were then compared to carbon isotope fingerprints. The separation of compounds of interest from co-extracted interfering peaks is a crucial prerequisite of CSIA by GC-IRMS. Hence, a sample preparation method which allowed the determination of precise carbon isotope signatures for up to 35 compounds per soil extract was developed, validated and applied to the samples previously analyzed by GC- MS. Although most soil samples were shown to be related to the point source tar contamination, PAHs ratios and principal component analysis of abundances highlighted some samples with unusual patterns, suggesting the input of a second source of contaminants. However, no statistically significant variation of the isotopic fingerprints of heavy molecular weight PAHs of these samples was observed. This was inconsistent with the first diagnosis. Since evidence was provided that most samples were only affected by a single source of contaminants, carbon isotopic fractionation was investigated in-situ. Importantly, naphthalene and 2- and 1- methylnaphthalenes isotopic fractionation was observed in a vertical

  16. Processing, phase equilibria and environmental degradation of molybdenum (silicom,aluminum)(2) intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Paul Duane

    The Mo(Si,Al)2 C40 compound was chosen for investigation as a possible high temperature structural material. To produce the C40 phase, several processing routes were explored with emphasis on obtaining microstructure/property relationships (i.e. control of grain size and minimization of secondary phases). To facilitate processing of single phase material, the phase equilibria of the Mo-Si-Al ternary system were reevaluated with respect to the phases adjacent to the C40 compound. An anomalous environmental degradation appeared to be the primary obstacle to further study of the compound and was investigated accordingly. Several processing routes were assessed for the production of dense, nearly single-phase Mo(Si,Al)2. Hot powder compaction was chosen as the method of sample production as is the case with many refractory silicide based materials. Therefore, variations in the processing techniques came from the choice of precursor materials and methods of powder production. Mechanical alloying, arc-melting and comminution, and blending of both elemental and compound powders were all employed to produce charges for hot uniaxial pressing. The final compacts were compared on the basis of density, grain size and presence of secondary phases. Establishment of a Mo-Si-Al ternary isothermal phase diagram at 1400°C was performed. Multiphase alloy compositions were selected to identify the phase boundaries of the C40, C54, T1 and Mo3Al8 phase fields, as well as to verify the existence of the C54 phase at 1400°C. The alloys were equilibrated by heat treatment and analyzed for phase identification and quantitative compositional information. The environmental degradation phenomenon was approached as a classical "pest" with an emphasis of study on grain boundary chemistry and atmospheric dependence of attack. Both Auger spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed carbon-impurity-induced grain boundary segregation responsible for the embrittlement and material loss. Means of

  17. Assessment of SPME Partitioning Coefficients: Implications for Passive Environmental Sampling of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difilippo, E. L.; Eganhouse, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive sampling technique in aqueous environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partitioning coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf) for the compounds of interest. Kf values for poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and water spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). However, most of the published data (86%) do not pass the criterion for negligible depletion (Vw > 100KfVf , where Vw is the sample volume [μl] and Vf is the fiber coating volume [μl]), resulting in erroneous Kf values. The range in reported Kf values is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these erroneous values are removed. We conducted a two-tailed t-test comparing Kf values for the same compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PCBs) measured with different fiber coating thicknesses and fiber manufacturers; the majority (85%) of these Kf values are not statistically different (p = 0.10). In addition to an accurate measurement of Kf, the impact of environmental factors on partitioning, such as temperature and ionic strength, are essential in applying laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf at conditions other than at 25° C in distilled water. While the available data indicate slight differences in Kf at different temperatures and ionic strength, the data are too limited to make an accurate assessment of the impact of these factors on the accuracy of in situ concentration measurements. Because of the challenges in measuring Kf for HOCs, it may be useful to develop predictive models for calculating Kf using known or measured physico-chemical properties. A multi-parameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate Kf in distilled water at 25° C for HOCs based on published physico

  18. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-12-28

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen.

  19. Estrogens and postcoital contraception.

    PubMed

    Notelovitz, M

    1981-07-01

    The contraceptive effect of large doses of estrogens administered postcoitally is not fully understood, although numerous reports have described the use of a 4 to 6 day course of high dose oral diethylstilbestrol (DES), ethinyl estradiol, conjugated estrogens, and combinations of estrogen and progestogen. Because estrogens are effective postovulatory rather than postcoital contraceptives, it is necessary to know the exact time of unprotected intercouse in relation to a woman's menstrual cycle. Depending on the frequency and timing of intercouse, a 5-day course of postcoital estrogen, introduced within 72 hours, yields a pregancy rate of .03-.3%. Failures are usually due to inadequate doses of estrogen, errors in timing, or multiple exposures. A lowering of basal body temperature after postovulatory administration of high doses of estrogen indicates successful intervention. Existence of various conditions such as hypertension and migraine contraindicate the use of postcoital estrogens. DES and possibly other estrogens are associated with teratogenic and potentially carcinogenic effects. 70 to 80% of women taking postcoital estrogens report side effects such as nausea, weight gain and headache. No randomized studies have compared the efficacy, side effects, or safety of the available estrogens. The use of informed coinsent procedures is advised because of the potency of high dose estrogens.

  20. Effects of pubertal exposure to dietary soy on estrogen receptor activity in the breast of cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Fitriya N.; Wood, Charles E.; Willson, Cynthia J.; Register, Thomas C.; Lees, Cynthia J.; Howard, Timothy D.; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K.; Tooze, Janet A.; Chou, Jeff W.; Miller, Lance D.; Cline, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous estrogens influence mammary gland development during puberty and breast cancer risk during adulthood. Early-life exposure to dietary or environmental estrogens may alter estrogen-mediated processes. Soy foods contain phytoestrogenic isoflavones (IFs), which have mixed estrogen agonist/antagonist properties. Here, we evaluated mammary gland responses over time in pubertal female cynomolgus macaques fed diets containing either casein/lactalbumin (n=12) or soy protein containing a human-equivalent dose of 120 mg IF/day (n=17) for ~4.5 years spanning menarche. We assessed estrogen receptor (ER) expression and activity, promoter methylation of ERs and their downstream targets, and markers of estrogen metabolism. Expression of ERα and classical ERα response genes (TFF1, PGR and GREB1) decreased with maturity, independent of diet. A significant inverse correlation was observed between TFF1 mRNA and methylation of CpG sites within the TFF1 promoter. Soy effects included lower ERβ expression before menarche and lower mRNA for ERα and GREB1 after menarche. Expression of GATA-3, an epithelial differentiation marker that regulates ERα-mediated transcription, was elevated before menarche and decreased after menarche in soy-fed animals. Soy did not significantly alter expression of other ER activity markers, estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, or promoter methylation for ERs or ER-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate greater ER expression and activity during the pubertal transition, supporting the idea that this life stage is a critical window for phenotypic modulation by estrogenic compounds. Pubertal soy exposure decreases mammary ERα expression after menarche and exerts subtle effects on receptor activity and mammary gland differentiation. PMID:27006379

  1. Estrogens Can Disrupt Amphibian Mating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L) can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L), alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline. PMID:22355410

  2. p21-activated kinase group II small compound inhibitor GNE-2861 perturbs estrogen receptor alpha signaling and restores tamoxifen-sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhilun; Lorent, Julie; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in most breast cancers. Consequently, ERα modulators, such as tamoxifen, are successful in breast cancer treatment, although tamoxifen resistance is commonly observed. While tamoxifen resistance may be caused by altered ERα signaling, the molecular mechanisms regulating ERα signaling and tamoxifen resistance are not entirely clear. Here, we found that PAK4 expression was consistently correlated to poor patient outcome in endocrine treated and tamoxifen-only treated breast cancer patients. Importantly, while PAK4 overexpression promoted tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, pharmacological treatment with a group II PAK (PAK4, 5, 6) inhibitor, GNE-2861, sensitized tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/LCC2 breast cancer cells to tamoxifen. Mechanistically, we identified a regulatory positive feedback loop, where ERα bound to the PAK4 gene, thereby promoting PAK4 expression, while PAK4 in turn stabilized the ERα protein, activated ERα transcriptional activity and ERα target gene expression. Further, PAK4 phosphorylated ERα-Ser305, a phosphorylation event needed for the PAK4 activation of ERα-dependent transcription. In conclusion, PAK4 may be a suitable target for perturbing ERα signaling and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients. PMID:26554417

  3. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiFilippo, Erica L.; Eganhouse, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), Kf values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable Kf values. The range in reported Kf is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported Kf, such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of Kf, an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf for HOCs at conditions other than at 20 degrees or 25 degrees C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in Kf at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log Kf in distilled water at 25 degrees C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R2 = 0.94) between measured and predicted log Kf values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log Kf for HOCs whose experimental log Kf values are presently unavailable. Future

  4. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Erica L; Eganhouse, Robert P

    2010-09-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (K(f)). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), K(f) values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable K(f) values. The range in reported K(f) is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported K(f), such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of K(f), an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured K(f) values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured K(f) for HOCs at conditions other than at 20° or 25 °C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in K(f) at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log K(f) in distilled water at 25 °C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R(2) = 0.94) between measured and predicted log K(f) values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log K(f) for HOCs whose experimental log K(f) values are presently

  5. An evaluation of the role of antiestrogen-binding sites in mediating the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens: studies using t-butylphenoxyethyl diethylamine, a compound lacking affinity for the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Y Y; Simpson, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    1985-08-01

    Tert-butylphenoxyethyl diethylamine (BPEA), a compound synthesized by us, was designed to incorporate features important in binding to antiestrogen-binding sites (AEBS) while lacking features important in binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). With this compound, we have addressed the question of the role of AEBS in mediating the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens. BPEA has an affinity for AEBS 6% that of tamoxifen and an affinity for ER less than 0.0003% that of estradiol. BPEA (10(-11)-10(-6) M) had no effect on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and no effect on inhibition of the growth of MCF-7 cells by different concentrations of the antiestrogen tamoxifen. In addition, BPEA (even at doses of 1 mg/day X 50 g rat) exhibited no uterotropic or antiuterotropic activity in immature rats and had no influence on the agonistic or antagonistic activity of varying concentrations of tamoxifen on uterine weight. Hence, we conclude that occupancy of AEBS, at least by BPEA, does not modulate growth of the uterus or breast cancer cells and does not influence the potency of tamoxifen as an antiestrogen. These findings raise serious doubts about the role of the AEBS in mediating directly the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens.

  6. Environmental guideline for the reduction of volatile organic compound emissions from the plastics processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to environmental regulatory agencies, manufacturers, and operators of plastics processing plants regarding the means of reducing emissions containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are released to the environment in the course of production. Sectors covered by the guideline are expanded polystyrene, cellular polyethylene foams, polyvinyl chloride, and reinforced plastics and composites made from thermoset polyester resins. The guideline focuses on the reduction of VOC emissions from processing and clean-up operations, the handling and storage of VOC-containing materials, and the handling and disposal of wastes. The guideline contains material, equipment, process, and operating standards for plastics processing facilities, record keeping and training standards, recommended operating practices, and testing protocols.

  7. Synergistic activation of human pregnane X receptor by binary cocktails of pharmaceutical and environmental compounds

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Dendele, Béatrice; Huet, Tiphaine; Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Beucher, Bertrand; Roecklin, Dominique; Muller, Christina; Rahmani, Roger; Cavaillès, Vincent; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Vivat, Valérie; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Balaguer, Patrick; Bourguet, William

    2015-01-01

    Humans are chronically exposed to multiple exogenous substances, including environmental pollutants, drugs and dietary components. Many of these compounds are suspected to impact human health, and their combination in complex mixtures could exacerbate their harmful effects. Here we demonstrate that a pharmaceutical oestrogen and a persistent organochlorine pesticide, both exhibiting low efficacy when studied separately, cooperatively bind to the pregnane X receptor, leading to synergistic activation. Biophysical analysis shows that each ligand enhances the binding affinity of the other, so the binary mixture induces a substantial biological response at doses at which each chemical individually is inactive. High-resolution crystal structures reveal the structural basis for the observed cooperativity. Our results suggest that the formation of ‘supramolecular ligands' within the ligand-binding pocket of nuclear receptors contributes to the synergistic toxic effect of chemical mixtures, which may have broad implications for the fields of endocrine disruption, toxicology and chemical risk assessment. PMID:26333997

  8. A wireless hybrid chemical sensor for detection of environmental volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Tsow, Francis; Campbell, Katherine Driggs; Iglesias, Rodrigo; Forzani, Erica; Tao, N J

    2013-05-01

    A hybrid sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air is developed. The device combines two orthogonal sensing principles, selective molecular binding with a microfabricated quartz tuning fork detector and separation of analytes with a column. The tuning fork detector is functionalized with molecular imprinted polymers for selective binding to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), and the separation column provides further discrimination of the analytes for real world complex sample analysis. The device is wireless, portable, battery-powered, and cell-phone operated, and it allows reliable detection in parts per billion (ppb) by volume-levels of BTEX in the presence of complex interferents. The hybrid device is suitable for occupational, environmental health, and epidemiological applications.

  9. Predicting the environmental distribution of compounds with unknown physicochemical properties from known pesticide properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines how pesticide characteristics such as water solubility, molecular weight, bioconcentration, volatility, and soil absorption affect soil-to-water mobility, water-to-air dissipation, and water-to-biota accumulation when present in the environmental medium of preferred residence. The study concludes that chemicals that have low water solubilities tend to adsorb to soil, those that have low vapor pressures tend to dissipate slowly from water, and those that have relatively high octanol-to-water partition coefficients or low water solubility have a high potential for bioconcentration. Based on these findings, researchers should be able to predict the mobility of pesticides belonging to a particular category or family of compounds with unknown physicochemical properties and recommend ways to restore the environment. 13 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Application of Spectral Accuracy to Improve the Identification of Organic Compounds in Environmental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Eysseric, Emmanuel; Barry, Killian; Beaudry, Francis; Houde, Magali; Gagnon, Christian; Segura, Pedro A

    2017-09-19

    Correct identification of a chemical substance in environmental samples based only on accurate mass measurements can be difficult especially for molecules >300 Da. Here is presented the application of spectral accuracy, a tool for the comparison of isotope patterns toward molecular formula generation, as a complementary technique to assist in the identification process of organic micropollutants and their transformation products in surface water. A set of nine common contaminants (five antibiotics, an herbicide, a beta-blocker, an antidepressant, and an antineoplastic) frequently found in surface water were spiked in methanol and surface water extracts at two different concentrations (80 and 300 μg L(-1)). They were then injected into three different mass analyzers (triple quadrupole, quadrupole-time-of-fight, and quadrupole-orbitrap) to study the impact of matrix composition, analyte concentration, and mass resolution on the correct identification of molecular formulas using spectral accuracy. High spectral accuracy and ranking of the correct molecular formula were in many cases compound-specific due principally to conditions affecting signal intensity such as matrix effects and concentration. However, in general, results showed that higher concentrations and higher resolutions favored ranking the correct formula in the top 10. Using spectral accuracy and mass accuracy it was possible to reduce the number of possible molecular formulas for organic compounds of relative high molecular mass (e.g., between 400 and 900 Da) to less than 10 and in some cases, it was possible to unambiguously assign one specific molecular formula to an experimental isotopic pattern. This study confirmed that spectral accuracy can be used as a complementary diagnostic technique to improve confidence levels for the identification of organic contaminants under environmental conditions.

  11. Evaluating cost when selecting performance reference compounds for the environmental deployment of polyethylene passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Perron, Monique M; Burgess, Robert M; Cantwell, Mark G; Fernandez, Loretta A

    2015-04-01

    A challenge in environmental passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampler, target contaminants, and environmental phases. A common approach is the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to estimate target contaminant sampling rates and indicate degree of sampler equilibrium. One logistical issue associated with using PRCs is their sometimes exorbitant cost. To address PRC expense, this investigation 1) compared the performance of inexpensive PRCs (deuterated PAHs) and expensive PRCs ((13) C-labeled PCBs) to estimate dissolved PCB concentrations in freshwater and marine deployments, and 2) evaluated the use of smaller quantities of PRC relative to regular amounts used for estimating dissolved PAH and PCB concentrations. Saltwater and freshwater site average differences between total dissolved PCB concentrations calculated using the 2 classes of PRCs was 34 pg/L (20%) and 340 pg/L (51%), respectively, and in some deployments, statistical differences in PCB concentrations generated by the 2 types of PRCs were detected. However, no statistical differences were detected between total dissolved PAH and PCB for the 3 quantities of PRCs. In both investigations, individual dissolved PCB congeners and PAH compounds demonstrated comparable behavior as those expressed as total PCB or PAH dissolved concentrations. This research provides evidence that in some applications passive sampling using inexpensive and smaller quantities of PRCs can yield cost savings of approximately 75%. This approach appears most promising in the marine water column and when focusing on dissolved concentrations of low and medium molecular weight congeners or total PCBs. Published 2014 SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Use of a Battery of Chemical and Ecotoxicological Methods for the Assessment of the Efficacy of Wastewater Treatment Processes to Remove Estrogenic Potency

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Nicola; Baynes, Alice; Kanda, Rakesh; Mills, Matthew R.; Arias-Salazar, Karla; Collins, Terrence J.; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine Disrupting Compounds pose a substantial risk to the aquatic environment. Ethinylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E1) have recently been included in a watch list of environmental pollutants under the European Water Framework Directive. Municipal wastewater treatment plants are major contributors to the estrogenic potency of surface waters. Much of the estrogenic potency of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can be attributed to the discharge of steroid estrogens including estradiol (E2), EE2 and E1 due to incomplete removal of these substances at the treatment plant. An evaluation of the efficacy of wastewater treatment processes requires the quantitative determination of individual substances most often undertaken using chemical analysis methods. Most frequently used methods include Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GCMS/MS) or Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Although very useful for regulatory purposes, targeted chemical analysis can only provide data on the compounds (and specific metabolites) monitored. Ecotoxicology methods additionally ensure that any by-products produced or unknown estrogenic compounds present are also assessed via measurement of their biological activity. A number of in vitro bioassays including the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) are available to measure the estrogenic activity of wastewater samples. Chemical analysis in conjunction with in vivo and in vitro bioassays provides a useful toolbox for assessment of the efficacy and suitability of wastewater treatment processes with respect to estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds. This paper utilizes a battery of chemical and ecotoxicology tests to assess conventional, advanced and emerging wastewater treatment processes in laboratory and field studies. PMID:27684328

  13. Use of a Battery of Chemical and Ecotoxicological Methods for the Assessment of the Efficacy of Wastewater Treatment Processes to Remove Estrogenic Potency.

    PubMed

    Beresford, Nicola; Baynes, Alice; Kanda, Rakesh; Mills, Matthew R; Arias-Salazar, Karla; Collins, Terrence J; Jobling, Susan

    2016-09-11

    Endocrine Disrupting Compounds pose a substantial risk to the aquatic environment. Ethinylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E1) have recently been included in a watch list of environmental pollutants under the European Water Framework Directive. Municipal wastewater treatment plants are major contributors to the estrogenic potency of surface waters. Much of the estrogenic potency of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can be attributed to the discharge of steroid estrogens including estradiol (E2), EE2 and E1 due to incomplete removal of these substances at the treatment plant. An evaluation of the efficacy of wastewater treatment processes requires the quantitative determination of individual substances most often undertaken using chemical analysis methods. Most frequently used methods include Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GCMS/MS) or Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS) using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Although very useful for regulatory purposes, targeted chemical analysis can only provide data on the compounds (and specific metabolites) monitored. Ecotoxicology methods additionally ensure that any by-products produced or unknown estrogenic compounds present are also assessed via measurement of their biological activity. A number of in vitro bioassays including the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) are available to measure the estrogenic activity of wastewater samples. Chemical analysis in conjunction with in vivo and in vitro bioassays provides a useful toolbox for assessment of the efficacy and suitability of wastewater treatment processes with respect to estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds. This paper utilizes a battery of chemical and ecotoxicology tests to assess conventional, advanced and emerging wastewater treatment processes in laboratory and field studies.

  14. The epigenetics of estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zaorui; Fan, Lu

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic processes have been implicated in everything from cell proliferation to maternal behavior. Epigenetic alterations, including histone alterations and DNA methylation, have also been shown to play critical roles in the formation of some types of memory, and in the modulatory effects that factors, such as stress, drugs of abuse and environmental stimulation, have on the brain and memory function. Recently, we demonstrated that the ability of the sex-steroid hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance memory formation is dependent on histone acetylation and DNA methylation, a finding that has important implications for understanding how hormones influence cognition in adulthood and aging. In this article, we provide an overview of the literature demonstrating that epigenetic processes and E2 influence memory, describe our findings indicating that epigenetic alterations regulate E2-induced memory enhancement, and discuss directions for future work on the epigenetics of estrogen. PMID:21593594

  15. Effect of genotype and environmental conditions on health-promoting compounds in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Marta; Cartea, María Elena; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo

    2011-03-23

    It is well-known that a variety of factors (genetic and environmental) affect the ultimate metabolite levels in brassica vegetables, although there is still little information about the role that genetics and environment play on glucosinolates and phenolic levels. Total glucosinolates were more abundant in turnip tops (26.02 μmol g(-1) dw) than in turnip greens (17.78 μmol g(-1) dw). On the other hand, total phenolic content was found in higher quantities in turnip greens (43.81 μmol g(-1) dw) than in turnip tops (37.53 μmol g(-1) dw). Aliphatic glucosinolates were clearly regulated by genotype; in contrast, the effects of environment and genotype×environment interaction on the indolic glucosinolate and phenolic compounds content appeared to be the main effects of variation. Identification of genotypes with enhanced and stable levels of these compounds would provide a value-added opportunity for marketing this crop with superior health promotion to consumers.

  16. Determination of aromatic tracer compounds for environmental tobacco smoke aerosol by two step laser mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrical, Brad D.; Zenobi, Renato

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of indoor aerosol pollution. Determination of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) aerosol is critical to understanding health effects. Sizing studies have shown that ETS has a size distribution that is efficiently deposited into the lungs and can therefore provide effective delivery of carcinogenic compounds into the human body. Two-step laser mass spectrometry is used to analyze aromatic compounds on aerosols collected from a smoking lobby. The determination and suitability of ETS tracers on aerosols is examined. Additionally, the transport of aerosol from the smoking lobby is examined to determine what effect deposition and dilution have on the mass spectrum observed. Results from the analysis of ETS, both from lobby samples and direct cigarette sampling, show that several unique peaks are present in the mass spectrum when compared to other combustion sources, such as automobiles and diesel trucks. In particular, ions at m/ z 118, 132, 146, and 160 are consistently present and are not found in other combustion sources. For the indoor environment, where chemical transformation is much less rapid than in the outdoor environment, these ions were found to be present as soon as the first smokers appeared and persisted over the course of the day. Aerosol samples taken in the morning prior to the presence of smokers in the lobby reveal the presence of skeletal PAHs, indicative of outdoor urban traffic aerosol penetration into the building.

  17. Environmental chamber studies of maximum incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Pierce, J.A.; Malkina, I.L.; Luo, D.; Long, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    The effects of 36 representative volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO on ozone formation, NO oxidation, and OH radical levels were measured in a series of environmental chamber experiments representing conditions where VOCs have the greatest effect on photochemical ozone formation. The experiments consisted of repeated 6-hour indoor chamber irradiations of a simplified mixture of ozone precursors with NOx in excess, alternating with runs with varying amounts of a test VOC added. The VOCs studied included representative alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, ethers, alcohol ethers, and siloxanes. CO, Acetone and 2-chloromethyl-3-chloropropene were also studied. Reactions of formaldehyde, acetone, the methylbenzenes and the alkenes had the largest positive effects on OH radical levels, and because of this they caused the most NO oxidation and ozone formation per molecule reacted. Reactions of the siloxanes and the C(6+) n-alkanes had the most inhibiting effects on radicals, causing them to inhibit NO oxidation and ozone formation under the conditions of these experiments. The other compounds had smaller and usually negative effects on OH radicals, and had moderate but positive effects on ozone formed and NO oxidized. Information was also obtained on amounts of NO oxidation caused directly by the reactions of the added VOCs or their products.

  18. Comparison of an array of in vitro assays for the assessment of the estrogenic potential of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Gutendorf, B; Westendorf, J

    2001-09-14

    Many chemicals in surface waters and sediments have recently been discovered to have estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity. Among these compounds, known as 'endocrine disrupters', are natural and synthetic hormones, phytoestrogenes and a variety of industrial chemicals, such as certain detergents and pesticides. These substances are supposed to affect the development and reproduction in wildlife and humans and may also be involved in the induction of cancer. In order to assess the estrogenic/antiestrogenic potential of pure compounds and complex environmental samples we compared an array of in vitro test systems, (i) two luciferase reporter gene assays using transgenic human MVLN cells (derived from MCF-7 cells) and HGELN cells (derived from HeLa cells); (ii) a competitive binding assay with recombinant human estrogen receptors (ER) alpha and beta; and (iii) a proliferation assay with MCF7-cells (E-Screen). The sensitivity of the assays for 17-beta-estradiol decreased in the order: MVLN-cells=E-Screen>HGELN-cells>binding to ER-alpha>binding to ER-beta. A good correlation was obtained between the estrogenic potencies of 11 compounds (17-beta-estradiol (E(2)), estrone (E(1)), estriol (E(3)), ethinylestradiol (EE(2)), diethylstilbestrol (DES), coumestrol, beta-sitosterol, genistein, 4-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, bisphenol A) in the three tissue culture assays. The relative potencies of the compounds obtained by the cell free binding assays were one to two orders of magnitude higher compared with the cell culture assays. The phytoestrogens showed a preference to bind to ER-beta, but only genistein showed a much lower activity in the E-Screen (growth induction in breast cancer cells) compared with the luciferase induction in MVLN and HGELN-cells.

  19. The Interplay between Estrogen and Fetal Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Ward, Wendy E.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that regulates embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation, organogenesis, the timing of parturition, and fetal imprinting by carrying chemical messages from glands to cells within tissues or organs in the body. During development, placenta is the primary source of estrogen production but estrogen can only be produced if the fetus or the mother supplies dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the estrogen prohormone. Studies show that the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal cortex supplies 60% of DHEA for placental estrogen production, and that placental estrogen in turn modulates the morphological and functional development of the fetal adrenal cortex. As such, in developed countries where humans are exposed daily to environmental estrogens, there is concern that the development of fetal adrenal cortex, and in turn, placental estrogen production may be disrupted. This paper discusses fetal adrenal gland development, how endogenous estrogen regulates the structure and function of the fetal adrenal cortex, and highlights the potential role that early life exposure to environmental estrogens may have on the development and endocrinology of the fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:22536492

  20. Impacts of environmental conditions on the sorption of volatile organic compounds onto tire powder.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong I; Nam, Kyongphile; Park, Jae W; Khim, Jee H; Kim, Yong K; Kim, Jae Y

    2008-05-01

    A series of batch tests were performed and the impacts of environmental conditions and phase change on the sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. Benzene, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and ethylbenzene were selected as target VOCs. Sorption of VOCs onto tire powder was well demonstrated by a linear-partitioning model. Water-tire partition coefficients of VOCs (not tested in this study) could be estimated using a logarithmic relationship between observed water-tire partition coefficients and octanol-water partition coefficients of the VOCs tested. The target VOCs did not seem to compete with other VOCs significantly when sorbed onto the tire powder for the range of concentrations tested. The influence of environmental conditions, such as pH and ionic strength also did not seem to be significant. Water-tire partition coefficients of benzene, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and ethylbenzene decreased as the sorbent dosage increased. However, they showed stable values when the sorbent dosage was greater than 10 g/L. Air-tire partition coefficient could be extrapolated from Henry's law constants and water-tire partition coefficient of VOCs.

  1. Estrogenic alkylphenols in fish tissues, sediments, and waters from the U.K. Tyne and Tees estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, C.M.; Frid, C.L.J.; Gill, M.E.; Cooper, D.W.; Jones, D.M.

    1999-04-01

    Nonylphenols and related compounds are common products of biodegradation of a large group of nonionic surfactants, the nonylphenol polyethoxylates. Many of these compounds are known to be environmentally persistent and to elicit estrogenic response in both mammals and fish. In this study, nonylphenol (NP), nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NP1EO), and octylphenol (OP) were found in tissues of mature male flounder, Platichthys flesus, and in tissues of juvenile flounder. These fish also showed detectable levels of the yolk protein vitellogenin in their plasma, indicative of estrogenic exposure. The compounds were also found in discharges from a major sewage treatment works and in sediments from two estuaries in north-east England; the highest levels from the highly industrialized Tees and lower levels from the industrialized/urbanized Tyne estuary. The implications of these findings for fish populations are discussed.

  2. Anti-estrogenic activity of lignans from Acanthopanax chiisanensis root.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyun; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Piao, Xiang Lan; Kim, Ju Sun; Kang, Sam Sik; Shin, Kuk Hyun

    2005-02-01

    Anti-estrogenic activity of (-)-sesamin (1), helioxanthin (2), savinin (3), taiwanin C (4), and 3-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl)butyrolactone (5) isolated from the root of Acanthopanax chiisanensis was tested using Ishikawa cells. Among them, compound 3 exhibited anti-estrogenic activity (IC50 = 4.86 microM).

  3. The effects of abiotic and biotic environmental components on the microbial mineralization of selected xenobiotic compounds in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Knaebel, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of environmental components on the microbial mineralization of xenobiotic compounds in soils. The soils' chemical and physical characteristics, microbial community structure, organic and inorganic components, and other associated biota (plants) were examined for their effects on the biodegradation process. The biodegradation of {sup 14}C foreign, synthetic ({double bond} xenobiotic) compounds was measured by quantifying {sup 14} CO{sub 2} production over time. Mineralization kinetics were estimated by first-order and 3/2 order mineralization models. The compounds displayed different mineralization kinetics in the different soils, which were due to nature of the xenobiotic chemical and to abiotic and biotic soil characteristics. Specific soil components (montmorillonite, humic acids and fulvic acids) inhibited mineralization. Other soil components (sand, illite, kaolinite) had less effect on the biodegradation process. Modified soil microbial communities mineralized the compounds differently. Bacteria-enhanced soils metabolized the compounds to greater extents than the fungi-enhanced soils, which both mineralized the compounds more than actinomycete-enhanced soils. However, the rates of mineralization were only significantly different between the bacteria-enhanced soils and the actinomycete-enhanced soil. Plants significantly increased soil microbial biomass and activity, and stimulated the rate of microbial mineralization of xenobiotic compounds. However, they had no effect on the total amounts of mineralization. In summary, these diverse abiotic and biotic environmental components exerted tremendous influences on the microbial turnover of xenobiotic compounds in soils. Therefore, these components should be considered when modeling the fate of xenobiotic chemicals in the environment.

  4. Postmenopausal skin and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Archer, David F

    2012-10-01

    The aging global population continues to drive increasing demand for cosmaceuticals and cosmetic surgery among older men and women. Since the discovery in the 1990s that estrogen receptors are present in skin cells and decline in number from the onset of menopause in women, researchers have explored a number of ways in which estrogen can improve skin condition. Skin is estrogen responsive, and several studies now exist to support the antiaging properties of estrogen replacement therapies in postmenopausal women. Both systemic and topical estrogens appear to have positive effects on hormonal aging, increasing skin collagen content, thickness, elasticity and hydration. Estrogen therapies may also improve wound healing and reduce the incidence of wound complications. This review explores the potential for targeted estrogen replacement as a therapeutic option for long-term skin management in postmenopausal women.

  5. Estrogenic activity of natural and synthetic estrogens in human breast cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Zava, D T; Blen, M; Duwe, G

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the estrogenic activity of various environmental pollutants (xenobiotics), in particular the xenoestrogen o,p-DDT, and compared their effects with those of endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens on estrogen receptor binding capacity, induction of estrogen end products, and activation of cell proliferation in estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells in monolayer culture. We also quantified the levels of phytoestrogens in extracts of some common foods, herbs, and spices and in human saliva following consumption of a high phytoestrogen food source (soy milk) to compare phytoestrogen abundance and bioavailability relative to the reported xenoestrogen burden in humans. Results show that natural endogenous estrogens, phytoestrogens, mycoestrogens, and xenoestrogens bind estrogen receptor (ER) in intact cells, but demonstrate marked differences in their ability to induce end products of estrogen action and to regulate cell proliferation. All of the different classes of estrogens stimulated cell proliferation at concentrations that half-saturated ER, but only some classes were able to induce estrogen-regulated end products. Genistein, a common phytoestrogen found in soy foods, differed from the xenoestrogen DDT in its effects on cell proliferation and ability to induce estrogen-regulated end products. Moreover, we found that many of the foods, herbs, and spices commonly consumed by humans contain significant amounts of phytoestrogens, and consumption of soy milk, a phytoestrogen-rich food, markedly increases the levels of phytoestrogens in saliva. In conclusion, our in vitro results predict that a diet high in phytoestrogens would significantly reduce the binding of weak xenoestrogens to ER in target tissues in vivo. PMID:9168008

  6. Sex- and tissue-specific effects of waterborne estrogen on estrogen receptor subtypes and E2-mediated gene expression in the reproductive axis of goldfish.

    PubMed

    Marlatt, Vicki L; Lakoff, Josh; Crump, Kate; Martyniuk, Chris J; Watt, Jennifer; Jewell, Linda; Atkinson, Susanna; Blais, Jules M; Sherry, Jim; Moon, Thomas W; Trudeau, Vance L

    2010-05-01

    This research examined the gene expression profile of three goldfish estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in multiple tissues in relation to mRNA levels of aromatase B and vitellogenin (VTG) following waterborne estrogen exposures. The protocol consisted of: i) adult male goldfish in late gonadal recrudescence exposed to 1 nM 17beta-estradiol (E2); ii) adult male and female goldfish in early sexual regression exposed to 1 nM E2 for 3, 6, 12 and 24h; and, iii) sexually mature, adult male goldfish exposed to 0.3 nM 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) for 24h. Liver produced the most consistent response with up-regulation of ERalpha in sexually regressed, mature and recrudescing males and in sexually regressed females. The dose and length of exposure, reproductive state and sex affected the auto-regulation of ERbeta1 by E2. ERbeta2 was not affected in any experiments suggesting it may not be auto-regulated by E2. Aromatase B and VTG gene expression were affected by E2, but also by other experimental conditions. EE2 induced liver ERalpha and VTG mRNA levels indicating that high environmental EE2 levels induce E2-mediated gene expression in a model teleost. These studies reveal a more complicated action of estrogenic compounds that has important implications on estrogenic endocrine disruptors in teleosts. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Flow analysis techniques as effective tools for the improved environmental analysis of organic compounds expressed as total indices.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-04-15

    The scope of this work is the accomplishment of an overview about the current state-of-the-art flow analysis techniques applied to the environmental determination of organic compounds expressed as total indices. Flow analysis techniques are proposed as effective tools for the quick obtention of preliminary chemical information about the occurrence of organic compounds on the environment prior to the use of more complex, time-consuming and expensive instrumental techniques. Recently improved flow-based methodologies for the determination of chemical oxygen demand, halogenated organic compounds and phenols are presented and discussed in detail. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the highlight of flow-based techniques as vanguard tools on the determination of organic compounds in environmental water samples.

  8. Dioxin-like exposures and effects on estrogenic and androgenic exposures and micronuclei frequency in mother-newborn pairs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Marie; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Mathiesen, Line; Mose, Tina; Brouwer, Abraham; Hedegaard, Morten; Loft, Steffen; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Besselink, Harrie; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2010-05-01

    In utero exposure to environmental dioxin-like, estrogen and androgen compounds can cause adverse health effects. Little is known about potential interactions in vivo between dioxin-like compounds, estrogens and androgens during fetal development in humans. Therefore we explored the potential interactions in vivo between dioxin-like compounds, estrogens, androgens using chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX)(R) bioassays in maternal and umbilical cord blood plasma concurrently collected at the time of planned Caesarean section from 98 healthy pregnancies. The dioxin-like activity was also determined after placental transfer of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in the ex vivo human placenta perfusion system. Similar dioxin-like activity in maternal and cord blood (37 versus 33pg CALUX(R)-TEQ/g plasma lipids, P>0.05) was detected and it demonstrates transplacental transfer. Increased dioxin-like activity in the perfused placenta tissue after ex vivo TCDD perfusions (from 17 to 280pg CALUX(R)-TEQ/g plasma lipids) suggest that accumulation in the placenta prevents immediate transplacental transfer of TCDD. Androgenic activity were also similar in the paired mother-newborns (0.10 versus 0.18ng CALUX(R)-AEQ/mL plasma), whereas cord blood plasma estrogenic activity was higher than maternal levels (22.6 versus 18.5ng CALUX(R)-EEQ/mL plasma). In cord blood plasma androgenic activity was strongly positively associated with maternal levels (Rs=0.8, P<0.001) whereas dioxin-like and estrogenic activities were modestly associated with maternal levels (Rsestrogenic and androgenic exposures during fetal development of humans.

  9. Characterization of estrogenicity of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived experimental model.

    PubMed Central

    Hopert, A C; Beyer, A; Frank, K; Strunck, E; Wünsche, W; Vollmer, G

    1998-01-01

    Severe developmental and reproductive disorders in wild animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with hormonal activity. These adverse effects of environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern and have received increasing attention. Although numerous chemicals with the capacity to interfere with the estrogen receptor (ER) have been identified, information on their molecular mechanism of action and their relative potency is rather limited. For the endometrium, the lack of information is due to the lack of a suitable experimental model. We investigated the functions of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived model, RUCA-I rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane to preserve their functional differentiation and estrogen responsiveness. We assessed the relative binding affinity to the estrogen receptor of the selected phytoestrogens coumestrol, genistein, daidzein, and the putative phytoestrogen mangostin compared to estradiol by a competitive Scatchard analysis. The following affinity ranking was measured: 17beta-estradiol >>> coumestrol > genistein > daidzein >>> mangostin. In addition, we investigated the capacity of these compounds to promote the increased production of complement C3, a well-known estradiol-regulated protein of the rat endometrium. All substances tested increased the production of complement C3, although different concentrations were necessary to achieve equivalent levels of induction compared to estradiol. Mechanistically we were able to demonstrate that the increase of complement C3 production was mediated by primarily increasing its steady-state mRNA level. These findings indicate that RUCA-I cells represent a sensitive model system to elucidate relative potencies and functions of environmental estrogens in an endometrium-derived model. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721258

  10. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Guzmán, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women. PMID:24734243

  11. Environmental and human exposure to persistent halogenated compounds derived from e-waste in China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong-Gang; Zeng, Hui; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2010-06-01

    Various classes of persistent halogenated compounds (PHCs) can be released into the environment due to improper handling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste), which creates severe environmental problems and poses hazards to human health as well. In this review, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), polybrominated phenols (PBPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs), and chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) are the main target contaminants for examination. As the world's largest importer and recycler of e-waste, China has been under tremendous pressure to deal with this huge e-waste situation. This review assesses the magnitude of the e-waste problems in China based on data obtained from the last several years, during which many significant investigations have been conducted. Comparative analyses of the concentrations of several classes of toxic compounds, in which e-waste recycling sites are compared with reference sites in China, have indicated that improper e-waste handling affects the environment of dismantling sites more than that of control sites. An assessment of the annual mass loadings of PBDEs, PBBs, TBBPA, PBPs, PCDD/Fs, and ClPAHs from e-waste in China has shown that PBDEs are the dominant components of PHCs in e-waste, followed by ClPAHs and PCDD/Fs. The annual loadings of PBDEs, ClPAHs, and PCDD/Fs emission were estimated to range from 76,200 to 182,000, 900 to 2,000 and 3 to 8 kg/year, respectively. However, PCDD/Fs and ClPAHs should not be neglected because they are also primarily released from e-waste recycling processes. Overall, the magnitude of human exposure to these toxics in e-waste sites in China is at the high end of the global range. Copyright 2010 SETAC.

  12. Menopausal Symptom Relief and Side Effects Experienced by Women Using Compounded Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy and Synthetic Conjugated Equine Estrogen and/or Progestin Hormone Replacement Therapy, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Deleruyelle, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The use of compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy by menopausal women has become a popular alternative to traditional synthetic conjugated equine estrogen and progestin hormone replacement therapy due to safety concerns raised by recent studies. However, due to the lack of randomized, large-scale trials to evaluate the efficacy and side-effect profile of compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy many healthcare providers are reluctant to prescribe such therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare women's menopausal symptom relief and side effects experienced when using compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy and traditional hormone replacement therapy. A descriptive comparative design was used. Inferential and descriptive statistical procedures including a paired difference t-test, two-sample t-test, and f-tests (percentage, mean, standard deviation, frequency) were run on the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The framework used to guide this study was Lenz and Pugh's Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms. Surveys were distributed once to a convenient sample of women aged 35 and older when they dropped off or picked up their prescriptions at a pharmacy. Of the 216 surveys distributed, 70 were returned from those women taking compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy and 53 from traditional hormone replacement therapy. The survey contained 15 questions pertaining to age, duration of hormone replacement therapy, type and formulation of hormone replacement therapy, reasons for initiating hormone replacement therapy, symptoms before and one month after hormone replacement therapy, and side effects related to hormone replacement therapy. Included in part 1 of this series of articles was the introduction to the study conducted and the results of the literature review that was conducted for the purpose of examining the current data related to the topic of hormone replacement therapy. Part 2 provides a brief discussion

  13. Menopausal Symptom Relief and Side Effects Experienced by Women Using Compounded Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy and Synthetic Conjugated Equine Estrogen and/or Progestin Hormone Replacement Therapy, Part 3.

    PubMed

    Deleruyelle, Laura J

    2017-01-01

    The use of compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy by menopausal women has become a popular alternative to traditional synthetic conjugated equine estrogen and progestin hormone replacement therapy due to safety concerns raised by recent studies. However, due to the lack of randomized, large-scale trials to evaluate the efficacy and side-effect profile of compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy many healthcare providers are reluctant to prescribe such therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare women's menopausal symptom relief and side effects experienced when using compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy and traditional hormone replacement therapy. A descriptive comparative design was used. Inferential and descriptive statistical procedures including a paired difference t-test, two-sample t-test, and f-tests (percentage, mean, standard deviation, frequency) were run on the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The framework used to guide this study was Lenz and Pugh's Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms. Surveys were distributed once to a convenient sample of women aged 35 and older when they dropped off or picked up their prescriptions at a pharmacy. Of the 216 surveys distributed, 70 were returned from those women taking compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy and 53 from traditional hormone replacement therapy. The survey contained 15 questions pertaining to age, duration of hormone replacement therapy, type and formulation of hormone replacement therapy, reasons for initiating hormone replacement therapy, symptoms before and one month after hormone replacement therapy, and side effects related to hormone replacement therapy. Included in part 1 of this series of articles was the introduction to the study conducted and the results of the literature review that was conducted for the purpose of examining the current data related to the topic of hormone replacement therapy. Part 2 provided a brief discussion

  14. The Estrogen Hypothesis of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, James P.; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The explanation of obesity as a simple result of positive energy balance fails to account for the scope of variable responses to diets and lifestyles. It is postulated that individual physiological and anatomical variation may be responsible for developing obesity. Girls in poor families develop greater adiposity than their male siblings, a trend not present in richer environments. This indicates strong influence of estrogen on fat accumulation irrespective of poor socioeconomic conditions. Obesity rates in males and females of developed nations are similar, while in poorer nations obesity is much more prevalent in females. Female to male ratio of obesity correlates inversely with gross domestic product. Therefore, the parity of male and female obesity in developed countries may result from male exposure to environmental estrogen-like substances associated with affluence. These hormonally driven mechanisms may be equally active within both sexes in more developed areas, thereby increasing overall obesity. PMID:24915457

  15. Phytoestrogens from Psoralea corylifolia reveal estrogen receptor-subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xin, D; Wang, H; Yang, J; Su, Y-F; Fan, G-W; Wang, Y-F; Zhu, Y; Gao, X-M

    2010-02-01

    The seed of Psoralea corylifolia L. (PCL), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been applied as a tonic or an aphrodisiac agent and commonly used as a remedy for bone fracture, osteomalacia and osteoporosis in China. In our study, the estrogen receptor subtype-selective activities of the extracts and compounds derived from PCL were analyzed using the HeLa cell assay. The different fractions including petroleum ether, CH(2)Cl(2) and EtOAc fractions of the EtOH extract of PCL showed significant activity in activating either ERalpha or ERbeta whereas the n-BuOH fraction showed no estrogenic activity. Further chromatographic purification of the active fractions yielded seven compounds including the two coumarins isopsoralen and psoralen, the four flavonoids isobavachalcone, bavachin, corylifol A and neobavaisoflavone, and the meroterpene phenol, bakuchiol. In reporter gene assay, the two coumarins (10(-8)-10(-5)M) acted as ERalpha-selective agonists while the other compounds (10(-9)-10(-6)M) activated both ERalpha and ERbeta. The estrogenic activities of all compounds could be completely suppressed by the pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suggesting that the compounds exert their activities through ER. Only psoralen and isopsoralen as ERalpha agonists promoted MCF-7 cell proliferation significantly. Although all the compounds have estrogenic activity, they may exert different biological effects. In conclusion, both ER subtype-selective and nonselective activities in compounds derived from PCL suggested that PCL could be a new source for selective estrogen-receptor modulators.

  16. Bioassay- versus analytically-derived estrogen equivalents: Ramifications for monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern for possible endocrine-related effects on aquatic vertebrates, environmental estrogens (EEs) are a growing focus of surface water contaminant monitoring programs. Some efforts utilize measurement of a targeted set of chemicals known to act as estrogen receptor (ER)...

  17. Bioassay- versus analytically-derived estrogen equivalents: Ramifications for monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern for possible endocrine-related effects on aquatic vertebrates, environmental estrogens (EEs) are a growing focus of surface water contaminant monitoring programs. Some efforts utilize measurement of a targeted set of chemicals known to act as estrogen receptor (ER)...

  18. Core-shell polydopamine magnetic nanoparticles as sorbent in micro-dispersive solid-phase extraction for the determination of estrogenic compounds in water samples prior to high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Socas-Rodríguez, Bárbara; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Salazar, Pedro; Martín, Miriam; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2015-06-05

    In this work, core-shell Fe3O4@poly(dopamine) magnetic nanoparticles (m-NPs) were prepared and characterized in our laboratory and applied as sorbents for the magnetic-micro solid phase extraction (m-μSPE) of twelve estrogenic compounds of interest (i.e. 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, estrone, hexestrol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, diethylstibestrol, dienestrol, zearalenone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol) from different water samples. Separation, determination and quantification were achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. NPs@poly(dopamine) were synthesized by a chemical coprecipitation procedure and characterized by different surface characterization techniques (X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, microelectrophoresis and adsorption/desorption isotherms). Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of m-μSPE (i.e. polymerization time, pH of the sample, extraction and elution conditions) were studied and optimized. The methodology was validated for Milli-Q, mineral, tap and wastewater using 2-methoxyestradiol as internal standard, obtaining recoveries ranging from 70 to 119% with relative standard deviation values lower than 20% and limits of quantification in the range 0.02-1.1 μg/L. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment and Molecular Actions of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals That Interfere with Estrogen Receptor Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kerdivel, Gwenneg; Habauzit, Denis; Pakdel, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    In all vertebrate species, estrogens play a crucial role in the development, growth, and function of reproductive and nonreproductive tissues. A large number of natural or synthetic chemicals present in the environment and diet can interfere with estrogen signaling; these chemicals are called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) or xenoestrogens. Some of these compounds have been shown to induce adverse effects on human and animal health, and some compounds are suspected to contribute to diverse disease development. Because xenoestrogens have varying sources and structures and could act in additive or synergistic effects when combined, they have multiple mechanisms of action. Consequently, an important panel of in vivo and in vitro bioassays and chemical analytical tools was used to screen, evaluate, and characterize the potential impacts of these compounds on humans and animals. In this paper, we discuss different molecular actions of some of the major xenoestrogens found in food or the environment, and we summarize the current models used to evaluate environmental estrogens. PMID:23737774

  20. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta - regulation by selective estrogen receptor modulators and importance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    S Katzenellenbogen, Benita; A Katzenellenbogen, John

    2000-01-01

    Estrogens display intriguing tissue-selective action that is of great biomedical importance in the development of optimal therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, for menopausal hormone replacement, and for fertility regulation. Certain compounds that act through the estrogen receptor (ER), now referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), can demonstrate remarkable differences in activity in the various estrogen target tissues, functioning as agonists in some tissues but as antagonists in others. Recent advances elucidating the tripartite nature of the biochemical and molecular actions of estrogens provide a good basis for understanding these tissue-selective actions. As discussed in this thematic review, the development of optimal SERMs should now be viewed in the context of two estrogen receptor subtypes, ERα and ERβ, that have differing affinities and responsiveness to various SERMs, and differing tissue distribution and effectiveness at various gene regulatory sites. Cellular, biochemical, and structural approaches have also shown that the nature of the ligand affects the conformation assumed by the ER-ligand complex, thereby regulating its state of phosphorylation and the recruitment of different coregulator proteins. Growth factors and protein kinases that control the phosphorylation state of the complex also regulate the bioactivity of the ER. These interactions and changes determine the magnitude of the transcriptional response and the potency of different SERMs. As these critical components are becoming increasingly well defined, they provide a sound basis for the development of novel SERMs with optimal profiles of tissue selectivity as medical therapeutic agents. PMID:11250726

  1. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from new carpets measured in a large-scale environmental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M. )

    1993-03-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by new carpets. Samples of four typical carpets, including two with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex adhesive and two with different backings, were collected from the finish lines at manufacturers' mills. Individual VOCs released from these samples were identified, and their concentrations, emission rates and mass emissions were measured under simulated indoor conditions in a 20 m[sup 3] environmental chamber over one week periods. Concentrations and emission rates of VOCs emitted by a new SBR carpet were also measured in a house. The carpets emitted a variety of VOCs. The two SBR carpets primarily emitted 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), the source of [open quotes]new carpet[close quotes] odor, and styrene. The concentrations and emission rates of 4-PCH were similar for the two carpets, while the styrene values varied significantly. The carpet with a polyvinyl chloride backing emitted formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, isooctane, 1,2-propanediol, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Of these, vinyl acetate and propanediol had the highest concentrations and emission rates. The carpet with a polyurethane backing primarily emitted butylated hydroxytoluene. With the exception of formaldehyde, little is known about the health effects of these VOCs at low concentrations. 23 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from new carpets measured in a large-scale environmental chamber.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, A T; Wooley, J D; Daisey, J M

    1993-03-01

    This study was undertaken to quantify the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by new carpets. Samples of four typical carpets, including two with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) latex adhesive and two with different backings, were collected from the finish lines at manufacturers' mills. Individual VOCs released from these samples were identified, and their concentrations, emission rates and mass emissions were measured under simulated indoor conditions in a 20 m3 environmental chamber over one week periods. Concentrations and emission rates of VOCs emitted by a new SBR carpet were also measured in a house. The carpets emitted a variety of VOCs. The two SBR carpets primarily emitted 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), the source of "new carpet" odor, and styrene. The concentrations and emission rates of 4-PCH were similar for the two carpets, while the styrene values varied significantly. The carpet with a polyvinyl chloride backing emitted formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, isooctane, 1,2-propanediol, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Of these, vinyl acetate and propanediol had the highest concentrations and emission rates. The carpet with a polyurethane backing primarily emitted butylated hydroxytoluene. With the exception of formaldehyde, little is known about the health effects of these VOCs at low concentrations.

  3. Effects of Environmental Factors on Cyanobacterial Production of Odorous Compounds: Geosmin and 2-Methylisoborneol.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Chang Soo; Srivastava, Ankita; Oh, Hee-Mock; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2017-07-28

    Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB), responsible for earthy or musty smell, are a major concern for safe drinking water supplies. This study investigated the effects of environmental factors on odorous compound production and cell growth in cyanobacterial strains. Anabaena sp. FACHB-1384, a 2-MIB producer, was sensitive to low temperature (<20°C). However, geosmin producers, Anabaena sp. Chusori and Anabaena sp. NIER, were sensitive to high light intensity (>100 μmol/m(2)/sec), but not to low temperature. Geosmin concentrations increased under higher nitrate concentrations, being linearly proportional to cell density. A P-limited chemostat showed that P-stress decreased the geosmin productivity and extracellular geosmin amount per cell in Anabaena sp. NIER. However, only 2-MIB productivity was reduced in Planktothrix sp. FACHB-1374 under P-limitation. The extracellular 2-MIB amount per cell remained constant at all dilution rates. In conclusion, high light intensity and P-stress can contribute to the lower incidence of geosmin, whereas 2-MIB reduction could be attainable at a lower temperature.

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas citronellolis SJTE-3, an Estrogen- and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Daning; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Pingping; Peng, Wanli; Ji, Nannan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis SJTE-3, isolated from the active sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in China, can utilize a series of environmental estrogens and estrogen-like toxicants. Here, we report its whole-genome sequence, containing one circular chromosome and one circular plasmid. Genes involved in estrogen biodegradation in this bacterium were predicted. PMID:27932659

  5. Estrogenic and androgenic activity of PCBs, their chlorinated metabolites and other endocrine disruptors estimated with two in vitro yeast assays.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, K; Placková, M; Novotná, V; Cajthaml, T

    2009-11-01

    Investigations of environmental pollution by endocrine-disrupting chemicals are now in progress. Up to now, several in vitro bioassays have been developed for evaluation of the endocrine disruptive activity; however, there is still a lack of comparative studies of their sensitivity. In this work comparison of the estrogen screening assay based on beta-galactosidase expression and a bioluminescent estrogen screen revealed differences in the sensitivity and specificity of the two tests. With the beta-galactosidase screen a slight estrogen-like activity of Delor 103, a commercial mixture of PCB congeners, and a fungicide triclosan was measured whereas no activity was detected using the bioluminescent assay. A bioluminescent androgen test negated previously suggested androgenic potential of triclosan. Further, this work demonstrates the androgenic activity of Delor 103, with an EC(50) value of 2.29 x 10(-2)mg/L. On the other hand, chlorobenzoic acids (CBAs), representing potential PCB degradation metabolites, exhibited no androgenic activity but were slightly estrogenic. Their estrogenicity varied with their chemical structure, with 2,3-CBA, 2,3,6-CBA, 2,4,6-CBA and monochlorinated compounds exhibiting the highest activity. Thus the results indicated possible transitions of the hormonal activity of PCBs during bacterial degradation.

  6. Volatile trace compounds released from municipal solid waste at the transfer stage: Evaluation of environmental impacts and odour pollution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongtao

    2015-12-30

    Odour pollution caused by municipal solid waste is a public concern. This study quantitatively evaluated the concentration, environmental impacts, and olfaction of volatile trace compounds released from a waste transfer station. Seventy-six compounds were detected, and ethanol presented the highest releasing rate and ratio of 14.76 kg/d and 12.30 g/t of waste, respectively. Life cycle assessment showed that trichlorofluoromethane and dichlorodifluoromethane accounted for more than 99% of impact potentials to global warming and approximately 70% to human toxicity (non-carcinogenic). The major contributor for both photochemical ozone formation and ecotoxicity was ethanol. A detection threshold method was also used to evaluate odour pollution. Five compounds including methane thiol, hydrogen sulphide, ethanol, dimethyl disulphide, and dimethyl sulphide, with dilution multiples above one, were considered the critical compounds. Methane thiol showed the highest contribution to odour pollution of more than 90%, as indicated by its low threshold. Comparison of the contributions of the compounds to different environmental aspects indicated that typical pollutants varied based on specific evaluation targets and therefore should be comprehensively considered. This study provides important information and scientific methodology to elucidate the impacts of odourant compounds to the environment and odour pollution.

  7. TyPol - a new methodology for organic compounds clustering based on their molecular characteristics and environmental behavior.

    PubMed

    Servien, Rémi; Mamy, Laure; Li, Ziang; Rossard, Virginie; Latrille, Eric; Bessac, Fabienne; Patureau, Dominique; Benoit, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    Following legislation, the assessment of the environmental risks of 30000-100000 chemical substances is required for their registration dossiers. However, their behavior in the environment and their transfer to environmental components such as water or atmosphere are studied for only a very small proportion of the chemical in laboratory tests or monitoring studies because it is time-consuming and/or cost prohibitive. Therefore, the objective of this work was to develop a new methodology, TyPol, to classify organic compounds, and their degradation products, according to both their behavior in the environment and their molecular properties. The strategy relies on partial least squares analysis and hierarchical clustering. The calculation of molecular descriptors is based on an in silico approach, and the environmental endpoints (i.e. environmental parameters) are extracted from several available databases and literature. The classification of 215 organic compounds inputted in TyPol for this proof-of-concept study showed that the combination of some specific molecular descriptors could be related to a particular behavior in the environment. TyPol also provided an analysis of similarities (or dissimilarities) between organic compounds and their degradation products. Among the 24 degradation products that were inputted, 58% were found in the same cluster as their parents. The robustness of the method was tested and shown to be good. TyPol could help to predict the environmental behavior of a "new" compound (parent compound or degradation product) from its affiliation to one cluster, but also to select representative substances from a large data set in order to answer some specific questions regarding their behavior in the environment.

  8. Estrogens facilitate memory processing through membrane mediated mechanisms and alterations in spine density

    PubMed Central

    Luine, Victoria N.; Frankfurt, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens exert sustained, genomically mediated effects on memory throughout the female life cycle, but here we review new studies documenting rapid effects of estradiol on memory, which are exerted through membrane-mediated mechanisms. Use of recognition memory tasks in rats, shows that estrogens enhance memory consolidation within one hour. 17α-estradiol is more potent than 17β-estradiol, and the dose response relationship between estrogens and memory is an inverted U shape. Use of specific estrogen receptor (ER) agonists suggests mediation by an ERβ-like membrane receptor. Enhanced memory is associated with increased spine density and altered noradrenergic activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus within 30 min. of administration. The environmental chemical, bisphenol-A, rapidly antagonizes enhancements in memory in both sexes possibly through actions on spines. Thus, estradiol and related compounds exert rapid alterations in cognition through non-genomic mechanisms, a finding which may provide a basis for better understanding and treating memory impairments. PMID:22981654

  9. Bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds in copepods: environmental triggers and sources of intra-specific variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagarese, H. E.; García, P.; Diéguez, M. D.; Ferraro, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature are two globally important abiotic factors affecting freshwater ecosystems. Planktonic organisms have developed a battery of counteracting mechanisms to minimize the risk of being damaged by UVR, which respond to three basic principles: avoid, protect, repair. Copepods are among the most successful zooplankton groups. They are highly adaptable animals, capable of displaying flexible behaviors, physiologies, and life strategies. In particular, they are well equipped to cope with harmful UVR. Their arsenal includes vertical migration, accumulation of photoprotective compounds, and photorepair. The preference for a particular strategy is affected by a plethora of environmental (extrinsic) parameters, such as the existence of a depth refuge, the risk of visual predation, and temperature. Temperature modifies the environment (e.g. the lake thermal structure), and animal metabolism (e.g., swimming speed, bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds). In addition, the relative weight of UVR-coping strategies is also influenced by the organism (intrinsic) characteristics (e.g., inter- and intra-specific variability). The UV absorbing compounds, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), are widely distributed among freshwater copepods. Animals are unable to synthesize MAAs, and therefore depend on external sources for accumulating these compounds. Although copepods may acquire MAAs from their food, for the few centropagic species investigated so far, the main source of MAAs are microbial (most likely prokaryotic) organisms living in close association with the copepods. Boeckella gracilipes is a common centropagic copepod in Patagonian lakes. We suspected that its occurrence in different types of lakes, hydrologically unconnected, but within close geographical proximity, could have resulted in different microbial-copepod associations (i.e., different MAAs sources) that could translate into intra-specific differences in the accumulation

  10. In vitro estrogenic activity of Achillea millefolium L.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, G; Vegeto, E; Dall'Acqua, S; Ciana, P; Giorgetti, M; Agradi, E; Sozzi, A; Fico, G; Tomè, F

    2007-02-01

    Isolation and biological characterization of pure compounds was used to identify and characterize estrogenic activity and estrogen receptors (ER) preference in chemical components of Achillea millefolium. This medicinal plant is used in folk medicine as an emmenagogue. In vitro assay, based on recombinant MCF-7 cells, showed estrogenic activity in a crude extract of the aerial parts of A. millefolium. After fractionation of the crude extract with increasing polar solvents, estrogenic activity was found in the methanol/water fraction. Nine compounds were isolated and characterized by HR-MS spectra and 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. In particular, dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside - a glycosyl-neolignan - was isolated for the first time from the genus Achillea in addition to six flavone derivatives, apigenin, apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin, luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin-4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, rutin, and two caffeic acid derivatives, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and chlorogenic acid. Apigenin and luteolin, the most important estrogenic compounds among those tested, were studied for their ability to activate alpha or beta estrogen receptors (ERalpha, ERbeta) using transiently transfected cells. Our results suggest that isolation and biological characterization of estrogenic compounds in traditionally used medicinal plants could be a first step in better assessing further (e.g. in vivo) tests of nutraceutical and pharmacological strategies based on phytoestrogens.