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Sample records for environmental gamma dose

  1. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-03-15

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify {sup 41}Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  2. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin

    2005-12-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 +/- 5 to 378 +/- 38 nGy h(-1). The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h(-1). The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 +/- 15, 161 +/- 16, 160 +/- 16, 175 +/- 18 and 176 +/- 18 nGy h(-1), respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 +/- 17 nGy h(-1). This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 +/- 54 nGy h(-1). The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv.

  3. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed.

  4. Measurements of environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in three mountainous locations in the western region of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghorabie, Fayez H.H. . E-mail: alghorabie_f@hotmail.com

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes measurements of external gamma radiation dose rate from terrestrial gamma-rays 1 m above the ground in three different mountainous locations in the western region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. These locations are At-Taif city, Al-Hada village, and Ash-Shafa village. CaSO{sub 4}:Dy (TLD-900) thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for the detection of terrestrial gamma radiation at 40 different places in the three locations. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate measured ranged between 14 and 279 nGy h{sup -1} for the time interval from June 2001 to June 2002. The measured dose rate varied with the season of the year. The average gamma radiation dose rates were 468, 541, and 781 {mu}Gy y{sup -1} for At-Taif city, Al-Hada village, and Ash-Shafa village, respectively. The corresponding average absorbed doses to the population of the three locations were 328, 379, and 547 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, respectively. The quality factor of 0.7 Sv Gy{sup -1} was applied in the calculations of the absorbed dose to humans.

  5. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-08-07

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096{+-}0.019(1 SD) and 0.092{+-}0.016(1 SD){mu}Sv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11{+-}0.042(1 SD) and 0.091{+-}0.026(1 SD){mu}Sv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, {sup 222}Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings.

  6. Automated Gamma Knife dose planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leichtman, Gregg S.; Aita, Anthony L.; Goldman, H. W.

    1998-06-01

    The Gamma Knife (Elekta Instruments, Inc., Atlanta, GA), a neurosurgical, highly focused radiation delivery device, is used to eradicate deep-seated anomalous tissue within the human brain by delivering a lethal dose of radiation to target tissue. This dose is the accumulated result of delivering sequential `shots' of radiation to the target where each shot is approximately 3D Gaussian in shape. The size and intensity of each shot can be adjusted by varying the time of radiation exposure and by using one of four collimator sizes ranging from 4 - 18 mm. Current dose planning requires that the dose plan be developed manually to cover the target, and only the target, with a desired minimum radiation intensity using a minimum number of shots. This is a laborious and subjective process which typically leads to suboptimal conformal target coverage by the dose. We have used adaptive simulated annealing/quenching followed by Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to automate the selection and placement of Gaussian-based `shots' to form a simulated dose plane. In order to make the computation of the problem tractable, the algorithm, based upon contouring and polygon clipping, takes a 2 1/2-D approach to defining the cost function. Several experiments have been performed where the optimizers have been given the freedom to vary the number of shots and the weight, collimator size, and 3D location of each shot. To data best results have been obtained by forcing the optimizers to use a fixed number of unweighted shots with each optimizer set free to vary the 3D location and collimator size of each shot. Our preliminary results indicate that this technology will radically decrease planning time while significantly increasing accuracy of conformal target coverage and reproducibility over current manual methods.

  7. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  13. Environmentally Relevant Chronic Low-Dose Tritium and Gamma Exposures do not Increase Somatic Intrachromosomal Recombination in pKZ1 Mouse Spleen.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura; Serran, Mandy; Bertrand, Lindsey; Klokov, Dmitry; Wyatt, Heather; Blimkie, Melinda; Gueguen, Yann; Priest, Nicholas; Jourdain, Jean-René; Sykes, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    The toxicity of tritium is a public health concern given its presence and mobility in the environment. For risk predictions using radiological protection models, it is essential to allocate an appropriate radiation weighting factor (WR). This in turn should be consistent with the observed relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta radiation. Although the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently recommends a WR of 1 for the calculation of committed effective dose for X rays, gamma rays and electrons of all energies, including tritium energies, there are concerns that tritium health risks are underestimated and that current regulatory tritium drinking water standards need revision. In this study, we investigated potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse spleen after one month and eight months of chronic exposure to low-dose tritiated water (HTO). The dose regimes studied were designed to mimic human chronic consumption of HTO at levels of 10 kBq/l, 1 MBq/l and 20 MBq/l. The total doses from these radiation exposures ranged from 0.01 to 180 mGy. We also compared the biological effects of exposure to HTO with equivalent exposure to external whole-body (60)Co gamma rays. Changes in spleen weight and somatic intrachromosomal recombination (DNA inversions) in spleen tissue of pKZ1(Tg/+) mice were monitored. Our results showed no overall changes in either spleen organ weights and no increase mouse splenic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies, indicating that current drinking water standards for tritium exposure in the form of HTO are likely to be adequately protective against cytotoxic and genotoxic damage in spleen. These results demonstrate no evidence for cytotoxicity or genotoxicity in mouse spleen following chronic exposures to HTO activities (or equivalent gamma doses) up to 20 MBq/L.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs.

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  16. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  17. Assessment of gamma-dose rate in city of Kermanshah

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohamad Bagher; Kodamoradi, Ehsan; Shaneh, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Environmental natural radiation measurement is of great importance and interest especially for human health. The induction of genetic disorder and cancer appears to be the most important in an exposed population. Materials and Methods: Measurements of background gamma rays were performed using a mini-rad environmental survey meter at 25 different locations around the city of Kermanshah (a city in the west of Iran). The measurements were also performed at two different time of day one in the morning and the other in the afternoon. At each location and time measurements were repeated for five times and the mean was considered as the background dose at that location. Results and Discussions: Comparison between the measured results in the morning and afternoon has not shown any significant difference (P > 0.95). The maximum and minimum obtained results were 2.63 mSv/y and 1.49 mSv/y, respectively. From the total measurements at 25 sites mean and SD background radiation dose to the population is 2.24 ± 0.25 mSv. Conclusion: The mean radiation dose to the population is about 2.5 times of the world average total external exposure cosmic rays and terrestrial gamma rays dose reported by UNSCEAR. PMID:23555133

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assembles, evaluates, and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water resources and consumption patterns for populations are estimated because they provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford radiation. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. GAMMA DOSE RATE NEAR A NEW (252)Cf BRACHYTHERAPY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fortune, Eugene C; Gauld, Ian C; Wang, C

    2011-01-01

    A new generation of medical grade (252)Cf sources was developed in 2002 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The combination of small size and large activity of (252)Cf makes the new source suitable to be used with the conventional high-dose-rate remote afterloading system for interstitial brachytherapy. A recent in-water calibration experiment showed that the measured gamma dose rates near the new source are slightly greater than the neutron dose rates, contradicting the well established neutron-to-gamma dose ratio of approximately 2:1 at locations near a (252)Cf brachytherapy source. Specifically, the MCNP-predicted gamma dose rate is a factor of two lower than the measured gamma dose rate at the distance of I cm, and the differences between the two results gradually diminish at distances farther away from the source. To resolve this discrepancy, we updated the source gamma spectrum by including in the ORIGEN-S data library the experimentally measured (252)Cf prompt gamma spectrum as well as the true (252)Cf spontaneous fission yield data to explicitly model delayed gamma emissions from fission products. We also investigated the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by the beta particles emitted from fission product decays. The results show that the discrepancy of gamma dose rates is mainly caused by the omission of the bremsstrahlung X-rays in the MCNP runs. By including the bremsstrahlung X-rays, the MCNP results show that the gamma dose rates near a new (252)Cf source agree well with the measured results and that the gamma dose rates are indeed greater than the neutron dose rates.

  1. Irradiation with low-dose gamma ray enhances tolerance to heat stress in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zheng, Fengxia; Qi, Wencai; Wang, Tianqi; Ma, Lingyu; Qiu, Zongbo; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Gamma irradiation at low doses can stimulate the tolerance to environmental stress in plants. However, the knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying the enhanced tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation is far from fully understood. In this study, to investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heat stress alleviated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the Arabidopsis seeds were exposed to a range of doses before subjected to heat treatment. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation maximally promoted seedling growth in response to heat stress. The production rate of superoxide radical and contents of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde in the seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy dose under heat stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione (GSH) content and proline level in the gamma-irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components related to heat tolerance were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under heat shock. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation can modulate the physiological responses as well as gene expression related to heat tolerance, thus alleviating the stress damage in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  2. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  3. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  5. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-07-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates. 3 figs.

  7. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Gabdo, H T; Garba, N N; Heryanshah, A; Wagiran, H; Said, M N

    2014-09-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h(-1) to 500 nGy h(-1). The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h(-1). This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h(-1) (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation.

  8. Physical changes associated with gamma doses on Wood/ Polypropylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, Diène; Tidjani, Adams

    2014-08-01

    The effect of gamma- radiation on the morphology, thermal behavior and mechanical properties of wood polypropylene composites has been investigated. Simultaneous thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) have been performed on WPC samples of (9.5 ± 0.1) mg. These samples were exposed to different gamma-dose in the range 10 to 100kGy. The results indicated that gamma radiation improves the mechanical properties while the thermal stability is decreased. With gamma radiation, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the micrographs became smoother and we can notice an improvement of interaction between polymer and wood fibers.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doeses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  10. beta- and gamma-Comparative dose estimates on Enewetak Atoll.

    PubMed

    Crase, K W; Gudiksen, P H; Robison, W L

    1982-05-01

    Enewetak Atoll is one of the Pacific atolls used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and gamma-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Enewetak Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the beta and low energy gamma-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a beta-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to beta- or low energy gamma-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is somewhat dependent on ground cover, since a minimal amount of vegetation will reduce it significantly from that over bare soil, but thick stands of vegetation have little effect on any further reductions. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey (En73). Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the beta's or low energy gamma's, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  11. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from released to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and, environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  13. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics; agriculture; food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs.

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits, Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-12-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have been have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the technical tasks which correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environment monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-06-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into technical tasks which address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-05-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) funds the project. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  20. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-10-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1990-04-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates: source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. The source terms task will develop estimates for radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. These estimates will be based on historical measurements and production information. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  3. Human Lymphocytes Response to Low Gamma-ray Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Bañuelos-Valenzuela, Rómulo

    2002-08-01

    Radiation and non-radiation workers lymphocytes were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90; from these, only Hsp70 protein was detected before and after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 70.5 uGy gamma-ray dose, radiation worker's lymphocytes expressed more Hsp70 protein, than non radiation workers' lymphocytes, indicating a larger tolerance to gamma rays (gammatolerance), due to an adaptation process developed by his labor condition.

  4. Environmental gamma radiation measurement in district Swat, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, T; Khan, K; Subhani, M S; Akhter, P; Jabbar, A

    2008-01-01

    External exposure to environmental gamma ray sources is an important component of exposure to the public. A survey was carried out to determine activity concentration levels and associated doses from (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs by means of high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry in the Swat district, famous for tourism. The mean concentrations for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be 50.4 +/- 0.7, 34.8 +/- 0.7 and 434.5 +/- 7.4 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in soil samples, which are slightly more than the world average values. However, (137)Cs was only found in the soil sample of Barikot with an activity concentration of 34 +/- 1.2 Bq kg(-1). Only (40)K was determined in vegetation samples with an average activity of 172.2 +/- 1.7 Bq kg(-1), whereas in water samples, all radionuclides were found below lower limits of detection. The radium equivalent activity in all soil samples is lower than the limit set in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development report (370 Bq kg(-1)). The value of the external exposure dose has been determined from the content of these radionuclides in soil. The average terrestrial gamma air absorbed dose rate was observed to be 62.4 nGy h(-1), which yields an annual effective dose of 0.08 mSv. The average value of the annual effective dose lies close to the global range of outdoor radiation exposure given in United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. However, the main component of the radiation dose to the population residing in the study area arises from cosmic ray due to high altitude.

  5. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    repair, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune functions. Twelve genes representative of key pathways found in this study were verified by qPCR. Potential common MoAs of low-dose gamma radiation may include induction of oxidative stress, DNA damage and disturbance of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Although common MoAs were proposed, a number of DEGs and pathways were still found to be dose-specific, potentially indicating multiple mechanisms of action (MOAs) of low-dose gamma radiation in fish. In addition, plasma glucose displayed an apparent increase with increasing radiation doses, although the results were not significantly different from the control. These findings suggested that sublethal doses of gamma radiation may cause dose-dependent transcriptional changes in the liver of Atlantic salmon after short-term exposure. The current study predicted multiple MoA for gamma radiation and may aid future impact assessment of environmental radioactivity in fish.

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  7. Modeling the radiation doses from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph; Liu, Ningyu; Rassoul, Hamid

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are intense bursts of gamma-rays that originate from thunderclouds, from altitudes that commercial aircraft fly. Based upon the fluence of gamma-rays measured by the RHESSI spacecraft, Dwyer et al. [2010] inferred radiation doses to individuals inside aircraft in the 0.001 - 0.1 Sv range, depending upon the assumed size of the TGF source region. The largest doses occur when an aircraft is directly struck by the energetic electron beam that produces the TGF. The relativistic feedback discharge model is a self-consistent model that includes the generation of runaway electrons via the positron and x-ray feedback mechanisms and the electric field changes due to the resulting ionization and low-energy electron and ion currents. This model has successfully explained many properties of TGFs, including the gamma-ray intensities, durations, multi-pulsed structures as well as discharge currents and radio emissions. In this presentation we discuss new radiation dose calculations based upon the relativistic feedback discharge model and compare these calculations to previous work.

  8. Distribution of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in the eastern coastal area of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Prasad, G; Omori, Y; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is one of the important radiation exposures on the earth's surface that results from the three primordial radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The elemental concentration of these elements in the earth's crust could result in the anomalous variation of the terrestrial gamma radiation in the environment. The geology of the local area plays an important role in distribution of these radioactive elements. Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured around the eastern coastal area of Odisha with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. The values of the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly at different locations in the study area. The values of the terrestrial gamma dose rate ranged from 77 to 1651 nGy h(-1), with an average of 230 nGy h(-1). During the measurement of the terrestrial gamma dose rate, sand and soil samples were also collected for the assessment of natural radionuclides. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K from these samples were measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry with a NaI(Tl) detector. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 15.6 to 69 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 46.7 Bq kg(-1), from 28.9 to 973 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 250 Bq kg(-1) and from 139 to 952 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 429, respectively. The detailed significance of these studies has been discussed from the radiation protection point of view.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H., Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction MDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in envirorunental pathways. epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering. radiation dosimetry. and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  10. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-01

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  11. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-08

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  12. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  13. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-07

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l0-norm and l1-norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms.

  14. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-11-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to ..gamma.. radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D/sub 0/) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury.

  15. A portable absorbed dose measuring instrument with gamma discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quam, W. M.; Wilde, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of an electronic instrument for measuring the radiation dose absorbed by tissues are presented. The detector is a sphere of tissue-equivalent plastic with a single wire located on a diameter of the sphere. The electronic circuits and method of operation of the detector are described. Advantages are the small size and easy portability plus ability to selectively measure neutron and gamma plus neutron events.

  16. Gamma doses from phospho-gypsum plaster-board.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S

    1997-01-01

    The use of phospho-gypsum plaster-board and plaster cement in buildings as a substitute for natural gypsum may constitute an additional source of radiation exposure to both workers and members of the public, both from inhalation of radon progeny produced from radon which is exhaled from the plaster-board and from beta and gamma radiation produced by radioactive decay in the plaster-board. The calculations presented in this paper indicate that if phospho-gypsum sheets 1 cm thick containing a 226Ra concentration of 400 Bq kg(-1) are used to line the walls and ceiling of a room of dimensions up to 5 m x 5 m x 3 m, the annual effective dose from gamma radiation for a person continually occupying the room should not exceed approximately 0.13 mSv. This compares with a measured annual average effective dose from gamma radiation in Australian homes of 0.9 mSv. The annual effective dose from such thin sheets is directly proportional to the 226Ra concentration in the plaster-board.

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Hanford environmental dose reconstruction project: Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The Technical Steering Panel consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included among the members are appointed technical members representing the States of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the Indian tribes in the region, and an individual representing the public.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the regional Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Project reports and references used in the reports are made available to the public in a public reading room. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. An alternative to gamma histograms for ROI-based quantitative dose comparisons.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, P

    2009-06-21

    An alternative to gamma (gamma) histograms for ROI-based quantitative comparisons of dose distributions using the gamma concept is proposed. The method provides minimum values of dose difference and distance-to-agreement such that a pre-set fraction of the region of interest passes the gamma test. Compared to standard gamma histograms, the method provides more information in terms of pass rate per gamma calculation. This is achieved at negligible additional calculation cost and without loss of accuracy. The presented method is proposed as a useful and complementary alternative to standard gamma histograms, increasing both the quantity and quality of information for use in acceptance or rejection decisions.

  1. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  2. Analytical description of dose profile behaviour in Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, J.; Gwilliam, M.; Mehrem, R.; Bird, A.; Walton, L.

    2008-04-01

    Stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery utilizes ionizing beams from 60Co sources and relies on a combination of collimator sizes, weighting, etc to generate a high-dose region that is conformal with a designated target volume. Dose computation is typically performed by computer, but in this paper, single collimator dose profile behaviour is modelled analytically and then extended to accommodate multiple collimators of different weights with co-located isocentres. The dose profile from a single helmet is derived from a top-hat beam profile approximation and an idealized symmetric distribution of sources is used to represent the 201 sources within a collimating helmet. The results from the analysis are validated by an independent numerical model and also compared with those obtained by other groups using numerical and experimental methods. With respect to multiple collimators, the relationship between the size (full width half maximum) of the irradiated volume and relative collimator weighting is also examined using the simple analytical model. The simplicity of the mathematics clarifies the relationship between beam profile, dose profile and multiple collimator behaviour, and provides data that compare favourably with published literature.

  3. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    PubMed Central

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A. I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. PMID:26347593

  4. Radon exhalation rates and gamma doses from ceramic tiles.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, R S; Aral, H; Peggie, J R

    1998-12-01

    This study was carried out to assess the possible radiological hazard resulting from the use of zircon in glaze applied to tiles used in buildings. The 226Ra content of various stains and glazing compounds was measured using gamma spectroscopy and the 222Rn exhalation rates for these materials were measured using adsorption on activated charcoal. The radon exhalation rates were found to be close to or less than the minimum detectable values for the equipment used. This limit was much lower than the estimated exhalation rates, which were calculated assuming that the parameters controlling the emanation and diffusion of 222Rn in the materials studied were similar to those of soil. This implied that the 222Rn emanation coefficients and/or diffusion coefficients for most of the materials studied were very much lower than expected. Measurements on zircon powders showed that the 222Rn emanation coefficient for zircon was much lower than that for soil, indicating that only a small fraction of the 222Rn produced by the decay of 226Ra was able to escape from the zircon grains. The estimated increase in radon concentration in room air and the estimated external gamma radiation dose resulting from the use of zircon glaze are both much lower than the relevant action level and dose limit.

  5. Gamma and neutrino radiation dose from gamma ray bursts and nearby supernovae.

    PubMed

    Karam, P Andrew

    2002-04-01

    Supernovae and gamma ray bursts are exceptionally powerful cosmic events that occur randomly in space and time in our galaxy. Their potential to produce very high radiation levels has been discussed, along with speculation that they may have caused mass extinctions noted from the fossil record. It is far more likely that they have produced radiation levels that, while not lethal, are genetically significant, and these events may have influenced the course of evolution and the manner in which organisms respond to radiation insult. Finally, intense gamma radiation exposure from these events may influence the ability of living organisms to travel through space. Calculations presented in this paper suggest that supernovae and gamma ray bursts are likely to produce sea-level radiation exposures of about I Gy with a mean interval of about five million years and sea-level radiation exposures of about 0.2 Gy every million years. Comets and meteors traveling through space would receive doses in excess of 10 Gy at a depth of 0.02 m at mean intervals of 4 and 156 million years, respectively. This may place some constraints on the ability of life to travel through space either between planets or between planetary systems. Calculations of radiation dose from neutrino radiation are presented and indicate that this is not a significant source of radiation exposure for even extremely close events for the expected neutrino spectrum from these events.

  6. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  7. Neutron and gamma-ray dose measurements at various distances from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, C.J.; Hankins, D.E.

    1984-08-01

    We measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates at various distances from the Little Boy-Comet Critical Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April of 1983. The Little Boy-Comet Assembly is a replica of the atomic weapon detonated over Hiroshima, designed to be operated at various steady-state power levels. The selected distances for measurement ranged from 107 m to 567 m. Gamma-ray measurements were made with a Reuter-Stokes environmental ionization chamber which has a sensitivity of 1.0 ..mu..R/hour. Neutron measurements were made with a pulsed-source remmeter which has a sensitivity of 0.1 ..mu..rem/hour, designed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). 12 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These task correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These task correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography; food consumption; and agriculture; and environmental pathway and dose estimates.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography; food consumption; and agriculture; and environmental pathway and dose estimates.

  13. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project Is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project Is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  15. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Ryukyu Islands, subtropical region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, M; Kina, S; Shiroma, M; Shiroma, Y; Masuda, N; Motomura, D; Hiraoka, H; Fujioka, S; Kawakami, T; Yasuda, Y; Arakawa, K; Fukahori, K; Jyunicho, M; Ishikawa, S; Ohomoto, T; Shingaki, R; Akata, N; Zhuo, W; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    In order to explain the distribution of natural radiation level in the Asia, in situ measurements of dose rate in air due to terrestrial gamma radiation have been conducted in a total of 21 islands that belong to Ryukyu Islands (Ryukyu Archipelago), subtropical rejoin of southwest Japan. Car-borne surveys have also been carried out in Okinawa-jima, the biggest island of the archipelago. Based on the results for these measurements, arithmetic mean, the maximum and the minimum of the dose rates at 1 m in height from the unpaved soil ground in the archipelago were estimated to be 47, 165 and 8 nGy h(-1), respectively. A comparative study of car-borne data obtained prior to and subsequent to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, as for Okinawa-jima, indicated that the nuclear accident has no impact on the environmental radiation at the present time.

  17. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  18. Impact of gamma analysis parameters on dose evaluation using Gafchromic EBT2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seu-Ran; Park, Ji-Yeon; Suh, Tae-Suk; Park, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2012-10-01

    To recommend optimal gamma analysis parameters (grid size and search range) for detecting dose errors, we evaluated the impact of gamma models and parameters on dose verification in volumetric modulated fields. Delivered doses were verified under open, 45° wedged, and volumetric modulated fields for prostate, anal, head and neck, and brain cancer by using Gafchromic EBT2 films for gamma evaluation. Two gamma models (a conventional method and a modified method to compensate for unintended dose errors caused by misalignments between reference and evaluated matrixes) were employed. The variation in the detected dose errors was evaluated in each gamma model for different grid sizes (0.5, 1, and 2 mm) and search ranges (1, 2, and 4 mm) applied to determine distant-to-agreement. The dose discrepancy of each evaluation was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using a pass ratio in analysis software developed in-house. The modified gamma model with a small search range and grid size showed a higher pass ratio than the conventional model in volumetric modulated arc therapy. The pass ratio for 2 mm grid size decreased by over 40% as compared to that for 1 mm grid size. The pass ratio decreased by more than 30% as the search range was increased from 1 mm to 4 mm. Therefore, 1 mm grid size and 1 mm search range may be appropriate to evaluate dose errors in modulated fields after using the modified gamma model.

  19. Toxicokinetics of the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane gamma: effect of dose, timing, route, repeated exposure, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Szabo, David T; Diliberto, Janet J; Hakk, Heldur; Huwe, Janice K; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2010-10-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane-gamma (γ-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ), comprise the mixture. Despite the γ-diastereoisomer being the major diastereoisomer in the mixture and environmental samples, the α-diastereoisomer predominates human tissue and wildlife. This study was conducted to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion parameters of γ-HBCD with respect to dose and time following a single acute exposure and repeated exposure in adult female C57BL/6 mice. Results suggest that 85% of the administered dose (3 mg/kg) was absorbed after po exposure. Disposition was dose independent and did not significantly change after 10 days of exposure. Liver was the major depot (< 0.3% of dose) 4 days after treatment followed by blood, fat, and then brain. γ-HBCD was rapidly metabolized and eliminated in the urine and feces. For the first time, in vivo stereoisomerization was observed of the γ-diastereoisomer to the β-diastereoisomer in liver and brain tissues and to the α- and β-diastereoisomer in fat and feces. Polar metabolites in the blood and urine were a major factor in determining the initial whole-body half-life (1 day) after a single po exposure. Elimination, both whole-body and from individual tissues, was biphasic. Initial half-lives were approximately 1 day, whereas terminal half-lives were up to 4 days, suggesting limited potential for γ-diastereoisomer bioaccumulation. The toxicokinetic behavior reported here has important implications for the extrapolation of toxicological studies of the commercial HBCD mixture to the assessment of risk.

  20. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  1. Application of airborne gamma spectrometric survey data to estimating terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates: an example in California.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, H A; Revzan, K L; Smith, A R

    1994-01-01

    We examined the applicability of radioelement data from the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance, an element of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation, to estimate terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates, by comparing dose rates calculated from aeroradiometric surveys of uranium, thorium, and potassium concentrations with dose rates calculated from a radiogeologic data base and the distribution of lithologies in California. Gamma-ray dose rates increase generally from north to south following lithological trends, with low values of 25-30 nGy h-1 in the northernmost 1 x 2 degrees quadrangles between 41 and 42 degrees N to high values of 75-100 nGy h-1 in southeastern California. Lithologic-based estimates of mean dose rates in the quadrangles generally match those from aeroradiometric data, with statewide means of 63 and 60 nGy h-1, respectively. These are intermediate between a population-weighted global average of 51 nGy h-1 reported in 1982 by UNSCEAR and a weighted continental average of 70 nGy h-1, based on the global distribution of rock types. The concurrence of lithologically and aeroradiometrically determined dose rates in California, with its varied geology and topography encompassing settings representative of the continents, indicates that the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance data are applicable to estimates of terrestrial absorbed dose rates from natural gamma emitters.

  2. Criticality prompt gamma and neutron dose equations validated by Monte Carlo analyses and compared to known criticality accident doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochhalter, Eugene

    The United States (US) Department of Energy [DOE] and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] have provided the nuclear industry with requirements, goals, and objectives for the preparation of safety analysis and the finalization of that safety analysis in the form of a documented safety analysis (DSA) and technical safety requirements (TSRs). The deterministic guidance provided by the NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 3.33 for calculating the prompt gamma and neutron doses from a criticality has a number of potential issues associated with the semi-empirical equations, which make these equations potentially out dated. The NRC guidance for estimating the prompt gamma and neutron doses to a facility worker due to an accidental criticality was withdrawn without newer deterministic guidance being issued. This research project determined the original basis for the RG prompt gamma and neutron equations, evaluated the potential issues associated with the RG 3.33 prompt gamma and neutron equations, and modified the RG 3.33 point source prompt gamma and neutron equations to calculate the doses for the selected set of criticality accidents. The criticality accidents addressed by this dissertation include: 1. U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 point source criticality, 2. U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 sphere source criticality, 3. Uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate solutions in a cylindrical process vessel and 4. Low level waste in 55-gallon and 30-gallon drums. The prompt gamma and neutron equation doses (RG 3.33/3.34/3.35) are compared to actual nuclear industry criticality accident worker doses to assess the conservatism of the RG equations. Finally, the RG 3.33 prompt gamma and neutron dose equations are compared to MCNP5 results to investigate consistency with respect to the modified prompt gamma and neutron dose equations and the representative dose estimates for each of the criticality configurations (point source, spherical source, and cylindrical source). Knowledge and accurate

  3. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  4. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGES

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  6. Inverse modelling of radionuclide release rates using gamma dose rate observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Thomas; Stohl, Andreas; von Haustein, Christoph; Thummerer, Severin; Wallner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants such as the historical accident in Chernobyl 1986 or the more recent disaster in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have drastic impacts on the population and environment. The hazardous consequences reach out on a national and continental scale. Environmental measurements and methods to model the transport and dispersion of the released radionuclides serve as a platform to assess the regional impact of nuclear accidents - both, for research purposes and, more important, to determine the immediate threat to the population. However, the assessments of the regional radionuclide activity concentrations and the individual exposure to radiation dose underlie several uncertainties. For example, the accurate model representation of wet and dry deposition. One of the most significant uncertainty, however, results from the estimation of the source term. That is, the time dependent quantification of the released spectrum of radionuclides during the course of the nuclear accident. The quantification of the source terms of severe nuclear accidents may either remain uncertain (e.g. Chernobyl, Devell et al., 1995) or rely on rather rough estimates of released key radionuclides given by the operators. Precise measurements are mostly missing due to practical limitations during the accident. Inverse modelling can be used to realise a feasible estimation of the source term (Davoine and Bocquet, 2007). Existing point measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations are therefore combined with atmospheric transport models. The release rates of radionuclides at the accident site are then obtained by improving the agreement between the modelled and observed concentrations (Stohl et al., 2012). The accuracy of the method and hence of the resulting source term depends amongst others on the availability, reliability and the resolution in time and space of the observations. Radionuclide activity concentrations are observed on a

  7. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington. and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks: Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report, November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington. and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks: Source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  10. Evolving Adjustments to External (Gamma) Slope Factors for CERCLA Risk and Dose Assessments - 12290

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stuart

    2012-07-01

    To model the external exposure pathway in risk and dose assessments of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses slope factors (SFs), also known as risk coefficients, and dose conversion factors (DCFs). Without any adjustment these external radiation exposure pathways effectively assumes that an individual is exposed to a source geometry that is effectively an infinite slab. The concept of an 'infinite slab' means that the thickness of the contaminated zone and its aerial extent are so large that it behaves as if it were infinite in its physical dimensions. EPA has been making increasingly complex adjustments to account for the extent of the contamination and its corresponding radiation field to provide more accurate risk and dose assessment modeling when using its calculators. In most instances, the more accurate modeling results derived from these gamma adjustments are less conservative. The notable exception are for some radionuclides in rooms with contaminated walls, ceiling, and floors, and the receptor is in location of the room with the highest amount of radiation exposure, usually the corner of small rooms and the center of large conference rooms. (authors)

  11. A comparative study of terrestrial gamma dose rate in air measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter, portable survey meter and HPGe gamma spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; He, Yi; Yang, Li-Tao; Shan, Zhen; Chen, Chao-Feng; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, three different widely-used measurement techniques for environmental gamma dose rate were studied and compared, i.e., the thermoluminescent dosimeter, the portable survey meter and the spectrometric analysis. Thirteen investigation sites were selected, and the TLDs were arranged to accumulate the radiation signals during an interval of about one quarter, the instant dose rates by using a portable survey meter were collected around the site, and top surface soils were sampled in the surroundings for radionuclides analyzing in laboratory. The results from these methods were compared, which revealed high correlations. The differences and possible uncertainties for the three methods were analyzed, inspired a further study should be conducted to have more successful estimation of dose rate in surface air.

  12. Local Environmental Characterization using Gamma Ground Survey Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litz, Marc; Burns, David; Katsis, Dimos; Carroll, James

    2013-04-01

    Inexpensive gamma detectors with GPS and wireless communications have been developed and installed to provide a ground survey network for detection of environmental levels of gamma radiation from naturally occurring events (i.e. radon, lightening, solar flares, etc.) and unintended gamma radiation on the battlefield and along transport routes. Signals from lightening and cosmic rays have pulse widths less than 100 us. Pedestrian borne and vehicle borne radiation sources have signatures from millseconds to seconds. The large energy associated with solar initiated disruptions (10^20J) generates a variety of ground level events that can last for hours. Data collected during the 24/7 operation of this gamma network is compared to xray, electron, and ion flux from satellite sensors. Local rainfall data is also utilized to make comparisons to local radon intensity levels. This paper will discuss the time and intensity correlations with corroborating environmental data. If the gamma signals characteristics from local environments and space-based environments can be described with enough detail, it is hoped that automated warning of unexpected radiation events can offer early warning protection to power and energy grid avoiding potentially damaging surges as well as offer local radiation health warning as necessary.

  13. Comparative study of treatment dose plans after the refinement of Leksell Gamma Knife registered single-beam dose profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y. C.; Ng, K. P.; Yu, C. P.; Ho, Robert T. K.

    2007-09-15

    We investigated the amplification of discrepancy when using multiple shots of the same collimator size helmet, by comparing dose plans in the Leksell GammaPlan registered employing the default single-beam dose profiles and the Monte Carlo generated single-beam profiles. Four collimator helmets were studied. The results show that the largest amplification of discrepancy with multiple shots was found with the 8 mm collimator because of the largest discrepancy of its single-beam dose profile. The amplification of discrepancy is significant when tumor volumes increase but insignificant when the tumor volumes are in an elongated shape. Using close shot overlapping strategy (i.e., more shots close packed together) shows no observable increase in the amplification of discrepancy. For the best quality of Leksell Gamma Knife registered radiosurgery, it is suggested that the single-beam dose profiles should be refined, especially the 8 mm collimator, to prevent error amplification when using multiple collimator shots.

  14. Calculation of Dose Deposition in Nanovolumes and Simulation of gamma-H2AX Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik

    2010-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track structure simulations can accurately simulate experimental data: a) Frequency of target hits. b) Dose per event. c) Dose per ion. d) Radial dose. The dose is uniform in micrometers sized voxels; at the nanometer scale, the difference in energy deposition between high and low-LET radiations appears. The calculated 3D distribution of dose voxels, combined with chromosomes simulated by random walk is very similar to the distribution of DSB observed with gamma-H2AX experiments. This is further evidenced by applying a visualization threshold on dose.

  15. Study of environmental radioactivity in Palestine by in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Al-Masri, Hussein; Judeh, Adnan

    2009-07-01

    This work presents qualitative and quantitative evaluation of environmental radioactivity in the central and southern areas of the West Bank, Palestine. For this purpose, the technology of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy is used with a scintillation of 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) crystal connected to multichannel analyzer InSpector 2000 from Canberra instruments and laptop computer. Gamma-ray spectra were collected using the detector placed 1 m above the ground surface. Calibration of the detection system for in situ measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in open terrain is performed theoretically using Monte Carlo techniques. Measurements are conducted in 18 locations in 3 regions across the West Bank. The vast majority of identified radionuclides are naturally occurring gamma-emitting sources (the decay products of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K). The only identified anthropogenic radionuclide is (137)Cs. Activity concentrations of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th as well as the total outdoor gamma dose rate from these radionuclides were determined from the gamma-ray spectra. The highest activity concentrations of the three primordial radionuclides were 203 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, 32 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 30 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th. The total outdoor gamma dose rate calculated for the whole study area at 1 m above ground ranged from 6 to 30 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 18 +/- 7 nGy h(-1), which represents about 30% of the world average value.

  16. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  17. Dose verification of single shot gamma knife applications using VIPAR polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, P.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Tatsis, E.; Angelopoulos, A.; Baras, P.; Kozicki, M.; Papagiannis, P.; Rosiak, J. M.; Sakelliou, L.; Sandilos, P.; Vlachos, L.

    2005-03-01

    This work describes an experimental procedure with potential to assess the overall accuracy associated with gamma knife clinical applications, from patient imaging and dosimetry planning to patient positioning and dose delivery using the automated positioning system of a Leksell Gamma Knife model C. The VIPAR polymer gel-MRI dosimetry method is employed due to its inherent three-dimensional feature and linear dose response over the range of gamma knife applications. Different polymer gel vials were irradiated with single shot gamma knife treatment plans using each of the four available collimator helmets to deliver a maximum dose of 30 Gy. Percentage relative dose results are presented not only in the form of one-dimensional profiles but also planar isocontours and isosurfaces in three dimensions. Experimental results are compared with corresponding Gammaplan treatment planning system calculations as well as acceptance test radiochromic film measurements. A good agreement, within the experimental uncertainty, is observed between measured and expected dose distributions. This experimental uncertainty is of the order of one imaging pixel in the MRI gel readout session (<1 mm) and allows for the verification of single shot gamma knife applications in terms of acceptance specifications for precision in beam alignment and accuracy. Averaging net R2 results in the dose plateau of the 4 mm and 18 mm collimator irradiated gel vials, which were MR scanned in the same session, provides a crude estimate of the 4 mm output factor which agrees within errors with the default value of 0.870.

  18. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-21

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  19. High Dose Gamma Radiation Selectively Reduces GABAA-slow Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Dagne, Beza A; Sunay, Melis K; Cayla, Noëlie S; Ouyang, Yi-Bing; Knox, Susan J; Giffard, Rona G; Adler, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the effects of gamma radiation on brain tissue have produced markedly differing results, ranging from little effect to major pathology, following irradiation. The present study used control-matched animals to compare effects on a well characterized brain region following gamma irradiation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 60 Gy of whole brain gamma radiation and, after 24-hours, 48-hours, and one-week periods, hippocampal brain slices were isolated and measured for anatomical and physiological differences. There were no major changes observed in tissue appearance or evoked synaptic responses at any post-irradiation time point. However, exposure to 60 Gy of irradiation resulted in a small, but statistically significant (14% change; ANOVA p < 0.005; n = 9) reduction in synaptic inhibition seen at 100 ms, indicating a selective depression of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) slow form of inhibition. Population spike (PS) amplitudes also transiently declined by ~ 10% (p < 0.005; n = 9) when comparing the 24-hour group to sham group. Effects on PS amplitude recovered to baseline 48 hour and one week later. There were no obvious negative pathological effects; however, a subtle depression in circuit level inhibition was observed and provides evidence for ‘radiomodulation’ of brain circuits.

  20. 131 iodine gamma dose determination in the thyroid gland using two geometrical shapes: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, A.; Bentabet, A.; Azbouche, A.; Fenineche, N.; Adjiri, A.; Dib, A.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the internal gamma dose, we used a Monte Carlo code ‘Penelope’ simulation with two geometrical models (cylindrical and spherical). The deposited energy was determined via the loss of energy calculated from the quantum theory for inelastic collisions based on the first-order (plane-wave) Born approximation for charged particles with individual atoms and molecules. Our results show that the cylindrical geometry is more suitable for carrying out such a study. Moreover, we developed an analytical expression for the 131 iodine gamma dose (the energy deposited per photon absorbed dose). This latter could be considered as an important tool for evaluating the gamma dose without going through stochastic models.

  1. Indoor terrestrial gamma dose rate mapping in France: a case study using two different geostatistical models.

    PubMed

    Warnery, E; Ielsch, G; Lajaunie, C; Cale, E; Wackernagel, H; Debayle, C; Guillevic, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma dose rates show important spatial variations in France. Previous studies resulted in maps of arithmetic means of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates by "departement" (French district). However, numerous areas could not be characterized due to the lack of data. The aim of our work was to obtain more precise estimates of the spatial variability of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates in France by using a more recent and complete data base and geostatistics. The study was based on the exploitation of 97,595 measurements results distributed in 17,404 locations covering all of France. Measurements were done by the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) using RPL (Radio Photo Luminescent) dosimeters, exposed during several months between years 2011 and 2012 in French dentist surgeries and veterinary clinics. The data used came from dosimeters which were not exposed to anthropic sources. After removing the cosmic rays contribution in order to study only the telluric gamma radiation, it was decided to work with the arithmetic means of the time-series measurements, weighted by the time-exposure of the dosimeters, for each location. The values varied between 13 and 349 nSv/h, with an arithmetic mean of 76 nSv/h. The observed statistical distribution of the gamma dose rates was skewed to the right. Firstly, ordinary kriging was performed in order to predict the gamma dose rate on cells of 1*1 km(2), all over the domain. The second step of the study was to use an auxiliary variable in estimates. The IRSN achieved in 2010 a classification of the French geological formations, characterizing their uranium potential on the bases of geology and local measurement results of rocks uranium content. This information is georeferenced in a map at the scale 1:1,000,000. The geological uranium potential (GUP) was classified in 5 qualitative categories. As telluric gamma rays mostly come from the progenies of the (238)Uranium series present in rocks, this

  2. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  3. Determination of canine dose conversion factors in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.A.; Bhatt, R.C.; Myska, J.C.; Holland, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The primary objective of mixed-field neutron/gamma radiation dosimetry in canine irradiation experiments conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is to determine the absorbed midline tissue dose (MLT) at the region of interest in the canine. A dose conversion factor (DCF) can be applied to free-in-air (FIA) dose measurements to estimate the MLT doses to canines. This report is a summary of the measured DCFs that were used to determine the MLT doses in canines at AFRRI from 1979 to 1992.

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  5. Monte Carlo calculation of the sensitivity of a commercial dose calibrator to gamma and beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Valley, Jean-François; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, François O

    2004-06-01

    The detection process used in a commercial dose calibrator was modeled using the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code. Dose calibrator efficiency for gamma and beta emitters, and the response to monoenergetic photons and electrons was calculated. The model shows that beta emitters below 2.5 MeV deposit energy indirectly in the detector through bremsstrahlung produced in the chamber wall or in the source itself. Higher energy beta emitters (E > 2.5 MeV) deposit energy directly in the chamber sensitive volume, and dose calibrator sensitivity increases abruptly for these radionuclides. The Monte Carlo calculations were compared with gamma and beta emitter measurements. The calculations show that the variation in dose calibrator efficiency with measuring conditions (source volume, container diameter, container wall thickness and material, position of the source within the calibrator) is relatively small and can be considered insignificant for routine measurement applications. However, dose calibrator efficiency depends strongly on the inner-wall thickness of the detector.

  6. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaile; Ma, Lijun

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered (~40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  7. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  8. The effect of low doses of gamma radiation on the electrophysical properties of mesoporous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, D. I.; Galushka, V. V.; Zharkova, E. A.; Sidorov, V. I.; Terin, D. V.; Khasina, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of low exposure doses (5-40 kR) of gamma radiation on the electrical properties of structures based on a mesoporous silicon (SiMP) layer is investigated. It is demonstrated that the conductivity of the SiMP layer increases, the Fermi level shifts, and the trap density changes in gamma-irradiated Al/SiMP/ p-Si/Al structures. Long-term stable switched-state memory in the region of the I-V curve hysteresis is revealed. This effect is controlled by the irradiation dose.

  9. HUMAN BIOMONITORING TO LINK ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract and presentation on Human Biomonitoring to Link Environmental Exposure to Biologically Relevant Dose describes the use of biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of current health state, and biomarker measurements. The abstract and presentation focuses on how biomarkers ...

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly Technical Report, November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Haerer, H. A.

    1987-11-01

    This monthly report for November 1987 summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  11. An improved technique for comparing Gamma Knife dose-volume distributions in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer-Loft, Stephen M.; Walton, Lee; Forster, David M. C.; Kemeny, Andras A.

    1999-08-01

    A function derived from the geometry of brachytherapy dose distributions is applied to stereotactic radiosurgery and an algorithm for the production of a novel dose-volume histogram, the Anderson inverse-square shifted dose-volume histogram (DVH), is proposed. The expected form of the function to be plotted is checked by calculating its value for single focus exposures, and its application to clinical examples of Gamma Knife treatments described. The technique is shown to provide a valuable tool for assessing the adequacy of radiosurgical plans and comparing and reporting dose distributions.

  12. Morphological changes induced by different doses of gamma irradiation in garlic sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C. N.; Croci, C. A.; Orioli, G. A.

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of different doses of gamma rays applied in dormancy and post-dormancy on garlic bulbs in relation with some morphophysiological parameters. High (commercial) doses cause the complete inhibition of sprouting and mitosis (due to nuclear aberrations). Relatively low doses show no effects on bulbs but doses of 10 Gy applied in post-dormancy reduce sprouting and stop mitosis. This inhibition becomes noticeable from 150 days post-harvest onwards. Exogenous growth regulators can reverse these effects. Results may reinforce the good practice of radioinhibition processes in garlic.

  13. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Continuous Dose Delivery with Gamma Knife Perfexion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi,; Li, W; Chung, C; Jaffray, D; Aleman, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose continuous dose delivery techniques for stereotactic treatments delivered by Gamma Knife Perfexion using inverse treatment planning system that can be applied to various tumour sites in the brain. We test the accuracy of the plans on Perfexion’s planning system (GammaPlan) to ensure the obtained plans are viable. This approach introduces continuous dose delivery for Perefxion, as opposed to the currently employed step-and-shoot approaches, for different tumour sites. Additionally, this is the first realization of automated inverse planning on GammaPlan. Methods: The inverse planning approach is divided into two steps of identifying a quality path inside the target, and finding the best collimator composition for the path. To find a path, we select strategic regions inside the target volume and find a path that visits each region exactly once. This path is then passed to a mathematical model which finds the best combination of collimators and their durations. The mathematical model minimizes the dose spillage to the surrounding tissues while ensuring the prescribed dose is delivered to the target(s). Organs-at-risk and their corresponding allowable doses can also be added to the model to protect adjacent organs. Results: We test this approach on various tumour sizes and sites. The quality of the obtained treatment plans are comparable or better than forward plans and inverse plans that use step- and-shoot technique. The conformity indices in the obtained continuous dose delivery plans are similar to those of forward plans while the beam-on time is improved on average (see Table 1 in supporting document). Conclusion: We employ inverse planning for continuous dose delivery in Perfexion for brain tumours. The quality of the obtained plans is similar to forward and inverse plans that use conventional step-and-shoot technique. We tested the inverse plans on GammaPlan to verify clinical relevance. This research was partially supported by Elekta

  14. Gamma Knife 3-D dose distribution near the area of tissue inhomogeneities by normoxic gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Isbakan, Fatih; Uelgen, Yekta; Bilge, Hatice; Ozen, Zeynep; Agus, Onur; Buyuksarac, Bora

    2007-05-15

    The accuracy of the Leksell GammaPlan registered , the dose planning system of the Gamma Knife Model-B, was evaluated near tissue inhomogeneities, using the gel dosimetry method. The lack of electronic equilibrium around the small-diameter gamma beams can cause dose calculation errors in the neighborhood of an air-tissue interface. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of inhomogeneity near the paranosal sinuses cavities. The homogeneous phantom was a spherical glass balloon of 16 cm diameter, filled with MAGIC gel; i.e., the normoxic polymer gel. Two hollow PVC balls of 2 cm radius, filled with N{sub 2} gas, represented the air cavities inside the inhomogeneous phantom. For dose calibration purposes, 100 ml gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses, and then scanned in a MR unit. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. Dose distributions are the results of a single shot of irradiation, obtained by collimating all 201 cobalt sources to a known target in the phantom. Both phantoms were irradiated at the same dose level at the same coordinates. Stereotactic frames and fiducial markers were attached to the phantoms prior to MR scanning. The dose distribution predicted by the Gamma Knife planning system was compared with that of the gel dosimetry. As expected, for the homogeneous phantom the isodose diameters measured by the gel dosimetry and the GammaPlan registered differed by 5% at most. However, with the inhomogeneous phantom, the dose maps in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were spatially different. The diameters of the 50% isodose curves differed 43% in the X axis and 32% in the Y axis for the Z=90 mm axial plane; by 44% in the X axis and 24% in the Z axis for the Y=90 mm coronal plane; and by 32% in the Z axis and 42% in the Y axis for the X=92 mm sagittal plane. The lack of ability of the GammaPlan registered to predict the rapid dose fall off, due

  15. GLODEP2: a computer model for estimating gamma dose due to worldwide fallout of radioactive debris

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, L.L.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    The GLODEP2 computer code provides estimates of the surface deposition of worldwide radioactivity and the gamma-ray dose to man from intermediate and long-term fallout. The code is based on empirical models derived primarily from injection-deposition experience gained from the US and USSR nuclear tests in 1958. Under the assumption that a nuclear power facility is destroyed and that its debris behaves in the same manner as the radioactive cloud produced by the nuclear weapon that attached the facility, predictions are made for the gamma does from this source of radioactivity. As a comparison study the gamma dose due to the atmospheric nuclear tests from the period of 1951 to 1962 has been computed. The computed and measured values from Grove, UK and Chiba, Japan agree to within a few percent. The global deposition of radioactivity and resultant gamma dose from a hypothetical strategic nuclear exchange between the US and the USSR is reported. Of the assumed 5300 Mton in the exchange, 2031 Mton of radioactive debris is injected in the atmosphere. The highest estimated average whole body total integrated dose over 50 years (assuming no reduction by sheltering or weathering) is 23 rem in the 30 to 50 degree latitude band. If the attack included a 100 GW(e) nuclear power industry as targets in the US, this dose is increased to 84.6 rem. Hotspots due to rainfall could increase these values by factors of 10 to 50.

  16. Assessment of gamma dose rates from terrestrial exposure in Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Dragović, S; Janković, Lj; Onjia, A

    2006-01-01

    The gamma dose rates due to naturally occuring terrestrial radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were calculated based on their activities in soil samples, determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. A total of 140 soil samples from 21 different regions of Serbia and Montenegro were collected. The gamma dose rates ranged from 7.40 to 29.7 nGy h(-1) for (226)Ra, from 12.9 to 46.5 nGy h(-1) for (232)Th and from 12.5 to 37.1 nGy h(-1) for (40)K. The total absorbed gamma dose rate due to these radionuclides varied from 34.5 to 97.6 nGy h(-1) with mean of 66.8 nGy h(-1). Assuming a 20% occupancy factor, the corresponding annual effective dose varied from 4.23 x 10(-5) to 11.9 x 10(-5) Sv with mean of 8.19 x 10(-5) Sv, i.e. the dose was lower than world wide average value. According to the values of external hazard index (mean: 0.39) obtained in this study, the radiation hazard was found to be insignificant for population living in the investigated area.

  17. Gamma and electron beam dose responses in synthetic mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, C.; Aziz, M. A.

    A thermoluminescence phenomenon has been observed in synthetic mica. The pristine sample glow curve provides the presence of TL glow peaks at 210, 260, 275, 300, 330 and 380°C with trap depths of 0.11, 0.46, 0.82, 1.4, 0.61 and 0.54 eV, respectively. The thermal activation energies of these defects were estimated by using the initial rise method. Gamma and electron beam irradiations have induced completely different glow curves in mica, which reveal the presence of other low temperature traps in the range 54-195°C. The TL growth curves reveal the possibility of using the investigated material in accident dosimetry.

  18. Low-dose radiation modifies skin response to acute gamma-rays and protons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Pecaut, Michael J; Cao, Jeffrey D; Moldovan, Maria; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to obtain pilot data on the effects of protracted low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays on the skin, both with and without acute gamma or proton irradiation (IR). Six groups of C57BL/6 mice were examined: a) 0 Gy control, b) LDR, c) Gamma, d) LDR+Gamma, e) Proton, and f) LDR+Proton. LDR radiation was delivered to a total dose of 0.01 Gy (0.03 cGy/h), whereas the Gamma and Proton groups received 2 Gy (0.9 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min, respectively). Assays were performed 56 days after exposure. Skin samples from all irradiated groups had activated caspase-3, indicative of apoptosis. The significant (p<0.05) increases in immunoreactivity in the Gamma and Proton groups were not present when LDR pre-exposure was included. However, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay for DNA fragmentation and histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections revealed no significant differences among groups, regardless of radiation regimen. The data demonstrate that caspase-3 activation initially triggered by both forms of acute radiation was greatly elevated in the skin nearly two months after whole-body exposure. In addition, LDR γ-ray priming ameliorated this response.

  19. Overview of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that specific and representative individuals and populations may have received as a result of releases of radioactive materials from historical operations at the Hanford Site. These dose estimates would account for the uncertainties of information regarding facilities operations, environmental monitoring, demography, food consumption and lifestyles, and the variability of natural phenomena. Other objectives of the HEDR Project include: supporting the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), declassifying Hanford-generated information and making it available to the public, performing high-quality, credible science, and conducting the project in an open, public forum. The project is briefly described.

  20. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  1. Environmental dose reconstruction for the urals population

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.

    1996-12-31

    In 1948 the Mayak plutonium production facility was put into operation in the Southern Urals approximately 100 km northwest of the city of Chelyabinsk. This facility consisted of three main sites: reactor plant, radiochemical facility, and waste management facility. A series of releases and accidents occurred in the initial period of intense activity during the start-up and early years of operation of the Mayak facility. The major sources of radioactive contamination were: (1) the discharges of 2.75 million curies of liquid wastes into the Techa River in 1949-1956, (2) an explosion in the storage facility of radioactive wastes in 1957 (so-called Kyshtym Accident) which led to the form East Urals Radioactive Trace (EURT) as a result of the dispersion of 2 million curies in the atmosphere, (3) the resuspension of 600 curies with dry silt from the shores of Karachay Lake during a heavy thunderstorm, and (5) gaseous-aerosol releases (about 560,000 Ci of {sup 131}I) mainly during the first decade of the facility`s operation. A large fraction of the releases into the Techa River and during the Kyshtym Accident consist of long-lived radionuclides, mainly {sup 90}Sr. This article covers the following, besides the sources and history of radioactive contamination: data bases for dose reconstruction and risk assessment; the approaches to population dose reconstruction. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Green, Stuart

    2010-04-06

    Ongoing controversy surrounds the adverse health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. The biological effects of gamma-radiation arise from the direct or indirect interaction between secondary electrons and the DNA of living cells. The probability of the absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays with energies below about 200 keV by particles of high atomic number is proportional to the third to fourth power of the atomic number. In such a case, the more heavily ionizing low-energy recoil electrons are preferentially produced; these cause dose enhancement in the immediate vicinity of the particles. It has been claimed that upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma-radiation, particles of DU in the human body would produce dose enhancement by a factor of 500-1000, thereby contributing a significant radiation dose in addition to the dose received from the inherent radioactivity of the DU. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc to accurately estimate the likely maximum dose enhancement arising from the presence of micrometre-sized uranium particles in the body. We found that although the dose enhancement is significant, of the order of 1-10, it is considerably smaller than that suggested previously.

  3. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, John E.; Hugtenburg, Richard P.; Green, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing controversy surrounds the adverse health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. The biological effects of gamma-radiation arise from the direct or indirect interaction between secondary electrons and the DNA of living cells. The probability of the absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays with energies below about 200 keV by particles of high atomic number is proportional to the third to fourth power of the atomic number. In such a case, the more heavily ionizing low-energy recoil electrons are preferentially produced; these cause dose enhancement in the immediate vicinity of the particles. It has been claimed that upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma-radiation, particles of DU in the human body would produce dose enhancement by a factor of 500–1000, thereby contributing a significant radiation dose in addition to the dose received from the inherent radioactivity of the DU. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc to accurately estimate the likely maximum dose enhancement arising from the presence of micrometre-sized uranium particles in the body. We found that although the dose enhancement is significant, of the order of 1–10, it is considerably smaller than that suggested previously. PMID:19776147

  4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) airborne gamma spectrometry system for environmental and emergency response surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, John, II; Thomas, Mark; Curry, Timothy

    2010-08-01

    The EPA Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) Program provides airborne ortho-rectified imagery, video, chemical and now radiological information directly to emergency response personnel via a commercial satellite link onboard the aircraft. EPA initiated the ASPECT Gamma Emergency Mapper GEM Project in 2008 to improve its airborne gamma-screening and mapping capability for monitoring any ground-based gamma contamination. This paper will provide an overview of the system, which can be configured to carry six 2"x4"x16" NaI(Tl) detectors and two 3"x3" LaBr3(Ce) detectors or eight 2"x4"x16" NaI(Tl) detectors. The paper will provide an overview of the analysis of gamma radiation spectra, system limitations, and emergency response applications.

  5. Estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, P S; Etnier, E L

    1980-01-01

    Factors important for characterization of tritium in environmental pathways leading to exposure of man are reviewed and quantification of those factors is discussed. Parameters characterizing the behavior of tritium in man are also subjected to review. Factors to be discussed include organic binding, bioaccumulation, quality factor and transmutation. A variety of models are presently in use to estimate dose to man from environmental releases of tritium. Results from four representative models are compared and discussed. Site-specific information is always preferable when parameterizing models to estimate dose to man. There may be significant differences in dose potential among geographic regions due to variable factors. An example of one such factor examined is absolute humidity. It is concluded that adequate methodologies exist for estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium although a number of areas are identified where additional tritium research is desirable.

  6. Attempted protection of spermatogenesis from single doses of gamma-irradiation in the androgen pretreated rat.

    PubMed

    Schlappack, O K; Delic, J I; Harwood, J R; Stanley, J A

    1987-01-01

    Spermatogenic stem-cell survival after gamma-irradiation has been investigated in the adult Wistar rat. Single doses of 4.5 and 9 Gy gamma-rays were administered to the testes of rats who received arachis oil (0.1 ml/100 g body weight) or testosterone enanthate (240 micrograms/100 g body weight) subcutaneously three times weekly for 6 weeks prior to radiation and during the week in which the radiations were given. A mean percentage of regenerating seminiferous tubule cross-sections of 32.45% and 7.26% was found in the testes of androgen-pretreated rats at 8 weeks after 4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively. Similar values (33.4% and 6.2%) were obtained in arachis oil-pretreated controls. We therefore conclude that protection of rat spermatogenesis from single doses of gamma-rays cannot be achieved by androgen pretreatment.

  7. Dose De-Escalation With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Clemens M.; Chan, Michael; Mignano, John; Duker, Jay; Melhus, Christopher S.; Williams, Lloyd B.; Wu, Julian K.; Yao, Kevin C.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Single-fraction targeted radiation therapy delivered by the Leksell Gamma Knife system is a minimally invasive treatment option for choroidal melanoma that has been used as an alternative to enucleation, proton beam therapy, or brachytherapy. Previously reported Gamma Knife series involved the treatment of choroidal melanomas with a dose of 40 to 50 Gy at the tumor margin. We report our institutional experience using a significantly lower dose. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with choroidal melanoma were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution over a 7-year period. The treatment and clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 32.2 months. Results: The mean dose to the tumor margin was 22.2 {+-} 2.4 Gy (range, 20- 25 Gy). Mean treated tumor volume was 1.1 {+-} 1.2 cc. Local control was achieved in 13 cases (93%). In 1 patient both intraocular spread and distant metastatic disease developed after treatment. Visual function of the affected eye was preserved in 5 patients (36%) at latest follow-up, in 9 patients (64%) visual loss ensued. Mild to moderate radiation toxicity developed in 8 patients. Conclusions: Choroidal melanoma can be safely and effectively treated using Leksell Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery with a marginal dose of less than 25 Gy.

  8. A simple method of independent treatment time verification in gamma knife radiosurgery using integral dose

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jianyue; Drzymala, Robert; Li Zuofeng

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a simple independent dose calculation method to verify treatment plans for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Our approach uses the total integral dose within the skull as an end point for comparison. The total integral dose is computed using a spreadsheet and is compared to that obtained from Leksell GammaPlan registered . It is calculated as the sum of the integral doses of 201 beams, each passing through a cylindrical volume. The average length of the cylinders is estimated from the Skull-Scaler measurement data taken before treatment. Correction factors are applied to the length of the cylinder depending on the location of a shot in the skull. The radius of the cylinder corresponds to the collimator aperture of the helmet, with a correction factor for the beam penumbra and scattering. We have tested our simple spreadsheet program using treatment plans of 40 patients treated with Gamma Knife registered in our center. These patients differ in geometry, size, lesion locations, collimator helmet, and treatment complexities. Results show that differences between our calculations and treatment planning results are typically within {+-}3%, with a maximum difference of {+-}3.8%. We demonstrate that our spreadsheet program is a convenient and effective independent method to verify treatment planning irradiation times prior to implementation of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  9. A geochemical assessment of terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, H A; Smith, A R

    1990-02-01

    A survey of the geochemical literature and unpublished data has resulted in the classification of the concentrations of the naturally occurring radioelements U, Th, and K by their associated rock types. A data base of over 2500 entries has been compiled, permitting calculation of terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates. The general lithology of terrains may be distinguished by their radioelement ratios, relative abundances, and total gamma radioactivities. The gamma-ray absorbed dose rates in air above igneous rocks generally vary with their silica contents, and with the exception of shale, sedimentary rocks have lower K:U and K:Th ratios than most igneous rocks. The appreciable difference between the overall mean terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate for rock of the continental surface (approximately 7 X 10(-8) Gy h-1) and the mean dose rate from field measurements over soil (approximately 5 X 10(-8) Gy h-1) is explained by the substantial differences between radioelement concentrations of soil and rock, differences that may vary markedly with rock type.

  10. Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2014-05-01

    CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented.

  11. Moving from gamma passing rates to patient DVH-based QA metrics in pretreatment dose QA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of the gamma passing rate metric for per-patient, pretreatment dose QA and to validate a novel patient-dose/DVH-based method and its accuracy and correlation. Specifically, correlations between: (1) gamma passing rates for three 3D dosimeter detector geometries vs clinically relevant patient DVH-based metrics; (2) Gamma passing rates of whole patient dose grids vs DVH-based metrics, (3) gamma passing rates filtered by region of interest (ROI) vs DVH-based metrics, and (4) the capability of a novel software algorithm that estimates corrected patient Dose-DVH based on conventional phan-tom QA data are analyzed. Methods: Ninety six unique ''imperfect'' step-and-shoot IMRT plans were generated by applying four different types of errors on 24 clinical Head/Neck patients. The 3D patient doses as well as the dose to a cylindrical QA phantom were then recalculated using an error-free beam model to serve as a simulated measurement for comparison. Resulting deviations to the planned vs simulated measured DVH-based metrics were generated, as were gamma passing rates for a variety of difference/distance criteria covering: dose-in-phantom comparisons and dose-in-patient comparisons, with the in-patient results calculated both over the whole grid and per-ROI volume. Finally, patient dose and DVH were predicted using the conventional per-beam planar data as input into a commercial ''planned dose perturbation'' (PDP) algorithm, and the results of these predicted DVH-based metrics were compared to the known values. Results: A range of weak to moderate correlations were found between clinically relevant patient DVH metrics (CTV-D95, parotid D{sub mean}, spinal cord D1cc, and larynx D{sub mean}) and both 3D detector and 3D patient gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) for dose-in-phantom along with dose-in-patient for both whole patient volume and filtered per-ROI. There was considerable scatter in the gamma passing rate

  12. In-situ gamma spectrometry in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kluson, J

    2010-01-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry (scintillation or semiconductor) can be used effectively for monitoring natural and man-made radionuclide concentrations, together with the corresponding photon fields, in the environment and in workplaces. It is applied in operational and emergency monitoring of nuclear facilities, waste storage facilities and the uranium industry, in radioactive contamination measurements and mapping, environmental, radiohygienic and radiation safety studies, etc. Methods for processing and interpreting data, experimental techniques (ground or airborne arrangement), calibration and verification and examples of applications are discussed in this paper.

  13. Optimal mapping of terrestrial gamma dose rates using geological parent material and aerogeophysical survey data.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, B G; Scheib, C; Tyler, A N; Beamish, D

    2012-12-01

    Regulatory authorities need ways to estimate natural terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (nGy h⁻¹) across the landscape accurately, to assess its potential deleterious health effects. The primary method for estimating outdoor dose rate is to use an in situ detector supported 1 m above the ground, but such measurements are costly and cannot capture the landscape-scale variation in dose rates which are associated with changes in soil and parent material mineralogy. We investigate the potential for improving estimates of terrestrial gamma dose rates across Northern Ireland (13,542 km²) using measurements from 168 sites and two sources of ancillary data: (i) a map based on a simplified classification of soil parent material, and (ii) dose estimates from a national-scale, airborne radiometric survey. We used the linear mixed modelling framework in which the two ancillary variables were included in separate models as fixed effects, plus a correlation structure which captures the spatially correlated variance component. We used a cross-validation procedure to determine the magnitude of the prediction errors for the different models. We removed a random subset of 10 terrestrial measurements and formed the model from the remainder (n = 158), and then used the model to predict values at the other 10 sites. We repeated this procedure 50 times. The measurements of terrestrial dose vary between 1 and 103 (nGy h⁻¹). The median absolute model prediction errors (nGy h⁻¹) for the three models declined in the following order: no ancillary data (10.8) > simple geological classification (8.3) > airborne radiometric dose (5.4) as a single fixed effect. Estimates of airborne radiometric gamma dose rate can significantly improve the spatial prediction of terrestrial dose rate.

  14. Differential absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays at the mono-energetic neutron calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Baba, M; Yamaguchi, H; Fujitaka, K

    2005-01-01

    Absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays of mono-energetic neutron sources from 140 keV to 15 MeV were measured in the Fast Neutron Laboratory at Tohoku University. By using both a tissue-equivalent plastic walled counter and a graphite-walled low-pressure proportional counter, absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons were obtained separately from those for gamma rays. This method needs no knowledge of energy spectra and dose distributions for gamma rays. The gamma-ray contribution in this neutron calibration field >1 MeV neutron was <3%, while for <550 keV it was >40%. The measured neutron absolute absorbed doses per unit neutron fluence agreed with the LA150 evaluated kerma factors. By using this method, absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays in an unknown neutron field can be obtained separately.

  15. Shot sequencing based on biological equivalent dose considerations for multiple isocenter Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Lee, Letitia; Barani, Igor; Hwang, Andrew; Fogh, Shannon; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2011-11-01

    Rapid delivery of multiple shots or isocenters is one of the hallmarks of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this study, we investigated whether the temporal order of shots delivered with Gamma Knife Perfexion would significantly influence the biological equivalent dose for complex multi-isocenter treatments. Twenty single-target cases were selected for analysis. For each case, 3D dose matrices of individual shots were extracted and single-fraction equivalent uniform dose (sEUD) values were determined for all possible shot delivery sequences, corresponding to different patterns of temporal dose delivery within the target. We found significant variations in the sEUD values among these sequences exceeding 15% for certain cases. However, the sequences for the actual treatment delivery were found to agree (<3%) and to correlate (R2 = 0.98) excellently with the sequences yielding the maximum sEUD values for all studied cases. This result is applicable for both fast and slow growing tumors with α/β values of 2 to 20 according to the linear-quadratic model. In conclusion, despite large potential variations in different shot sequences for multi-isocenter Gamma Knife treatments, current clinical delivery sequences exhibited consistent biological target dosing that approached that maximally achievable for all studied cases.

  16. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites).

    PubMed

    Tzortzis, Michalis; Tsertos, Haralabos; Christofides, Stelios; Christodoulides, George

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverised, sealed in 1-l plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with an accumulating time between 10 and 14 h each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for (232)Th (range from 1 to 906 Bq kg(-1)), (238)U (from 1 to 588 Bq kg(-1)) and (40)K (from 50 to 1606 Bq kg(-1)). The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy h(-1) for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy h(-1) for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy h(-1) for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per person indoors were determined to be between 0.02 and 2.97 mSv y(-1) for half utilization of the materials. Applying dose criteria recently recommended by the EU for superficial materials, 25 of the samples meet the exemption dose limit of 0.3 mSv y(-1), two of them meet the upper dose limit of 1 mSv y(-1) and only one clearly exceeds this limit.

  17. Radon survey and soil gamma doses in primary schools of Batman, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, Nevzat; Aldemir, Kamuran

    2014-06-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate levels of indoor radon and gamma doses in 42 primary schools located in Batman, southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. Indoor radon measurements were carried out using CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector-based radon dosimeters. The overall mean annual (222)Rn activity in the surveyed area was found to be 49 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 0.25 mSv). However, in one of the districts (Besiri) the maximum radon value turned out to be 307 Bq m(-3). The estimated annual effective doses are less than the recommended action level (3-10 mSv). It is found that the radon concentration decreases with increasing floor number. The concentrations of natural and artificial radioisotopes were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy for soil samples collected in close vicinity of the studied schools. The mean gamma activity concentrations in the soil samples were 31, 25, 329 and 12 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The radiological parameters such as the absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose equivalent were calculated. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended values.

  18. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  19. Tracking Human Adenovirus Inactivation by Gamma Radiation under Different Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Andreia I.; Guerreiro, Duarte; Madureira, Joana; Margaça, Fernanda M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus is the most prevalent enteric virus in waters worldwide due to its environmental stability, which leads to public health concerns. Mitigation strategies are therefore required. The aim of this study was to assess the inactivation of human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5) by gamma radiation in aqueous environments. Various substrates with different organic loads, including domestic wastewater, were inoculated with HAdV-5 either individually or in a viral pool (with murine norovirus type 1 [MNV-1]) and were irradiated in a Cobalt-60 irradiator at several gamma radiation doses (0.9 to 10.8 kGy). The infectivity of viral particles, before and after irradiation, was tested by plaque assay using A549 cells. D10 values (dose required to inactivate 90% of a population or the dose of irradiation needed to produce a 1 log10 reduction in the population) were estimated for each substrate based on virus infectivity inactivation exponential kinetics. The capability of two detection methods, nested PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), to track inactivated viral particles was also assessed. After irradiation at 3.5 kGy, a reduction of the HAdV-5 titer of 4 log PFU/ml on substrates with lower organic loads was obtained, but in highly organic matrixes, the virus titer reduction was only 1 log PFU/ml. The D10 values of HAdV-5 in high organic substrates were significantly higher than in water suspensions. The obtained results point out some discrepancies between nested PCR, ELISA, and plaque assay on the assessments of HAdV-5 inactivation. These results suggest that the inactivation of HAdV-5 by gamma radiation, in aqueous environments, is significantly affected by substrate composition. This study highlights the virucidal potential of gamma radiation that may be used as a disinfection treatment for sustainable water supplies. IMPORTANCE Human adenovirus (HAdV) is the most prevalent of the enteric viruses in environmental waters worldwide. The purposes of

  20. Integrated Codes for Estimating Environmental Accumulation and Individual Dose from Past Hanford Atmospheric Releases: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T. A.; Burnett, R. A.; Napier, B. A.; Reitz, N. A.; Shipler, D. B.

    1992-02-01

    Preliminary radiation doses were estimated and reported during Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. As the project has progressed, additional information regarding the magnitude and timing of past radioactive releases has been developed, and the general scope of the required calculations has been enhanced. The overall HEDR computational model for computing doses attributable to atmospheric releases from Hanford Site operations is called HEDRIC (Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes). It consists of four interrelated models: source term, atmospheric transport, environmental accumulation, and individual dose. The source term and atmospheric transport models are documented elsewhere. This report describes the initial implementation of the design specifications for the environmental accumulation model and computer code, called DESCARTES (Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments), and the individual dose model and computer code, called CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides). The computations required of these models and the design specifications for their codes were documented in Napier et al. (1992). Revisions to the original specifications and the basis for modeling decisions are explained. This report is not the final code documentation but gives the status of the model and code development to date. Final code documentation is scheduled to be completed in FY 1994 following additional code upgrades and refinements. The user's guide included in this report describes the operation of the environmental accumulation and individual dose codes and associated pre- and post-processor programs. A programmer's guide describes the logical structure of the programs and their input and output files.

  1. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  2. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  3. Dosimetric effects of Onyx embolization on Gamma Knife arteriovenous malformation dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, David J; Nordström, Håkan; Lundin, Anders; Xu, Zhiyuan; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) subsequent to embolization suffer from elevated local failure rates and differences in adverse radiation effects. Onyx is a common embolic material for AVMs. Onyx is formulated with tantalum, a high atomic number (Z = 73) element that has been investigated as a source of dosimetric uncertainty contributing to the less favorable clinical results. However, prior studies have not modeled the complicated anatomical and beam geometries characteristic of GKRS. This study investigated the magnitude of dose perturbation that can occur due to Onyx embolization using clinically realistic anatomical and Gamma Knife beam models. METHODS Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) was used to segment the AVM nidus and areas of Onyx from postcontrast stereotactic MRI for 7 patients treated with GKRS postembolization. The resulting contours, skull surface, and clinically selected dose distributions were exported from LGP in DICOM-RT (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine-radiotherapy) format. Isocenter locations and dwell times were recorded from the LGP database. Contours were converted into 3D mesh representations using commercial and in-house mesh-editing software. The resulting data were imported into a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine (Pegasos, Elekta Instruments AB) with a beam geometry for the Gamma Knife Perfexion. The MC-predicted dose distributions were calculated with Onyx assigned manufacturer-reported physical constants (MC-Onyx), and then compared with corresponding distributions in which Onyx was reassigned constants for water (MC-water). Differences in dose metrics were determined, including minimum, maximum, and mean dose to the AVM nidus; selectivity index; and target coverage. Combined differences in dose magnitude and distance to agreement were calculated as 3D Gamma analysis passing rates using tolerance criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm, 1.0%/1.0 mm, and 3.0%/3.0 mm

  4. SU-E-T-86: A Systematic Method for GammaKnife SRS Fetal Dose Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Geneser, S; Paulsson, A; Sneed, P; Braunstein, S; Ma, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Estimating fetal dose is critical to the decision-making process when radiation treatment is indicated during pregnancy. Fetal doses less than 5cGy confer no measurable non-cancer developmental risks but can produce a threefold increase in developing childhood cancer. In this study, we estimate fetal dose for a patient receiving Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) treatment and develop a method to estimate dose directly from plan details. Methods: A patient underwent GKSRS on a Perfexion unit for eight brain metastases (two infratentorial and one brainstem). Dose measurements were performed using a CC13, head phantom, and solid water. Superficial doses to the thyroid, sternum, and pelvis were measured using MOSFETs during treatment. Because the fetal dose was too low to accurately measure, we obtained measurements proximally to the isocenter, fitted to an exponential function, and extrapolated dose to the fundus of the uterus, uterine midpoint, and pubic synthesis for both the preliminary and delivered plans. Results: The R-squared fit for the delivered doses was 0.995. The estimated fetal doses for the 72 minute preliminary and 138 minute delivered plans range from 0.0014 to 0.028cGy and 0.07 to 0.38cGy, respectively. MOSFET readings during treatment were just above background for the thyroid and negligible for all inferior positions. The method for estimating fetal dose from plan shot information was within 0.2cGy of the measured values at 14cm cranial to the fetal location. Conclusion: Estimated fetal doses for both the preliminary and delivered plan were well below the 5cGy recommended limit. Due to Pefexion shielding, internal dose is primarily governed by attenuation and drops off exponentially. This is the first work that reports fetal dose for a GK Perfexion unit. Although multiple lesions were treated and the duration of treatment was long, the estimated fetal dose remained very low.

  5. Effective gamma-ray doses due to natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; Bellini, B. S.; Medina, N. H.; Aguiar, V. A. P.

    2010-08-04

    We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to study the distribution of natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil: Billings reservoir, Sao Bernardo do Campo Parks, Diadema Parks, Interlagos region, Sao Paulo, and soil from Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro beaches. In most of the regions studied we have found that the dose due the external exposure to gamma-rays, proceeding from natural terrestrial elements, are between the values 0.3 and 0.6 mSv/year, established by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

  6. The high-energy radiation dose received aboard aircraft exposed to a terrestrial gamma- ray flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hazelton, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGF) are large bursts of high energy radiation observed from space that originate from our atmosphere. These millisecond long flashes of gamma-rays are often so bright that they saturate detectors, even from 600 km away. Several independent observations suggest that terrestrial gamma-ray flashes originate from thunderstorms deep within the atmosphere, near the altitudes where commercial aircraft fly. Based upon the flux of gamma-rays observed by the RHESSI spacecraft, detailed gamma-ray propagation models show that at least 1.0E17 energetic, multi-MeV electrons, are typically produced at the source. This large number of energetic electrons could potentially be a hazard for aircraft passengers, pilots and electronics. Using theoretical and observational estimates of the size of the TGF source region, we calculate the high-energy radiation dose from the energetic electrons and the gamma-rays for an aircraft exposed to the TGF from a close range. Finally, we shall discuss upcoming observations that will help constrain this radiation risk from TGFs.

  7. HEDR model validation plan. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Gilbert, R.O.; Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1993-06-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computational ``tools`` for estimating the possible radiation dose that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the planned activities to ``validate`` these tools. In the sense of the HEDR Project, ``validation`` is a process carried out by comparing computational model predictions with field observations and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the model.

  8. Expression of Genes Associated with DNA Damage Sensing in Human Fibroblasts Exposed to Low-dose-rate Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish; Hammond, Diane; Pierson, Duane; Jeevarajan, Antony; Cucinotta, Francis; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the molecular response to low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation exposure is essential for the extrapolation of high-dose radiation risks to those at dose levels relevant to space and other environmental concerns. Most of the reported studies of gene expressions induced by low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation were carried out on exponentially growing cells. In the present study, we analyzed expressions of 84 genes associated with DNA damage sensing using real time PCR in human fibroblasts in mostly G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cells were exposed continuously to gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.8 cGy/hr for 1, 2, 6 or 24 hrs at 37 C throughout the exposure. The total RNA was isolated immediately after the exposure was terminated. Of the 84 genes, only a few showed significant changes of the expression level. Some of the genes (e.g. DDit3 and BTG2) were found to be up or down regulated only after a short period of exposure, while other genes (e.g. PRKDC) displayed a highest expression level at the 24 hr time point. The expression profiles for the exposed cells which had a smaller portion of G1 cells indicated more cell cycle signaling and DNA repair genes either up or down regulated. Interestingly, the panel of genes changed from radiation exposure in G1 cells is different from the panel in cells having less G1 arrest cells. The gene expression profile of the cells responding to low-dose-radiation insult apparently depends on the cell growth stage. The response pathway in G1 cells may differ from that in exponentially growing cells.

  9. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Monthly report, May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of independent Technical Steering Panel. The Technical Steering Panel consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included among the members are appointed technical members representing the States of Oregon and Washington, cultural and technical experts nominated by the Indian tribes in the region, and an individual representing the public.

  11. Physiological and molecular characterization of the enhanced salt tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation in Arabidopsis seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Hangbo; Wang, Lin; Jiao, Zhen

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • 50-Gy gamma irradiation markedly promotes the seedling growth under salt stress in Arabidopsis. • The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA are obviously reduced by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. • Low-dose gamma irradiation stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes under salt stress. • Proline accumulation is required for the low-gamma-ray-induced salt tolerance. • Low gamma rays differentially regulate the expression of genes related to salt stress. - Abstract: It has been established that gamma rays at low doses stimulate the tolerance to salt stress in plants. However, our knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism underlying the enhanced salt tolerance remains limited. In this study, we found that 50-Gy gamma irradiation presented maximal beneficial effects on germination index and root length in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA in irradiated seedlings under salt stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were markedly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of salt stress signaling pathways were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. Our results suggest that gamma irradiation at low doses alleviates the salt stress probably by modulating the physiological responses as well as stimulating the stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  12. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    This report summarizes the water pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the water-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  14. Study of the Melting Latent Heat of Semicrystalline PVDF applied to High Gamma Dose Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.; Lima, Claubia P.B.

    2015-07-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) homopolymers [PVDF] homopolymers were irradiated with gamma doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.75 MGy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FTIR spectrometry were used in order to study the effects of gamma radiation in the amorphous and crystalline polymer structures. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. The melting latent heat (LM) measured by DSC was used to construct an unambiguous relationship with the delivered dose. Regression analyses revealed that the best mathematical function that fits the experimental calibration curve is a 4-degree polynomial function, with an adjusted Rsquare of 0.99817. (authors)

  15. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  16. Radon level and indoor gamma doses in dwellings of Trabzon, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, A; Küçükömeroğlu, B; Cevik, U; Celebi, N

    2011-10-01

    The seasonal variations of the indoor radon activity concentrations were determined in the 97 dwellings of Trabzon, Turkey. The annual average indoor radon activity concentration varied from 8 to 583 Bq/m³. The average winter/summer ratio of radon activity concentrations was 3.62. The gamma activity concentrations in the soil samples were determined as 41, 38, 443 and 25 Bq/kg for ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th, ⁴⁰K and ¹³⁷Cs, respectively. The average gamma dose rate in air and the annual effective dose equivalent for outdoor occupancy were calculated as 63 nGy/h and 77 μSv/y, respectively.

  17. Computed radiography as a gamma ray detector—dose response and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, D. S.; McLeod, R. W.

    2004-08-01

    Computed radiography (CR) can be used for imaging the spatial distribution of photon emissions from radionuclides. Its wide dynamic range and good response to medium energy gamma rays reduces the need for long exposure times. Measurements of small doses can be performed without having to pre-sensitize the computed radiography plates via an x-ray exposure, as required with screen-film systems. Cassette-based Agfa MD30 and Kodak GP25 CR plates were used in applications involving the detection of gamma ray emissions from technetium-99m and iodine-131. Cassette entrance doses as small as 1 µGy (140 keV gamma rays) produce noisy images, but the images are suitable for applications such as the detection of breaks in radiation protection barriers. A consequence of the gamma ray sensitivity of CR plates is the possibility that some nuclear medicine patients may fog their x-rays if the x-ray is taken soon after their radiopharmaceutical injection. The investigation showed that such fogging is likely to be diffuse.

  18. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-01

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of 60Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  19. Preliminary Results of Indoor Radon/thoron Concentrations and Terrestrial Gamma Doses in Gejiu, Yunnan, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Sun Quafu; Min Xiangdong

    2008-08-07

    A preliminary survey on indoor radon/thoron and external gamma ray dose rate was conducted for houses in Gejiu city and its neighboring village in Yunnan Province, China. As a result of the radon/thoron measurements for about 50 houses, very high thoron concentrations were found in some hoses (maximum: 7,900 Bq/m{sup 3}). The mean annual dose from thoron decay products was estimated to be larger than that from radon decay products (2.9 mSv vs. 1.6 mSv). Further dosimetric and epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of radon and thoron.

  20. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-15

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of {sup 60}Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  1. Gamma-irradiated onions as a biological indicator of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Vaijapurkar, S G; Agarwal, D; Chaudhuri, S K; Senwar, K R; Bhatnagar, P K

    2001-10-01

    Post-irradiation identification and dose estimation are required to assess the radiation-induced effects on living things in any nuclear emergency. In this study, radiation-induced morphological/cytological changes i.e., number of root formation and its length, shooting length, reduction in mitotic index, micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberrations in the root tip cells of gamma-irradiated onions at lower doses (50-2000 cGy) are reported. The capabilities of this biological species to store the radiation-induced information are also studied.

  2. Development of a Portable Gamma-ray Survey System for the Measurement of Air Dose Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Jun; Shobugawa, Yugo; Kawano, Yoh; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Izumikawa, Takuji; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Shiiya, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Hidenori; Naito, Makoto

    BIo-Safety Hybrid Automatic MOnitor-Niigata (BISHAMON), a portable gamma-ray survey system, was developed to support victims of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. BISHAMON is capable of constructing a map of the distribution of ambient dose equivalent rates using vehicle-mounted or on-foot survey methods. In this study, we give an overview of BISHAMON and its measurement results including a comparison with those of other systems such as KURAMA.

  3. Mining gene expression data for pollutants (dioxin, toluene, formaldehyde) and low dose of gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Snezhkina, Anastasia; Kogan, Valeria; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Peregudova, Darya; Melnikova, Nataliya; Uroshlev, Leonid; Mylnikov, Sergey; Dmitriev, Alexey; Plusnin, Sergey; Fedichev, Peter; Kudryavtseva, Anna

    2014-01-01

    (dioxin, toluene), low dose of gamma-irradiation and common molecular pathways for different kind of stressors.

  4. Assessment of Annual Effective Dose for Natural Radioactivity of Gamma Emitters in Biscuit Samples in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Abojassim, Ali Abid; Al-Alasadi, Lubna A; Shitake, Ahmed R; Al-Tememie, Faeq A; Husain, Afnan A

    2015-09-01

    Biscuits are an important type of food, widely consumed by babies in Iraq and other countries. This work uses gamma spectroscopy to measure the natural radioactivity due to long-lived gamma emitters in children's biscuits; it also estimates radiation hazard indices, that is, the radium equivalent activity, the representative of gamma level index, the internal hazard index, and the annual effective dose in children. Ten samples were collected from the Iraqi market from different countries of origin. The average specific activities for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K were 9.390, 3.1213, and 214.969 Bq/kg, respectively, but the average of the radium equivalent activity and the internal hazard index were 33.101 Bq/kg and 0.107, respectively. The total average annual effective dose from consumption by adults, children, and infants is estimated to be 0.655, 1.009, and 0.875 mSv, respectively. The values found for specific activity, radiation hazard indices, and annual effective dose in all samples in this study were lower than worldwide median values for all groups; therefore, these values are found to be safe.

  5. Work plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944, with descriptions of uncertainties inherent in such estimates. The secondary objective is to make project records--information that HEDR staff members used to estimate radiation doses--available to the public. Preliminary dose estimates for a limited geographic area and time period, certain radionuclides, and certain populations are planned to be available in 1990; complete results are planned to be reported in 1993. Project reports and references used in the reports are available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room in Richland, Washington. Project progress is documented in monthly reports, which are also available to the public in the DOE Public Reading Room.

  6. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  7. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The work described in this report was prompted by the public's concern about potential effect from the radioactive materials released from the Hanford Site. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation dose the public might have received from the Hanford Site since 1944, when facilities began operating. Phase 1 of the HEDR Project is a pilot'' or demonstration'' phase. The objectives of this initial phase were to determine whether enough historical information could be found or reconstructed to be used for dose estimation and develop and test conceptual and computational models for calculating credible dose estimates. Preliminary estimates of radiation doses were produced in Phase 1 because they are needed to achieve these objectives. The reader is cautioned that the dose estimates provided in this and other Phase 1 HEDR reports are preliminary. As the HEDR Project continues, the dose estimates will change for at least three reasons: more complete input information for models will be developed; the models themselves will be refined; and the size and shape of the geographic study area will change. This is one of three draft reports that summarize the first phase of the four-phased HEDR Project. This, the Summary Report, is directed to readers who want a general understanding of the Phase 1 work and preliminary dose estimates. The two other reports -- the Air Pathway Report and the Columbia River Pathway Report -- are for readers who understand the radiation dose assessment process and want to see more technical detail. Detailed descriptions of the dose reconstruction process are available in more than 20 supporting reports listed in Appendix A. 32 refs., 46 figs.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project--an overview.

    PubMed

    Shipler, D B; Napier, B A; Farris, W T; Freshley, M D

    1996-10-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was initiated because of public interest in the historical releases of radioactive materials from the Hanford Site, located in southcentral Washington State. By 1986, over 38,000 pages of environmental monitoring documentation from the early years of Hanford operations had been released. Special committees reviewing the documents recommended initiation of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, which began in October 1987, and is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The technical approach taken was to reconstruct releases of radioactive materials based on facility operating information; develop and/or adapt transport, pathway, and dose models and computer codes; reconstruct environmental, meteorological, and hydrological monitoring information; reconstruct demographic, agricultural, and lifestyle characteristics; apply statistical methods to all forms of uncertainty in the information, parameters, and models; and perform scientific investigations that were technically defensible. The geographic area for the study includes approximately 2 x 10(5) km2 (75,000 mi2) in eastern Washington, western Idaho, and northeastern Oregon (essentially the Mid-Columbia Basin of the Pacific Northwest). Three exposure pathways were considered: the atmosphere, the Columbia River, and ground water. the radionuclide of interest for atmospheric pathway doses was 131I. The median dose for the maximally exposed individual was approximately 2.3 Gy (230 rad) to the thyroid over the period from 1944 to 1972 with a 90% subjective confidence interval of 0.54 to 8.4 Gy (54 to 840 rad). The Columbia River was studied from Priest Rapids Dam, upstream of the Hanford Site, to the mouth of the river and nearby bays. Radionuclides of interest for river pathway doses were 24Na, 32P, 65Zn, 76As, and 239Np. The median dose from the river pathway for the maximally exposed individual was approximately 0.0015 Sv (0.15 rem

  9. Foods for a Mission to Mars: Investigations of Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolph, J.; Shand, A.; Stoklosa, A.; Ma, A.; Weiss, I.; Alexander, D.; Perchonok, M.; Mauer, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Food must be safe, nutritious, and acceptable throughout a long duration mission to maintain the health, well-being, and productivity of the astronauts. In addition to a developing a stable pre-packaged food supply, research is required to better understand the ability to convert edible biomass into safe, nutritious, and acceptable food products in a closed system with many restrictions (mass, volume, power, crew time, etc.). An understanding of how storage conditions encountered in a long-term space mission, such as elevated radiation, will impact food quality is also needed. The focus of this project was to contribute to the development of the highest quality food system possible for the duration of a mission, considering shelf-stable extended shelf-life foods, bulk ingredients, and crops to be grown in space. The impacts of space-relevant radiation doses on food, bulk ingredient, and select candidate crop quality and antioxidant capacity were determined. Interestingly, increasing gamma-radiation doses (0 to 1000 Gy) did not always increase dose-related effects in foods. Intermediate radiation doses (10 to 800Gy) often had significantly larger impact on the stability of bulk ingredient oils than higher (1000Gy) radiation doses. Overall, most food, ingredient, and crop systems investigated showed no significant differences between control samples and those treated with 3 Gy of gamma radiation (the upper limit estimated for a mission to Mars). However, this does not mean that all foods will be stable for 3-5 years, nor does it mean that foods are stable to space radiation comprising more than gamma rays.

  10. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Patel, N. P.; Majumdar, B.; Vijayan, V.

    2010-01-01

    The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM) Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm) and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°). The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (Λ), radial dose function gL(r) and anisotropy function F(r, θ) of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study. PMID:20927220

  11. Environmental contamination and external radiation dose rates from radionuclides released from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuda, Naoki; Takahashi, Jumpei; Gutevitc, Alexander; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Takamura, Noboru

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analysed by gamma spectrometry. Six artificial radionuclides ((131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (129m)Te, (95)Nb and (136)Cs) were detected in soil samples around FNPP. Calculated external effective doses from artificial radionuclide contamination in soil samples around FNPP were 1.9-2.9 μSv h(-1) (8.7-17.8 mSv y(-1)) in Fukushima city on 22 March 2011. After several months, these calculated external effective doses were 0.25-0.88 μSv h(-1) (2.2-7.6 mSv y(-1)) in Fukushima city on 29 June 2011. The present study revealed that the detected artificial radionuclides around FNPP mainly shifted to long-lived radionuclides such as radioactive caesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) even though current levels are decreasing gradually due to the decay of short-lived radionuclides such as (131)I, (129m)Te, (95)Nb and (136)Cs. Thus, radiation exposure potency still exists even though the national efforts are ongoing for reducing the annual exposure dose closer to 1 mSv, the public dose limit. Long-term environmental monitoring around FNPP contributes to radiation safety, with a reduction in unnecessary exposure to the residents.

  12. Validation of HEDR models. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Eslinger, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Thiede, M.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model estimates with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid.

  13. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of Alpha- or Gamma-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolism of alpha- and gamma-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. Alpha- or gamma-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed a...

  14. Novel and distinct metabolites identified following a single oral dose of alpha- or gamma-hexabromocyclododecane in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of alpha- and gamma-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. Alpha- or gamma-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed and sacrificed 3 hour...

  15. Gamma dose rate estimation and operation management suggestions for decommissioning the reactor pressure vessel of HTR-PM

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Fang; Hong Li; Jianzhu Cao; Wenqian Li; Feng Xie; Jiejuan Tong

    2013-07-01

    China is now designing and constructing a high temperature gas cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM). In order to investigate the future decommissioning approach and evaluate possible radiation dose, gamma dose rate near the reactor pressure vessel was calculated for different cooling durations using QAD-CGA program. The source term of this calculation was provided by KORIGEN program. Based on the calculated results, the spatial distribution and temporal changes of gamma dose rate near reactor pressure vessel was systematically analyzed. A suggestion on planning decommissioning operation of reactor pressure vessel of HTRPM was given based on calculated dose rate and the Chinese Standard GB18871-2002. (authors)

  16. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation doses for some Egyptian granite samples.

    PubMed

    El Arabi, A M; Ahmed, N K; Salahel Din, K

    2008-01-01

    External exposures of population to ionising radiation due to naturally occurring radionuclides in sixty-three granite samples from three different locations in south eastern desert of Egypt were considered in this article. Average outdoor gamma dose rates in air were 190, 290 and 330 nGy h(-1) for Elba, Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites, respectively. The corresponding doses in indoor air are 270, 400 and 470 nGy h(-1), respectively. These average values give rise to annual effective dose (outdoor, indoor and in total) 0.24, 1.4 and 1.6 mSv for Elba granite. For Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites the corresponding values were 0.35, 2 and 2.3 mSv and 0.41, 2.3 and 2.7 mSv, respectively.

  17. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, K. B.; Müller, T. O.; Astrup, P.; Dyve, J. E.

    2014-05-01

    Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often chosen using regular grids or according to administrative constraints. Nowadays, however, the choice can be based on more realistic risk assessment, as it is possible to simulate potential radioactive plumes. To support sensor planning, we developed the DETECT Optimisation Tool (DOT) within the scope of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64 source locations. These simulations cover the whole European Union, so the DOT allows evaluation and optimisation of sensor networks for all EU countries, as well as evaluation of fencing sensors around possible sources. Users can choose from seven cost functions to evaluate the capability of a given monitoring network for early detection of radioactive plumes or for the creation of dose maps. The DOT is implemented as a stand-alone easy-to-use JAVA-based application with a graphical user interface and an R backend. Users can run evaluations and optimisations, and display, store and download the results. The DOT runs on a server and can be accessed via common web browsers; it can also be installed locally.

  18. The impact of cobalt-60 source age on biologically effective dose in high-dose functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kann, Benjamin H; Yu, James B; Stahl, John M; Bond, James E; Loiselle, Christopher; Chiang, Veronica L; Bindra, Ranjit S; Gerrard, Jason L; Carlson, David J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) procedures have been increasingly used for treating patients with tremor, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although its rates of toxicity are low, GKRS has been associated with some, if low, risks for serious sequelae, including hemiparesis and even death. Anecdotal reports have suggested that even with a standardized prescription dose, rates of functional GKRS toxicity increase after replacement of an old cobalt-60 source with a new source. Dose rate changes over the course of the useful lifespan of cobalt-60 are not routinely considered in the study of patients treated with functional GKRS, but these changes may be associated with significant variation in the biologically effective dose (BED) delivered to neural tissue. METHODS The authors constructed a linear-quadratic model of BED in functional GKRS with a dose-protraction factor to correct for intrafraction DNA-damage repair and used standard single-fraction doses for trigeminal nerve ablation for TN (85 Gy), thalamotomy for tremor (130 Gy), and capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (180 Gy). Dose rate and treatment time for functional GKRS involving 4-mm collimators were derived from calibrations in the authors' department and from the cobalt-60 decay rate. Biologically plausible values for the ratio for radiosensitivity to fraction size (α/β) and double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair halftimes (τ) were estimated from published experimental data. The biphasic characteristics of DSB repair in normal tissue were accounted for in deriving an effective τ1 halftime (fast repair) and τ2 halftime (slow repair). A sensitivity analysis was performed with a range of plausible parameter values. RESULTS After replacement of the cobalt-60 source, the functional GKRS dose rate rose from 1.48 to 2.99 Gy/min, treatment time fell, and estimated BED increased. Assuming the most biologically plausible parameters, source

  19. Out of field dose during Gamma Knife treatment: a paediatric case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutrie, V.; Grace, M.; Izard, M. A.; Fuller, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) was referred for Gamma Knife treatment. As this would be the first paediatric treatment in Australia, additional investigations were undertaken into out of field dose to assure the best possible long term outcome for the patient. A phantom was constructed from water equivalent materials to simulate the patient. A target volume was defined to emulate the size and location of the AVM visible in diagnostic images. An ionisation chamber and EBT3 Gafchromic film were used to record absorbed dose at strategic points both on the surface and at depth within the phantom. On the day of treatment, EBT3 Gafchromic film was used to conduct in vivo dosimetry. The pre-treatment phantom measurements matched the planning system for the cranial section (the only modelled section) and no measurable dose above background was detected in the extracranial sites. In vivo measurements of the lenses returned doses of up to 2 cGy for imaging and 8 cGy for treatment which was also consistent with the planned dose. Dose to the thyroid, chest and abdomen was not measurable above background.

  20. Reduction in mutation frequency by very low-dose gamma irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Keiji; Magae, Junji; Kawakami, Yasushi; Koana, Takao

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for stochastic effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to very low-dose radiation at a low dose rate, we irradiated immature male germ cells of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, with several doses of (60)Co gamma rays at a dose rate of 22.4 mGy/h. Thereafter, we performed the sex-linked recessive lethal mutation assay by mating the irradiated males with nonirradiated females. The mutation frequency in the group irradiated with 500 microGy was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.01), whereas in the group subjected to 10 Gy irradiation, the mutation frequency was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.03). A J-shaped dose-response relationship was evident. Molecular experiments using DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription PCR indicated that several genes known to be expressed in response to heat or chemical stress and grim, a positive regulator of apoptosis, were up-regulated immediately after irradiation with 500 microGy. The involvement of an apoptosis function in the non-linear dose-response relationship was suggested.

  1. Detection and original dose assessment of egg powders subjected to gamma irradiation by using ESR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Talat

    2015-09-01

    ESR (electron spin resonance) techniques were applied for detection and original dose estimation to radiation-processed egg powders. The un-irradiated (control) egg powders showed a single resonance line centered at g=2.0086±0.0005, 2.0081±0.0005, 2.0082±0.0005 (native signal) for yolk, white and whole egg, respectively. Irradiation induced at least one additional intense singlet overlapping to the control signal and caused a significant increase in signal intensity without any changes in spectral patterns. Responses of egg powders to different gamma radiation doses in the range 0-10 kGy were examined. The stability of the radiation-induced ESR signal of irradiated egg powders were investigated over a storage period of about 5 months. Additive reirradiation of the egg powders produces a reproducible dose response function, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. The additive dose method gives an estimation of the original dose within ±12% at the end of the 720 h storage period.

  2. Estimation of food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  3. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-03-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach that will be used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems that will be used to plan and control the HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Monthly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The Department of Energy (DOE) funds the project and represents the interests of the federal government and the public. The organization for the project is outlined.

  5. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R.

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  6. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. ); Davis, J.S. )

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  7. Avoidance behaviour and anxiety in rats irradiated with a sublethal dose of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Tomášová, Lenka; Smajda, B; Bona, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, whether a sublethal dose of gamma-rays will influence the avoidance behaviour and anxiety in rats and whether the response to radiation depends on time of day of its application. Adult male Wistar rats were tested in elevated plus-maze, in hot plate test and in the light/dark box in 4 regular intervals during a day. After two weeks the animals were irradiated with a whole-body dose 6 Gy of gamma-rays. One day after irradiation the animals were repeatedly tested in the same way, as before irradiation. In the plus-maze test an increased level of anxiety was established. The irradiation significantly decreased the locomotor activity of rats, but the extent of exploratory and comfortable behaviour were not altered. After irradiation, an elevated aversion to the thermal stimulus was observed in the hot plate test. The effects of radiation were more pronounced in the light period of the day, than in the dark one. No significant differences in aversion to light were detected after irradiation. The obtained results indicate, that sublethal doses of ionizing radiation can markedly influence the reactivity of animals to adverse stimuli, their motoric activity and emotional status, as well.

  8. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheva, A.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.; Lyng, F.

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  9. Low dose gamma irradiation enhances defined signaling components of intercellular reactive oxygen-mediated apoptosis induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.

    2011-01-01

    Transformed cells are selectively removed by intercellular ROS-mediated induction of apoptosis. Signaling is based on the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite pathway (major pathways) and the nitryl chloride and the metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss pathway (minor pathways). During tumor progression, resistance against intercellular induction of apoptosis is acquired through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Low dose radiation of nontransformed cells has been shown to enhance intercellular induction of apoptosis. The present study was performed to define the signaling components which are modulated by low dose gamma irradiation. Low dose radiation induced the release of peroxidase from nontransformed, transformed and tumor cells. Extracellular superoxide anion generation was strongly enhanced in the case of transformed cells and tumor cells, but not in nontransformed cells. Enhancement of peroxidase release and superoxide anion generation either increased intercellular induction of apoptosis of transformed cells, or caused a partial protection under specific signaling conditions. In tumor cells, low dose radiation enhanced the production of major signaling components, but this had no effect on apoptosis induction, due to the strong resistance mechanism of tumor cells. Our data specify the nature of low dose radiation-induced effects on specific signaling components of intercellular induction of apoptosis at defined stages of multistep carcinogenesis.

  10. Hematopoietic responses under protracted exposures to low daily dose gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Seed, T M; Fritz, T E; Tolle, D V; Jackson, W E

    2002-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the possible health consequences of chronic ionizing radiation exposure during extended space travel (e.g., Mars Mission), ground-based experimental studies of the clinical and pathological responses of canines under low daily doses of 60Co gamma irradiation (0.3-26.3 cGy d-1) have been examined. Specific reference was given to responses of the blood forming system. Results suggest that the daily dose rate of 7.5 cGy d-1 represents a threshold below which the hematopoietic system can retain either partial or full trilineal cell-producing capacity (erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and megakaryopoiesis) for extended periods of exposure (>1 yr). Trilineal capacity was fully retained for several years of exposure at the lowest dose-rate tested (0.3 cGy d-1) but was completely lost within several hundred days at the highest dose-rate (26.3 cGy d-1). Retention of hematopoietic capacity under chronic exposure has been demonstrated to be mediated by hematopoietic progenitors with acquired radioresistance and repair functions, altered cytogenetics, and cell-cycle characteristics. Radiological, biological, and temporal parameters responsible for these vital acquisitions by hematopoietic progenitors have been partially characterized. These parameters, along with threshold responses, are described and discussed in relation to potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation at intermediate doses on the performance of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combernoux, Nicolas; Labed, Véronique; Schrive, Luc; Wyart, Yvan; Carretier, Emilie; Moulin, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study is to explain the degradation of Polyamide (PA) composite reverse osmosis membrane (RO) in function of the irradiation dose. Irradiations were performed with a gamma 60Co source in wet conditions and under oxygen atmosphere. For different doses of 0.2 and 0.5 MGy with a constant dose rate of 0.5 kGy h-1, RO membranes performances (NaCl retention, permeability) were studied before and after irradiation. ATR-FTIR, ion chromatography and gas chromatography were used to characterize structural modification. Results showed that the permeability of RO membranes irradiated at 0.2 MGy exhibited a small decrease, related to scissions of the PVA coating. However, retention did not change at this dose. At 0.5 MGy, permeability showed a large increase of a factor around 2 and retention began to decrease from 99% to 95%. Chromatography measurements revealed a strong link between permselectivity properties variation, ion leakage and oxygen consumption. Add to ATR-FTIR observations, these results emphasized that the cleavages of amide and ester bonds were observed at 0.5 MGy, more precisely the loss of hydrogen bonds between polyamide chains. By different analysis, modifications of the polysulfone layer occur until a dose of 0.2 MGy.

  12. Performance of a GM tube based environmental dose rate monitor operating in the Time-To-Count mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zickefoose, J.; Kulkarni, T.; Martinson, T.; Phillips, K.; Voelker, M.

    2015-07-01

    The events at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in the aftermath of a natural disaster underline the importance of a large array of networked environmental monitors to cover areas around nuclear power plants. These monitors should meet a few basic criteria: have a uniform response over a wide range of gamma energies, have a uniform response over a wide range of incident angles, and have a large dynamic range. Many of these criteria are met if the probe is qualified to the international standard IEC 60532 (Radiation protection instrumentation - Installed dose rate meters, warning assemblies and monitors - X and gamma radiation of energy between 50 keV and 7 MeV), which specifically deals with energy response, angle of incidence, dynamic range, response time, and a number of environmental characteristics. EcoGamma is a dual GM tube environmental gamma radiation monitor designed specifically to meet the requirements of IEC 60532 and operate in the most extreme conditions. EcoGamma utilizes two energy compensated GM tubes operating with a Time-To-Count (TTC) collection algorithm. The TTC algorithm extends the lifetime and range of a GM tube significantly and allows the dual GM tube probe to achieve linearity over approximately 10 decades of gamma dose rate (from the Sv/hr range to 100 Sv/hr). In the TTC mode of operation, the GM tube is not maintained in a biased condition continuously. This is different from a traditional counting system where the GM tube is held at a constant bias continuously and the total number of strikes that the tube registers are counted. The traditional approach allows for good sensitivity, but does not lend itself to a long lifetime of the tube and is susceptible to linearity issues at high count rates. TTC on the other hand only biases the tube for short periods of time and in effect measures the time between events, which is statistically representative of the total strike rate. Since the tube is not continually biased, the life of the tube

  13. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information.

  14. Neonatal low-dose gamma irradiation-induced impaired fertility in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Freud, A; Canfi, A; Sod-Moriah, U A; Chayoth, R

    1990-11-01

    The reproductive capacity of mature rats at the age of 8 days was studied following neonatal exposure to 0.06 Gy dose of gamma-radiation. Decreased litter size and reduced body weight of the pups on weaning day, but not at parturition, were observed in female rats. The reduced litter size was not associated with impaired ovulation, impaired uterine implantation or mortality in utero, but resulted from increased death rate or at near parturition. Of the neonatally irradiated males 29% were found to be sterile and had degenerated or necrotic testes. The testicular damage and the reduced growth rate of the offspring of the irradiated females demonstrate the extreme sensitivity of the immature reproductive system to ionizing radiation, even at very low doses.

  15. Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation.

    PubMed

    Luff, R; Zähringer, M; Harms, W; Bleher, M; Prommer, B; Stöhlker, U

    2014-08-01

    The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection operates a network of about 1800 gamma dose rate stations as a part of the national emergency preparedness plan. Each of the six network centres is capable of operating the network alone. Most of the used hardware and software have been developed in-house under open-source license. Short development cycles and close cooperation between developers and users ensure robustness, transparency and fast maintenance procedures, thus avoiding unnecessary complex solutions. This also reduces the overall costs of the network operation. An easy-to-expand web interface has been developed to make the complete system available to other interested network operators in order to increase cooperation between different countries. The interface is also regularly in use for education during scholarships of trainees supported, e.g. by the 'International Atomic Energy Agency' to operate a local area dose rate monitoring test network.

  16. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  17. User instructions for the DESCARTES environmental accumulation code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, T.B.; Eslinger, P.W.; Nichols, W.E.; Lessor, K.S.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project work is conducted under several technical and administrative tasks, among which is the Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates task. The staff on this task have developed a suite of computer codes which are used to estimate doses to individuals in the public. This document contains the user instructions for the DESCARTES (Dynamic estimates of concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments) suite of codes. In addition to the DESCARTES code, this includes two air data preprocessors, a database postprocessor, and several utility routines that are used to format input data needed for DESCARTES.

  18. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    For more than 40 years, the US government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Radioactive materials were released to both the air and water from Hanford. People could have been exposed to these materials, called radionuclides. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is a multi-year scientific study to estimate the radiation doses the public may have received as a results of these releases. The study began in 1988. During the first phase, scientists began to develop and test methods for reconstructing the radiation doses. To do this, scientists found or reconstructed information about the amount and type of radionuclides that were released from Hadford facilities, where they traveled in environment, and how they reached people. Information about the people who could have been exposed was also found or reconstructed. Scientists then developed a computer model that can estimate doses from radiation exposure received many years ago. All the information that had been gathered was fed into the computer model. Then scientists did a test run'' to see whether the model was working properly. As part of its test run,'' scientists asked the computer model to generate two types of preliminary results: amounts of radionuclides in the environment (air, soil, pasture grass, food, and milk) and preliminary doses people could have received from all the routes of radiation exposure, called exposure pathways. Preliminary dose estimates were made for categories of people who shared certain characteristics and for the Phase 1 population as a whole. 26 refs., 48 figs.

  19. Initial findings of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. The objective of phase 1 of the project was to demonstrate through calculation that adequate models and support data existed or could be developed to allow estimation of realistic doses to individuals from releases of radionuclides to the environment that occurred as long as 45 years ago. This paper presents a summary of the results calculated for phase 1 of the project. These results were made public in July of 1990. The phase 1 study area for the air pathway covers the ten countries nearest the Hanford Site. This area was selected to encompass populations nearest the releases and therefore most likely to have been in the path of the highest concentrations of radioactive materials. The radionuclide likely to have contributed most to doses to off-site populations was determined to be {sup 131}I. It was estimated that the 1944-1947 period accounts for > 90% of the {sup 131}I released since start-up of the facilities. The phase-1 air release time period was therefore selected to encompass this period. Pathways of exposure included external exposure via submersion and groundshine, inhalation, and ingestion of crops and animal products, particularly milk.

  20. Assessment of gamma dose rate over a suspected uranium mineralisation area of Jebel Mun, Western Sudan.

    PubMed

    Sam, A K; Sirelkhatim, D A; Hassona, R K; Hassan, R E; Hag Musa, E; Ahmed, M M O

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted at the request of authorities in western Darfour State, to address the public concern about the levels of radioactivity in the area of Jebel Mun situated at Sudan-Chad international boundaries. It has been identified as a high background radiation area through aerial geological surveys conducted in late 1970s. The ambient gamma dose in the area was measured with the aid of a hand-held dose rate meter (Mini-Rad, Series 1000) and the surface rock samples were collected and analysed for their radioactivity content using a high-resolution gamma spectrometry equipped with HPGe with relative efficiency of 18%. The activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K were found to range from 39-253 Bq.kg(-1), 41-527 Bq.kg(-1) and 77-3027 Bq.kg(-1), respectively. From the values of the standard deviation it was concluded that the activity concentration of the considered primordial radionuclides was highly scattered (localised) which in turn indicates non-uniformity in the geological features and/or formations. 238U activity concentration corresponds to equivalent mass concentration of 7.77+/-6.12 ppm (3.19-20.73 ppm), which is of no economic importance. Samples are enriched in thorium relative to uranium as reflected by the Th:U mass ratio which ranges from 3 to 17. The absorbed dose rate in air as estimated from the measured activity concentrations of the primordial radionuclides using the DRCFs (dose rate conversion factors) falls within the range of 70-522 nGy.h(-1) with an average of 221+/-130 nGy.h(-1). It corresponds to an annual effective dose equivalent averaged of 0.27 mSv. The regression analysis has shown that the correlation between calculated and the measured ambient dose rate is marginally significant (r2 = 0.59). The 232Th series is the major producer of the surface radioactivity followed by 40K as they contribute 48% and 32% of the total absorbed dose, respectively.

  1. Spatial analysis of ambient gamma dose equivalent rate data by means of digital image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Petrik, Attila; Horváth, Ákos; Szabó, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    A detailed ambient gamma dose equivalent rate mapping based on field measurements at ground level and at 1 m height was carried out at 142 sites in 80 × 90 km area in Pest County, Hungary. Detailed digital image processing analysis was carried out to identify and characterise spatial features such as outlying points, anomalous zones and linear edges in a smoothed TIN interpolated surface. The applied method proceeds from the simple shaded relief model and digital cross-sections to the more complex gradient magnitude and gradient direction maps, 2nd derivative profile curvature map, relief map and lineament density map. Each map is analysed for statistical characteristics and histogram-based image segmentation is used to delineate areas homogeneous with respect to the parameter values in these maps. Assessment of spatial anisotropy is implemented by 2D autocorrelogram and directional variogram analyses. The identified spatial features are related to underlying geological and tectonic conditions using GIS technology. Results show that detailed digital image processing is efficient in revealing the pattern present in field-measured ambient gamma dose equivalent rates and they are related to regional scale tectonic zones and surface sedimentary lithological conditions in the study area.

  2. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Quarterly report, September--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates); Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  3. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Quarterly report, December 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radio-nuclides followed from release to impact on humans(dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, agriculture; environmental pathways; and dose estimates.

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Quarterly report, June--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  5. Biological radiation dose from secondary particles in a Milky Way gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Karam, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are a class of highly energetic explosions emitting radiation in a very short timescale of a few seconds and with a very narrow opening angle. Although, all GRBs observed so far are extragalactic in origin, there is a high probability of a GRB of galactic origin beaming towards the Earth in the past ~0.5 Gyr. We define the level of catastrophic damage to the biosphere as approximation 100 kJ m-2, based on Thomas et al. (2005a, b). Using results in Melott & Thomas (2011), we estimate the probability of the Earth receiving this fluence from a GRB of any type, as 87% during the last 500 Myr. Such an intense burst of gamma rays would ionize the atmosphere and deplete the ozone (O3) layer. With depleted O3, there will be an increased flux of Solar UVB on the Earth's surface with potentially harmful biological effects. In addition to the atmospheric damage, secondary particles produced by gamma ray-induced showers will reach the surface. Among all secondary particles, muons dominate the ground-level secondary particle flux (99% of the total number of particles) and are potentially of biological significance. Using the Monte Carlo simulation code CORSIKA, we modelled the air showers produced by gamma-ray primaries up to 100 GeV. We found that the number of muons produced by the electromagnetic component of hypothetical galactic GRBs significantly increases the total muon flux. However, since the muon production efficiency is extremely low for photon energies below 100 GeV, and because GRBs radiate strongly for only a very short time, we find that the biological radiation dose from secondary muons is negligible. The main mechanism of biological damage from GRBs is through Solar UVB irradiation from the loss of O3 in the upper atmosphere.

  6. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, G. T.; Dixon, K. L.

    2016-09-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  7. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  8. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; McMakin, A.H.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach being used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems used to plan and control HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP). Battelle`s contract with CDC only extends through May 1994 when the key technical work will be completed. There-fore, this plan is focused only on the period during which Battelle is a participant.

  9. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; McMakin, A.H.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach being used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems used to plan and control HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP). Battelle's contract with CDC only extends through May 1994 when the key technical work will be completed. There-fore, this plan is focused only on the period during which Battelle is a participant.

  10. Dose response of multiple parameters for calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue; Zhao, Hua; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have investigated exposure biomarkers for high dose radiation. However, no systematic study on which biomarkers can be used in dose estimation through premature chromosome condensation (PCC) analysis has been conducted. The present study aims to screen the high-dose radiation exposure indicator in calyculin A-induced PCC. The dose response of multiple biological endpoints, including G2/A-PCC (G2/M and M/A-PCC) index, PCC ring (PCC-R), ratio of the longest/shortest length (L/L ratio), and length and width ratio of the longest chromosome (L/B ratio), were investigated in calyculin A-induced G2/A-PCC spreads in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 0-20Gy (dose-rate of 1Gy/min) cobalt-60 gamma-rays. The G2/A-PCC index was decreased with enhanced absorbed doses of 4-20Gy gamma-rays. The G2/A PCC-R at 0-12Gy gamma-rays conformed to Poisson distribution. Three types of PCC-R were scored according to their shape and their solidity or hollowness. The frequencies of hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including or excluding solid ring in G2/A-PCC spreads were enhanced with increased doses. The length and width of the longest chromosome, as well as the length of the shortest chromosome in each G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread, were measured. All L/L or L/B ratios in G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread increased with enhanced doses. A blind test with two new irradiated doses was conducted to validate which biomarker could be used in dose estimation. Results showed that hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including solid ring can be utilized for accurate dose estimation, and that hollow PCC-R was optimal for practical application.

  11. Three-dimensional dose verification of the clinical application of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Kozicki, M.; Rosiak, J. M.; Sakelliou, L.; Sandilos, P.; Seimenis, I.; Torrens, M.

    2005-05-01

    This work seeks to verify multi-shot clinical applications of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife model C unit employing a polymer gel-MRI based experimental procedure, which has already been shown to be capable of verifying the precision and accuracy of dose delivery in single-shot gamma knife applications. The treatment plan studied in the present work resembles a clinical treatment case of pituitary adenoma using four 8 mm and one 14 mm collimator helmet shots to deliver a prescription dose of 15 Gy to the 50% isodose line (30 Gy maximum dose). For the experimental dose verification of the treatment plan, the same criteria as those used in the clinical treatment planning evaluation were employed. These included comparison of measured and GammaPlan calculated data, in terms of percentage isodose contours on axial, coronal and sagittal planes, as well as 3D plan evaluation criteria such as dose-volume histograms for the target volume, target coverage and conformity indices. Measured percentage isodose contours compared favourably with calculated ones despite individual point fluctuations at low dose contours (e.g., 20%) mainly due to the effect of T2 measurement uncertainty on dose resolution. Dose-volume histogram data were also found in a good agreement while the experimental results for the percentage target coverage and conformity index were 94% and 1.17 relative to corresponding GammaPlan calculations of 96% and 1.12, respectively. Overall, polymer gel results verified the planned dose distribution within experimental uncertainties and uncertainty related to the digitization process of selected GammaPlan output data.

  12. Determination of the Absorbed Dose Rate to Water for the 18-mm Helmet of a Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Youngho; Hyun, Sangil; Choi, Yongsoo; Kim, Gi Hong; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To measure the absorbed dose rate to water of {sup 60}Co gamma rays of a Gamma Knife Model C using water-filled phantoms (WFP). Methods and Materials: Spherical WFP with an equivalent water depth of 5, 7, 8, and 9 cm were constructed. The dose rates at the center of an 18-mm helmet were measured in an 8-cm WFP (WFP-3) and two plastic phantoms. Two independent measurement systems were used: one was calibrated to an air kerma (Set I) and the other was calibrated to the absorbed dose to water (Set II). The dose rates of WFP-3 and the plastic phantoms were converted to dose rates for an 8-cm water depth using the attenuation coefficient and the equivalent water depths. Results: The dose rate measured at the center of WFP-3 using Set II was 2.2% and 1.0% higher than dose rates measured at the center of the two plastic phantoms. The measured effective attenuation coefficient of Gamma Knife photon beam in WFPs was 0.0621 cm{sup -1}. After attenuation correction, the difference between the dose rate at an 8-cm water depth measured in WFP-3 and dose rates in the plastic phantoms was smaller than the uncertainty of the measurements. Conclusions: Systematic errors related to the characteristics of the phantom materials in the dose rate measurement of a Gamma Knife need to be corrected for. Correction of the dose rate using an equivalent water depth and attenuation provided results that were more consistent.

  13. Gamma-ray methods for determining natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in environmental and soil science

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.; Evans, C.V.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental materials are convenient because they generally require less bench-top preparation time than, for example, determinations based on alpha-particle pulse-height analysis. Also, parallel measurements of chemical yield are not needed, and typically several radionuclides can be determined simultaneously. In this paper, the authors review gamma-ray methods currently in use at Brookhaven, and present a new method for the determination of the radionuclide protactinium-231 in soils and other environmental materials, using the gamma-ray deconvolution package in the EG&G Ortec {open_quotes}Gammavision{close_quotes} software.

  14. SU-E-T-647: Quality Assurance of VMAT by Gamma Analysis Dependence On Low-Dose Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J; Kim, M; Lee, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AAPM TG-119 instructed institutions to use low-dose threshold (LDT) of 10% or a ROI determined by the jaw when they collected gamma analysis QA data of planar dose distribution. Also, based on a survey by Nelms and Simon, more than 70% of institutions use a LDT between 0% and 10% for gamma analysis. However, there are no clinical data to quantitatively demonstrate the impact of the LDT on the gamma index. Therefore, we performed a gamma analysis with LDTs of 0% to 15% according to both global and local normalization and different acceptance criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm. Methods: A total of 30 treatment plans—10 head and neck, 10 brain, and 10 prostate cancer cases—were randomly selected from the Varian Eclipse TPS, retrospectively. For the gamma analysis, a predicted portal image was acquired through a portal dose calculation algorithm in the Eclipse TPS, and a measured portal image was obtained using a Varian Clinac iX and an EPID. Then, the gamma analysis was performed using the Portal Dosimetry software. Results: For the global normalization, the gamma passing rate (%GP) decreased as the LDT increased, and all cases of low-dose thresholds exhibited a %GP above 95% for both the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. However, for local normalization, the %GP increased as LDT increased. The gamma passing rate with LDT of 10% increased by 6.86%, 9.22% and 6.14% compared with the 0% in the case of the head and neck, brain and prostate for 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusion: Applying the LDT in the global normalization does not have critical impact to judge patient-specific QA results. However, LDT for the local normalization should be carefully selected because applying the LDT could affect the average of the %GP to increase rapidly.

  15. Induction of a Radio-Adaptive Response by Low-dose Gamma Irradiation in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Seawright, John W.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) 137Cs gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value < or = 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio

  16. Dose evaluation of an NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Jen; Lin, Jing-Quan; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Chin-Hsing

    2014-11-01

    An N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel dosimeter has great potential in clinical applications. However, its three-dimensional dose distribution must be assessed. In this work, a quantitative evaluation of dose distributions was performed to evaluate the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma analysis. A cylindrical acrylic phantom filled with NIPAM gel measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated by a 4×4 cm2 square light field. The irradiated gel phantom was scanned using an optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner (OCTOPUS™, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) at 1 mm resolution. The projection data were transferred to an image reconstruction program, which was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). The program reconstructed the image of the optical density distribution using the algorithm of a filter back-projection. Three batches of replicated gel phantoms were independently measured. The average uncertainty of the measurements was less than 1%. The gel was found to have a high degree of spatial uniformity throughout the dosimeter and good temporal stability. A comparison of the line profiles of the treatment planning system and of the data measured by optical CT showed that the dose was overestimated in the penumbra region because of two factors. The first is light scattering due to changes in the refractive index at the edge of the irradiated field. The second is the edge enhancement caused by free radical diffusion. However, the effect of edge enhancement on the NIPAM gel dosimeter is not as significant as that on the BANG gel dosimeter. Moreover, the dose uncertainty is affected by the inaccuracy of the gel container positioning process. To reduce the uncertainty of 3D dose distribution, improvements in the gel container holder must be developed.

  17. Effect of gamma-ray irradiation at low doses on the performance of PES ultrafiltration membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Niu, Lixia; Li, Fuzhi; Yu, Suping; Zhao, Xuan; Hu, Hongying

    2016-10-01

    The influence of gamma irradiation on the performance of polyether sulfone (PES) ultrafiltration (UF) membrane was investigated at low absorbed doses (0-75 kGy) using a cobalt source. The performance of the UF membranes was tested using low level radioactive wastewater (LLRW) containing three types of surfactants (anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants). The physical and chemical properties of membrane surface were analyzed, and relationships between these properties and separation performance and fouling characteristics were determined. At 10-75 kGy irradiation, there were no significant changes observed in the membrane surface roughness or polymer functional groups, however the contact angle decreased sharply from 92° to ca. 70° at irradiation levels as low as 10 kGy. When membranes were exposed to the surfactant-containing LLRW, the flux decreased more sharply for higher dosed irradiated membranes, while flux in virgin membranes increased during the filtration processes. The study highlights that fouling properties of membrane may be changed due to the changes of surface hydrophilicity at low dose irradiation, while other surface properties and retentions remain stable. Therefore, a membrane fouling test with real or simulated wastewater is recommended to fully evaluate the membrane irradiation resistance.

  18. High doses of gamma radiation suppress allergic effect induced by food lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Antônio F. M.; Souza, Marthyna P.; Vieira, Leucio D.; Aguiar, Jaciana S.; Silva, Teresinha G.; Medeiros, Paloma L.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A.; Santana, Lucimeire A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Perez, Katia R.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Correia, Maria T. S.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for the development of functional foods lies in the development of effective methods to reduce or eliminate food allergenicity, but few reports have summarized information concerning the progress made with food irradiation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between allergenicity and molecular structure of a food allergen after gamma irradiation and evaluate the profile of the allergic response to irradiated allergens. Cramoll, a lectin isolated from a bean and used as a food allergen, was irradiated and the possible structural changes were accompanied by spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. Subsequently, sensitized animals subjected to intragastric administration of non-irradiated and irradiated Cramoll were treated for 7 days. Then, body weight, leukocytes, cytokine profiles and histological parameters were also determined. Cramoll showed complete inhibition of intrinsic activity after high radiation doses. Changes in fluorescence and CD spectra with a simultaneous collapse of the tertiary structure followed by a pronounced decrease of native secondary structure were observed after irradiation. After oral challenge, sensitized mice demonstrate an association between Cramoll intake, body weight loss, eosinophilia, lymphocytic infiltrate in the gut and Eotaxin secretion. Irradiation significantly reduces, according to the dose, the effects observed by non-irradiated food allergens. We confirm that high-dose radiation may render protein food allergens innocuous by irreversibly compromising their molecular structure.

  19. Effect of exposure to low-dose [gamma] radiation during late organogenesis in the mouse fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, P.U.; Baskar, R.; Hande, M.P. )

    1994-04-01

    The adominal region of pregnant Swiss mice was exposed to 0.05 to 0.50 of [gamma] radiation on day 11.5 postcoitus. The animals were sacrificed on day 18 gestation and the fetuses were examined for mortality, growth retardation, changes in head size and brain weight, and incidence of microphthalmia. No marked increase in fetal mortality or growth retardation was observed below 0.25 Gy; the increase in these parameters was significant only at 0.50 Gy. A significant reduction in head size and brain weight and a significant increase in the incidence of microphthalmia were observed at doses above 0.15 Gy. Detectable levels of microcephaly and microphthalmia were evident even at 0.10 Gy. A linear dose response was seen for these effects in the dose range of 0.05 to 0.15 Gy. It is concluded that the late period of organogenesis in the mouse, especially between days 10 and 12 postcoitus, is a particularly sensitive phase in the development of the skull, brain and eye. 21 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Sequential changes in bone marrow architecture during continuous low dose gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Chubb, G.T.; Tolle, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    Beagles continuously exposed to low daily doses (10 R) of whole-body /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-radiation are prone to develop either early occurring aplasstic anemia or late occurring myeloproliferative disorders. In this study, we have examined by a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy the sequential changes in the morphology of biopsied rib bone marrow of continuously irradiated dogs that developed either aplastic anemia, myelofibrosis, or myelogenous leukemia. Characteristic modifications of key elements of marrow architecture have been observed during preclinical and clinical phases of these hemopathological conditions. These architectural changes during preclinical phases appear to be related to the pathological progression to each of the radiation-induced hemopathological end points.

  1. Low doses of gamma radiation in the management of postharvest Lasiodiplodia theobromae in mangos

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alice Maria Gonçalves; Lins, Severina Rodrigues Oliveira; da Silva, Josenilda Maria; de Oliveira, Sônia Maria Alves

    2015-01-01

    The postharvest life of mango is limited by the development of pathogens, especially fungi that cause rot, among which stands out the Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Several control methods have been employed to minimize the damages caused by this fungus, chemical control can leave residues to man and nature; physical control by the use of gamma radiation in combination with modified atmosphere and cold storage. The use of gamma radiation helps to reduce the severity of the pathogen assist in the ripening process of fruits, even at low doses (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45 kGy) chemical properties such as pH, soluble solids, acid ascorbic, titratable acidity and also the quality parameters of the pulp showed no damage that are ideal for trade and consumption of mangoes. This treatment can be extended for use in the management of diseases such as natural infections for penducular rot complex that has as one of L. theobroma pathogens involved. PMID:26413068

  2. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    SciTech Connect

    Bougrov, N.G.; Degteva, M.O.; Goeksu, H.Y.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Haskell, E.

    1998-12-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  3. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougrov, N. G.; Goksu, H. Y.; Haskell, E.; Degteva, M. O.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  4. Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Lespukh, E; Stegnar, P; Yunusov, M; Tilloboev, H; Zyazev, G; Kayukov, P; Hosseini, A; Strømman, G; Salbu, B

    2013-12-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) was carried out at former uranium (U) mining and processing sites in Taboshar and at Digmai in Tajikistan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments. (222)Rn/(220)Rn measurements were carried out with field instruments for instantaneous measurements and then discriminative (222)Rn/(220)Rn solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were used for longer representative measurements. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected U legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, (222)Rn and (220)Rn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low to relatively low radiological risk. The radiation doses deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor (222)Rn and (220)Rn with their short-lived progenies did not exceed national or international standards. At none of the sites investigated did the average individual annual effective doses exceed 10 mSv, the recommended threshold value for the general public. A radiation hazard could be associated with exceptional situations, such as elevated exposures to ionizing radiation at the Digmai tailings site and/or in industrial facilities, where gamma and (222)Rn/(220)Rn dose rates could reach values of several 10 mSv/a. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent a hazard to the health of the resident public, with the exception of some specific situations. These issues should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of the resident public to ionizing radiation.

  5. Effect of skull contours on dose calculations in Gamma Knife Perfexion stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Komori, Masataka; Mori, Yoshimasa; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2014-03-06

    In treatment planning of Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK) radiosurgery, the skull geometry defined by generally dedicated scalar measurement has a crucial effect on dose calculation. The LGK Perfexion (PFX) unit is equipped with a cone-shaped collimator divided into eight sectors, and its configuration is entirely different from previous model C. Beam delivery on the PFX is made by a combination of eight sectors, but it is also mechanically available from one sector with the remaining seven blocked. Hence the treatment time using one sector is more likely to be affected by discrepancies in the skull shape than that of all sectors. In addition, the latest version (Ver. 10.1.1) of the treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) includes a new function to directly generate head surface contouring from computed tomography (CT) images in conjunction with the Leksell skull frame. This paper evaluates change of treatment time induced by different skull models. A simple simulation using a uniform skull radius of 80 mm and anthropomorphic phantom was implemented in LGP to find the trend between dose and skull measuring error. To evaluate the clinical effect, we performed an interobserver comparison of ruler measurement for 41 patients, and compared instrumental and CT-based contours for 23 patients. In the phantom simulation, treatment time errors were less than 2% when the difference was within 3 mm. In the clinical cases, the variability of treatment time induced by the differences in interobserver measurements was less than 0.91%, on average. Additionally the difference between measured and CT-based contours was good, with a difference of -0.16% ± 0.66% (mean ±1 standard deviation) on average and a maximum of 3.4%. Although the skull model created from CT images reduced the dosimetric uncertainty caused by different measurers, these results showed that even manual skull measurement could reproduce the skull shape close to that of a patient's head within an acceptable

  6. The effect of high dose rate transient gamma radiation on high-energy optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, A.; Bowden, M. D.; Cheeseman, M. C.; Knowles, S. L.; Meister, D. C.; Pecak, S. N.; Simmons Potter, K.

    2009-08-01

    High power laser systems have a number of uses in a variety of scientific and defense applications, for example laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) or laser-triggered switches. In general, high power optical fibers are used to deliver the laser energy from the source to the target in preference to free space beams. In certain cases, such as nuclear reactors, these optical systems are expected to operate in ionizing radiation environments. In this paper, a variety of modern, currently available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical fiber designs have been assessed for successful operation in the transient gamma radiation environment produced by the HERMES III accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, USA. The performance of these fibers was evaluated for high (~1 MW) and low (<1 W) optical power transmission during high dose rate, high total dose gamma irradiation. A significant reduction in low optical power transmission to 32% of maximum was observed for low OH- content fibers, and 35% of maximum for high OH- fibers. The high OH- fibers were observed to recover to 80% transmission within 1 μs and 100% transmission within 1 ms. High optical power transmission losses followed generally similar trends to the low optical power transmission losses, though evidence for an optical power dependent recovery was observed. For 10-20 mJ, 15 ns laser pulses, around 46% was transmitted coincident with the radiation pulse, recovering to 70% transmission within 40 ns of the radiation pulse. All fibers were observed to completely recover within a few minutes for high optical powers. High optical power densities in excess of 1 GW/cm2 were successfully transmitted during the period of highest loss without any observed damage to the optical fibers.

  7. Low-Dose Gamma Irradiation of Decellularized Heart Valves Results in Tissue Injury in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Helder, Meghana R. K.; Hennessy, Ryan S.; Spoon, Daniel B.; Tefft, Brandon J.; Witt, Tyra A.; Marler, Ronald J.; Pislaru, Sorin V.; Simari, Robert D.; Stulak, John M.; Lerman, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background Decellularized heart valves are emerging as a potential alternative to current bioprostheses for valve replacement. While techniques of decellularization have been thoroughly examined, terminal sterilization techniques have not received the same scrutiny. Methods This study evaluated low dose gamma irradiation as a sterilization method for decellularized heart valves. Incubation of valves and transmission electron microscopy evaluation after different doses of gamma irradiation were used to determine the optimal dose of gamma irradiation. Quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties was done by tensile mechanical testing of isolated cusps. Sterilize decellularized heart valves were tested in a sheep model (n=3, 1 1,500 Gy and 2 3,000 Gy) of pulmonary valve replacement. Results Valves sterilized with gamma radiation between 1,000 Gy and 3,000 Gy were found to be optimal with in-vitro testing. However, with in-vivo showed deteriorating valve function within 2 months. On explant the valve with 1,500 Gy gamma irradiation showed signs of endocarditis with neutrophils on hematoxylin and eosin staining, positive gram stain resembling streptococcus infection. The 3,000 Gy valves had no evidence of infection, but the hematoxylin and eosin staining showed evidence of wound remodeling with macrophages and fibroblasts. Tensile strength testing showed decreased strength (0 Gy-2.53±0.98 MPa, 1,500 Gy-2.03±1.23 MPa, 3,000 Gy-1.26±0.90 MPa) with increasing levels of irradiation. Conclusions Low dose gamma irradiation does not maintain the mechanical integrity of valves and the balance between sterilization and damage may not be able to be achieved with gamma irradiation. Other methods of terminal sterilization must be pursued and evaluated. PMID:26453425

  8. [Testing doses? Environmental health stakes associated with nanotechnologies].

    PubMed

    Jouzel, Jean-Noël

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution, we analyse how nanoscience and nanotechnology have given birth to an important environmental health controversy regarding the potential sanitary dangers of engineered nanomaterials. We show how this controversy is part of a larger picture, made of a series of social and scientific disputes about the effects of man made chemicals on the human body. We show how these disputes have contributed throughout the 20th century to the emergence and the transformation of toxicology as a scientific field, and to test the robustness of the dose paradigm that constitues the cornerstone of this discipline. We suggest that the contemporary emergence of a new scientific field known as "nanotoxicolgy" must be interpreted as a successful adaptation of this paradigm to the specific toxicological questions raised by engineered nanomaterials.

  9. Assessment of absorbed dose to thyroid, parotid and ovaries in patients undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanzadeh, H.; Sharafi, A.; Allah Verdi, M.; Nikoofar, A.

    2006-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was originally introduced by Lars Leksell in 1951. This treatment refers to the noninvasive destruction of an intracranial target localized stereotactically. The purpose of this study was to identify the dose delivered to the parotid, ovaries, testis and thyroid glands during the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. A three-dimensional, anthropomorphic phantom was developed using natural human bone, paraffin and sodium chloride as the equivalent tissue. The phantom consisted of a thorax, head and neck and hip. In the natural places of the thyroid, parotid (bilateral sides) and ovaries (midline), some cavities were made to place TLDs. Three TLDs were inserted in a batch with 1 cm space between the TLDs and each batch was inserted into a single cavity. The final depth of TLDs was 3 cm from the surface for parotid and thyroid and was 15 cm for the ovaries. Similar batches were placed superficially on the phantom. The phantom was gamma irradiated using a Leksell model C Gamma Knife unit. Subsequently, the same batches were placed superficially over the thyroid, parotid, testis and ovaries in 30 patients (15 men and 15 women) who were undergoing radiosurgery treatment for brain tumours. The mean dosage for treating these patients was 14.48 ± 3.06 Gy (10.5-24 Gy) to a mean tumour volume of 12.30 ± 9.66 cc (0.27-42.4 cc) in the 50% isodose curve. There was no significant difference between the superficial and deep batches in the phantom studies (P-value < 0.05). The mean delivered doses to the parotid, thyroid, ovaries and testis in human subjects were 21.6 ± 15.1 cGy, 9.15 ± 3.89 cGy, 0.47 ± 0.3 cGy and 0.53 ± 0.31 cGy, respectively. The data can be used in making decisions for special clinical situations such as treating pregnant patients or young patients with benign lesions who need radiosurgery for eradication of brain tumours.

  10. Assessment of absorbed dose to thyroid, parotid and ovaries in patients undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, H; Sharafi, A; Allah Verdi, M; Nikoofar, A

    2006-09-07

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was originally introduced by Lars Leksell in 1951. This treatment refers to the noninvasive destruction of an intracranial target localized stereotactically. The purpose of this study was to identify the dose delivered to the parotid, ovaries, testis and thyroid glands during the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. A three-dimensional, anthropomorphic phantom was developed using natural human bone, paraffin and sodium chloride as the equivalent tissue. The phantom consisted of a thorax, head and neck and hip. In the natural places of the thyroid, parotid (bilateral sides) and ovaries (midline), some cavities were made to place TLDs. Three TLDs were inserted in a batch with 1 cm space between the TLDs and each batch was inserted into a single cavity. The final depth of TLDs was 3 cm from the surface for parotid and thyroid and was 15 cm for the ovaries. Similar batches were placed superficially on the phantom. The phantom was gamma irradiated using a Leksell model C Gamma Knife unit. Subsequently, the same batches were placed superficially over the thyroid, parotid, testis and ovaries in 30 patients (15 men and 15 women) who were undergoing radiosurgery treatment for brain tumours. The mean dosage for treating these patients was 14.48 +/- 3.06 Gy (10.5-24 Gy) to a mean tumour volume of 12.30 +/- 9.66 cc (0.27-42.4 cc) in the 50% isodose curve. There was no significant difference between the superficial and deep batches in the phantom studies (P-value < 0.05). The mean delivered doses to the parotid, thyroid, ovaries and testis in human subjects were 21.6 +/- 15.1 cGy, 9.15 +/- 3.89 cGy, 0.47 +/- 0.3 cGy and 0.53 +/- 0.31 cGy, respectively. The data can be used in making decisions for special clinical situations such as treating pregnant patients or young patients with benign lesions who need radiosurgery for eradication of brain tumours.

  11. Development of an algorithm to improve the accuracy of dose delivery in Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernica, George Dumitru

    2007-12-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery has demonstrated decades of successful treatments. Despite its high spatial accuracy, the Gamma Knife's planning software, GammaPlan, uses a simple exponential as the TPR curve for all four collimator sizes, and a skull scaling device to acquire ruler measurements to interpolate a threedimensional spline to model the patient's skull. The consequences of these approximations have not been previously investigated. The true TPR curves of the four collimators were measured by blocking 200 of the 201 sources with steel plugs. Additional attenuation was provided through the use of a 16 cm tungsten sphere, designed to enable beamlet measurements along one axis. TPR, PDD, and beamlet profiles were obtained using both an ion chamber and GafChromic EBT film for all collimators. Additionally, an in-house planning algorithm able to calculate the contour of the skull directly from an image set and implement the measured beamlet data in shot time calculations was developed. Clinical and theoretical Gamma Knife cases were imported into our algorithm. The TPR curves showed small deviations from a simple exponential curve, with average discrepancies under 1%, but with a maximum discrepancy of 2% found for the 18 mm collimator beamlet at shallow depths. The consequences on the PDD of the of the beamlets were slight, with a maximum of 1.6% found with the 18 mm collimator beamlet. Beamlet profiles of the 4 mm, 8 mm, and 14 mm showed some underestimates of the off-axis ratio near the shoulders (up to 10%). The toes of the profiles were underestimated for all collimators, with differences up to 7%. Shot times were affected by up to 1.6% due to TPR differences, but clinical cases showed deviations by no more than 0.5%. The beamlet profiles affected the dose calculations more significantly, with shot time calculations differing by as much as 0.8%. The skull scaling affected the shot time calculations the most significantly, with differences of up to 5

  12. Environmental radioactivity in the UK: the airborne geophysical view of dose rate estimates.

    PubMed

    Beamish, David

    2014-12-01

    This study considers UK airborne gamma-ray data obtained through a series of high spatial resolution, low altitude surveys over the past decade. The ground concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides Potassium, Thorium and Uranium are converted to air absorbed dose rates and these are used to assess terrestrial exposure levels from both natural and technologically enhanced sources. The high resolution airborne information is also assessed alongside existing knowledge from soil sampling and ground-based measurements of exposure levels. The surveys have sampled an extensive number of the UK lithological bedrock formations and the statistical information provides examples of low dose rate lithologies (the formations that characterise much of southern England) to the highest sustained values associated with granitic terrains. The maximum dose rates (e.g. >300 nGy h(-1)) encountered across the sampled granitic terrains are found to vary by a factor of 2. Excluding granitic terrains, the most spatially extensive dose rates (>50 nGy h(-1)) are found in association with the Mercia Mudstone Group (Triassic argillaceous mudstones) of eastern England. Geological associations between high dose rate and high radon values are also noted. Recent studies of the datasets have revealed the extent of source rock (i.e. bedrock) flux attenuation by soil moisture in conjunction with the density and porosity of the temperate latitude soils found in the UK. The presence or absence of soil cover (and associated presence or absence of attenuation) appears to account for a range of localised variations in the exposure levels encountered. The hypothesis is supported by a study of an extensive combined data set of dose rates obtained from soil sampling and by airborne geophysical survey. With no attenuation factors applied, except those intrinsic to the airborne estimates, a bias to high values of between 10 and 15 nGy h(-1) is observed in the soil data. A wide range of

  13. [The status of the progeny of male rats subjected to low-dose external gamma irradiation exposure].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E P; Kononenko, V V; Galian, S P; Vernidub, I V; Topchiĭ, I G

    1996-01-01

    In studies on 120 mature males of Wistar rats and 252 female rats of the same line, 20-day-old fetuses and 974 young rats of the first generation, anomalies of antenatal and postnatal development were found after exposure of spermatids and spermatozoa to gamma-radiation in doses 0.25-1.0 Gy. After exposure of male rats to radiation in dose 0.25 Gy, reliable delay of pelvic bone ossification was observed as compared to the control.

  14. [The reduction of the dose to the lung in whole-body irradiation with cobalt-60 gamma rays (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hochhäuser, E; Balk, O A

    1980-09-01

    In order to reduce the exposure of the lung and oesophagus during whole-body irradiation with cobalt-60 gamma rays the dose rate delivered to the lungs and the neck is diminished by means of a filter. Because of its special shape, sternum and columna vertebralis obtain the unreduced dose. The filter is constructed for irradiation in antero-posterior direction. A fixed position of the patient is not necessary.

  15. RayXpert V1: 3D software for the gamma dose rate calculation by Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, P. F.; Pourrouquet, P.; Dossat, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Chatry, N.; Lavielle, D.; Chatry, C.

    2014-06-01

    RayXpert has been developed to ease the access to the power and accuracy of the 3D Monte Carlo method in the field of gamma dose rate estimate. Optimization methods have been implemented to address dose calculation behind thick 3D structures. At the same time, the engineering interface makes all the preprocessing tasks (modeling, material settings,…) faster using predefined tables and push button features.

  16. Peripheral dose in ocular treatments with CyberKnife and Gamma Knife radiosurgery compared to proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zytkovicz, A.; Daftari, I.; Phillips, T. L.; Chuang, C. F.; Verhey, L.; Petti, P. L.

    2007-09-01

    Peripheral radiation can have deleterious effects on normal tissues throughout the body, including secondary cancer induction and cataractogenesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the peripheral dose received by various regions of the body after ocular treatment delivered with the Model C Gamma Knife, proton radiotherapy with a dedicated ocular beam employing no passive-scattering system, or a CyberKnife unit before and after supplemental shielding was introduced. TLDs were used for stray gamma and x-ray dosimetry, whereas CR-39 dosimeters were used to measure neutron contamination in the proton experiments. Doses to the contralateral eye, neck, thorax and abdomen were measured on our anthropomorphic phantom for a 56 Gy treatment to a 588 mm3 posterior ocular lesion. Gamma Knife (without collimator blocking) delivered the highest dose in the contralateral eye, with 402-2380 mSv, as compared with 118-234 mSv for CyberKnife pre-shielding, 46-255 mSv for CyberKnife post-shielding and 9-12 mSv for proton radiotherapy. Gamma Knife and post-shielding CyberKnife delivered comparable doses proximal to the treatment site, with 190 versus 196 mSv at the thyroid, whereas protons doses at these locations were less than 10 mSv. Gamma Knife doses decreased dramatically with distance from the treatment site, delivering only 13 mSv at the lower pelvis, comparable to the proton result of 4 to 7 mSv in this region. In contrast, CyberKnife delivered between 117 and 132 mSv to the lower pelvis. In conclusion, for ocular melanoma treatments, a proton beam employing no double scattering system delivers the lowest peripheral doses proximally to the contralateral eye and thyroid when compared to radiosurgery with the Model C Gamma Knife or CyberKnife. At distal locations in the pelvis, peripheral doses delivered with proton and Gamma Knife are of an order of magnitude smaller than those delivered with CyberKnife.

  17. Gamma Dose Calculations in the Target Service Cell of the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Johnson, J.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1999-11-14

    Calculations of the gamma dose rates inside and outside of the Target Service Cell (TSC) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are complicated by the large size of the structure, large volume of air (internal void), optical thickness of the enclosing walls, and multiplicity of radiation sources. Furthermore, a reasonably detailed distribution of the dose rate over the volume of the TSC, and on the outside of its walls is necessary in order to optimize electronic instrument locations, and plan access control. For all these reasons a deterministic transport method was preferred over Monte Carlo, The three- dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT was employed for this purpose with support from other peripheral codes in the Discrete Ordinates of Oak Ridge System (DOORS). The computational model for the TSC is described and the features of TORT and its companion codes that enable such a difficult calculation are discussed. Most prominent is the presence of severe ray effects in the air cavity of the TSC that persists in the transport through the concrete walls and is pronounced throughout the problem volume. Initial attempts at eliminating ray effects from the computed results using the newly developed three-dimensional uncollided flux and first collided source code GRTUNCL3D are described.

  18. Calculations of background beta-gamma radiation dose through geologic time.

    PubMed

    Karam, P A; Leslie, S A

    1999-12-01

    Life on earth is exposed to a background level of ionizing radiation from a number of sources, including beta and gamma radiation from geologic and biologic materials. Radiation dose from geologic emitters has changed because of the chemical evolution of the continental crust, changes in the relative abundances of 235U and 238U, and the radioactive decay of uranium, thorium, and 40K with time. The radiation dose from internal 40K has decreased by a factor of about eight because of changes in the activity concentration of 40K in potassium over the past 4 billion years. Radiation exposure from geologic materials has decreased from about 1.6 mGy y(-1) to 0.66 mGy y(-1) over the past 4 billion years, and radiation exposure to an organism with a potassium concentration of 250 mmol L(-1) has decreased from about 5.5 to about 0.70 mGy y(-1). Accordingly, background radiation exposure from these two sources has dropped from about 7.0 to 1.35 mGy y(-1) during the time life has existed on Earth. The conservative nature of mutation repair mechanisms in modern organisms suggest that these mechanisms may have evolved in the distant past and that organisms may retain some of the capability of efficiently repairing damage from higher radiation levels than exist at present.

  19. Quantitative comparison of dose distribution in radiotherapy plans using 2D gamma maps and X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background The advanced dose calculation algorithms implemented in treatment planning system (TPS) have remarkably improved the accuracy of dose calculation especially the modeling of electrons transport in the low density medium. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of 2D gamma (γ) index to quantify and evaluate the impact of the calculation of electrons transport on dose distribution for lung radiotherapy. Methods X-ray computed tomography images were used to calculate the dose for twelve radiotherapy treatment plans. The doses were originally calculated with Modified Batho (MB) 1D density correction method, and recalculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), using the same prescribed dose. Dose parameters derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) and target coverage indices were compared. To compare dose distribution, 2D γ-index was applied, ranging from 1%/1 mm to 6%/6 mm. The results were displayed using γ-maps in 2D. Correlation between DVH metrics and γ passing rates was tested using Spearman’s rank test and Wilcoxon paired test to calculate P values. Results the plans generated with AAA predicted more heterogeneous dose distribution inside the target, with P<0.05. However, MB overestimated the dose predicting more coverage of the target by the prescribed dose. The γ analysis showed that the difference between MB and AAA could reach up to ±10%. The 2D γ-maps illustrated that AAA predicted more dose to organs at risks, as well as lower dose to the target compared to MB. Conclusions Taking into account of the electrons transport on radiotherapy plans showed a significant impact on delivered dose and dose distribution. When considering the AAA represent the true cumulative dose, a readjusting of the prescribed dose and an optimization to protect the organs at risks should be taken in consideration in order to obtain the better clinical outcome. PMID:27429908

  20. Rapid In-Situ Measurement of Gamma Activity in Soil for Environmental Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. K.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma radiation in soil are used as a rapid, low-cost, non-intrusive alternative to conventional sampling and analysis methods in the preliminary assessment of environmental impacts to watersheds at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The method resolves the ambient gamma-radiation field near ground surface into background and residual components and provides radionuclide-specific soil activity determination. The efficacy of the method has been evaluated and compares favorably with conventional gamma-PHA soil analyses and aerial survey data. The method has garnered regulatory approval and is being successfully deployed to evaluate the impact of Cs-137 contamination from CERCLA sites.

  1. Construction of a cytogenetic dose-response curve for low-dose range gamma-irradiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using three-color FISH.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko; Akiyama, Miho; Noda, Takashi; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate biological doses after low-dose ionizing radiation exposure, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using three differentially colored chromosome painting probes was employed to detect exchange-type chromosome aberrations. A reference dose response curve was constructed using blood samples from a female donor whose lymphocytes consistently exhibited a low frequency of cells at the second mitosis under routine culture conditions. Aberration yields were studied for a total of about 155 thousand metaphases obtained from seven dose-points of gamma irradiations (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300mGy). In situ hybridization was performed using commercially available painting probes for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. With the aid of an automated image-capturing method, exchange-type aberrations involving painted chromosomes were detected with considerable accuracy and speed. The results on the exchange-type aberrations (dicentrics plus translocations) at the seven dose-points showed a good fit to the linear-quadratic model (y=0.0023+0.0015x+0.0819x(2), P=0.83). A blind test proved the reproducibility of the reference dose-response relationship. In the control experiments using blood samples from another donor, the estimated doses calculated on the basis of the present reference curve were proved to be in good agreement with the actual physical doses applied. The present dose-response curve may serve as a means to assess the individual differences in cytogenetical radio-sensitivities.

  2. [Induction of glutathione and activation of immune functions by low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji

    2006-10-01

    We first examined the relation between the induction of glutathione and immune functions in mice after low-dose gamma-ray irradiation. Thereafter, inhibition of tumor growth by radiation was confirmed in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST)-bearing mice. The total glutathione level of the splenocytes transiently increased soon after irradiation and reached a maximum at around 4 h postirradiation. Thereafter, the level reverted to the 0 h value by 24 h postirradiation. A significantly high splenocyte proliferative response was also recognized 4 h postirradiation. Natural killer (NK) activity was also increased significantly in a similar manner. The time at which the response reached the maximum coincided well with that of maximum total glutathione levels of the splenocytes in the gamma-ray-irradiated mice. Reduced glutathione exogenously added to splenocytes obtained from normal mice enhanced the proliferative response and NK activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of radiation on tumor growth was then examined in EST-bearing mice. Repeated low-dose irradiation (0.5 Gy, four times, before and within an early time after inoculation) significantly delayed the tumor growth. Finally, the effect of single low-dose (0.5 Gy), whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on immune balance was examined to elucidate the mechanism underlying the antitumor immunity. The percentage of B cells in blood lymphocytes was selectively decreased after radiation, concomitant with an increase in that of the helper T cell population. The IFN-gamma level in splenocyte culture prepared from EST-bearing mice was significantly increased 48 h after radiation, although the level of IL-4 was unchanged. IL-12 secretion from macrophages was also enhanced by radiation. These results suggest that low-dose gamma-rays induce Th1 polarization and enhance the activities of tumoricidal effector cells, leading to an inhibition of tumor growth.

  3. A cyanocobalamin dosimeter for monitoring gamma-radiation doses of 0.1-2 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maged, A. F.; Hamza, M. S. A.; Saad, E. A.

    1997-08-01

    A simple dosimeter is described for measuring gamma-ray doses useful for insect sterilization, seed-sprouting inhibition and food shelf-life extensions. The red aqueous solution of cyanocobalamin (B 12) before irradiation, assumes a stable yellow color when irradiated. It shows a linear response of absorbance decrease with the dose over the range of 0.1-2.0 kGy when the concentration of cyanocobalamin is equal 0.09 mM. The radiation-induced color is analyzed spectrophotometrically at the maximum absorption band (361 nm). The absorption spectra, dose response and post-irradiation stability of the dosimeter are discussed.

  4. Inverse modelling of radionuclide release rates using gamma dose rate observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Thomas; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas; von Haustein, Christoph; Thummerer, Severin; Wallner, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants such as the historical accident in Chernobyl 1986 or the more recent disaster in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have drastic impacts on the population and environment. Observations and dispersion modelling of the released radionuclides help to assess the regional impact of such nuclear accidents. Modelling the increase of regional radionuclide activity concentrations, which results from nuclear accidents, underlies a multiplicity of uncertainties. One of the most significant uncertainties is the estimation of the source term. That is, the time dependent quantification of the released spectrum of radionuclides during the course of the nuclear accident. The quantification of the source term may either remain uncertain (e.g. Chernobyl, Devell et al., 1995) or rely on estimates given by the operators of the nuclear power plant. Precise measurements are mostly missing due to practical limitations during the accident. The release rates of radionuclides at the accident site can be estimated using inverse modelling (Davoine and Bocquet, 2007). The accuracy of the method depends amongst others on the availability, reliability and the resolution in time and space of the used observations. Radionuclide activity concentrations are observed on a relatively sparse grid and the temporal resolution of available data may be low within the order of hours or a day. Gamma dose rates, on the other hand, are observed routinely on a much denser grid and higher temporal resolution and provide therefore a wider basis for inverse modelling (Saunier et al., 2013). We present a new inversion approach, which combines an atmospheric dispersion model and observations of radionuclide activity concentrations and gamma dose rates to obtain the source term of radionuclides. We use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; Stohl et al., 2005) to model the atmospheric transport of the released radionuclides. The

  5. Influence of seed extract of Syzygium Cumini (Jamun) on mice exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Venkatesh, Ponemone

    2005-03-01

    The radioprotective activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of jamun seeds (SCE) was studied in mice exposed to different doses of gamma radiation. The mice were injected with 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140 or 160 mg/kg body weight of SCE, before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, to select the optimum dose of radiation protection. The 80 mg/kg SCE was found to offer highest protection, therefore, further studies were carried out using this dose. The drug was more effective when administered through the intraperitoneal route at equimolar doses than the oral route. Since higher survival was observed for the i.p. route (50%), than the oral route (29.2%), all other studies were carried out by injecting SCE intraperitoneally. The mice treated with 80 mg/kg body weight SCE intraperitoneally before exposure to 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 Gy of gamma radiation showed reduction in the symptoms of radiation sickness and mortality at all exposure doses and caused a significant increase in the animal survival when compared with the concurrent double distilled water (DDW) + irradiation group. The SCE treatment protected mice against the gastrointestinal as well as bone marrow deaths and the DRF was found to be 1.24.

  6. Dosimetric and Clinical Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Radiation Dose in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Massager, Nicolas; Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Benmebarek, Nadir; Desmedt, Francoise; Devriendt, Daniel

    2011-11-15

    Objectives: We investigated variations in the distribution of radiation dose inside (dose inhomogeneity) and outside (dose falloff) the target volume during Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation of vestibular schwannoma (VS). We analyzed the relationship between some parameters of dose distribution and the clinical and radiological outcome of patients. Methods and Materials: Data from dose plans of 203 patients treated for a vestibular schwannoma by GK C using same prescription dose (12 Gy at the 50% isodose) were collected. Four different dosimetric indexes were defined and calculated retrospectively in all plannings on the basis of dose-volume histograms: Paddick conformity index (PI), gradient index (GI), homogeneity index (HI), and unit isocenter (UI). The different measures related to distribution of the radiation dose were compared with hearing and tumor outcome of 203 patients with clinical and radiological follow-up of minimum 2 years. Results: Mean, median, SD, and ranges of the four indexes of dose distribution analyzed were calculated; large variations were found between dose plans. We found a high correlation between the target volume and PI, GI, and UI. No significant association was found between the indexes of dose distribution calculated in this study and tumor control, tumor volume shrinkage, hearing worsening, loss of functional hearing, or complete hearing loss at last follow-up. Conclusions: Parameters of distribution of the radiation dose during GK radiosurgery for VS can be highly variable between dose plans. The tumor and hearing outcome of patients treated is not significantly related to these global indexes of dose distribution inside and around target volume. In GK radiosurgery for VS, the outcome seems more to be influenced by local radiation dose delivered to specific structures or volumes than by global dose gradients.

  7. Radiation Resistance Study of Semi-Insulating GaAs-Based Radiation Detectors to Extremely High Gamma Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly Anh, T.; Perd'ochová, A.; Nečas, V.; Pavlicová, V.

    2006-01-01

    In our previous paper [V. Nečas et al.: Nucl. Inst. and Meth. A 458 (2001) 348-351] we reported on the study on radiation stability of semi-insulating (SI) LEG GaAs detectors to doses of photons from 60Co up to 19.2 kGy. Later we presented a study, which covered radiation hardness to the same doses on the base of detector material itself, where strong dependence has been proved [T. Ly Anh et al., Proceedings of the XII th International Conference on Semiconducting and Insulating Materials (SIMC-XII-2002). Smolenice Castle, Slovakia (2002) 292-295 (0-7803-7418-5)]. In this paper we present both the key electrical and detection characteristics of SI GaAs radiation detectors prepared using substrates from four various supplies and two different types of contacts, which were exposed to several gamma doses from 60Co up to the integral dose of about 1 MGy. The obtained results show that SI LEG GaAs detectors provide good spectroscopic performances and even their slight improvement after low to middle gamma irradiation doses (3 -10 kGy) was observed. Further dose exposure caused the degradation of detection properties with an extreme and following improvement depending on detector material properties. SI GaAs detector still retains its working capabilities even after very high doses applied, up to 1 MGy.

  8. Determination of key radionuclides and parameters related to dose from the Columbia River pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These scoping calculations may include some radionuclides and pathways that were included in the Phase 1 Columbia River pathway dose evaluations, as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in future Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) modeling efforts. This scoping calculation (Calculation 009) examines the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in water, fish, and other aquatic biota. Addressed in these calculations are the contributions to effective dose from (1) external exposure to contaminated river water, ( 2) ingestion of contaminated drinking water, and (3) ingestion of contaminated resident Columbia River fish. Additional information on contamination of anadromous fish and waterfowl is provided.

  9. Aerosol and gamma background measurements at Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Christo; Arsov, Todor; Penev, Ilia; Nikolova, Nina; Kalapov, Ivo; Georgiev, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Trans boundary and local pollution, global climate changes and cosmic rays are the main areas of research performed at the regional Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) station Moussala BEO (2925 m a.s.l., 42°10'45'' N, 23°35'07'' E). Real time measurements and observations are performed in the field of atmospheric chemistry and physics. Complex information about the aerosol is obtained by using a threewavelength integrating Nephelometer for measuring the scattering and backscattering coefficients, a continuous light absorption photometer and a scanning mobile particle sizer. The system for measuring radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols allows us to monitor a large scale radioactive aerosol transport. The measurements of the gamma background and the gamma-rays spectrum in the air near Moussala peak are carried out in real time. The HYSPLIT back trajectory model is used to determine the origin of the data registered. DREAM code calculations [2] are used to forecast the air mass trajectory. The information obtained combined with a full set of corresponding meteorological parameters is transmitted via a high frequency radio telecommunication system to the Internet.

  10. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

  11. Measurements and Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose Quantities in the Vicinity of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Darois, E.L.; Keefer, D.G.; Plazeski, P.E.; Connell, J.

    2006-07-01

    As part of the decommissioning of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (MYAPCo) nuclear power plant, the spent nuclear fuel is being temporarily stored in a dry cask storage facility on a portion of the original licensed property. Each of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage casks hold approximately 25 spent fuel assemblies. Additional storage casks for the greater-than-Class C waste (GTCC) are also used. This waste is contained in 64 casks (60 SNF, 4 GTCC), each of which contain a substantial amount of concrete for shielding and structural purposes. The vertical concrete casks (VCCs) are typically separated by a distance of 4 and 6 feet. The storage casks are effective personnel radiation shields for most of the gamma and neutron radiation emitted from the fuel. However measurable gamma and neutron radiation levels are present in the vicinity of the casks. In order to establish a controlled area boundary around the facility such that a member of the public annual dose level of 0.25-mSv could be demonstrated, measurements of gamma and neutron dose equivalents were conducted. External gamma exposure rates were measured with a Pressurized Ion Chamber (PIC). Neutron absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates were measured with a Rossi-type tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Both gamma and neutron measurements were made at increasing distances from the facility as well as at a background location. The results of the measurements show that the distance to the 0.25-mSv per year boundary for 100% occupancy conditions varies from 321 feet to 441 feet from the geometric center of the storage pads, depending on the direction from the pad. For the TEPC neutron measurements, the average quality factor from the facilities was approximately 7.4. This quality factor compares well with the average quality factor of 7.6 that was measured during a calibration performed with a bare Cf-252 source. (authors)

  12. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  13. Emission rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose measurements in a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Tsiouri, V; Kovalets, I; Andronopoulos, S; Bartzis, J G

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient algorithm for estimating the unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere following a nuclear accident. The algorithm is based on assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model. Such models are used in the framework of nuclear emergency response systems (ERSs). It is shown that the algorithm is applicable in both deterministic and stochastic modes of operation of the dispersion model. The method is evaluated by computational simulations of a 3-d field experiment on atmospheric dispersion of ⁴¹Ar emitted routinely from a research reactor. Available measurements of fluence rate (photons flux) in air are assimilated in the Lagrangian dispersion model DIPCOT and the ⁴¹Ar emission rate is estimated. The statistical analysis shows that the model-calculated emission rates agree well with the real ones. In addition the model-predicted fluence rates at the locations of the sensors, which were not used in the data assimilation procedure are in better agreement with the measurements. The first evaluation results of the method presented in this study show that the method performs satisfactorily and therefore it is applicable in nuclear ERSs provided that more comprehensive validation studies will be performed.

  14. Sequential changes in bone marrow architecture during continuous low dose gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Chubb, G.T.; Tolle, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    Beagles continuously exposed to low daily doses (10 R) of whole-body 60Co gamma-radiation are prone to develop either early occurring aplastic anemia or late occurring myeloproliferative disorders (Seed et al., 1977). In this study, we have examined by a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy the sequential changes in the morphology of biopsied rib bone marrow of continuously irradiated dogs that developed either aplastic anemia, myelofibrosis, or myelogenous leukemia. Characteristic modification of key elements of marrow architecture have been observed during preclinical and clinical phases of these hemopathological conditions. The more prominent of these changes include the following. (i) In developing aplastic anemia: severe vascular sinus and parenchymal cord compression, and focally degenerate endosteal surfaces. (ii) In developing myelofibrosis: hyperplasia of endosteal and reticular stomal elements. (iii) In developing leukemia: hypertrophy of reticular and endothelial elements in the initial restructuring of the stromal matrix and the subsequent aberrant hemopoietic repopulation of the initially depleted stromal matrix. These architectural changes during preclinical phases appear to be related to the pathological progression to each of the radiation-induced hemopathological end points.

  15. Clinical improvement in feline herpesvirus 1 infected cats by oral low dose of interleukin-12 plus interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, Filomena; Cantiello, Antonietta; Granato, Giovanna Elvira; Navas, Luigi; Diffidenti, Carmine; De Martino, Luisa; Maharajan, Veeramani; Olivieri, Fabio; Pagnini, Ugo; Iovane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) is a widespread cat pathogen inducing rhinitis, conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. To alleviate acute FHV-1-induced disease, antiviral agents are used often with antibiotics. But sometimes, these treatments, as well as conventional doses of cytokines have moderate efficacy and/or collateral effects. Herein we have investigated the effects of low dose interleukin (IL)-12 plus interferon (IFN)-gamma, prepared by Sequential Kinetic Activated (SKA), on the treatment of FHV-1 infection. Twenty-five, unvaccinated FHV-1-positive cats were recruited into a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Fifteen cats were treated for 6 months with oral low doses of SKA IL-12 plus IFN-gamma and 10 cats were treated with placebo. At 1, 6 and 12 months (follow-up) after the beginning of treatment, clinical assessment, PCR assay and blood count were carried out. At follow-up, in treated group, we observed significant (p<0.05) improvements in clinical signs and PCR became negative in 12/15 cats (80%). In placebo, 10/10 cats were PCR-positive, with improvements (30%) or worsening (70%) in clinical signs. Blood values were normal in both groups. Our results show that the low dose therapy, based on activated solutions of IL-12 plus IFN-gamma, represents a novel approach to treat FHV-1 infection in cats.

  16. A paracrine signal mediates the cell transformation response to low dose gamma radiation in JB6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Siegel, Robert W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Lei, Xingye C.; Colburn, Nancy H.

    2005-05-01

    Radiation at low doses (? 50 cGy) can enhance or reduce tumor incidence in the mouse skin multistage model of carcinogenesis, depending on the timing of radiation exposure relative to chemical initiator. Here we have used JB6 mouse epidermal cells, an in vitro model of late stage tumor promotion, to evaluate the effects of low dose gamma radiation on cell transformation response. JB6 cells were isolated from the DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK) deficient Balb/c mouse that exhibits an unusually sensitive mammary tumor response to ionizing radiation. Exposure of JB6 cells to low dose (2-20 cGy) gamma radiation increased cell transformation response in a dose- and cell density-dependent fashion. JB6 cells were transfected with a membrane targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP-membrane) and used as bystander cells in a co-culture model. Co-culture of 10 cGy irradiated JB6 cells with na?ve EYFP-membrane cells resulted in a significant increase in EYFP-expressing colonies, relative to co-cultures of sham exposed P+ cells/na?ve EYFP-membrane cells. In contrast, low dose gamma radiation (20 cGy) reduced tumor promoter (epidermal growth factor; 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate)-induced transformation response and cell survival in a clonogenic assay to a comparable extent (40%). Our results demonstrate different selective pressures depending on whether low dose radiation modulated the cell transformation response of irradiated or bystander cells, or whether irradiation occurred in conjunction with tumor promoter treatment. The co-culture system developed here is a promising model to define positive and negative selective pressures induced by low dose radiation in a DNA damage repair deficient context that are relevant to carcinogenesis responses.

  17. Equivalence of cell survival data for radiation dose and thermal dose in ablative treatments: analysis applied to essential tremor thalamotomy by focused ultrasound and gamma knife.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, D; Lee, M; Ter Haar, G; Sela, B; Eames, M; Snell, J; Kassell, N; Sheehan, J; Larner, J M; Aubry, J-F

    2017-01-31

    Thermal dose and absorbed radiation dose have historically been difficult to compare because different biological mechanisms are at work. Thermal dose denatures proteins and the radiation dose causes DNA damage in order to achieve ablation. The purpose of this paper is to use the proportion of cell survival as a potential common unit by which to measure the biological effect of each procedure. Survival curves for both thermal and radiation doses have been extracted from previously published data for three different cell types. Fits of these curves were used to convert both thermal and radiation dose into the same quantified biological effect: fraction of surviving cells. They have also been used to generate and compare survival profiles from the only indication for which clinical data are available for both focused ultrasound (FUS) thermal ablation and radiation ablation: essential tremor thalamotomy. All cell types could be fitted with coefficients of determination greater than 0.992. As an illustration, survival profiles of clinical thalamotomies performed by radiosurgery and FUS are plotted on a same graph for the same metric: fraction of surviving cells. FUS and Gamma Knife have the potential to be used in combination to deliver a more effective treatment (for example, FUS may be used to debulk the main tumour mass, and radiation to treat the surrounding tumour bed). In this case, a model which compares thermal and radiation treatments is valuable in order to adjust the dose between the two.

  18. Measurements of environmental radiation exposure dose rates at selected sites in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, W C; Penna-Franca, E; Ribeiro, C C; Nogueira, A R; Londres, H; Oliveira, A E

    1981-12-01

    Two types of portable instruments were developed by the former Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to characterize external gamma radiation fields and to estimate individual exposure dose rates from major natural or fission radionuclides distributed in the soil: a pressurized ionization chamber and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer. The two instruments were used to measure environmental radiation exposure rates at three distinct geological areas of Brazil: - in the towns of Guarapari and Meaípe located on the monazite sand belt, ES. - on the vicinities of the uranium mine of Poços de Caldas, MG. - around the site of the Brazilian first nuclear power plant, in Angra dos Reis, RJ. The radiometric survey demonstrated once more the usefulness and versatility of the two instruments used. The measurements around the nuclear installations of Poços de Caldas and Angra dos Reis, allowed a rapid assessment of the local radiation background and its variability, as well as the selection of stations for the routine monitoring program. Radioactive anomalies were detected and characterized previously to the start of plant operations. The survey in Guarapari and Meaípe confirmed the results obtained by Roser and Cullen in 1958 and 1962, except on sites where considerable changes took place since then. The spectrometric measurements gave estimations of the relative proportion of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in the ground and also indications on the homogeneity of their distribution in the soil.

  19. Influence of terrestrial radionuclides on environmental gamma exposure in a uranium deposit in Paraíba, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo Dos Santos Júnior, José; Dos Santos Amaral, Romilton; Simões Cezar Menezes, Rômulo; Reinaldo Estevez Álvarez, Juan; Marques do Nascimento Santos, Josineide; Herrero Fernández, Zahily; Dias Bezerra, Jairo; Antônio da Silva, Alberto; Francys Rodrigues Damascena, Kennedy; de Almeida Maciel Neto, José

    2017-03-22

    One of the main natural uranium deposits in Brazil is located in the municipality of Espinharas, in the State of Paraíba. This area may present high levels of natural radioactivity due to the presence of these radionuclides. Since this is a populated area, there is need for a radioecological dosimetry assessment to investigate the possible risks to the population. Based on this problem, the objective of this study was to estimate the environmental effective dose outdoors in inhabited areas influenced by the uranium deposit, using the specific activities of equivalent uranium, equivalent thorium and (40)K and conversion factors. The environmental assessment was carried using gamma spectroscopy in sixty-two points within the municipality, with a high-resolution gamma spectrometer with HPGe semiconductor detector and Be window. The results obtained ranged from 0.01 to 19.11 mSv y(-1), with an average of 2.64 mSv y(-1). These levels are, on average, 23 times higher than UNSCEAR reference levels and up to 273 times the reference value of the earth's crust for primordial radionuclides. Therefore, given the high radioactivity levels found, we conclude that there is need for further investigation to evaluate the levels of radioactivity in indoor environments, which will reflect more closely the risks of the local population.

  20. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  1. A guide to environmental monitoring data, 1945--1972: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.E.; Bates, D.J.; Mart, E.I.; Hanf, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a guide to the work accomplished by the Environmental Monitoring Data Task, which is one of the tasks in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task was to recover, evaluate, process, and/or reconstruct the environmental monitoring data for the period 1945--1972. The period of time for which environmental monitoring data were sought was determined by the start-up and shut-down dates of the Hanford facilities that emitted the majority of radionuclides to the two major pathways: air and the Columbia River. Radionuclide emissions to the air were mainly the result of the operation of the chemical separations plants from 1944--1972 (Heeb 1994). Radionuclide emissions to the Columbia River were mainly the result of the operation of the single-pass production reactors from 1944--1971 (Heeb and Bates 1994). Therefore, the historical environmental monitoring data sought were for the period 1945--1972. Within the period of 1945--1972, specific periods of interest to the HEDR Project vary depending on the pathway. For example, 1945--1951 was the peak period for radionuclide emissions to the air and hence vegetation uptake of radionuclides, while 1956--1965 was the peak period for radionuclide emissions to the Columbia River and hence fish uptake of radionuclides. However, adequate historical data were not always available for the periods of interest. In the case of vegetation measurements, conversion and correction factors had to be developed to convert the historical measurements to modern standard measurements. Table S.1 lists the reports that explain these conversion and correction factors. In the case of Columbia River fish and waterfowl, bioconcentration factors were developed for use in any year where the river pathway data are insufficient.

  2. Low doses of gamma-irradiation induce an early bystander effect in zebrafish cells which is sufficient to radioprotect cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term "bystander effect" is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01-0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors.

  3. Radionuclide releases to the atmosphere from Hanford Operations, 1944--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. The first step in determining dose is to estimate the amount and timing of radionuclide releases to air and water. This report provides the air release information.

  4. Microbial decontamination by low dose gamma irradiation and its impact on the physico-chemical quality of peppermint (Mentha piperita)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machhour, Hasna; El Hadrami, Ismail; Imziln, Boujamaa; Mouhib, Mohamed; Mahrouz, Mostafa

    2011-04-01

    Peppermint was inoculated with Escherichia coli and its decontamination was carried out by gamma irradiation at low irradiation doses (0.5, 1.0 and 2.66 kGy). The efficiency of this decontamination method was evaluated and its impact on the quality parameters of peppermint, such as the color and ash content, as well as the effect on fingerprint components such as phenols and essential oils, was studied. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) were used to characterize essential oils and phenolic compounds, respectively. The results indicated a complete decontamination of peppermint after the low dose gamma irradiation without a significant loss in quality attributes.

  5. A reform in the helium purification system of the HTR-10: gamma dose rate measurement and suggestions for decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xie; Hong Li; Jianzhu Cao; Suyuan Yu; Liguo Zhang; Wenqian Li; Sheng Fang

    2013-07-01

    A reform will be implemented in the helium purification system of the 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor (HTR-10) in China. The measurement of the gamma dose rates of facilities, including valves, pipes, dust filter, etc., in the purification system of the HTR-10, has been performed. The results indicated that most radiation nuclides are concentrated in the dust filter and facilities at the entrance of the helium purification system upstream of the dust filter. Other facilities have the same gamma dose rate level as the background. Based on the previous study and experiences in AVR, the measurement results can be understood that the radioactive dust carried by the helium gas was filtered by the dust filter. It provides important insights for the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities in the primary loop, especially in the helium purification system of the HTR-10 as well as the High Temperature Reactor-Pebble bed Modules (HTR-PM). (authors)

  6. Effects of bone- and air-tissue inhomogeneities on the dose distributions of the Leksell Gamma Knife calculated with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Rojas, E Leticia; Lallena, Antonio M

    2005-12-07

    Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE (version 2003) is applied to calculate Leksell Gamma Knife dose distributions for heterogeneous phantoms. The usual spherical water phantom is modified with a spherical bone shell simulating the skull and an air-filled cube simulating the frontal or maxillary sinuses. Different simulations of the 201 source configuration of the Gamma Knife have been carried out with a simplified model of the geometry of the source channel of the Gamma Knife recently tested for both single source and multisource configurations. The dose distributions determined for heterogeneous phantoms including the bone- and/or air-tissue interfaces show non-negligible differences with respect to those calculated for a homogeneous one, mainly when the Gamma Knife isocentre approaches the separation surfaces. Our findings confirm an important underdosage (approximately 10%) nearby the air-tissue interface, in accordance with previous results obtained with the PENELOPE code with a procedure different from ours. On the other hand, the presence of the spherical shell simulating the skull produces a few per cent underdosage at the isocentre wherever it is situated.

  7. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    The perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  8. Effects of filters and wedges on skin sparing and gamma/neutron dose ratios in neutron teletherapy.

    PubMed

    Smathers, J; Graves, R; Almond, P; Otte, V; Grant, W

    1980-01-01

    The effects of skin sparing and the gamma/neutron dose ratios in the clinical situations presently in use at the TAMVEC neutron teletherapy facility are not appreciably affected by the presence of filters and/or wedges. It is also shown that if skin sparing is lost due to close proximity of a hydrogenous scattering source, it can be restored by the use of thin lead filters.

  9. SU-E-T-679: Retrospective Analysis of the Sensitivity of Planar Dose Measurements To Gamma Analysis Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Elguindi, S; Ezzell, G; Gagneur, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IMRT QA using planar dose measurements is still a widely used method for checking the accuracy of treatment plans. A pass/fail judgment is made using gamma analysis based on a single endpoint. Using more stringent criteria is a way to increase the sensitivity to planning and delivery errors. Before such implementation, it is necessary to understand how the sensitivity to different gamma criteria settings affects gamma passing rates (GPR). Methods: 752 IMRT QA measurements were re-analyzed with varying distance to agreement (DTA) and dose difference (DD) percentages using a Matlab program. Other quantifying information such as the mean dose difference in the treatment target (defined as points that are greater than 80% of maximal dose) were stored in a relational database for retrospective analysis. Results: The average and standard deviation of GPR (%) fell from 99.84 ± (0.43) to 89.61 ± (6.08) when restricting DD from 5 − 1% respectively, as compared to a drop from 99.15 ± (1.19) to 95.00 ± (4.43), when restricting the DTA from 5 − 1 mm respectively. The mean dose difference (%) in the treatment target between measured and calculated dose was −1.96 ± (0. 83), −0.09 ± (0.98), and 1.44 ± (0. 86) for each of our institution’s three matched linear accelerators (LINAC 1, 2, and 3 respectively). For plans that are approximately 2.7 sigma below the mean GPR, an average of 78.4% of those plans were measured on LINAC 1 or 3, while only 48% of the total plans were run on those machines. Conclusion: The data demonstrates that when restricting gamma criterion, such as the DD, the greatest indicator of reduced GPR in our institution is which matched LINAC the plan was measured on. While small, these differences manifest themselves to levels comparable to other treatment related differences and possibly confound the gamma analysis.

  10. Double strand breaks induced by low doses of {gamma} rays or heavy ions: Quantitation in nonradioactive human DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1996-07-15

    We have developed a method of quantitating low frequencies (0-30 sites/10{sup 9} base pairs) of double strand breaks in {approximately}1 {mu}g of nonradioactive human DNA. Unirradiated or irradiated DNA is digested with the restriction endonuclease NotI, producing cleavage fragments that include a major group centered at {approximately}1.2-1.3 Mbp. The DNA molecules are separated as a function of size by transverse alternating field electrophoresis. The frequency of double strand breaks is computed directly from the decrease in number average molecular length induced in the 1.2 to 1.3-Mbp cleavage fragment group by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} or Fe{sup 26+} (1.1 GeV/nucleon) irradiation vs the corresponding unirradiated DNA samples. The double strand break frequency can be quantitated easily in the dose range of 0-10 cGy of {gamma} rays. The frequency of breaks per unit dose calculated for {gamma} irradiation of DNA in human cells ({approximately}4.6 double strand breaks/10{sup 9} bp/Gy) who used methods requiring higher doses. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  11. TOXICOKINETICS OF THE FLAME RETARDANT HEXABROMOCYCLODODECANE GAMMA: EFFECT OF DOSE, TIMING, ROUTE, REPEATED EXPOSURE AND METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,2,5,6,9,10-Hexabromocyc1ododecane-gamma (y-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (B) and gamma (y) comprise the commercial mixture. D...

  12. Toxicokinetics of the Flame Retardant Hexabromocyclododecane Gamma: Effect of Dose, Timing, Route, Repeated Exposure and Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1,2,5,6,9,10-Hexabromocyclododecane-gamma ('-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (ß) and gamma (') comprise the commercial mixture. Despite the '-diaster...

  13. Leakage correction estimate for electret ion chamber dielectric material used for long-term environmental gamma monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jones, David F; Paulus, L R

    2008-05-01

    The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality INL Oversight Program (DEQ-INL) operates an environmental gamma radiation detection network consisting of a series of high-pressure ion chambers to provide real-time ambient radiation measurements and a series of passive environmental electret ion chambers to increase coverage area and measure cumulative dose over a calendar quarter. DEQ-INL has identified a consistent over-response of approximately 40% by the electret ion chambers with respect to co-located high-pressure ion chambers since 1998. DEQ-INL conducted a series of three investigations to quantify this over-response. The over-response is likely attributable to a number of factors, including inherent voltage loss by the electret material not due to ionization within the chamber. One aspect of the investigation verified the manufacturer's calibration factor used to convert decrease in voltage to exposure. Additional investigations were performed that identified an average electret voltage loss of 0.2 V d(-1). When this voltage correction was applied to historical environmental data, electret ion chamber response was within 10% of the co-located high-pressure ion chamber response.

  14. Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Does Not Induce an Adaptive Response for Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L A; Serran, M L; Mantha, R R

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation is known to induce radioadaptive responses in cells in vitro as well as in mice in vivo. Low-dose radiation decreases the incidence and increases latency for spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in mice, potentially as a result of enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency or a reduction in genomic instability. In this study, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to examine dose response and potential radioadaptive response for cytogenetic damage and cell survival in C57BL/6 and BALB/c spleen cells exposed in vitro or in vivo to low-dose 60Co gamma radiation. The effects of genetic background, radiation dose and dose rate, sampling time and cell cycle were investigated with respect to dose response and radioadaptive response. In C57BL/6 mice, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) was observed for doses between 100 mGy and 2 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased radiosensitivity for MN induction compared to C57BL/6 mice. A 20 mGy dose had no effect on MN frequencies in splenocytes of either mouse strain, however, increased spleen weight and a reduced number of dead cells were noted in the C57BL/6 strain only. Multiple experimental parameters were investigated in radioadaptive response studies, including dose and dose rate of the priming dose (20 mGy at 0.5 mGy/min and 100 mGy at 10 mGy/min), time interval (4 and 24 h) between priming and challenge doses, cell cycle stage (resting or proliferating) at exposure and kinetics after the challenge dose. Radioadaptive responses were not observed for MN induction for either mouse strain under any of the experimental conditions investigated. In contrast, a synergistic response for radiation-induced micronuclei in C57BL/6 spleen was detected after in vivo 20 mGy irradiation. This increase in the percentage of cells with cytogenetic damage was associated with a reduction in the number of nonviable spleen cells, suggesting that low-dose

  15. Caffeine induces a second wave of apoptosis after low dose-rate gamma radiation of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Jirina; Mareková-Rezácová, Martina; Vokurková, Doris; Szkanderová, Sylva; Psutka, Jan

    2003-10-01

    Most cell lines that lack functional p53 protein are arrested in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle due to DNA damage. It was previously found that the human promyelocyte leukemia cells HL-60 (TP53 negative) that had been exposed to ionizing radiation at doses up to 10 Gy were arrested in the G(2) phase for a period of 24 h. The radioresistance of HL-60 cells that were exposed to low dose-rate gamma irradiation of 3.9 mGy/min, which resulted in a pronounced accumulation of the cells in the G(2) phase during the exposure period, increased compared with the radioresistance of cells that were exposed to a high dose-rate gamma irradiation of 0.6 Gy/min. The D(0) value (i.e. the radiation dose leading to 37% cell survival) for low dose-rate radiation was 3.7 Gy and for high dose-rate radiation 2.2 Gy. In this study, prevention of G(2) phase arrest by caffeine (2 mM) and irradiation of cells with low dose-rate irradiation in all phases of the cell cycle proved to cause radiosensitization (D(0)=2.2 Gy). The irradiation in the presence of caffeine resulted in a second wave of apoptosis on days 5-7 post-irradiation. Caffeine-induced apoptosis occurring later than day 7 post-irradiation is postulated to be a result of unscheduled DNA replication and cell cycle progress.

  16. Comparative toxicity and micronuclei formation in Tribolium castaneum, Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus oryzae exposed to high doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehrdad; Mozdarani, Hossein; Abd-Alla, Adly M M

    2015-07-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on mortality and micronucleus formation in Tribolium castaneum Herbst, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) genital cells were evaluated. Two groups of healthy and active adult insects 1-3 and 8-10 days old were irradiated with various doses (50-200 Gy) gamma ray. Seven days post-irradiation; mortality rates and micronucleus formation were assessed in genital cells of the irradiated insects. The results show that with increasing gamma doses, the mortality rate of each species increased and T. castaneum and S. oryzae showed the low and high sensitivity respectively. It was shown that the micronucleus appearance in the tested insects had correlation with amount and intensity of radiation doses. Moreover our results indicate different levels in the genotoxicity of gamma radiation among the insects' genital cells under study. The frequency of micronuclei in genital cells of 1-3 days old insects exposed to 50 and 200 Gy were 12.6 and 38.8 Mn/1000 cells in T. castaneum, 20.8 and 46.8 Mn/1000 cells in C. maculatus and 16.8 and 57.2 Mn/1000 cells in S. oryzae respectively. A high sensitivity of the genital cells to irradiation exposure was seen in S. oryzae correlated with its high mortality rate compared with the other two species. These results might be indicative of inflicting chromosomal damage expressed as micronucleus in high mortality rates observed in the pest population; an indication of genotoxic effects of radiation on the studied species.

  17. Parameters used in the environmental pathways and radiological dose modules (DESCARTES, CIDER, and CRD codes) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1994-05-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site during the period of 1944 to 1992. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  18. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  19. Study of bulk damage in high resistivity silicon detectors irradiated by high dose of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Li, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    High dose (> 200 Mrad) {gamma}-radiation induced displacement damage (or bulk damage) in high resistivity (6--10 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors has been studied. It has been found that detector bulk leakage current increases with {gamma} dose at a rate of 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 3}/Mrad. This introduction rate of bulk leakage current makes the introduction of generation centers by 210 Mrad of {gamma}-radiation comparable to that by 1 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} of neutron radiation. Significant carrier removal (or donor removal), about 100%, was found in detectors irradiated to 215 Mrad. Space charge sign inversion (SCSI) (or type inversion) was observed in detectors irradiated to {ge} 215 Mrad using transient current technique (TCT). As many as seven deep levels have been observed by current deep level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS). There was little or no annealing (or reverse annealing) for detectors irradiated to 215 Mrad. Some annealing for detectors irradiated to 500 Mrad have been observed.

  20. Effects of Low-Dose-Gamma Rays on the Immune System of Different Animal Models of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Noriko; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the beneficial or harmful effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on several diseases based on a search of the literature. The attenuation of autoimmune manifestations in animal disease models irradiated with low-dose γ-rays was previously reported by several research groups, whereas the exacerbation of allergic manifestations was described by others. Based on a detailed examination of the literature, we divided animal disease models into two groups: one group consisting of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), experimental encephalomyelitis (EAE), and systemic lupus erythematosus, the pathologies of which were attenuated by low-dose irradiation, and another group consisting of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, the pathologies of which were exacerbated by low-dose irradiation. The same biological indicators, such as cytokine levels and T-cell subpopulations, were examined in these studies. Low-dose irradiation reduced inter-feron (IFN)-gamma (γ) and interleukin (IL)-6 levels and increased IL-5 levels and the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in almost all immunological disease cases examined. Variations in these biological indicators were attributed to the attenuation or exacerbation of the disease’s manifestation. We concluded that autoimmune diseases caused by autoantibodies were attenuated by low-dose irradiation, whereas diseases caused by antibodies against external antigens, such as atopic dermatitis, were exacerbated. PMID:25249835

  1. Absolute calibration of the Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ and delivered dose verification using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbeck, Amaury E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Garcia, Tristan E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Cuttat, Marguerite; Jenny, Catherine

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} (LGK) is a radiotherapy beam machine whose features are not compliant with the international calibration protocols for radiotherapy. In this scope, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital decided to conceive a new LKG dose calibration method and to compare it with the currently used one. Furthermore, the accuracy of the dose delivered by the LGK machine was checked using an “end-to-end” test. This study also aims to compare doses delivered by the two latest software versions of the Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The dosimetric method chosen is the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of alanine. Dose rate (calibration) verification was done without TPS using a spherical phantom. Absolute calibration was done with factors calculated by Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-X). For “end-to-end” test, irradiations in an anthropomorphic head phantom, close to real treatment conditions, are done using the TPS in order to verify the delivered dose. Results: The comparison of the currently used calibration method with the new one revealed a deviation of +0.8% between the dose rates measured by ion chamber and EPR/alanine. For simple fields configuration (less than 16 mm diameter), the “end-to-end” tests showed out average deviations of −1.7% and −0.9% between the measured dose and the calculated dose by Gammaplan v9 and v10, respectively. Conclusions: This paper shows there is a good agreement between the new calibration method and the currently used one. There is also a good agreement between the calculated and delivered doses especially for Gammaplan v10.

  2. FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993.

  3. FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993.

  4. Evaluation of environmental dose at JCO using luminescence from quartz stimulated by blue light.

    PubMed

    Hong, D G; Galloway, R B; Takano, M; Hashimoto, T

    2001-01-01

    The environmental dose due to the recent nuclear accident at JCO, Japan, was estimated using luminescence optically stimulated from unheated quartz. Two methods originally developed for dating analysis, the single aliquot additive dose method and the single aliquot regeneration added dose method, were employed to confirm the dose rate. Consistent results were obtained from both methods and from thermoluminescence measurements. Although the dose rate values had lower precision than can be obtained from heated materials, it is suggested that luminescence from sedimentary quartz can usefully be employed in retrosepective dosimetry.

  5. A dosimetric evaluation of tissue equivalent phantom prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin for absorbed dose imaging in Gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Rodrigues, O., Jr.; Cervantes, J. H.; Rabbani, S. R.; Campos, L. L.

    2009-05-01

    Tissue equivalent gel phantoms have been widely studied in radiation therapy for both relative and reference dosimetry. A Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) spherical phantom was evaluated by means of magnetic resonance image method (MRI) to measure absorbed dose distribution resulted from gamma knife irradiation. The FXG phantom was prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue equivalent material, of easy preparation, can be used to mold phantoms into different shapes and volumes, is commercially available and inexpensive. The results show that the Fricke gel phantom prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin satisfy the requirements to be used for the quality control in stereotactic radiosurgery using Gamma Knife technique and may constitute one more option of dosimeter in radiation therapy applications.

  6. Measurements of activation induced by environmental neutrons using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez Canet, M J; Hult, M; Köhler, M; Johnston, P N

    2000-03-01

    The flux of environmental neutrons is being studied by activation of metal discs of selected elements. Near the earth's surface the total neutron flux is in the order of 10(-2) cm(-2)s(-1), which gives induced activities of a few mBq in the discs. Initial results from this technique, involving activation at ground level for several materials (W, Au, Ta, In, Re, Sm, Dy and Mn) and ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory located at 500 m.w.e., are presented. Diffusion of environmental neutrons in water is also measured by activation of gold at different depths.

  7. Cause of death and neoplasia in mice continuously exposed to very low dose rates of gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, I B; Tanaka, S; Ichinohe, K; Matsushita, S; Matsumoto, T; Otsu, H; Oghiso, Y; Sato, F

    2007-04-01

    Four thousand 8-week-old SPF B6C3F1 mice (2000 of each sex) were divided into four groups, one nonirradiated (control) and three irradiated. The irradiated groups were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays at dose rates of 21, 1.1 and 0.05 mGy day(-1) for approximately 400 days with total doses equivalent to 8000, 400 and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until natural death, and pathological examination was performed to determine the cause of death. Neoplasms accounted for >86.7% of all deaths. Compared to the nonirradiated controls, the frequency of myeloid leukemia in males, soft tissue neoplasms and malignant granulosa cell tumors in females, and hemangiosarcoma in both sexes exposed to 21 mGy day(-1) were significantly increased. The number of multiple primary neoplasms per mouse was significantly increased in mice irradiated at 21 mGy day(-1). Significant increases in body weights were observed from 32 to 60 weeks of age in males and females exposed to 1.1 mGy day(-1) and 21 mGy day(-1), respectively. Our results suggest that life shortening (Tanaka et al., Radiat. Res. 160, 376-379, 2003) in mice continuously exposed to low-dose-rate gamma rays is due to early death from a variety of neoplasms and not from increased incidence of specific neoplasms.

  8. Cancer Dose-Response Assessment for Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Application to Environmental Mixtures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report updates the cancer dose-response assessment for PCBs and shows how information on toxicity, disposition, and environmental processes can be considered together to evaluate health risks from PCB mixtures in the environment.

  9. Connecting the Dots: Linking Environmental Justice Indicators to Daily Dose Model Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongtai; Barzyk, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Many different quantitative techniques have been developed to either assess Environmental Justice (EJ) issues or estimate exposure and dose for risk assessment. However, very few approaches have been applied to link EJ factors to exposure dose estimate and identify potential impacts of EJ factors on dose-related variables. The purpose of this study is to identify quantitative approaches that incorporate conventional risk assessment (RA) dose modeling and cumulative risk assessment (CRA) considerations of disproportionate environmental exposure. We apply the Average Daily Dose (ADD) model, which has been commonly used in RA, to better understand impacts of EJ indicators upon exposure dose estimates and dose-related variables, termed the Environmental-Justice-Average-Daily-Dose (EJ-ADD) approach. On the U.S. nationwide census tract-level, we defined and quantified two EJ indicators (poverty and race/ethnicity) using an EJ scoring method to examine their relation to census tract-level multi-chemical exposure dose estimates. Pollutant doses for each tract were calculated using the ADD model, and EJ scores were assigned to each tract based on poverty- or race-related population percentages. Single- and multiple-chemical ADD values were matched to the tract-level EJ scores to analyze disproportionate dose relationships and contributing EJ factors. We found that when both EJ indicators were examined simultaneously, ADD for all pollutants generally increased with larger EJ scores. To demonstrate the utility of using EJ-ADD on the local scale, we approximated ADD levels of lead via soil/dust ingestion for simulated communities with different EJ-related scenarios. The local-level simulation indicates a substantial difference in exposure-dose levels between wealthy and EJ communities. The application of the EJ-ADD approach can link EJ factors to exposure dose estimate and identify potential EJ impacts on dose-related variables. PMID:28036053

  10. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 002

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  11. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 003

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  12. Low Doses of Gamma-Irradiation Induce an Early Bystander Effect in Zebrafish Cells Which Is Sufficient to Radioprotect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term “bystander effect” is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01–0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors. PMID:24667817

  13. Mechanism of Action for Anti-radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-dose Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  14. Calculation of gamma radiation dose rate and radon concentration due to granites used as building materials in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, A

    2013-07-01

    Natural radioactivity concentrations in granite building materials that are commonly used in Iran have been surveyed by using a gamma-ray spectrometry system, using a high-purity germanium detector. Health hazards from gamma radiation doses due to granite and radon concentration have been calculated. The dose rate of exposure from granite building materials on humans is obtained as a result of an external exposure from gamma-emitting radionuclides in the granites. Another mode of exposure is from the inhalation of the decay products of (222)Ra and (220)Ra. The average concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K were in the ranges of 6.5-172.2, 3.8-94.2 and 556.9-1539.2 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radon exhalation rates have also been studied and values were in the range of 0.32 ± 0.01 to 7.86 ± 1.65 Bq m(-2) h(-1). For two models of standard living rooms (5.0 m × 4.0 m area; 2.8 m), the radon concentration (Ci) and the absorbed dose (D) rates were calculated and the results were found to be 10.64-29.32 Bq m(-3), 3.84-68.02 nGy h(-1) and 0.02-0.33 mSv y(-1) for Model 1, 10.07-15.38 Bq m(-3) and 2.29-39.99 nGy h(-1) for Model 2, respectively. According to our estimations, mechanical ventilation systems (λν = 0.5 h(-1)) in a room all granite samples would produce radon concentration <100 Bq m(-3).

  15. Influence of germ cells upon Sertoli cells during continuous low-dose rate gamma-irradiation of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Pinon-Lataillade, G; Vélez de la Calle, J F; Viguier-Martinez, M C; Garnier, D H; Folliot, R; Maas, J; Jégou, B

    1988-07-01

    The effects of continuous gamma-irradiation of adult rats at two low-dose rates (7 cGy and 12 cGy/day; up to a total dose of 9.1 Gy and 10.69 Gy 60Co gamma-ray, respectively) were investigated. Over a period of 3-131 days of irradiation, groups of experimental and control animals were killed. Body weight, testis, epididymis, prostate and seminal vesicle weights, the number of germ cells and Sertoli cells, tubular ultrastructure, epididymal and testicular levels of biologically active androgen-binding protein (ABP), and the plasma concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were monitored. Irradiation had no effect on body weight, whereas testicular and epididymal weight began to decrease following 35 and 50 days of irradiation at 7 and 12 cGy, respectively. At 7 cGy the target cells of the gamma-rays were essentially A spermatogonia, whereas at 12 cGy A spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes were primarily affected. This resulted in a progressive and sequential dose-related reduction in the number of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids and late spermatids (LS). Under both irradiation procedures the Sertoli cell number remained unchanged whereas partial (7 cGy) or no change (12 cGy) was seen at the Leydig cell level. Whatever the irradiation protocol, from the time LS numbers decreased, vacuolisation of the Sertoli cell cytoplasm progressively occurred, followed by thickening and folding of the peritubular tissue. Moreover, in parallel to the drop in the number of these germ cell types, ABP production fell whereas FSH levels rose. A highly significant positive correlation was found between LS numbers and these Sertoli cell parameters. This study supports our previous concept of a control of certain important aspects of Sertoli cell function by late spermatids in the adult rat.

  16. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  17. A Monte Carlo study of the relationship between the time structures of prompt gammas and the in-vivo radiation dose in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Min, Chul Hee; Shin, Jae-Ik; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Lee, Se Byeong

    2015-07-01

    For in-vivo range verification in proton therapy, attempts have been made to measure the spatial distribution of the prompt gammas generated by the proton-induced interactions and to determine the proton dose distribution. However, the high energies of prompt gammas and background gammas are still problematic in measuring the distribution. In this study, we suggested a new method for determining the in-vivo range by utilizing the time structure of the prompt gammas formed during the rotation of a range modulation wheel (RMW) in passive scattering proton therapy. To validate the Monte Carlo code simulating the proton beam nozzle, we compared the axial percent depth doses (PDDs) with the measured PDDs for varying beam range from 4.73 to 24.01 cm. Also, we assessed the relationship between the proton dose rate and the time structure of the prompt gammas in a water phantom. The results of the PDD showed agreement within relative errors of 1.1% in the distal range and 2.9% in the modulation width. The average dose difference in the modulation was assessed as less than 1.3% by comparison with the measurements. The time structure of prompt gammas was well-matched, within 0.39 ms, with the proton dose rate, and this enabled an accurate prediction of the in-vivo range.

  18. Long-term health effects of persistent exposure to low-dose lr192 gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Li; Xiao, Zhifang; Liu, Zenghui; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Hui; Su, Lei; Xiao, Yang

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of persistent low-dose iridium-192 (Ir192) exposure on immunological function, chromosome aberration and the telomerase activity of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs), in order to increase clinical knowledge of the late effects of persistent low-dose Ir192 gamma-ray exposure. Patients (n=54) accidentally exposed to persistent low-dose Ir192 were included in this 10-year follow-up study. Clinical symptoms, peripheral blood, bone marrow, cellular and humoral immune status, chromosome aberrations and the telomerase activity of BMNCs were analyzed in this study. Exposure to low-dose Ir192 resulted in different degrees of clinical symptoms and significantly lowered complement C3 and C4 levels, CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell levels, the lymphocyte transformation rate and the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. It also led to increases in peripheral blood and bone marrow abnormality rates, chromosome aberration rate and BMNC telomerase activity. Exposure to persistent low-dose Ir192 radiation resulted in different degrees of immune dysfunction, and abnormalities of blood cells and bone marrow, which recovered within 1-3 years. Chromosome aberrations were observed to take 5-10 years to recover. However, it would take >10 years for the telomerase activity of BMNCs to be reduced to normal levels. A prolonged follow-up time is required in order to monitor clonal proliferative diseases such as leukemia.

  19. Long-term health effects of persistent exposure to low-dose lr192 gamma-rays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Li; Xiao, Zhifang; Liu, Zenghui; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Hui; Su, Lei; Xiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of persistent low-dose iridium-192 (Ir192) exposure on immunological function, chromosome aberration and the telomerase activity of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs), in order to increase clinical knowledge of the late effects of persistent low-dose Ir192 gamma-ray exposure. Patients (n=54) accidentally exposed to persistent low-dose Ir192 were included in this 10-year follow-up study. Clinical symptoms, peripheral blood, bone marrow, cellular and humoral immune status, chromosome aberrations and the telomerase activity of BMNCs were analyzed in this study. Exposure to low-dose Ir192 resulted in different degrees of clinical symptoms and significantly lowered complement C3 and C4 levels, CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell levels, the lymphocyte transformation rate and the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. It also led to increases in peripheral blood and bone marrow abnormality rates, chromosome aberration rate and BMNC telomerase activity. Exposure to persistent low-dose Ir192 radiation resulted in different degrees of immune dysfunction, and abnormalities of blood cells and bone marrow, which recovered within 1–3 years. Chromosome aberrations were observed to take 5–10 years to recover. However, it would take >10 years for the telomerase activity of BMNCs to be reduced to normal levels. A prolonged follow-up time is required in order to monitor clonal proliferative diseases such as leukemia. PMID:27698774

  20. Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

  1. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  2. Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

  3. Protection by pantothenol and beta-carotene against liver damage produced by low-dose gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Slyshenkov, V S; Omelyanchik, S N; Moiseenok, A G; Petushok, N E; Wojtczak, L

    1999-01-01

    Rats were exposed to a total dose of 0.75 Gy of gamma radiation from a 60Co source, receiving three doses of 0.25 Gy at weekly intervals. During two days before each irradiation, the animals received daily intragastric doses of 26 mg pantothenol or 15 mg beta-carotene per kg body mass. The animals were killed after the third irradiation session, and their blood and livers were analyzed. As found previously (Slyshenkov, V.S., Omelyanchik, S.N., Moiseenok, A.G., Trebukhina, R.V. & Wojtczak, L. (1998) Free Radical Biol. Med. 24, 894-899), in livers of animals not supplied with either pantothenol or beta-carotene and killed one hour after the irradiation, a large accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, as conjugated dienes, ketotrienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, could be observed. The contents of CoA, pantothenic acid, total phospholipids, total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio were considerably decreased, whereas the NAD/NADH ratio was increased. All these effects were alleviated in animals supplied with beta-carotene and were completely abolished in animals supplied with pantothenol. In the present paper, we extended our observations of irradiation effects over a period of up to 7 days after the last irradiation session. We found that most of these changes, with the exception of GSH/GSSG ratio, disappeared spontaneously, whereas supplementation with beta-carotene shortened the time required for the normalization of biochemical parameters. In addition, we found that the activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and NADP-dependent malate (decarboxylating) dehydrogenase ('malic enzyme') in liver were also significantly decreased one hour after irradiation but returned to the normal level within 7 days. Little or no decrease in these activities, already 1 h after the irradiation, could be seen in animals supplemented with either beta-carotene or pantothenol. It is concluded that pantothenol is an excellent radioprotective

  4. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  5. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  6. State-of-the-art gamma-ray spectroscopy and its environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, N.A.; Reeves, J.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    There are many environmental applications for gamma-ray spectrometers having backgrounds more than two orders of magnitude below standard systems. Large, high-resolution germanium ingots, which are very nearly free of radioactivity, are currently being produced. These ingots, when placed in an ultralow background system using super-clean materials, multilayered cosmic ray anticoincidence, and passive shielding, provide very low background. The spectrometers provide an improved minimum detectable activity for environmental measurements. Minimum detectable activity coupled with high counting efficiencies and good peak-to-Compton ratios have made greater sample analysis throughout possible. The minimum detectible radioactivity in the sample is becoming more important as environmental concerns and regulations require more sensitive measurement of the radioactivity levels allowed in the work place and in the home.

  7. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Does Not Affect the Quality or Total Ascorbic Acid Concentration of "Sweetheart" Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis).

    PubMed

    Golding, John B; Blades, Barbara L; Satyan, Shashirekha; Spohr, Lorraine J; Harris, Anne; Jessup, Andrew J; Archer, John R; Davies, Justin B; Banos, Connie

    2015-08-26

    Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis, Sims, cultivar "Sweetheart") were subject to gamma irradiation at levels suitable for phytosanitary purposes (0, 150, 400 and 1000 Gy) then stored at 8 °C and assessed for fruit quality and total ascorbic acid concentration after one and fourteen days. Irradiation at any dose (≤1000 Gy) did not affect passionfruit quality (overall fruit quality, colour, firmness, fruit shrivel, stem condition, weight loss, total soluble solids level (TSS), titratable acidity (TA) level, TSS/TA ratio, juice pH and rot development), nor the total ascorbic acid concentration. The length of time in storage affected some fruit quality parameters and total ascorbic acid concentration, with longer storage periods resulting in lower quality fruit and lower total ascorbic acid concentration, irrespective of irradiation. There was no interaction between irradiation treatment and storage time, indicating that irradiation did not influence the effect of storage on passionfruit quality. The results showed that the application of 150, 400 and 1000 Gy gamma irradiation to "Sweetheart" purple passionfruit did not produce any deleterious effects on fruit quality or total ascorbic acid concentration during cold storage, thus supporting the use of low dose irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment against quarantine pests in purple passionfruit.

  8. Measurement of radon/thoron exhalation rates and gamma-ray dose rate in granite areas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G; Ishikawa, T; Hosoda, M; Sahoo, S K; Kavasi, N; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Uchida, S

    2012-11-01

    Radon and thoron exhalation rates and gamma-ray dose rate in different places in Hiroshima Prefecture were measured. Exhalation rates were measured using an accumulation chamber method. The radon exhalation rate was found to vary from 3 to 37 mBq m(-2) s(-1), while the thoron exhalation rate ranged from 40 to 3330 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The highest radon exhalation rate (37 mBq m(-2) s(-1)) and gamma-ray dose rate (92 nGy h(-1)) were found in the same city (Kure City). In Kure City, indoor radon and thoron concentrations were previously measured at nine selected houses using a radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). The indoor radon concentrations varied from 16 to 78 Bq m(-3), which was higher than the average value in Japan (15.5 Bq m(-3)). The indoor thoron concentration ranged from ND (not detected: below a detection limit of approximately 10 Bq m(-3)) to 314 Bq m(-3). The results suggest that radon exhalation rate from the ground is an influential factor for indoor radon concentration.

  9. [Reoxygenation of tumors of the uterine cervix during combined radiotherapy using low dose gamma-neutron irradiation with californium-252].

    PubMed

    Tacev, T; Rasovská, O; Strnad, V; Krystof, V; Prokes, B; Vacek, A

    1989-03-01

    A polarographic method was used to follow the changes in oxygenation of a tumour of uterus cervix after intracavital irradiation by 252Cf by a physical dose of 2 Gy, applied at the beginning of a therapeutic cycle of combined radiotherapy. The results reached are compared with the results of tumour oxygenation in the course of a conventional therapeutic procedure. It has become apparent that even after the irradiation of a tumour of uterus cervix by a small dose of gamma-neutron radiation with 252Cf there is, beginning with 2nd week of therapy, a significant reoxygenation of the tumour population. The changes of oxygenation after a conventional irradiation have been less marked and reached, in the 4th week of therapy, only marginally significant increase. Differences in reoxygenation of tumours of uterus cervix were confirmed by analysis of the oxygen test. The importance of tumour reoxygenation after the application of 252Cf source of radiation for facilitation of its regression in a combined treatment with Californium-252 and gamma irradiation is discussed.

  10. Dose-dependent interferon-gamma release in dairy calves experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Rienske A R; Barkema, Herman W; Wilson, Todd A; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Wolf, Robert; De Buck, Jeroen

    2014-10-15

    The interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay is considered useful for diagnosis of subclinical paratuberculosis. However, interpretation can be subjective and complex; therefore, additional information regarding the course of the cellular immune response and effects of age and dose at infection would be helpful. Thirty-three calves were randomly allocated to 10 challenge groups and a negative control group. Calves were inoculated orally at 2 weeks or at 3, 6, 9, or 12 months of age. Within each age group, calves received either a high or low dose of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Monthly blood samples were collected, stimulated with Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) Johnin in vitro, and the subsequent release of IFN-γ measured. Calves inoculated with a high dose had earlier and stronger IFN-γ responses than low-dose calves. Furthermore, calves inoculated at 2 weeks of age produced less IFN-γ compared to those inoculated later in life. The IFN-γ response peaked (on average) 4 months after exposure; therefore, this would be an optimal interval to test cattle for MAP-infection (although the timing of field-based infections is unknown and clearance of infection a possibility). To conclude, the IFN-γ release assay could be a valuable diagnostic test on herd-level to indicate exposure to MAP.

  11. Gamma-radiation-induced phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 is dose-dependent in MOLT-4 leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tichý, A; Záskodová, D; Zoelzer, F; Vávrová, J; Sinkorová, Z; Pejchal, J; Osterreicher, J; Rezácová, M

    2009-01-01

    Molecular indicators of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are powerful tools in biodosimetry. The studies reported here were undertaken with the motivation to find such a marker among the mo lecules involved in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase- dependent signalling induced by ionizing radiation (ATM-kinase, checkpoint kinase-2, protein p53, and oncoprotein Mdm2). In our previous work on T-lymphocyte leukaemia MOLT-4 cells we described the mentioned molecules of ATM-dependent pathway and none of them showed a pronounced dosedependent response. Here we employed Western blotting and ELISA assay to investigate the response of post-translationally modified p53 (particularly phosphorylated on serine 15) after gamma-irradiation. We have found the amount of phosphorylated p53 to be homogenously increased after irradiation by the doses of 0.5 to 7.5 Gy. The dose-dependent response was pronounced especially after the doses up to 3.0 Gy. The presented data indicate that p53 phosphorylated on serine 15 might be used as a potential biodosimetric marker.

  12. [The dose-response of unstable chromosome exchanges in lymphocytes of cancer patients undergone whole-body fractionated gamma-rays exposure at the total dose 1.15 Gy].

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Vorobtsova, I E; Zharinov, G M

    2010-01-01

    The dose-response of unstable chromosome exchanges (UCE) in lymphocytes of 4 cancer patients undergone whole-body fractionated gamma-rays exposure (at the daily dose of 0.115 Gy up to the total dose 1.15 Gy) was compared with corresponding dose-response for lymphocytes of the same patients, irradiated in vitro at the same dose range. In vivo irradiation yielded lower frequency of UCE on the dose unit than in vitro irradiation. It was shown that the in vivo dose-response curve gives more adequate dose estimation than in vitro one. This curve could be used for reconstruction of absorbed dose in the cases of analogous character of in-controlled irradiation of people.

  13. Dicentric chromosomes and gamma-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of human blood samples exposed to a CT scanner: a direct comparison of dose response relationships.

    PubMed

    Golfier, Sven; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Eckardt-Schupp, Friederike; Schmid, Ernst; Voth, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    Experiments using the induction of dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics) as well as the gamma-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of blood samples from a healthy donor were performed to directly evaluate the radiation sensitivity of both biological endpoints. For computed tomography scans at dose levels from 0.025 to 1 Gy, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentrics and a linear dose-response relationship for gamma-H2AX foci were obtained. The coefficients of the dose-response relationship for dicentrics are alpha = (3.76 +/- 0.29) x 10(-2) Gy(-1) and beta = (5.54 +/- 0.45) x 10(-2) Gy(-2), the linear coefficient for gamma-H2AX foci is (7.38 +/- 0.11) Gy(-1). The findings indicate that scoring of dicentrics as well as microscopic analysis of gamma-H2AX foci are sensitive methods to quantify a radiation-induced biological damage at low doses. However, since gamma-H2AX foci can be partially repaired within a few hours, biological damages present for days or even months, which constitute the clinically relevant endpoints, can only be quantified reliably by scoring of chromosome aberrations. Thus currently the quantification of dicentrics or reciprocal translocations remains the recommended method for estimating the effect of exposures to low dose levels of radiation ('biological dosimetry'). However, owing to the high radiation sensitivity of the gamma-H2AX foci assay observed in the present study, further investigations on the effectiveness of low-linear energy transfer radiation qualities in producing gamma-H2AX foci in lymphocytes from healthy donors should be performed.

  14. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  15. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  16. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  17. Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation together with Lipid A on Human Leukocytes Activities In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakova, E.; Dubnickova, M.; Boreyko, A.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of gamma irradiation and of Lipid A from Escherichia coli on phagocytosis, lyzosyme and peroxidase activities of human leukocytes, in vitro was investigated. Leukocytes samples were irradiated with 1 and 5 Gy, respectively. The number of irradiated leukocytes was decreased in the irradiated samples. Only samples with additive Lipid A were not damaged by irradiation. The Lipid A had positive influence on biological activities of the irradiated leukocytes.

  18. Dose rate dependency of electronic personal dosemeters measuring X- and gamma-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, J P; Shen, H; Downton, B

    2008-01-01

    Three models of electronic personal dosemeters (EPDs)-Siemens Mk 2.3, Rados RAD-60S and Vertec Bleeper Sv-were irradiated with seven photon beam qualities: 60Co, 137Cs and the ISO narrow spectrum series X-ray qualities N-250, N-200, N-150, N-60 and N-20. The personal dose equivalent rates delivered to the devices varied between 0.002 and 0.25 mSv s(-1). Measurements were made with the EPDs mounted free-in-air as well as against Lucite and water phantoms. Results for all models of EPDs showed differences in personal dose equivalent energy response for different energies covered by this range of radiation qualities, with different models showing variations from 15 to 65%. In some cases, the personal dose equivalent rate response of these devices varied by a factor of 3 between irradiations at typical calibration dose rates and those normally encountered by nuclear energy workers.

  19. Application of Geant4 in routine close geometry gamma spectroscopy for environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Dababneh, Saed; Al-Nemri, Ektimal; Sharaf, Jamal

    2014-08-01

    This work examines the utilization of Geant4 to practically achieve crucial corrections, in close geometry, for self-absorption and true coincidence summing in gamma-ray spectrometry of environmental samples, namely soil and water. After validation, different simulation options have been explored and compared. The simulation was used to correct for self-absorption effects, and to establish a summing-free efficiency curve, thus overcoming limitations and uncertainties imposed by conventional calibration standards. To be applicable in busy laboratories, simulation results were introduced into the conventional software Genie 2000 in order to be reliably used in everyday routine measurements.

  20. Continuous gamma-irradiation of rats: dose-rate effect on loss and recovery of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinon-Lataillade, G; Maas, J

    1985-07-01

    Male Sprague Dawley rats were continuously irradiated at a dose-rate of either 5 or 7 cGy/day, up to a total dose of 900 cGy. Changes in spermatogenesis with irradiation and the recovery of the testis during 33 weeks after irradiation were studied. No clear dose-rate effect with testicular weight occurred. During the irradiation time, increased dose and dose-rate induced a decrease in A spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocyte number. In our experimental conditions germ cell production did not plateau, as shown by the increasing number of tubular cross sections devoid of germ cells beyond 500 cGy. The recovery of seminiferous epithelium occurred essentially within nine weeks. It was not dose-rate dependent and was still incomplete after 33 weeks. This lack of recovery might be due to limited compensatory division ability of the stem cells. Clusters of Sertoli cells were observed in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules; impaired function of these cells could also prevent the complete recovery of the seminiferous epithelium. By 16 weeks after the end of irradiation 67% of 5 cGy/day irradiated rats and 34% of 7 cGy/day irradiated rats recovered fertility.

  1. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  2. Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

  3. Determination of the feasibility of reducing the spatial domain of the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 006

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Snyder, S.F.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. The primary impetus for this scoping calculation was to determine if large areas of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project atmospheric domain could be excluded from detailed calculation because the atmospheric transport of radionuclides from Hanford resulted in no (or negligible) deposition in those areas. The secondary impetus was to investigate whether an intermediate screen could be developed to reduce the data storage requirements by taking advantage of locations with periods of ``effectively zero`` deposition. This scoping calculation (Calculation 006) examined the spatial distribution of potential doses resulting from releases in the year 1945. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study, of iodine in cow`s milk, and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, and (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cow`s milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in scoping calculation 001.

  4. Uncertainty of gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of environmental samples due to uncertainties in matrix composition, density and sample geometry.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, S; Jakobi, A; Wilhelm, Chr

    2014-12-01

    This paper is intended to identify the uncertainties of activities in environmental samples measured with gamma-ray spectrometry that result from uncertainties in matrix composition, density and geometrical dimensions of the sample. For that purpose efficiencies were calculated for a wide range of environmental matrices such as fresh and ashed food samples, water samples and soil samples. Compositions were mainly taken from literature. Densities and geometry parameters were varied in a range occurring in practice. Considered energies cover a range from 46.5keV to 2000keV. Finally, a couple of recommendations in respect to gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of environmental samples are given.

  5. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Tsai, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  6. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan. Draft for Peer Review: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  7. The impact of low-dose carcinogens and environmental disruptors on tissue invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Josiah; Nangami, Gladys N.; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Koturbash, Igor; Odero-Marah, Valerie; McCawley, Lisa; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Papagerakis, Silvana; Wolf, Gregory T.; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bisson, William H.; Eltom, Sakina E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to stimulate new ideas regarding low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens and their potential to promote invasion and metastasis. Whereas a number of chapters in this review are devoted to the role of low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in specific tumors such as breast and prostate, the overarching theme is the role of low-dose carcinogens in the progression of cancer stem cells. It is becoming clearer that cancer stem cells in a tumor are the ones that assume invasive properties and colonize distant organs. Therefore, low-dose contaminants that trigger epithelial–mesenchymal transition, for example, in these cells are of particular interest in this review. This we hope will lead to the collaboration between scientists who have dedicated their professional life to the study of carcinogens and those whose interests are exclusively in the arena of tissue invasion and metastasis. PMID:26106135

  8. Simulation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose from 137 Cs Gammas Using a Si Timepix Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Empl, Anton; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The TimePix readout chip is a hybrid pixel detector with over 65k independent pixel elements. Each pixel contains its own circuitry for charge collection, counting logic, and readout. When coupled with a Silicon detector layer, the Timepix chip is capable of measuring the charge, and thus energy, deposited in the Silicon. Measurements using a NIST traceable 137Cs gamma source have been made at Johnson Space Center using such a Si Timepix detector, and this data is compared to simulations of energy deposition in the Si layer carried out using FLUKA.

  9. Low-dose gamma irradiation enhances superoxide anion production by nonirradiated cells through TGF-β1-dependent bystander signaling.

    PubMed

    Temme, Jennifer; Bauer, Georg

    2013-04-01

    We show here that low-dose gamma irradiation substantially increase in extracellular superoxide anion production in oncogenically transformed cells and tumor cells but not by nontransformed cells. The transfer of only a few cells from an irradiated culture to nonirradiated control cells was sufficient for the transmission of a signal to induce superoxide anion production in the nonirradiated cells. The number of irradiated cells that was necessary for the successful induction of superoxide anion production in the nonirradiated cells depended on radiation dose. When irradiated cells were allowed to incubate for 1 h before transmission to the nonirradiated cultures, nearly all of the cells from the irradiated cell population were able to communicate the inducing signal to nonirradiated cells. siRNA-dependent knockdown and reconstitution experiments showed that TGF-β1 was sufficient to mediate the bystander effect triggered by low-dose radiation in this experimental system. A kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enhanced superoxide anion production was substantially reduced before the release of the bystander signal by activated TGF-β.

  10. Developmental disturbance of rat cerebral cortex following prenatal low-dose gamma-irradiation: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Hoshino, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Inouye, M.; Kameyama, Y. )

    1991-06-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to a single whole-body gamma-irradiation on Day 15 of gestation at a dose of 0.27, 0.48, 1.00, or 1.46 Gy. They were allowed to give birth and the offspring were killed at 6 or 12 weeks of age for microscopic and electron microscopic examinations of the cerebrum. Their body weight, brain weight, cortical thickness, and numerical densities of whole cells and synapses in somatosensory cortex were examined. Growth of the dendritic arborization of layer V pyramidal cells was also examined quantitatively with Golgi-Cox specimens. A significant dose-related reduction in brain weight was found in all irradiated groups. Neither gross malformation nor abnormality of cortical architecture was observed in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy. A significant change was found in thickness of cortex in the groups exposed to 0.48 Gy or more. Cell packing density increased significantly in the group exposed to 1.00 Gy. Significant reduction in the number of intersections of dendrites with the zonal boundaries were found in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy or more. There was no difference in the numerical density of synapses in layer I between the control and irradiated groups. These results suggested that doses as low as 0.27 Gy could cause a morphologically discernible change in the mammalian cerebrum.

  11. Influence of A Continuous Very Low Dose of Gamma-Rays on Cell Proliferation, Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jozan, Suzanne; Pereda, Veronica; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown a delay of death by lymphoma in SJL/J mice irradiated with continuous very low doses of ionizing radiation. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, we have irradiated in vitro the Raw264.7 monocytic and the YAC-1 lymphoma cell lines at very low-dose rate of 4cGy.month-1. We have observed a transient increase in production of both free radicals and nitric oxide with a transient adaptive response during at least two weeks after the beginning of the irradiation. The slight decrease of Ki67 proliferation index observed during the second and third weeks of YAC-1 cells culture under irradiation was not significant but consistent with the shift of the proliferation assay curves of YAC-1cells at these same durations of culture. These in vitro results were in good agreement with the slightly decrease under irradiation of Ki67 proliferative index evaluated on lymphomatous lymph nodes of SJL/J mice. A significant decrease of YAC-1 cells apoptotic rate under radiation appeared after 4 weeks of culture. Therefore very small doses of gamma-irradiation are able to modify the cellular response. The main observations did not last with increasing time under irradiation, suggesting a transient adaptation of cells or organisms to this level of irradiation. PMID:26692019

  12. Study of dose-response and radical decay curves of gamma irradiated norfloxacin using EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sütçü, Kerem; Osmanoǧlu, Yunus Emre

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and γ-irradiated at doses of 1, 5, 10, 12 and 15 kGy norfloxacin (NOF) were investigated. Before irradiation no EPR signal were observed. After irradiation a weak singlet signal at g = 2.0039 were obtained at room temperature. In order to describe the variation of EPR signal intensity with absorbed radiation dose, several mathematical equations were tried. Increasing irradiation dose up to 15 kGy has increased the signal intensity of the central signal however, no significant changes were observed in g spectroscopic splitting factor. The stability of signal intensity of irradiated NOF was studied over a storage period of 200 days. According to analyses conducted, EPR spectroscopy can be used to distinguish irradiated and unirradiated samples from each other.

  13. Low-dose gamma irradiation of food protein increases its allergenicity in a chronic oral challenge.

    PubMed

    Vaz, A F M; Souza, M P; Medeiros, P L; Melo, A M M A; Silva-Lucca, R A; Santana, L A; Oliva, M L V; Perez, K R; Cuccovia, I M; Correia, M T S

    2013-01-01

    Few chronic food protein models have described the relationship between allergenicity and the molecular structure of food protein after physical processing. The effect of γ-radiation on the structure of food protein was measured by fluorescence, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and then given non-irradiated and irradiated Con-A by daily gavage for 28days. The tendency to form insoluble amorphous aggregates and partially unfolded species was observed after irradiation. The administration of non-irradiated and irradiated samples at low-dose significantly increased weight loss as well as plasma levels of eotaxin in animals repeatedly exposed to Con-A. Significant lymphocytic infiltrate filling completely the stroma of microvilli and tubular glands was observed in the small intestinal of the group given Con-A irradiated at a low dose. This phenotype was not observed in animals treated with Con-A irradiated at a high dose.

  14. Atmospheric transport modeling and input data for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Burk, K.W.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the information used in modeling atmospheric transport and diffusion for Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. It also lists the results of the atmospheric transport calculations that were provided for use in dose estimation. The report does not contain a description of the atmospheric model or an analysis of the results of the atmospheric calculations. 9 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Environmental Radiation Dose Reconstruction for U.S. and Russian Weapons Production Facilities: Hanford and Mayak

    SciTech Connect

    Ansbaugh, Lynn R.; Degteva, M. O.; Kozheurov, V. P.; Napier, Bruce A.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.

    2003-05-01

    Another way to look at Cold War legacies is to examine the major environmental releases that resulted from past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Examining these historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States, such as the Hanford facility; several are also underway in other countries, such as at the Mayak facility in Russia. The efforts in the United States are mostly based on historical operating records and current conditions, which are used to estimate environmental releases, transport, and human exposure. The Russian efforts are largely based on environmental measurements and measurements of human subjects; environmental transport modelling, when conducted, is used to organize and validate the measurements. Past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons has resulted in major releases of radionuclides into the environment. Reconstruction of the historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals in the public living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States; several are also underway in other countries. The types of activity performed, the operating histories, and the radionuclide releases vary widely across the different facilities. The U.S. Hanford Site and the Russian Mayak Production Association are used here to illustrate the nature of the assessed problems and the range of approaches developed to solve them.

  16. Organ doses from environmental exposures calculated using voxel phantoms of adults and children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Endo, A.; Saito, K.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents effective and organ dose conversion coefficients for members of the public due to environmental external exposures, calculated using the ICRP adult male and female reference computational phantoms as well as voxel phantoms of a baby, two children and four adult individual phantoms--one male and three female, one of them pregnant. Dose conversion coefficients are given for source geometries representing environmental radiation exposures, i.e. whole body irradiations from a volume source in air, representing a radioactive cloud, a plane source in the ground at a depth of 0.5 g cm-2, representing ground contamination by radioactive fall-out, and uniformly distributed natural sources in the ground. The organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated employing the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc simulating the photon transport in the voxel phantoms, and are given as effective and equivalent doses normalized to air kerma free-in-air at height 1 m above the ground in Sv Gy-1. The findings showed that, in general, the smaller the body mass of the phantom, the higher the dose. The difference in effective dose between an adult and an infant is 80-90% at 50 keV and less than 40% above 100 keV. Furthermore, dose equivalent rates for photon exposures of several radionuclides for the above environmental exposures were calculated with the most recent nuclear decay data. Data are shown for effective dose, thyroid, colon and red bone marrow. The results are expected to facilitate regulation of exposure to radiation, relating activities of radionuclides distributed in air and ground to dose of the public due to external radiation as well as the investigation of the radiological effects of major radiation accidents such as the recent one in Fukushima and the decision making of several committees.

  17. Gamma activity of stream sediment feldspars as ceramic raw materials and their environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Ibrahim, Tarek; Saad, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    In situ gamma spectrometric measurements have been performed to characterise the natural radiation that emitted from the stream sediment feldspars in Wadi El Missikat and Wadi Homret El Gergab, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The measurements of potassium (K, %), equivalent uranium (eU, ppm) and equivalent thorium (eTh, ppm) were converted into specific activities and equivalent dose rate. The average specific activities were 1402 Bq kg(-1) for K, 113 Bq kg(-1) for eU and 108 Bq kg(-1) for eTh in Wadi El Missikat, while they were 1240, 104 and 185 Bq kg(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The calculated outdoor average effective dose rates was 1.1 mSv y(-1) in wadi El Missikat and 1.3 mSv y(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The terrestrial-specific activities and effective dose rate levels of the natural radioactivity in the two areas lie within the international recommended limits for occupational feldspar quarry workers. On the other hand, these results indicated that irradiation is higher than the allowable level for members of the public. Therefore, quarrying the feldspar sediments from these locations as ceramic raw materials may yield an undesired impact on the environment, especially through the indoor applications.

  18. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses.

  19. Columbia River Pathway Dosimetry Report, 1944-1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Snyder, S.F.; Shipler, D.B.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to individuals who were exposed to the radionuclides released to the Columbia River (the river pathway). This report documents the last in a series of dose calculations conducted on the Columbia River pathway. The report summarizes the technical approach used to estimate radiation doses to three classes of representative individuals who may have used the Columbia River as a source of drinking water, food, or for recreational or occupational purposes. In addition, the report briefly explains the approaches used to estimate the radioactivity released to the river, the development of the parameters used to model the uptake and movement of radioactive materials in aquatic systems such as the Columbia River, and the method of calculating the Columbia River`s transport of radioactive materials. Potential Columbia River doses have been determined for representative individuals since the initiation of site activities in 1944. For this report, dose calculations were performed using conceptual models and computer codes developed for the purpose of estimating doses. All doses were estimated for representative individuals who share similar characteristics with segments of the general population.

  20. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1974-01-01

    Cellular response and cell population kinetics were studied during lymphopoiesis in the thymus of the mouse under continuous gamma irradiation using autoradiographic techniques and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine. On the basis of tissue weights, it is concluded that the response of both the thymus and spleen to continuous low dose-rate irradiation is multiphasic. That is, alternating periods of steady state growth, followed by collapse, which in turn is followed by another period of homeostasis. Since there are two populations of lymphocytes - short lived and long-lived, it may be that different phases of steady state growth are mediated by different lymphocytes. The spleen is affected to a greater extent with shorter periods of steady-state growth than exhibited by the thymus.

  1. Kinetics of the current response in TlBr detectors under a high dose rate of {gamma}-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gazizov, I. M.; Zaletin, V. M.; Kukushkin, V. M.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Lisitsky, I. S.

    2012-03-15

    The kinetics of the photocurrent response in doped and undoped TlBr samples subjected to irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons from a {sup 137}Cs source with the dose rate 0.033 to 3.84 Gy/min are studied. The crystals were grown by the directional crystallization of the melt method using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The Pb impurity mass fraction introduced into the doped TlBr crystals was 1-10 ppm and amounted to 150 ppm for the Ca impurity. The crystals were grown in a vacuum, in bromine vapors, in a hydrogen atmosphere, and in air. Decay of the photocurrent is observed for extrinsic semiconductor crystals doped with bivalent cations (irrespective of the growth atmosphere), and also for crystals grown in hydrogen and crystals grown in an excess of thallium. The time constant of photocurrent decay {tau} amounted to 30-1400 s and was proportional to resistivity. It is shown that the current response can be related to photolysis in the TlBr crystals during irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons. The energy of hole traps responsible for a slow increase in the photo-current has been estimated and found to be equal to 0.6-0.85 eV.

  2. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  3. Study of dose effects on IGBT-type devices subjected to gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, M.; Brisset, C.; Da Costa, M.

    1999-12-01

    In the nuclear power industry, speed control has become a mandatory requirement for induction motors used in the precision handling of dangerous substances. Because of this trend, the control systems of such actuators are now being exposed in service to neutrons and gamma radiation. Use of insulated gate bipolar-type transistors in power stage amplifiers has likewise become unavoidable, since IGBTs ensure better conduction and are less expensive than MOS (metal oxide semiconductor) transistors. As no hardened IGBTs are available on the market, it is necessary to study the radiation responses of the COTS versions of these products. This document describes the characterization tests performed on an IGBT transistor, International Rectifier model IRGP45OUD2. It also provides an analysis of IGBT behavior, using an electrical model and a PSPICE simulator.

  4. Use of Gamma Spectrometry Method for Environmental Monitoring in the area of NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinova, L.; Cechak, T.; Kluson, J.; Trojek, T.

    2006-05-01

    It is generally not possible to correctly determine the long and short term impact of human activity upon the environment, without thorough processing of data, obtained through monitoring. It was confirmed that such impact on the environment must be monitored over a long time period. The data obtained must be of high quality, an attribute assured by present state of scientific knowledge. One of the well established methods for monitoring atmospheric deposition of radionuclides in the environment is laboratory and in situ gamma spectrometry. With the aim to monitor an occurrence of a one-time escape or persistent release of fission products into the air, resulting from an operation of a nuclear plant, two types of monitoring are performed: i/ measurement of samples from the environment (Schreber moss, forest humus, pine bark, mushrooms and forest berries) using laboratory gamma spectrometry method in the range up to 3 MeV (those data are used for the trend analysis and for the construction of the contaminationmaps); ii/ in situ gama spectrometry for assessment dosimetry and spectrometry characteristic of photon-fields (those data are used for the dose rate calculation).

  5. Effects of the loss of correlation structure on Phase 1 dose estimates. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    In Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, a step-by-step (modular) calculational structure was used. This structure was intended (1) to simplify the computational process, (2) to allow storage of intermediate calculations for later analyses, and (3) to guide the collection of data by presenting understandable structures for its use. The implementation of this modular structure resulted in the loss of correlation among inputs and outputs of the code, resulting in less accurate dose estimates than anticipated. The study documented in this report investigated two types of correlations in the Phase I model: temporal and pathway. Temporal correlations occur in the simulation when, in the calculation, data estimated for a previous time are used in a subsequent calculation. If the various portions of the calculation do not use the same realization of the earlier estimate, they are no longer correlated with respect to time. Similarly, spatial correlations occur in a simulation when, in the calculation, data estimated for a particular location are used in estimates for other locations. If the various calculations do not use the same value for the original location, they are no longer correlated with respect to location. The loss of the correlation structure in the Phase I code resulted in dose estimates that are biased. It is recommended that the air pathway dose model be restructured and the intermediate histograms eliminated. While the restructured code may still contain distinct modules, all input parameters to each module and all out put from each module should be retained in a database such that subsequent modules can access all the information necessary to retain the correlation structure.

  6. Columbia River pathway report: phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the river-pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the river-pathway dose reconstruction effort sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Doses from drinking water were lower at Pasco than at Richland and lower at Kennewick than at Pasco. The median values of preliminary dose estimates calculated by HEDR are similar to independent, previously published estimates of average doses to Richland residents. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Gamma- and neutron continuous irradiations at low doses can increase stromal progenitor cell (cfu-f) number in mouse bone marrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Tsetlin, V.; Bueverova, E.; Payushina, O.; Butorina, N.; Starostin, V.

    Low doses of continuous gamma and neutron irradiation chosen in these experiments corresponded to those aboard a spacecraft (Mitricas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice at the age of 3-4 months were used. The experimental groups of mice were exposed for 10 days to gamma irradiation (total dose 1.5 cGy, dose rate 0.15 cGy/day) or neutron irradiation (neutrons with energy of 4 MeV at flow in the range from 10-5 to 10-6 n/cm2, flow densities from 1 to 30 n/cm2sec). Gamma irradiation stimulated the proliferative rate of femoral CFU-F and raised their number 1,5-4,5-fold. The size of ectopic marrow transplants from gamma irradiated donors also increased. However, no changes in CFU-S proliferative rate and their number were observed. Neutron irradiation at total absorbed dose of 48x10-3 cGy (total neutron flow 2,8x106 n/cm2) produced a 3-fold increase of femoral CFU-F number, but CFU-S number remained unchanged. If total absorbed dose was lowered to 7x10-3 cGy (total neutron flow 1,3x105 n/cm2) CFU-F number remained at the control level. Therefore, the effect of radiation hormesis that caused by the neutron irradiation was observed at doses much lower than those of gamma irradiation. Supported in part by Russian Ministry of Education (projects ``Scientific Schools'' - 1629.2003.4).

  8. Dose-dependent effects of dietary gamma-linolenic acid on rat spleen lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L D; Thies, F; Calder, P C

    1999-07-01

    Feeding rodents a diet rich in evening primrose oil (EPO), which contains 5-10 g gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)/100 g total fatty acids, has been shown to decrease lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer cell activity. However, EPO contains a very high level of linoleic acid which itself can affect lymphocyte functions and it is not clear to what extent the effects of EPO can be attributed to GLA. The current study investigated the effect of two levels of GLA in the rat diet upon immune cell functions; the level of linoleic acid was maintained below 30 g/100 g total fatty acids. Weanling rats were fed on high fat (178 g/kg) diets which contained 4.4 g or 10 g GLA/100 g total fatty acids in place of a proportion of linoleic acid. The total polyunsaturated fatty acid content and the n-6 to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio of the diet were maintained at 35 g/100 g total fatty acids and 7, respectively. The fatty acid compositions of the serum and of spleen leukocytes were markedly influenced by that of the diet, with an increase in the proportions of GLA and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid when the diets containing GLA were fed; these diets also increased the proportion of arachidonic acid in spleen leukocytes. Spleen lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A was significantly reduced (by 60%) by feeding the diet containing the higher level of GLA, but not by the diet containing the lower level of GLA. Spleen natural killer cell activity and prostaglandin E (PGE) production by spleen leukocytes were not significantly affected by inclusion of GLA in the diet, although there was a tendency towards decreased natural killer cell activity by cells from rats fed the high GLA diet. Thus, this study shows that dietary GLA is capable of altering the fatty acid composition of cells of the immune system and of exerting some immunomodulatory effects, but that the level of GLA in the diet must exceed 4.4 g/100 g total fatty acids for these effects to become apparent.

  9. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan.

  10. Development of Dose-Volume Relation Model for Gamma Knife Surgery of Non-Skull Base Intracranial Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.-T.; Kim, Dong Gyu Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To provide a dose-volume relationship for gamma knife surgery (GKS) of non-skull base intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: The radiologic outcomes of GKS of 82 imaging-defined benign meningiomas located at non-skull base areas were analyzed. A total of 80 patients were included and all underwent treatment with GKS as the first and the only treatment modality. The mean patient age was 55.0 years (range, 26-78) and the mean tumor volume was 5.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.5-16.8). On average, 14.6 Gy (range, 10-20) was applied to the 50% isodose surface. The binary logistic regression method was applied to find prognostic factors of signal change (SC) on T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after GKS. Results: The actuarial tumor control rate was 91.6% at 5 years. A total of 29 lesions (35.4%) showed newly developed or aggravated SCs. The volume irradiated {>=}14 Gy was the only statistically significant (p < .01) prognostic factor of SC. A dose-volume relation model obtained from the cases without SC estimated a 12.2% SC probability. Conclusion: This model can be used in GKS to treat small- to medium-size (<9.2 cm{sup 3}) non-skull base meningiomas.

  11. Short Communication: Rheological properties of blood serum of rats after irradiation with different gamma radiation doses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar K; Moussa, Sherif Aa; Ms, Al-Ayed

    2016-01-01

    The blood serum rheological properties open the door to find suitable radio-protectors and convenient therapy for many cases of radiation exposure. The present study aimed to investigate the rheological properties of rat blood serum at wide range of shear rates after whole body irradiation with different gamma radiation doses in vivo. Healthy male rats were divided into five groups; one control group and 4 irradiated groups. The irradiation process was carried out using Co60 source with dose rate of 0.883cG/sec. Several rheological parameters were measured using Brookfield LVDV-III Programmable rheometer. A significant increase in viscosity and shear stress was observed with 25 and 50Gy corresponding to each shear rate compared with the control; while a significant decrease observed with 75 and 100Gy. The viscosity exhibited a Non-Newtonian behaviour with the shear rate while shear stress values were linearly related with shear rate. The decrease in blood viscosity might be attributed to changes in molecular weight, pH sensitivity and protein structure. The changes in rheological properties of irradiated rats' blood serum might be attributed to destruction changes in the haematological and dimensional properties of rats' blood products.

  12. Study of the ESR signal of gamma irradiated hydroxyapatite for dose assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Costa, Z. M.; Pontuschka, W. M.; Campos, L. L.

    2004-06-01

    In this work the ESR signal based on the measurement of the concentration of radiation induced radicals CO 2- in hydroxyapatite, obtained from human tooth enamel, was investigated aiming to standardise the sample preparation method and the measurement conditions for practical application of this technique to accident personal dosimetry. In this regard, practical considerations of sample preparation, grain size, ESR spectrum, spurious induced mechanical ESR signal, influence of dose radiation and measurement temperatures are discussed, as well are presented results of signal reproducibility, angular and microwave power signal dependence.

  13. The effects of integrated treatment of UV light and low dose gamma radiation on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years considerable numbers of foodborne disease outbreaks associated with produce were reported and specifically Tomatoes have been involved with a number of multi state outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy of integrated treatment of UVC and low dose Gamma radiatio...

  14. Efficacy of integrated treatment of UV light and low dose gamma irradiation on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficacy of integrated treatment of UVC and low dose Gamma irradiation to inactivate mixed Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica inoculated on whole Grape tomatoes was evaluated. A mixed bacterial cocktail composed of a three strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, E02128 an...

  15. Environmental stress cracking in gamma-irradiated polycarbonate - A diffusion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pietro Paolo J. C. de O.; Araújo, Patricia L. B.; da Silveira, Leopoldo B. B.; Araújo, Elmo S.

    2017-01-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is an engineering polymer which presents interesting properties. This material has been also used in medical devices, which is frequently exposed to gamma radiosterilization and to chemical agents. This may produce significant changes in polymer structure, leading to failure in service. The present work brings about a new approach on environmental stress cracking (ESC) processes elucidation in 100 kGy gamma-irradiated PC, by evaluating the diffusion process of methanol or 2-propanol in test specimens and determining the diffusion parameters on solvent-irradiated polymer systems. A comparison of diffusion parameters for both solvents indicated that methanol has a considerable ESC action on PC, with diffusion parameter of 7.5×10-14±1% m2 s-1 for non-irradiated PC and 7.8×10-14±2.8% m2 s-1 for PC irradiated at 100 kGy. In contrast, 2-propanol did not act as an ESC agent, as it did promote neither swelling nor cracks in the test specimens. These results were confirmed by visual analysis and optical microscopy. Unexpectedly, structural damages evidenced in tensile strength tests suggested that 2-propanol is as aggressive as methanol chemical for PC. Moreover, although some manufacturers indicate the use of 2-propanol as a cleaning product for PC artifacts, such use should be avoided in parts under mechanical stress.

  16. ESR spectroscopy for detecting gamma-irradiated dried vegetables and estimating absorbed doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2000-03-01

    In view of an increasing demand for food irradiation technology, the development of a reliable means of detection for the control of irradiated foods has become necessary. Various vegetable food materials (dried cabbage, carrot, chunggyungchae, garlic, onion, and green onion), which can be legally irradiated in Korea, were subjected to a detection study using ESR spectroscopy. Correlation coefficients ( R2) between absorbed doses (2.5-15 kGy) and their corresponding ESR signals were identified from ESR signals. Pre-established threshold values were successfully applied to the detection of 54 coded unknown samples of dried clean vegetables ( chunggyungchae, Brassica camestris var. chinensis), both non-irradiated and irradiated. The ESR signals of irradiated chunggyungchae decreased over a longer storage time, however, even after 6 months of ambient storage, these signals were still distinguishable from those of non-irradiated samples. The most successful estimates of absorbed dose (5 and 8 kGy) were obtained immediately after irradiation using a quadratic fit with average values of 4.85 and 8.65 kGy being calculated.

  17. SU-E-T-517: Investigation of Factors Contributing to Extracranial Radiation Doses From Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Kon, D; Nakano, M; Nawa, K; Haga, A; Nakagawa, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate dominant factors for doses to extracranial sites in treatment with Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK). Methods Monte Carlo simulation was implemented using EGS5 version 1.4.401. The simulation was divided into two major steps for the purpose of efficiency. As the first step, phase-space files were obtained at a scoring plane located just below patient-side surface of the collimator helmet of LGK. Scored particles were classified into three groups, primary, leakage and scatter, using their history information until their arrival to the scoring plane. Then classification was used at the following second step simulation to investigate which type of particle is dominant in the deposited energy at extra-cranial sites. In the second stage, a cylindrical phantom with a semisphere shaped head was modeled such that the geometrical center of the phantom’s head corresponds to the unit center point (UCP) of LGK. Scoring regions were arranged at 10 cm intervals from the UCP to 70 cm away on the central axis of the phantom. Energy deposition from each type of particles and location of interaction were recorded. Results The dominant factor of deposited energy depended on the collimator size. In the case of smaller collimator size, leakage was dominant. However, contribution of leakage was relatively small in the case of larger collimator size. The contribution of internal scatter varied with the distance from the UCP. In the proximal areas, internal scatter was dominant, whereas in the distal areas, particles interacting with machine components became dominant factor. Conclusion The Result of this study indicates that the dominant factor to dose to an extracranial site can vary with the distance from UCP and with collimator size. This means that the variation of this contribution must be considered for modeling of the extracranial dose especially in the distal area. This work was partly supported by the JSPS Core-to-Core Program (No

  18. Activity Concentrations and Dose Assessment of Gamma Emitting Radionuclides in Canned Tuna and Sardines Produced after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Ababneh, Zaid Q; Al-Masoud, Fahad I; Ababneh, Anas M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the radioactivity concentrations of gamma emitting radionuclides in canned tuna and sardines that were produced after the Fukushima nuclear accident and to assess the resulting radiation doses to the public. Fifty-eight brands of canned tuna and sardines consumed in the Middle East and produced from different parts of the world were analyzed using a germanium detector. Cesium-137 (137Cs) was not detected above the minimum detectable activity in any of the samples. Natural radionuclides 40K, 226Ra and 228Ra were detected with wide activity concentration ranges and with average values of (in Bq kg(-1) wet weight): 68 ± 36, 0.31 ± 0.45, 0.34 ± 0.25, respectively, in tuna samples and with averages of 129 ± 67, 0.20 ± 0.33, 0.60 ± 0.31 in sardine samples. The results of the activity concentrations of 40K and 226Ra showed some regional dependence. Tuna samples produced in Europe have almost twice the concentration of 40K and half the concentration of 226Ra as compared to samples produced in either East or South Asia and North America. Moreover, sardine samples produced in North Africa and Europe have almost twice the concentrations of 40K and 226Ra as those produced in East or South Asia and North America. Dose assessment due to ingestion of canned seafood was also performed, and the committed effective dose was found to be well within the worldwide average.

  19. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  20. A new code for spectrometric analysis for environmental radiological surveillance on monitors focused on gamma radioactivity on aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Riego, Albert; Garcia, Roger; Dies, Javier; Diaz, Pedro; Toral, Juan; Batalla, Enric

    2015-07-01

    pGamma is a code developed by the NERG group of the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech for the analysis of gamma spectra generated by the Equipment for the Continuous Measurement and Identification of Gamma Radioactivity on Aerosols with Paper Filter developed for our group and Raditel Servies company. Nowadays the code is in the process of adaptation for the monitors of the Environmental Radiological Surveillance Network of the Local Government of Catalonia (Generalitat of Catalonia), Spain. The code is a Spectrum Analysis System, it identifies the gamma emitters on the spectrum, determines its Concentration of Activity, generates alarms depending on the Activity of the emitters and generates a report. The Spectrum Analysis System includes a library with emitters of interest, NORM and artificial. The code is being used on the three stations with the aerosol monitor of the Network (Asco and Vandellos, near both Nuclear Power Plants and Barcelona). (authors)

  1. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-07-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked - the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that "stress" can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called "non-targeted" mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the "health" of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed.

  2. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of cell proliferation is studied in the lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose-rate of 10 roentgens per day for 105 days. Autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine were utilized. It was found that at least four compensatory mechanisms maintained a near-steady state of cellular growth: (1) an increase in the proportion of PAS-positive cells which stimulate mitotic activity, (2) maturation arrest of proliferating and differentiating cells which tend to replenish the cells damaged or destroyed by irradiation, (3) an increase in the proportion of cells proliferating, and (4) an increase in the proportion of precursor cells. The results are compared to previous findings observed in the thymus.

  3. Induction of Genomic Instability In Vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Simon, Sanford, R.; Whorton, Elbert, B.

    2006-01-06

    The overall goal of this project is to determine if low doses (below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection, i.e. less than or equal to 10 cGy) of low LET radiation can induce genomic instability. The magnitude of genomic instability was measured as delayed chromosome instability in bone marrow cells of exposed mice with different levels of endogenous DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) activity, i.e. high (C57BL/6J mice), intermediate (BALB/cJ mice), and extremely low (Scid mice). In addition, at early time points (1 and 4 hrs) following irradiation, levels of activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcription factor known to be involved in regulating the expression of genes responsible for cell protection following stimuli, were measured in these cells. Bone marrow cells were collected at different times following irradiation, i.e. 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1 month, and 6 months. A total of five mice per dose per strain were sacrificed at each time point for sample collection. As a result, a total of 80 mice from each strain were used. The frequency and the type of metaphase chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells collected from exposed mice at different times following irradiation were used as markers for radiation-induced genomic instability. A three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol for mouse chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was used for the analysis of delayed stable chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells. All other visible chromatid-type aberrations and gross structural abnormalities involving non-painted chromosomes were also evaluated on the same metaphase cells used for scoring the stable chromosomal aberrations of painted chromosomes. Levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation were also determined in cells at 1 and 4 hrs following irradiation (indicative of early responses).

  4. Assessment of background gamma radiation levels using airborne gamma ray spectrometer data over uranium deposits, Cuddapah Basin, India - A comparative study of dose rates estimated by AGRS and PGRS.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, D; Ramesh Babu, V; Patra, I; Tripathi, Shailesh; Ramayya, M S; Chaturvedi, A K

    2017-02-01

    The Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and Research (AMD) has conducted high-resolution airborne gamma ray spectrometer (AGRS), magnetometer and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) surveys for uranium exploration, along the northern margins of Cuddapah Basin. The survey area includes well known uranium deposits such as Lambapur-Peddagattu, Chitrial and Koppunuru. The AGRS data collected for uranium exploration is utilised for estimating the average absorbed rates in air due to radio-elemental (potassium in %, uranium and thorium in ppm) distribution over these known deposit areas. Further, portable gamma ray spectrometer (PGRS) was used to acquire data over two nearby locations one from Lambapur deposit, and the other from known anomalous zone and subsequently average gamma dose rates were estimated. Representative in-situ rock samples were also collected from these two areas and subjected to radio-elemental concentration analysis by gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) in the laboratory and then dose rates were estimated. Analyses of these three sets of results complement one another, thereby providing a comprehensive picture of the radiation environment over these deposits. The average absorbed area wise dose rate level is estimated to be 130 ± 47 nGy h(-1) in Lambapur-Peddagattu, 186 ± 77 nGy h(-1) in Chitrial and 63 ± 22 nGy h(-1) in Koppunuru. The obtained average dose levels are found to be higher than the world average value of 54 nGy h(-1). The gamma absorbed dose rates in nGy h(-1) were converted to annual effective dose rates in mSv y(-1) as proposed by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual average effective dose rates for the entire surveyed area is 0.12 mSv y(-1), which is much lower than the recommended limit of 1 mSv y(-1) by International Commission on Radiation protection (ICRP). It may be ascertained here that the present study establishes a reference data set (baseline) in these

  5. Final report on the meteorological database, December 1944--1949. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Stage, S.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.; Berg, L.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is estimating radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at Hanford from 1944 to the present. A number of computer programs are being developed by the HEDR Project to estimate doses and confidence ranges associated with radionuclides transported through the atmosphere and the Columbia River. One computer program is the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET combines release data with information on atmospheric conditions including wind direction and speed. The RATCHET program uses these data to produce estimates of time-integrated air concentrations and surface contamination. These estimates are used in calculating dose by the Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations And Radionuclides in Terrestrial EnvironmentS (DESCARTES) and the Calculations of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides (CIDER) computer programs. This report describes the final status of the meteorological database used by RATCHET. Data collection procedures and the preparation and control of the meteorological database are described, along with an assessment of the data quality.

  6. Gamma radiation at a human relevant low dose rate is genotoxic in mice

    PubMed Central

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M.; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M.; Brede, Dag A.; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Lind, Ole C.; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Bjerke, Hans; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann K.

    2016-01-01

    Even today, 70 years after Hiroshima and accidents like in Chernobyl and Fukushima, we still have limited knowledge about the health effects of low dose rate (LDR) radiation. Despite their human relevance after occupational and accidental exposure, only few animal studies on the genotoxic effects of chronic LDR radiation have been performed. Selenium (Se) is involved in oxidative stress defence, protecting DNA and other biomolecules from reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is hypothesised that Se deficiency, as it occurs in several parts of the world, may aggravate harmful effects of ROS-inducing stressors such as ionising radiation. We performed a study in the newly established LDR-facility Figaro on the combined effects of Se deprivation and LDR γ exposure in DNA repair knockout mice (Ogg1−/−) and control animals (Ogg1+/−). Genotoxic effects were seen after continuous radiation (1.4 mGy/h) for 45 days. Chromosomal damage (micronucleus), phenotypic mutations (Pig-a gene mutation of RBCCD24−) and DNA lesions (single strand breaks/alkali labile sites) were significantly increased in blood cells of irradiated animals, covering three types of genotoxic activity. This study demonstrates that chronic LDR γ radiation is genotoxic in an exposure scenario realistic for humans, supporting the hypothesis that even LDR γ radiation may induce cancer. PMID:27596356

  7. Gamma radiation at a human relevant low dose rate is genotoxic in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M.; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M.; Brede, Dag A.; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Lind, Ole C.; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Bjerke, Hans; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann K.

    2016-09-01

    Even today, 70 years after Hiroshima and accidents like in Chernobyl and Fukushima, we still have limited knowledge about the health effects of low dose rate (LDR) radiation. Despite their human relevance after occupational and accidental exposure, only few animal studies on the genotoxic effects of chronic LDR radiation have been performed. Selenium (Se) is involved in oxidative stress defence, protecting DNA and other biomolecules from reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is hypothesised that Se deficiency, as it occurs in several parts of the world, may aggravate harmful effects of ROS-inducing stressors such as ionising radiation. We performed a study in the newly established LDR-facility Figaro on the combined effects of Se deprivation and LDR γ exposure in DNA repair knockout mice (Ogg1‑/‑) and control animals (Ogg1+/‑). Genotoxic effects were seen after continuous radiation (1.4 mGy/h) for 45 days. Chromosomal damage (micronucleus), phenotypic mutations (Pig-a gene mutation of RBCCD24‑) and DNA lesions (single strand breaks/alkali labile sites) were significantly increased in blood cells of irradiated animals, covering three types of genotoxic activity. This study demonstrates that chronic LDR γ radiation is genotoxic in an exposure scenario realistic for humans, supporting the hypothesis that even LDR γ radiation may induce cancer.

  8. Latent transforming growth factor beta1 activation in situ: quantitative and functional evidence after low-dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Segarini, P.; Tsang, M. L.; Carroll, A. G.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The biological activity of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta) is controlled by its secretion as a latent complex in which it is noncovalently associated with latency-associated peptide (LAP). Activation is the extracellular process in which TGF-beta is released from LAP, and is considered to be a primary regulatory control. We recently reported rapid and persistent changes in TGF-beta immunoreactivity in conjunction with extracellular matrix remodeling in gamma-irradiated mouse mammary gland. Our hypothesis is that these specific changes in immunoreactivity are indicative of latent TGF-beta activation. In the present study, we determined the radiation dose response and tested whether a functional relationship exists between radiation-induced TGF-beta and collagen type III remodeling. After radiation exposures as low as 0.1 Gy, we detected increased TGF-beta immunoreactivity in the mammary epithelium concomitant with decreased LAP immunostaining, which are events consistent with activation. Quantitative image analysis demonstrated a significant (P=0.0005) response at 0.1 Gy without an apparent threshold and a linear dose response to 5 Gy. However, in the adipose stroma, loss of LAP demonstrated a qualitative threshold at 0.5 Gy. Loss of LAP paralleled induction of collagen III immunoreactivity in this tissue compartment. We tested whether TGF-beta mediates collagen III expression by treating animals with TGF-beta panspecific monoclonal antibody, 1D11.16, administered i.p. shortly before irradiation. Radiation-induced collagen III staining in the adipose stroma was blocked in an antibody dose-dependent manner, which persisted through 7 days postirradiation. RNase protection assay revealed that radiation-induced elevation of total gland collagen III mRNA was also blocked by neutralizing antibody treatment. These data provide functional confirmation of the hypothesis that radiation exposure leads to latent TGF-beta activation, support our interpretation of the

  9. Draft Air Pathway Report: Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-20

    This report summarizes the air pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating historical radiation doses that could have been received by populations near the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the air-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Effect of dose rate of gamma irradiation on biochemical quality and browning of mushrooms Agaricus bisporus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of edible mature mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionising treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h ( I-) and 32 kGy/h ( I+). Both I+ and I- showed 2 and 4 days shelf-life enhancement compared to the control ( C). Before day 9, no significant difference ( p>0.05) in L* value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L* value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I-. Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I- contained more phenols than I+ and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analysed via catechol oxidase and dopa oxidase substrates, resulted in being significantly lowered ( p⩽0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I+. Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I+, contrasting with its lower phenol concentration. Ionising treatments also increased significantly ( p⩽0.05) the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity. The observation of mushrooms cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I- than in I+. It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I+ was caused by both the decompartimentation of vacuolar phenol and by the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning in I+ than in I-.

  11. Gamma-glutamyltransferase and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongzhong; Li, Xingsheng; Huang, Wenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) elevation likely contributes to cardiovascular (CV) mortality, however it has remained unknown whether a dose-response relationship exists between serum GGT and CV mortality. Methods We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases for prospective cohort studies published up to October 2, 2016. Summary hazard ratios (HRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed effects model. Findings Nine prospective studies, including 527,589 participants and more than 7,011 cases, were included in this meta-analysis. For the moderate, high, and highest levels of GGT, the pooled HRs of CV mortality were 1.11 (95% CI = 1.04–1.19), 1.29 (95% CI = 1.21–1.38) and 1.59 (95% CI = 1.47–1.72), respectively (all p < 0.05 as compared to the lowest levels of GGT). Additionally, the HR per incremental increase of GGT by 10 U/L was 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08–1.11). Evidence of a positive relationship with nonlinear trend for GGT elevation with CV mortality in females was found (P = 0.04 for nonlinearity). However, a linear model was better fit to illustrate the GGT-CV mortality among males (P = 0.304 for nonlinearity). Conclusions These findings indicate that serum GGT activity within the reference interval is positively associated with increased risk of CV mortality in a dose-response manner. PMID:28231268

  12. Computational model design specification for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emission from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. The purpose of this report is to outline the basic algorithm and necessary computer calculations to be used to calculate radiation doses specific and hypothetical individuals in the vicinity of Hanford. The system design requirements, those things that must be accomplished, are defined. The system design specifications, the techniques by which those requirements are met, are outlined. Included are the basic equations, logic diagrams, and preliminary definition of the nature of each input distribution. 4 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project`s primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

  14. Sequential multi-nuclide emission rate estimation method based on gamma dose rate measurement for nuclear emergency management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaole; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Trybushnyi, Dmytro; Li, Yu

    2017-03-05

    In case of a nuclear accident, the source term is typically not known but extremely important for the assessment of the consequences to the affected population. Therefore the assessment of the potential source term is of uppermost importance for emergency response. A fully sequential method, derived from a regularized weighted least square problem, is proposed to reconstruct the emission and composition of a multiple-nuclide release using gamma dose rate measurement. The a priori nuclide ratios are incorporated into the background error covariance (BEC) matrix, which is dynamically augmented and sequentially updated. The negative estimations in the mathematical algorithm are suppressed by utilizing artificial zero-observations (with large uncertainties) to simultaneously update the state vector and BEC. The method is evaluated by twin experiments based on the JRodos system. The results indicate that the new method successfully reconstructs the emission and its uncertainties. Accurate a priori ratio accelerates the analysis process, which obtains satisfactory results with only limited number of measurements, otherwise it needs more measurements to generate reasonable estimations. The suppression of negative estimation effectively improves the performance, especially for the situation with poor a priori information, where it is more prone to the generation of negative values.

  15. SU-E-J-240: The Impact On Clinical Dose-Distributions When Using MR-Images Registered with Stereotactic CT-Images in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, H; Kraepelien, T; Forander, P; Wangerid, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most Gamma knife treatments are based solely on MR-images. However, for fractionated treatments and to implement TPS dose calculations that require electron densities, CT image data is essential. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric effects of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images in Gamma knife treatments. Methods: Twelve patients treated for vestibular schwannoma with Gamma Knife Perfexion (Elekta Instruments, Sweden) were selected for this study. The prescribed doses (12 Gy to periphery) were delivered based on the conventional approach of using stereotactic MR-images only. These plans were imported into stereotactic CT-images (by registering MR-images with stereotactic CT-images using the Leksell gamma plan registration software). The dose plans, for each patient, are identical in both cases except for potential rotations and translations resulting from the registration. The impact of the registrations was assessed by an algorithm written in Matlab. The algorithm compares the dose-distributions voxel-by-voxel between the two plans, calculates the full dose coverage of the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan, and calculates the minimum dose delivered to the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan. Results: The mean dose difference between the plans was 0.2 Gy to 0.4 Gy (max 4.5 Gy) whereas between 89% and 97% of the target (treated in the conventional approach) received the prescribed dose, by the CT-plan. The minimum dose to the target (treated in the conventional approach) given by the CT-based plan was between 7.9 Gy and 10.7 Gy (compared to 12 Gy in the conventional treatment). Conclusion: The impact of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images has successfully been compared to conventionally delivered dose plans showing significant differences between the two. Although CTimages have been implemented clinically; the effect of the

  16. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Davis, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  17. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration In Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma-ray and Secondary Neutrons of Low Dose Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's "30L" beam line is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams at an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr or gamma-ray at 1.7cGy/hr, and assessed the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with mBAND. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results for gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate, the neutron data showed a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. The low dose rate gamma-rays induced a lower frequency of chromosome aberrations than high dose rate gamma-rays, but the inversion spectrum was similar for the same cytotoxic effect. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 for different radiation types will also be discussed.

  18. Commercial milk distribution profiles and production locations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Deonigi, D.E.; Anderson, D.M.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. For this period iodine-131 is the most important offsite contributor to radiation doses from Hanford operations. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 is the dominant radiation pathway for individuals who drank milk. Information has been developed on commercial milk cow locations and commercial milk distribution during 1945 and 1951. The year 1945 was selected because during 1945 the largest amount of iodine-131 was released from Hanford facilities in a calendar year; therefore, 1945 was the year in which an individual was likely to have received the highest dose. The year 1951 was selected to provide data for comparing the changes that occurred in commercial milk flows (i.e., sources, processing locations, and market areas) between World War II and the post-war period. To estimate the doses people could have received from this milk flow, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk people consumed, the source of the milk, the specific feeding regime used for milk cows, and the amount of iodine-131 contamination deposited on feed.

  19. Air pathway report: Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Phase 1 of the air-pathway portion of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and, relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. Preliminary median dose estimates summed over the year 1945--1947 for the primary pathway, air-pasture-cow-milk-thyroid, ranged from low median values of 0.006 rad for upwind adults who obtained milk from backyard cows not on pasture to high median values of 68.0 rad for downwind infants who drank milk from pasture-fed cows. Extremes of the estimated range are a low of essentially zero to upwind adults and a high of almost 3000 rem to downwind infants. 37 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Commercial milk distribution profiles and production locations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Deonigi, D.E.; Anderson, D.M.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. For this period iodine-131 is the most important offsite contributor to radiation doses from Hanford operations. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 is the dominant radiation pathway for individuals who drank milk (Napier 1992). Information has been developed on commercial milk cow locations and commercial milk distribution during 1945 and 1951. The year 1945 was selected because during 1945 the largest amount of iodine-131 was released from Hanford facilities in a calendar year (Heeb 1993); therefore, 1945 was the year in which an individual was likely to have received the highest dose. The year 1951 was selected to provide data for comparing the changes that occurred in commercial milk flows (i.e., sources, processing locations, and market areas) between World War II and the post-war period. To estimate the doses people could have received from this milk flow, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk people consumed, the source of the milk, the specific feeding regime used for milk cows, and the amount of iodine-131 contamination deposited on feed.

  1. Selection of dominant radionuclides for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions from nuclear operations at Hanford since their inception in 1944. A vital step in the estimation of radiation doses is the determination of the source term,'' that is, the quantities of radionuclides that were released to the environment from the various Hanford operations. Hanford operations have at various times involved hundreds of different radionuclides, some in relatively large quantities. Those radionuclides present in the largest quantities, although significant from an operational handling point of view, may not necessarily have been those of greatest concern for offsite radiation dose. This report documents the selection of the dominant radionuclides (those that may have resulted in the largest portion of the received doses) in the source term for Phase 1 of the HEDR Project, that is, for atmospheric releases from 1944 through 1947 and for surface water releases from 1964 through 1966. 15 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report for 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrincione, D.A.; Erdmann, N.L.

    1992-12-31

    The Rocky Rats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1992. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population.

  3. MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

    1981-04-01

    The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based

  4. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures.

  5. Continuous gamma and neutron irradiation at low doses can increase the number of stromal progenitor cell (CFU-F) in mouse bone marrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E. I.; Tsetlin, V. V.; Bueverova, E. I.; Payushina, O. I.; Butorina, N. N.; Khrushchov, N. G.; Starostin, V. I.

    Experimental groups of male and female F1 (CBA × C57Bl/6) mice at the age of 3-4 months were exposed for 10 days to gamma irradiation (total dose 1.5 cGy, dose rate 0.15 cGy/day) or neutron irradiation (neutrons at average energy of 4.5 MeV at a total neutron flux ranging from 10 5 to 10 6 cm -2 and neutron flux density from 1 to 30 cm -2 s -1). These radiation doses were chosen so as to correspond to those received aboard spacecraft. [Mitrikas, V.G., Tsetlin, V.V., 2000. Radiation control onboard the MIR orbital manned station during the 22th solar cycle. Kosm. Issled. 38(2), 113-118.] Gamma irradiation stimulated the proliferation of femoral CFU-F, and their number increased by a factor of 1.5-4.5. The ectopic marrow grafts from γ-irradiated donors also increased in size. However, no changes in CFU-S proliferation rate and their number were observed. Neutron irradiation at a total absorbed dose of 2 × 10 -1 cGy (total neutron flux 2.8 × 10 7 cm -2) produced a 1.5-3-fold increase in the number of femoral CFU-F, but that of CFU-S remained unchanged. At a lower total absorbed dose 0.82 × 10 -2 cGy, total neutron flux 1.3 × 10 6 cm -2, the number of CFU-F remained at the control level. Therefore, the effect of radiation hormesis caused by neutron irradiation was observed at doses much lower than those of gamma irradiation.

  6. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Cement Composites Observed with XRD and SEM Methods in the Range of Radiation Dose 0-1409 MGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łowińska-Kluge, A.; Piszora, P.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of gamma radiation in the range of 0-1409 MGy on the structure of a new mineral additive to cement based composites was investigated in the perspective of employing them as radioactive waste protection material. According to the authors knowledge, it is the first paper dealing with observations of the cement matrix, both pure and modified, treated with so giant radiation dose. The absorption of gamma radiation modifies the morphology of the additive grains, causes decomposition of cement hydrates and clinker relicts in cement paste containing the additive at twice higher radiation dose than that inducing the decomposition of the reference pure cement paste and the cement paste containing pozzolane additives.

  7. Effects of bone- and air-tissue inhomogeneities on the dose distributions of the Leksell Gamma Knife® calculated with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Rojas, E. Leticia; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2005-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE (version 2003) is applied to calculate Leksell Gamma Knife® dose distributions for heterogeneous phantoms. The usual spherical water phantom is modified with a spherical bone shell simulating the skull and an air-filled cube simulating the frontal or maxillary sinuses. Different simulations of the 201 source configuration of the Gamma Knife have been carried out with a simplified model of the geometry of the source channel of the Gamma Knife recently tested for both single source and multisource configurations. The dose distributions determined for heterogeneous phantoms including the bone- and/or air-tissue interfaces show non-negligible differences with respect to those calculated for a homogeneous one, mainly when the Gamma Knife isocentre approaches the separation surfaces. Our findings confirm an important underdosage (~10%) nearby the air-tissue interface, in accordance with previous results obtained with the PENELOPE code with a procedure different from ours. On the other hand, the presence of the spherical shell simulating the skull produces a few per cent underdosage at the isocentre wherever it is situated.

  8. From prompt gamma distribution to dose: a novel approach combining an evolutionary algorithm and filtering based on Gaussian-powerlaw convolutions.

    PubMed

    Schumann, A; Priegnitz, M; Schoene, S; Enghardt, W; Rohling, H; Fiedler, F

    2016-10-07

    Range verification and dose monitoring in proton therapy is considered as highly desirable. Different methods have been developed worldwide, like particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) and prompt gamma imaging (PGI). In general, these methods allow for a verification of the proton range. However, quantification of the dose from these measurements remains challenging. For the first time, we present an approach for estimating the dose from prompt γ-ray emission profiles. It combines a filtering procedure based on Gaussian-powerlaw convolution with an evolutionary algorithm. By means of convolving depth dose profiles with an appropriate filter kernel, prompt γ-ray depth profiles are obtained. In order to reverse this step, the evolutionary algorithm is applied. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for a spread-out Bragg-peak in a water target.

  9. From prompt gamma distribution to dose: a novel approach combining an evolutionary algorithm and filtering based on Gaussian-powerlaw convolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, A.; Priegnitz, M.; Schoene, S.; Enghardt, W.; Rohling, H.; Fiedler, F.

    2016-10-01

    Range verification and dose monitoring in proton therapy is considered as highly desirable. Different methods have been developed worldwide, like particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) and prompt gamma imaging (PGI). In general, these methods allow for a verification of the proton range. However, quantification of the dose from these measurements remains challenging. For the first time, we present an approach for estimating the dose from prompt γ-ray emission profiles. It combines a filtering procedure based on Gaussian-powerlaw convolution with an evolutionary algorithm. By means of convolving depth dose profiles with an appropriate filter kernel, prompt γ-ray depth profiles are obtained. In order to reverse this step, the evolutionary algorithm is applied. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for a spread-out Bragg-peak in a water target.

  10. Evaluation of Generic 3X Upper Bound Factor Used in Reconstructing External Gamma Doses to Military Participants at Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-30

    34 5.1.2.1 Marine Brigade at Shot BEE .........................................................34...zero (but were not worn by participants) are given in Figure 3-2 (Shot MOTH), 3-4 (Shot TESLA), 3-5 (Shot TURK), 3-7 (Shot BEE ), 3-8 (Shot APPLE I...compared with reconstructed residual gamma doses for that unit given by Edwards et al. (1983). 5.1.2.1 Marine Brigade at Shot BEE . Exposure of

  11. Total integrated dose testing of solid-state scientific CD4011, CD4013, and CD4060 devices by irradiation with CO-60 gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantas, A. R. V.; Gauthier, M. K.; Coss, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The total integrated dose response of three CMOS devices manufactured by Solid State Scientific has been measured using CO-60 gamma rays. Key parameter measurements were made and compared for each device type. The data show that the CD4011, CD4013, and CD4060 produced by this manufacturers should not be used in any environments where radiation levels might exceed 1,000 rad(Si).

  12. [Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (N(D,w))].

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2012-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an IAEA/WHO TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the ISO standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N(D,w)) with the new field. The uncertainty of N(D,w) was estimated to be 1.1% (k = 2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly.

  13. Gamma-ray dose rate surveys help investigating century-scale beach ridge progradation in the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinis, Pedro A.; Pereira, Alcides C.; Quinzeca, Domingos; Jombi, Domingos

    2017-02-01

    A strandplain at the downdrift side of the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola) includes distinguishable deposits with very high natural radioactivity (up to 0.44 microSv/hour). In order to establish the geometry of these sedimentary units and understand their genetic processes, dose rate surveys were performed with the portable equipment Rados RDS-40WE. In addition, grain-size distribution, heavy-mineral composition and gamma-ray mass spectra of the high dose rate deposits were analysed. High dose rate values are found in ribbon units aligned parallel to the shoreline, which are a few tens of meters wide and up to approximately 3 km long. These units reflect the concentration of Th-bearing grains in coastal deposits enriched in heavy minerals. An integrated analysis of the high dose rate ribbons in GIS environment with aerial photography and topographic maps suggests that parts of the high dose rate units formed during the last two centuries may be related with the erosion of older shoreline deposits, due to updrift displacements of the Catumbela river outlet and recycling of shoreline accumulations with downdrift deposition. Simple gamma-ray surveys carried out with a portable detector can unravel depositional units characterised by significant enrichment in heavy-mineral grains that are likely to correspond to key events in the evolution of wave-dominated accumulations. The location of such deposits should be taken into account when planning future work using more expensive or time-consuming techniques.

  14. Repair of I-SceI induced DSB at a specific site of chromosome in human cells: influence of low-dose, low-dose-rate gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio; Suzuki, Masao; Ishioka, Noriaki; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Honma, Masamitsu

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the influence of low-dose, low-dose-rate gamma-ray irradiation on DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. A single DSB was introduced at intron 4 of the TK+ allele (chromosome 17) by transfection with the I-SceI expression vector pCBASce. We assessed for DSB repair due to non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) by determining the generation of TK-deficient mutants in the TK6 derivative TSCE5 (TK +/-) carrying an I-SceI recognition site. We similarly estimated DSB repair via homologous recombination (HR) at the same site in the derived compound heterozygote (TK-/-) cell line TSCER2 that carries an additional point mutation in exon 5. The NHEJ repair of DSB was barely influenced by pre-irradiation of the cells with 30 mGy gamma-rays at 1.2 mGy h(-1). DSB repair by HR, in contrast, was enhanced by approximately 50% after pre-irradiation of the cells under these conditions. Furthermore, when I-SceI digestion was followed by irradiation at a dose of 8.5 mGy, delivered at a dose rate of only 0.125 mGy h(-1), HR repair efficiency was enhanced by approximately 80%. This experimental approach can be applied to characterize DSB repair in the low-dose region of ionizing radiation.

  15. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W. F.

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  16. A low, adaptive dose of gamma-rays reduced the number and altered the spectrum of S1- mutants in human-hamster hybrid AL cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Gustafson, D. L.; Wong, J. C.; Waldren, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of a low, adaptive dose of 137Cs-gamma-irradiation (0.04 Gy) on the number and kinds of mutants induced in AL human-hamster hybrid cells by a later challenge dose of 4 Gy. The yield of S1- mutants was significantly less (by 53%) after exposure to both the adaptive and challenge doses compared to the challenge dose alone. The yield of hprt- mutants was similarly decreased. Incubation with cycloheximide (CX) or 3-aminobenzamide largely negated the decrease in mutant yield. The adaptive dose did not perturb the cell cycle, was not cytotoxic, and did not of itself increase the mutant yield above background. The adaptive dose did, however, alter the spectrum of S1- mutants from populations exposed only to the adaptive dose, as well as affecting the spectrum of S1- mutants generated by the challenge dose. The major change in both cases was a significant increase in the proportion of complex mutations compared to small mutations and simple deletions.

  17. Radiation-induced oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder by gamma rays and electron beams: A clear dependence of dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglong; Xu, Lu; Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2015-10-01

    Oxidation is an important effect of irradiation on polyethylene in air. In this work, oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder (ca. 110 μm in diameter) induced by gamma rays (γ ray) and electron beams (EB) in air resulted in some large differences in properties, such as oxidative scission due to dose rate differences. However, other properties, such as surface wettability and thermal stability were not that greatly affected. The dose-rates used were 0.0019 kGy/s from a cobalt-60 gamma source and 92 kGy/s from an electron beam. The chemical structure, oxidation level, surface wettability and thermal stability of irradiated UHMWPE were analyzed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA and the static contact angle. Hydrophilic carboxyl and carbonyl groups were present on the surface of irradiated UHMWPE after irradiation in air, resulting in a decrease in the contact angle. After irradiation at 300 kGy, the gel content of the γ ray-irradiated UHMWPE samples decreased to almost zero, while that of EB irradiated UHMWPE decreased to 57%. For UHMWPE powder irradiated by gamma rays at lower doses, radiation-induced oxidation was complete and consistent with a simple theoretic estimation. Surface wettability was primarily affected by surface oxidation, and the oxidation level of UHMWPE could be easily predicted.

  18. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made.

  19. FY 1991 Task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The objectives of work in Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 are to analyze data and models used in Phase 1 and restructure the models to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty in dose estimation capability. Databases will be expanded and efforts will begin to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Project scope and accuracy requirements, once defined, can be translated into additional model and data requirements later in the project. Task plans for FY 1991 have been prepared based on activities approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in October 1990 and mid-year revisions discussed at the TSP planning/budget workshop in February 1991. The activities can be divided into two broad categories: (1) model and data development and evaluation, (2) project, technical and communication support. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Overview of vegetation monitoring data, 1952--1983. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Members of the HEDR Project`s Environmental Monitoring Data Task have developed databases of historical environmental measurements of such emissions. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. This report is the third in a series that documents the information available on measurements of iodine-131 concentrations in vegetation. The first two reports provide the data for 1945--1951. This report provides an overview of the historical documents, which contain vegetation data for 1952--1983. The overview is organized according to the documents available for any given year. Each section, covering one year, contains a discussion of the media sampled, the sampling locations, significant events if there were any, emission quantities, constituents measured, and a list of the documents with complete reference information. Because the emissions which affected vegetation were significantly less after 1951, the vegetation monitoring data after that date have not been used in the HEDR Project. However, access to these data may be of interest to the public. This overview is, therefore, being published.

  1. Manipulating Sensory and Phytochemical Profiles of Greenhouse Tomatoes Using Environmentally Relevant Doses of Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Dzakovich, Michael P; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Mitchell, Cary A

    2016-09-14

    Fruits harvested from off-season, greenhouse-grown tomato plants have a poor reputation compared to their in-season, garden-grown counterparts. Presently, there is a gap in knowledge with regard to the role of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) in determining greenhouse tomato quality. Knowing that UV-B is a powerful elicitor of secondary metabolism and not transmitted through greenhouse glass and some greenhouse plastics, we tested the hypothesis that supplemental UV-B radiation in the greenhouse will impart quality attributes typically associated with garden-grown tomatoes. Environmentally relevant doses of supplemental UV-B radiation did not strongly affect antioxidant compounds of fruits, although the flavonol quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin) significantly increased in response to UV-B. Physicochemical metrics of fruit quality attributes and consumer sensory panels were used to determine if any such differences altered consumer perception of tomato quality. Supplemental UV-A radiation (315-400 nm) pre-harvest treatments enhanced sensory perception of aroma, acidity, and overall approval, suggesting a compelling opportunity to environmentally enhance the flavor of greenhouse-grown tomatoes. The expression of the genes COP1 and HY5 were indicative of adaptation to UV radiation, which explains the lack of marked effects reported in these studies. To our knowledge, these studies represent the first reported use of environmentally relevant doses of UV radiation throughout the reproductive portion of the tomato plant life cycle to positively enhance the sensory and chemical properties of fruits.

  2. Hierarchical dose-response modeling for high-throughput toxicity screening of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ander; Reif, David M; Reich, Brian J

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of environmental chemicals is used to identify chemicals with high potential for adverse human health and environmental effects from among the thousands of untested chemicals. Predicting physiologically relevant activity with HTS data requires estimating the response of a large number of chemicals across a battery of screening assays based on sparse dose-response data for each chemical-assay combination. Many standard dose-response methods are inadequate because they treat each curve separately and under-perform when there are as few as 6-10 observations per curve. We propose a semiparametric Bayesian model that borrows strength across chemicals and assays. Our method directly parametrizes the efficacy and potency of the chemicals as well as the probability of response. We use the ToxCast data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as motivation. We demonstrate that our hierarchical method provides more accurate estimates of the probability of response, efficacy, and potency than separate curve estimation in a simulation study. We use our semiparametric method to compare the efficacy of chemicals in the ToxCast data to well-characterized reference chemicals on estrogen receptor α (ERα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) assays, then estimate the probability that other chemicals are active at lower concentrations than the reference chemicals.

  3. High-dose electron beam sterilization of soft-tissue grafts maintains significantly improved biomechanical properties compared to standard gamma treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoburg, A; Keshlaf, S; Schmidt, T; Smith, M; Gohs, U; Perka, C; Pruss, A; Scheffler, S

    2015-06-01

    Allografts have gained increasing popularity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, one of the major concerns regarding allografts is the possibility of disease transmission. Electron beam (Ebeam) and Gamma radiation have been proven to be successful in sterilization of medical products. In soft tissue sterilization high dosages of gamma irradiation have been shown to be detrimental to biomechanical properties of grafts. Therefore, it was the objective of this study to compare the biomechanical properties of human bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts after ebeam with standard gamma irradiation at medium (25 kGy) and high doses (34 kGy). We hypothesized that the biomechanical properties of Ebeam irradiated grafts would be superior to gamma irradiated grafts. Paired 10 mm-wide human BPTB grafts were harvested from 20 donors split into four groups following irradiation with either gamma or Ebeam (each n = 10): (A) Ebeam 25 kGy, (B) Gamma 25 kGy, (C) Ebeam 34 kGy (D) Gamma 34 kGy and ten non-irradiated BPTB grafts were used as controls. All grafts underwent biomechanical testing which included preconditioning (ten cycles, 0-20 N); cyclic loading (200 cycles, 20-200 N) and a load-to-failure (LTF) test. Stiffness of non-irradiated controls (199.6 ± 59.1 N/mm) and Ebeam sterilized grafts did not significantly differ (152.0 ± 37.0 N/mm; 192.8 ± 58.0 N/mm), while Gamma-irradiated grafts had significantly lower stiffness than controls at both irradiation dosages (25 kGy: 126.1 ± 45.4 N/mm; 34 kGy: 170.6 ± 58.2 N/mm) (p < 0.05). Failure loads at 25 kGy were significantly lower in the gamma group (1,009 ± 400 N), while the failure load was significantly lower in both study groups at high dose irradiation with 34 kGy (Ebeam: 1,139 ± 445 N, Gamma: 1,073 ± 617 N) compared to controls (1,741 ± 304 N) (p < 0.05). Creep was significantly larger in the gamma irradiated groups (25 kGy: 0.96 ± 1.34 mm; 34 kGy: 1.06 ± 0.58 mm) than in the Ebeam (25 k

  4. Repeated irradiations with gamma-rays at a Dose of 0.5 Gy may exacerbate asthma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Su-ping; Tago, Fumitoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Simura, Noriko; Muto, Yasuko; Goto, Resuke; Kojima, Shuji

    2005-06-01

    We previously showed that 0.5 Gy whole-body gamma-ray irradiation with a single or small number of repeated exposures inhibits tumor growth in mice, via elevation of the IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio concomitantly with a decrease in the percentage of B cells. Here we examined whether repeated 0.5 Gy gamma-rays irradiation can improve asthma in an OVA-induced asthmatic mouse model. We found that repeated irradiation (10 times) with 0.5 Gy of gamma-rays significantly increased total IgE in comparison with the disease-control group. The levels of IL-4 and IL-5 were also significantly higher in the gamma-ray-irradiated group, while that of IFN-gamma was significantly lower, resulting in a further decrease of the IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio from the normal value. These results indicate that the repeated irradiation with gamma-rays may exacerbate asthma, and may have opposite effects on different immune reactions unlike the irradiation with a single or small number of repeated exposures.

  5. SU-E-T-366: Estimation of Whole Body Dose From Cranial Irradiation From C and Perfexion Series Gamma Knife Units

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S; Andersen, A; Lulu, B; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Leksell Gamma Knife (GK) B & C series contains 201 Cobalt-60 sources with a helmet. The new model, Perfexion uses 192 Cobalt-60 sources without a helmet; using IRIS system for collimation and stereotactic guidance to deliver SRS to brain tumors. Relative dose to extracranial organs at risk (OARs) is measured in phantom in this study for Perfexion and C-series GK. Materials & Methods: Measurements were performed in a Rando anthropomorphic phantom on both systems using a large ion chamber (Keithley-175) for each collimator. The Keithley-175 cc ion chamber was sandwiched between phantom slices at various locations in the phantom to correspond to different extracranial OARs (thyroid, heart, kidney, ovary and testis, etc.) The dose measurement was repeated with OSL detectors for each position and collimator. Results: A large variation is observed in the normalized dose between these two systems. The dose beyond the housing falls off exponentially for Perfexion. Dose beyond the C-series GK housing falls off exponentially from 0–20cm then remains relatively constant from 20–40cm and again falls off with distance but less rapidly. The variation of extracranial dose with distance for each collimator is found to be parallel to each other for both systems. Conclusion: Whole body dose is found to vary significantly between these systems. It is important to measure the extracranial dose, especially for young patients. It is estimated that dose falls off exponentially from the GK housing and is about 1% for large collimators at 75 cm. The dose is two-orders of magnitude smaller for the 4mm collimator. However, this small dose for patient may be significant radiologically.

  6. Once the Light Touch to the Brain: Cytotoxic Effects of Low-Dose Gamma-Ray, Laser Light, and Visible Light on Rat Neuronal Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murteza; Colak, Abdullah; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Taspinar, Numan; Sagsoz, Mustafa Erdem; Kadioglu, Hakan Hadi; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Seven, Sabriye

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma-ray, laser light, and visible light, which neurons are commonly exposed to during treatment of various cranial diseases, on the viability of neurons. Materials and Methods: Neuronal cell culture was prepared from the frontal cortex of 9 newborn rats. Cultured cells were irradiated with gamma-ray for 1–10 min by 152Eu, 241Am, and 132Ba isotopes, visible light for 1–160 min, and laser light for 0.2–2 seconds. The MTT tetrazolium reduction assay was used to assess the number of viable cells in the neuronal cell cultures. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to determine Na, K, and Ca levels in cellular fluid obtained from neuronal cell culture plaques. Results: Under low-dose radiation with 152Eu, 241Am, and 132Ba isotopes, cell viability insignificantly decreased with time (p>0.05). On the other hand, exposure to visible light produced statistically significant decrease in cell viability at both short- (1–10 min) and long-term (20–160 min). Cell viability did not change with 2 seconds of laser exposure. Na, K, and Ca levels significantly decreased with gamma-ray and visible light. The level of oxidative stress markers significantly changed with gamma-ray. Conclusion: In conclusion, while low dose gamma-ray has slight to moderate apoptotic effect in neuronal cell cultures by oxidative stress, long-term visible light induces remarkable apoptosis and cell death. Laser light has no significant effect on neurons. Further genetic studies are needed to clarify the chronic effect of visible light on neuronal development and functions. PMID:27551168

  7. Effect of continuous irradiation with a very low dose of gamma rays on life span and the immune system in SJL mice prone to B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lacoste-Collin, L; Jozan, S; Cances-Lauwers, V; Pipy, B; Gasset, G; Caratero, C; Courtade-Saïdi, M

    2007-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to have dose- and dose-rate-dependent carcinogenic effects on the hematopoietic and lymphoreticular systems. We report here that continuous exposure to a low dose of gamma rays influences the course of spontaneous B-cell lymphoma in SJL mice. We studied the biological effects of 10 cGy year(-1) gamma rays on the life span of 560 4-week-old SJL/J female mice and on various parameters of the cell-mediated immune response. Life span was slightly prolonged. The mean survival was 397 days for controls and 417 days for irradiated mice that died with lymphoma (P = 0.34). In lymph nodes and spleen, lower percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed in irradiated mice before 32 weeks. Interestingly, the percentages of CD49+ NK cells were increased in the spleens of irradiated mice at 28 weeks (0.61 +/- 0.08% compared to 0.43 +/- 0.12% in controls, P = 0.01) and at 32 weeks (0.62 +/- 0.24% compared to 0.33 +/- 0.09%, P = 0.02), while NK cell activity remained unchanged in exposed mice. These results provide further support for the absence of harmful effects of a continuous very low dose of radiation on life span and incidence of lymphoma in SJL mice.

  8. Effect of low doses of gamma irradiation before incubation on hatchability and body weight of broiler chickens hatched under commercial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zakaria, A.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation before incubation on hatchability of eggs and body weight of chick at hatching. Commercial broiler parent stocks in their first laying year were used to supply hatching eggs. Five, four, and three independent trials of each dose were conducted at weekly intervals for a total of 10, 12, and 15 units for Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. A unit was an incubation tray of 150 eggs each. Experiments 1 and 2 used eggs from Strain 1 of high (greater than 90%) or medium (80 to 84%) fertility. Eggs of medium fertility from Strain 2 were used in Experiment 3. About 22,000 settable eggs of the commercial broiler parent stocks were treated with doses of 0 to 1.2 Gray (Gy) of gamma irradiation before incubation with a medical 60Co-machine at a dose rate of about .12 Gy/min. In all three experiments there were no significant differences in hatchability of eggs and body weight of chick at hatching among treatments.

  9. [Effect of continuous gamma-radiation at low doses on clonogenic hemopoietic (CFU-S) and stromal (CFU-F) bone marrow cells ].

    PubMed

    Domaratskaia, E I; Starostin, V I; Tsetlin, V V; Butorina, N N; Bueverova, E I; Bragina, E V; Khrushchov, N G

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of low doses of continuous gamma-irradiation (Co60, 10 days, mean daily dose power 1.5-2.0 mGy, total dose 15 mGy) on hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cells of murine bone marrow. The content of hemopoietic clonogenic cells representing a "younger" (CFU-S-11) and more "mature" (CFU-S-7) categories in the compartment of stem cells was determined in the bone marrow. The state of bone marrow stroma was estimated by the method of in vitro cloning according to the number of progenitor cells that form colonies of fibroblasts (CFU-F) and by the method of ectopic transplantation according to the capacity of stroma of organizing and building new hemopoietic territories. Continuous gamma-irradiation at low doses, that were by one order of magnitude lower than those inducing hermesis, exerted a stimulating effect on both hemopoietic (CFU-S) and stromal (CFU-F) progenitor cells. The number of CFU-S in the compartment of stem cells of the bone marrow markedly increased and they formed larger hemopoietic territories but these cells appeared to create a qualitatively different microenvironment, which stimulated the proliferation of CFU-S.

  10. Use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry for environmental assessment of the rehabilitated nabarlek uranium mine, Australia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul; Tims, Stephen; McGill, Anthony; Ryan, Bruce; Pfitzner, Kirrilly

    2006-04-01

    This article describes an airborne gamma survey of a 7 x 5 km region around the rehabilitated Nabarlek uranium mine in northern Australia. An unusually tight line spacing (100 m) and low aircraft height (50 m) were used, enabling the survey to distinguish man-made structures such as ponds and accommodation areas, as well as creek lines. Positive correlations between airborne data and ground-based readings enabled an estimation of the average absorbed dose rate arising from terrestrial gamma radiation over large areas of the site to be derived. For the fenced minesite area this estimate was 0.31 micro Gy hr(- 1). The airborne survey data were found to be invaluable in helping to plan further ground-level investigations and showed promise as an assessment tool for rehabilitated minesites.

  11. Gamma-dose rates from terrestrial and Chernobyl radionuclides inside and outside settlements in the Bryansk Region, Russia in 1996-2003.

    PubMed

    Ramzaev, Valery; Yonehara, Hidenori; Hille, Ralf; Barkovsky, Anatoly; Mishine, Arkady; Sahoo, Sarat Kumar; Kurotaki, Katsumi; Uchiyama, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    In order to estimate current external gamma doses to the population of the Russian territories contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident, absorbed gamma-dose rates in air (DR) were determined at typical urban and suburban locations. The study was performed in the western districts of the Bryansk Region within the areas of 30 settlements (28 villages and 2 towns) with the initial levels of 137Cs deposition ranging from 13 to 4340 kBqm(-2). In the towns, the living areas considered were private one-story wooden and stone houses. DR values were derived from in situ measurements performed with the help of gamma-dosimeters and gamma-spectrometers as well as from the results of soil samples analysis. In the areas under study, the values of DR from terrestrial radionuclides were 25+/-6, 24+/-5, 50+/-10, 32+/-6, 54+/-11, 24+/-8, 20+/-6, 25+/-8, and 18+/-5 nGyh(-1) at locations of kitchen gardens, dirt surfaces, asphalt surfaces, wooden houses, stone houses, grasslands inside settlement, grasslands outside settlement, ploughed fields, and forests, respectively. In 1996-2001, mean normalized (per MBqm(-2) of 137Cs current inventory in soil) values of DR from (137)Cs were 0.41+/-0.07, 0.26+/-0.13, 0.15+/-0.07, 0.10+/-0.05, 0.05+/-0.04, 0.48+/-0.12, 1.04+/-0.22, 0.37+/-0.07, and 1.15+/-0.19 microGyh(-1) at the locations of kitchen gardens, dirt surfaces, asphalt surfaces, wooden houses, stone houses, grasslands inside settlement, grasslands outside settlement, ploughed fields, and forests, respectively. The radiometric data from this work and the values of occupancy factors determined for the Russian population by others were used for the assessments of annual effective doses to three selected groups of rural population. The normalized (per MBqm(-2) 137Cs current ground deposition) external effective doses to adults from 137Cs ranged from 0.66 to 2.27 mSvy(-1) in the years 1996-2001, in accordance with professional activities and structures of living areas. For the

  12. Three-dimensional assessment of the effects of high-density embolization material on the absorbed dose in the target for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Sandhu, Divyajot; Warmington, Leighton; Moen, Sean; Tummala, Ramachandra

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an intracranial vascular disorder. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is used in conjunction with intraarterial embolization to eradicate the nidus of AVMs. Clinical results indicate that patients with prior embolization tend to gain less benefit from GKRS. The authors hypothesized that this was partly caused by dosimetric deficiency. The actual dose delivered to the target may be smaller than the intended dose because of increased photon attenuation by high-density embolic materials. The authors performed a phantom-based study to quantitatively evaluate the 3D dosimetric effect of embolic material on GKRS. METHODS A 16-cm-diameter and 12-cm-long cylindrical phantom with a 16-cm-diameter hemispherical dome was printed by a 3D printer. The phantom was filled with radiologically tissue-equivalent polymer gel. To simulate AVM treatment with embolization, phantoms contained Onyx 18. The material was injected into an AVM model, which was suspended in the polymer gel. The phantom was attached to a Leksell frame by standard GK fixation method, using aluminum screws, for imaging. The phantom was scanned by a Phillips CT scanner with the standard axial-scanning protocol (120 kV and 1.5-mm slice thickness). CT-based treatment planning was performed with the GammaPlan treatment planning system (version 10.1.1). The plan was created to cover a fictitious AVM target volume near the embolization areas with eleven 8-mm shots and a prescription dose of 20 Gy to 50% isodose level. Dose distributions were computed using both tissue maximum ratio (TMR) 10 and convolution dose-calculation algorithms. These two 3D dose distributions were compared using an in-house program. Additionally, the same analysis method was applied to evaluate the dosimetric effects for 2 patients previously treated by GKRS. RESULTS The phantom-based analyses showed that the mean dose difference between TMR 10 and convolution doses of the AVM target was no larger than

  13. Media information review, January--June 1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    The media information review, requested by the Communications Subcommittee of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), provides a general indication of the media`s areas of interests with regard to the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. This review briefly assesses 14 newspaper articles/advertisements collected between January and June 1992 by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). Articles that mention the project, activities closely associated with it, or members of the Panel were included in the analysis. The sources of the articles and announcements include most newspapers in the Northwest (dailies and weeklies) as collected and distributed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Hanford contractors by Westinghouse Hanford Company, Communications. National and international media coverage was provided during the review period by Burrelle`s Press Clipping Service, New York, and A.T.P., New Jersey. The articles and advertisements represent those collected and judged applicable to issues and activities associated with the Technical Steering Panel and the Hanford Environmental dose Reconstruction Project. The collection is not considered inclusive of every written account of the subject, but as good a representative collection as reasonable. This review is unscientific and is not meant to display a technical analysis of the materials.

  14. A preliminary examination of audience-related communications issues for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, C.W.

    1991-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation doses people may have received from exposure to radioactive materials released during past operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project was initiated in response to public concerns about possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to effectively communicate to the many different concerned audiences. Accordingly, the TSP directed PNL to examine methods for communicating causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. After considering the directive and discussing it with the Communications Subcommittee of the TSP, PNL undertook a broad investigation of communications methods to consider for inclusion in the TSP's current communications program. As part of this investigation, a literature review was conducted regarding risk communications. A key finding was that, in order to successfully communicate risk-related information, a thorough understanding of the knowledge level, concerns and information needs of the intended recipients (i.e., the audience) is necessary. Hence, a preliminary audience analysis was conducted as part of the present research. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. 1 ref., 9 tabs.

  15. Summary of literature review of risk communication: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Byram, S.J.

    1991-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation exposures people may have received from radioactive materials released during past operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The project is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) will use HEDR dose estimates in studies to investigate a potential link between thyroid disease and historical Hanford emissions. The HEDR Project was initiated to address public concerns about the possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to communicate effectively to the many different concerned audiences. To identify and develop these mechanisms, the TSP issued Directive 89-7 to PNL in May 1989. The TSP directed PNL to examine methods to communicate the causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. A literature review was conducted as the first activity in response to the TSP's directive. This report presents the results of the literature review. The objective of the literature review was to identify key principles'' that could be applied to develop communications strategies for the project. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Comparative study of equimolar doses of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) on catalepsy after acute and chronic administration.

    PubMed

    Towiwat, Pasarapa; Phattanarudee, Siripan; Maher, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and its precursors 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) are known drugs of abuse. The ability of acute and chronic administration of equimolar doses of GHB (200mg/kg), 1,4-BD (174mg/kg) and GBL (166mg/kg) to produce catalepsy in male Swiss Webster mice was examined. GHB, 1,4-BD, GBL produced catalepsy when injected acutely. Drug treatment was then continued for 14days. Tolerance development was determined on days 6, 14, and challenged with a higher dose on day 15 in those chronically pretreated mice, and compared with naïve mice. Chronic GHB produced tolerance to catalepsy, as evidenced from area under the curve (AUC) of catalepsy versus time (min-sec) on days 6 (678±254), 14 (272±247), which were less than those on day 1 (1923±269). However, less tolerance was seen from GBL or 1,4-BD, as AUCs on days 6 and 14 were not significantly lower than that of day 1. In conclusion, although equimolar doses were used, expecting similar levels of GHB in the body, 1,4-BD and GBL shared only some of the in vivo effects of GHB. The rate of metabolic conversion of 1,4-BD and GBL into GHB might be responsible for the differences in the tolerance development to these drugs.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution in water around 57Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticle in the nuclear gamma resonance condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbasov, R.; Polikarpov, M.; Safronov, V.; Sozontov, E.; Yurenya, A.; Panchenko, V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work was proposed a new radiotherapy enhancement method consisting of the administration of magnetic nanoparticles into the cells with further irradiation with a gamma-ray beam. As a result, adjusting the energy distribution of a gamma-ray beam and 57Fe abundance it is possible to achieve an extremely intensive electron emission because of a nuclear resonance. The produced conversion and Auger electrons can be used as an effective tool for DNA lesions production. We developed a Monte Carlo model for an electron and gamma emission by 57Fe nucleus using the Geant4 program package. The parameters of a resonant absorption were taken from Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles synthesized for the administration into live cells. The space distribution of the radiation dose showed an increase in the dose of 2-2.5 times in the case of the natural abundance and more than 50 times in the case of the 66 % enrichment of the nanoparticles.

  18. Skin dose from neutron-activated soil for early entrants following the A-bomb detonation in Hiroshima: contribution from beta and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2008-07-01

    Epilation was reported among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, including "early entrance survivors" who entered the cities after the bombings. The absorbed dose to the skin by neutron-activated soil via beta and gamma rays has been estimated in a preliminary fashion, for these survivors in Hiroshima. Estimation was done for external exposures from activated soil on the ground as well as skin and hair contamination from activated soil particles, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. Assuming 26 mum thickness of activated soil on the skin as an example, the skin dose was estimated to be about 0.8 Gy, for an exposure scenario that includes the first 7 days after the bombing at 1 m above the ground at the hypocenter. In this case, 99% of the total skin dose came from activated radionuclides in the soil, i.e., 0.19 and 0.63 Gy due to beta and gamma rays, respectively. In contrast, contribution to skin dose due to skin contamination with soil particles was found to be about 1%. To make it comparable to the exposure by neutron-activated soil on the ground, a soil thickness on the skin of about 1 mm would be required, which seems to be difficult to keep for a long time. Fifty-five percent of the 7-day skin dose was delivered during the first hour after the bombing. Our estimates of the skin dose are lower than the conventionally reported threshold of 2 Gy for epilation. It should be noted, however, that the possibility of more extreme exposure scenarios for example for entrants who received much heavier soil contamination on their skin cannot be excluded.

  19. Commercial production and distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables: A scoping study on the importance of produce pathways to dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T.L.; Anderson, D.M.; Farris, W.T.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report summarizes a scoping study that examined the potential importance of fresh fruit and vegetable pathways to dose. A simple production index was constructed with data collected from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), the United States Bureau of the Census, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff from Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, in cooperation with members of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), selected lettuce and spinach as the produce pathways most likely to impact dose. County agricultural reports published in 1956 provided historical descriptions of the predominant distribution patterns of fresh lettuce and spinach from production regions to local population centers. Pathway rankings and screening dose estimates were calculated for specific populations living in selected locations within the HEDR study area.

  20. Offsite radiation doses summarized from Hanford environmental monitoring reports for the years 1957-1984. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Soldat, J.K.; Price, K.R.; McCormack, W.D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1957, evaluations of offsite impacts from each year of operation have been summarized in publicly available, annual environmental reports. These evaluations included estimates of potential radiation exposure to members of the public, either in terms of percentages of the then permissible limits or in terms of radiation dose. The estimated potential radiation doses to maximally exposed individuals from each year of Hanford operations are summarized in a series of tables and figures. The applicable standard for radiation dose to an individual for whom the maximum exposure was estimated is also shown. Although the estimates address potential radiation doses to the public from each year of operations at Hanford between 1957 and 1984, their sum will not produce an accurate estimate of doses accumulated over this time period. The estimates were the best evaluations available at the time to assess potential dose from the current year of operation as well as from any radionuclides still present in the environment from previous years of operation. There was a constant striving for improved evaluation of the potential radiation doses received by members of the public, and as a result the methods and assumptions used to estimate doses were periodically modified to add new pathways of exposure and to increase the accuracy of the dose calculations. Three conclusions were reached from this review: radiation doses reported for the years 1957 through 1984 for the maximum individual did not exceed the applicable dose standards; radiation doses reported over the past 27 years are not additive because of the changing and inconsistent methods used; and results from environmental monitoring and the associated dose calculations reported over the 27 years from 1957 through 1984 do not suggest a significant dose contribution from the buildup in the environment of radioactive materials associated with Hanford operations.

  1. Differential dose volume histograms of Gamma Knife in the presence of inhomogeneities using MRI-polymer gel dosimetry and MC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Riahi Alam, Nader; Ay, Mohammad-Reza; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad-Hasan

    2009-07-15

    Polymer gel dosimeters offer a practical solution to 3D dose verification for conventional radiotherapy as well as intensity-modulated and stereotactic radiotherapy. In this study, EGSnrc calculated and PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter measured dose volume histograms (DVHs) for single-shot irradiations of the Gamma Knife (GK) unit were used to investigate the effects of the presence of inhomogeneities on 3D dose distribution. The head phantom was a custom-built 16 cm diameter Plexiglas sphere. Inside the phantom, there is a cubic cutout for inserting the gel vials and another cutout for inserting the inhomogeneities. Following irradiation with the GK unit, the polymer gel phantoms were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Comparing the results of measurement in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms revealed that inserting inhomogeneities inside the homogeneous phantom did not cause considerable disturbances on dose distribution in irradiation with 8 mm collimator within low isodose levels (<50%), which is essential for the dose sparing of sensitive structures. The results of simulation for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms in irradiation with 18 mm collimator of the GK unit showed 23.24% difference in DVH within 90%-100% relative isodose level and also revealed that a significant part of the target (28.56%) received relative doses higher than the maximum dose, which exceeds the acceptance criterion (5%). Based on these results it is concluded that the presence of inhomogeneities inside the phantom can cause considerable errors in dose calculation within high isodose levels with respect to LGP prediction which assumes that the target is a homogeneous material. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the applied MC code is an accurate and stand-alone tool for 3D evaluation of dose distribution in irradiation with the GK unit, which can provide important, 3D plan evaluation criteria used in clinical practice.

  2. Summary of the environmental dose models used at DOE nuclear sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Mueller, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. This review includes a summary of the methods used in 1979 as described in annual environmental reports submitted by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors. The methods used ranged from estimating public doses based on environmental measurements and comparison to the DOE concentration guides, to complex methods using environmental pathway modeling and estimated radionuclide releases. No two sites used the same combination of measurements and pathway models in their analysis. While most sites used an atmospheric dispersion model to predict air concentrations of radioactive material, only about half of the sites provided enough information about the model used to permit proper model evaluation. The waterborne pathways related to drinking water or ingestion of fish were generally well described, while the external exposure or terrestrial food pathways were often not considered. The major recommendation resulting from this review was that complete documentations of the models used should be included either within the annual reports or as separate readily available documents. In addition, most sites could make better use of graphics (i.e., tables and figures) to better communicate the findings of their analyses.

  3. Evaluation of radioactive environmental hazards in Area-3, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria using airborne spectrometric gamma technique.

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Aissa, M; Al-Hent, R

    2016-01-01

    Airborne spectrometric gamma data are used in this paper to estimate the degree of radioactive hazard on humanity in Area-3, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria. Exposure Rate (ER), Absorbed Dose Rate (ADR), Annual Effective Dose Rate (AEDR), and Heat Production (HP) of the eleven radiometric units included in the established lithological scored map in the study area have been computed to evaluate the radiation background influence in humans. The results obtained indicate that a human body in Area-3 is subjected to radiation hazards in the acceptable limits for long duration exposure. The highest radiogenetic heat production values in Area-3 correspond to the phosphatic locations characterized by relatively high values of uranium and thorium.

  4. The usefulness of a continuous administration of tirapazamine combined with reduced dose-rate irradiation using {gamma}-rays or reactor thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y; Nagata, K; Suzuki, M; Maruhashi, A; Kinashi, Y; Nagasawa, H; Uto, Y; Hori, H; Ono, K

    2006-12-01

    We clarified the usefulness of the continuous administration of tirapazamine (TPZ) in combination with reduced dose-rate irradiation (RDRI) using gamma-rays or reactor thermal neutrons. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) VII tumour-bearing mice received a continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. Then, they received a single intraperitoneal injection or 24 h continuous subcutaneous infusion of TPZ in combination with conventional dose-rate irradiation (CDRI) or RDRI using gamma-rays or thermal neutrons. After irradiation, the tumour cells were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker, and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labelling ( = quiescent (Q) cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency in the total tumour cells was determined using tumours that were not pre-treated with BrdU. The sensitivity of both total and Q cells, especially of Q cells, was significantly reduced with RDRI compared with CDRI. Combination of TPZ increased the sensitivity of both populations, with a slightly more remarkable increase in Q cells. Furthermore, the continuous administration of TPZ raised the sensitivity of both total and Q cell populations, especially the former, more markedly than the single administration, whether combined with CDRI or RDRI using gamma-rays or thermal neutrons. From the viewpoint of solid tumour control as a whole, including intratumour Q-cell control, the use of TPZ, especially when administered continuously, combined with RDRI, is useful for suppressing the reduction in the sensitivity of tumour cells caused by the decrease in irradiation dose rate in vivo.

  5. Biomarkers of internal dose for the assessment of environmental exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; D'Errico, Maria Nicolà; Fustinoni, Silvia; Drago, Ignazio; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Carrieri, Mariella; Apostoli, Pietro; Soleo, Leonardo

    2011-10-01

    The urinary excretion of t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA) and urinary benzene and the influence of a smoking habit and of exposure to urban traffic on the urinary excretion of these biomarkers were investigated in 137 male adults from the general population. All subjects were not occupationally exposed to benzene and resident in two cities in Puglia (Southern-Italy). Environmental exposure to benzene was measured using passive personal samplers. The biomarkers t,t-MA, SPMA and urinary benzene were determined in urine samples collected from each subject at the end of the environmental sampling. The percentage of cases above the limit of detection was higher for SPMA and urinary benzene in smokers than in non-smokers, and for airborne benzene and urinary benzene in subjects exposed to urban traffic. Airborne benzene was correlated with the time spent in urban traffic during the environmental sampling. Among the biomarkers, urinary benzene was found to be correlated with airborne benzene only in non-smokers, and with the time spent in urban traffic, both in smokers and non-smokers considered together, and in non-smokers only. Finally, multiple regression analysis showed that the urinary excretion of all the biomarkers was dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked per day and, for urinary benzene, also on the time spent in urban traffic. In conclusion, urinary benzene seems to be a more valid biomarker than t,t-MA and SPMA to assess environmental exposure to extremely low concentrations of benzene. Cigarette smoking prevailed over traffic exhaust fumes in determining the internal dose of benzene.

  6. LINK BETWEEN LOW-DOSE ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT CADMIUM EXPOSURES AND ASTHENOZOOSPERMIA IN A RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Benoff, Susan; Auborn, Karen; Marmar, Joel L.; Hurley, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To define the mechanism(s) underlying an association between asthenozoospermia and elevated blood, seminal plasma and testicular cadmium levels in infertile human males using a rat model of environmentally relevant cadmium exposures. Setting University medical center andrology research laboratory. Animals Male Wistar rats (n = 60), documented to be sensitive to the testicular effects of cadmium. Interventions Rats were given ad libitum access to water supplemented with 14% sucrose and 0, 5, 50 or 100 mg/L cadmium for 1, 4 or 8 weeks being at puberty. Main outcome measure(s) Testicular cadmium levels were determined by atomic absorption, cauda epididymal sperm motility by visual inspection, and testicular gene expression by DNA microarray hybridization. Results Chronic, low dose cadmium exposures produced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in sperm motility. Transcription of genes regulated by calcium and expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel mRNA splicing variants were altered by cadmium exposure. Expression of calcium binding proteins involved in modulation of sperm motility was unaffected. Conclusions A causal relationship between elevated testicular cadmium and asthenozoospermia was identified. Aberrrant sperm motility was correlated with altered expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel isoforms found on the sperm tail, which regulate calcium and cadmium influx. PMID:18308070

  7. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Graphical Environmental Tools for Application to Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, D.C.; Blair, M.; Pauly, S., Todd, R.

    2007-05-25

    In this CRADA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) assisted RIS Corporation of Knoxville, TN, in the development of graphical environment tools for the development and programming of high speed real-time algorithms to be implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The primary application was intended to be digital signal processing for gamma-ray spectroscopy, in particular for Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays such as the GRETINA project. Key components of this work included assembling an evaluation platform to verify designs on actual hardware, and creating various types of Simulink functional blocks for peak-shaping and constant-fraction discrimination.

  9. Juvenile Male Rats Exposed to a Low-Dose Mixture of Twenty-Seven Environmental Chemicals Display Adverse Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Svingen, Terje; Mandrup, Karen; Skov, Kasper; Pedersen, Mikael; Frederiksen, Hanne; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to a large number of environmental chemicals in their daily life, many of which are readily detectable in blood or urine. It remains uncertain if these chemicals can cause adverse health effects when present together at low doses. In this study we have tested whether a mixture of 27 chemicals administered orally to juvenile male rats for three months could leave a pathophysiological footprint. The mixture contained metals, perfluorinated compounds, PCB, dioxins, pesticides, heterocyclic amines, phthalate, PAHs and others, with a combined dose of 0.16 (Low dose), 0.47 (Mid dose) or 1.6 (High dose) mg/kg bw/day. The lowest dose was designed with the aim of obtaining plasma or urine concentrations in rats at levels approaching those observed in humans. Some single congeners were administered at doses representative of combined doses for chemical groups. With this baseline, we found effects on weight, histology and gene expression in the liver, as well as changes to the blood plasma metabolome in all exposure groups, including low-dose. Additional adverse effects were observed in the higher dosed groups, including enlarged kidneys and alterations to the metabolome. No significant effects on reproductive parameters were observed. PMID:27598887

  10. MFISH Measurements of Chromosomal Aberrations Individuals Exposed in Utero to Gamma-ray Doses from 5 to 20 cGy

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-11-17

    Our plan was to identify and obtain blood from 36 individuals from the Mayak-in-utero exposed cohort who were exposed in utero only to gamma ray does doses fro 5 to 20 cGy. Our goal is to do mFISH and in a new development, single-arm mFISH on these samples to measure stable chromosome aberrations in these now adult individuals. The results were compared with matched control individuals (same age, same gender) available from the large control population which we are studying in the context of our plutonium worker study. The long term goal was to assess the results both in terms of the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to low doses of ionizing radiation, and in terms of different potential mechanisms (expanded clonal origin vs. induced instability) for an increased risk.

  11. Toxicokinetics of the Sterioisomer Specific Flame Retardant Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Gamma: Effect of Dose, Time, and Repeated Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) are high production volume brominated aliphatic cyclic hydrocarbons used as flame-retardants in foams, plastics and textiles. Commercial HBCD is a mixture of three main stereoisomers, alpha (α), beta (β) and gamma (γ). A shift from the high percent...

  12. Gamma irradiation dose: Effects on spinach baby-leaf ascorbic acid, carotenoids, folate, alpha-tocopherol, and phylloquinone concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ionizing radiation of fruits and vegetables, in the form of gamma rays or electron beams, is effective in overcoming quarantine barriers in trade, decontamination, disinfestation and prolonging shelf life, but a void of information persists on ionizing radiation effects of vitamin profiles in indivi...

  13. Pantex Plant Cell 12-44-1 tritium release: Re-assessment of environmental doses for 1990 to 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.F.; Hwang, S.T.

    1994-03-01

    A release of tritium gas occurred within Cell 12-44-1 at the Pantex Plant on May 17, 1989. The release was the result of a nuclear component containment failure. This document summarizes past assessments and characterization of the release. From 1990 to 1992, the average annual dose to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), re-assessed using updated methods and data, ranged from 9E-6 to 2E-4 mrem/y. Doses at this level are well below the regulatory dose limit and support the discontinuation of the distinct calculation of the MEI doses from the cell`s tritium releases in future Pantex Annual Site Environmental Reports. Additional information provides guidance for the evaluation of similar releases in the future. Improved Environmental Protection Department sampling plans and assessment goals will increase the value of the data collected during future incidents.

  14. Bisphenol A exposure at an environmentally relevant dose induces meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Renyan; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Wu, Hongjuan; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Whether environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may induce reproductive disorders is still controversial but certain studies have reported that BPA may cause meiotic abnormalities in C. elegans and female mice. However, little is known about the effect of BPA on meiosis in adult males. To determine whether BPA exposure at an environmentally relevant dose could induce meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 20 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. We found that BPA significantly increased the proportion of stage VII seminiferous epithelium and decreased the proportion of stage VIII. Consequently, spermiation was inhibited and spermatogenesis was disrupted. Further investigation revealed that BPA exposure delayed meiosis initiation in the early meiotic stage and induced the accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the late meiotic stage. The latter event subsequently activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (ATM). Our results suggest that long-term exposure to BPA may lead to continuous meiotic abnormalities and ultimately put mammalian reproductive health at risk.

  15. Terrestrial gamma dose rate, radioactivity and radiological hazards in the rocks of an elevated radiation background in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien; Alnhary, Anees; Fadhl, Shadi

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate natural radiation and radioactivity in the rock and to assess the corresponding health risk in a region of elevated background radiation in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen. The mean external gamma dose rate was 374 nGy h(-1) which is approximately six times the world average. The measured results were used to compute annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk, which are 2.298 mSv, 61.95 man Sv y(-1) and 8.043  ×  10(-3), respectively. Rocks samples from different geological formations were analyzed for quantitative determination of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The specific activity of the rocks samples ranges from 7  ±  1 Bq Kg(-1) to 12 513  ±  329 Bq Kg(-1) for (232)Th, from 6  ±  1 Bq kg(-1) to 3089  ±  74 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra and 702  ±  69 Bq kg(-1) to 2954  ±  285 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. (232)Th is the main contributor to gamma dose rate from the rock samples. Indicators of radiological health impact, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are 3738 Bq kg(-1) and 10.10, respectively. The mean external hazard index was ten times unity in the studied locations in Juban District, which is higher than the recommended value.

  16. Radionuclide releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1971. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Bates, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One source of radionuclide releases to the Columbia River was from production reactor operations. This report provides a quantitative estimate of the amount of radioactivity released each month (1944--1971) to the Columbia River from eleven radionuclides as well as from gross beta activity.

  17. Radionuclide releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1971. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Bates, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One source of radionuclide releases to the Columbia River was from production reactor operations. This report provides a quantitative estimate of the amount of radioactivity released each month (1944--1971) to the Columbia River from eleven radionuclides as well as from gross beta activity.

  18. Summary of the March 25--26, 1991 atmospheric model working meeting. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1992-07-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations for the initial phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project were made using the MESOILT2 computer code (Ramsdell and Burk 1991). This code implemented a Lagrangian trajectory, puff dispersion model using components from other models designed primarily for regulatory applications. Uncertainty in the dispersion calculations was estimated following model calculations. The results of the atmospheric dispersion calculations were summarized in frequency distributions by location for use in preliminary dose calculations.

  19. Gamma-ray Full Spectrum Analysis for Environmental Radioactivity by HPGe Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Meeyoung; Lee, Kyeong Beom; Kim, Kyeong Ja; Lee, Min-Kie; Han, Ju-Bong

    2014-12-01

    Odyssey, one of the NASA¡¯s Mars exploration program and SELENE (Kaguya), a Japanese lunar orbiting spacecraft have a payload of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) for analyzing radioactive chemical elements of the atmosphere and the surface. In these days, gamma-ray spectroscopy with a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been widely used for the activity measurements of natural radionuclides contained in the soil of the Earth. The energy spectra obtained by the HPGe detectors have been generally analyzed by means of the Window Analysis (WA) method. In this method, activity concentrations are determined by using the net counts of energy window around individual peaks. Meanwhile, an alternative method, the so-called Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) method uses count numbers not only from full-absorption peaks but from the contributions of Compton scattering due to gamma-rays. Consequently, while it takes a substantial time to obtain a statistically significant result in the WA method, the FSA method requires a much shorter time to reach the same level of the statistical significance. This study shows the validation results of FSA method. We have compared the concentration of radioactivity of 40K, 232Th and 238U in the soil measured by the WA method and the FSA method, respectively. The gamma-ray spectrum of reference materials (RGU and RGTh, KCl) and soil samples were measured by the 120% HPGe detector with cosmic muon veto detector. According to the comparison result of activity concentrations between the FSA and the WA, we could conclude that FSA method is validated against the WA method. This study implies that the FSA method can be used in a harsh measurement environment, such as the gamma-ray measurement in the Moon, in which the level of statistical significance is usually required in a much shorter data acquisition time than the WA method.

  20. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Does Not Affect the Quality or Total Ascorbic Acid Concentration of “Sweetheart” Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis)

    PubMed Central

    Golding, John B.; Blades, Barbara L.; Satyan, Shashirekha; Spohr, Lorraine J.; Harris, Anne; Jessup, Andrew J.; Archer, John R.; Davies, Justin B.; Banos, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis, Sims, cultivar “Sweetheart”) were subject to gamma irradiation at levels suitable for phytosanitary purposes (0, 150, 400 and 1000 Gy) then stored at 8 °C and assessed for fruit quality and total ascorbic acid concentration after one and fourteen days. Irradiation at any dose (≤1000 Gy) did not affect passionfruit quality (overall fruit quality, colour, firmness, fruit shrivel, stem condition, weight loss, total soluble solids level (TSS), titratable acidity (TA) level, TSS/TA ratio, juice pH and rot development), nor the total ascorbic acid concentration. The length of time in storage affected some fruit quality parameters and total ascorbic acid concentration, with longer storage periods resulting in lower quality fruit and lower total ascorbic acid concentration, irrespective of irradiation. There was no interaction between irradiation treatment and storage time, indicating that irradiation did not influence the effect of storage on passionfruit quality. The results showed that the application of 150, 400 and 1000 Gy gamma irradiation to “Sweetheart” purple passionfruit did not produce any deleterious effects on fruit quality or total ascorbic acid concentration during cold storage, thus supporting the use of low dose irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment against quarantine pests in purple passionfruit. PMID:28231212

  1. Modifications in rat testicular morphology and increases in IFN-gamma serum levels by the oral administration of subtoxic doses of mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Penna, Salvador; Pocino, Marisol; Marval, Maria Josefina; Lloreta, José; Gallardo, Luis; Vila, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Mercury induces structural and functional damage in several organs, however the effects of subtoxic doses of the metal on the male reproductive system are not well defined. In order to analyze testicular and epididymal morphological alterations and changes in IL-4 or IFN-gamma serum levels, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0.01, 0.05 or 0.1 microg/ml of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) in deionized water for 1 to 7 months by oral route. Controls received deionized water alone. Twenty rats, separated in four groups of five animals each, were used per time of exposure. Progressive degenerative lesions consisting of lack of germ cell cohesion and desquamation, arrest at spermatocyte stage and hypospermatogenesis were observed in seminiferous epithelium by light and electron microscopy. Leydig cells showed cytoplasmic vacuolation and nuclear signs of cell death. Loss of peritubular cell aggregation was evidenced in the epididymis. Mercury accumulation was detected in both organs by mass spectroscopy. Rats showed enhanced IFN-gamma serum levels as compared to controls but only reached significance after 7 months of mercury administration. Subtoxic doses of inorganic mercury could lead to reproductive and immunological alterations. The results demonstrate that sublethal concentrations of mercuric chloride are enough to induce morphological and ultrastructural modifications in male reproductive organs. These contribute to functional alterations of spermatogenesis with arrest at spermatocyte stage, hypospermatogenesis and possibly impaired steroidogenesis which together could affect male fertility.

  2. Calibration Curve for Dicentric Chromosomes Induced in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Gamma Rays at a Dose Rate of 12.5 mGy/s

    PubMed Central

    Que, Tran; Duy, Pham Ngoc; Luyen, Bui Thi Kim

    2016-01-01

    To develop a calibration curve for induction of dicentric chromosomes by radiation, we have used a 60Co gamma-ray source with dose rate of 12.5 mGy/s. Whole blood from 15 healthy donors was collected. Whole blood from each donor was divided equally into 8 parts for exposing to supposedly physical doses 0, 0.30, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50, 2.00, 3.00 and 4.00 Gy for a independent calibration curve. Whole blood from 15 donors was used to calibrate dose – effect and statistical for general calibration curve. Using Poisson test (U-test) for the distribution of dicentric chromosomes in the metaphases to determine the uniformity of the radiation field. The average from 15 independent calibration curves of linear correlated coefficient was determined to be r (y, d) = 0.5136 ± 0.0038. The model equation derived is y = aD + bD2 + C. The calibration equation of dose-effect was y = 1.01D + 4.43D2 + 0.56. PMID:28217278

  3. Calibration Curve for Dicentric Chromosomes Induced in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Gamma Rays at a Dose Rate of 12.5 mGy/s.

    PubMed

    Que, Tran; Duy, Pham Ngoc; Luyen, Bui Thi Kim

    2016-01-01

    To develop a calibration curve for induction of dicentric chromosomes by radiation, we have used a 60Co gamma-ray source with dose rate of 12.5 mGy/s. Whole blood from 15 healthy donors was collected. Whole blood from each donor was divided equally into 8 parts for exposing to supposedly physical doses 0, 0.30, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50, 2.00, 3.00 and 4.00 Gy for a independent calibration curve. Whole blood from 15 donors was used to calibrate dose - effect and statistical for general calibration curve. Using Poisson test (U-test) for the distribution of dicentric chromosomes in the metaphases to determine the uniformity of the radiation field. The average from 15 independent calibration curves of linear correlated coefficient was determined to be r (y, d) = 0.5136 ± 0.0038. The model equation derived is y = aD + bD(2) + C. The calibration equation of dose-effect was y = 1.01D + 4.43D(2) + 0.56.

  4. Evaluation of dose delivery accuracy of gamma knife using MRI polymer gel dosimeter in an inhomogeneous phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourfallah T, A.; Alam N, Riahi; M, Allahverdi; M, Ay; M, Zahmatkesh

    2009-05-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry is still the only dosimetry method for directly measuring three-dimensional dose distributions. MRI Polymer gel dosimeters are tissue equivalent and can act as a phantom material. Because of high dose response sensitivity, the MRI was chosen as readout device. In this study dose profiles calculated with treatment-planning software (LGP) and measurements with the MR polymer gel dosimeter for single-shot irradiations were compared. A custom-built 16 cm diameter spherical plexiglas head phantom was used in this study. Inside the phantom, there is a cubic cutout for insertion of gel phantoms and another cutout for inserting the inhomogeneities. The phantoms were scanned with a 1.5T MRI (Siemens syngo MR 2004A 4VA25A) scanner. The multiple spin-echo sequence with 32 echoes was used for the MRI scans. Calibration relations between the spin-spin relaxation rate and the absorbed dose were obtained by using small cylindrical vials, which were filled with the PAGAT polymer gel from the same batch as for the spherical phantom. 1D and 2D data obtained using gel dosimeter for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with dose obtained using LGP calculation. The distance between relative isodose curves obtained for homogeneous phantom and heterogeneous phantoms exceed the accepted total positioning error (>±2mm). The findings of this study indicate that dose measurement using PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used for verifying dose delivering accuracy in GK unit in presence of inhomogeneities.

  5. Modeling aeolian transport of soil-bound plutonium: considering infrequent but normal environmental disturbances is critical in estimating future dose.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Erika A; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Eisele, William F; Breshears, David D; Kirchner, Thomas B

    2013-06-01

    Dose assessments typically consider environmental systems as static through time, but environmental disturbances such as drought and fire are normal, albeit infrequent, events that can impact dose-influential attributes of many environmental systems. These phenomena occur over time frames of decades or longer, and are likely to be exacerbated under projected warmer, drier climate. As with other types of dose assessment, the impacts of environmental disturbances are often overlooked when evaluating dose from aeolian transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. Especially lacking are predictions that account for potential changing vegetation cover effects on radionuclide transport over the long time frames required by regulations. A recently developed dynamic wind-transport model that included vegetation succession and environmental disturbance provides more realistic long-term predictability. This study utilized the model to estimate emission rates for aeolian transport, and compare atmospheric dispersion and deposition rates of airborne plutonium-contaminated soil into neighboring areas with and without environmental disturbances. Specifically, the objective of this study was to utilize the model results as input for a widely used dose assessment model (CAP-88). Our case study focused on low levels of residual plutonium found in soils from past operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, NM, located in the semiarid southwestern USA. Calculations were conducted for different disturbance scenarios based on conditions associated with current climate, and a potential future drier and warmer climate. Known soil and sediment concentrations of plutonium were used to model dispersal and deposition of windblown residual plutonium, as a function of distance and direction. Environmental disturbances that affected vegetation cover included ground fire, crown fire, and drought, with reoccurrence rates for current climate based on site historical

  6. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user`s guide, and a programmer`s guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user`s guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user`s guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer`s guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer`s guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements.

  7. Environmental application of gamma technology: Update on the Canadian sludge irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Fraser, Frank M.

    1993-10-01

    Waste treatment and disposal technologies have recently been subjected to increasing public and regulatory scrutiny. Concern for the environment and a heightened awareness of potential health hazards that could result from insufficient or inappropriate waste handling methods have combined to push waste generators in their search for new treatment alternatives. Gamma technology can offer a new option for the treatment of potentially infectious wastes, including municipal sewage sludge. Sewage sludge contains beneficial plant nutrients and a high organic component that make it ideal as a soil conditioning agent or fertilizer bulking material. It also carries potentially infectious microorganisms which limit opportunities for beneficial recycling of sludges. Gamma irradiation-disinfection of these sludges offers a reliable, fast and efficient method for safe sludge recycling. Nordion International's Market Development Division was created in 1987 as part of a broad corporate reorganization. It was given an exclusive mandate to develop new applications of gamma irradiation technology and markets for these new applications. Nordion has since explored and developed opportunities in food irradiation, pharmaceutical/cosmetic products irradiation, biomedical waste sterilization, airline waste disinfection, and sludge disinfection for recycling. This paper focuses on the last of these -a proposed sludge recycling facility that incorporates a cobalt 60 sludge irradiator.

  8. Low dose of the gamma acute radiation syndrome (1.5 Gy) does not significantly alter either cognitive behavior or dopaminergic and serotoninergic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Martin, S; Viret, R; Denis, J; Mirguet, F; Diserbo, M; Multon, E; Lamproglou, I

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the early-delayed effects of a low dose of the gamma acute radiation syndrome (1.5 Gy) on memory and on dopaminergic and serotoninergic metabolism in Swiss albino CD1 mice, of various ages (6, 10 and 20 weeks). At different times after irradiation (from 24 hr to three months), the mice were trained in a single-trial passive avoidance task and tested for retention either 24 hr or 5 days later. Their performance was compared to that of mice that were sham-irradiated. At the end of the behavioral test (days 3, 9, 30 and 93), the concentrations of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) and their metabolites were determined in hippocampus, anterior cortex and striatum of mice irradiated at the age of six weeks. No significant behavioral effect was observed whichever the age of the animals or the delay of observation. On the contrary at the moderate dose of 4.5 Gy we observed a significant memory deficit 9 days after the exposure. Considering the neurochemical study, in the striatum or in the frontal cortex, no significant modification was observed whichever the delay or the molecule. In the hippocampus slight modifications were noted: an increase (+144%, p = 0.002) in DA level on day 3 after exposure, and a decrease (-27%, p = 0.028) of 5HT level on day 30 post-irradiation. These modifications were only transient and not associated to modifications of the catabolites. This study demonstrates that total-body exposure to gamma radiation at low dose seems to induce only slight effects on the central nervous system.

  9. Changes in mammary histology and transcriptome profiles by low-dose exposure to environmental phenols at critical windows of development.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Kalpana; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Lambertini, Luca; Wetmur, James; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Panzacchi, Simona; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals has been linked to altered mammary development and cancer risk at high doses using animal models. Effects at low doses comparable to human exposure remain poorly understood, especially during critical developmental windows. We investigated the effects of two environmental phenols commonly used in personal care products - methyl paraben (MPB) and triclosan (TCS) - on the histology and transcriptome of normal mammary glands at low doses mimicking human exposure during critical windows of development. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed during perinatal, prepubertal and pubertal windows, as well as from birth to lactation. Low-dose exposure to MPB and TCS induced measurable changes in both mammary histology (by Masson's Trichrome Stain) and transcriptome (by microarrays) in a window-specific fashion. Puberty represented a window of heightened sensitivity to MPB, with increased glandular tissue and changes of expression in 295 genes with significant enrichment in functions such as DNA replication and cell cycle regulation. Long-term exposure to TCS from birth to lactation was associated with increased adipose and reduced glandular and secretory tissue, with expression alterations in 993 genes enriched in pathways such as cholesterol synthesis and adipogenesis. Finally, enrichment analyses revealed that genes modified by MPB and TCS were over-represented in human breast cancer gene signatures, suggesting possible links with breast carcinogenesis. These findings highlight the issues of critical windows of susceptibility that may confer heightened sensitivity to environmental insults and implicate the potential health effects of these ubiquitous environmental chemicals in breast cancer.

  10. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  11. Effect of Low Doses (5-40 cGy) of Gamma-irradiation on Lifespan and Stress-related Genes Expression Profile in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Zhikrevetskaya, Svetlana; Peregudova, Darya; Danilov, Anton; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Krasnov, George; Dmitriev, Alexey; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Studying of the effects of low doses of γ-irradiation is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. The goal of this work is to identify changes of lifespan and expression stress-sensitive genes in Drosophila melanogaster, exposed to low doses of γ-irradiation (5 – 40 cGy) on the imaginal stage of development. Although some changes in life extensity in males were identified (the effect of hormesis after the exposure to 5, 10 and 40 cGy) as well as in females (the effect of hormesis after the exposure to 5 and 40 cGy), they were not caused by the organism “physiological” changes. This means that the observed changes in life expectancy are not related to the changes of organism physiological functions after the exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. The identified changes in gene expression are not dose-dependent, there is not any proportionality between dose and its impact on expression. These results reflect nonlinear effects of low dose radiation and sex-specific radio-resistance of the postmitotic cell state of Drosophila melanogaster imago. PMID:26248317

  12. Effect of Low Doses (5-40 cGy) of Gamma-irradiation on Lifespan and Stress-related Genes Expression Profile in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhikrevetskaya, Svetlana; Peregudova, Darya; Danilov, Anton; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Krasnov, George; Dmitriev, Alexey; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Studying of the effects of low doses of γ-irradiation is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. The goal of this work is to identify changes of lifespan and expression stress-sensitive genes in Drosophila melanogaster, exposed to low doses of γ-irradiation (5-40 cGy) on the imaginal stage of development. Although some changes in life extensity in males were identified (the effect of hormesis after the exposure to 5, 10 and 40 cGy) as well as in females (the effect of hormesis after the exposure to 5 and 40 cGy), they were not caused by the organism "physiological" changes. This means that the observed changes in life expectancy are not related to the changes of organism physiological functions after the exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. The identified changes in gene expression are not dose-dependent, there is not any proportionality between dose and its impact on expression. These results reflect nonlinear effects of low dose radiation and sex-specific radio-resistance of the postmitotic cell state of Drosophila melanogaster imago.

  13. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval

    PubMed Central

    FELLMAN, C. L.; ARCHER, T. M.; STOKES, J. V.; WILLS, R. W.; LUNSFORD, K. V.; MACKIN, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  14. Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.E.

    1988-05-25

    Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini (Jamun) in mice exposed to a lethal dose of gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2003-06-01

    The effects of various concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 80 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) of the leaf extracts of Syzygium cumini Linn. and Eugenia cumini (SCE, black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) on the radiation-induced sickness and mortality in mice exposed to 10 Gy gamma-irradiation were studied. The treatment of mice with different doses of SCE, consecutively for five days before irradation, delayed the onset of mortality and reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness when compared with the nondrug-treated irradiated controls. All doses of SCE provied protection against the gastrointestinal death increasing the survival by 66.66% after treatment with 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg SCE versus a 12% survival in the irradiated control group (oil + irradiation). Similarly, SCE provided protection against the radiation-induced bone marrow death in mice treated with 10-60 mg/kg b.wt. of SCE. However, the best protection was obtained for 30 mg/kg b.wt. SCE, where the number of, survivors after 30 days post-irradiation was highest (41.66%) when compared with the other doses of SCE.

  16. Phase 1 summaries of radionuclide concentration data for vegetation, river water, drinking water, and fish. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, D.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Poston, T.M.; Thiede, M.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. As part of the HEDR Project, the Environmental Monitoring Data Task (Task 05) staff assemble, evaluate, and summarize key historical measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the environment as a result of Hanford operations. The scope of work performed during Phase I included initiating the search, recovery, and inventory of environmental reports. Summaries of the environmental monitoring data that were recovered and evaluated are presented for specific periods of interest. These periods include vegetation monitoring data (primarily sagebrush) for the years 1945 through 1947, Columbia River water and drinking water monitoring data for the years 1963 through 1966, and fish monitoring data for the years 1964 through 1966. Concern was limited to those radionuclides identified as the most likely major contributors to the dose potentially received by the public during the times of interest: phosphorous-32, copper-64, zinc-65, arsenic-76, and neptunium-239 in Columbia River fish and drinking water taken from the river, and iodine-131 in vegetation. This report documents the achievement of the Phase I objectives of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task.

  17. TestDose: A nuclear medicine software based on Monte Carlo modeling for generating gamma camera acquisitions and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Marie-Paule Villoing, Daphnée; Ferrer, Ludovic; Cremonesi, Marta; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila; Bardiès, Manuel

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The TestDose platform was developed to generate scintigraphic imaging protocols and associated dosimetry by Monte Carlo modeling. TestDose is part of a broader project (www.dositest.com) whose aim is to identify the biases induced by different clinical dosimetry protocols. Methods: The TestDose software allows handling the whole pipeline from virtual patient generation to resulting planar and SPECT images and dosimetry calculations. The originality of their approach relies on the implementation of functional segmentation for the anthropomorphic model representing a virtual patient. Two anthropomorphic models are currently available: 4D XCAT and ICRP 110. A pharmacokinetic model describes the biodistribution of a given radiopharmaceutical in each defined compartment at various time-points. The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit GATE offers the possibility to accurately simulate scintigraphic images and absorbed doses in volumes of interest. The TestDose platform relies on GATE to reproduce precisely any imaging protocol and to provide reference dosimetry. For image generation, TestDose stores user’s imaging requirements and generates automatically command files used as input for GATE. Each compartment is simulated only once and the resulting output is weighted using pharmacokinetic data. Resulting compartment projections are aggregated to obtain the final image. For dosimetry computation, emission data are stored in the platform database and relevant GATE input files are generated for the virtual patient model and associated pharmacokinetics. Results: Two samples of software runs are given to demonstrate the potential of TestDose. A clinical imaging protocol for the Octreoscan™ therapeutical treatment was implemented using the 4D XCAT model. Whole-body “step and shoot” acquisitions at different times postinjection and one SPECT acquisition were generated within reasonable computation times. Based on the same Octreoscan™ kinetics, a dosimetry

  18. Characterisation of uranium(VI) sorption by two environmental fungal species using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gargarello, R; Cavalitto, S; Di Gregorio, D; Niello, J Fernández; Huck, H; Pardo, A; Somacal, H; Curutchet, G

    2008-12-01

    Uranium(VI) sorption by two highly uranium-resistant air-borne fungi in a low-pH medium was measured by means of gamma spectrometry. Growth kinetics and stoichiometry of the two fungal species were also studied. Results show acceptable growth rates in synthetic medium with glucose and ammonia as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Typical oxidative metabolism of carbohydrates was found. In vivo uptake of the radionuclide was negligible, but biosorption dry biomass presented a remarkable performance. The fungal strains showed potential for use in bioremediation.

  19. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC).

  20. Effect of dose rate on inactivation of microorganisms in spices by electron-beams and gamma-rays irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Islam, Md. Shamsul

    1994-06-01

    Total aerobic bacteria in spices used in this study were determined to be 1 × 10 6 to 6 × 10 7 per gram. A study on the inactivation of microorganisms in spices showed that doses of 6-9kGy of EB (electron-beams) or γ-irradiation were required to reduce the total aerobic bacteria in many However, a little increase of resistance was observed on the inactivation of total aerobic bacteria in many spices in case of EB irradiation. These difference of radiation sensitivities between EB and γ-rays was explained by dose rate effect on oxidation damage to microorganisms from the results of radiation sensitivities of Bacillus pumilus and B. megaterium spores at dry conditions. On the other hand, these high dose rate of EB irradiation suppressed the increase of peroxide values in spices at high dose irradiation up to 80 kGy. However, components of essential oils in spices were not changed even irradiated up to 50 kGy with EB and γ-rays.

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation treatment at phytosanitary dose levels on the quality of ‘Lane Late’ navel oranges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the dose tolerance of ‘Lane Late’ navel oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) to irradiation for phytosanitary purposes, identify the sensory attributes that may be affected by the treatment, and determine which changes, if any, influence consumer liking....

  2. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The problem studied involved cell proliferation in mice thymus undergoing irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roetgens/day for 105 days. Specifically, the aim was to determine wheather or not a steady state of cell population can be established for the indicated period of time and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population are involved.

  3. Calculation of Dose Deposition in 3D Voxels by Heavy Ions and Simulation of gamma-H2AX Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, I.; Ponomarev, A. L.; Wang, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The biological response to high-LET radiation is different from low-LET radiation due to several factors, notably difference in energy deposition and formation of radiolytic species. Of particular importance in radiobiology is the formation of double-strand breaks (DSB), which can be detected by -H2AX foci experiments. These experiments has revealed important differences in the spatial distribution of DSB induced by low- and high-LET radiations [1,2]. To simulate -H2AX experiments, models based on amorphous track with radial dose are often combined with random walk chromosome models [3,4]. In this work, a new approach using the Monte-Carlo track structure code RITRACKS [5] and chromosome models have been used to simulate DSB formation. At first, RITRACKS have been used to simulate the irradiation of a cubic volume of 5 m by 1) 450 1H+ ions of 300 MeV (LET 0.3 keV/ m) and 2) by 1 56Fe26+ ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET 150 keV/ m). All energy deposition events are recorded to calculate dose in voxels of 20 m. The dose voxels are distributed randomly and scattered uniformly within the volume irradiated by low-LET radiation. Many differences are found in the spatial distribution of dose voxels for the 56Fe26+ ion. The track structure can be distinguished, and voxels with very high dose are found in the region corresponding to the track "core". These high-dose voxels are not found in the low-LET irradiation simulation and indicate clustered energy deposition, which may be responsible for complex DSB. In the second step, assuming that DSB will be found only in voxels where energy is deposited by the radiation, the intersection points between voxels with dose > 0 and simulated chromosomes were obtained. The spatial distribution of the intersection points is similar to -H2AX foci experiments. These preliminary results suggest that combining stochastic track structure and chromosome models could be a good approach to understand radiation-induced DSB and chromosome aberrations.

  4. Unintended attenuation in the Leksell Gamma Knife registered Perfexion trade mark sign calibration-phantom adaptor and its effect on dose calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-04-15

    The calibration of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX) is performed using a spherical polystyrene phantom 160 mm in diameter, which is provided by the manufacturer. This is the same phantom that has been used with LGK models U, B, C, and 4C. The polystyrene phantom is held in irradiation position by an aluminum adaptor, which has stainless steel side-fixation screws. The phantom adaptor partially attenuates the beams from sectors 3 and 7 by 3.2% and 4.6%, respectively. This unintended attenuation introduces a systematic error in dose calibration. The overall effect of phantom-adaptor attenuation on output calibration of the LGK PFX unit is to underestimate output by about 1.0%.

  5. Korean space food development: Ready-to-eat Kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented vegetable, sterilized with high-dose gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-Il; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Addition of calcium lactate and vitamin C, a mild heating, deep-freezing, and gamma irradiation at 25 kGy were conducted to prepare Kimchi as a ready-to-eat space food. It was confirmed that the space food was sterilized by an irradiation at 25 kGy through incubation at 37 °C for 30 days. The hardness of the Space Kimchi (SK) was lower than the untreated Kimchi (CON), but higher than the irradiated Kimchi (IR). Also, this result was supported by the scanning electron microscopic observation. Sensory attributes of the SK were similar to CON, and maintained during preservation at 35 °C for 30 days. According to the Ames test, Kimchi sterilized with a high-dose irradiation exerted no mutagenic activity in the bacterial strains of Salmonella typhimurium. And, the SK was certificated for use in space flight conditions during 30 days by the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems.

  6. In-situ thermal annealing of on-membrane silicon-on-insulator semiconductor-based devices after high gamma dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Amor, S; André, N; Kilchytska, V; Tounsi, F; Mezghani, B; Gérard, P; Ali, Z; Udrea, F; Flandre, D; Francis, L A

    2017-05-05

    In this paper, we investigate the recovery of some semiconductor-based components, such as N/P-type field-effect transistors (FETs) and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverter, after being exposed to a high total dose of gamma ray radiation. The employed method consists mainly of a rapid, low power and in situ annealing mitigation technique by silicon-on-insulator micro-hotplates. Due to the ionizing effect of the gamma irradiation, the threshold voltages showed an average shift of -580 mV for N-channel transistors, and -360 mV for P-MOSFETs. A 4 min double-cycle annealing of components with a heater temperature up to 465 °C, corresponding to a maximum power of 38 mW, ensured partial recovery but was not sufficient for full recovery. The degradation was completely recovered after the use of a built-in high temperature annealing process, up to 975 °C for 8 min corresponding to a maximum power of 112 mW, which restored the normal operating characteristics for all devices after their irradiation.

  7. An innovative in vitro device providing continuous low doses of gamma-rays and altered gravity mimicking spatial exposure: dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Laetitia; Courtade-Saidi, Monique; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Franceries, Xavier; Afonso, Anne Sophie; Ayala, Alicia; Bardies, Manuel

    Astronauts are exposed to microgravity and chronic irradiation. Experimental conditions combining these two factors are difficult to reproduce on earth. The aim of our study was to create an experimental device able to combine chronic irradiation and altered gravity that may be used for cell cultures or plant models. Irradiation was provided with Thorium nitrate powder, conditioned in several bags in order to obtain a sealed source. This source was placed in an incubator. Lead leafs covered the internal walls of the incubator in order to protect people outside from radiations. Cell plates or plants seeds could be placed on direct contact with the source or at different distances above the source. Moreover, a random positioning machine (RPM) was placed inside the incubator and positioned on the source. The dosimetry was performed for different experimental conditions. The activity of the source was established considering all the decay chain of thorium. The spectrum of the source calculated according to the natural decrease of radioactivity was compared with gamma spectrometry (InterceptorTM) and showed a very good adequacy. The fluence evaluated with a gamma detector was closed to the theoretical fluence evaluated with our model, attesting that the source was uniformly distributed. Dosimetry was performed with radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPL) placed for one month exposition in different locations (x and y axis) inside cell culture dishes. When the dishes were placed directly on the source, we obtained a dose rate from 660 to 983 mSv/year, while it was between 80 to 127 mSv/year at a distance of 14.5 cm above the source. Using the RPM placed on the source we reached median dose rate levels of 140 mSv/year. In conclusion, we have elaborated a new device allowing the combination of chronic radiation exposure and altered gravity. This device can be used by researchers interested in the field of space biology.

  8. Radiocesium contaminations of 20 wood species and the corresponding gamma-ray dose rates around the canopies at 5 months after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Matsumura, Hideyuki; Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Nagaoka, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Radiocesium ((134)Cs + (137)Cs) deposition from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident was measured in 20 woody plants (12 evergreen and 8 deciduous species) grown in Abiko (approximately 200 km SSW from the NPP). Leaves (needles) and twigs were sampled from each of three foliar positions (top, middle, and bottom) in the plant canopy in early August 2011. At the time, soils around the plants were also sampled, and gamma radiation dose rates were measured at each sampling position. The average radiocesium activity in the observed leaves of the evergreen species was 7.7 times that in the leaves of the deciduous species. Among the observed evergreen coniferous species, the activity in pre-fallout-expanded leaves was 2.4 times that in the post-fallout-expanded leaves. Notably, a distinct variation in the activity among the evergreen coniferous species could be observed for the post-fallout-expanded leaves but not for the pre-fallout-expanded leaves. Although these differences depend on whether the leaves had expanded at the time of the fallout, it is probable that a considerable amount of radiocesium was translocated to newly developed leaves at a species-specific rate. In addition, it was demonstrated that dose rates around woody plants were not consistent with the prevailing prediction that general dose rates correspondingly decrease with monitoring height from the ground. Thus, the dose rates in the top foliar layer of the deciduous species decreased more than predicted, whereas those in the top foliar layer of the coniferous species did not decrease. This may be due to differences in the balance between the attenuation resulting from a shielding effect of the plant bodies and the higher radiocesium accumulation in the leaves.

  9. Parameters used in the environmental pathways and radiological dose modules of the Phase I air pathway code

    SciTech Connect

    Shindle, S.F.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-05-01

    This report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944, when facilities there first began operating. An independent Technical Steering Panel directs the project, which is conducted by Battelle staff from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of Phase 1 of the HEDR Project was to demonstrate through calculation that adequate models and support data existed or could be developed to allow estimation of realistic doses to individuals from historical Hanford Site radionuclide releases. The HEDR Phase 1 computer code was used to model the transport of iodine-131 released to the atmosphere from the Hanford Site facilities, through environmental pathways to points of human exposure. Output from the code was preliminary estimates of doses received by members of the public living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. Later project work continues to build upon Phase 1 progress in order to refine dose estimates.

  10. Amifostine ameliorates recognition memory defect in acute radiation syndrome caused by relatively low-dose of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-03-01

    This study examined whether amifostine (WR-2721) could attenuate memory impairment and suppress hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice with the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). These were assessed using object recognition memory test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis [Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX)]. Amifostine treatment (214 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to irradiation significantly attenuated the recognition memory defect in ARS, and markedly blocked the apoptotic death and decrease of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in ARS. Therefore, amifostine may attenuate recognition memory defect in a relatively low-dose exposure of ARS in adult mice, possibly by inhibiting a detrimental effect of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. [Effect of long-term exposure to low dose gamma-irradiation on the rat thyroid status].

    PubMed

    Nadol'nik, L I; Netsetskaia, Z V; Vinogradov, V V

    2004-01-01

    The effect of long-term exposure to low-dose external radiation on the rat thyroid status was studied. The experiments were carried out on Wistar female rats. The single doses absorbed were 0.1; 0.25; 0.5 Gy. The rats were irradiated 20 times (5 days x 4 weeks). The animals were decapitated after 1, 30 and 180 days following the last irradiation. Blood serum was assayed for content of thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) radioimmunologically. The liver was spectrophotometrically assayed for thyroid-induced NADP-malatedehydrogenase (NADP-MDH). It was shown that the long-term 0.5-Gy irradiation of the animals induced a decrease in blood T4 and T3 concentrations 1.34-1.71-fold and 1.24-1.43-fold after 1, 30 and 180 days, respectively. The T3 level was diminished most pronouncedly after 1 day, whereas that of T4--after 30 days following the exposure. With the doses of 0.1 and 0.25 Gy absorbed, the T4 and T3 concentration remained unchanged throughout all the periods studied. The activity of NADP-MDH was decreased 1.55-2.46-fold in all the experimental animals, and it was held decreased after 180 days (1.43-1.50-fold) in 0.25- and 0.5-Gy-irradiated groups, which indicates a disturbance in thyroid hormone metabolism in rats exposed chronically to low-dose radiation. After 180 days, the experimental animals experienced an elevation of thyroid gland weight on 15-20%. The thyroid status disturbance seemed to be due to both inhibited T4 and T3 biosynthesis in thyroid and disturbed hormone peripheral metabolism under radiation exposure.

  12. A radiochromic folm dosimeter for gamma radiation in the absorbed-dose range 0.1-10 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Farahani, Mahnaz; William L., McLaughlin

    A commercially available leuco-dye film (FWT-63-02), having a thickness of 0.55 mm, has been investigated spectrophotometrically for its characteristics as a radiochromic dosimeter and for its potential use in food-irradiation applications. The γ-ray irradiation of the nearly colorless, transparent film induces blue color with an absorption maximum at 600 nm. The increase in absorbance at 600 nm per unit thickness of film (Δ A mm -1) is linear with dose in the dose range up to 8 kGy, with a slope of 0.91 mm -1·kGy -1. After a modest additional increase during the first day following irradiation, the radiation-induced color is stable when stored at room temperature at least for 5 weeks. The response slope is 16% higher when stored at 60°C, however, after the initial 1-day increase it is stable for several weeks when stored at that temperature. The response of the dosimeter is independent of dose rate in the range 0.5-170 Gy min -1.

  13. [Morphometric analysis of follicular structure of the thyroid gland after chronic low-dose gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, A V; Ermakova, O V; Korableva, T V; Raskosha, O V

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative study of follicle average cross-sectional diameter distribution was conducted in the thyroid gland (TG) of mouse like rodents (25 tundra voles, 24 CBA mice, 16 Wistar rats) after chronic exposure to low-level external y-radiation both in the environment and under the experimental condition (absorbed dose range 0.05-0.5 Gy). Spectrum analysis of TG follicle cross-sectional diameter distribution in the irradiated animals has demonstrated a universal regularity: in comparison with the unirradiated animals there was a significant (1.3-1.7-fold) increase in content of small follicles (with a cross-sectional diameter lower than 36-41 microm in the studied animal species). A similar phenomenon was reproduced in the model experiments (TG regeneration in rats after hemithyroidectomy). The observed activation of the folliculogenesis processes after chronic low-dose irradiation in small doses may be interpreted as a nonspecific adaptive reaction of TG to radiation induced damage of its parenchyma.

  14. [Effects of single-dose external gamma irradiation on rat thyroid status as observed during the year].

    PubMed

    Nadol'nik, L I; Netsetskaia, Z V; Vinogradov, V V

    2003-01-01

    We studied the rat thyroid status depending on the dose of external radiation and the time passed after the exposure. The experiments were carried out on female albino Wistar rats. The doses absorbed amounted to 0.25; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0 and 5.0 Gy. The animals were decapitated after 3, 6, 24 hours and 7, 30, 180 and 365 days following the radiation. The blood serum was assayed for the contents of thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) using a radioimmunological technique. The liver tissue was assayed spectrophotometrically for the activity of thyroid-induced NADP malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH). No changes were found in the blood thyroid hormone contents within short periods after the radiation effect. After 6 hours the T4 levels was 1.2-1.3-fold decreased in the blood of rats receiving the radiation doses of 1.0; 2.0; and 5.0 Gy. After a day the T4 concentration was diminished by 1.21-193-fold in all the experimental animals independently of the radiation dose and that of T3--in 2.0 Gy--and 5.0 Gy--irradiated group. After 7 days following the radiation the T4 and T3 contents remained to be decreased by 1.37-1.75 fold and those of NADP-MDH--by 1.3-1.8-fold in all the animal groups. In a month, the low dose-treated animals (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 Gy) showed the level of thyroid hormones reduced to the control values, whereas the 2.0 and 5.0 Gy--treated rats demonstrated this reduction only by 6 months. The decreased concentration of blood thyroid hormones was due not to the activation of their peripheral metabolism, but, probably, to inhibition of their biosynthesis in thyroid cells under conditions of radiation-induced activation of oxidative stress.

  15. Efficacy of integrated treatment of UV light and low-dose gamma irradiation on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Ukuku, D; Fan, X; Juneja, V K

    2013-07-01

    The study evaluated the efficacy of integrated ultraviolet-C light (UVC) and low-dose gamma irradiation treatments to inactivate mixed strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on inoculated whole grape tomatoes. A mixed bacterial cocktail composed of a 3 strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, E02128, and F00475) and a 3 serotype mixture of S. enterica (S. Montevideo G4639, S. Newport H1275, and S. Stanley H0558) was used based on their association with produce-related outbreaks. Spot inoculation (50 to 100 μmL) on tomato surfaces was performed to achieve a population of appropriately 10(7-8) CFU/tomato. Inoculated tomatoes were subjected to UVC (253.7 nm) dose of 0.6 kJ/m(2) followed by 4 different low doses of gamma irradiations (0.1 kGy, 0.25 kGy, 0.5 kGy, 0.75 kGy). The fate of background microflora (mesophilic aerobic) including mold and yeast counts were also determined during storage at 5 °C over 21 d. Integrated treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the population of target pathogens. Results indicate about 3.4 ± 0.3 and 3.0 ± 0.1 log CFU reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica, respectively, per tomato with UVC (0.6 kJ/m(2) ) and 0.25 kGy irradiation. More than a 4 log and higher reduction (>5 log) per fruit was accomplished by combined UVC treatment with 0.5 kGy and 0.75 kGy irradiation, respectively, for all tested pathogens. Furthermore, the combined treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the native microflora compared to the control during storage. The data suggest efficacious treatment strategy for produce indicating 5 or higher log reduction which is consistent with the recommendations of the Natl. Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods.

  16. Measuring DNA Damage and Repair in Mouse Splenocytes After Chronic In Vivo Exposure to Very Low Doses of Beta- and Gamma-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Flegal, Matthew; Blimkie, Melinda S; Wyatt, Heather; Bugden, Michelle; Surette, Joel; Klokov, Dmitry

    2015-07-03

    Low dose radiation exposure may produce a variety of biological effects that are different in quantity and quality from the effects produced by high radiation doses. Addressing questions related to environmental, occupational and public health safety in a proper and scientifically justified manner heavily relies on the ability to accurately measure the biological effects of low dose pollutants, such as ionizing radiation and chemical substances. DNA damage and repair are the most important early indicators of health risks due to their potential long term consequences, such as cancer. Here we describe a protocol to study the effect of chronic in vivo exposure to low doses of γ- and β-radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse spleen cells. Using a commonly accepted marker of DNA double-strand breaks, phosphorylated histone H2AX called γH2AX, we demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate not only the levels of DNA damage, but also changes in the DNA repair capacity potentially produced by low dose in vivo exposures. Flow cytometry allows fast, accurate and reliable measurement of immunofluorescently labeled γH2AX in a large number of samples. DNA double-strand break repair can be evaluated by exposing extracted splenocytes to a challenging dose of 2 Gy to produce a sufficient number of DNA breaks to trigger repair and by measuring the induced (1 hr post-irradiation) and residual DNA damage (24 hrs post-irradiation). Residual DNA damage would be indicative of incomplete repair and the risk of long-term genomic instability and cancer. Combined with other assays and end-points that can easily be measured in such in vivo studies (e.g., chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei frequencies in bone marrow reticulocytes, gene expression, etc.), this approach allows an accurate and contextual evaluation of the biological effects of low level stressors.

  17. Low Dose Gamma Radiation Monitoring Through TiO{sub 2} Doped Lead Phthalocyanine (Pb-Pc) Based Schottky Device

    SciTech Connect

    Janu, Yojana; Gautam, Anil; Kumar, Manish; Prasad, Narottam; Deol, Y. S.; Roy, M. S.

    2008-04-23

    The concept of Organic thin film based solid-state dosimeters is relatively new and more effective. The organic conductor based solid-state dosimeter provides a mean for low cost, ease to fabricate and sensitive radiation sensor which can be employed as pocket dosimeter for army personals getting exposed to nuclear radiation while working in the radioactive environment This concept is being utilized here for monitoring the effect of nuclear radiation on our organic material based sandwiched devices. In the present communication, lead Phthalocyanine (PbPc) doped with TiO{sub 2} (5% by weight) is developed into the form of thin film structure. The developed ITO/PbPc: TiO{sub 2}/Ag Schottky device structure was characterized in terms of change in its electrical and optical properties before and after exposure to radiation Exposure to radiation imparts an accelerated decrease in forward bias current and capacitance characteristics reveal a linear relationship between dose v/s current behavior which supports its suitability as pocket dosimeter for the dose ranging from 50 mR to 800 mR.

  18. Investigation of gamma ray shielding efficiency and mechanical performances of concrete shields containing bismuth oxide as an environmentally friendly additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ya; Zhang, Xiaowen; Li, Mi; Yang, Rong; Jiang, Tianjiao; Lv, Junwen

    2016-10-01

    Concrete has a proven ability to attenuate gamma rays and neutrons without compromising structural property; therefore, it is widely used as the primary shielding material in many nuclear facilities. Recently, there is a tendency toward using various additives to enhance the shielding properties of these concrete mixtures. However, most of these additives being used either pose hygiene hazards or require special handling processes. It would be ideal if environmentally friendly additives were available for use. The bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) additive shows promise in various shielding applications due to its proven radiation attenuation ability and environmentally friendly nature. To the best of our knowledge, however, Bi2O3 has never been used in concrete mixtures. Therefore, for this research, we fabricated the Bi2O3-based concrete mixtures by adding Bi2O3 powder in the ordinary concrete mixture. Concrete mixtures with lead oxide (PbO) additives were used for comparison. Radiation shielding parameters like the linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of all these concrete mixtures showing the effects of the Bi2O3 additions are presented. The mechanical performances of concrete mixtures incorporated with Bi2O3 additive were also investigated. It suggested that the concrete mixture containing 25% Bi2O3 powder (B5 in this study) provided the best shielding capacity and mechanical performance among other mixes. It has a significant potential for application as a structural concrete where radiological protection capability is required.

  19. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  20. Foxp3(+)-Treg cells enhanced by repeated low-dose gamma-irradiation attenuate ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum Soo; Hong, Gwan Ui; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-05-01

    Gamma radiation is used for several therapeutic indications such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Low-dose whole-body γ irradiation has been shown to activate immune responses in several ways, however, the effect and mechanism of irradiation on allergic asthma remains poorly understood. This study investigated whether or not irradiation exacerbates allergic asthma responses and its potential mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma. The mice received whole-body irradiation once daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 0.667 Gy using (137)Cs γ rays 24 h before every OVA challenge. Repeated low-dose irradiation reduced OVA-specific IgE levels, the number of inflammatory cells including mast cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway hyperresponsiveness, expression of inflammatory cytokines, CCL2/CCR2, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 activities. All of these factors were increased in BAL cells and lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Irradiation increased the number of Treg cells, expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2 and IL-35 in BAL cells and lung tissue. Irradiation also increased Treg cell-expressed Foxp3 and IL-10 by NF-κB and RUNX1 in OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, while Treg cell-expressing OX40 and IL-10 were enhanced in lung tissue or act-bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with Treg cells, but BMMCs-expressing OX40L and TGF-β were decreased. The data suggest that irradiation enhances Foxp3(+)- and IL-10-producing Treg cells, which reduce OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation and tissue remodeling through the down-regulation of migration by the CCL2/CCR2 axis and activation of mast cells via OX40/OX40L in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice.

  1. Combination of hot-water surface pasteurization of whole fruit and low-dose gamma irradiation of fresh-cut cantaloupe.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Annous, Bassam A; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Burke, Angela; Mattheis, James P

    2006-04-01

    Improvements in methods for disinfecting fresh-cut cantaloupe could reduce spoilage losses and reduce the risk of foodborne illness from human pathogen contamination. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using hot-water treatment in com