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Sample records for environmental monitoring summary

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (EMAP): WESTERN STREAMS AND RIVERS STATISTICAL SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This statistical summary reports data from the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) Western Pilot (EMAP-W). EMAP-W was a sample survey (or probability survey, often simply called 'random') of streams and rivers in 12 states of the western U.S. (Arizona, Californ...

  2. Site environmental report summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

  3. US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report. Second calendar quarter--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1997-12-01

    The moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. This report consists of a summary of the radiological and non-radiological data collected and analyzed during the second quarter of 1997.

  4. Environmental report 1998, executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J M; Harrach, R J; Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Biermann, A H; Blake, R G; Brandstetter, E R; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Christofferson, E; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Garcia, L M; Giesing, T A; Grayson, A R; Hall, L C; MacQueen, D H; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Taffet, M J; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, R J

    1999-09-22

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capabilities. The Laboratory's mission focuses on nuclear weapons and national security, and over the years has been broadened to include areas such as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, the economy, and education. The Laboratory carries out this mission in compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulatory requirements. It does so with the support of the Environmental Protection Department, which is responsible for environmental monitoring and analysis, hazardous waste management, environmental restoration, and assisting Laboratory organizations in ensuring compliance with environmental laws and regulations. LLNL comprises two sites: the Livermore site and Site 300. The Livermore site occupies an area of 3.28 square kilometers on the eastern edge of Livermore, California. Site 300, LLNL's experimental testing site, is located 24 kilometers to the east in the Altamont Hills, and occupies an area of 30.3 square kilometers. Environmental monitoring activities are conducted at both sites as well as in surrounding areas. This summary provides an overview of LLNL's environmental activities in 1998, including radiological and nonradiological surveillance, effluent, and compliance monitoring, remediation, assessment of radiological releases and doses, and determination of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and public health.

  5. Summary of Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) activities in South Dakota, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heakin, Allen J.; Neitzert, Kathleen M.; Shearer, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated data-collection activities for the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program-West (EMAP-West) in South Dakota during 2000. The objectives of the study were to develop the monitoring tools necessary to produce unbiased estimates of the ecological condition of surface waters across a large geographic area of the western United States, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of those tools in a large-scale assessment. In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks (GF&P) established a cooperative agreement and assumed responsibility for completing the remaining assessments for the perennial, wadable streams of the EMAP-West in the State. Stream assessment sites were divided into two broad categories-the first category of sites was randomly selected and assigned by the USEPA for South Dakota. The second category consisted of sites that were specifically selected because they appeared to have reasonable potential for representing the best available physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the State. These sites comprise the second category of assessment sites and were called 'reference' sites and were selected following a detailed evaluation process. Candidate reference site data will serve as a standard or benchmark for assessing the overall ecological condition of the randomly selected sites. During 2000, the USEPA completed 22 statewide stream assessments in South Dakota. During 2001-2003, the USGS and GF&P completed another 42 stream assessments bringing the total of randomly selected stream assessments within South Dakota to 64. In addition, 18 repeat assessments designed to meet established quality-assurance/quality-control requirements were completed at 12 of these 64 sites. During 2002-2004, the USGS in cooperation with GF&P completed stream assessments at 45 candidate reference sites. Thus, 109 sites had stream assessments completed in South

  6. Paducah Site annual environmental report summary for 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, C.M.

    1996-02-01

    This pamphlet contains summaries of the environmental programs at the Paducah Gaseous Plant site, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1994.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  9. Site Environmental Report summary, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the Fernald site mission, exposure pathways, and environmental standards and guidelines. Environmental monitoring activities measure and estimate the amount of radioactive and nonradioactive materials that may leave the site and enter the surrounding environment. This presents an overall view of the impact these activities have on the local environment and public health.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office environmental monitoring program summary data report, first calendar quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1997-10-01

    The continuing moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. The onsite radiological surveillance program is shown in a table, and this report gives the first quarter results for that program. During the first calendar quarter of 1997, air samples were collected and analyzed from 45 air particulate sampling stations, 3 noble gas sampling stations, and 12 tritiated water (HTO) vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from one wastewater containment pond and nine sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from ten potable supply wells, one non-potable supply well, and seven drinking water distribution end points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 168 locations.

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

  12. Environmental management system objectives & targets results summary :

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2014-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL/NM Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2013.

  13. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NTS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NTS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  15. 31 CFR 26.3 - Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). 26.3 Section 26.3 Money and... DEVELOPMENT BANDS (MDBs) § 26.3 Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries)...

  16. 31 CFR 26.3 - Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). 26.3 Section 26.3 Money and... DEVELOPMENT BANDS (MDBs) § 26.3 Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries)...

  17. 31 CFR 26.3 - Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). 26.3 Section 26.3 Money and... DEVELOPMENT BANDS (MDBs) § 26.3 Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries)...

  18. 31 CFR 26.3 - Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). 26.3 Section 26.3 Money and... DEVELOPMENT BANDS (MDBs) § 26.3 Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries)...

  19. 31 CFR 26.3 - Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). 26.3 Section 26.3 Money and... DEVELOPMENT BANDS (MDBs) § 26.3 Availability of Environmental Impact Assessment Summaries (EIA Summaries)...

  20. Environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  2. Summary pamphlet: 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    As required in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, an Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) has been prepared for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) for 1995. The ASER represents a key component of the DOE`s effort to keep the public informed about environmental efforts and compliance status at SNL/NM. This booklett was prepared by the Environmental Operations Center of SNL/NM and reviewed by Community Relations and Risk Management. Suggestions were incorporated from the students of New Futures High School as a part of the Environmental Education Program. This work is supported by the DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. A copy of the ASER can be obtained by calling the Environmental Monitoring and Reporting Department at 848-0927. This pamphlet provides a brief summary of the 1995 SNL/NM environmental programs and monitoring results. Additional copies of this pamphlet may be obtained by calling the number above.

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  6. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

    2005-11-23

    The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the

  7. Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-07-01

    This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

  8. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2006-09-28

    This small booklet provides highlights of the environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site during 2005. It is a summary of the information contained in the larger report: Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring for Calendar Year 2005.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report, second calendar quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1997-02-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, has been the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the continental US. Testing began in 1951 and continued until the moratorium in 1992. Waste storage and disposal facilities for defense radioactive and mixed waste are located in Areas 3 and 5. At the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS-5), low-level wastes (LLW) from US Department of Energy (DOE) affiliated onsite and offsite generators are disposed of using standard shallow land disposal techniques. Transuranic wastes are retrievably stored at the RWMS-5 in containers on a surface pad, pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility in New Mexico. Nonradioactive hazardous wastes are accumulated at a special site before shipment to a licensed offsite disposal facility. Non-standard packages of LLW are buried in subsidence craters in the Area 3 RWMS. This report describes these activities on and around the NTS and includes a listing of the results obtained from environmental surveillance activities during the second calendar quarter of 1996.

  10. Forest health monitoring 1992 annual statistical summary. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Aalexander, S.A.; Barnard, J.E.

    1994-04-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service (FS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a cooperative national program to monitor the condition of the nation's forests. This multi-agency effort, within EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), is called the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program. In 1992, Detection Monitoring activities were conducted in twelve states: Alabama; Connecticut; Delaware; Georgia; Maine; Maryland; Massachusetts; New Hampshire; New Jersey; Rhode Island; Vermont; and Virginia. Data analysis results for the following indicators are presented; tree species and stand density (mensuration); tree crown condition; tree species diversity; and air pollution bioindicator plants. The cumulative distribution function methods used in the analysis provide a statistical summary of most measurements. Tabular summaries were also prepared in some cases.

  11. Environmental Monitoring without Borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kaseke, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous monitoring of environmental variables is essential in most environmental projects. However, due to economic constraints, many students from underrepresented groups and developing countries often have limited access to "standardized" data logging and monitoring techniques. We assessed the student's learning in rural settings and worked with student without strong science background to utilize various environmental sensors to conduct innovative projects. We worked with students in Namibia and a minority high school student in Indianapolis to conduct relative humidity monitoring in creative ways. This high school student is from Indianapolis Project Seed program (sponsored by American Chemical Society, http://www.indyprojectseed.org) and worked in Wang's lab for two months in summer 2014. The experience showed us the potential of working with people with minimum exposure to modern scientific instrumentation to carry out innovative projects.

  12. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  13. Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, R.D.

    2000-03-30

    The goal of the project was to develop a wireless communications system, including communications, command, and control software, to remotely monitor the environmental state of a process or facility. Proof of performance would be tested and evaluated with a prototype demonstration in a functioning facility. AR Designs' participation provided access to software resources and products that enable network communications for real-time embedded systems to access remote workstation services such as Graphical User Interface (GUI), file I/O, Events, Video, Audio, etc. in a standardized manner. This industrial partner further provided knowledge and links with applications and current industry practices. FM and T's responsibility was primarily in hardware development in areas such as advanced sensors, wireless radios, communication interfaces, and monitoring and analysis of sensor data. This role included a capability to design, fabricate, and test prototypes and to provide a demonstration environment to test a proposed remote sensing system. A summary of technical accomplishments is given.

  14. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, G.C.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  15. Workshop summary: Space environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1991-01-01

    The workshop on Space Environmental Effects is summarized. The underlying concern of the group was related to the question of how well laboratory tests correlate with actual experience in space. The discussion ranged over topics pertaining to tests involving radiation, atomic oxygen, high voltage plasmas, contamination in low earth orbit, and new environmental effects that may have to be considered on arrays used for planetary surface power systems.

  16. Environmental Monitoring Data System

    2004-04-21

    A set of database management tools, data processing tools, and auxiliary support functionality for processing and handling semi-structured environmental monitoring data. The system provides a flexible description language for describing the data, allowing the database to store disparate data from many different sources without changes to the configuration. The system employs XML to support unlimited named allribute/value pairs for each object defined in the system.

  17. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

    2006-01-10

    Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report summary for 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires an annual site environmental report from each of the sites operating under its authority. The reports present the results from the various environmental monitoring and surveillance programs carried out during the year. In addition to meeting the DOE requirement, the reports also document compliance with various state and federal laws and regulations. This report was published to fulfill those requirements for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for calendar year 1995. The report is based on thousands of environmental samples collected on and around the ORR and analyzed during the year. The data on which the report is based are published in Environmental Monitoring and Surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 Data (ES/ESH-71). Both documents are highly detailed. This summary report is meant for readers who are interested in the monitoring results but who do not need to review the details.

  20. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  1. Environmental monitoring equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Perugini, F.

    1995-12-31

    For over 10 years GEOGUARD has been serving the waste industry with innovative, relevant and high quality products for ground water sampling, remediation pumping, and ground water monitoring. GEOGUARD has four advanced technology products for environmental monitoring. (1) MASTER-FLO{trademark} PUMPS collect accurate ground water samples and standardize field sampling procedures. MASTER-FLO{trademark} PUMPS are based upon a time proven bladder squeeze pump, the most accepted ground water sampling pump available, which can be operated with a flow through cell and low flow rates to minimize sample aeration and turbidity. (2) RELIA-FLO{trademark} PUMPS simplifiy ground water pollution clean ups. Pump and Test Remediation depends upon reliable pumping systems that can operate continually year after year in the most hostile environments. RELIA-FLO{trademark} PUMPS combine simplicity with versatility to satisfy the most demanding ground water pollution clean-up projects. (3) TUBER{trademark} measures and combines the latest sensor technology with a dedicated logger into one integrated unit, which can record well water levels, temperatures, pH and conductivity in two inch or larger wells. (4) TERRAPROBE{trademark} offers a versatile, portable alternative to drilling Wells for shallow ground penetration up to 30 feet. With TERRAPROBE{trademark}, samples for soil gas, water or soil can be easily acquired where vehicle access is not possible.

  2. Quarterly environmental data summary for first quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the first quarter of 1999 is enclosed. The data presented in this constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and merged into the database during the first quarter of 1999. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during first quarter 1999 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  3. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

  4. Environmental Management System (EMS) objectives & targets annual results summary :

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2013-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2012.

  5. Summary of Environmental Flow Monitoring for the Sustainable Rivers Project on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Western Oregon, 2014–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose; Bervid, Heather D.; Olson, Melissa; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Bach, Leslie

    2016-11-07

    This report presents the results of an ongoing environmental flow monitoring study by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and U.S. Geological Survey in support of the Sustainable Rivers Project (SRP) of TNC and USACE. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and characterize relations between streamflow, geomorphic processes, and black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) recruitment on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, western Oregon, that were hypothesized in earlier investigations. The SRP can use this information to plan future monitoring and scientific investigations, and to help mitigate the effects of dam operations on streamflow regimes, geomorphic processes, and biological communities, such as black cottonwood forests, in consultation with regional experts. The four tasks of this study were to:Compare the hydrograph from Water Year (WY) 2015 with hydrographs from WYs 2000–14 and the SRP flow recommendations,Assess short-term and system-wide changes in channel features and vegetation throughout the alluvial valley section of the Middle Fork Willamette River (2005–12),Examine changes in channel features and vegetation over two decades (1994–2014) for two short mapping zones on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, andComplete a field investigation of summer stage and the growth of black cottonwood and other vegetation on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers in summer 2015.

  6. Summary of the Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W.; O`Connor, G.P.; Dirkes, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes the 420-page Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996. The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The summary is designed to briefly: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status in 1996 of compliance with environmental regulations; describe environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1996 Hanford Site activities; present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including groundwater protection and monitoring; and discuss activities to ensure quality.

  7. MONITORING, ASSESSMENT, AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview chapter examines the roles that environmental monitoring and assessment can play in the development of environmental policy. It takes a case study approach, focusing on the key roles played by monitoring data in policy formulation in acid deposition, stratospheric...

  8. Fernald Environmental Management Project 1995 site environmental report summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes the 1995 Site Environmental Report for the Fernald site. It describes the Fernald site mission, exposure pathways, and environmental standards and guidelines. An overview is presented of the impact these activities have on the local environment and public health. Environmental monitoring activities measure and estimate the amount of radioactive and nonradioactive materials that may leave the site and enter the surrounding environment.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, JF

    2003-11-25

    The ''State-of-the-Environment'' on and around the Oak Ridge Reservation is a mission of highest importance to the Department of Energy and our contractors. In order to be fully aware of the consequences of our operations and cleanup, an annual multimillion-dollar monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of samples from air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plants, and animals. A mission of equal importance is to provide our stakeholders a complete understanding of this program. To do this we publish a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report and this summary document. The raw data is published separately in the Data Volume. All three documents can be found on the web, along with past documents, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. Though I work on numerous technical documents throughout the year, no document is more important to me than the Annual Site Environmental Report and its Summary because: (1) they represent the efforts of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out this extensive program, and who work hard to protect and enhance the environment; (2) they set out the programs in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public; and (3) the Summary is directed to the public with the hope that the information is understandable and of value in gaining an accurate picture of the Oak Ridge Reservation as a neighbor. I thank the Karns High School students and their teacher for accepting my challenge in writing this Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, for thinking out of the box, for doing such a fine job, and for all the artwork and photographs (the morning coffee in the classroom was greatly appreciated, leaks and all). They were an especially enjoyable class to work with, and I hope you, our stakeholders and the public, find their efforts of value.

  10. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for

  11. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT SUMMARY FOR 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.; Meyer, A.

    2013-09-12

    This report's purpose is to: Present summary environmental data that characterize Site environmental management performance, Describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements, and Highlight significant programs and efforts. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively with a 2,000-square-mile network extending 25 miles from SRS, with some monitoring performed as far as 100 miles from the Site. The area includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia (GA) and South Carolina (SC). Thousands of samples of air, rainwater, surface water, drinking water, groundwater, food products, wildlife, soil, sediment, and vegetation are collected by SRS and analyzed for the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. During 2012, SRS accomplished several significant milestones while maintaining its record of environmental excellence, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the public and the environment. The Site's radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose to the public was well below the DOE public dose limit.

  12. 1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    L. V. Street

    2000-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  13. Polar Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.; Schulteis, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    The present and projected benefits of the polar regions were reviewed and then translated into information needs in order to support the array of polar activities anticipated. These needs included measurement sensitivities for polar environmental data (ice/snow, atmosphere, and ocean data for integrated support) and the processing and delivery requirements which determine the effectiveness of environmental services. An assessment was made of how well electromagnetic signals can be converted into polar environmental information. The array of sensor developments in process or proposed were also evaluated as to the spectral diversity, aperture sizes, and swathing capabilities available to provide these measurements from spacecraft, aircraft, or in situ platforms. Global coverage and local coverage densification options were studied in terms of alternative spacecraft trajectories and aircraft flight paths.

  14. Oak Ridge reservation, annual site environmental report summary for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy requires annual site environmental reports from facilities that operate under its auspices. To fulfill that requirement, such an annual report is published for the Oak Ridge Reservation, which comprises three major sites, each of which has unique monitoring requirements in addition to many shared obligations. As a result, the report is complex and highly detailed. Annual site environmental reports are public documents that are read by government regulators, scientists, engineers, business people, special interest groups, and members of the public at large. For that reason, the reports need to be accessible to a variety of audiences in addition to being accurate and complete. This pamphlet summarizes environmental activities on the reservation, which for some readers may be adequate; for those who seek more detail, it will lend coherence to their approach to the report itself. The content of this summary was taken from Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993. Results of the many environmental monitoring and surveillance activities are detailed in this report.

  15. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-07-01

    The Pinellas Plant Environmental Monitoring Program is comprised of two major activities as follows: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. The collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants, assessing radiation exposures to members of the public, providing a means to control effluents at or near the point of discharge, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. The collection and analysis of samples or direct measurements of air, water, soil, food stuff, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs for the purpose of determining compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, assessing radiation exposure to members of the public, and assessing the effects, if any, on the local environment. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at the Pinellas Plant include monitoring liquid and airborne effluents, groundwater, surface water, soil, and local weather conditions.

  16. Environmental and process monitoring technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan )

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum dealing with state-of-the-art methods and instrumentation for environmental and process monitoring. In the last few years, important advances have been made in improving existing analytical methods and developing new techniques for trace detection of chemicals. These monitoring technologies are a topic of great interest for environmental and industrial control in a wide spectrum of areas. Sensitive detection, selective characterization, and cost-effective analysis are among the most important challenges facing monitoring technologies. This conference integrating interdisciplinary research and development was aimed to present the most recent advances and applications in the important areas of environmental and process monitoring. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 34 papers for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  17. Near-facility environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the routine near-facility environmental monitoring programs which are presently being conducted at the Hanford Site. Several types of environmental media are sampled near nuclear facilities to monitor the effectiveness of waste management and restoration activities, and effluent treatment and control practices. These media include air, surface water and springs, surface contamination, soil and vegetation, investigative sampling (which can include wildlife), and external radiation. Sampling and analysis information and analytical results for 1994 for each of these media are summarized in this section. Additional data and more detailed information may be found in Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring Annual Report, Calendar Year 1994.

  18. 1979 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.

    1980-04-01

    The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during 1979 are summarized. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory.

  19. Monitoring environmental quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, C.N.; Calder, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, billions of public and private dollars have been spent on pollution control and other costs of compliance with environmental regulations in coastal and estuarine areas of the US. Much of this investment has been made without comprehensive, high quality, and continuing information about the status and trends of environmental quality in these areas. Are general conditions getting better or worse. How do existing conditions among different estuaries and coastal areas compare. Are these conditions approaching or exceeding levels that are known to be harmful to living resources. Since 1984 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has conducted a national program that will answer these questions. Progress has been made on the cleanup of conventional pollutants (oxygen-demanding materials, particulate matter and nutrients) in the water column, and now increasing attention is being directed toward toxic substances in animals and sediments. Emphasis of the National Status and Trends Program is on the measurement of these chemicals and observations of the effects they may cause. The program is measuring existing levels of toxic chemical contaminants in bivalves (mussels and oysters), bottom-fish (flounders), and associated sediments.

  20. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed

    2012-09-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report (NNSSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NNSS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NNSSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NNSS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NNSSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NNSS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The NNSS is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national security-related missions and high-risk operations. The NNSS is located about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The approximately 1,360-square-mile site is one of the largest restricted access areas in the United States. It is surrounded by federal installations with strictly controlled access, as well as by lands that are open to public entry.

  1. A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, I. J.

    1980-01-01

    Studies conducted in and around John F. Kennedy Space Center, Merrit Island, Florida were designed to establish baseline conditions for various attributes of the biotic and abiotic environment. Features were described and quantitatively measured. Certain condition were found to be appropriate for the detection and assessment of possible environmental perturbations caused by future NASA activities. These include plant communities, mammal populations, rainfall chemistry, fish populations, and the status of rare and endangered species. On the basis of statistical analysis of quantitative data and logistic considerations, it was possible to refine the kinds and amounts of measurements needed to evaluate perturbations in selected environmental components.

  2. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, JF

    2005-11-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and our contractors strive to provide our stakeholders a comprehensive understanding of the consequences of DOE operations past and present. Toward this end a far-reaching multimillion-dollar annual monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plant, and animal samples. This effort represents the work of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out these extensive programs and work hard to protect and enhance the environment. We publish the results in a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER), and a separate Data Volume for those who wish to see the supporting data. These documents present all the facts and figures, but are highly technical and not easily understood, and it's essential we provide a summary document simple to read and understand. So each year I team with Karns High School and ask students to write an Annual Site Environmental Report Summary that will be both informative and enjoyable to read. These environmental documents are perhaps the most important DOE reports because they explain the environmental monitoring programs and show the consequences of our operations in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public. This ASER summary is written for you, the public, our most important stakeholder, with the hope that you find it comprehensible and of value in gaining an accurate understanding of the Oak Ridge Reservation. All three documents can be found on the web, along with previous publications, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. It's a great pleasure to meet my new class each year and capture fresh creative ideas. I'm always delighted to see their interest and desire to learn and to produce a document for the public that reflects their personality and skills, and one the public will utilize and find of value. I sincerely thank these talented Karns High School students and their exceptional teacher, Mrs. Heather Bock

  3. Quarterly environmental data summary for fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1997 is prepared in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data presented constitute the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the data base during the fourth quarter of 1997. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the data base and KPA data are not merged into the regular data base. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined ``above normal`` level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in response to such data. Data received and verified during the fourth quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those which are detailed.

  4. Quarterly environmental data summary for first quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the first quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the data base during the first quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the data base, and KPA data are not merged into the regular data base. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined {open_quotes}above normal{close_quotes} Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES&H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that {open_quotes}above normal{close_quotes} data occur. All data received and verified during the first quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those detailed below. Above normal occurrences are cited for groundwater, air, and NPDES data. There were none for springs or surface water. The following discussion offers a brief summary of the data merged during the first quarter that exceeded the above normal criteria and updates on past reported above normal data. The attached tables present the most recent data for air and the data merged into the data base during the first quarter 1998 for groundwater, NPDES, surface water, and springs. Graphs showing concentrations of selected contaminants of concern at some of the critical locations have also been included in this QEDS. The graphs are discussed in the separate sections.

  5. Construction and installation summary for fiscal year 1992 of the hydraulic head monitoring stations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dreier, R.B.; Switek, J.; Couzens, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    During FY 1992, as part of the Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) Project, three multiport wells (HHMS 12, 13, and 14) were constructed along or near the boundaries of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Haw Ridge water gap. The purpose of this report is to document well construction and multiport component installation activities. The hydraulic head monitoring stations (HHMS) are well clusters and single multiport wells that provide data required for evaluation of the transition between shallow and deep groundwater systems and of the nature of these systems. This information is used for required characterization of the hydrologic framework as dictated by state and federal regulatory agencies. Groundwater contaminants may move laterally across WAG boundaries or offsite; they may also move in a vertical direction. Because the HHMS Project was designed to address otential contamination problems, the project provides a means for defining the bounds of the uppermost aquifer; identifying potential pathways for offsite contamination for shallow; intermediate, and deep groundwater flow; and evaluating the capacity for contaminant transport in intermediate and deep groundwater flow systems.

  6. Enlisting qualitative methods to improve environmental monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental monitoring tracks ecological changes in order to support environmental management decisions. Monitoring design is driven by natural scientists, usually lacking a formal social science basis. However, human perspectives drive environmental resource decisions, with ...

  7. NORTH PACIFIC SALMON MONITORING WORKSHOP I - SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of the first North Pacific Salmon Monitoring Workshop was to initiate development of an economically feasible monitoring strategy that could serve as a warning system for detecting changes in the status of Pacific Rim salmon. This is a summary of the workshop held Fe...

  8. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2002-10-01

    This booklet summarizes a more detailed report, Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001. This summary booklet is designed to briefly (1) describe the highlights for fiscal year 2001; (2) identify emerging issued in groundwater monitoring; (3) discuss groundwater flow and movement; and (4) provide an overview of current contamination in the Hanford Site groundwater and vadose zone.

  9. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-03-01

    This is a summary booklet of the main report: Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005. It is the summary section of the main report with a CD of the entire report included. The main report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the

  10. Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

  11. US Department of Energy Portsmouth Site annual environmental report summary for 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, C.M.

    1996-03-01

    This pamphlet contains summaries of the environmental programs at the Portsmouth site, including environmental monitoring and results and the impact of plant operations on the environment and the public for 1994. More detailed information on the material summarized in this pamphlet is available in the {ital Portsmouth Site Annual Environmental Report for 1994}. The data used to compile the site annual environment report and this summary pamphlet are published in the {ital Portsmouth Site Annual Environmental Data for 1994}, which is a collection of tables containing effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and dose calculation data for 1994. To obtain copies of any of these documents, contact: Environmental Management, P.O. Box 628, Building X7725, MS-7556, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH 45661 (Telephone: 614-897-3603). 13 figs.

  12. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

  13. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Westinghouse Electric Company Waste Isolation Division

    1999-09-29

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program Requirements (DOE, 1990a), requires each DOE facility to prepare an EMP. This document is prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (DOE, 1990b); Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (Draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1 (DOE, 1995), which is the driver for the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Company, Waste Isolation Division (WID), for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of the WIPP's effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses the WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE, 1991). This document references DOE orders and other federal and state regulations affecting environmental monitoring programs at the site. WIPP procedures, which implement

  15. LESSONS-LEARNED AND SUCCESS STORIES FROM EPA'S REAL-TIME ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, DATA DELIVERY, AND PUBLIC OUTREACH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    TTSD has completed a series of technology transfer and risk communication handbooks, case studies, and summary reports for community-based environmental monitoring projects under EPA's Real-Time Environmental Monitoring, Data Delivery, and Public Outreach Program. The Program tak...

  16. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are presented in this report.

  17. Environmental monitoring and surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1993 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1994-12-01

    Environmental monitoring and surveillance are conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its environs throughout the year. Environmental monitoring ensures that (1) the reservation is a safe place to work, (2) activities on the reservation do not adversely affect the neighboring communities, and (3) compliance is made with federal and state regulations. This document is a compilation of the monitoring and surveillance data for calendar year 1993. It is a tool for analysts in the fields of environmental monitoring and environmental restoration. The summary information found in the annual site environmental report was drawn from the contents of summary in this document.

  18. Precision Environmental Radiation Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2010-07-01

    A new precision low-level environmental radiation monitoring system has been developed and tested at Jefferson Lab. This system provides environmental radiation measurements with accuracy and stability of the order of 1 nGy/h in an hour, roughly corresponding to approximately 1% of the natural cosmic background at the sea level. Advanced electronic front-end has been designed and produced for use with the industry-standard High Pressure Ionization Chamber detector hardware. A new highly sensitive readout electronic circuit was designed to measure charge from the virtually suspended ionization chamber ion collecting electrode. New signal processing technique and dedicated data acquisition were tested together with the new readout. The designed system enabled data collection in a remote Linux-operated computer workstation, which was connected to the detectors using a standard telephone cable line. The data acquisition system algorithm is built around the continuously running 24-bit resolution 192 kHz data sampling analog to digital convertor. The major features of the design include: extremely low leakage current in the input circuit, true charge integrating mode operation, and relatively fast response to the intermediate radiation change. These features allow operating of the device as an environmental radiation monitor, at the perimeters of the radiation-generating installations in densely populated areas, like in other monitoring and security applications requiring high precision and long-term stability. Initial system evaluation results are presented.

  19. Environmental monitoring of secondhand smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Apelberg, Benjamin J; Hepp, Lisa M; Avila-Tang, Erika; Gundel, Lara; Hammond, S Katharine; Hovell, Melbourne F; Hyland, Andrew; Klepeis, Neil E; Madsen, Camille C; Navas-Acien, Ana; Repace, James; Samet, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    The complex composition of secondhand smoke (SHS) provides a range of constituents that can be measured in environmental samples (air, dust and on surfaces) and therefore used to assess non-smokers' exposure to tobacco smoke. Monitoring SHS exposure (SHSe) in indoor environments provides useful information on the extent and consequences of SHSe, implementing and evaluating tobacco control programmes and behavioural interventions, and estimating overall burden of disease caused by SHSe. The most widely used markers have been vapour-phase nicotine and respirable particulate matter (PM). Numerous other environmental analytes of SHS have been measured in the air including carbon monoxide, 3-ethenylpyridine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific nitrosamines, nitrogen oxides, aldehydes and volatile organic compounds, as well as nicotine in dust and on surfaces. The measurement of nicotine in the air has the advantage of reflecting the presence of tobacco smoke. While PM measurements are not as specific, they can be taken continuously, allowing for assessment of exposure and its variation over time. In general, when nicotine and PM are measured in the same setting using a common sampling period, an increase in nicotine concentration of 1 μg/m3 corresponds to an average increase of 10 μg/m3 of PM. This topic assessment presents a comprehensive summary of SHSe monitoring approaches using environmental markers and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these methods and approaches. PMID:22949497

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, JF

    2004-12-02

    A mission of foremost importance to the Department of Energy and our contractors is to provide our stakeholders with a complete understanding of the consequences of our operations, both past and present. To do this, an extensive annual multimillion-dollar monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of samples from air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plants, and animals. The results are published in a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report available to all. We also publish a separate Data Volume for those who wish to see the raw data. Though these documents present all the facts and figures, they are long, technical, and not always easy to read. Thus, I team with a local high school each year and ask students to write an Annual Site Environmental Report Summary specifically for the public. These documents are perhaps the most important reports the Department of Energy produces. Why? First, they lay out the environmental monitoring programs and the consequences of Department of Energy operations in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public; second, they represent the efforts of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out these extensive programs and work hard to protect and enhance the environment; and third, the summary is written for you, the public, our most important stakeholder, with the hope that you find it understandable and of value in gaining an accurate understanding of the Oak Ridge Reservation. All three documents can be found on the web, along with previous years, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. Working with a new class each year brings new faces, new personalities, and new creative ideas. The students always amaze me with their interest and desire to produce a document the public will utilize and find of value. I personally thank the Karns High School students and their teacher, Ms Evelyn Hammonds, for accepting my challenge in writing this public document and for thinking out of the

  1. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary. Fourth quarter, 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are described.

  2. Environmental Monitoring of Endemic Cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElNemr, W.; Jutla, A. S.; Constantin de Magny, G.; Hasan, N. A.; Islam, M.; Sack, R.; Huq, A.; Hashem, F.; Colwell, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat. Since Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease, is autochthonous to riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters, it is unlikely the bacteria can be eradicated from its natural habitat. Prediction of disease, in conjunction with preventive vaccination can reduce the prevalence rate of a disease. Understanding the influence of environmental parameters on growth and proliferation of bacteria is an essential first step in developing prediction methods for outbreaks. Large scale geophysical variables, such as SST and coastal chlorophyll, are often associated with conditions favoring growth of V. cholerae. However, local environmental factors, meaning biological activity in ponds from where the bulk of populations in endemic regions derive water for daily usage, are either neglected or oversimplified. Using data collected from several sites in two geographically distinct locations in South Asia, we have identified critical local environmental factors associated with cholera outbreak. Of 18 environmental variables monitored for water sources in Mathbaria (a coastal site near the Bay of Bengal) and Bakergonj (an inland site) of Bangladesh, water depth and chlorophyll were found to be important factors associated with initiation of cholera outbreaks. Cholera in coastal regions appears to be related to intrusion. However, monsoonal flooding creates conditions for cholera epidemics in inland regions. This may be one of the first attempts to relate in-situ environmental observations with cholera. We anticipate that it will be useful for further development of prediction models in the resource constrained regions.

  3. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs. (KJD)

  4. Conductometric Microbiosensors for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Dzyadevych, Sergei V.

    2008-01-01

    This review presents the principles of conductometric measurements in ionic media and the equivalent electrical circuits of different designs for conductometric measurements. These types of measurements were first applied for monitoring biocatalytic reactions. The use of conductometric microtransducers is then presented and detailed in the case of pollutant detection for environmental monitoring. Conductometric biosensors have advantages over other types of transducers: they can be produced through inexpensive thin- film standard technology, no reference electrode is needed and differential mode measurements allow cancellation of a lot of interferences. The specifications obtained for the detection of different pesticides, herbicides and heavy metal ions, based on enzyme inhibition, are presented as well as those obtained for the detection of formaldehyde, 4- chlorophenol, nitrate and proteins as markers of dissolved organic carbon based on enzymatic microbiosensors.

  5. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2005-04-05

    This booklet is the summary chapter of the large groundwater report printed in booklet form with a CD of the complete report inside the back cover. It contains information on the current status of groundwater beneath the Hanford Site, highlights of FY 2004 monitoring, and emerging issues.

  6. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING: A REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosensors show the potential to complement laboratory-based analytical methods for environmental applications. Although biosensors for potential environmental-monitoring applications have been reported for a wide range of environmental pollutants, from a regulatory perspective, ...

  7. Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

  8. Environmental Monitoring Using Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhang, C.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.; Fu, S.; Acevedo, M. F.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental observatories, consisting of a variety of sensor systems, computational resources and informatics, are important for us to observe, model, predict, and ultimately help preserve the health of the nature. The commoditization and proliferation of coin-to-palm sized wireless sensors will allow environmental monitoring with unprecedented fine spatial and temporal resolution. Once scattered around, these sensors can identify themselves, locate their positions, describe their functions, and self-organize into a network. They communicate through wireless channel with nearby sensors and transmit data through multi-hop protocols to a gateway, which can forward information to a remote data server. In this project, we describe an environmental observatory called Texas Environmental Observatory (TEO) that incorporates a sensor network system with intertwined wired and wireless sensors. We are enhancing and expanding the existing wired weather stations to include wireless sensor networks (WSNs) and telemetry using solar-powered cellular modems. The new WSNs will monitor soil moisture and support long-term hydrologic modeling. Hydrologic models are helpful in predicting how changes in land cover translate into changes in the stream flow regime. These models require inputs that are difficult to measure over large areas, especially variables related to storm events, such as soil moisture antecedent conditions and rainfall amount and intensity. This will also contribute to improve rainfall estimations from meteorological radar data and enhance hydrological forecasts. Sensor data are transmitted from monitoring site to a Central Data Collection (CDC) Server. We incorporate a GPRS modem for wireless telemetry, a single-board computer (SBC) as Remote Field Gateway (RFG) Server, and a WSN for distributed soil moisture monitoring. The RFG provides effective control, management, and coordination of two independent sensor systems, i.e., a traditional datalogger-based wired

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-03-12

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  10. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  11. 10 CFR 61.53 - Environmental monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental monitoring. 61.53 Section 61.53 Energy... Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.53 Environmental monitoring. (a) At the time a... to provide basic environmental data on the disposal site characteristics. The applicant shall...

  12. 10 CFR 61.53 - Environmental monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Environmental monitoring. 61.53 Section 61.53 Energy... Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.53 Environmental monitoring. (a) At the time a... to provide basic environmental data on the disposal site characteristics. The applicant shall...

  13. Environmental Monitoring Using Microcantilever Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, Thomas; Brown, Gilbert M.; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2003-03-27

    There is presently an urgent need for rugged, low cost sensing systems for real-time, in situ chemical sensors for characterization and monitoring of ground water, contaminated soil and process streams. Recent advances in designing and fabricating microcantilever beams capable of detecting extremely small forces, mechanical stress and mass additions offer the promising prospect of environmental sensing with unprecedented sensitivity and dynamic range. The resonance frequency of a cantilever beam varies sensitively as a function of molecular adsorption. In addition, when the adsorption is confined to one side of the cantilever, the cantilever undergoes deflection due to adsorption-induced variation in surface free energy. Chemical selectivity can be achieved by coating the cantilevers with selective molecules. We have detected a number of ions such as Cs, Cr, Cu, Hg and methyl Hg in ground water with very high sensitivity. Recent results from nanocantilever sensor arrays will be presented.

  14. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  15. Calendar Year 2002 RCRA & CERCLA Groundwater Monitoring Well summary report

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the calendar year 2002 field activities associated with installing four new groundwater monitoring wells in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. Two groundwater monitoring wells are located around waste management area (WMA) TX-TY to support the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and two groundwater monitoring wells are located in the 200-UP-1 and 200-ZP-1 operable units (OU) to support the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980'' (CERCLA).

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-02-19

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not

  17. Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  18. Health and environmental research. Summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  19. Environmental bioremediation and biodegradation. A meeting summary

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to bring together the leading scientists and engineers in this diverse area to further dialogue between those conducting basic mechanistic research and those designing fieldable Systems, within the context of policy guidelines. The meeting was attended by 110 participants representing industry, academia, and government institutions, from 11 countries on 5 continents. To accomplish the goals of the symposium, the talks were arranged broadly into sessions covering basic molecular genetics, microbial physiology and biochemistry, applications and engineering systems, fate and effects and monitoring, and policy guidelines. In addition, there were poster sessions throughout the week.

  20. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993 summary pamphlet

    SciTech Connect

    Karapatakis, L.

    1994-05-01

    This pamphlet summarizes the impact of 1993 Savannah River Site operations on the environment and the off-site public. It includes an overview of site operations; the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring; 1993 radiological releases and the resulting dose to the off-site population; and results of the 1993 nonradiological program. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 describes the findings of the environmental monitoring program for 1993. The report contains detailed information about site operations,the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs, monitoring and surveillance results, environmental compliance activities, and special programs. The report is distributed to government officials, members of the US Congress, universities, government facilities, environmental and civic groups, the news media, and interested individuals.

  1. Summary of panel session 3 -- Environmental issues affecting CCT deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Hausker, K.

    1997-12-31

    The panelists discussed a variety of environmental issues that affect CCT deployment, and more broadly speaking, power development in general. The issues were both international and domestic in nature. The author summarizes the issues discussed. A summary is also presented which highlights ideas from the panelists that could be characterized as solutions to the demand for improved environmental performance and the surrounding uncertainties. The author offers some personal comments and observations.

  2. Summary and report on four national environmental workshops

    SciTech Connect

    House, Peter W.

    1980-07-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for the summaries of four workshops held during the last two years: (1) Integrated Assessment for Energy Related Environmental Standards Workshop - Berkeley, California, November 1978; (2) National Ecological Assessment Workshop - Savannah, Georgia, January 1979; (3) National/Regional Modelling Workshop - Reston, Virginia, May 1979; (4) Groundwater Workshop - Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 1980. (JGB)

  3. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary - second quarter 1997 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.; Marks, B.M.

    1997-07-22

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1997 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized below: All of the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1997, were performed as planned with the exception of UN-216-E-9. This site was not surveyed as stabilization activities were in progress. The sites scheduled for the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) team were switched with those identified for the third quarter as there was a conflict with vegetation management activities.

  4. Environmental monitoring and surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 data

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.V.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental monitoring and surveillance are conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its environs throughout the year. Environmental monitoring ensures that (1) the reservation is a safe place to work, (2) activities on the reservation do not adversely affect the neighboring communities, and (3) compliance is made with federal and state regulations. This document is a compilation of the monitoring and surveillance data for calendar year 1995. It is a tool for analysts in the fields of environmental monitoring and environmental restoration. The summary information found in the annual site environmental report was drawn from the contents of this document.

  5. REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) supports the development and utilization of ecological monitoring as a critical component of environmental management and protection. Its authorization is provided under the Clean Water Act, as amended, Public L...

  6. Report Summary, Final Hells Canyon Environmental Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-01-01

    The Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 provided for the establishment of a Regional Power Planning Council (Regional Council) and mandated the development of a Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (F&W Program). The F&W Program was adopted by the Regional Council in November 1982. and is intended to mitigate fish and wildlife losses resulting from the development of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. One element of the FLW Program is the Water Budget. It calls for additional flows in the Columbia and Snake Rivers between April 15 and June 15 to improve the survival of juvenile salmon and steelhead migrating downstream. The Snake River's contribution to the Water Budget is 20,000 cubic feet per second-months (A volume of water equal to a flow of 20.000 cubic feet per second, 24 hours per day, for a period of a month) over and above water that would normally flow for power production. The water for the Water Budget would come out of Idaho Power Company's (IPCo) Hells Canyon Complex and the Corps of Engineers' (Corps) Dvorshak Reservoir. IPCo's Hells Canyon Complex consists of three dams, Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon. Brownlee, at the upstream end, contains a large reservoir and controls flow to the lower dams. IPCo's participation in the Water Budget could affect the level of the Brownlee Reservoir and flows downstream of the Hells Canyon Complex on the Snake River. In light of this, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and IPCo contracted with the consulting firm of CH2!4 Hill to study the potential changes that could occur to the environment. The Environmental Investigation (EI) takes into account concerns that were expressed by the public at a series of public meetings held in the Snake River area during June 1983 and again during September 1984. Existing information and consultations with agencies which have management responsibilities in the project area formed the basis for the data used in the EI

  7. Sensors for environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Russell; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Davis, Mary Jo

    2004-09-01

    This report surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. Regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report contains environmental monitoring information for the following UMTRA sites for the 1992 Calendar Year: Lakeview, OR; Lowman, ID; Mexican Hat, UT; Monument Valley, AZ; Rifle, CO; Riverton, WY; Shiprock, NM; Spook, WY; Tuba City, AZ. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  9. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  10. Executive summary for the Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report is the sixth in a series of annual reports produced by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) since 1986. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of the Weldon Spring site (WSS) on the surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters; air quality; vegetation and wildlife; and, through these multiple pathways, the potential for exposure to receptor human populations. Information is also presented on the environmental monitoring quality assurance program, waste management activities, audits and reviews, and special environmental studies. Data are included for both the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. Based on the consistent exercise of quality assurance in both standard operating procedures and quality control sample collection, the WSSRAP asserts that the data presented in the WSS Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1991 accurately reflect the environmental conditions monitored at the WSS. This report presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions on environmental monitoring at the WSS and surrounding vicinity properties for the entire 1991 monitoring year. During 1991 the WSSRAP also published quarterly data reports, wherein all routine monitoring data were tabulated and presented quarterly to allow the public to review the data in a timely fashion prior to issuance of the annual report.

  11. Soil and soil environmental quality monitoring in China: a review.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yanguo; Wu, Jin; Lu, Sijin; Wang, Yeyao; Jiao, Xudong; Song, Liuting

    2014-08-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous concerns have been raised in China over the issue of environmental sustainability. Various soil survey and monitoring programs have been carried out in China to study soil quality, and to provide a scientific basis for environment policy making. This paper provides an overview of past and current soil quality surveys and monitoring activities in China. This paper includes a summary of concerns over background concentrations of elements in soil, and soil environmental standards and guidelines in China. Levels of pollution in urban soil, agricultural soil, and soil in mining and smelting areas were compared using the concentrations and pollution indexes. In addition to soil surveys, soil monitoring is essential to study the data and to examine the effects of contaminants in soils. However, the current soil quality monitoring system was insufficient to accurately determine the soil quality status of soils across China. For accurate soil monitoring in China, it will be necessary to set up routine monitoring systems at various scales (national, provincial, and local scales), taking into consideration monitoring indicators and quality assurance. This is currently an important priority for the environmental protection administration of China.

  12. Continuous environmental monitoring for aqueous effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Jones, G. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    An aquatic environmental monitor has been developed that will continuously monitor aqueous waste streams from coal processing plants. The monitor contains three different instruments: a continuous chemical oxygen demand monitor and two continuous-flow fluorometers with different excitation-emission characteristics. A prototype instrument was fabricated and evaluated for several different applications. The details of the instrument design and results of its evaluation are presented in this report.

  13. Site Annual Environmental Report for 1997 - Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Althouse, P.E; Brandstetter, E.R.; Christofferson, E.C.; Fields, B.C.; Gallegos, G.M.; Garcia, L.M.; Harrach, R.J.; Larson, J.M.; Tate, P.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Environmental Report 1997 is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as required by DOE Order 5400.1 and DOE Order 231.1, by the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The results of LLNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public are presented in this publication.

  14. 1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

    1990-05-01

    This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

  15. 1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

    1992-11-01

    This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  16. 1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. ); Goodrich, M. )

    1991-05-01

    This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

  17. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  18. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  19. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  20. Linked Micromaps: Statistical Summaries of Aquatic Monitoring Data in a Spatial Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    Communicating summaries of spatial data to decision makers and the public is challenging. Linked micromaps provide a way to simultaneously present geographic context and statistical summaries of data. Monitoring data collected over areal units, such as watersheds or ecoregions,...

  1. Environmental Management System (EMS) objectives and targets : annual results summary - FY2011.

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2012-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NM's operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2011.

  2. Environmental impacts of proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Scharber, Wayne K.; Macintire, H. A.; Davis, Paul E.; Cothron, Terry K.; Stephens, Barry K.; Travis, Norman; Walter, George; Mobley, Mike

    1985-12-17

    This report describes environmental impacts from a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility for spent fuels to be located in Tennessee. Areas investigated include: water supply, ground water, air quality, solid waste management, and health hazards. (CBS)

  3. BIOSEPARATION AND BIOANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growing use of antibody-based separation methods has paralleled the expansion of immunochemical detection methods in moving beyond the clinical diagnostic field to applications in environmental monitoring. In recent years high-performance immunoaffinity chromatography, which ...

  4. COMPOSITE SAMPLING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Guidance for selecting a plan to tomposite environmental or biological samples is provided in the form of models, equations, tables, and criteria. Composite sampling procedures can increase sensitivity, reduce sampling variance, and dramatically reduce analytical costs, depending...

  5. Great Basin Integrated Landscape Monitoring Pilot Summary Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Sean P.; Kitchell, Kate; Baer, Lori Anne; Bedford, David R.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Matchett, J.R.; Mathie, Amy; Miller, David M.; Pilliod, David S.; Torregrosa, Alicia; Woodward, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The Great Basin Integrated Landscape Monitoring Pilot project (GBILM) was one of four regional pilots to implement the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Science Thrust on Integrated Landscape Monitoring (ILM) whose goal was to observe, understand, and predict landscape change and its implications on natural resources at multiple spatial and temporal scales and address priority natural resource management and policy issues. The Great Basin is undergoing rapid environmental change stemming from interactions among global climate trends, increasing human populations, expanding and accelerating land and water uses, invasive species, and altered fire regimes. GBLIM tested concepts and developed tools to store and analyze monitoring data, understand change at multiple scales, and forecast landscape change. The GBILM endeavored to develop and test a landscape-level monitoring approach in the Great Basin that integrates USGS disciplines, addresses priority management questions, catalogs and uses existing monitoring data, evaluates change at multiple scales, and contributes to development of regional monitoring strategies. GBILM functioned as an integrative team from 2005 to 2010, producing more than 35 science and data management products that addressed pressing ecosystem drivers and resource management agency needs in the region. This report summarizes the approaches and methods of this interdisciplinary effort, identifies and describes the products generated, and provides lessons learned during the project.

  6. Climatological summary of wind and temperature data for the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Schwartz, M.N.; Burk, K.W.; Kasper, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; Perrault, P.J.

    1990-09-01

    This document presents climatological summaries of wind and temperature data collected at the twenty-five monitoring stations operated by the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Network. The climatological analyses presented here involve hourly averaged wind data collected over an 8-year period beginning in 1982 (fewer wind data are available for the several monitoring stations that began full-time operation after 1982) and hourly averaged air temperature data collected over 2-year period beginning in mid-1988. The tables and figures presented in this document illustrate the spatial and temporal variation of meteorological parameters across the Hanford Site and the surrounding areas. This information is useful for emergency response applications, routine meteorological forecasting, planning and scheduling operations, facility design, and environmental impact studies.

  7. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  8. Summary of Research in Environmental Education, 1971-1982. Monographs in Environmental Education and Environmental Studies, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iozzi, Louis A., Ed.

    Summaries of environmental education (EE) research studies conducted during the 12-year period 1971-1982 are presented in this seven-chapter publication. These chapters are: (1) "Environmental Education Research, 1971-1982--Overview" (by Louis Iozzi); (2) "Environmental Education Research Related to Ecological Foundations" (by Thomas…

  9. South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect

    Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification of

  10. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  11. Improving ecological response monitoring of environmental flows.

    PubMed

    King, Alison J; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D; Nielsen, Daryl L; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  12. Heat stress monitoring system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program involves the need to decontaminate and decommission buildings expeditiously and cost-effectively. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. Often, D and D workers must perform duties in inclement weather, and because they also frequently work in contaminated areas, they must wear personal protective clothing and/or respirators. Monitoring the health status of workers under these conditions is an important component of ensuring their safety. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System`s heat stress monitoring system (HSMS) is designed to monitor the vital signs of individual workers as they perform work in conditions that might be conducive to heat exhaustion or heat stress. The HSMS provides real-time data on the physiological condition of workers which can be monitored to prevent heat stress or other adverse health situations. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their condition more difficult. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System can monitor up to four channels (e.g., heart rate, body activity, ear canal, and skin temperature) and ten workers from a single supervisory station. The monitors are interfaced with a portable computer that updates and records information on individual workers. This innovative technology, even though it costs more, is an attractive alternative to the traditional (baseline) technology, which measures environmental statistics and predicts the average worker`s reaction to those environmental conditions without taking the physical condition of the individual worker into consideration. Although use of the improved technology might be justified purely on the basis of improved safety, it has the potential to pay for itself by reducing worker time lost caused by heat

  13. 10 CFR 61.53 - Environmental monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.53 Environmental monitoring. (a) At the time a... to provide basic environmental data on the disposal site characteristics. The applicant shall...

  14. 10 CFR 61.53 - Environmental monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.53 Environmental monitoring. (a) At the time a... to provide basic environmental data on the disposal site characteristics. The applicant shall...

  15. 10 CFR 61.53 - Environmental monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Technical Requirements for Land Disposal Facilities § 61.53 Environmental monitoring. (a) At the time a... to provide basic environmental data on the disposal site characteristics. The applicant shall...

  16. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING DATABASES FOR STATISTICAL ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) collects data that are used to statistically assess the environmental condition of large geographic regions. These data are then posted on the EMAP web site so that anyone can use them. Databases used for the statistical ...

  17. Nanotechnology-based Sensors for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, Willi

    2010-03-01

    COINS mission is to inspire and realize applications directed towards sensing of environmental conditions using nano-mechanical technology, integrated with suitable societal implications studies and educational, outreach, and knowledge transfer programs. Specifically, the technical focus of COINS is to develop the means for realizing its two major technology applications -- personal and community-based environmental monitoring (PACMON) and tagging tracking and locating (TTL). These platforms combine technologies of molecular recognition and signal transduction, energy harvesting and conversion, efficient signal processing and wireless communications, and mobility. In this talk, I will give an overview of some of the recent advances in our environmental monitoring sensor development.

  18. Environmental radiation protection: philosophy, monitoring and standards.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Augustin

    2004-01-01

    The Euratom Treaty confers important powers to the European Commission with regard to monitoring and assessment of levels of radioactivity in the environment and discharges with effluents (Articles 35-37 of the Euratom Treaty). Current developments in the area relate to harmonised reporting of environmental data and to harmonisation of effluent monitoring data. Both developments relate to the requirement under the new Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for a realistic assessment of population exposure. Guidance to this effect is being prepared by the Article 31 Group of Experts. In the context of Article 36 intercomparison exercises for radionuclides measurements in environmental samples are organised. New challenges for environmental monitoring result from the requirement under the BSS to regulate also industries processing NORM materials. Also the international move towards extending the scope of environmental radioactivity to the protection of biota opens new perspectives.

  19. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

  20. Canadian Landsat studies for monitoring resource development: A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, F. J.; Howarth, P. J.

    This report summarizes a major paper reviewing Canadian work using Landsat imagery for monitoring the environmental effects of the development of both renewable and non-renewable resources. Landsat has definite advantages for studying resources. In particular, the data are able to show changes in surface cover indicating in many cases development or the exploitation of resources. Monitoring of areas and rates of change over time is possible. Outlined in the paper are examples related to three aspects of resource development. First is the use of Landsat for updating topographic maps for areas where recent developments have taken place. The second aspect is forestry, and examples related to the detection and measurement of clear cuts and recording of areas affected by spruce budworm are reported. Finally, studies of landscape changes produced by mining activities are presented.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012. Student Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hutzel, Margaret; Siegrist, Lindsey; Wilson, Natalie; Kloepfer, Daniel

    2015-12-31

    The report that follows is a summary of the U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER), regarding PORTS located near Piketon, Ohio. The summary has been compiled by the 2015 WHS Environmental Science class, made up of juniors and seniors at WHS during the 2014-2015 school year. Even with most of the class having lived in this region for their entire lives, it became apparent how little of the workings of the plant were known by the members of the class. In the process of putting this summary together, we were able to gain a better understanding of the history, function, and possible future of the site. The presentations provided by Ohio University, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth LLC (FBP), U.S. DOE, and Rio Grande University were greatly appreciated and provided invaluable understanding of the materials which we were asked to summarize. Not only did we learn from the presentations, but we greatly enjoyed the opportunities to participate in the field studies that gave us a glimpse into what is being done at the plant site to ensure the environmental safety of people and wildlife of this region. Our goal from this summary has been to make the information concerning the monitoring and cleanup of the PORTS facility better understood by the people who it most affects. We hope that this summary makes the information useful to you and that you can gain a better understanding of the cleanup processes that are going on around the site to ensure your safety. Though it has been hard work, we appreciate the opportunity that we have been presented with to learn and share with the people of our community.

  2. TOR station for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Y.; Arshinova, V. G.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kovalevskii, Valentin K.; Plotnikov, Aleksandr P.; Pokrovskii, Evgenii V.; Rasskazchikova, T. M.; Simonenkov, D. V.; Sklyadneva, Tatyana K.; Tolmachev, Gennadii N.

    1997-05-01

    In December 1992 a station for atmospheric observations has been put into operation at the Institute of Atmospheric Optics within the frameworks of the program of ecological monitoring of Siberia. The station provides for acquiring data on gas and aerosol composition of the atmosphere, on meteorological quantities, and the background of gamma radiation. The station operates day and night and the whole year round. All the measurement procedures are fully automated. Readouts from the measuring devices are performed very hour 10 minutes averaged. In addition, synoptic information is also received at the station. Periodically gas chromatographic analysis is being done to determine concentrations of hydrocarbons from the methane row. Occasionally, chemical composition of suspended matter is determined relative to 39 ingredients. The station is located to the north-east of Tomsk, Akademgorodok. Therefore sometimes it measures air mass coming from Tomsk down town area and sometimes the air mass from rural areas. As a result information obtained at this station should be typical for recreation zones around Tomsk.

  3. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary. Third quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1995-09-01

    Routine radiological surveys are part of the near-facility environmental monitoring program which monitors and helps direct the reduction of the radiologically controlled areas at the Hanford Site. The routine radiological surveys are performed by the Southern Area Remediation Support Group and the Site Surveillance Radiological Control Group as directed by Near-Field Monitoring. The surveys included in this program consist of inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste sites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; and road and rail surfaces. This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed during the Third Quarter of 1995. The status of corrective actions required from current and past reports are also discussed.

  4. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are the focus of this report. Tritium activities exceeded the PDWS in 4 wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in 1 well, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 2. No priority pollutant (EPA, 1990) exceeded the PDWS or Flag 2 criteria in 2 wells. None of the HAC wells exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Elevated tritium activities were found in all four HAC wells every quarter. Elevated total radium occurred in well HAC 2 during third quarter.

  5. Full spectrum analysis in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Sascha

    2014-08-01

    In environmental radiation monitoring, the time-variable natural gamma radiation background complicates the nuclide identification and analysis of a gamma spectrum. A full spectrum analysis based on the noise adjusted singular value decomposition method for the description of the time-variable background and adjustment calculations is a possible analysis method, which may provide advantages compared with a peak-based analysis, if applied to a time series of gamma spectra. An analysis example is shown and discussed with a measured time series of gamma spectra obtained from a spectroscopic gamma detector with a NaI(Tl) scintillator as it is used in the environmental radiation monitoring.

  6. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY83 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Besides the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a full year of operation. A phased approach has been planned to assure the proper level of monitoring to coincide with the TFTR program. During CY83 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  7. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.

    1989-05-01

    The results of the 1988 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), were in operation during the year. The Environmental Committee, which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB), continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY88 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations. Over the last two years the Department of Energy conducted major environmental audits at all of its facilities, including PPPL. No significant environmental concerns were noted as a result of the inspection and sampling at PPPL. 43 refs., 25 figs., 33 tabs.

  8. ICCP Environmental Monitoring Report CY-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, J.K.

    1993-07-01

    Summarized in this report are the data collected through Environmental Monitoring programs conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) by the Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) Department. This report is published in response to DOE Order 5400.1. This report covers the period from December 21, 1991 through December 20, 1992 and details airborne and liquid effluents from the Chemical Processing Plant.

  9. Environmental monitoring for Space Station WP01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    External contamination monitoring instrumentation for the Space Station work package one (WP01) elements, were imposed on the contractor as deliverable hardware. The monitoring instrumentation proposed by the WP01 contractor in response to the contract requirement includes both real time measurements and passive samples. Real time measurement instrumentation consists of quartz crystal microbalances for molecular deposition, ion gaseous species identification. Internal environmental contamination monitoring for particulates is included in both Lab and HAB modules. Passive samples consists of four sample mounting plates mounted external to the Space Station modules, two on the U.S. LAB, and two on the HAB module.

  10. Finnish remote environmental monitoring field demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.; Leppaenen, A.; Ylaetalo, S.; Lehtinen, J.; Hokkinen, J.; Tarvainen, M.; Crawford, T.; Glidewell, D.; Smartt, H.; Torres, J.

    1997-10-01

    Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki, Finland and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), working under the Finnish Support Program to IAEA Safeguards and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) funded International Remote Monitoring Program (Task FIN E 935), have undertaken a joint effort to demonstrate the use of remote monitoring for environmental air sampling and safeguards applications. The results of the task will be used by the IAEA to identify the feasibility, cost-effectiveness, reliability, advantages, and problems associated with remote environmental monitoring. An essential prerequisite for a reliable remote air sampling system is the protection of samples against tampering. Means must be developed to guarantee that the sampling itself has been performed as designed and the original samples are not substituted with samples produced with other equipment at another site. One such method is to label the samples with an unequivocal tag. In addition, the inspection personnel must have the capability to remotely monitor and access the automated environmental air sampling system through the use of various sensors and video imagery equipment. A unique aspect to this project is the network integration of remote monitoring equipment with a STUK radiation monitoring system. This integration will allow inspectors to remotely view air sampler radiation data and sensor/image data through separate software applications on the same review station. A sensor network and video system will be integrated with the SNL developed Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) to provide a comprehensive remote monitoring approach for safeguards purposes. This field trial system is being implemented through a multiphase approach for use by STUK, SNL, and for possible future use by the IAEA.

  11. Environmental Management System (EMS) objectives & targets : annual results summary %3CU%2B2013%3E FY10.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale S.; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2011-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico's (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each fiscal year (FY) significant environmental aspects are identified and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are designed to mitigate the impact of SNL/NM's operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established objectives and targets provides a connection to and rational for annually revised significant aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2010.

  12. FIBER OPTIC SENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to decades of neglect as well as ever-increasing industrial activity, environmental monitoring has become an important issue. Given the expense and time constraints associated with classical laboratory analysis, there exists a growing interest in cost-effective and real-time ...

  13. Environmental monitoring: the key to effective sanitation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alan; Wilfred, Antonia G; Hidell, Timothy B

    2003-05-01

    Judicious and effective use of chemical decontaminants has a critical function in meeting the bioexclusion and biocontainment objectives established in every well-managed animal research facility. The authors provide an overview of the components to consider when developing and implementing an environmental monitoring program. PMID:19757613

  14. Annual environmental monitoring report: calendar year 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, B.M.; Carfagno, D.G.

    1982-04-21

    The environment locally surrounding Mound was monitored primarily for tritium and plutonium-238. The results are reported for CY-1981. The environmental medium analyzed included air, water, vegetation, foodstuffs, and sediment. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the applicable standards (adopted by the US DOE) for radioactive species.

  15. Instrumentation for Environmental Monitoring: Water, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    This volume is one of a series discussing instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Each volume contains an overview of the basic problems, comparisons among the basic methods of sensing and detection, and notes that summarize the characteristics of presently available instruments and techniques. The text of this survey discusses the…

  16. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites` HNF-PRO-455, Solid Waste 3 Management4 and BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling, routines for the near-facility environmental monitoring program during calendar year (CY) 1998. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Environmental Monitoring and investigations and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1999. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for 1332 assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this

  17. Satellite global monitoring of environmental quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The missions of two NASA satellites for the monitoring of environmental quality are described: Nimbus G, the Air Pollution and Oceanographic Observing Satellite, and the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) satellite to be used in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE). The scientific payload of Nimbus G is described in detail with a discussion of limb infrared monitoring of the stratosphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder, stratospheric aerosol measurement, the solar and backscatter UV spectrometer for ozone mapping, the earth radiation budget experiment, the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer, the coastal zone color scanner and the temperature-humidity infrared radiometer. A brief description is given of the SAGE program and future NASA plans relating to the global monitoring of environmental quality are outlined.

  18. Routine Operational Environmental Monitoring schedule, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This document provides Health Physics (HP) a schedule in accordance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) Program during calendar year (CY) 1994. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of EES and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive waste sites are scheduled to be surveyed annually at a minimum. Any newly discovered waste sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995. This schedule does not discuss the manpower needs nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines.

  19. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities. PMID:27558781

  20. ISFET Based Microsensors for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia; Orozco, Jahir; Baldi, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    The use of microsensors for in-field monitoring of environmental parameters is gaining interest due to their advantages over conventional sensors. Among them microsensors based on semiconductor technology offer additional advantages such as small size, robustness, low output impedance and rapid response. Besides, the technology used allows integration of circuitry and multiple sensors in the same substrate and accordingly they can be implemented in compact probes for particular applications e.g., in situ monitoring and/or on-line measurements. In the field of microsensors for environmental applications, Ion Selective Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) have a special interest. They are particularly helpful for measuring pH and other ions in small volumes and they can be integrated in compact flow cells for continuous measurements. In this paper the technologies used to fabricate ISFETs and a review of the role of ISFETs in the environmental field are presented. PMID:22315527

  1. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.

  2. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Techtmann, Stephen M.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.

  3. Marine environmental assessment: Gulf of Mexico 1985 annual summary

    SciTech Connect

    Pechmann, K.B.; Ellis, J.O.; Everdale, F.G.; Green, S.Z.; Sheifer, I.C.

    1986-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico 1985 Annual Assessment presents a synoptic view of several economic sectors and their direct and indirect relations to the physical and biological aspects of the marine and atmospheric environments. The report is comprised of seven sections. In the introductory section the authors define the concept of an assessment as embodied in the report, specify the coverage of the present report, and suggest areas of extension and future development. In section 2 the authors present a summary of impacts they have identified for 1985. Sections 3 through 6 contain details of the weather and ocean conditions, fisheries, recreation, and transportation in the Gulf of Mexico marine environment for 1985. Section 7 contains a discussion of a selected environmental issue in the Gulf. The disposition of abandoned offshore oil and gas platforms.

  4. Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

  5. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary, first quarter 1998: 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1998-04-27

    Routine radiological surveys are part of near-facility environmental monitoring, which monitors and helps direct the reduction of the radiological areas at the Hanford Site. The routine radiological surveys are performed by the Southern Area Remediation Support Group and the Site Support Services Radiological Control Group as directed by Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The surveys performed have included inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste sites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; underground pipelines; and road and rail surfaces. This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site during the first quarter 1998. The survey results and the status of actions required are also discussed. A waste site survey schedule, Routine Environmental Monitoring Schedule, Calendar year 1998, HNF-SP-0098-9, was developed by Environmental Monitoring and Investigations working with the Southern Area Remediation Support Group and the Site Support Services Radiological Control Group. Environmental Monitoring and Investigations reviews the radiological survey reports and files a copy for historical purposes and reference. Radiological conditions are tracked and trends noted. All sites are surveyed at least once each year. The survey frequencies for particular sites are based on site history, 1,551 radiological conditions, and general maintenance. Special surveys may be conducted at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant (e.g., growth of deep-rooted vegetation is noted at a waste site). Radiological surveys are conducted to detect surface contamination and document changes in vegetation growth, biological intrusion, erosion, and general site maintenance conditions. Survey data are compared

  6. Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and operational environmental monitoring performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company as it implements the Operational Environmental Monitoring program. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company in implementing the Operational Environmental Monitoring program at the Hanford Site.

  7. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    The results of the 1987 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1987. The Environmental Committee which is a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY87 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations. 41 refs., 24 figs., 34 tabs.

  8. SEMS: System for Environmental Monitoring and Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this project was to establish a computational and data management system, SEMS, building on our existing system and MTPE-related research. We proposed that the new system would help support Washington University's efforts in environmental sustainability through use in: (a) Problem-based environmental curriculum for freshmen and sophomores funded by the Hewlett Foundation that integrates scientific, cultural, and policy perspectives to understand the dynamics of wetland degradation, deforestation, and desertification and that will develop policies for sustainable environments and economies; (b) Higher-level undergraduate and graduate courses focused on monitoring the environment and developing policies that will lead to sustainable environmental and economic conditions; and (c) Interdisciplinary research focused on the dynamics of the Missouri River system and development of policies that lead to sustainable environmental and economic floodplain conditions.

  9. Environmental monitoring report for Calendar Year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The results of the 1986 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) was shut down in December 1985 to undergo major modifications, and will recommence operations in 1987. PLT was shut down in December 1986. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1986. The Environmental Committee became a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) and continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY86 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations.

  10. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-10-01

    As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

  12. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This progress report for fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary fro the Savannah River Plant includes discussion on the following topics: description of facilities; hydrostratigraphic units; monitoring well nomenclature; integrity of the monitoring well network; groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; tritium, nitrate, and pH time-trend data; water levels; groundwater flow rates and directions; upgradient versus downgradient results.

  13. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2005-09-26

    This booklet summarizes the information contained in ''Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004.'' The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of the activities at DOE's Hanford Site.

  14. Evaluating the efficiency of environmental monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, Carrie R.; Yanai, Ruth D.; Lampman, Gregory G.; Burns, Douglas A.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Lynch, Jason; Schoch, Nian

    2014-01-01

    Statistical uncertainty analyses can be used to improve the efficiency of environmental monitoring, allowing sampling designs to maximize information gained relative to resources required for data collection and analysis. In this paper, we illustrate four methods of data analysis appropriate to four types of environmental monitoring designs. To analyze a long-term record from a single site, we applied a general linear model to weekly stream chemistry data at Biscuit Brook, NY, to simulate the effects of reducing sampling effort and to evaluate statistical confidence in the detection of change over time. To illustrate a detectable difference analysis, we analyzed a one-time survey of mercury concentrations in loon tissues in lakes in the Adirondack Park, NY, demonstrating the effects of sampling intensity on statistical power and the selection of a resampling interval. To illustrate a bootstrapping method, we analyzed the plot-level sampling intensity of forest inventory at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, to quantify the sampling regime needed to achieve a desired confidence interval. Finally, to analyze time-series data from multiple sites, we assessed the number of lakes and the number of samples per year needed to monitor change over time in Adirondack lake chemistry using a repeated-measures mixed-effects model. Evaluations of time series and synoptic long-term monitoring data can help determine whether sampling should be re-allocated in space or time to optimize the use of financial and human resources.

  15. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22

    This summary of Argonne National Laboratory's Site Environmental Report for calendar year 2007 was written by 20 students at Downers Grove South High School in Downers Grove, Ill. The student authors are classmates in Mr. Howard's Bio II course. Biology II is a research-based class that teaches students the process of research by showing them how the sciences apply to daily life. For the past seven years, Argonne has worked with Biology II students to create a short document summarizing the Site Environmental Report to provide the public with an easy-to-read summary of the annual 300-page technical report on the results of Argonne's on-site environmental monitoring program. The summary is made available online and given to visitors to Argonne, researchers interested in collaborating with Argonne, future employees, and many others. In addition to providing Argonne and the public with an easily understandable short summary of a large technical document, the participating students learn about professional environmental monitoring procedures, achieve a better understanding of the time and effort put forth into summarizing and publishing research, and gain confidence in their own abilities to express themselves in writing. The Argonne Summary Site Environmental Report fits into the educational needs for 12th grade students. Illinois State Educational Goal 12 states that a student should understand the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences. To create this summary booklet, the students had to read and understand the larger technical report, which discusses in-depth many activities and programs that have been established by Argonne to maintain a safe local environment. Creating this Summary Site Environmental Report also helps students fulfill Illinois State Learning Standard 12B5a, which requires that students be able to analyze and explain biodiversity issues, and the causes and effects of extinction. The

  17. Electronic Noses for Environmental Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Rosso, Renato Del

    2014-01-01

    Electronic nose applications in environmental monitoring are nowadays of great interest, because of the instruments' proven capability of recognizing and discriminating between a variety of different gases and odors using just a small number of sensors. Such applications in the environmental field include analysis of parameters relating to environmental quality, process control, and verification of efficiency of odor control systems. This article reviews the findings of recent scientific studies in this field, with particular focus on the abovementioned applications. In general, these studies prove that electronic noses are mostly suitable for the different applications reported, especially if the instruments are specifically developed and fine-tuned. As a general rule, literature studies also discuss the critical aspects connected with the different possible uses, as well as research regarding the development of effective solutions. However, currently the main limit to the diffusion of electronic noses as environmental monitoring tools is their complexity and the lack of specific regulation for their standardization, as their use entails a large number of degrees of freedom, regarding for instance the training and the data processing procedures. PMID:25347583

  18. Environmental Monitoring of Microbe Metabolic Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad (Inventor); Fleming, Erich (Inventor); Piccini, Matthew (Inventor); Beasley, Christopher (Inventor); Bebout, Leslie (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile system and method for monitoring environmental parameters involved in growth or metabolic transformation of algae in a liquid. Each of one or more mobile apparati, suspended or partly or wholly submerged in the liquid, includes at least first and second environmental sensors that sense and transmit distinct first and second environmental, growth or transformation parameter values, such as liquid temperature, temperature of gas adjacent to and above the exposed surface, liquid pH, liquid salinity, liquid turbidity, O.sub.2 dissolved in the liquid, CO.sub.2 contained in the liquid, oxidization and reduction potential of the liquid, nutrient concentrations in the liquid, nitrate concentration in the liquid, ammonium concentration in the liquid, bicarbonate concentration in the liquid, phosphate concentration in the liquid, light intensity at the liquid surface, electrical conductivity of the liquid, and a parameter.alpha.(alga) associated with growth stage of the alga, using PAM fluorometry or other suitable parameter measurements.

  19. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: calendar year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, M.D.

    1981-04-01

    The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) and other Laboratory facilities are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. The ALRR ceased operation on December 1, 1977. Decommissioning activities began January 3, 1978, and are scheduled for completion October 1, 1981. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR on-site station showed no radioactivity that could be attributed to ALRR operations. The radiosotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium (H-3). The yearly individual dose from H-3 at the exclusion fence was estimated to be 0.016 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 26.6 man-Rem. These values are 0.0032% and 0.026%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. On September 1, 1978, the ALRR site was connected to the City of Ames sanitary sewage system. All liquids (except building foundation and roof water) from the ALRR complex are now discharged to the sewage system negating the requirement for monitoring chemical constituents of effluent and environmental waters. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, H-3 was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.68% of the dose derived from the concentration guide. Building foundation and roof water are discharged to a drainage gulch on site.

  20. Environmental monitoring at Hanford for 1987: Surface and Columbia River data

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquish, R.E.

    1988-08-01

    Environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State is conducted for the US Department of Energy. The data collected provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor the status of chemicals on the site and in the Columbia River. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries in PNL--6464.

  1. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

  2. Phase 1 summaries of radionuclide concentration data for vegetation, river water, drinking water, and fish. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, D.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Poston, T.M.; Thiede, M.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. As part of the HEDR Project, the Environmental Monitoring Data Task (Task 05) staff assemble, evaluate, and summarize key historical measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the environment as a result of Hanford operations. The scope of work performed during Phase I included initiating the search, recovery, and inventory of environmental reports. Summaries of the environmental monitoring data that were recovered and evaluated are presented for specific periods of interest. These periods include vegetation monitoring data (primarily sagebrush) for the years 1945 through 1947, Columbia River water and drinking water monitoring data for the years 1963 through 1966, and fish monitoring data for the years 1964 through 1966. Concern was limited to those radionuclides identified as the most likely major contributors to the dose potentially received by the public during the times of interest: phosphorous-32, copper-64, zinc-65, arsenic-76, and neptunium-239 in Columbia River fish and drinking water taken from the river, and iodine-131 in vegetation. This report documents the achievement of the Phase I objectives of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task.

  3. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation

    DOE PAGES

    Techtmann, Stephen M.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples ofmore » the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.« less

  4. Process monitoring for reprocessing plant safeguards: a summary review

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, H.T.; Ehinger, M.H.; Wachter, J.W.; Hebble, T.L.

    1986-10-01

    Process monitoring is a term typically associated with a detailed look at plant operating data to determine plant status. Process monitoring has been generally associated with operational control of plant processes. Recently, process monitoring has been given new attention for a possible role in international safeguards. International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) Task C.59 has the goal to identify specific roles for process monitoring in international safeguards. As the preliminary effort associated with this task, a review of previous efforts in process monitoring for safeguards was conducted. Previous efforts mentioned concepts and a few specific applications. None were comprehensive in addressing all aspects of a process monitoring application for safeguards. This report summarizes the basic elements that must be developed in a comprehensive process monitoring application for safeguards. It then summarizes the significant efforts that have been documented in the literature with respect to the basic elements that were addressed.

  5. Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Keystone conference on environmental biotechnology. Summary -- Results of conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This symposium brought together a unique mix of scientists, engineers and policy makers to discuss the latest applications of biotechnology to in situ bioremediation and ex situ biodegradation of pollutants and industrial wastes. Several new topics were prominent in the discussions. Chief among these were issues related to environmentally acceptable endpoints, command and control versus incentive driven regulations, bioavailability of pollutants to microbial action, delivery of biodegrading organisms to pollutant plumes, value added production, and genetic probes for monitoring the status of soil consortia. These new issues gave a new perspective to the more traditional topics of the molecular genetics of microorganisms, marine bioremediation, bioprocessing of industrial and agricultural wastes, and engineered bioremediation systems which were featured.

  7. Method for monitoring environmental and corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1995-08-01

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figs.

  8. Method for monitoring environmental and corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1995-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  9. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Selid, Paul D.; Xu, Hanying; Collins, E. Michael; Face-Collins, Marla Striped; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury. PMID:22346707

  10. Global Environmental Change: Modelling and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Christopher

    Stimulating work in many areas of environmental science has led to a growing awareness of and concern for the global environment. The subject of global change itself can be expressed narrowly, in terms of anthropogenic impacts on climate, or offered in the broadest sense, to include all changes occurring in the Earth-ocean-atmosphere system, either naturally, or as a result of human-induced interactions. Global Environmental Change: Modelling and Monitoring chooses the latter expression, and the authors ambitiously propose a unified global modeling system to study and monitor all such changes and provide real-time assessments to assist policymakers.Although the text is divided into 11 chapters, it conceptually splits into four sections. The introduction frames the need for a centralized, international monitoring organization by predicting the catastrophic trajectory of unsustainable development of the present Earth system based on a range of environmental and societal indicators; for example, enhanced atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, tropical forest destruction, unchecked fossil fuel consumption, and increases in human disease. The second section presents an overall structure of a system designed to chart this trajectory: a global observational data base linked to a vast model—or really a collection of interconnected modeling units—spanning ocean, atmospheric and terrestrial hydrodynamics, chemistry, and biology. The third section, which represents the bulk of the text, considers specific applications of the model as explored by the authors. The final two chapters describe some recent developments in microwave remote sensing capabilities and some theory into hypothesis testing and decision-making.

  11. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael M; Olivieri, Isabelle; Waller, Donald M; Nielsen, Einar E

    2012-03-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how to use genetic monitoring to study adaptive responses via repeated analysis of the same populations over time, distinguishing between phenotypic and molecular genetics approaches. After describing monitoring designs, we develop explicit criteria for demonstrating adaptive responses, which include testing for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We further review a broader set of 44 studies to assess how well they meet the proposed criteria, and conclude that only 23% fulfill all criteria. Approximately half (43%) of these studies failed to rule out the alternative hypothesis of replacement by a different, better-adapted population. Likewise, 34% of the studies based on phenotypic variation did not test for selection as opposed to drift. These shortcomings can be addressed via improved experimental designs and statistical testing. We foresee monitoring of adaptive responses as a future valuable tool in conservation biology, for identifying populations unable to evolve at sufficiently high rates and for identifying possible donor populations for genetic rescue. Technological advances will further augment the realization of this potential, especially next-generation sequencing technologies that allow for monitoring at the level of whole genomes.

  12. Interferometric atmospheric refractive-index environmental monitor.

    PubMed

    Ludman, J E; Ludman, J J; Callahan, H; Caulfield, H J; Watt, D; Sampson, J L; Robinson, J; Davis, S; Hunt, A

    1995-06-20

    Long, open-path, outdoor interferometric measurement of the index of refraction as a function of wavelength (spectral refractivity) requires a number of innovations. These include active compensation for vibration and turbulence. The use of electronic compensation produces an electronic signal that is ideal for extracting data. This allows the appropriate interpretation of those data and the systematic and fast scanning of the spectrum by the use of bandwidths that are intermediate between lasers (narrow bandwidth) and white light (broad bandwidth). An Environmental Interferometer that incorporates these features should be extremely valuable in both pollutant detection and pollutant identification. Spectral refractivity measurements complement the information available from spectral absorption instruments (e.g., a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer). The Environmental Interferometer currently uses an electronic compensating device with a 1-kHz response time, and therefore rapid spectral scans are feasibe so that it is possible to monitor the time evolution of pollutant events.

  13. Columbia River monitoring: Summary of chemical monitoring along cross sections at Vernita Bridge and Richland

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, R.L.; Patton, G.W.; Tiller, B.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report presents the results of the chemical monitoring performed by the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) along cross sections of the Columbia River established at Vernita Bridge and the Richland Pumphouse. Potential Hanford-origin chemical constituents of interest were selected based on their presence in ground water near the river, past surveillance efforts that have documented their entry into the river, and reviews of special study reports, CERCIA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) documentation, RCRA facility investigation/corrective measure (FI/CW) study plans, and preliminary risk assessments. Results presented in this report include volatile organic compounds, metals, and anions. The data were generated as part of the routine Columbia River monitoring program currently conducted as part of the SESP.

  14. Summary of monitoring station component evaluation project 2009-2011.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.

    2012-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is regarded as a center for unbiased expertise in testing and evaluation of geophysical sensors and instrumentation for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring (GNEM) systems. This project will sustain and enhance our component evaluation capabilities. In addition, new sensor technologies that could greatly improve national monitoring system performance will be sought and characterized. This work directly impacts the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring mission by verifying that the performance of monitoring station sensors and instrumentation is characterized and suitable to the mission. It enables the operational monitoring agency to deploy instruments of known capability and to have confidence in operational success. This effort will ensure that our evaluation capabilities are maintained for future use.

  15. Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    The application of statistics to environmental pollution monitoring studies requires a knowledge of statistical analysis methods particularly well suited to pollution data. This book fills that need by providing sampling plans, statistical tests, parameter estimation procedure techniques, and references to pertinent publications. Most of the statistical techniques are relatively simple, and examples, exercises, and case studies are provided to illustrate procedures. The book is logically divided into three parts. Chapters 1, 2, and 3 are introductory chapters. Chapters 4 through 10 discuss field sampling designs and Chapters 11 through 18 deal with a broad range of statistical analysis procedures. Some statistical techniques given here are not commonly seen in statistics book. For example, see methods for handling correlated data (Sections 4.5 and 11.12), for detecting hot spots (Chapter 10), and for estimating a confidence interval for the mean of a lognormal distribution (Section 13.2). Also, Appendix B lists a computer code that estimates and tests for trends over time at one or more monitoring stations using nonparametric methods (Chapters 16 and 17). Unfortunately, some important topics could not be included because of their complexity and the need to limit the length of the book. For example, only brief mention could be made of time series analysis using Box-Jenkins methods and of kriging techniques for estimating spatial and spatial-time patterns of pollution, although multiple references on these topics are provided. Also, no discussion of methods for assessing risks from environmental pollution could be included.

  16. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  17. Inventory of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Chapman, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    This document presents the results of a study commissioned to survey and summarize major environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region. Projects with field sites located within 400 km (250 mi) of the border and active after 1980 were reviewed. The types of projects included: ambient air-quality monitoring, ambient water-quality monitoring, deposition monitoring, forest/vegetation monitoring and research, soil studies, and ecosystem studies. Ecosystem studies included projects involving the measurement of parameters from more than one monitoring category (e.g., studies that measured both water and soil chemistry). Individual descriptions were formulated for 184 projects meeting the spatial and temporal criteria. Descriptions included the official title for the project, its common abbreviation, program emphasis, monitoring site locations, time period conducted, parameters measured, protocols employed, frequency of sample collection, data storage information, and the principal contact for the project. A summary inventory subdivided according to the six monitoring categories was prepared using a computerized data management system. Information on major centralized data bases in the field of environmental monitoring was also obtained, and summary descriptions were prepared. The inventory and data base descriptions are presented in appendices to this document.

  18. "Smart pebble" design for environmental monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, while focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions. "Smart pebble" allows for a wider range of environmental sensors (e.g. for environmental/pollutant monitoring) to be incorporated so as to extend the range of its application, enabling accurate environmental monitoring which is required to ensure infrastructure resilience and preservation of ecological health.

  19. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-12-16

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

  20. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are presented in this report. No constituents exceeded the PDWS at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin. Iron and total organic halogens exceeded Flag 2 criteria in sidegradient-to-downgradient well KAC 7 but not in other KAC wells. No priority pollutants (EPA, 1990) exceeded the PDWS or the Flag 2 criteria in wells KAC 1 and 3. None of the KAC wells exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well KAC 7 during first quarter. No other constituent exceeded the PDWS at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin during the year.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico 1994 site environmental report. Summary pamphlet

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document presents details of the environmental activities that occurred during 1994 at Sandia National Laboratories. Topics include: Background about Sandia; radiation facts; sources of radiation; environmental monitoring; discussion of radiation detectors; radioactive waste management; environmental restoration; and quality assurance.

  2. Innovative Sensors for Environmental Monitoring in Museums

    PubMed Central

    Bacci, Mauro; Cucci, Costanza; Mencaglia, Andrea Azelio; Mignani, Anna Grazia

    2008-01-01

    Different physical and chemical factors, such as light, temperature, relative humidity, pollutants and so on, can affect works of art on display. Each factor does not act individually, but its effect can be enhanced or accelerated by the presence of other factors. Accordingly, an evaluation of the impact of the whole environment on art objects is recognized as an essential requirement for conservation purposes. To meet the most up-to-date guidelines on preventive conservation, in recent years several scientific projects supported by the EC were aimed at developing innovative tools that could complement the standard methods for environmental monitoring in museums. These research projects produced a new generation of passive sensors that are capable of taking into account the overall environmental effects by mimicking in some way the behaviour of real works of art. The main goal of the present paper is to provide a survey of these sensors, which represent a new frontier in the environmental control in museums. Furthermore, the use of optical fibres, as both intrinsic sensors and devices for interrogating sensors, will also be illustrated, and examples of their use in the cultural heritage field will be reported.

  3. Environmental monitoring: civilian applications of remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, W.; Lapp, M.; Vitko, J. Jr.; Phipps, G.

    1996-11-01

    This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to explore how best to utilize Sandia`s defense-related sensing expertise to meet the Department of Energy`s (DOE) ever-growing needs for environmental monitoring. In particular, we focused on two pressing DOE environmental needs: (1) reducing the uncertainties in global warming predictions, and (2) characterizing atmospheric effluents from a variety of sources. During the course of the study we formulated a concept for using unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) for making key 0798 climate measurements; designed a highly accurate, compact, cloud radiometer to be flown on those UAVs; and established the feasibility of differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) to measure atmospheric effluents from waste sites, manufacturing processes, and potential treaty violations. These concepts have had major impact since first being formulated in this ,study. The DOE has adopted, and DoD`s Strategic Environmental Research Program has funded, much of the UAV work. And the ultraviolet DIAL techniques have already fed into a major DOE non- proliferation program.

  4. In Summary: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    A. A. Luft; R. B. Evans; T. Saffle; R. G. Mitchell; D. B. Martin

    2000-06-01

    Scientists from the Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO), the US Geological Survey, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Naval Reactors Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-West, and others monitored the environment on and around the INEEL to find contaminants attributable to the INEEL. During 1998, exposures from the INEEL to the public were found to be negligible. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LMITCO made progress in developing and implementing a site-wide Environmental Management System. This system provides an underlying structure to make the management of environmental activities at the INEEL more systematic and predictable. Pathways by which INEEL contaminants might reach people off the INEEL were monitored. These included air, precipitation, water, locally grown food (milk, lettuce, wheat, and potatoes), livestock, game animals, soil, and direct ionizing radiation. Results from samples collected to monitor these pathways often contain ''background radioactivity,'' which is radioactivity from natural sources and nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1945 and 1980. According to results obtained in 1998, radioactivity from operations at the INEEL could not be distinguished from this background radioactivity in the regions surrounding the INEEL. Because radioactivity from the INEEL was not detected by offsite environmental surveillance methods, computer models were used to estimate the radiation dose to the public. The hypothetical maximum dose to an individual from INEEL operations was calculated to be 0.08 millirem. That is 0.002 percent of an average person's annual dose of 360 millirem from natural background radiation in southeast Idaho.

  5. Coso Monitoring Program. Summary report, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, E.M.

    1987-02-01

    The Coso Monitoring Program is a continuing effort in support of the development of the Navy's Geothermal Resources within the Coso Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Data are presented on the monitoring of steam flow rates and temperatures, water levels in ponds and wells, water chemistry, temperature logs of shallow wells and rainfall in the Coso Hot Springs Resort Area. A weekly photographic essay of the mud pots and pools shows the variation of surface-water levels throughout the year.

  6. Coso monitoring program, January 1981 through December 1983. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, S.C.; Rodgers, C.R.

    1984-09-01

    The Coso monitoring program is a continuing effort in support of the development of the Navy's geothermal resources within the Coso Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Data are presented on the monitoring of steam flow rates and temperatures, water levels in ponds and wells, water chemistry, temperature logs of shallow wells, and rainfall in the Coso Hot Springs Resort area. A weekly photographic essay of the mud pots and pools shows the variation of surface water levels thoughout the year.

  7. Determining ecoregions for environmental and GMO monitoring networks.

    PubMed

    Graef, F; Schmidt, G; Schröder, W; Stachow, U

    2005-09-01

    A representative environmental monitoring network at the regional scale cannot use raster-based or random sampling designs, but requires a stratified sampling procedure integrating different information layers, and it has to occur in ecologically differing homogeneous regions (ecoregions). These we have determined using a set of spatial strata with ecological variables which we analysed with classification and regression trees (CART). We present a framework for environmental monitoring, that covers different scales, and we transfer the framework to a potential GMO (genetically modified organisms) monitoring network. We use ecoregion and other environmental strata together with existing environmental monitoring networks to determine GMO monitoring sites more precisely.

  8. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.; Hopper, J.L.

    1982-08-01

    This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years.

  9. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management...

  10. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management...

  11. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management...

  12. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management...

  13. 24 CFR 50.22 - Environmental management and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental management and... and Urban Development PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Environmental Review Procedures § 50.22 Environmental management and monitoring. An Environmental Management...

  14. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary first quarter 1996 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas

    SciTech Connect

    Dorian, J.J.

    1996-04-19

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The First Quarter 1996 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized: All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during January, February, and March 1996 were completed. One hundred four environmental radiological surveys were performed during the first quarter of 1996, thirty at the active waste sites and seventy four at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels was found at six of the active waste sites and eight of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as > 1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys, all were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas. The contamination found within eleven of the URH areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining three sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR`s) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required.

  15. Wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-12-01

    The Science Application International Corporation (SAIC) RadStar{trademark} wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS) is designed to provide real-time monitoring of the radiation dose to workers as they perform work in radiologically contaminated areas. WRRMS can also monitor dose rates in a room or area. The system uses radio-frequency communications to transmit dose readings from the wireless dosimeters worn by workers to a remote monitoring station that can be located out of the contaminated area. Each base station can monitor up to 16 workers simultaneously. The WRRMS can be preset to trigger both audible and visual alarms at certain dose rates. The alarms are provided to the worker as well as the base station operator. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their self-reading dosimeters (SRDs), which are typically used to monitor workers, more difficult. The base station is an IBM-compatible personal computer that updates and records information on individual workers every ten seconds. Although the equipment costs for this improved technology are higher than the SRDs (amortized at $2.54/hr versus $1.02/hr), total operational costs are actually less ($639/day versus $851/day). This is because the WRRMS requires fewer workers to be in the contaminated zone than the traditional (baseline) technology. There are also intangible benefits associated with improved worker safety and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principles, making the WRRMS an attractive alternative to the baseline technology. The baseline technology measures only integrated dose and requires workers to check their own dosimeters manually during the task.

  16. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Sensors for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu

    As a one dimensional material, a Single-walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) is made of a rolled up graphene sheet. With a diameter of 1˜2 nm, the SWNTs exhibit many unique properties, such as high aspect ratios, ballistic carrier transport, high mechanical strength and thermal stability. These properties enable SWNTs to have superior performances in various applications including electronics and sensors. SWNT based sensors are extremely sensitive to slight electrostatic changes in their environment and have a fast response where conductance of an SWNT is observed to change in less than 2 sec upon exposure. In addition, SWNT sensors have size advantage over traditional sensors. Hence, SWNTs have been widely explored as active sensing elements for chemical and biomolecule detection. Despite high sensitivities observed from nanotube sensors, one drawback is their lack of selectivity. The conductance of SWNTs is susceptible to many gas molecules in air, including oxygen and moisture which are abundantly present in the ambient environment. Due to this nonspecificity, the presence of any type of gas vapors can possibly interfere with the induced signals from the target gas vapors and hence reduce S/N ratio during detection. To minimize the effects of undesirable interference signals from the environment, several functionalization methods have been developed to customize the affinities of SWNTs to specific targets, including metal nano particles, conducting polymers and biomolecules. The objective of this thesis is to utilize SWNTs in environmental applications. The proposed research topics include: investigating the sensing characteristics of RNA oligomers on carbon nanotubes; analyzing the sensing characteristics of DNA with different sequence lengths on carbon nanotubes; integration of DNA decorated SWNTs onto CMOS chip for toxic and explosive gas monitoring; building nanosensor array based on multi-functionalized SWNTs for air quality monitoring and exploring the sensing

  17. Meteorological Monitoring on bikini atoll: system description and data summary (May 2000 - April 2001)

    SciTech Connect

    Gouveia F; Bradsher, R; Brunk, J; Hamilton, T

    2002-01-01

    Meteorological data are continuously collected at three sites on Bikini Atoll in support of radioecological research and monitoring programs conducted by the Health and Ecological Assessments Division at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Weather stations were first established on Bikini Atoll in April 1990, and provide information on rainfall, wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, and solar radiation. These data and information are used to interpret results of remediation experiments designed to evaluate the effectiveness of potassium fertilizer on reducing the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into locally grown foods. We have also demonstrated that {sup 137}Cs is slowly leached from surface soil by the action of rain water. Long-term meteorological data are crucial to our efforts of developing an understanding of environmental processes controlling the environment loss of {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll soil. In May 2000, older data collection platforms and the DOS-based system that downloaded data from National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s Data Automatic Processing System (DAPS) was decommissioned, and new data loggers, GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) transmitters and antennas were installed. Consequently, new procedures were developed to maintain the field systems, download the data, and reduce and archive the data. This document provides an operational description and status report on the three new meteorological monitoring systems on Bikini Atoll as well as an computational summary of previously recorded data. Included are overviews of procedures for sensor exchange, data recovery and reduction, and specific information about the different sensors. We also provide a description of systems maintenance and trouble shooting activities. This report will be updated on an annual basis.

  18. Summary Report on Beam and Radiation Generation, Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D. F.; Power, J. G.

    2009-01-22

    The discussions of the working group on beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control (working group 6) at the 2008 advanced accelerator concepts workshop are summarized. The discussions concerned electron injectors, phase space manipulation, beam diagnostics, pulse train generation, intense beam physics, and radiation generation.

  19. JAXA's activities for environmental health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    In the first ten years after establishment of the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) in 2003, our focuses were mainly on technical development (hardware and software) and accumulation of application research. In the next decade, we focus more on solution on social issues using innovative space science technology. Currently, JAXA is operating and developing several earth observation satellites and sensors: Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) "IBUKI", Global Change Observation Mission - Water "SHIZUKU" (GCOM-W), Global Precipitation Measurement/Dual- frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM/DPR), Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2), Global Change Observation Mission - Climate (GCOM-C), Earth Cloud, Aerosol and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE), and GOSAT-2. They will provide essential environmental parameters, such as aerosols, clouds, land vegetation, ocean color, GHGs, and so on. In addition to the above missions, we are studying new instruments (altimeter, LIDAR, detectors, optical components) to obtain new parameters. Our activities will advance to provide essential inputs for diagnosis, prediction, and management of climate change, environmental assessment, and disaster monitoring.

  20. Environmental monitoring and assessment program forest health monitoring quality assurance project plan for detection monitoring project

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, S.P.; Alexander, S.A.; Barnard, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAP) is written specifically for the Detection Minitoring project of the interagency Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program. Sections 1 through 3 briefly explain key features of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), the FHM program, and their interrelationship, respectively. Section 4 describes the general quality assurance (QA) requirements for the FHM Detection Monitoring project. Section 5 contains the separate QAPs for each forest condition indicator: site condition and tree growth and regeneration, tree crown condition, tree damage assessment, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), vegetation structure, ozone bioindicator plants, and lichen communities.

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  3. Small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Walton, B T

    1991-01-01

    The merit of using small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants was assessed using data from the published literature. Information was located on 35 species of small mammals from 7 families used to monitor heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals at mine sites, industrial areas, hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites, and agricultural and forested land. To document foodchain transfer of chemicals, concentrations in soil, vegetation, and invertebrates, where available, were included. The most commonly trapped North American species were Peromyscus leucopus, Blarina brevicauda, and Microtus pennsylvanicus. In these species, exposure to chemicals was determined from tissue residue analyses, biochemical assays, and cytogenetic assays. Where enough information was available, suitable target tissues, or biological assays for specific chemicals were noted. In general, there was a relationship between concentrations of contaminants in the soil or food, and concentrations in target tissues of several species. This relationship was most obvious for the nonessential heavy metals, cadmium, lead, and mercury and for fluoride. Kidney was the single best tissue for residue analyses of inorganic contaminants. However, bone should be the tissue of choice for both lead and fluorine. Exposure to lead was also successfully documented using biochemical and histopathological endpoints. Bone was the tissue of choice for exposure to 90Sr, whereas muscle was an appropriate tissue for 137Cs. For organic contaminants, exposure endpoints depended on the chemical(s) of concern. Liver and whole-body residue analyses, as well as enzyme changes, organ histology, genotoxicity, and, in one case, population dynamics, were successfully used to document exposure to these contaminants. Based on information in these studies, each species' suitability as a monitor for a specific contaminant or type of contaminant was evaluated and subsequently ranked. A relationship between

  4. Small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Walton, B T

    1991-01-01

    The merit of using small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants was assessed using data from the published literature. Information was located on 35 species of small mammals from 7 families used to monitor heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals at mine sites, industrial areas, hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites, and agricultural and forested land. To document foodchain transfer of chemicals, concentrations in soil, vegetation, and invertebrates, where available, were included. The most commonly trapped North American species were Peromyscus leucopus, Blarina brevicauda, and Microtus pennsylvanicus. In these species, exposure to chemicals was determined from tissue residue analyses, biochemical assays, and cytogenetic assays. Where enough information was available, suitable target tissues, or biological assays for specific chemicals were noted. In general, there was a relationship between concentrations of contaminants in the soil or food, and concentrations in target tissues of several species. This relationship was most obvious for the nonessential heavy metals, cadmium, lead, and mercury and for fluoride. Kidney was the single best tissue for residue analyses of inorganic contaminants. However, bone should be the tissue of choice for both lead and fluorine. Exposure to lead was also successfully documented using biochemical and histopathological endpoints. Bone was the tissue of choice for exposure to 90Sr, whereas muscle was an appropriate tissue for 137Cs. For organic contaminants, exposure endpoints depended on the chemical(s) of concern. Liver and whole-body residue analyses, as well as enzyme changes, organ histology, genotoxicity, and, in one case, population dynamics, were successfully used to document exposure to these contaminants. Based on information in these studies, each species' suitability as a monitor for a specific contaminant or type of contaminant was evaluated and subsequently ranked. A relationship between

  5. Variability in traffic monitoring data. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.; Hu, P.S.; Young, J.; Lu, A.

    1997-08-01

    For highway maintenance and planning purposes, it is desirable to characterize each road segment by its traffic flow [such as the annual average daily traffic (AADT) and the AADT for each vehicle class], by the weight distribution of vehicles that travel on its roads [such as the annual average daily equivalent single axle loadings (ESAL) and the annual average daily weight per vehicle for each vehicle class]. As with almost any data collection effort, the monitoring data suffer from errors from many sources. This report summarizes results of a two year empirical research effort, which was sponsored by the Federal highway Administration, (i) to study and characterize the variability in the traffic data (volume, classification, and weight) from the continuously monitored road segments, and (ii) to study the extent to which this variability is transferred to, and affects the precision of the data produced form the road segments which are monitored only one or two days each year. The ultimate hope is not only that states will eventually be able to publish an estimate of a characteristic such as AADT for each road segment, but also that each estimate will be accompanied by a statement of how good the estimate is in terms of the estimated variability or precision which will likely be experienced as a coefficient of variation (i.e., the quotient of a standard deviation and a mean). This report provides highlights of research reported in five working papers.

  6. Outdoor Recreation Participation and Environmental Concern: A Research Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berns, Gretchen Newhouse; Simpson, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Many experiential educators assume that participation in outdoor recreation creates an awareness and commitment to the environment through direct experience. This research summary looks to whether the research supports such an assumption. Specifically it reviews the key literature on this topic, examines the various classifications of outdoor…

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: DIOXIN EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This technology brief...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  9. Predictive monitoring research: Summary of the PREMON system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.; Sellers, Suzanne M.; Atkinson, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional approaches to monitoring are proving inadequate in the face of two important issues: the dynamic adjustment of expectations about sensor values when the behavior of the device is too complex to enumerate beforehand, and the selective but effective interpretation of sensor readings when the number of sensors becomes overwhelming. This system addresses these issues by building an explicit model of a device and applying common-sense theories of physics to model causality in the device. The resulting causal simulation of the device supports planning decisions about how to efficiently yet reliably utilize a limited number of sensors to verify correct operation of the device.

  10. Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report -- First Calendar Quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1995-07-01

    During the first calendar quarter of 1995, air samples were collected and analyzed from 47 air particulate/halogen sampling stations, 6 noble gas sampling stations, and 16 tritiated water vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from 1 wastewater containment pond and 10 sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from 11 potable and 1 non-potable supply wells and 6 drinking water consumption points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 201 locations. Water sampling was conducted for analysis of bacteria, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic constituents, and water quality as required by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and state of Nevada regulations. Samples were taken at various locations throughout all drinking water distribution systems on the NTS.

  11. Small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, S.S.; Walton, B.T. )

    1991-01-01

    The merit of using small mammals as monitors of environmental contaminants was assessed using data from the published literature. Information was located on 35 species of small mammals from 7 families used to monitor heavy metals, radionuclides, and organic chemicals at mine sites, industrial areas, hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites, and agricultural and forested land. To document foodchain transfer of chemicals, concentrations in soil, vegetation, and invertebrates, where available, were included. The most commonly trapped North American species were Peromyscus leucopus, Blarina brevicauda, and Microtus pennsylvanicus. In these species, exposure to chemicals was determined from tissue residue analyses, biochemical assays, and cytogenetic assays. Where enough information was available, suitable target tissues, or biological assays for specific chemicals were noted. In general, there was a relationship between concentrations of contaminants in the soil or food, and concentrations in target tissues of several species. This relationship was most obvious for the nonessential heavy metals, cadmium, lead, and mercury and for fluoride. Kidney was the single best tissue for residue analyses of inorganic contaminants. However, bone should be the tissue of choice for both lead and fluorine. Exposure to lead was also successfully documented using biochemical and histopathological endpoints. Bone was the tissue of choice for exposure to 90Sr, whereas muscle was an appropriate tissue for 137Cs. For organic contaminants, exposure endpoints depended on the chemical(s) of concern. Liver and whole-body residue analyses, as well as enzyme changes, organ histology, genotoxicity, and, in one case, population dynamics, were successfully used to document exposure to these contaminants.

  12. In Summary: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Mitchell; D. E. Roush, Jr.; R. B. Evans

    1998-10-01

    Scientists from the Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, the US Geological Survey, and other INEEL contractors monitored the environment on and around the INEEL to find contaminants attributable to the INEEL. During 1997, exposures from the INEEL to the public were found to be negligible. Pathways by which INEEL contaminants might reach people were monitored. These included air, precipitation, water, locally grown food (wheat, milk, potatoes, and lettuce), livestock, game animals, and direct radiation. Results from samples collected to monitor these pathways often contain radioactivity from natural sources and nuclear weapons testing carried out in the 1950s and 1960s, termed ''background radioactivity.'' According to the results obtained in 1997, radioactivity from operations at the INEEL could not be distinguished from this background radioactivity in the regions surrounding the INEEL. Because radioactivity from t! he INEEL wa s not detected by offsite environmental surveillance methods, computer models were used to estimate a radiation dose to people. The hypothetical maximum individual dose from the INEEL was calculated to be 0.03 millirem. That is 0.008 percent of an average person's annual dose from background radiation in southeast Idaho.

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Sharon D.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) environmental surveillance is to characterize radiological and nonradiological conditions of the off-site environs and estimate public doses related to these conditions, confirm estimations of public dose based on effluent monitoring data, and, where appropriate, provide supplemental data to support compliance monitoring for applicable environmental regulations. This environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is intended to document the rationale, frequency, parameters, and analytical methods for the ORR environmental surveillance program and provides information on ORR site characteristics, environmental pathways, dose assessment methods, and quality management. ORR-wide environmental monitoring activities include a variety of media including air, surface water, vegetation, biota, and wildlife. In addition to these activities, site-specific effluent, groundwater, and best management monitoring programs are conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). This is revision 5.

  14. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2009-09-15

    This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2009 information is included where appropriate.

  15. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2010-09-30

    This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2010 information is included where appropriate.

  16. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2008-09-10

    This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights signifi cant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2008 information is included where appropriate.

  17. Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan

    2015-09-25

    Understanding and controlling beam halo is important for high-intensity hadron accelerators, for high-brightness electron linacs, and for low-emittance light sources. This can only be achieved by developing suitable diagnostics. The main challenge faced by such instrumentation is the high dynamic range needed to observe the halo in the presence of an intense core. In addition, measurements must often be made non-invasively. This talk summarizes the one-day workshop on Beam-Halo Monitoring that was held at SLAC on September 19 last year, immediately following IBIC 2014 in Monterey. Workshop presentations described invasive techniques using wires, screens, or crystal collimators, and non-invasive measurements with gas or scattered electrons. Talks on optical methods showed the close links between observing halo and astronomical problems like observing the solar corona or directly observing a planet orbiting another star.

  18. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary second quarter 1996 100, 200, 300 and 600 areas

    SciTech Connect

    Dorian, J.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-26

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1996 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized below: All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1996 were completed. One Hundred twenty- five environmental radiological surveys were performed during the second quarter of 1996, twenty nine at the active waste sites and ninety six at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels Wag found at three of the active waste sites and fifteen of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as 65,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys seven were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and one was in an unposted area. The contamination found within three of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining four sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. At the site where there was no posting, the contamination was below action levels, however, Site Support Services was notified. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR`s) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. During the second quarter 1996, 0. 7 hectares (1.7 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Surface Contamination (SC) to URM. No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARS) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. No Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIR) were closed during the Second Quarter of 1996. Five open SCIRB had not been resolved.

  19. Image-based spectroscopy for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmakov, Eduard; Molina, Carolyn; Wynne, Rosalind

    2014-03-01

    An image-processing algorithm for use with a nano-featured spectrometer chemical agent detection configuration is presented. The spectrometer chip acquired from Nano-Optic DevicesTM can reduce the size of the spectrometer down to a coin. The nanospectrometer chip was aligned with a 635nm laser source, objective lenses, and a CCD camera. The images from a nanospectrometer chip were collected and compared to reference spectra. Random background noise contributions were isolated and removed from the diffraction pattern image analysis via a threshold filter. Results are provided for the image-based detection of the diffraction pattern produced by the nanospectrometer. The featured PCF spectrometer has the potential to measure optical absorption spectra in order to detect trace amounts of contaminants. MATLAB tools allow for implementation of intelligent, automatic detection of the relevant sub-patterns in the diffraction patterns and subsequent extraction of the parameters using region-detection algorithms such as the generalized Hough transform, which detects specific shapes within the image. This transform is a method for detecting curves by exploiting the duality between points on a curve and parameters of that curve. By employing this imageprocessing technique, future sensor systems will benefit from new applications such as unsupervised environmental monitoring of air or water quality.

  20. Wireless Sensor Networks for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Liang, Y.; Navarro, M.; Zhong, X.; Villalba, G.; Li, Y.; Davis, T.; Erratt, N.

    2015-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have gained an increasing interest in a broad range of new scientific research and applications. WSN technologies can provide high resolution for spatial and temporal data which has not been possible before, opening up new opportunities. On the other hand, WSNs, particularly outdoor WSNs in harsh environments, present great challenges for scientists and engineers in terms of the network design, deployment, operation, management, and maintenance. Since 2010, we have been working on the deployment of an outdoor multi-hop WSN testbed for hydrological/environmental monitoring in a forested hill-sloped region at the Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania (ASWP), Pennsylvania, USA. The ASWP WSN testbed has continuously evolved and had more than 80 nodes by now. To our knowledge, the ASWP WSN testbed represents one of the first known long-term multi-hop WSN deployments in an outdoor environment. As simulation and laboratory methods are unable to capture the complexity of outdoor environments (e.g., forests, oceans, mountains, or glaciers), which significantly affect WSN operations and maintenance, experimental deployments are essential to investigate and understand WSN behaviors and performances as well as its maintenance characteristics under these harsh conditions. In this talk, based on our empirical studies with the ASWP WSN testbed, we will present our discoveries and investigations on several important aspects including WSN energy profile, node reprogramming, network management system, and testbed maintenance. We will then provide our insight into these critical aspects of outdoor WSN deployments and operations.

  1. Enzyme and microbial sensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenberger, U.; Neumann, B.; Scheller, Frieder W.

    1993-03-01

    Biosensors employing the biocatalyst on a different level of integration have been developed for monitoring environmental pollution. These probes range from laboratory specimen to commercial detectors applied to analyzers. This paper presents a selection of recent developments on amperometric enzyme and microbial biosensors. A monoenzymatic bulk type carbon electrode is described for biosensing organic hydroperoxides in aqueous solutions. Here, peroxidase is immobilized within the electrode body and the direct electron transfer between electrode and enzyme is measured. Both, reversible and irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase have been quantified by using a kinetically controlled acetylcholine enzyme sequence electrode. The inhibitory effect of pesticides such as butoxycarboxime, dimethoate, and trichlorfon could be quantified within 6 min in micrometers olar concentrations. Different multi-enzyme electrodes have been developed for the determination of inorganic phosphate. These sensors represent examples of sequentially acting enzymes in combination with enzymatic analyte recycling. Using this type of amplification nanomolar concentrations could be measured. A very fast responding microbial sensor for biological oxygen demand has been developed by immobilizing Trichosporon cutaneum onto an oxygen electrode. With this whole cell sensor waste water can be assayed with a sample frequency of 20 per hour and a working stability of more than 30 days.

  2. Bangladesh Agro-Climatic Environmental Monitoring Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, C.; Maurer, H.; Williams, M.; Kamowski, J.; Moore, T.; Maksimovich, W.; Obler, H.; Gilbert, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Agro-Climatic Environmental Monitoring Project (ACEMP) is based on a Participating Agency Service Agreement (PASA) between the Agency for International Development (AID) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In FY80, the Asia Bureau and Office of Federal Disaster Assistance (OFDA), worked closely to develop a funding mechanism which would meet Bangladesh's needs both for flood and cyclone warning capability and for application of remote sensing data to development problems. In FY90, OFDA provided for a High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) receiving capability to improve their forecasting accuracy for cyclones, flooding and storm surges. That equipment is primarily intended as a disaster prediction and preparedness measure. The ACEM Project was designed to focus on the development applications of remote sensing technology. Through this Project, AID provided to the Bangladesh Government (BDG) the equipment, technical assistance, and training necessary to collect and employ remote sensing data made available by satellites as well as hydrological data obtained from data collection platforms placed in major rivers. The data collected will enable the BDG to improve the management of its natural resources.

  3. Environmental exposure modeling and monitoring of human pharmaceutical concentrations in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Versteeg, D.J.; Alder, A. C.; Cunningham, V. L.; Kolpin, D.W.; Murray-Smith, R.; Ternes, T.

    2005-01-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are receiving increased attention as environmental contaminants. This is due to their biological activity and the number of monitoring programs focusing on analysis of these compounds in various environmental media and compartments. Risk assessments are needed to understand the implications of reported concentrations; a fundamental part of the risk assessment is an assessment of environmental exposures. The purpose of this chapter is to provide guidance on the use of predictive tools (e.g., models) and monitoring data in exposure assessments for pharmaceuticals in the environment. Methods to predict environmental concentrations from equations based on first principles are presented. These equations form the basis of existing GIS (geographic information systems)-based systems for understanding the spatial distribution of pharmaceuticals in the environment. The pharmaceutical assessment and transport (PhATE), georeferenced regional exposure assessment tool for European rivers (GREAT-ER), and geographical information system (GIS)-ROUT models are reviewed and recommendations are provided concerning the design and execution of monitoring studies. Model predictions and monitoring data are compared to evaluate the relative utility of each approach in environmental exposure assessments. In summary, both models and monitoring data can be used to define representative exposure concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the environment in support of environmental risk assessments.

  4. Environmental Monitoring Report - United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Facilities, Calendar Year 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    Each year since 1972, a report has been prepared on the environmental monitoring activities for the DOE facilities in oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the previous calendar year. previously, the individual facilities published quarterly and annual progress reports that contained some environmental monitoring data. The environmental monitoring program for 1984 includes sampling and analysis of air, water from surface streams, groundwater, creek sediment, biota, and soil for both radioactive and nonradioactive (including hazardous) materials. Special environmental studies that have been conducted in the Oak Ridge area are included in this report, primarily as abstracts or brief summaries. The annual report for 1984 on environmental monitoring and surveillance of the Oak Ridge community by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is included as an appendix. A brief description of the topography and climate of the Oak Ridge area and a short description of the three DOE facilities are provided below to enhance the reader's understanding of the direction and contents of the environmental monitoring program for Oak Ridge.

  5. Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Bettis-Pittsburgh Site environmental summary report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-08-01

    This summary report provides a description of the nature and environmental aspects of work and facilities at the Bettis-Pittsburgh site, an historical perspective of Bettis-Pittsburgh operations that is not provided by the annual reports, and background information pertinent to understanding the environmental aspects of Bettis-Pittsburgh operations.

  6. 1989 Environmental Issues and Priorities Survey, Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HRN Co., Philadelphia, PA.

    This survey was designed to target approximately 7,000 leaders in business, education, media, environmental advocacy, and government in ten regional areas throughout the United States. The survey was designed to accomplish the following: identify the environmental priorities, determine leaders' perceptions on a range of policy-related issues, and…

  7. YES in Action: Youth Environmental Service Program Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquent Prevention (Dept. of Justice), Washington, DC.

    The Youth Environmental Service (YES) aims to rehabilitate adjudicated delinquents and to prevent at-risk youth from entering the juvenile justice system by engaging them in environmental work and education programs on federally owned land. YES is a joint program of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and the Office of Juvenile Justice and…

  8. Environmental Monitoring at the Savannah River Plant, Annual Report - 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, C.

    2001-07-26

    An environmental monitoring program has been in existence at SRP since 1951. The original preoperational surveys have evolved into an extensive environmental monitoring program in which sample types from approximately 500 locations are analyzed for radiological and/or nonradiological parameters. The results of these analyses for 1981 are presented in this report.

  9. Studies on Monitoring and Tracking Genetic Resources: An Executive Summary

    PubMed Central

    Garrity, George M.; Thompson, Lorraine M.; Ussery, David W.; Paskin, Norman; Baker, Dwight; Desmeth, Philippe; Schindel, D.E.; Ong, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    The principles underlying fair and equitable sharing of benefits derived from the utilization of genetic resources are set out in Article 15 of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, which stipulate that access to genetic resources is subject to the prior informed consent of the country where such resources are located and to mutually agreed terms regarding the sharing of benefits that could be derived from such access. One issue of particular concern for provider countries is how to monitor and track genetic resources once they have left the provider country and enter into use in a variety of forms. This report was commissioned to provide a detailed review of advances in DNA sequencing technologies, as those methods apply to identification of genetic resources, and the use of globally unique persistent identifiers for persistently linking to data and other forms of digital documentation that is linked to individual genetic resources. While the report was written for an audience with a mixture of technical, legal, and policy backgrounds it is relevant to the genomics community as it is an example of downstream application of genomics information. PMID:21304641

  10. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

  11. ERT monitoring of environmental remediation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Brecque, D. J.; Ramirez, A. L.; Daily, W. D.; Binley, A. M.; Schima, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The use of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to monitor new environmental remediation processes is addressed. An overview of the ERT method, including design of surveys and interpretation, is given. Proper design and lay-out of boreholes and electrodes are important for successful results. Data are collected using an automated collection system and interpreted using a nonlinear least squares inversion algorithm. Case histories are given for three remediation technologies: Joule (ohmic) heating, in which clay layers are heated electrically; air sparging, the injection of air below the water table; and electrokinetic treatment, which moves ions by applying an electric current. For Joule heating, a case history is given for an experiment near Savannah River, Georgia, USA. The target for Joule heating was a clay layer of variable thickness. During the early stages of heating, ERT images show increases in conductivity due to the increased temperatures. Later, the conductivities decreased as the system became dehydrated. For air sparging, a case history from Florence, Oregon, USA is described. Air was injected into a sandy aquifer at the site of a former service station. Successive images clearly show the changes in shape of the region of air saturation with time. The monitoring of an electrokinetic laboratory test on core samples is shown. The electrokinetic treatment creates a large change in the core resistivity, decreasing near the anode and increasing near the cathode. Although remediation efforts were successful both at Savannah River and at Florence, in neither case did experiments progress entirely as predicted. At Savannah River, the effects of heating and venting were not uniform and at Florence the radius of air flow was smaller than expected. Most sites are not as well characterized as these two sites. Improving remediation methods requires an understanding of the movements of heat, air, fluids and ions in the sub-surface which ERT can provide. The

  12. Overview of Sensors and Needs for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Clifford K.; Robinson, Alex; Miller, David R.; Davis, Mary J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. United States regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

  13. Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report focuses on research in global change, as well as environmental remediation. Global change research investigates the following: distribution and balance of radiative heat energy; identification of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases; and prediction of changes in the climate and concomitant ecological effects. Environmental remediation develops the basic understanding needed to remediate soils, sediments, and ground water that have undergone radioactive and chemical contamination.

  15. Environmental monitoring at Mound: 1986 report

    SciTech Connect

    Carfagno, D.G.; Farmer, B.M.

    1987-05-11

    The local environment around Mound was monitored for tritium and plutonium-238. The results are reported for 1986. Environmental media analyzed included air, water, vegetation, foodstuffs, and sediment. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the DOE interim air and water Derived Concentration Guides (DCG) for these radionuclides. The average incremental concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium oxide in air measured at all offsite locations during 1986 were 0.03% and 0.01%, respectively, of the DOE DCGs for uncontrolled areas. The average incremental concentration of plutonium-238 measured at all locations in the Great Miami River during 1986 was 0.0005% of the DOE DCG. The average incremental concentration of tritium measured at all locations in the Great Miami River during 1986 was 0.005% of the DOE DCG. The average incremental concentrations of plutonium-238 found during 1986 in surface and area drinking water were less than 0.00006% of the DOE DCG. The average incremental concentration of tritium in surface water was less than 0.005% of the DOE DCG. All tritium in drinking water data is compared to the US EPA Drinking Water Standard. The average concentrations in local private and municipal drinking water systems were less than 25% and 1.5%, respectively. Although no DOE DCG is available for foodstuffs, the average concentrations are a small fraction of the water DCG (0.04%). The concentrations of sediment samples obtained at offsite surface water sampling locations were extremely low and therefore represent no adverse impact to the environment. The dose equivalent estimates for the average air, water, and foodstuff concentrations indicate that the levels are within 1% of the DOE standard of 100 mrem. None of these exceptions, however, had an adverse impact on the water quality of the Great Miami River or caused the river to exceed Ohio Stream Standards. 20 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  16. Pinellas Plant environmental monitoring report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms, to provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess the concentrations of these discharges in the environment. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, carbon-14 labeled solvent and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 1/10 of 1% of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Off-site releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for this site. Analyses were performed for biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity and zinc. Excursions above permit limits were experienced in the results for suspended solids, fecal coliforms, iron and mercury. In addition to the non-radioactive parameters listed, a small quantity of radioactive tritium oxide was released in the effluent. Analyses showed the average concentration was 0.43% of the nonoccupational standard. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distance of 9.6 kilometers from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 1/10 of 1% of the standard for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Calculation were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, krypton-85 and carbon-14 to: an individual at the site boundary; individuals in the closest residential area; and the population within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of the plant site.

  17. The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, William T.; Shafer, David S.

    2007-07-01

    Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km{sup 2} area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate

  18. Quarterly Environmental Radiological Survey Summary Third Quarter 1998, 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    SciTech Connect

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    1998-10-27

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. The Third Quarter 1998 survey results and the status of actions required are summarized: (1) All of the eighty-five environmental radiological surveys scheduled during July, August and September were performed as planned. Fifty-one of the surveys were conducted at Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) sites and thirty-four at Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) sites. Contamination above background levels was found at seventeen of the PHMC waste sites and two of the ERC waste sites. Contamination levels as high >1,000,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per 100 cm{sup 2} were reported. Of these contaminated surveys nine were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas, three were in unposted areas and seven were in contamination areas. The contamination found within four of the URM and three of the CA areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. The remaining five URM and two unposted sites were posted and along with the five CA sites will require remediation. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR's) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action as required. (2) During the second quarter of 1998, 1.2 hectares (3.0 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Contamination Area (CA)/Soil Contamination (SC) to URM. (3) Four hectares (10 acres) located south and west of B-Plant were posted as a radiological buffer area as a result of a contamination spread. This off-normal occurrence is currently being investigated. (4) Four Surveillance Compliance Inspection Reports (SCIRs) remained open and had not been resolved. Tank Farms Operations has responsibility for the unresolved SCIRs.

  19. ANALYTICAL CHALLENGES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported increases in the incidence of endocrine-related conditions have led to speculation about environmental causes. Environmental scientists are focusing increased research effort into understanding the mechanisms by which endocrine disruptors affect human and ecological h...

  20. Summary of residential environmental issues and program consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M C

    1989-05-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Act authorizes the Bonneville Power Administration to acquire all necessary energy resources to serve Northwest utilities choosing to acquire power from the agency and to give conservation the highest priority in responding to the demand for electricity. To meet this mandate, the agency has established residential conservation programs for weatherizing existing homes, building new energy-efficient homes, and promoting energy-efficient appliances. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared this report to compare and contrast the environmental requirements and issues involving Bonneville's residential conservation programs. The key environmental concern confronting each of the programs with measures aimed at reducing air leakage rates in houses (both new and existing) is indoor air quality (IAQ). This report reviews the similarity and consistency of the programs' approach to IAQ, their impacts, program features, mitigation techniques, and new information about IAQ and other potential environmental issues confronting the programs. The information is intended for use in comparing and contrasting how environmental features mesh with other program features, checking consistency across programs and determining whether it makes sense for programs to be consistent, determining consistency between programs, and providing information to aid program planning in light of potential environmental issues and new information. 31 refs.

  1. In summary: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.G.; Roush, D.E. Jr.; Evans, R.B.

    1998-10-01

    Every human is exposed to natural radiation. This exposure comes from many sources, including cosmic radiation from outer space, naturally-occurring radon, and radioactivity from substances in the body. In addition to natural sources of radiation, humans can also be exposed to human-generated sources of radiation. Some examples of these sources include nuclear medicine, X-rays, nuclear weapons testing, and accidents at nuclear power plants. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) research facility that deals, in part, with studying nuclear reactors and the storage and cleanup of radioactive materials. Careful handling and rigorous procedures do not completely eliminate the risk of releasing radioactivity. So, there is a possibility for a member of the public near the INEEL to be exposed to radioactivity from the INEEL. Extensive monitoring of the environment takes place one and around the INEEL. These programs search for radionuclides and other contaminants. The results of these programs are presented each year in a site environmental report. This document summarizes the INEEL site environmental report for 1997.

  2. 21 CFR 1271.195 - Environmental control and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Maintenance of equipment used to control conditions necessary for aseptic processing operations. (b..., TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.195 Environmental control and monitoring. (a) Environmental control. Where environmental conditions could reasonably...

  3. Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This document describes the Fiscal Year 1996 activities and products of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The report is organized into four main sections. The introduction identifies the basic program structure, describes the programs of the Environmental Sciences Division, and provides the level of effort for each program area. The research areas and project descriptions section gives program contact information, and provides descriptions of individual research projects including: three-year funding history, research objective and approach used in each project, and results to date. Appendixes provide postal and e-mail addresses for principal investigators and define acronyms used in the text. The indexes provide indexes of principal investigators, research institutions, and keywords for easy reference. Research projects are related to climatic change and remedial action.

  4. Summary of commercial conservation programs environmental issues and program consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Beachler, M.C.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration. The purpose of the report is to compare and contrast the environmental requirements and issues involving Bonneville's residential conservation programs. In addition to environmental issues that Bonneville has addressed in environmental documents, this report also briefly examines new issues that may affect residential conservation programs. The key environmental concern confronting each of the programs with measures aimed at reducing air leakage in houses (both new and existing) is indoor air quality. There are inconsistencies in how the Weatherization Program and the New Homes programs approach indoor air quality. However, these differences make sense, given the character and constraints affecting how each program operates. Newer issues that have arisen include global warming, potential health effects of mineral and glass fibers, and possible fire hazards associated with plastic foam and cellulose insulation. Bonneville staff are aware of these issues as they relate to conservation programs. No action appears necessary at this time.

  5. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is a multi-purpose engineering test facility located in Butte, Montana, and is managed by MSE, Inc. WETO seeks to contribute to environmental research by emphasizing projects to develop heavy metals removal and recovery processes, thermal vitrification systems, and waste minimization/pollution prevention technologies. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of usable resources from waste. In one of WETO`s areas of focus, groundwater contamination, water from the Berkeley Pit, located near the WETO site, is being used in demonstrations directed toward the recovery of potable water and metal from the heavy metal-bearing water. The Berkeley Pit is part of an inactive copper mine near Butte that was once part of the nation`s largest open-pit mining operation. The Pit contains approximately 25 billion gallons of Berkeley Pit groundwater and surface water containing many dissolved minerals. As part of DOE/OST`s Resource Recovery Project (RRP), technologies are being demonstrated to not only clean the contaminated water but to recover metal values such as copper, zinc, and iron with an estimated gross value of more than $100 million. When recovered, the Berkeley Pit waters could benefit the entire Butte valley with new water resources for fisheries, irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. At WETO, the emphasis is on environmental technology development and commercialization activities, which will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management.

  6. Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-14

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

  7. Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM) - Realizing Integrated Environmental Monitoring Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosch, Thomas; Fietzek, Peer

    2016-04-01

    In a variety of scientific and industrial application areas, ranging i.e. from the supervision of hydrate fields over the detection and localization of fugitive emissions from subsea oil and gas production to fish farming, fixed point observatories are useful and applied means. They monitor the water column and/or are placed at the sea floor over long periods of time. They are essential oceanographic platforms for providing valuable long-term time series data and multi-parameter measurements. Various mooring and observatory endeavors world-wide contribute valuable data needed for understanding our planet's ocean systems and biogeochemical processes. Continuously powered cabled observatories enable real-time data transmission from spots of interest close to the shore or to ocean infrastructures. Independent of the design of the observatories they all rely on sensors which demands for regular maintenance. This work is in most cases associated with cost-intensive maintenance on a regular time basis for the entire sensor carrying fixed platform. It is mandatory to encounter this asset for long-term monitoring by enhancing hardware efficiency. On the basis of two examples of use from the area of hydrate monitoring (off Norway and Japan) we will present the concept of the Modular Subsea Monitoring Network (MSM). The modular, scalable and networking capabilities of the MSM allow for an easy adaptation to different monitoring tasks. Providing intelligent power management, combining chemical and acoustical sensors, adaptation of the payload according to the monitoring tasks, autonomous powering, modular design for easy transportation, storage and mobilization, Vessel of Opportunity-borne launching and recovery capability with a video-guided launcher system and a rope recovery system are key facts addressed during the development of the MSM. Step by step the MSM concept applied to the observatory hardware will also be extended towards the gathered data to maximize the

  8. Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

  9. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report - Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-09

    A maximum of fifty-three wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water permit and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  10. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: ARSENIC MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This technology ...

  11. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techn...

  12. Environment, health, socioeconomics and environmental control technology. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.W.

    1980-10-01

    This report summarizes the important findings of a two-volume report that deals with the potential impacts and environmental controls associated with the operation of geothermal power plants in California's Imperial Valley. The valley contains nearly a third of the nation's total energy potential for identified hot-water resources. Possible impacts of developing those resources include violation of air quality standards if emissions of hydrogen sulfide are not abated, negative ecological effects resulting from increased in the salinity of the Salton Sea, and damage to irrigation systems caused by land subsidence induced by the extraction of geothermal fluids. Other minor impacts concern occupational health and safety, socioeconomics, and hazardous wastes. Analyses of environmental impacts and the control measures for minimizing negative impacts are based primarily on a projected production of 3000 MW of electrical power by the year 2010.

  13. Health and Environmental Research: Summary of Accomplishments. Volume 2

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through "snapshots" - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  14. Health and Environmental Research: summary of accomplishments. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through ''snapshots'' - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  15. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Western Energy Company (WECO) was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) which upgrades low rank coals into high Btu, low sulfur, synthetic bituminous coal. As specified in the Corporate Agreement, RSCP is required to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) which describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) identify monitoring activities that will be undertaken to show compliance to applicable regulations, (2) confirm the specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base of the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project. The EMP specifies the streams to be monitored (e.g. gaseous, aqueous, and solid waste), the parameters to be measured (e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rate), and the species to be analyzed (e.g. sulfur compounds, nitrogen compounds, trace elements) as well as human health and safety exposure levels. The operation and frequency of the monitoring activities is specified, as well as the timing for the monitoring activities related to project phase (e.g. preconstruction, construction, commissioning, operational, post-operational). The EMP is designed to assess the environmental impacts and the environmental improvements resulting from construction and operation of the project.

  16. Environmental monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is an omnibus document providing a single point of reference for the effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORR areas outside specific facility boundaries. Authorization and requirement for the EMP are contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 Chapter 4, which states that environmental monitoring consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. This EMP is intended to document the rationale and design criteria for the effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs, extent and frequency of sampling and analysis, analytical laboratory procedures, quality assurance, implementation, and reporting. The EMP describes one of several programs that collect and analyze data to assess the impacts of ORR on the environment and human health. Others include the Environmental Restoration Program and the Clinch River Remedial Investigation Program. While the ultimate goal for DOE may be to integrate information from all these programs into a formalized assessment of risk to ecosystems and human health, that level of integration is beyond the scope of the EMP. The EMP outlines the goals of environmental monitoring for the ORR and its facilities and includes activities that are not presently conducted. In general, the programs described in this EMP represent an increase in surveillance activities over past practices.

  17. Summary of Session Activities: Coordination of Environmental Education Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Michael; Mahootian, Farzad

    1995-01-01

    In this session, we address four fundamental questions related to environmental fields with emphasis on education. These are: What are the goals, objectives, and practical opportunities for coordinating our projects? How can we improve awareness of, interest in, access to, and support the products of our work? How can we build relationships between projects for scientific, educational, technical, and programmatic benefit? How can we evaluate the effectiveness of coordination efforts. In this working session, we produced answers to these questions and proposed a structure for future collaboration.

  18. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space physics and plasma physics experiments that can be performed from the space shuttle were identified. Potential experiment concepts were analyzed to derive requirements for a spaceborne experiment facility. The laboratory, known as the Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory consists of a 33-foot pallet of instruments connected to a 25-foot pressurized control module. Two 50-meter booms, two subsatellites, a high power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator array, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform are the primary systems deployed from the pallet. The pressurized module contains all the control and display equipment required to conduct the experiments, and life support and power subsystems.

  19. Summary of the Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W.; Schrempf, R.E.; Dirkes, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the 390-page Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1994. The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to review and document environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts and is written to meet both the reporting requirements and guidelines of the US Department of energy (DOE) and the needs of the public. This report includes information on important Hanford Site compliance issues, environmental monitoring programs and results, and general information on the Site and the surrounding area.

  20. 1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

  1. A Summary of Environmentally Friendly Turbine Design Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Odeh, Mufeed

    1999-07-01

    The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program (AHTS) was created in 1994 by the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Hydropower Research Foundation. The Program’s main goal is to develop “environmentally friendly” hydropower turbines. The Program’s first accomplishment was the development of conceptual designs of new environmentally friendly turbines. In order to do so, two contractors were competitively selected. The ARL/NREC team of engineers and biologists provided a conceptual design for a new turbine runner*. The new runner has the potential to generate hydroelectricity at close to 90% efficiency. The Voith team produced new fish-friendly design criteria for Kaplan and Francis turbines that can be incorporated in units during rehabilitation projects or in new hydroelectric facilities**. These include the use of advanced plant operation, minimum gap runners, placement of wicket gates behind stay vanes, among others. The Voith team will also provide design criteria on aerating Francis turbines to increase dissolved oxygen content. Detailed reviews of the available literature on fish mortality studies, causation of injuries to fish, and available biological design criteria that would assist in the design of fish-friendly turbines were performed. This review identified a need for more biological studies in order to develop performance criteria to assist turbine manufacturers in designing a more fish-friendly turbine.

  2. Urban environmental health applications of remote sensing, summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, M.; Goldstein, J.; Hsi, B. P.; Olsen, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    Health and its association with the physical environment was studied based on the hypothesis that there is a relationship between the man-made physical environment and health status of a population. The statistical technique of regression analysis was employed to show the degree of association and aspects of physical environment which accounted for the greater variation in health status. Mortality, venereal disease, tuberculosis, hepatitis, meningitis, shigella/salmonella, hypertension and cardiac arrest/myocardial infarction were examined. The statistical techniques were used to measure association and variation, not necessarily cause and effect. Conclusions drawn show that the association still exists in the decade of the 1970's and that it can be successfully monitored with the methodology of remote sensing.

  3. Environmental impacts of proposed Monitored Retrievable Storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-17

    This report describes environmental impacts from a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility for spent fuels to be located in Tennessee. Areas investigated include: water supply, ground water, air quality, solid waste management, and health hazards. (CBS)

  4. Concepts for Environmental Radioactive Air Sampling and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-11-04

    Environmental radioactive air sampling and monitoring is becoming increasingly important as regulatory agencies promulgate requirements for the measurement and quantification of radioactive contaminants. While researchers add to the growing body of knowledge in this area, events such as earthquakes and tsunamis demonstrate how nuclear systems can be compromised. The result is the need for adequate environmental monitoring to assure the public of their safety and to assist emergency workers in their response. Two forms of radioactive air monitoring include direct effluent measurements and environmental surveillance. This chapter presents basic concepts for direct effluent sampling and environmental surveillance of radioactive air emissions, including information on establishing the basis for sampling and/or monitoring, criteria for sampling media and sample analysis, reporting and compliance, and continual improvement.

  5. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    Results for 1981 of the LBL Environmental Monitoring Program are given. Data include monitoring results for accelerator-produced radiation, airborne and waterborne radionuclides, and nonradioactive pollutants. Population doses resulting from LBL operations are given in terms of accelerator-produced and airborne radioactivities. Trends in the environmental impacts of LBL operations are discussed in terms of accelerator-produced, airborne, and waterborne radionuclides. (ERB)

  6. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING DATABASES FOR STATISTIC ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Databases designed for statistical analyses have characteristics that distinguish them from databases intended for general use. EMAP uses a probabilistic sampling design to collect data to produce statistical assessments of environmental conditions. In addition to supporting the ...

  7. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This volume presents six- to ten-page summaries of post-secondary environmental education and training program surveys. The programs represented are a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. Ten national surveys were completed, and the following topics were included: air, energy, noise, pesticides, potable water, radiation,…

  8. Monitoring 1984: a first report from the Chesapeake Bay Program Monitoring Subcommittee. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The study outlines the objectives, program structuring and sampling network. Objectives for the monitoring program are to: describe and track long-term trends; characterize the current state of the Bay; assure a Baywide perspective; serve as a useful support framework for ongoing and future studies; and make monitoring information widely available so that it can be used to help managers make decisions on the Bay's future.

  9. Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  10. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-04-25

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D. (JGB)

  11. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  12. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  13. BNL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN TRIENNIAL UPDATE, JANUARY 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is located on a 5,265-acre site in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. BNL has a comprehensive Environmental Management System (EMS) in place, which meets the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization 14001 EMS Standard, as described in the BNL EMS Manual. BNL's extensive environmental monitoring program is one component of the EMS, and the BNL Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes this program in detail. The data derived from systematically monitoring the various environmental media on site enable BNL to make informed decisions concerning the protection of human health and the environment and to be responsive to community concerns.

  14. Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

    1991-08-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

  15. Executive summary for the Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1991. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report is the sixth in a series of annual reports produced by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) since 1986. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of the Weldon Spring site (WSS) on the surrounding region`s groundwater and surface waters; air quality; vegetation and wildlife; and, through these multiple pathways, the potential for exposure to receptor human populations. Information is also presented on the environmental monitoring quality assurance program, waste management activities, audits and reviews, and special environmental studies. Data are included for both the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. Based on the consistent exercise of quality assurance in both standard operating procedures and quality control sample collection, the WSSRAP asserts that the data presented in the WSS Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1991 accurately reflect the environmental conditions monitored at the WSS. This report presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions on environmental monitoring at the WSS and surrounding vicinity properties for the entire 1991 monitoring year. During 1991 the WSSRAP also published quarterly data reports, wherein all routine monitoring data were tabulated and presented quarterly to allow the public to review the data in a timely fashion prior to issuance of the annual report.

  16. Annual Report for 2008 - 2009 Detection Monitoring at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Walker J.R.

    2010-03-01

    short descriptions of the facility, the hydrogeologic setting, CERCLA decision document requirements for environmental monitoring, and a summary of the EMWMF monitoring history to date. Sect. 3 identifies the respective groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air monitoring locations at the EMWMF and outlines the associated sampling frequencies, field measurements, and laboratory analytes. Sect. 4 presents a concise technical evaluation of the groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air monitoring data. Sect. 5 summarizes key monitoring results and data evaluation conclusions along with any recommended changes to groundwater, surface water, stormwater, or air monitoring at the EMWMF. Sect. 6 lists the documents and other technical reports referenced in the preceding narrative sections. Maps and other illustrations referenced in the narrative sections of this annual EMR are in Appendix A. Referenced summary tables of FY 2009 environmental monitoring data are in Appendix B (Groundwater), Appendix C (Surface Water), Appendix D (Stormwater), and Appendix E (Ambient Air).

  17. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2009-02-19

    In this presentation, lectures in the school are revisited and a brief summary is given. An emphasis is made to illustrate how the lectures are interconnected so as to constitute the unified basis of knowledge in realizing thermonuclear fusion in ITER.The first message here is the integration of the knowledge. All of conditions (which is imposed by individual characteristic dynamics) must be simultaneously fulfilled. Plasma conditions (density, pressure, current, shape, etc.) set parameter boundaries. Achievement of Q = 10 is expected to be realized near the ridge of boundary, so that exact knowledge of mutual relations between constraints is inevitable. The other message is that, the constraints of plasma, material and design must be subject to a special care. In this regard, the use of tritium in ITER introduces new issue in research. For instance, the containment of tritium in the device leads to a new demand for the system. This issue influences the choice of the wall material. The difference of the wall material (either light element or heavy metal), on the other hand, can have a large impact on confinement. These new features in integration will be explained.The other issue is the need of integration of knowledge to form a law of understanding. The mission of ITER must be realized as fast as possible, considering the fact the necessity for fusion energy will be more keen as time goes on. The operation of ITER has been predicted by extending the empirical scaling relations. More precise prediction and the resolution of possible problems in advance are required. For this urgency, our knowledge must be distilled as a scientific law in which elementary processes are validated.

  18. Versatile electrochemical microsensors for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.; Hong, K.C. . Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.); Ashley, K. . Dept. of Chemistry); Granstaff, V.E. )

    1991-10-01

    The fabrication of novel multielement microelectrode array sensors is reported. With regard to individual array elements, two main concepts are pursued. One involves the use of relatively non-selective microelectrode elements, coupled with pattern recognition methods, for data analysis. This strategy is most applicable when prior knowledge about the chemical environment is limited, or when mainly qualitative information is sought. The second concept involves the development of arrays containing intrinsically more selective microelectrode elements. Our main concern here is the determination of specific contaminants. Most of our current emphasis is in the selection and development of appropriate elements for microelectrode arrays of this type, with a goal of quantitative analysis for a variety of compounds and elements. Other efforts are concerned with defining the behavior of microelectrodes and devising mass fabrication methods for these sensors. Two designs for the arrays are discussed, one employing photolithographic fabrication methods and another in which individual microelectrodes are encased in glass. Potential applications for these sensors include monitoring for toxic contaminants in natural waters, monitoring waste streams, and process control. 35 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Monitoring environmental change in an ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Gámez, M; López, I; Molnár, S

    2008-09-01

    The monitoring and analysis of the processes taking place in an ecosystem is a key issue for a sustainable human activity. A system of populations, as the biotic component of a complex ecosystem is usually affected by the variation of its abiotic environment. Even in nearly natural ecosystems an abiotic effect like climatic implications of global warming may cause important changes in the dynamics of the population system. In ecosystems involving field cultivation or any industrial activity; the abiotic parameter in question may be the concentration of a substance, changing, e.g. as a result of pollution, application of a pesticide, or a fertilizer, etc. In many cases the observation of the densities of each population may be technically complicated or expensive, therefore the question arises whether from the observation of the densities of certain (indicator) populations, the whole state process of the population system can be uniquely recovered. The paper is aimed at a methodological development of the state monitoring, under the conditions of a changing environment. It is shown, how the technique of mathematical systems theory can be applied not only for the approximate calculation of the state process on the basis of the observed data, even under the effect of an exogene abiotic change with known dynamics; but in certain cases, also for the estimation of the unknown biological effect of the change of an abiotic parameter. The proposed methodology is applied to simple illustrative examples concerning a three-species predator-prey system.

  20. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program Environmental Monitoring Program. Annual report, October 1, 1990-December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The report contains summaries of compliance and supplemental environmental and industrial hygiene and health surveillance monitoring conducted during the period; compliance permits, permit changes, and Notices of Violations discussions; statistical significance of Employee General Health information, medical histories, physical exams, pulmonary functions, clinical tests and demographics; independent audit reports; and a description of retorted shale disposal activities.

  1. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program environmental monitoring program. Annual report, October 1, 1989-September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan, incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socioeconomic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Phase I of the project is to produce 10,000 barrels per day of syncrude from oil shale, using the Unishale B process. A summary of compliance and supplemental activities is included in the report. Health monitoring results, safety summaries and a status report of the retorted shale laydown area, with photos, are also given.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR PUBLIC ACCESS AND COMMUNITY TRACKING (EMPACT) PROGRAM MICROBIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF RECREATIONAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended microbiological monitoring practices for bathing beach water quality were suggested in 1968, as a part of the fecal coliform guideline developed by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration. The guideline stated ...

  3. Sensorcope: A Urban Environmental Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrenetxea, G.; Mezzo, J.; Dubois-Ferriere, H.; Couach, O.; Krichane, M.; Tromp, M.; Huwald, H.; Vetterli, M.; Parlanges, M.; Selker, J.

    2006-12-01

    The SensorScope project is a collaboration between environmental scientists and hardware/software engineers at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) that aims to study the energy exchanges and balances at the earth/atmosphere boundary. It consists in a large scale Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) deployed in the EPFL campus that measures key environmental quantities at high spatial resolution for the purpose of modeling and understanding this energy exchange. A broad environmental sensing platform has been developed for this project. The design considers the entire chain of requirements for a scientific atmospheric measurement campaign, including packaging, energy autonomy, sensor placement, and a diverse set of sensors. This sensing unit is centered around a TinyNode module, consisting of a TI MSP430 microcontroller running TinyOS, and a Xemics XE1205 radio. Around this core module we have designed an autonomous solar energy power system. The system has bi-directional multi-hop communication allowing for automatic re-configuration of the network and over-the-air reprogramming. A data base and web interface were developed to organize and present the data. The station includes also a sensor interface board accommodating seven external sensors, which makes the station capable of measuring nine different data inputs: ambient temperature and humidity, IR surface temperature, solar radiation, wind speed and direction, precipitation, soil moisture, and soil pressure. The system has been tested with external multiplexers which allow for multi-sensor configurations for each parameter. The system is mounted on an aluminum frame with a weatherproof housing containing the core module, solar energy board, and interface board. This weather station has been deployed at over one hundred locations distributed over the EPFL campus as part of a high-resolution measurement and modeling campaign with a goal of better understanding urban environmental processes. This system

  4. Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Ying; Bartonova, Alena; Pascal, Mathilde; Smolders, Roel; Skjetne, Erik; Dusinska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as 'a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain'. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions. PMID:23171406

  5. Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Ying; Bartonova, Alena; Pascal, Mathilde; Smolders, Roel; Skjetne, Erik; Dusinska, Maria

    2012-11-21

    Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as 'a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain'. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions.

  6. Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as ‘a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain’. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions. PMID:23171406

  7. Lidar techniques for environmental and ecological monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2015-04-01

    An overview of optical probing of the atmosphere will be given, where mostly active remote- sensing techniques of the laser-radar type will be covered, but also some passive techniques employing ambient radiation. Atmospheric objects of quite varying sizes can be studied. Mercury is the only pollutant in atomic form in the atmosphere, while other pollutants are either molecular or in particle form. Light detection and ranging (Lidar) techniques allow three-dimensional mapping of such constituents, and examples from atmospheric lidar work in Lund and in Guangzhou will be given. Recently, much larger lidar targets have been studied. Monitoring of flying insects and birds is of considerable ecological interest, and several projects have been pursued in collaboration with biologists. Mostly, elastic backscattering and fluorescence techniques are employed. Some references to recent activities by the author and his colleagues are given below. [1] Z.G. Guan, L. Mei, P. Lundin, G. Somesfalean, and S. Svanberg, Vertical Lidar Sounding of Air Pollutants in a Major Chinese City, Appl. Phys. B 101, 465 (2010) [2] L. Mei, G.Y. Zhou and S. Svanberg, Differential Absorption Lidar System Employed for Background Atomic Mercury Vertical Profiling in South China, Lasers Opt. Eng. 55, 128 (2013) [3] Z.G. Guan, M. Brydegaard, P. Lundin, M. Wellenreuther, E. Svensson, and S. Svanberg, Insect Monitoring with Fluorescence LIDAR techniques - Field experiments, Appl. Optics 48, 5668 (2010) [4] A. Runemark, M. Wellereuther, H. Jayaweera, S. Svanberg and M. Brydegaard, Rare Events in Remote Dark Field Spectroscopy: An Ecological Case study of Insects, IEEE JSTQE 18, 1573 (2011) [5] L. Mei, Z.G. Guan, H.J. Zhou, J. Lv, Z.R. Zhu, J.A. Cheng, F.J. Chen, C. Löfstedt, S. Svanberg, and G. Somesfalean, Agricultural Pest Monitoring using Fluorescence Lidar Techniques, Applied Physics B 106, 733 (2011) [6] P. Lundin, P. Samuelsson, S. Svanberg, A. Runemark, S. Åkesson, and M. Brydegaard, Remote

  8. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Mike; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  9. An innovative technology for indoor environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Latko, M.A.; Chezsek, M.L.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the results of two field studies for an indoor air quality (IAQ) monitoring system, utilizing Echelon{reg_sign} technology to eliminate the need for direct wiring of remote sensing units to a central datalogger. Up to eight sensors of differing technology and up to 256 remote units can feed one datalogger. The results can then be analyzed and displayed in various formats (i.e., tables, graphs, and reports) or used as input to HVAC and other control devices. The system was installed and collected data during a summer test period in a commercial building and a winter test period in an industrial facility. These sites were chosen because results of previous IAQ assessments showed elevated CO levels. The commercial building is a municipal facility that houses public works maintenance and engineering functions. The industrial location is a manufacturer of machined metal parts and shares shipping and receiving docks with an adjacent foundry and casting operation. The system used in these field tests consisted of three remote sensing units, which were plugged directly into standard electrical outlets in various places throughout the sites, and one central datalogger which polled the remote units and collected the data. The remote units, as configured for these field tests, continuously measured methane, carbon monoxide (CO), relative humidity (RH), and temperature (T). Other sensors, including carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and specialty gases, can be utilized. In both tests, the data were collected over a period of several weeks. The data collected showed quick detection and sensor recovery of CO spikes and accurate tracking of T and RH variations. No methane was detected during the field tests. The field tests showed the viability of this system to monitor IAQ parameters for the purpose of alarm and control functions.

  10. Environmental monitoring to enhance comprehension and control of infectious diseases†

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Kuenzi, Amy; Douglass, Richard; Ostfeld, Richard S.; Weinstein, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In a world of emerging and resurging infectious diseases, dominated by zoonoses, environmental monitoring plays a vital role in our understanding their dynamics and their spillover to humans. Here, we critically review the ecology, epidemiology and need for monitoring of a variety of directly transmitted (Sin Nombre virus, Avian Influenza) and vector-borne (Ross River virus, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, anaplasmosis and babesiosis) zoonoses. We focus on the valuable role that existing monitoring plays in the understanding of these zoonoses, the demands for new monitoring, and how improvements can be made to existing monitoring. We also identify the fruitful outcomes which would result from implementation of the monitoring demands we have highlighted. This review aims to promote improvements in our understanding of zoonoses, their management, and public health by encouraging discussion among researchers and public health officials. PMID:20957286

  11. The use of plants for environmental monitoring and assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Freemark, K

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents a critical review on phytotoxicity tests for environmental monitoring and assessment. Vascular macrophytes used in the laboratory testing are emphasized; algae are mentioned only for comparison. Several issues are discussed, including the rationale for and misconceptions about phytotoxicity tests, relation to regulation, status of phytotoxicity test protocols, advantages and disadvantages of phytotoxicity tests, and possible research directions. Aquatic and terrestrial macrophytes, along with algae, are essential components of ecosystems. Macrophytes are becoming more important for the monitoring and assessment of herbicides, effluents, and industrial chemicals. In the United States, Canada, and international organizations, phytotoxicity tests can be required for environmental monitoring and assessment in statutes such as Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; Water Quality Act; Canadian Pest Control Products Act; and Canadian Environmental Protection Act. Possible research directions for phytotoxicity tests are discussed relative to the role in regulations of industrial chemicals, effluents, hazardous waste sites, and pesticides. PMID:7541343

  12. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  13. The community environmental monitoring program: a historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, L.H.; Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Giles, K.

    2007-07-01

    With the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) entering its 26. year of monitoring the offsite areas around the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a look back on the history and the hows and whys of its formation is in order. In March of 1979, the accident at Three-Mile Island Nuclear Power Generating Plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania occurred, and Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV), along with other governmental agencies such as the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was requested to provide monitoring personnel. Public concerns over the accident were high, especially for those living around the power plant. It was found that involving the local community in the sample collection process helped to ease some of the concerns, and the Citizens Monitoring Program (CMP) was instituted. This idea was brought back to Las Vegas and in 1981, the NTS Community Monitoring Program was started to involve the communities surrounding and downwind of the NTS, who were experiencing many of the same concerns, in the monitoring of the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program. By reviewing the history of the CEMP, one can see what the concerns of the local communities were, how they were addressed, and the effect this has had on them. From the standpoint of stakeholders, getting information on radiation safety issues from an informed local citizen rather than from a government agency official living elsewhere can only have a positive effect on how the public views the reliability of the monitoring data. (authors)

  14. Comfort monitoring? Environmental assessment follow-up under community-industry negotiated environmental agreements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Bram; Birk, Jasmine

    2011-01-15

    Negotiated environmental agreements are becoming common practice in the mining industry. In principle, negotiated environmental agreements are said to respond to many of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment by providing for improved follow-up of project impacts through, among other things, data provision, engaging stakeholders in the monitoring and management of project impacts, and building capacity at the local level to deal with project-induced environmental change. In practice, however, little is known about the efficacy of follow-up under negotiated environmental agreements between proponents and communities and the demonstrated value added to project impact management. This paper examines follow-up practice under negotiated environmental agreements with a view to understanding whether and how community-based monitoring under privatized agreements actually contributes to improved follow-up and impact management. Based on lessons emerging from recent experiences with environmental agreements in Canada's uranium industry, we show that follow-up under negotiated agreements may be described as 'comfort monitoring'. While such monitoring does improve community-industry relations and enhance corporate image, it does little to support effects-based management. If follow-up under negotiated agreements is to be credible over the long term, there is a need to ensure that monitoring results are useful for, and integrated with, regulatory-based monitoring and project impact management practices.

  15. A methodology for post-EIS (environmental impact statement) monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Linda Graves

    1979-01-01

    A methodology for monitoring the impacts predicted in environmental impact statements (EIS's) was developed using the EIS on phosphate development in southeastern Idaho as a case study. A monitoring system based on this methodology: (1) coordinates a comprehensive, intergovernmental monitoring effort; (2) documents the major impacts that result, thereby improving the accuracy of impact predictions in future EIS's; (3) helps agencies control impacts by warning them when critical impact levels are reached and by providing feedback on the success of mitigating measures; and (4) limits monitoring data to the essential information that agencies need to carry out their regulatory and environmental protection responsibilities. The methodology is presented as flow charts accompanied by tables that describe the objectives, tasks, and products for each work element in the flow chart.

  16. Environmental monitoring plan, July 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) under the terms of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) are providing annual reports: reporting of State`s monitoring and analysis, and findings of DOE`s quality and effectiveness of DOE`s monitoring and surveillance. This report blends some of both of the required annual reports as described in the TOA section A.7.2.2. The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) integrates the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report presents the results of environmental monitoring in Tennessee in the following areas: surface waters; ground water; air; and fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

  17. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report Supporting Radiological Air Surveillance Monitoring for the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Thomas Jay

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site ambient air surveillance program. The development of the DQOs was based on the seven-step process recommended “for systematic planning to generate performance and acceptance criteria for collecting environmental data” (EPA 2006). The process helped to determine the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to meet current regulatory requirements and to follow U.S. Department of Energy guidance for environmental surveillance air monitoring design. It also considered the current air monitoring program that has existed at INL Site since the 1950s. The development of the DQOs involved the application of the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF to identify likely contamination dispersion patterns at and around the INL Site using site-specific meteorological data. Model simulations were used to quantitatively assess the probable frequency of detection of airborne radionuclides released by INL Site facilities using existing and proposed air monitors.

  18. MEMS-based biosensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Morita, Yasutaka; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-03-01

    Biosensors in connection with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can be applied in many fields of research. In this paper, the reduction in the size of ELISA utilizing micro-chemical reaction is described in a microchamber array chip, and also a micro-flow antibody chip. The chips were fabricated by micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The quantitative determination of dioxins was performed by using the chips. Glass or polystyrene beads were used for immobilization of an antibody at these chips. The antibody-immobilized beads were introduced into micro-flow channel or microchamber. As a competitive ELISA, sample solution mixed with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antigen, and non-HRP conjugated antigen was allowed to react in the microchamber or flow channel. As a sandwich assay, sample solution and HRP-conjugated antibody were sequentially added to the chamber. After the antigen-antibody reaction, addition of PBS buffer, hydrogen peroxide, and fluorogenic substrate produced the fluorescent dye. The resulting change in the fluorescence intensity was monitored by a fluorescence microscope.

  19. Multivariate statistical analysis of environmental monitoring data

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    EPA requires statistical procedures to determine whether soil or ground water adjacent to or below waste units is contaminated. These statistical procedures are often based on comparisons between two sets of data: one representing background conditions, and one representing site conditions. Since statistical requirements were originally promulgated in the 1980s, EPA has made several improvements and modifications. There are, however, problems which remain. One problem is that the regulations do not require a minimum probability that contaminated sites will be correctly identified. Another problems is that the effect of testing several correlated constituents on the probable outcome of the statistical tests has not been quantified. Results from computer simulations to determine power functions for realistic monitoring situations are presented here. Power functions for two different statistical procedures: the Student`s t-test, and the multivariate Hotelling`s T{sup 2} test, are compared. The comparisons indicate that the multivariate test is often more powerful when the tests are applied with significance levels to control the probability of falsely identifying clean sites as contaminated. This program could also be used to verify that statistical procedures achieve some minimum power standard at a regulated waste unit.

  20. Pulsed laser fluorometry for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, G. C.; Martin, J. C.; Jett, J. H.; Wilder, M. E.; Martinez, A.; Bentley, B. F.; Lopez, J.; Hutson, L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact pulsed laser fluorometer has been incorporated into a continuous flow system developed to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and/or primary amine compounds in air and water. A pulsed nitrogen laser pumped dye laser excites fluorescent reactants which flow continuously through a quartz flow cell. Data are collected, analyzed, and displayed using a Macintosh II personal computer. For detection of cholinesterase inhibitors the fluorogenic substrate N methylindoxyl acetate is used to monitor the activity of immobilized enzyme. Presence of inhibitors results in a decrease of steady state fluorescence. Detection of compounds containing primary amines is based on their reaction with fluorescamine to rapidly produce intensely fluorescent products. Compounds of interest to our research were amino acids, peptides, and proteins. An increase in steady state fluorescence could be cause to evaluate the reasons for the change. The detection limit of the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water is 10 ppT. Nebulized BSA concentrated by the LANL air sampler can be detected at sub ppT original air concentration. 16 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SURFACE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface environmental monitoring system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333PY ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  2. 1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    L. V. Street

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  3. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

  4. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Development of environmental charging effect monitors for operational satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Sturman, J. C.; Berkopec, F. D.

    1976-01-01

    An instrumentation package to monitor the effects of the environmental charging of spacecraft surfaces on the systems of operational spacecraft was developed. This package performs two functions: first, the local charged particle flux and the particle characteristic energy is monitored; and second, transients in the spacecraft electrical harness is counted as a function of amplitude, with time. It is used to determine the duration and effect of any environmental charging of the spacecraft surfaces. Thus, it will be possible to determine the relationship between the occurrence of any anomalies and the charging phenomenon. Design details and design goals of this package are presented.

  6. Plant sentinels and molecular probes that monitor environmental munitions contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; DeWitt, J.G.; Hill, K.K.; Kuske, C.R.; Kim, D.Y.

    1994-08-01

    Plants accumulate TNT and similar compounds from soil. Their sessile nature requires that plants adapt to environmental changes by biochemical and molecular means. In principle, it is possible to develop a monitoring capability based on expression of any gene that is activated by specific environmental conditions. The authors have identified plant genes activated upon exposure to TNT. Partial gene sequences allow design of DNA probes that measure TNT-induced gene activity. These will be used to develop sensitive assays that monitor gene expression in plants growing in environments possibly contaminated with explosives.

  7. Novel laser breakdown spectrometer for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Lee, Wonwoo; Martyshkin, Dmitri V.; Mirov, Olga D.; Randolph, Jeremy J.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Orlovskii, Yurii V.; Alimov, Olimkhon K.; Vorob'ev, Ivan N.

    1999-11-01

    A novel experimental set-up using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for environmental analyses of heavy metals is described in this paper. It is based on state-of-the-art spectroscopic equipment, advanced detectors, and laser atomizers: a 0.75 m spectrometer ARC-750, intensified TE- cooled 256 X 1024 CCD camera, probe with fiber optic guide for signal transportation, and Nd:YAG laser plasma atomizers with two different methods for sample delivery. In the first method the liquid solution containing the atoms to be investigated is drawn into the chamber of the nebulizer. The mixture passes through the nozzle, accompanied by argon gas along with formed aerosol, and enters the plasma plume, which is generated by the laser spark in argon. The second method is based on direct generating of the plasma in the water jet of a continuously circulating sample. LIBS testing of samples containing Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cr ions was compared with results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Initial indications showed good agreement between these two methods. Detection levels of less than 100 ppb were observed for copper and chromium. The described spectroscopic system exhibits high sensitivity, accumulation of luminescence spectrum in real time; and high dynamic range for concentrations detection from 100 ppb to 1000 ppm.

  8. Recent Advances in Nanoplasmonic Sensors for Environmental Detection and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee

    2016-05-01

    The great attention in environmental pollution urges the development of innovative monitoring system enabling rapid, sensitive, specific detection and easy operation. Recent progress in nanoplasmonic sensors allowing real-time, highly-sensitive, label-free and multiplex detection provides a promising alternative to conventional environmental analyzing techniques. This review summarizes novel nanoplasmonic approaches categorized by optical detection technologies, which include surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, dark-field nanospectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and even naked eyes. The focus of this review will be on how plasmonic nanostructures can be utilized to detect environmental pollutants, and remarkable accomplishments to enhance the detection performances. In addition, we discuss current challenge and future direction for ubiquitous environmental sensing and monitoring. PMID:27483747

  9. 1993 environmental monitoring report for the naval reactors facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

  10. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-31

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2001 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U. S. Department of Energy.

  11. 1997 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1997 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

  12. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  13. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2000 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-31

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Environmental monitoring of brominated flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagula, Mary C.; Kubeldis, Nathan; Nelatury, Charles F.

    2011-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic organobromide compounds which inhibit ignition and combustion processes. Because of their immense ability to retard fire and save life and property, they have been extensively used in many products such as TVs, computers, foam, plastics etc. The five major classes of BFRs are tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromodiphenyl ether, octabromodiphenyl ether, and decabromodiphenyl ether. The last three are also commonly called PBDEs. BDE-85 and BDE-209 are the two prominent congeners of PBDEs and this study reports the adverse effects of these congeners in rodents. Exposure of rat sciatic nerves to 5 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 respectively lead to significant, concentration dependent reduction in nerve conduction function. Glucose absorption in the rat intestinal segments exposed to 5 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 was significantly reduced for both the compounds tested. Lastly, mice when exposed to 0.25 mg/kg body weight for four days showed a disruption in oxidant and antioxidant equilibrium. The tissues namely liver and brain have shown increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides indicating oxidative stress. Moreover, all the protective enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and glutathione S transferase (GST) have shown tissue specific alterations indicating the induction of damaging oxidative stress and setting in of lipid peroxidation in exposed animals. The results indicate monitoring of PBDEs in the environment is essential because levels as low as 5 μg/mL and 0.25 mg/kg body weight were able to cause damage to the functions of rodents.

  16. Environmental monitoring report, 1980: Pinellas Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Results of the monitoring program at the Pinellas Plant are described. Small quantities of tritium gas, tritium oxide, carbon-14 labeled solvent and krypton-85 gas were released from the plant during the year. Average maximum ground level concentrations of these radioisotopes were all significantly less than 0.1% of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Off-site releases of liquid effluents were analyzed for compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Analyses were performed for biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, chlorides, chromium, copper, cyanides, detergents, fluorides, iron, lead, mercury, oil plus greases, phenols, turbidity, and zinc. In addition to the non-radioactive parameters listed above, a small quantity of radioactive tritium oxide was released in the effluent. Analyses showed the average concentration was 0.20% of the nonoccupational exposure guide. Site perimeter and off-site air samples for tritium gas and tritium oxide, as well as off-site surface water samples obtained to distance of 9.6 kilometers (6 miles) from the plant site and analyzed for tritium content, showed levels significantly less than 0.1% of the recommended guide for continuous nonoccupational exposure. Small sealed plutonium sources containing approximately 80% plutonium-238 oxide and 20% plutonium-239 oxide and other isotopes, are utilized at this site. No plutonium was released to the environment.Calculations were made to determine the radiation doses resulting from releases of tritium oxide, /sup 85/Kr, and /sup 14/C to: an individual at the site boundary; individuals in the closest residential area; and the population within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of the plant site. The total dose commitment to the population residing within 80 kilometers was determined to be 0.55 man-rem as compared to the annual dose from natural radiation of 223,165 man-rem.

  17. Environmental monitoring of biological markers in animals and plants

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Adams, S.M.; Jimemez, B.D.; Shugart, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    In an environmental monitoring plan, a suite of biomarkers are measured in wild animal or plant species sampled from areas of suspected contamination and from pristine reference environments. Based on the magnitude and pattern of the biomarker responses, the environmental species offer the potential of serving as sentinels demonstrating the presence of bioavailable contaminants, surrogates indicating potential human exposure and effects, and predictors of long-term ecological effects. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program seeks to deliver needed technologies, timely and cost-effectively, to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The scope of characterizations monitoring, and sensor technology needs that are required by those organizations encompass: (1) initial location and characterization of wastes and waste environments - prior to treatment; (2) monitoring of waste retrieval, remediation and treatment processes; (3) characterization of the co-position of final waste treatment forms to evaluate the performance of waste treatments processes; and (4) site closure and compliance monitoring. Wherever possible, the CMST-IP fosters technology transfer and commercialization of technologies that it sponsors.

  19. Environmental monitoring report for Pantex Plant covering 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Laseter, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental monitoring program at Pantex Plant for 1983 and presents monitoring data for both radioactive and non-radioactive species in the local environment. Plant activities involve the handling of significant quantities of uranium, plutonium, and tritium. However, only small release of uranium (depleted in the isotope U-238) and tritium occurred which could have affected the local environment. Monitoring data indicate that concentrations of these nuclides in the environment are below established criteria for air and water and therefore should not present a health hazard either to employees or to the public. 23 references, 7 figures, 23 tables.

  20. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2006-04-12

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several powerful analytical techniques, well suited for characterizing atmospheric composition. A few applications of infrared spectroscopy include air quality monitoring of building environs, automotive exhaust emissions, “fence-line” or open-path monitoring near industrial facilities and smokestack emissions. Regardless of the application or the specific instrumental configuration (Fourier transform, dispersive, laser based, …) a comprehensive reference library is critical to interpreting spectral data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), through the support of the Department of Energy is developing a comprehensive infrared spectral library tailored for atmospheric environmental monitoring.

  1. Environmental monitoring report, May 10, 1993--June 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) DOE Oversight Division (DOE-O) monitoring effort will serve as oversight with ongoing compliance and ambient sampling by Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor staff programs. These sources provide a comprehensive database which must be reviewed and analyzed in order to streamline DOE-O sampling efforts. DOE-O monitoring is necessary to provide quality control, to ensure compliance, to ensure completeness, and to assure protection of public health and the environment. The Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA), includes a section on Environmental Monitoring as Attachment A. To accomplish these objectives, DOE-O will implement the following monitoring programs: surface waters; ground water; air; fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

  2. 1987 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, T.K.

    1988-04-01

    Sandia National Labortories conduct various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on limiting releases. The environmental monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and augmented by Sandia is designed to measure the performance of the environmental controls. The program includes analysis of air, water, soil, vegetation, sewer effluent, ground water, and foodstuffs for various toxic, hazardous, or radioactive materials. Based on these studies, the releases of materials of concern at Sandia during 1987 were well below applicable Department of Energy standards. 8 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (EMAP) IN THE 21ST CENTURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agancy's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is improving the tools to assess status and trends in the condition of aquatic ecosystems across the U.S. Within the Office of Research and Development, EMAP has developed an approac...

  4. Early Action on the Global Environmental Monitoring System. A Report of the International Environmental Programs Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Environmental Studies Board.

    The Global Environmental Monitoring System (GEMS) is one of four components of Earthwatch, a part of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP). The purpose of GEMS is to provide early warning of impending natural or man-induced environmental changes or trends that threaten direct or indirect harm to human health or well-being. In 1975, the…

  5. Open source data logger for low-cost environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The increasing transformation of biodiversity into a data-intensive science has seen numerous independent systems linked and aggregated into the current landscape of biodiversity informatics. This paper outlines how we can move forward with this programme, incorporating real time environmental monitoring into our methodology using low-power and low-cost computing platforms. PMID:24855446

  6. 21 CFR 1271.195 - Environmental control and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental control and monitoring. 1271.195 Section 1271.195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN...

  7. 21 CFR 1271.195 - Environmental control and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental control and monitoring. 1271.195 Section 1271.195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND...

  8. 21 CFR 1271.195 - Environmental control and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental control and monitoring. 1271.195 Section 1271.195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN...

  9. Open source data logger for low-cost environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The increasing transformation of biodiversity into a data-intensive science has seen numerous independent systems linked and aggregated into the current landscape of biodiversity informatics. This paper outlines how we can move forward with this programme, incorporating real time environmental monitoring into our methodology using low-power and low-cost computing platforms. PMID:24855446

  10. 72. DETAIL OF PAYLOAD ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL AND MONITORING PANELS (PECMP) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. DETAIL OF PAYLOAD ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL AND MONITORING PANELS (PECMP) LOCATED AT WEST END OF LONG CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

  12. Environmental monitoring master sampling schedule, January--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for calendar year 1990 for the Environment Surveillance and Ground-Water Monitoring Projects. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operations, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs. This schedule includes ground-water sampling performed by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

  13. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  14. Refinement of background environmental monitoring measurements using meteorological frequency distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, P.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Since the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program's inception in 1969, the direct radiation monitoring network around the Oyster Creek nuclear generating station has incorporated both monthly and quarterly thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). In 1988, the environmental controls department of GPU Nuclear decided to eliminate the monthly TLD network for scientific and economic reasons. The most obvious scientific basis on which to designate TLD stations is by meteorology. It would be the plume path that dictates off-site direct radiation contribution from the plant and not simply distance from the site. Through meteorological and statistical analysis of existing TLD results, the appropriate basis for designating TLD stations has been accomplished that will provide the most accurate and comprehensive data on environmental measurement of releases from Oyster Creek.

  15. New techniques of low level environmental radiation monitoring at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtiarenko, V. Popov

    2010-07-01

    We present the first long-term environmental radiation monitoring results obtained using the technique of pulse mode readout for the industry-standard Reuter-Stokes RSS-1013 argon-filled high pressure ionization chambers (HPIC). With novel designs for the front-end electronics readout and customized signal processing algorithms, we are capable of detecting individual events of gas ionization in the HPIC, caused by interactions of gammas and charged particles in the gas. The technique provides enough spectroscopic information to distinguish between several different types of environmental and man-made radiation. The technique also achieves a high degree of sensitivity and stability of the data, allowing long-term environmental radiation monitoring with unprecedented precision.

  16. Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report for 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrincione, D.A.; Erdmann, N.L.

    1992-12-31

    The Rocky Rats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1992. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population.

  17. Critical issues for long-term environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    Detecting global change and variations is a demanding problem. Changes and variations are manifested in the environmental record in many forms such as jumps, trends, cycles, and quasi-cycles. each characteristic is superimposed upon a background of high short-term variability. For example, short-term weather and seasonal climate variability often obscures longer-term changes and variations. Early detection of natural and anthropogenically induced environmental change is critically dependent on a monitoring system that can deliver data that reflects changes and variations not dependent on type of instrument or procedure used. At this time in many instances documenting important aspects of environmental change and variability is poor. Measured long-term data, both space-based and in-situ measurements, have been collected primarily for short-term applications such as weather prediction. Only in rare instances have data been collected for the purpose of documenting long-term (decadal to century) changes. Long-term environmental monitoring, capable of resolving decade-to-century scale changes, requires a strategy of operation that focuses on detecting the trends, jumps, cycle, and quasi-cycles of the system against the backdrop of high short-term variability. Continued investment in data management and analyses to minimize time-varying biases and other data quality problems from past and present data are essential if we are to adequately understand environmental variations and change, but these analyses will never replace foresight with respect to ongoing and planned observing systems required for long-term monitoring. Long-term environmental monitoring that will be capable of providing robust information about decadal-to-century scale changes and variations will require adherence to a number of guiding precepts that are discussed.

  18. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  19. National directory of citizen volunteer environmental monitoring programs (third edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Like the volunteer environmental monitoring movement itself, the directory has grown rapidly. The first edition, published in September 1988, listed 43 programs. Just seven months later, the second edition, containing 70 entries, was produced. The expanded, updated, and revised third edition of the directory includes 133 programs. Thirty of these are brand-new programs that started within the year. During that same year many of the older programs have expanded, increasing the number of volunteers involved and the number of sites monitored, and taking on new projects. Most of the entries in this edition contain much more detailed information than in previous editions--information about specific techniques and tests used for monitoring, about funding sources, and about ways that governmental agencies are using citizen volunteer monitoring results.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory-East summary site environmental report for calendar year 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2003-02-20

    This report is a summary of the actions taken by Argonne National Laboratory in 2001 to keep the public and environment safe. Over the last year, Argonne has monitored, evaluated, and taken steps to control problems or potential problems on its DuPage County site. The problems that have or might occur are things like spilled or leaked radiological waste, non-radiological wastes or hazardous materials. Argonne is keeping its promise to be a good neighbor, and this report confirms its commitment to its neighbors, both human and environmental. Argonne's commitment to have minimal effect on the environment was tested vigorously over 2001. Argonne's first priority is keeping the people around it safe. This was verified through tests done on the air. The air can be the most damaging way to pollute an area. This is why Argonne was so extensive in its testing. They followed guidelines of the Clean Air Act, which covers radioactive emissions, asbestos, and conventional air pollutants. Air was tested, and after all calculations were finished, the effect on the public was found to be so minimal that it almost didn't register. The sources of pollutants from Argonne are exhausts from laboratories and other facilities, the steam plant that provides space heating for Argonne's buildings, and emissions from emergency generators when they are operating. The traces that were found were evaluated and reduced, even though they were originally well within regulatory limits. The same trends--further reduction of concentrations that were already safe--were found in the water analysis, as well. Water was sampled and evaluated many times over the course of the year, and what was found was good news. The radiological elements were very minimal, and most of the trace amounts were due to naturally occurring radiological sources. The only measurements that exceeded standards a few times were of total dissolved solids (TDS), essentially road salts dissolved in rainwater runoff. These problems

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  2. Quality assurance of environmental gamma radiation monitoring in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Stuhec, M; Zorko, B; Mitić, D; Miljanić, S; Ranogajec-Komor, M

    2006-01-01

    Environmental gamma radiation monitoring established in Slovenia consists of a network of multifunctional gamma monitors (MFMs) based on pairs of Geiger-Müller counters and a network of measuring sites with high-sensitive thermoluminiscence dosemeters. The measuring points are evenly spread across Slovenia, located at the meteorological stations and more densely on additional locations around the Krsko NPP. The MFM network has a 2-fold function with one sensor used for the purpose of early warning system in near surroundings of the NPP and the other, more sensitive, for natural radiation monitoring. The paper summarises activities to establish quality assurance of the environmental gamma radiation measurements in Slovenia, with a critical view of the results in comparison with the international standards and recommendations. While the results of linearity and energy dependence tests were satisfying, on-field intercomparison showed that the inherent signal of one of the monitors (MFM) has to be taken into account in the range of environmental background radiation.

  3. Environmental monitoring for protected areas: Review and prospect.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, D S

    1992-04-01

    Monitoring activities in protected areas have a long history. Internal planning and management needs early led to ecological inventories. More recently the increasing number and awareness of external threats to parks has led to a variety of monitoring programs. Efforts to use protected areas, and especially biosphere reserves, as ecological baselines, have reinforced this trend. And as protected areas are increasingly recognized to be islands with complex internal and regional interactions, holistic, systems approaches to inventory, monitoring, and assessment of their state are being developed. This paper begins by reviewing threats to parks and the origins and importance of inventory and monitoring activities. A review of resource survey methods follows. Ecosystem science and environmental monitoring are introduced as a foundation for consideration of several newer approaches to monitoring and assessing the state of natural environments. These newer approaches are stress/response frameworks, landscape ecology, ecosystem integrity, and state of the environment reporting. A final section presents some principles for monitoring the state of protected areas. Examples are drawn from experience with Canadian national parks.

  4. Environmental monitoring for protected areas: Review and prospect.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, D S

    1992-04-01

    Monitoring activities in protected areas have a long history. Internal planning and management needs early led to ecological inventories. More recently the increasing number and awareness of external threats to parks has led to a variety of monitoring programs. Efforts to use protected areas, and especially biosphere reserves, as ecological baselines, have reinforced this trend. And as protected areas are increasingly recognized to be islands with complex internal and regional interactions, holistic, systems approaches to inventory, monitoring, and assessment of their state are being developed. This paper begins by reviewing threats to parks and the origins and importance of inventory and monitoring activities. A review of resource survey methods follows. Ecosystem science and environmental monitoring are introduced as a foundation for consideration of several newer approaches to monitoring and assessing the state of natural environments. These newer approaches are stress/response frameworks, landscape ecology, ecosystem integrity, and state of the environment reporting. A final section presents some principles for monitoring the state of protected areas. Examples are drawn from experience with Canadian national parks. PMID:24234344

  5. Annual environmental monitoring report, January-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not easily distinguishable from natural environmental sources. During 1983, the maximum approximated neutron dose near the site boundary was 5 mrem. There have been no measurable increases in radioactivity in ground water attributable to SLAC operations since operation began in 1966. We have never found any evidence of radioactivity in ground water in excess of natural background radioactivity from uranium and thorium decay chains and potassium-40. Airborne radioactivity released from SLAC continues to make only a negligible environmental impact, and results in a site-boundary annual dose of less than 0.3 mrem; this represents less than 0.3% of the annual dose from the natural radiation environment, and about 0.06% of the technical standard. 8 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Systematic management of environmental monitoring data for radioactive waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, C. G.; Park, S. M.; Lim, Y. S.; Lee, H. J.; Park, J. W.; Kim, C. L.

    2003-04-01

    For the safe management of radwaste repository, data of the site and environment have to be collected and managed systematically. Particularly, for the radwaste repository, which has to be institutionally controlled for a long period after closure, data will be collected and maintained through the monitoring programme. To meet this requirement, a new programme called ``Site Information and Total Environmental data management System (SITES)" is being developed. The scope and function of the SITES programme are issued from the first stage of the SITES development. The hardware composed of a server and clients is constructed within those extents. The software system is developed with database and the three-tier server/client system consisted of a server, the middle-ware and PC client. The server is for the DB/GIS managements, and the PC client offers variable GUI in respect of end-user. A middle-ware is for the system management such as transaction. For this system, ArcSDE(ESRI) is used for unifying the spatial/attribute data to the Relative Database Management System. In the server/client system, the function of spatial illustration and analysis is embodied through ArcGIS. The SITES programme is designed with two modules of the Database Management System and the Monitoring and Assessment. The DBMS module is composed of two sub-modules. One is the Site Information Management System, which manages data on site characterization such as topography, geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology, etc. The other is the ENVironmental Information management System, which manages environmental data required for environmental assessment study. To enhance the effectiveness of SIMS and ENVIS, the objects are itemized through analyzing the end-user's demands reflected from domestic regulatory guidelines. The database is constructed based on Entity Relationship Diagram produced from each item. Also using ArcGIS with the spatial characteristics of the data, it enables groundwater and

  7. UNOCAL Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental monitoring plan, annual report, October 1, 1988-September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan, incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socioeconomic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Phase I of the project is to produce 10,000 barrels per day of syncrude from oil shale, using the Unishale B process. A summary of monitoring 18 supplemental sites, including particulates, gases, liquids and solids is given. Results of Industrial Hygiene Supplemental Monitoring are discussed; no trends or relationships were evident in the data. Permit compliance and quality assurance/quality control activities are discussed.

  8. In-situ gamma spectrometry in environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kluson, J

    2010-01-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry (scintillation or semiconductor) can be used effectively for monitoring natural and man-made radionuclide concentrations, together with the corresponding photon fields, in the environment and in workplaces. It is applied in operational and emergency monitoring of nuclear facilities, waste storage facilities and the uranium industry, in radioactive contamination measurements and mapping, environmental, radiohygienic and radiation safety studies, etc. Methods for processing and interpreting data, experimental techniques (ground or airborne arrangement), calibration and verification and examples of applications are discussed in this paper. PMID:20022255

  9. Trends in public perceptions and preferences on energy and environmental policy: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.C.

    1993-03-01

    This is a summary of a report that presents selected results from a secondary analysis of public opinion surveys, taken at the national and state/local levels, relevant to energy and environmental policy choices. The data base used in the analysis includes about 2,000 items from nearly 600 separate surveys conducted between 1979 and 1992. Answers to word-for-word questions were traced over time, permitting trend analysis. Patterns of response were also identified for findings from similarly worded survey items. The analysis identifies changes in public opinion concerning energy during the past 10 to 15 years.

  10. Stakeholder participation in the Mound Plant environmental monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    The Mound Plant is a 306-acre U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site located in southwest Ohio. Historically, the plant has researched, developed, and evaluated nuclear weapons components. This mission is nearing completion, and the site is on an accelerated schedule for environmental restoration. However, in support of remaining operations and decommissioning and decontamination projects, EG&G Mound continues to operate extensive networks of effluent and environmental monitors and samplers. The data generated by these networks are reported to stakeholders through formal and informal reports, newsletters, public meetings, press releases, and other mechanisms deemed appropriate. Among all of the Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP) results reported to stakeholders each year, regulators and area residents continue to demonstrate keen interest in the detection of radionuclides in the off-site environment. Technical exchanges on this subject have been held with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), the Ohio Department of Health, and the Miamisburg Environmental Safety and Health Citizens Action Group. Exchanges held to date have focused on the water-sampling program; the air-sampling program will be studied subsequently.

  11. Development of a Personal Integrated Environmental Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Man Sing; Yip, Tsan Pong; Mok, Esmond

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution in the urban areas of Hong Kong has become a serious public issue but most urban inhabitants have no means of judging their own living environment in terms of dangerous threshold and overall livability. Currently there exist many low-cost sensors such as ultra-violet, temperature and air quality sensors that provide reasonably accurate data quality. In this paper, the development and evaluation of Integrated Environmental Monitoring System (IEMS) are illustrated. This system consists of three components: (i) position determination and sensor data collection for real-time geospatial-based environmental monitoring; (ii) on-site data communication and visualization with the aid of an Android-based application; and (iii) data analysis on a web server. This system has shown to be working well during field tests in a bus journey and a construction site. It provides an effective service platform for collecting environmental data in near real-time, and raises the public awareness of environmental quality in micro-environments. PMID:25420154

  12. Development of a personal integrated environmental monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Man Sing; Yip, Tsan Pong; Mok, Esmond

    2014-11-20

    Environmental pollution in the urban areas of Hong Kong has become a serious public issue but most urban inhabitants have no means of judging their own living environment in terms of dangerous threshold and overall livability. Currently there exist many low-cost sensors such as ultra-violet, temperature and air quality sensors that provide reasonably accurate data quality. In this paper, the development and evaluation of Integrated Environmental Monitoring System (IEMS) are illustrated. This system consists of three components: (i) position determination and sensor data collection for real-time geospatial-based environmental monitoring; (ii) on-site data communication and visualization with the aid of an Android-based application; and (iii) data analysis on a web server. This system has shown to be working well during field tests in a bus journey and a construction site. It provides an effective service platform for collecting environmental data in near real-time, and raises the public awareness of environmental quality in micro-environments.

  13. Development of a personal integrated environmental monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Man Sing; Yip, Tsan Pong; Mok, Esmond

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution in the urban areas of Hong Kong has become a serious public issue but most urban inhabitants have no means of judging their own living environment in terms of dangerous threshold and overall livability. Currently there exist many low-cost sensors such as ultra-violet, temperature and air quality sensors that provide reasonably accurate data quality. In this paper, the development and evaluation of Integrated Environmental Monitoring System (IEMS) are illustrated. This system consists of three components: (i) position determination and sensor data collection for real-time geospatial-based environmental monitoring; (ii) on-site data communication and visualization with the aid of an Android-based application; and (iii) data analysis on a web server. This system has shown to be working well during field tests in a bus journey and a construction site. It provides an effective service platform for collecting environmental data in near real-time, and raises the public awareness of environmental quality in micro-environments. PMID:25420154

  14. 1996 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1996 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The NRF is located on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and contains three naval reactor prototypes and the Expended Core Facility, which examines developmental nuclear fuel material samples, spent naval fuel, and irradiated reactor plant components/materials. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Application of nanomaterials in environmental analysis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minmin; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2009-04-01

    Recent advances in the development and application of nanomaterials in analytical chemistry for environmental analysis and monitoring are reviewed, with focus on sensors, separation and extraction techniques, including the use of nanomaterials as transducer elements for electrochemical sensors, as nanolabels for optical sensors, as stationary phases for liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, as pseudostationary phases or buffer additives in capillary electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, and microchip electrophoresis, as well as extraction materials for enrichment prior to chromatographic analysis. Examples of different nanomaterials-based analytical techniques for the detection of major families of environmental pollutants, i.e., organic contaminants, heavy metals and air pollutants, are presented.

  16. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  17. A Pilot System for Environmental Monitoring Through Domestic Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabe, Calvin W.; Sawyer, John; Martin, Wayne

    1971-01-01

    A pilot system for environmental monitoring is in its early phases of development in Northern California. It is based upon the existing nation wide Federal-State Market Cattle Testing (14CT) program for brucellosis in cattle. This latter program depends upon the collection of blood program at the time of identified cattle. As the cattle Population of California is broadly distributed throughout the state, we intend to utilize these blood samples to biologically monitor the distribution and intensity of selected environmental pollutants. In a 2-year preliminary trial, the feasibility of retrieving, utilizing for a purpose similar to this, and tracing back to their geographic areas of origin of MCT samples have been demonstrated.

  18. Gill cell culture systems as models for aquatic environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bury, Nic R; Schnell, Sabine; Hogstrand, Christer

    2014-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals require environmental safety assessments for market authorisation. To ensure acceptable water quality, effluents and natural waters are monitored for their potential harmful effects. Tests for market authorisation and environmental monitoring usually involve the use of large numbers of organisms and, for ethical, cost and logistic reasons, there is a drive to develop alternative methods that can predict toxicity to fish without the need to expose any animals. There is therefore a great interest in the potential to use cultured fish cells in chemical toxicity testing. This review summarises the advances made in the area and focuses in particular on a system of cultured fish gill cells grown into an epithelium that permits direct treatment with water samples.

  19. Proceedings of the Summit on Environmental Challenges to Reproductive Health and Fertility: Executive Summary

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Tracey J.; Carlson, Alison; Schwartz, Jackie M.; Giudice, Linda C.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Summit on “Environmental Challenges to Reproductive Health and Fertility” convened scientists, health care professionals, community groups, political representatives and the media to hear presentations on the impact of environmental contaminants on reproductive health and fertility and to discuss opportunities to improve health through research, education, communication and policy. Environmental reproductive health focuses on exposures to environmental contaminants, particularly during critical periods of development, and their potential effects on future reproductive health, including conception, fertility, pregnancy, adolescent development and adult health. Approximately 87,000 chemical substances are registered for use in commerce in the US, with ubiquitous human exposures to environmental contaminants in air, water, food and consumer products. Exposures during critical windows of susceptibility may result in adverse effects with lifelong and even intergenerational health impacts. Effects can include impaired development and function of the reproductive tract and permanently altered gene expression, leading to metabolic and hormonal disorders, reduced fertility and fecundity and illnesses such as testicular, prostate, uterine and cervical cancers later in life. This executive summary reviews effects of pre- and post-natal exposures on male and female reproductive health and provides a series of recommendations for advancing the field in the areas of research, policy, health care and community action. PMID:18275883

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. The importance of metrological metadata in the environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Márcio A. A.; Guimarães, Patrícia L. O.; Almêida, Eugênio S.; Eklin, Tero

    2016-07-01

    The metrological metadata propagation contributes significantly to improve the data analysis of the meteorological observation systems. An overview of the scenarios data and metadata treatment in environmental monitoring is presented in this article. We also discussed the ways of use of the calibration results on the meteorological measurement systems as well as the convergence of the methods used in the corrections treatment and estimation of the measuring uncertainty in metrological and meteorological areas.

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  3. MONITORING CHANGES IN THE ESTUARIES OF THE UNITED STATES: THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program/Estuaries (EMAP-E) is to estimate the current status, extent, changes, and trends in ecological indicators of the condition of the nation's coastal resources (intertidal, subtidal, and offshore) on a regional and ...

  4. Integrated environmental quality monitoring around an underground methane storage station.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Linda; Vignudelli, Marco; Bartolucci, Fabrizio; Salvatorelli, Fiorenzo; Di Michele, Cesare; Tavano, Nicola; Rossi, Paola; Dinelli, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    The study reports an integrated environmental quality monitoring of a 100 km2 area in central Italy mostly occupied by an underground station of methane storage, working since 1982. The nitrogen oxides, ozone and isoprene concentration detached with a network monitoring of passive filters were compared with the results of lichens biomonitoring. Data from the two monitorings were in accordance: there was an inversely correlation between lichen biodiversity index (IBL) and NOx (-0.96) and ozone (-0.80), and a positive correlation between IBL and isoprene (0.67). IBL indicated that the area ranged between medium naturalness and medium alteration status, values fully compatible with the medium-high level of eutrophication, caused by intensive agriculture. Only two areas were in high alteration status, due to their proximity to glass factories and to a quarries area. Despite almost thirty years of activity, the environment quality of the area around the station did not show signs of declining. PMID:25828802

  5. 3M corporate incinerator environmental monitoring study and risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.B.; Elnabarawy, M.T.; Pilney, J.

    1998-12-31

    A one-year multi-media environmental monitoring study was performed around the 3M Cottage Grove Facility. Particulate metals from the 3M Corporate hazardous waste incinerator were the focus of the study. Two environmental media were of primary interest: area soil sampling was conducted to investigate the impact of past incinerator emissions on the environment, and ambient air monitoring was conducted to address current impacts. Over 180 soil samples were taken from both agricultural and forested land in the vicinity of the Facility. More than 25 chemical parameters were then quantified in the samples. The potential impacts of past emissions from the incinerator were assessed by comparing chemical concentrations from locations where incinerator impacts were expected to be greatest (based on air dispersion modeling) to chemical concentrations in matched samples from sites expected to be least impacted. The ambient air monitoring network consisted of six stations. Source-receptor modeling was used to determine the most likely contribution of the incinerator and six additional major area sources for the air monitoring (i.e. filter) data at each station. The model provided a best-fit analysis regarding the likely contributions of each source to the sample results. The results of these evaluations lead to the conclusion that the current emissions from this Facility do not present an unacceptable risk to human health.

  6. Colorado River fish monitoring in Grand Canyon, Arizona; 2000 to 2009 summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Makinster, Andrew S.; Persons, William R.; Avery, Luke A.; Bunch, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term fish monitoring in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam is an essential component of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP). The GCDAMP is a federally authorized initiative to ensure that the primary mandate of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 to protect resources downstream from Glen Canyon Dam is met. The U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center is responsible for the program's long-term fish monitoring, which is implemented in cooperation with the Arizona Game and Fish Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, SWCA Environmental Consultants, and others. Electrofishing and tagging protocols have been developed and implemented for standardized annual monitoring of Colorado River fishes since 2000. In 2009, sampling occurred throughout the river between Lees Ferry and Lake Mead for 38 nights over two trips. During the two trips, scientists captured 6,826 fish representing 11 species. Based on catch-per-unit-effort, salmonids (for example, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta)) increased eightfold between 2006 and 2009. Flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis) catch rates were twice as high in 2009 as in 2006. Humpback chub (Gila cypha) catches were low throughout the 10-year sampling period.

  7. Summary of radiological monitoring of Columbia River water along the Hanford Reach, 1980 through 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Columbia River monitoring program, conducted as part of the SESP, provides a historical record of contaminant concentrations in the river attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and operations conducted at the Hanford Site. In addition to ongoing monitoring, special studies are conducted periodically to enhance the understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in the river. The Columbia River monitoring program includes sampling of river water, river sediment, river-bank springs entering the river, and various types of aquatic biota found in or along the river. These samples are analyzed for radiological constituents and a wide range of chemical parameters. This report describes the water sampling component of the overall Columbia River monitoring program conducted during the years 1980 through 1989 and summarizes the radiological results generated through the program during this time period. The only radionuclides found in the river that were consistently influenced by Hanford were tritium and iodine-129. Strontium-90 and uranium, also attributable to Hanford operations, were present in localized areas within the river near ground-water discharge points; however, these contaminants are quickly dispersed within the river to concentrations similar to background.

  8. Environmental assessment and planning at Mound - environmental monitoring capabilities and personnel profiles

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Through its long experience with radioactive materials, Mound has developed a comprehensive, routine, offsite, environmental surveillance program to safeguard its employees, the physical plant, and the integrity of the surrounding environment from any potential adverse effects of its widely diverse operations. Effluent samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological parameters. The environment surrounding Mound Facility is continuously monitored - air, water, foodstuffs, vegetation, soil, and silt samples are analyzed to ensure that radioisotopic concentrations and other possible pollutants are well within the stringent standards adopted by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agencies (both federal and state), and various regional and local agencies. Moreover, this environmental surveillance program has been designed to ensure that the facility is designed, constructed, managed, operated, and maintained in a manner that continues to meet all federal, state, and local standards for environmental protection. Work in environmental science has been broadened to assess environmental factors associated with various aspects of the National Energy Plan. Both the management and staff at Mound have undertaken a firm commitment to make Mound`s environmental monitoring capabilities available to agencies that have the responsibility for the resolution of important environmental issues.

  9. Monitoring of environmental factors at the San Manuel mine

    SciTech Connect

    Calizaya, F.; Mousset-Jones, P.; Casten, T.

    1995-12-31

    Currently, a 4.3 km long drift is being developed on the 3440 level in the Lower Kalamazoo project at the San Manuel Mine, Magma Copper Company, AZ. The drift, located at 1050 m below surface, is being constructed using a 4.6 m diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM). The drift is ventilated by a forcing type auxiliary ventilation system. At the face, to mitigate the impact on the work environment of the TBM, the system is equipped with dust extraction and refrigeration systems. Recently, to evaluate the ventilation conditions in the drift, a continuous monitoring system has been installed. The system can be used to measure the air velocity, barometric pressure, relative humidity and air and rock temperatures. This study describes the capabilities and limitations of this system, and presents a summary of the results.

  10. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1994. Benzene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, mercury, nonvolatile beta, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 140 ft/year during first and fourth quarters 1994.

  11. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1997 and 1997 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-02-01

    A maximum of forty-eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride) and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1997. Lead (total recoverable), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, mercury, benzene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, tetrachloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, tritium, and 1.2-dichloropropane also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 139 ft/year during first quarter 1997 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter.

  12. Sanitary Landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1993. Benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethene 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, lindane, mercury, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. No groundwater contaminants were observed in wells screened in the lower section of Steed Pond Aquifer.

  13. Summary report: Working Group 4 on 'Beam Monitoring, Conditioning, and Control at High Frequencies and Ultrafast Timescales'

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Todd I.

    1999-07-12

    Working Group 4 at the 8th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop (ACC'98), held July 5-11, 1998 in Baltimore, Maryland hosted more than fifteen scheduled or impromptu talks (all punctuated with lively discussion) on the general topic of 'Beam Monitoring, Conditioning, and Control at High Frequencies and Ultrafast Timescales'. This report is a summary of these talks and discussions.

  14. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

  15. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  16. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1985-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs.

  17. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  18. Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility groundwater monitoring report, Fourth quarter 1995 and 1995 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, L.S.

    1996-03-01

    Samples from the ZBG wells at the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Industrial Waster Permit IWP-217 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1995, no constituents were reported above final Primary Drinking Water Standards or SRS flagging criteria. In the past, tritium has been detected sporadically in the ZBG wells at levels similar to those detected before Z Area began radioactive operations.

  19. A guide to environmental monitoring data, 1945--1972: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.E.; Bates, D.J.; Mart, E.I.; Hanf, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a guide to the work accomplished by the Environmental Monitoring Data Task, which is one of the tasks in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task was to recover, evaluate, process, and/or reconstruct the environmental monitoring data for the period 1945--1972. The period of time for which environmental monitoring data were sought was determined by the start-up and shut-down dates of the Hanford facilities that emitted the majority of radionuclides to the two major pathways: air and the Columbia River. Radionuclide emissions to the air were mainly the result of the operation of the chemical separations plants from 1944--1972 (Heeb 1994). Radionuclide emissions to the Columbia River were mainly the result of the operation of the single-pass production reactors from 1944--1971 (Heeb and Bates 1994). Therefore, the historical environmental monitoring data sought were for the period 1945--1972. Within the period of 1945--1972, specific periods of interest to the HEDR Project vary depending on the pathway. For example, 1945--1951 was the peak period for radionuclide emissions to the air and hence vegetation uptake of radionuclides, while 1956--1965 was the peak period for radionuclide emissions to the Columbia River and hence fish uptake of radionuclides. However, adequate historical data were not always available for the periods of interest. In the case of vegetation measurements, conversion and correction factors had to be developed to convert the historical measurements to modern standard measurements. Table S.1 lists the reports that explain these conversion and correction factors. In the case of Columbia River fish and waterfowl, bioconcentration factors were developed for use in any year where the river pathway data are insufficient.

  20. RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.

    SciTech Connect

    MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F.

    2001-05-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

  1. Louisiana Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring (BICM) Program Summary Report: Data and Analyses 2006 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Buster, Noreen A.; Flocks, James G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kulp, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring (BICM) program was implemented under the Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology (LCA S&T) office as a component of the System Wide Assessment and Monitoring (SWAMP) program. The BICM project was developed by the State of Louisiana (Coastal Protection Restoration Authority [CPRA], formerly Department of Natural Resources [DNR]) to complement other Louisiana coastal monitoring programs such as the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System-Wetlands (CRMS-Wetlands) and was a collaborative research effort by CPRA, University of New Orleans (UNO), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The goal of the BICM program was to provide long-term data on the barrier islands of Louisiana that could be used to plan, design, evaluate, and maintain current and future barrier-island restoration projects. The BICM program used both historical and newly acquired (2006 to 2010) data to assess and monitor changes in the aerial and subaqueous extent of islands, habitat types, sediment texture and geotechnical properties, environmental processes, and vegetation composition. BICM datasets included aerial still and video photography (multiple time series) for shoreline positions, habitat mapping, and land loss; light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys for topographic elevations; single-beam and swath bathymetry; and sediment grab samples. Products produced using BICM data and analyses included (but were not limited to) storm-impact assessments, rate of shoreline and bathymetric change, shoreline-erosion and accretion maps, high-resolution elevation maps, coastal-shoreline and barrier-island habitat-classification maps, and coastal surficial-sediment characterization maps. Discussions in this report summarize the extensive data-collection efforts and present brief interpretive analyses for four coastal Louisiana geographic regions. In addition, several coastal-wide and topical themes were selected that integrate the data and analyses within a

  2. Evaluation of Diesel Exhaust Continuous Monitors in Controlled Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Patton, Allison P.; Zhang, Andrew; Fanac, Zhi-Hua (Tina); Weisel, Clifford P.; Lioy, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) contains a variety of toxic air pollutants, including diesel particulate matter (DPM) and gaseous contaminants (e.g., carbon monoxide (CO)). DPM is dominated by fine (PM2.5) and ultrafine particles (UFP), and can be representatively determined by its thermal-optical refractory as elemental carbon (EC) or light-absorbing characteristics as black carbon (BC). The currently accepted reference method for sampling and analysis of occupational exposure to DPM is the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 5040. However, this method cannot provide in-situ short-term measurements of DPM. Thus, real-time monitors are gaining attention to better examine DE exposures in occupational settings. However, real-time monitors are subject to changing environmental conditions. Field measurements have reported interferences in optical sensors and subsequent real-time readings, under conditions of high humidity and abrupt temperature changes. To begin dealing with these issues, we completed a controlled study to evaluate five real-time monitors: Airtec real-time DPM/EC Monitor, TSI SidePak Personal Aerosol Monitor AM510 (PM2.5), TSI Condensation Particle Counter 3007, microAeth AE51 BC Aethalometer, and Langan T15n CO Measurer. Tests were conducted under different temperatures (55, 70, and 80 °F), relative humidity (10, 40, and 80%), and DPM concentrations (50 and 200 µg/m3) in a controlled exposure facility. The 2-hour averaged EC measurements from the Airtec instrument showed relatively good agreement with NIOSH Method 5040 (R2=0.84; slope=1.17±0.06; N=27) and reported ~17% higher EC concentrations than the NIOSH reference method. Temperature, relative humidity, and DPM levels did not significantly affect relative differences in 2-hour averaged EC concentrations obtained by the Airtec instrument versus the NIOSH method (p<0.05). Multiple linear regression analyses, based on 1-min averaged data, suggested combined effects of up to 5

  3. IOC/WMO Workshop on Marine Pollution Monitoring (3rd, New Delhi, India, February 11-15, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a summary report of the third IOC/WMO (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission/World Meteorological Organization) workshop of marine pollution monitoring. Summaries are presented in nine sections, including: (1) workshop opening; (2) welcoming addresses; (3) reports on the Marine Pollution (Petroleum) Monitoring Pilot Project…

  4. The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative--Performance Monitoring for DOE Environmental Remediation and Contaminant Containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W. J.; Venedam, R. J.; Lohrstorfer, C. F.; Weeks, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Advanced Monitoring System Initiative (AMSI) is a new approach to accelerate the development and application of advanced sensors and monitoring systems in support of Department of Energy needs in monitoring the performance of environmental remediation and contaminant containment activities. The Nevada Site Office of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Bechtel Nevada manage AMSI, with funding provided by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM). AMSI has easy access to unique facilities and capabilities available at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including the Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Spill Center, a one-of-a-kind facility built and permitted for releases of hazardous materials for training purposes, field-test detection, plume dispersion experimentation, and equipment and materials testing under controlled conditions. AMSI also has easy access to the facilities and considerable capabilities of the DOE and NNSA National Laboratories, the Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, Desert Research Institute, and Nevada Universities. AMSI provides rapid prototyping, systems integration, and field-testing, including assistance during initial site deployment. The emphasis is on application. Important features of the AMSI approach are: (1) customer investment, involvement and commitment to use - including definition of needs, desired mode of operation, and performance requirements; and (2) employment of a complete systems engineering approach, which allows the developer to focus maximum attention on the essential new sensing element or elements while AMSI assumes principal responsibility for infrastructure support elements such as power, packaging, and general data acquisition, control, communication, visualization and analysis software for support of decisions. This presentation describes: (1) the needs for sensors and performance monitoring for environmental systems as seen by the DOE Long Term Stewardship Science and

  5. Environmental summary for calendar year 1980. [US DOE Kansas Ciy Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Air and water quality in the Kansas City Plant environment were monitored and results are reported for calendar year 1980. Environmental monitoring for significant non-radioactive pollutants was conducted to allow evaluation of effluent effects on the environs of the Federal Complex. The monitoring data were compared to appropriate standards and guidelines. Ambient air and surface water analyses have shown no discernible effects on the environment from plant dischargers. In regard to land quality surveillance, all hazardous waste generated at the plant is transported off-site for disposal by licensed commercial subontractors in accordance with federal and state hazardous waste management regulations. PCB-contaminated wastes generated as a result of process upsets, resulting in contained spills and leaks from two on-site heat-transfer systems, were disposed of in an EPA-approved landfill facility. (JGB)

  6. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: An ecological status and trends program

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.F.; Holland, A.F.; Schimmel, S.C.; Summers, J.K.; Scott, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is initiating an Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) to monitor the status and trends of the Nation's near-coastal waters, forests, freshwater wetlands, surface waters, agroecosystems, deserts, and rangelands. The program is also intended to evaluate the effectiveness of EPA policies in protecting the ecological resources of these systems. The monitoring data collected for all ecosystems will be integrated for national status and trends assessments. The near-coastal component of EMAP consists of four ecosystem categories: estuaries, wetlands, coastal waters, and the Great Lakes. The near-coastal ecosystems have been regionalized and classified, an integrated sampling strategy has been designed, and quality-control procedures and data-base management designs will be implemented.

  7. Catalytic nanomotors for environmental monitoring and water remediation

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Self-propelled nanomotors hold considerable promise for developing innovative environmental applications. This review highlights the recent progress in the use of self-propelled nanomotors for water remediation and environmental monitoring applications, as well as the effect of the environmental conditions on the dynamics of nanomotors. Artificial nanomotors can sense different analytes—and therefore pollutants, or “chemical threats”—can be used for testing the quality of water, selective removal of oil, and alteration of their speeds, depending on the presence of some substances in the solution in which they swim. Newly introduced micromotors with double functionality to mix liquids at the microscale and enhance chemical reactions for the degradation of organic pollutants greatly broadens the range of applications to that of environmental. These “self-powered remediation systems” could be seen as a new generation of “smart devices” for cleaning water in small pipes or cavities difficult to reach with traditional methods. With constant improvement and considering the key challenges, we expect that artificial nanomachines could play an important role in environmental applications in the near future. PMID:24752489

  8. Catalytic nanomotors for environmental monitoring and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Soler, Lluís; Sánchez, Samuel

    2014-07-01

    Self-propelled nanomotors hold considerable promise for developing innovative environmental applications. This review highlights the recent progress in the use of self-propelled nanomotors for water remediation and environmental monitoring applications, as well as the effect of the environmental conditions on the dynamics of nanomotors. Artificial nanomotors can sense different analytes-and therefore pollutants, or "chemical threats"-can be used for testing the quality of water, selective removal of oil, and alteration of their speeds, depending on the presence of some substances in the solution in which they swim. Newly introduced micromotors with double functionality to mix liquids at the microscale and enhance chemical reactions for the degradation of organic pollutants greatly broadens the range of applications to that of environmental. These "self-powered remediation systems" could be seen as a new generation of "smart devices" for cleaning water in small pipes or cavities difficult to reach with traditional methods. With constant improvement and considering the key challenges, we expect that artificial nanomachines could play an important role in environmental applications in the near future.

  9. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water.

  10. Catalytic nanomotors for environmental monitoring and water remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Lluís; Sánchez, Samuel

    2014-06-01

    Self-propelled nanomotors hold considerable promise for developing innovative environmental applications. This review highlights the recent progress in the use of self-propelled nanomotors for water remediation and environmental monitoring applications, as well as the effect of the environmental conditions on the dynamics of nanomotors. Artificial nanomotors can sense different analytes--and therefore pollutants, or ``chemical threats''--can be used for testing the quality of water, selective removal of oil, and alteration of their speeds, depending on the presence of some substances in the solution in which they swim. Newly introduced micromotors with double functionality to mix liquids at the microscale and enhance chemical reactions for the degradation of organic pollutants greatly broadens the range of applications to that of environmental. These ``self-powered remediation systems'' could be seen as a new generation of ``smart devices'' for cleaning water in small pipes or cavities difficult to reach with traditional methods. With constant improvement and considering the key challenges, we expect that artificial nanomachines could play an important role in environmental applications in the near future.

  11. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water. PMID:9380841

  12. Andra Environmental Specimen Bank: archiving the environmental chemical quality for long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Elisabeth; d'Arbaumont, Maëlle; Verron, Jean-Patrick; Goldstein, Céline; Cesar, Frédérique; Dewonck, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    Andra Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) was established in 2010 as a part of the Perennial Observatory of the Environment (OPE), ongoing Long-Term Environmental Research Monitoring and Testing System located next to the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at Bure, Meuse/Haute-Marne, France. The URL is used to study the deep geological disposal of high and intermediate level radioactive waste. Andra ESB is designed to archive during at least 100 years samples collected to define the initial state of environmental quality of the local area before the construction of industrial facilities and to ensure the traceability of long-term series of samples collected by the OPE ( http://www.andra.fr/ope ), using safe long-term conservation practices. Samples archived in the bank include some local food chain products (milk, cheese, honey, cereals, grass, cherry plum…) and specimen usually archived internationally to monitor the environmental quality (soil, sediment, water, fish, tree leaves, wild life, etc.). Regarding the different samples and analytical issues, three conservation modalities and facilities were designed: dry conservation under controlled temperature and humidity, cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen (LN2) vapor phase freezers (-150 °C) and in deep-freezing at -80 °C for temporary storage and raw samples before preparation. Andra ESB is equipped with a sample preparation clean room, certified ISO Class 5, dedicated to cryopreservation. This paper describes this first French experiment of long-term chemical quality monitoring and samples cryopreservation of different ecosystems and environmental compartments. PMID:24809491

  13. Andra Environmental Specimen Bank: archiving the environmental chemical quality for long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Elisabeth; d'Arbaumont, Maëlle; Verron, Jean-Patrick; Goldstein, Céline; Cesar, Frédérique; Dewonck, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    Andra Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) was established in 2010 as a part of the Perennial Observatory of the Environment (OPE), ongoing Long-Term Environmental Research Monitoring and Testing System located next to the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at Bure, Meuse/Haute-Marne, France. The URL is used to study the deep geological disposal of high and intermediate level radioactive waste. Andra ESB is designed to archive during at least 100 years samples collected to define the initial state of environmental quality of the local area before the construction of industrial facilities and to ensure the traceability of long-term series of samples collected by the OPE ( http://www.andra.fr/ope ), using safe long-term conservation practices. Samples archived in the bank include some local food chain products (milk, cheese, honey, cereals, grass, cherry plum…) and specimen usually archived internationally to monitor the environmental quality (soil, sediment, water, fish, tree leaves, wild life, etc.). Regarding the different samples and analytical issues, three conservation modalities and facilities were designed: dry conservation under controlled temperature and humidity, cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen (LN2) vapor phase freezers (-150 °C) and in deep-freezing at -80 °C for temporary storage and raw samples before preparation. Andra ESB is equipped with a sample preparation clean room, certified ISO Class 5, dedicated to cryopreservation. This paper describes this first French experiment of long-term chemical quality monitoring and samples cryopreservation of different ecosystems and environmental compartments.

  14. Environmental monitoring master sampling schedule: January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for calendar year 1989 for the Surface and Ground-Water Environmental Monitoring Projects. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operations, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. This schedule includes routine ground-water sampling performed by PNL for Westinghouse Hanford Company, but does not include samples that may be collected in 1989 to support special studies or special contractor projects, or for quality control. The sampling schedule for Site-wide chemical monitoring is not included here, because it varies each quarter as needed, based on past results and operating needs. This schedule does not include Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water sampling performed by PNL for Hanford Site contractors, nor does it include sampling that may be done by other DOE Hanford contractors.

  15. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  16. Large scale remote sensing for environmental monitoring of infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Matthew J; Fuchs, Michael P; Janoyan, Kerop D

    2008-07-01

    Recent developments in wireless sensor technology afford the opportunity to rapidly and easily deploy large-scale, low-cost, and low-power sensor networks across relatively sizeable environmental regions. Furthermore, the advancement of increasingly smaller and less expensive wireless hardware is further complemented by the rapid development of open-source software components. These software protocols allow for interfacing with the hardware to program and configure the onboard processing and communication settings. In general, a wireless sensor network topology consists of an array of microprocessor boards, referred to as motes, which can engage in two-way communication among each other as well as with a base station that relays the mote data to a host computer. The information can then be either logged and displayed on the local host or directed to an http server for network monitoring remote from the site. A number of wireless sensor products are available that offer off-the-shelf network hardware as well as sensor solutions for environmental monitoring that are compatible with the TinyOS open-source software platform. This paper presents an introduction to wireless sensing and to the use of external antennas for increasing the antenna radiation intensity and shaping signal directivity for monitoring applications requiring larger mote-to-mote communication distances.

  17. 15 CFR 970.702 - Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Monitoring and mitigation of... Environmental Effects § 970.702 Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects. (a) Monitoring. If an... will provide assistance in developing monitoring plans in consultation with applicants. (b)...

  18. 15 CFR 970.702 - Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monitoring and mitigation of... Environmental Effects § 970.702 Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects. (a) Monitoring. If an... will provide assistance in developing monitoring plans in consultation with applicants. (b)...

  19. 15 CFR 970.702 - Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Monitoring and mitigation of... Environmental Effects § 970.702 Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects. (a) Monitoring. If an... will provide assistance in developing monitoring plans in consultation with applicants. (b)...

  20. 15 CFR 970.702 - Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Monitoring and mitigation of... Environmental Effects § 970.702 Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects. (a) Monitoring. If an... will provide assistance in developing monitoring plans in consultation with applicants. (b)...

  1. 15 CFR 970.702 - Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and mitigation of... Environmental Effects § 970.702 Monitoring and mitigation of environmental effects. (a) Monitoring. If an... will provide assistance in developing monitoring plans in consultation with applicants. (b)...

  2. Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: Calendar year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR site showed detectable amounts of /sup 60/Co. This isotope was 1.5 x 10/sup -4/% of the concentration guide (1) and was probably due to ALRR operations. The radioisotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium. The average yearly individual dose from /sup 3/H at the exclusion fence was estimated to 0.0038 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 6.31 man-Rem. These values are 0.00076% and 0.0063%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, /sup 3/H was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.59% of the dose derived from the concentration guide.

  3. Environmental monitoring of hydrocarbons: a chemical sensor perspective.

    PubMed

    Pejcic, Bobby; Eadington, Peter; Ross, Andrew

    2007-09-15

    Assessing the environmental impact of organic pollutants requires reliable analytical tools that can rapidly screen them with minimal sample handling. Chemical sensors are expected to play an increasing role in environmental monitoring, and recent technological advances are certain to facilitate the application of chemical sensing devices. The search for highly selective, sensitive, low cost, stable, and robust sensors for hydrocarbons is an area of interest that is reflected by many publications on this topic. This report surveys some of the work that has been undertaken using sensors to detect hydrocarbons in the gas and liquid phase. The analytical capabilities of various sensors are compared and discussed in terms of their selectivity, sensitivity, and detection limit. It was found that the sensitivity is highly dependent on the experimental conditions used in the preparation of the sensing surface. Many sensors display acceptable sensitivity under controlled laboratory conditions; however, very few are selective enough to distinguish among several hydrocarbons in complex mixtures. Selectivity is still a challenge that is hindering the widespread application of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of hydrocarbons and a number of strategies have been proposed to help overcome some of these problems.

  4. Advanced Environmental Monitoring and Control Program: Technology Development Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell (Editor); Seshan, Panchalam (Editor); Ganapathi, Gani (Editor); Schmidt, Gregory (Editor); Doarn, Charles (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Human missions in space, from the International Space Station on towards potential human exploration of the moon, Mars and beyond into the solar system, will require advanced systems to maintain an environment that supports human life. These systems will have to recycle air and water for many months or years at a time, and avoid harmful chemical or microbial contamination. NASA's Advanced Environmental Monitoring and Control program has the mission of providing future spacecraft with advanced, integrated networks of microminiaturized sensors to accurately determine and control the physical, chemical and biological environment of the crew living areas. This document sets out the current state of knowledge for requirements for monitoring the crew environment, based on (1) crew health, and (2) life support monitoring systems. Both areas are updated continuously through research and space mission experience. The technologies developed must meet the needs of future life support systems and of crew health monitoring. These technologies must be inexpensive and lightweight, and use few resources. Using these requirements to continue to push the state of the art in miniaturized sensor and control systems will produce revolutionary technologies to enable detailed knowledge of the crew environment.

  5. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    In order to establish whether LBL research activities produces any impact on the population surrounding the Laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1982, as in the previous several years, doses attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG). The maximum perimeter dose equivalent was less than or equal to 24.0 mrem (the 1982 dose equivalent measured at the Building 88 monitoring station B-13A, about 5% of the RPG). The total population dose equivalent attributable to LBL operations during 1982 was less than or equal to 16 man-rem, about 0.002% of the RPG of 170 mrem/person to a suitable sample of the population.

  6. Electronic noses and their applications in environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks for real-time data analysis of a sensor array. Analyzing the sensor data in parallel may allow for rapid identification of contaminants in the field without requiring highly selective component sensors. A sensor array combined with a data analysis module is referred to as an electronic nose. In this paper, we investigate the trade off between sensor sensitivity and selectivity relating to the applications of neural network based-electronic noses in environmental monitoring. We use a prototype electronic nose which consists of nine tin-oxide Taguchi-type sensors, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. We illustrate that by using neural network based analysis of a sensor data, the selectivity of a sensor array may be significantly improved, especially when some (or all) sensors are not highly selective.

  7. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1992 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State in 1992. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and to control the impacts of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the workers and the local environment. Additionally, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although impacts from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and are slightly elevated when compared to offsite, these impacts are less than in previous years.

  8. Space Station Environmental Health System water quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincze, Johanna E.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the unique aspects of the Space Station is that it will be a totally encapsulated environment and the air and water supplies will be reclaimed for reuse. The Environmental Health System, a subsystem of CHeCS (Crew Health Care System), must monitor the air and water on board the Space Station Freedom to verify that the quality is adequate for crew safety. Specifically, the Water Quality Subsystem will analyze the potable and hygiene water supplies regularly for organic, inorganic, particulate, and microbial contamination. The equipment selected to perform these analyses will be commercially available instruments which will be converted for use on board the Space Station Freedom. Therefore, the commercial hardware will be analyzed to identify the gravity dependent functions and modified to eliminate them. The selection, analysis, and conversion of the off-the-shelf equipment for monitoring the Space Station reclaimed water creates a challenging project for the Water Quality engineers and scientists.

  9. Environmental monitors in the Midcourse Space Experiments (MSX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uy, O. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) is an SDIO sponsored space based sensor experiment with a full complement of optical sensors. Because of the possible deleterious effect of both molecular and particulate contamination on these sensors, a suite of environmental monitoring instruments are also being flown with the spacecraft. These instruments are the Total Pressure Sensor based on the cold-cathode gauge, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a Bennett-type ion mass spectrometer, a cryogenic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), four temperature-controlled QCM's, and a Xenon and Krypton Flash Lamp Experiment. These instruments have been fully space-qualified, are compact and low cost, and are possible candidate sensors for near-term planetary and atmospheric monitoring. The philosophy adopted during design and fabrication, calibration and ground testing, and modeling will be discussed .

  10. Environmental monitors in the Midcourse Space Experiments (MSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uy, O. M.

    The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) is an SDIO sponsored space based sensor experiment with a full complement of optical sensors. Because of the possible deleterious effect of both molecular and particulate contamination on these sensors, a suite of environmental monitoring instruments are also being flown with the spacecraft. These instruments are the Total Pressure Sensor based on the cold-cathode gauge, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a Bennett-type ion mass spectrometer, a cryogenic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), four temperature-controlled QCM's, and a Xenon and Krypton Flash Lamp Experiment. These instruments have been fully space-qualified, are compact and low cost, and are possible candidate sensors for near-term planetary and atmospheric monitoring. The philosophy adopted during design and fabrication, calibration and ground testing, and modeling will be discussed .

  11. Environmental Monitoring using Measurements from Cellular Network Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, N.; Gao, O. H.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurements of atmospheric parameters at ground level are fundamentally essential for hazard warning, meteorological forecasting and for various applications in agriculture, hydrology, transportation and more. The accuracy of existing instruments, however, is often limited as a result of technical and practical constraints. Existing technologies such as satellite systems cover large areas but may experience lack of precision at near surface level. On the other hand, ground based in-situ sensors often suffer from low spatial representativity. In addition, these conventional monitoring instruments are costly to implement and maintain. At frequencies of tens of GHz, various atmospheric hydrometeors affect microwave beams, causing perturbations to radio signals. Consequently, commercial wireless links that constitute the infrastructure for data transport between cellular base stations can be considered as a built in environmental monitoring facility (Messer et al., Science, 2006). These microwave links are widely deployed worldwide at surface level altitudes and can provide measurements of various atmospheric phenomena. The implementation costs are minimal since the infrastructure is already situated in the field. This technique has been shown to be applicable for 2D rainfall monitoring (e.g. Overeem et al., PNAS, 2013; Liberman et al., AMT, 2014) and potentially for water vapor observations (David et al., ACP, 2009; Chwala et al., Atmos. Res., 2013). Moreover, it has been recently shown that the technology has strong potential for detection of fog and estimation of its intensity (David et al., JGR-Atmos., 2013; David et al., BAMS, 2014). The research conducted to this point forms the basis for the initiation of a research project in this newly emerging field at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering of Cornell University. The presentation will provide insights into key capabilities of the novel approach. The potential to monitor various

  12. Space in environmental diplomacy: Exploring the role of earth observing satellites for monitoring international environmental agreements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Shaida Sahami

    This research determines under what conditions, and for what types of environmental treaties, Earth observation (EO) is useful for monitoring international environmental agreements. The research extracts specific monitoring requirements from nine multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and explores how satellite EO data can be used to support them. The technical characteristics of the sensor systems and science data products associated with current and planned EO satellites were analyzed and mapped to the MEA requirements, providing a significant step toward linking the EO community with the international treaty community implementing these environmental agreements. The research results include a listing and analysis of the positive and negative factors that influence whether EO data are useful for monitoring and verifying MEAs, analysis of existing international EO institutions, and a set of key findings describing the conditions under which EO data are most useful to the treaties. The use of EO data in various treaty phases is also analyzed, drawing the conclusion that EO data are most useful for monitoring and treaty refinement and not very useful for compliance verification or enforcement. MEAs manage compliance using governance structures that offer expertise and resources to assist states that are reported to be in non-compliance, rather than enforce compliance with sanctions or other punishments. In addition, the temporal and spatial resolution of the current and planned fleet of satellites does not provide the required detail needed for MEA verification. Identifying specific treaty implementation deficiencies requires additional information that cannot be gathered from EO data; on-site economic, social, and environmental conditions are critical elements in assessing compliance verification. But for environmental monitoring and assessments, MEA effectiveness reviews, and national reporting required for each MEA, EO data are very useful. They provide

  13. Using Environmental DNA for Invasive Species Surveillance and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Andrew R; Jerde, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    The method employed for environmental DNA (eDNA) surveillance for detection and monitoring of rare species in aquatic systems has evolved dramatically since its first large-scale applications. Both active (targeted) and passive (total diversity) surveillance methods provide helpful information for management groups, but each has a suite of techniques that necessitate proper equipment training and use. The protocols described in this chapter represent some of the latest iterations in eDNA surveillance being applied in aquatic and marine systems. PMID:27460374

  14. Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program at Toolik Field Station, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kade, A.; Bret-Harte, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Environmental Data Center at the Toolik Field Station, Alaska established a baseline environmental monitoring program in 2007 to provide a long-term record of key biotic and abiotic variables to the scientific community. We maintain a weather station for a long-term climate record at the field station and monitor the timing of key plant phenological events, bird migration and mammal sightings. With regards to plant phenology, we record event dates such as emergence of first leaves, open flowers and seed dispersal for twelve select species typical of the moist acidic tundra, following the ITEX plant phenology protocol. From 2007 to 2011, we observed earlier emergence of first leaves by approximately one week for species such as the dwarf birch Betula nana, sedge Carex bigelowii and evergreen lingonberry Vaccinium vitis-idaea, while seed dispersal for some of these species was delayed by more than two weeks. We also monitor the arrival and departure dates of thirty bird species common to the Toolik area. Yearlong residents included species such as the common raven, rock and willow ptarmigan, and some migrants such as yellow-billed loons and American tree sparrows could be detected for about four months at Toolik, while long-distance traveling arctic terns stayed only two months during the summer. The timing of bird migration dates did not show any clear trends over the past five years for most species. For the past two decades, we recorded climate data such as air, soil and lake temperature, radiation, wind speed and direction, relative humidity and barometric pressure. During this time period, monthly mean air temperatures varied from -31.7 to -12.8 °C in January and from 8.3 to 13.1 °C in July, with no trend over time. Our baseline data on plant phenological changes, timing of bird migration and climate variables are valuable in the light of long-term environmental monitoring efforts as they provide the context for other seasonality projects that are

  15. Bioindicators as metrics for environmental monitoring of desalination plant discharges.

    PubMed

    de-la-Ossa-Carretero, J A; Del-Pilar-Ruso, Y; Loya-Fernández, A; Ferrero-Vicente, L M; Marco-Méndez, C; Martinez-Garcia, E; Giménez-Casalduero, F; Sánchez-Lizaso, J L

    2016-02-15

    Development of desalination projects requires simple methodologies and tools for cost-effective and environmentally-sensitive management. Sentinel taxa and biotic indices are easily interpreted in the perspective of environment management. Echinoderms are potential sentinel taxon to gauge the impact produced by brine discharge and the BOPA index is considered an effective tool for monitoring different types of impact. Salinity increase due to desalination brine discharge was evaluated in terms of these two indicators. They reflected the environmental impact and recovery after implementation of a mitigation measure. Echinoderms disappeared at the station closest to the discharge during the years with highest salinity and then recovered their abundance after installation of a diffuser reduced the salinity increase. In the same period, BOPA responded due to the decrease in sensitive amphipods and the increase in tolerant polychaete families when salinities rose. Although salinity changes explained most of the observed variability in both indicators, other abiotic parameters were also significant in explaining this variability.

  16. Data Acquisition and Environmental Monitoring of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Samuel; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Low-background non-accelerator experiments have unique requirements for their data acquisition and environmental monitoring. Background signals can easily overwhelm the signals of interest, so events which could contribute to the background must be identified. There is a need to correlate events between detectors and environmental conditions, and data integrity must be maintained. Here, we describe several of the software and hardware techniques achieved by the MAJORANA Collaboration for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, such as using the Object-oriented Realtime Control and Acquisition (ORCA) software package. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  17. Monitoring of environmental UV radiation by biological dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Ronto, G; Berces, A; Grof, P; Fekete, A; Kerekgyarto, T; Gaspar, S; Stick, C

    2000-01-01

    As a consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion biological systems can be damaged due to increased UV-B radiation. The aim of biological dosimetry is to establish a quantitative basis for the risk assessment of the biosphere. DNA is the most important target molecule of biological systems having special sensitivity against short wavelength components of the environmental radiation. Biological dosimeters are usually simple organisms, or components of them, modeling the cellular DNA. Phage T7 and polycrystalline uracil biological dosimeters have been developed and used in our laboratory for monitoring the environmental radiation in different radiation conditions (from the polar to equatorial regions). Comparisons with Robertson-Berger (RB) meter data, as well as with model calculation data weighted by the corresponding spectral sensitivities of the dosimeters are presented. Suggestion is given how to determine the trend of the increase in the biological risk due to ozone depletion.

  18. A proposed framework for establishing integrated cost and performance criteria for environmental technologies: A summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This document presents a summary of results of a joint EPA/DOE project aimed at establishing a suite of standard cost and performance criteria for evaluating environmental cleanup technologies for DOE sites. Project findings include: (1) decisionmakers have quite different perspectives with interests and information needs varying among decisionmaker groups, (2) previous criteria development efforts may be too narrowly focused to apply to all decisionmakers, (3) criteria must include social/political/economic interests of decisionmakers as well as site-specific variations, and (4) there are 5 core questions that all decisionmakers are likely to ask when considering a technology for use at a site. The resource developed in the project offers decisionmakers a first-time comprehensive assessment of major technology evaluation issues.

  19. Summary of Current and Future MSFC International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Charles D.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Minton-Summers, Silvia

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of current work accomplished under technical task agreement (TTA) by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) regarding the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) as well as future planning activities in support of the International Space Station (ISS). Current activities include ECLSS computer model development, component design and development, subsystem integrated system testing, life testing, and government furnished equipment delivered to the ISS program. A long range plan for the MSFC ECLSS test facility is described whereby the current facility would be upgraded to support integrated station ECLSS operations. ECLSS technology development efforts proposed to be performed under the Advanced Engineering Technology Development (AETD) program are also discussed.

  20. Summary of Resources for the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The assembly complete Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) s ystem for the International Space Station (ISS) will consist of compo nents and subsystems in both the U.S. and International partner eleme nts which together will perform the functions of Temperature and Hum idity Control (THC), Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), Fire Detect ion and Suppression (FDS), and Vacuum System (VS) for the station. D ue to limited resources available on ISS, detailed attention is given to minimizing and tracking all resources associated with all systems , beginning with estimates during the hardware development phase thr ough measured actuals when flight hardware is built and delivered. A summary of resources consumed by the current on-orbit U.S. ECLS syste m hardware is presented, including launch weight, average continuous and peak power loads, on-orbit volume and resupply logistics. ..

  1. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program in the 21st Century: The Evolution of a Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

    2007-01-19

    This paper focuses on the evolution of the various operational aspects of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) network following the transfer of program administration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education in 1999-2000. The CEMP consists of a network of 29 fixed radiation and weather monitoring stations located in Nevada, Utah, and California. Its mission is to involve stakeholders directly in monitoring for airborne radiological releases to the off site environment as a result of past or ongoing activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and to make data as transparent and accessible to the general public as feasible. At its inception in 1981, the CEMP was a cooperative project of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), DRI, and EPA. In 1999-2000, technical administration of the CEMP transitioned from EPA to DRI. Concurrent with and subsequent to this transition, station and program operations underwent significant enhancements that furthered the mission of the program. These enhancements included the addition of a full suite of meteorological instrumentation, state-of-the-art electronic data collectors, on-site displays, and communications hardware. A public website was developed. Finally, the DRI developed a mobile monitoring station that can be operated entirely on solar power in conjunction with a deep-cell battery, and includes all meteorological sensors and a pressurized ion chamber for detecting background gamma radiation. Final station configurations have resulted in the creation of a platform that is well suited for use as an in-field multi-environment test-bed for prototype environmental sensors and in interfacing with other scientific and educational programs. Recent and near-future collaborators have included federal, state, and local agencies in both the government and private sectors. The CEMP also serves as a model for other programs wishing to

  2. Final report on fiscal year 1992 activities for the environmental monitors line-loss study

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.

    1993-12-09

    The work performed on this Environmental Monitors Line-Loss Study has been performed under Contract Numbers MLW-SVV-073750 and MFH-SVV-207554. Work on the task was initiated mid-December 1991, and this report documents and summarizes the work performed through January 18, 1993. The sections included in this report summarize the work performed on the Environmental Monitors Line-Loss Study. The sections included in this report are arranged to reflect individual sub-tasks and include: descriptions of measurement systems and procedures used to obtain cascade impactor samples and laser spectrometer measurements from multiple stacks and locations; information on data acquisition, analyses, assessment, and software; discussion of the analyses and measurement results from the cascade impactor and laser spectrometer systems and software used; discussion on the development of general test methods and procedures for line-loss determinations; an overall summary and specific conclusions that can be made with regard to efforts performed on this task during FY 1992 and FY 1993. Supporting information for these sections is included in this report as appendices.

  3. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sett, Arghya; Das, Suradip; Bora, Utpal

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to replace conventional chromatographic methods for environmental monitoring with cheaper and easy to use biosensors for precise detection and estimation of hazardous environmental toxicants, water or air borne pathogens as well as various other chemicals and biologics are gaining momentum. Out of the various types of biosensors classified according to their bio-recognition principle, nucleic-acid-based sensors have shown high potential in terms of cost, sensitivity, and specificity. The discovery of catalytic activities of RNA (ribozymes) and DNA (DNAzymes) which could be triggered by divalent metallic ions paved the way for their extensive use in detection of heavy metal contaminants in environment. This was followed with the invention of small oligonucleotide sequences called aptamers which can fold into specific 3D conformation under suitable conditions after binding to target molecules. Due to their high affinity, specificity, reusability, stability, and non-immunogenicity to vast array of targets like small and macromolecules from organic, inorganic, and biological origin, they can often be exploited as sensors in industrial waste management, pollution control, and environmental toxicology. Further, rational combination of the catalytic activity of DNAzymes and RNAzymes along with the sequence-specific binding ability of aptamers have given rise to the most advanced form of functional nucleic-acid-based sensors called aptazymes. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors (FNASs) can be conjugated with fluorescent molecules, metallic nanoparticles, or quantum dots to aid in rapid detection of a variety of target molecules by target-induced structure switch (TISS) mode. Although intensive research is being carried out for further improvements of FNAs as sensors, challenges remain in integrating such bio-recognition element with advanced transduction platform to enable its use as a networked analytical system for tailor made analysis of environmental

  4. Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-09

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

  5. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  6. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  7. Monitoring of trifluoroacetic acid concentration in environmental waters in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbo; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Jianxin; Ye, Peng; Zeng, Zheng

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important and extremely meaningful to determine the concentration of TFA in the environmental water in China. This will create background reference for the effects of analyzing the extensive employment of the substitutes to CFCs in China. In this paper a set of analytical methods was described for use in monitoring of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) concentration of environmental waters including collecting, pre-treatment measures, preserving, concentrating and derivatization of samples from different kinds of environmental waters. The GC with electrical capture detector (ECD) and headspace auto sampler were used in the analysis. The lowest detection limit of the instrument is 0.0004 ng methyl trifluoroacetic acid (MTFA), and the lowest detected concentration with the method is 3.0 ng/ml TFA. TFA collected in various environmental water samples (including rainfall, inland surface water, ground water, and waste water) from nine provinces and autonomous regions in China have been determined by applying the analytical methods created and defined in this work. The results indicate that the concentrations of TFA in nine rainfalls and three snowfalls through the period from 2000 to 2001 ranged from 25 to 220 ng/l, the TFA concentration in the inland surface water samples ranged from 4.7 to 221 ng/l, the concentration of TFA in groundwater samples collected in Beijing was 10 ng/l, and the TFA concentration in coastal water samples ranged from 4.2 to 190.1 ng/l.

  8. Recent advances in environmental monitoring using commercial microwave links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Pinhas; Guez, Oded; Messer, Hagit; David, Noam; Harel, Oz; Eshel, Adam; Cohen, Ori

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in environmental monitoring using commercial microwave links Pinhas Alpert, H. Messer, N. David, O. Guez, O. Cohen, O. Harel, A. Eshel Tel Aviv University, Israel The propagation of electromagnetic radiation in the lower atmosphere, at centimeter wavelengths, is impaired by atmospheric conditions. Absorption and scattering of the radiation, at frequencies of tens of GHz, are directly related to the atmospheric phenomena, primarily precipitation, oxygen, mist, fog and water vapor. As was recently shown, wireless communication networks supply high resolution precipitation measurements at ground level while often being situated in flood prone areas, covering large parts of these hazardous regions. On the other hand, at present, there are no satisfactory real time flash flood warning facilities found to cope well with this phenomenon. I will exemplify the flash flood warning potential of the commercial wireless communication system for semi-arid region cases when floods occurred in the Judean desert in Israel with comparison to hydrological measurements in the Dead Sea area. In addition, I will review our recent improvements in monitoring rainfall as well as other-than-rain phenomena like, fog, dew, atmospheric moisture. References: N. David, P. Alpert, and H. Messer, "Technical Note: Novel method for water vapor monitoring using wireless communication networks measurements", Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 2413-2418, 2009. A. Rayitsfeld, R. Samuels, A. Zinevich, U. Hadar and P. Alpert,"Comparison of two methodologies for long term rainfall monitoring using a commercial microwave communication system", Atmospheric Research 104-105, 119-127, 2012. N. David, O. Sendik, H. Messer and P. Alpert, "Cellular network infrastructure-the future of fog monitoring?" BAMS (Oct. issue), 1687-1698, 2015. O. Harel, David, N., Alpert, P. and Messer, H., "The potential of microwave communication networks to detect dew using the GLRT- experimental study", IEEE Journal of Selected

  9. Environmental assessment of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been prepared to determine if the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (the Center), or its alternatives would have significant environmental impacts that must be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Statement. DOE`s proposed action is to continue funding the Center. While DOE is not funding construction of the planned Center facility, operation of that facility is dependent upon continued funding. To implement the proposed action, the Center would initially construct a facility of approximately 2,300 square meters (25,000 square feet). The Phase 1 laboratory facilities and parking lot will occupy approximately 1.2 hectares (3 acres) of approximately 8.9 hectares (22 acres) of land which were donated to New Mexico State University (NMSU) for this purpose. The facility would contain laboratories to analyze chemical and radioactive materials typical of potential contaminants that could occur in the environment in the vicinity of the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site or other locations. The facility also would have bioassay facilities to measure radionuclide levels in the general population and in employees of the WIPP. Operation of the Center would meet the DOE requirement for independent monitoring and assessment of environmental impacts associated with the planned disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP.

  10. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  11. An Experimental Study of a WSN System for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Davis, T. W.; Hare, T. P.; Navarro, M.; Liang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are being increasingly utilized to monitor environmental, biological and hydrological processes. This is an investigation of WSN applications using MEMSIC's (previously Crossbow's) XMesh routing protocol on MICAz wireless motes. The factors that are examined include the use of XMesh's high power and low power operation modes and the data transmission intervals. The focus of this study is to understand the battery savings, route utilization and success rate of data transmissions using XMesh. Preliminary results showed little variation in mote battery life tested over various transmission intervals under both power modes. Further examination uncovered additional messages (health statistics and routing updates) that were being transmitted in addition to forwarded messages through the multi-hop style network. Route utilization was identified and for certain motes was shown to attribute up to 50% of the mote's battery life in the low power mode. A field study of a small testbed of motes was conducted for comparative purposes. The results from the field study were analogous with the laboratory tests with regards to the battery life and route utilization, however, the network reliability was found to be considerably lower in the field. The information ascertained in this study are for the purposes of better understanding the power use and networking abilities of wireless motes using the XMesh routing protocol for environmental monitoring.

  12. Plug-and-Play Environmental Monitoring Spacecraft Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Brinza, David E.; Tran, Tuan A.; Blaes, Brent R.

    2011-01-01

    A Space Environment Monitor (SEM) subsystem architecture has been developed and demonstrated that can benefit future spacecraft by providing (1) real-time knowledge of the spacecraft state in terms of exposure to the environment; (2) critical, instantaneous information for anomaly resolution; and (3) invaluable environmental data for designing future missions. The SEM architecture consists of a network of plug-and- play (PnP) Sensor Interface Units (SIUs), each servicing one or more environmental sensors. The SEM architecture is influenced by the IEEE Smart Transducer Interface Bus standard (IEEE Std 1451) for its PnP functionality. A network of PnP Spacecraft SIUs is enabling technology for gathering continuous real-time information critical to validating spacecraft health in harsh space environments. The demonstrated system that provided a proof-of-concept of the SEM architecture consisted of three SIUs for measurement of total ionizing dose (TID) and single event upset (SEU) radiation effects, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and deep dielectric charging through use of a prototype Internal Electro-Static Discharge Monitor (IESDM). Each SIU consists of two stacked 2X2 in. (approximately 5X5 cm) circuit boards: a Bus Interface Unit (BIU) board that provides data conversion, processing and connection to the SEM power-and-data bus, and a Sensor Interface Electronics (SIE) board that provides sensor interface needs and data path connection to the BIU.

  13. Management of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi; Perry, Jay; Howard, David

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Exploration Systems Program's Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project is working to further optimize atmosphere revitalization and environmental monitoring system architectures. This paper discusses project management strategies that tap into skill sets across multiple engineering disciplines, projects, field centers, and industry to achieve the project success. It is the project's objective to contribute to system advances that will enable sustained exploration missions beyond Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) and improve affordability by focusing on the primary goals of achieving high reliability, improving efficiency, and reducing dependence on ground-based logistics resupply. Technology demonstrations are achieved by infusing new technologies and concepts with existing developmental hardware and operating in a controlled environment simulating various crewed habitat scenarios. The ARREM project's strengths include access to a vast array of existing developmental hardware that perform all the vital atmosphere revitalization functions, exceptional test facilities to fully evaluate system performance, and a well-coordinated partnering effort among the NASA field centers and industry partners to provide the innovative expertise necessary to succeed.

  14. Environmental monitoring report for commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (1960`s through 1990`s)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    During the time period covered in this report (1960`s through early 1990`s), six commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities have been operated in the US. This report provides environmental monitoring data collected at each site. The report summarizes: (1) each site`s general design, (2) each site`s inventory, (3) the environmental monitoring program for each site and the data obtained as the program has evolved, and (4) what the program has indicated about releases to off-site areas, if any, including a statement of the actual health and safety significance of any release. A summary with conclusions is provided at the end of each site`s chapter. The six commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed are located near: Sheffield, Illinois; Maxey Flats, Kentucky; Beatty, Nevada; West Valley, New York; Barnwell, South Carolina; Richland, Washington.

  15. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1996 and 1996 summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    A maximum of eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and chloroethene (vinyl chloride) were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1996. Benzene, trichloroethylene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead (total recoverable), gross alpha, mercury (total recoverable), tetrachloroethylene, fluoride, thallium, radium-226, radium-228, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 141 ft/year during first quarter 1996 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter 1996

  16. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1999 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    2000-03-13

    A maximum of thirty eight-wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Iron (Total Recoverable), Chloroethene (Vinyl Chloride) and 1,1-Dichloroethane were the most widespread constituents exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during 1999. Trichloroethylene, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Aluminum (Total Recoverable), Benzene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride), Gross Alpha, Mercury (Total Recoverable), Nonvolatile Beta, Tetrachloroethylene, Total Organic Halogens, Trichlorofluoromethane, Tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 144.175 ft/year during first quarter 1999 and 145.27 ft/year during fourth quarter 1999.

  17. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

  18. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Samples were collected from 130 wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control in December 1990. Historically, as well as currently, tritium, nitrate, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, and mercury have been the primary constituents observed above final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater at the HASB. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during first and fourth quarter 1992. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  19. PCR for bioaerosol monitoring: sensitivity and environmental interference.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A J; Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1995-10-01

    The PCR technique has potential for use in detection of low concentrations of airborne microorganisms. In this study, the sensitivity of PCR and its susceptibility to environmental interference were assessed with Escherichia coli DH1 as the target organism. Air samples, containing environmental bioaerosols, were collected with AGI-30 samplers and seeded with E. coli DH1 cells. Parallel studies were performed with cells seeded into the sampler prior to collection of air samples to determine the effects of environmental inhibition and sampling stress on the PCR assay. Baseline studies were also performed without environmental challenge or sampling stress to compare two protocols for cell lysis, solid phase and freeze-thaw. Amplification of a plasmid target sequence resulted in a detection limit of a single bacterial cell by the freeze-thaw and solid-phase methods within 5 and 9 h, respectively. With a genomic target, the sensitivity of the solid-phase method was 10-fold lower than that of freeze-thaw. Samples which contained 10(3) to 10(4) CFU of environmental organisms per m3 inhibited amplification; however, a 1/10 dilution of these samples resulted in successful amplifications. No difference in sensitivity of the PCR assay was obtained as a result of sampling stress, although a 10-fold decrease in culturability was observed. A field validation of the protocol with genomic primers demonstrated the presence of airborne E. coli and/or Shigella spp. in outdoor samples. This study indicates that the PCR method for detection of airborne microorganisms is rapid and sensitive and can be used as an alternative method for air quality monitoring. PMID:7487000

  20. Application of algae-biosensor for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Umar, Lazuardi; Alexander, Frank A; Wiest, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Environmental problems including water and air pollution, over fertilization, insufficient wastewater treatment and even ecological disaster are receiving greater attention in the technical and scientific area. In this paper, a method for water quality monitoring using living green algae (Chlorella Kessleri) with the help of the intelligent mobile lab (IMOLA) is presented. This measurement used two IMOLA systems for measurement and reference simultaneously to verify changes due to pollution inside the measurement system. The IMOLA includes light emitting diodes to stimulate photosynthesis of the living algae immobilized on a biochip containing a dissolved oxygen microsensor. A fluid system is used to transport algae culture medium in a stop and go mode; 600s ON, 300s OFF, while the oxygen concentration of the water probe is measured. When the pump stops, the increase in dissolved oxygen concentration due to photosynthesis is detected. In case of a pollutant being transported toward the algae, this can be detected by monitoring the photosynthetic activity. Monitoring pollution is shown by adding emulsion of 0,5mL of Indonesian crude palm oil and 10mL algae medium to the water probe in the biosensor.

  1. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-03-15

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify {sup 41}Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  2. Long-term environmental monitoring at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1990-11-01

    Environmental monitoring has been an ongoing activity on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington for over 45 years. Objectives are to detect and assess potential impacts of Site operations (nuclear and nonnuclear) on air, surface and ground water, foodstuffs, fish, wildlife, soils and vegetation. Data from monitoring efforts are used to calculate the overall radiological dose to humans working onsite or residing in nearby communities. In 1988, measured Hanford Site perimeter concentrations of airborne radionuclides were below applicable guidelines. In addition to monitoring radioactivity in fish and wildlife, population numbers of key species are determined. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning in the Columbia River at Hanford has increased in recent years with a concomitant increase in winter roosting activity of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). An elk (Cervus elaphus) herd, established by immigration in 1972, is increasing. The Hanford Site also serves as a refuge for Canada good (Branta canadensis) and great blue heron (Ardea herodias), and various plants and other animals, e.g., (Odocoileus hemionus) and coyote (Canis latrans). 32 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jisha, N V; Krishnakumar, D N; Surya Prakash, G; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2012-03-01

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify (41)Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation. PMID:22462965

  4. Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jisha, N V; Krishnakumar, D N; Surya Prakash, G; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2012-03-01

    Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify (41)Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  6. Application of algae-biosensor for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Umar, Lazuardi; Alexander, Frank A; Wiest, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Environmental problems including water and air pollution, over fertilization, insufficient wastewater treatment and even ecological disaster are receiving greater attention in the technical and scientific area. In this paper, a method for water quality monitoring using living green algae (Chlorella Kessleri) with the help of the intelligent mobile lab (IMOLA) is presented. This measurement used two IMOLA systems for measurement and reference simultaneously to verify changes due to pollution inside the measurement system. The IMOLA includes light emitting diodes to stimulate photosynthesis of the living algae immobilized on a biochip containing a dissolved oxygen microsensor. A fluid system is used to transport algae culture medium in a stop and go mode; 600s ON, 300s OFF, while the oxygen concentration of the water probe is measured. When the pump stops, the increase in dissolved oxygen concentration due to photosynthesis is detected. In case of a pollutant being transported toward the algae, this can be detected by monitoring the photosynthetic activity. Monitoring pollution is shown by adding emulsion of 0,5mL of Indonesian crude palm oil and 10mL algae medium to the water probe in the biosensor. PMID:26737928

  7. Monitoring temporal and spatial trends of legacy and emerging contaminants in marine environment: results from the environmental specimen bank (es-BANK) of Ehime University, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shinsuke; Ramu, Karri

    2012-07-01

    The Environmental Specimen Bank (es-BANK) for Global Monitoring at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Japan has more than four decades of practical experience in specimen banking. Over the years, es-BANK has archived specimens representing a wide range of environmental matrices, i.e. fishes, reptiles, birds, aquatic mammals, terrestrial mammals, human, soils, and sediments. The samples have been collected as part of the various monitoring programs conducted worldwide. The current review is a summary of selected studies conducted at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies, on temporal and spatial trends of legacy and emerging contaminants in the marine environment. One of the major conclusions drawn from the studies is that environmental problems are no more regional issues and, thus, environmental specimen banking should not be limited to national boundaries, but should have a global outlook.

  8. 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident: summary of regional radioactive deposition monitoring results.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Katsumi

    2012-09-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting Tsunami on March 11, 2011, serious accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant has been occurred. Huge amounts of radionuclides were released in atmosphere and ocean. Japanese prefectural governments have carried out environmental radioactivity monitoring; external dose rate, radioactivity measurements in environmental samples and others. Since March 18, 2011, daily and monthly deposition samples were collected in 45 stations covering Japanese Islands and radionuclides in the deposition samples were determined. We summarize radioactive deposition data reported by Japanese Government and study the depositional behaviors of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides. The results revealed that Fukushima-derived radioactive cloud dominantly affected in the central and eastern part of Honshu-Island, although it affected all of Japanese land area and also western North Pacific. The temporal change of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs revealed that the apparent atmospheric residence time of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in sites within 300 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPPis about 10 d.

  9. Summary of work completed under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification research program (EDQP)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Bramwell, D.L.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the main projects undertaken under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification Research Program (EDQP) sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under FIN A6322. Lasting from fiscal year 1983 to 1987, the program dealt with environmental and dynamic (including seismic) equipment qualification issues for mechanical and electromechanical components and systems used in nuclear power plants. The research results have since been used by both the NRC and industry. The program included seven major research projects that addressed the following issues: (a) containment purge and vent valves performing under design basis loss of coolant accident loads, (b) containment piping penetrations and isolation valves performing under seismic loadings and design basis and severe accident containment wall displacements, (c) shaft seals for primary coolant pumps performing under station blackout conditions, (d) electrical cabinet internals responding to in-structure generated motion (rattling), and (e) in situ piping and valves responding to seismic loadings. Another project investigating whether certain containment isolation valves will close under design basis conditions was also started under this program. This report includes eight main section, each of which provides a brief description of one of the projects, a summary of the findings, and an overview of the application of the results. A bibliography lists the journal articles, papers, and reports that document the research.

  10. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns.

  11. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns. PMID:26414739

  12. Development of a millimeter-wave sensor for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    A millimeter-wave (mm-wave) sensor in the frequency range of 225-315 GHz is being developed for continuous emission monitoring of airborne effluents from industrial sites for environmental compliance monitoring and process control. Detection of chemical species is based on measuring the molecular rotational energy transitions at mm-wave frequencies. The mm-wave technique offers better transmission properties compared to optics in harsh industrial environments with smoke, dust, aerosols, and steam, as well as in adverse atmospheric conditions. The laboratory measurements indicate that polar molecules can be measured with a sensitivity of tens of parts-per-million-meter using this technology. Proof of principle of the open-path system was tested by releasing and detecting innocuous chemicals in the open air. It uses a monostatic radar configuration with transmitter and receiver on one side and a comer cube on tire other side of the plume to be measured. A wide-band swept frequency mm-wave signal is transmitted through the plume and return signal from the comer cube is detected by a hot-electron-bolometer. Absorption spectra of plume gases are measured by comparing the return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. Using signal processing based on deconvolution, high specificity of detection has been shown for resolving individual chemicals from a mixture. This technology is applicable for real-time measurement of a suite of airborne gases/vapors emitted from vents and stacks of process industries. A prototype sensor is being developed for wide-area monitoring of industrial sites and in-place monitoring of stack gases.

  13. 2009 DOE-EM LONG-TERM MONITORING TECHNICAL FORUM SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2009-09-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has the responsibility for cleaning up 60 sites in 22 states that were associated with the legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and other research and development activities. These sites are unique and many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition the associated wastes have yet to be developed or would require significant re-engineering to be adapted for future EM cleanup efforts. In 2008, the DOE-EM Engineering and Technology Program (EM-22) released the Engineering and Technology Roadmap in response to Congressional direction and the need to focus on longer term activities required for the completion of the aforementioned cleanup program. One of the strategic initiatives included in the Roadmap was to enhance long term performance monitoring as defined by 'Develop and deploy cost effective long-term strategies and technologies to monitor closure sites (including soil, groundwater, and surface water) with multiple contaminants (organics, metals and radionuclides) to verify integrated long-term cleanup performance'. To support this long-term monitoring (LTM) strategic initiative, EM 22 and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) organized and held an interactive symposia, known as the 2009 DOE-EM Long-Term Monitoring Technical Forum, to define and prioritize LTM improvement strategies and products that could be realized within a 3 to 5 year investment time frame. This near-term focus on fundamental research would then be used as a foundation for development of applied programs to improve the closure and long-term performance of EM's legacy waste sites. The Technical Forum was held in Atlanta, GA on February 11-12, 2009, and attended by 57 professionals with a focus on identifying those areas of opportunity that would most effectively advance the transition of the current practices to a more effective strategy for the LTM paradigm. The meeting format

  14. ZigBee wireless sensor network for environmental monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Shun-qi; Ji, Lei; Wu, Hong

    2009-11-01

    ZigBee is a new close-up, low-complexity, low-power, low data rate, low-cost wireless networking technology, mainly used for short distance wireless transmission. It is based on IEEE802.15.4 standards, thousands of tiny sensors form a network through mutual coordination to communications. This paper introduces the ZigBee wireless sensor networks in environmental monitoring applications. The hardware design, including microprocessor, data acquisition, antenna and peripheral circuits of the chips, and through software design composed ZigBee mesh network that can make data acquisition and communication. This network has low power consumption, low cost, the effective area is big, and information transfers reliable merits. And have confirmed the network's communication applicability by the Serial Com Assistant, also testified the network have very good pragmatism by the NS2 emulation the network's operation.

  15. Frequency-agile CO2 DIAL for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lewis W.; Fletcher, Leland; Crittenden, Max; Carlisle, Clinton B.; Gotoff, Steve W.; Reyes, Felix; D'Amico, Francis

    1994-06-01

    SRI International has designed and developed a fully automated frequency-agile CO2 DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system. The system sensor head consists of a single, frequency- agile, CO2, TEA laser; a 10-inch receiver telescope, a liquid-nitrogen-cooled HgCdTe detector; and a transmit energy monitor. The sensor head and its auxiliary equipment (including the data acquisition and processing system, laser power supply, and water cooler) are mounted in a Grumman-Olson 11-ft step van. The self-contained, mobile system can be used to detect and quantify many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at parts per million sensitivities over open-path ranges to 5 km. Characterization and demonstration of the system is ongoing. However, data collected on benzene, toluene, xylene, methanol, ethyl acetate, acetic anhydride, and other VOCs will be described herein. The system could be used by industry and government agencies in stand-off monitoring to map VOC emission sources and transport patterns into surrounding communities. A single mobile system could be used for several locations to verify compliance with environmental regulations such as the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

  16. Recent trends in nanomaterials applications in environmental monitoring and remediation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sumistha; Sen, Biswarup; Debnath, Nitai

    2015-12-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the greatest problems that the world is facing today, and it is increasing with every passing year and causing grave and irreparable damage to the earth. Nanomaterials, because of their novel physical and chemical characteristics, have great promise to combat environment pollution. Nanotechnology is being used to devise pollution sensor. A variety of materials in their nano form like iron, titanium dioxide, silica, zinc oxide, carbon nanotube, dendrimers, polymers, etc. are increasingly being used to make the air clean, to purify water, and to decontaminate soil. Nanotechnology is also being used to make renewable energy cheaper and more efficient. The use of nanotechnology in agriculture sector will reduce the indiscriminate use of agrochemicals and thus will reduce the load of chemical pollutant. While remediating environment pollution with nanomaterials, it should also be monitored that these materials do not contribute further degradation of the environment. This review will focus broadly on the applications of nanotechnology in the sustainable development with particular emphasis on renewable energy, air-, water-, and soil-remediation. Besides, the review highlights the recent developments in various types of nanomaterials and nanodevices oriented toward pollution monitoring and remediation.

  17. Evaluation of a hydrogen chloride detector for environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Moyer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes a hydrogen chloride detector designed to monitor concentrations of hydrogen chloride gas in the ambient environment. The detector was developed for NASA for use in launch vehicle effluent monitoring. The detector operates on chemiluminescence principles with a lower detection limit of less than 5 x 10 to the -3rd ppm (by volume). The hydrogen chloride in the air sample reacts with a bromide-bromate coating in the inlet tube of the instrument producing bromine. Bromine is then quantitated by chemiluminescent oxidation of luminol. The visible light generated in the chemiluminescent reaction is proportional to the hydrogen chloride concentration of the sampled airstream. The detector is most suited to laboratory or field studies where hydrogen chloride is the dominant pollutant, as compared to the interfering species. Interferences include strong acids, acid-forming gases, and halogen gases. Of the interferences investigated the most serious in these groups are hydrochloric and sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and chlorine, respectively. The detector has been in use since 1974 and has been found to be highly portable, rugged, and stable under extreme environmental conditions.

  18. Linked Micromaps: Statistical Summaries of Monitoring Data in a Spatial Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    Communicating summaries of spatial data to decision makers and the public are challenging. Linked micromap plots (LMplots) provide a way to simultaneously summarize and display both statistical and geographic distributions of data from surveys such as the National Aquatic Resour...

  19. Advanced Environmental Monitoring and Control Program: Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory

    1996-01-01

    Human missions in space, from short-duration shuttle missions lasting no more than several days to the medium-to-long-duration missions planned for the International Space Station, face a number of hazards that must be understood and mitigated for the mission to be carried out safely. Among these hazards are those posed by the internal environment of the spacecraft itself; through outgassing of toxic vapors from plastics and other items, failures or off-nominal operations of spacecraft environmental control systems, accidental exposure to hazardous compounds used in experiments: all present potential hazards that while small, may accumulate and pose a danger to crew health. The first step toward mitigating the dangers of these hazards is understanding the internal environment of the spacecraft and the compounds contained within it. Future spacecraft will have integrated networks of redundant sensors which will not only inform the crew of hazards, but will pinpoint the problem location and, through analysis by intelligent systems, recommend and even implement a course of action to stop the problem. This strategic plan details strategies to determine NASA's requirements for environmental monitoring and control systems for future spacecraft, and goals and objectives for a program to answer these needs.

  20. Decision support system for monitoring environmental-human interactions.

    PubMed

    Delavari-Edalat, Farideh; Abdi, M Reza

    2009-06-01

    The specific aim of this study is to investigate popular attitudes toward trees. The paper is involved the understanding of biophilia tendencies with respect to people's views in an urban area. Biophilia is considered as the idea insisting on the dependency of human identity on his relationship with nature. The biophilia fundamental tendencies were explored to establish a biological framework for valuing and affiliating the natural world. Accordingly, the nine tendencies i.e. utilitarian, naturalistic, ecologistic-scientific, aesthetic, symbolic, humanistic, moralistic, dominionistic, and negativistic were investigate to find out how people relate to the nature especially trees. The investigation was based on a quantitative interview which was applied to the public population in the Liverpool urban parks. Data collected from the designed questionnaire was followed by analysis of the data to identify people's attitudes towards trees. The results indicated how important the physical appeal and beauty of trees was for the people and also showed the people's emotional attachments to trees. Furthermore, a decision support model was proposed to evaluate human instincts and preferences in relation to their surrounding areas using the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP). The proposed model composed the environmental factors and the biophilia tendencies as the criteria of evaluating environmental-human interactions. A case study was then conducted in Liverpool parks to examine theses interactions. The data gathered was used as the input to the AHP model for the attribute analysis. The AHP model would enable environment managers to compose the relevant information via a link between human feelings about urban trees, and environmental factors for monitoring purposes and performance analysis.

  1. Environmental factors influence lesser scaup migration chronology and population monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finger, Taylor A.; Afton, Alan D.; Schummer, Michael L.; Petrie, Scott A.; Badzinski, Shannon S.; Johnson, Michael A.; Szymanski, Michael L.; Jacobs, Kevin J.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Mitchell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Identifying environmental metrics specific to lesser scaup (Aythya affinis; scaup) spring migration chronology may help inform development of conservation, management and population monitoring. Our objective was to determine how environmental conditions influence spring migration of lesser scaup to assess the effectiveness of the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey in accurately estimating scaup populations. We first compared peak timing of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and scaup migration from weekly ground surveys in North Dakota, USA because the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey is designed to capture annual mallard migration. As predicted, we detected that peak timing of scaup and mallard migrations differed in 25 of 36 years investigated (1980–2010). We marked scaup with satellite transmitters (n = 78; 7,403 locations) at Long Point, Lake Erie, Ontario, Canada; Pool 19 of the Mississippi River, Iowa and Illinois, USA; and Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, Pennsylvania, USA. We tested the assumption that our marked scaup were representative of the continental population using the traditional survey area by comparing timing of migration of marked birds and scaup counted in the North Dakota Game and Fish Department survey. We detected a strong positive correlation between marked scaup and the survey data, which indicated that marked scaup were representative of the population. We subsequently used our validated sample of marked scaup to investigate the effects of annual variation in temperature, precipitation, and ice cover on spring migration chronology in the traditional and eastern survey areas of the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey, 2005–2010. We evaluated competing environmental models to explain variation in timing and rate of scaup migration at large-scale and local levels. Spring migration of scaup occurred earlier and faster during springs with warmer temperatures and greater precipitation, variables known

  2. Monitoring environmental state of Alaskan forests with AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Way, Jobea; Rignot, Eric; Williams, Cindy; Viereck, Les; Adams, Phylis

    1992-01-01

    During March 1988 and May 1991, the JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar, AIRSAR, collected sets of multi-temporal imagery of the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska. These data sets consist of series of multi-polarized images collected at P-, L-, and C-bands each over a period of a few days. The AIRSAR campaigns were complemented with extensive ground measurements that included observations of both static canopy characteristics such as forest architecture as well as properties that vary on short term time scales such as canopy dielectric conditions. Observations exist for several stands of deciduous and coniferous species including white spruce (Picea glauca), black spruce (Picea mariana), and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera). Although the duration of each campaign was fairly short, significant changes in environmental conditions caused notable variations in the physiological state of the canopies. During the 1988 campaign, environmental conditions ranged from unseasonably warm to more normal subfreezing temperatures. This permitted AIRSAR observations of frozen and thawed canopy states. During May 1991, ice jams that occurred along the river caused many stands to flood while the subsequent clearing of the river then allowed the waters to recede, leaving a snow covered ground surface. This allowed observations of several stands during both flooded and nonflooded conditions. Furthermore, the local weather varied from clear sunny days to heavy overcast days with some occurrence of rain. Measurements of leaf water potential indicated that this caused significant variations in canopy water status, allowing SAR observations of water stressed and unstressed trees. Mean backscatter from several stands is examined for the various canopy physiological states. The changes in canopy backscatter that occur as a function of environmental and physiological state are analyzed. Preliminary results of a backscatter signature modeling analysis are presented

  3. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 and 2000 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    2001-03-07

    A maximum of forty wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Quality Assessment Plan. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride) and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituent exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during the calendar year 2000. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, benzene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), gross alpha, lead (total recoverable) mercury (total recoverable), thallium (total recoverable), and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate at this unit was approximately 122.64 ft/year during first quarter 2000 and 132.28 ft/year during fourth quarter 2000.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT ANR PIPELINE COMPANY PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of a gaseous-emissions monitoring system for large, natural-gas-fired internal combustion engines. The device tested is the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR ...

  5. Use of artificial intelligence methods for systems of environmental monitoring in NPP region

    SciTech Connect

    Barbashev, S.V.; Verkhovetsky, N.A.; Maslov, O.V.

    1993-12-31

    Conception of complex ecological environmental monitoring in NPP region, including control function , is presented. The outlook for the design of an expert system to be utilized in the monitoring is described.

  6. THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM FOR THE GREAT RIVER ECOSYSTEM (EMAP-GRE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring and assessment tools, including sample designs, analytical procedures, field protocols, metrics and reference conditions are not well developed for Great River Ecosystems such as the Missouri, Mississippi, and Ohio Rivers. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Pr...

  7. Environmental Monitoring Networks Optimization Using Advanced Active Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, Mikhail; Volpi, Michele; Copa, Loris

    2010-05-01

    The problem of environmental monitoring networks optimization (MNO) belongs to one of the basic and fundamental tasks in spatio-temporal data collection, analysis, and modeling. There are several approaches to this problem, which can be considered as a design or redesign of monitoring network by applying some optimization criteria. The most developed and widespread methods are based on geostatistics (family of kriging models, conditional stochastic simulations). In geostatistics the variance is mainly used as an optimization criterion which has some advantages and drawbacks. In the present research we study an application of advanced techniques following from the statistical learning theory (SLT) - support vector machines (SVM) and the optimization of monitoring networks when dealing with a classification problem (data are discrete values/classes: hydrogeological units, soil types, pollution decision levels, etc.) is considered. SVM is a universal nonlinear modeling tool for classification problems in high dimensional spaces. The SVM solution is maximizing the decision boundary between classes and has a good generalization property for noisy data. The sparse solution of SVM is based on support vectors - data which contribute to the solution with nonzero weights. Fundamentally the MNO for classification problems can be considered as a task of selecting new measurement points which increase the quality of spatial classification and reduce the testing error (error on new independent measurements). In SLT this is a typical problem of active learning - a selection of the new unlabelled points which efficiently reduce the testing error. A classical approach (margin sampling) to active learning is to sample the points closest to the classification boundary. This solution is suboptimal when points (or generally the dataset) are redundant for the same class. In the present research we propose and study two new advanced methods of active learning adapted to the solution of

  8. Community Environmental Monitoring Program: a case study of public education and involvement in radiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shafer, David S; Hartwell, William T

    2011-11-01

    The public's trust in the source of information about radiation is a key element of its acceptance. The public tends to trust two groups where risk communication is concerned: (1) scientists with expertise who are viewed as acting independently; and (2) friends, family, and other close associates who are viewed as sharing the same interests and concern, even if they have less knowledge of the subject. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) bridges both of these groups by having members of the public help operate and communicate results of a network of 29 radiation monitoring stations around the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal continental location where the United States conducted nuclear tests. The CEMP stations, spread across a 160,000 km area, help provide evidence to the public that no releases of radiation of health concern are occurring from the NNSS to public receptors. The stations provide continuous measurements of gamma radiation and collect air particulate samples that are analyzed for radioactivity and meteorological measurements that aid in interpreting variations in background radiation. A public website (http://cemp.dri.edu) provides data for most instruments. Twenty-three of the 29 stations upload their data in near-real time to a public website as well as to digital readout displays at the stations, both of which are key elements in the CEMP's transparency. The remaining six stations upload their data hourly. Public stakeholders who are direct participants provide the most significant element of the CEMP. The "Community Environmental Monitors," who are residents of towns where the stations are located, are part of the chain-of-custody for the air samples, perform minor station maintenance, and most significantly in terms of trust, serve as lay experts on issues concerning the NNSS and on ionizing radiation and nuclear technologies in general. The CEMP meets nearly all

  9. Community Environmental Monitoring Program: a case study of public education and involvement in radiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shafer, David S; Hartwell, William T

    2011-11-01

    The public's trust in the source of information about radiation is a key element of its acceptance. The public tends to trust two groups where risk communication is concerned: (1) scientists with expertise who are viewed as acting independently; and (2) friends, family, and other close associates who are viewed as sharing the same interests and concern, even if they have less knowledge of the subject. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) bridges both of these groups by having members of the public help operate and communicate results of a network of 29 radiation monitoring stations around the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal continental location where the United States conducted nuclear tests. The CEMP stations, spread across a 160,000 km area, help provide evidence to the public that no releases of radiation of health concern are occurring from the NNSS to public receptors. The stations provide continuous measurements of gamma radiation and collect air particulate samples that are analyzed for radioactivity and meteorological measurements that aid in interpreting variations in background radiation. A public website (http://cemp.dri.edu) provides data for most instruments. Twenty-three of the 29 stations upload their data in near-real time to a public website as well as to digital readout displays at the stations, both of which are key elements in the CEMP's transparency. The remaining six stations upload their data hourly. Public stakeholders who are direct participants provide the most significant element of the CEMP. The "Community Environmental Monitors," who are residents of towns where the stations are located, are part of the chain-of-custody for the air samples, perform minor station maintenance, and most significantly in terms of trust, serve as lay experts on issues concerning the NNSS and on ionizing radiation and nuclear technologies in general. The CEMP meets nearly all

  10. A multimedia approach to environmental monitoring in a northern environment: The Slave River environmental quality monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Peddle, J.; Stephens, G.; Robertson, K.

    1995-12-31

    The Slave River Environmental Quality Monitoring Program is a multimedia sampling program that was established in 1990 to characterize baseline conditions of the aquatic ecosystem in the Slave River at Fort Smith, NWT, Canada. The comprehensive nature of the sampling program made it the first of its kind in the Northwest Territories. The Slave River watershed drains an area of approximately 600,000 km{sup 2}, including the Peace and Athabasca Rivers, with the territorial portion being the furthest downstream. Increase in developments in the upstream portion of the basin prompted concerns by northern residents. In order to answer the questions of ``Can one drink the water?`` and ``Can one eat the fish?``, the program had to take an ecosystem approach and analyze a variety of media including water, suspended sediment and fish. In addition, benthic surveys, stable isotope work and delta coring were carried out in conjunction with this study. Samples were collected under both winter ({minus}40 C, under ice) and summer conditions. Samples were analyzed for organic and inorganic parameters including mixed function oxygenases (MFOs), dioxins, furans and other organochlorines. There was an emphasis on those contaminants likely to result from anthropogenic developments upstream, namely pulp and paper mills, agricultural activities and hydrocarbon developments. A comprehensive and extensive database was created which can be used to address concerns, aid in transboundary negotiations and monitor future changes in the quality of the aquatic environment.

  11. Comparison of environmental radiation monitoring programs in China and the United States.

    PubMed

    Wolbarst, Anthony B; Griggs, John; Lee, H N; Ren, Tianshan; Hudson, Tonya; White, Jacolyn D; Zhu, Changshou

    2008-06-01

    The monitoring of environmental radiation has been carried out across the United States by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's RadNet (formerly the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System, ERAMS) and the Global Network Program (GNP) of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), and in the People's Republic of China (PRC) by their National Radioactivity Contamination Monitoring System (NRCMS). It is expected that an awareness of the similarities and differences in the structure and operation of these programs will prove helpful to both countries and perhaps others as they continue to develop their monitoring capabilities.

  12. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, K.S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1983-03-14

    Environmental monitoring efforts spanned air, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, and radiation doses. Monitoring data collection, analysis, and evaluation are presented for air, soils, sewage, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, milk, and general environmental radioactivity. Non-radioactive monitoring addresses beryllium, chemical effluents in sewage, noise pollution, and storm runoff and liquid discharge site pollutants. Quality assurance efforts are addressed. Five appendices present tabulated data; environmental activity concentration; dose calculation method; discharge limits to sanitary sewer systems of Livermore; and sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring. (PSB)

  13. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-03-27

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I think the amount of

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-29

    During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Robert C.

    2011-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 Update program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  17. Industrial effluent quality, pollution monitoring and environmental management.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S; Hammad, Waleed S

    2008-12-01

    Royal Commission Environmental Control Department (RC-ECD) at Yanbu industrial city in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has established a well-defined monitoring program to control the pollution from industrial effluents. The quality of effluent from each facility is monitored round the clock. Different strategic measures have been taken by the RC-ECD to implement the zero discharge policy of RC. Industries are required to pre-treat the effluent to conform pretreatment standards before discharging to central biological treatment plant. Industries are not allowed to discharge any treated or untreated effluent in open channels. After treatment, reclaimed water must have to comply with direct discharge standards before discharge to the sea. Data of industrial wastewater collected from five major industries and central industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWTP) is summarized in this report. During 5-year period, 3,705 samples were collected and analyzed for 43,436 parameters. There were 1,377 violations from pretreatment standards from all the industries. Overall violation percentage was 3.17%. Maximum violations were recorded from one of the petrochemical plants. The results show no significant pollution due to heavy metals. Almost all heavy metals were within RC pretreatment standards. High COD and TOC indicates that major pollution was due to hydrocarbons. Typical compounds identified by GC-MS were branched alkanes, branched alkenes, aliphatic ketones, substituted thiophenes, substituted phenols, aromatics and aromatic alcohols. Quality of treated water was also in compliance with RC direct discharge standards. In order to achieve the zero discharge goal, further studies and measures are in progress.

  18. In summary: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Roush, D.; Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.

    1996-08-01

    Every human is exposed to natural radiation. This exposure comes from many sources, including cosmic radiation from outer space, naturally-occurring radon, and radioactivity from substances in our bodies. In addition to natural sources of radiation, humans can also be exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Examples of man-made sources include nuclear medicine, X-rays, nuclear weapons testing, and accidents at nuclear power plants. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research facility that deals, in part, with studying nuclear reactors and storing radioactive materials. Careful handling and rigorous procedures do not completely eliminate the risk of releasing radioactivity. So, there is a remote possibility for a member of the public near the INEL to be exposed to radioactivity from the INEL. Extensive monitoring of the environment takes place on and around the INEL. These programs search for radionuclides and other contaminants. The results of these programs are presented each year in a site environmental report. This document summarizes the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995.

  19. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Eighty-five wells provided samples from the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control in December 1990. Historically, as well as currently, tritium, nitrate, gross alpha, total alpha-emitting radium, cadmium, and lead are the primary constituents observed above final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater at the FASB. Nonvolatile beta has consistently exceeded its drinking water screening level. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also have exceeded the final PDWS in the groundwater at the FASB. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents, primarily tritium. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/ activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units for first and fourth quarters 1992. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  20. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, National Summary: Nevada-South Carolina. Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report is one in a four-volume National Summary which presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials for each of the states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Each individual state program summary is followed by a depiction of the current and projected (1976-1981) workforce figures for the…