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Sample records for environmental restoration quality

  1. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  2. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a ``entral Environmental Restoration Division`` to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization`s objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  3. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program requirements for implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C are identified in the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan, (QPP). Management systems necessary to implement the ER QPP consist of the necessary standards and procedures required to be developed to adequately control ER processes. To the extent possible, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., standards and procedures will be utilized at the ER Program level, and requirements will not be repeated. The quality management systems identified for enhancement or development are identified in the section on Procedure Development Strategy and directly relate to unique ER Program activities. Procedures and standards that currently exist in the ER Program will be validated for compliance with ER QPP requirements.

  4. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program requirements for implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C are identified in the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan, (QPP). Management systems necessary to implement the ER QPP consist of the necessary standards and procedures required to be developed to adequately control ER processes. To the extent possible, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., standards and procedures will be utilized at the ER Program level, and requirements will not be repeated. The quality management systems identified for enhancement or development are identified in the section on Procedure Development Strategy and directly relate to unique ER Program activities. Procedures and standards that currently exist in the ER Program will be validated for compliance with ER QPP requirements.

  5. Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Quality Assurance Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, R.F.

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Quality Assurance Requirements Document defines the quality assurance program requirements for the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Program at the Hanford Site. This paper describes the objectives outlined in DOE/RL 90-28. The Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Program implements significant commitments made by the US Department of Energy in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order entered into with the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Environmental Protection Agency. 18 refs.

  6. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-30

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has initiated the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) in an effort to manage, control and remediate existing hazardous, toxic and radioactive wastes generated at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This ERP Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) is responsive to the PORTS ESH Division QAPP and the ES Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) QAPP. This QAPP establishes the policies, requirements and responsibilities by which an appropriate level of QA shall be implemented within the PORTS-ERP. All PORTS-ERP activities shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements of this document and/or of a project level document which is derivative of this document.

  7. Assessing data quality for a federal environmental restoration project: Rationalizing the requirements of multiple clients

    SciTech Connect

    Kiszka, V.R.; Carlsen, T.M.

    1994-07-01

    Most environmental restoration projects at federal facilities face the difficult task of melding the quality assurance (QA) requirements of multiple clients, as well as dealing with historical data that are often of unknown quality. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have successfully integrated the requirements of our multiple clients by carefully developing a QA program that efficiently meets our clients` needs. The Site 300 Experimental Test Site is operated by LLNL in support of its national defense program. The responsibility for conducting environmental contaminant investigations and restoration at Site 300 is vested in the Site 300 Environmental Restoration Project (Site 300 ERP) of LLNL`s Environmental Restoration Division. LLNL Site 300 ERP must comply with the QA requirements of several clients, which include: the LLNL Environmental Protection Department, the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region IX (EPA), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board -- Central Valley Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control. This comprehensive QA program was used to determine the acceptability of historical data. The Site 300 ERP began soil and ground water investigations in 1982. However, we did not begin receiving analytical quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) data until 1989; therefore, the pre-1989 data that were collected are of unknown quality. The US EPA QAMS-005/80 defines data quality as the totality of features and characteristics of data that bears on its ability to satisfy a given purpose. In the current context, the characteristics of major importance are accuracy, precision, completeness, representativeness, and comparability. Using our established QA program, we determined the quality of this historical data based on its comparability to the post-1989 data. By accepting this historical data, we were able to save a considerable amount of money in recharacterization costs.

  8. Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements.

  9. Environmental Restoration Program quality system requirements for the Hanford Site. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, R.F.

    1993-11-01

    This document defines the quality system requirements for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Program at the Hanford Site. The Quality System Requirements (OSR) for the Hanford Site integrates quality assurance requirements from the US Department of Energy Orders, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), and applicable industry standards into a single source document for the development of quality systems applicable to the Environmental Restoration Program activities. This document, based on fifteen criteria and divided intro three parts, provides user organizations with the flexibility to incorporate only those criteria and parts applicable to their specific scopes of work. The requirements of this document shall be applied to activities that affect quality based on a graded approach that takes into consideration the risk inherent in, as well as the importance of, specific items, services, and activities in terms of meeting ER Program objectives and customer expectations. The individual quality systems developed in accordance with this document are intended to provide an integrated management control system that assures the conduct of ER Program activities in a manner that protects human health and the environment.

  10. Requirements for quality control of analytical data for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, J.

    1992-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was established for the investigation and remediation of inactive US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities that have been declared surplus in terms of their previous uses. The purpose of this document is to Specify ER requirements for quality control (QC) of analytical data. Activities throughout all phases of the investigation may affect the quality of the final data product, thus are subject to control specifications. Laboratory control is emphasized in this document, and field concerns will be addressed in a companion document Energy Systems, in its role of technical coordinator and at the request of DOE-OR, extends the application of these requirements to all participants in ER activities. Because every instance and concern may not be addressed in this document, participants are encouraged to discuss any questions with the ER Quality Assurance (QA) Office, the Analytical Environmental Support Group (AESG), or the Analytical Project Office (APO).

  11. Environmental restoration at the KCP: Quality science with a view toward the future

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Korte, N.

    1992-07-01

    The Kansas City Plan-E (KCP), built in 1942, is currently operated by Allied-Signal for the Department of Energy (DOE). The KCP manufactures non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons. Throughout the production history of the KCP, waste material has been generated and hazardous spills have occurred. In 1983, the DOE and Allied-Signal began a concerted effort to clean-up all hazardous waste sites at the KCP. This paper briefly discusses the history of the environmental restoration effort at the KCP before and after a RCRA order on Consent Agreement was signed with the Environmental Protection Agency, the successes of the program, problems encountered, and a vision for the future of environmental restoration at the KCP.

  12. Advanced, Environmentally Friendly Hydroelectric Turbines for the Restoration of Fish and Water Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshier, P.A.; Cada, G.F.; Flynn, J.V.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sale, M.J.; Sommers, G.L.

    1999-09-06

    Hydroelectric power contributes about 10 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States, and nearly 20 percent of the world�s electrical energy. The contribution of hydroelectric generation has declined in recent years, often as a consequence of environmental concerns centering around (1) restriction of upstream and downstream fish passage by the dam, and (2) alteration of water quality and river flows by the impoundment. The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy is developing turbine technology which would help to maximize global hydropower resources while minimizing adverse environmental effects. Major technical goals for the Program are (1) the reduction of mortality among turbine-passed fish to 2 percent or less, compared to current levels ranging up to 30 percent or greater; and (2) development of aerating turbines that would ensure that water discharged from reservoirs has a dissolved oxygen concentration of at least 6 mg/L. These advanced, �environmentally friendly� turbines would be suitable both for new hydropower installations and for retrofitting at existing dams. Several new turbine designs that have been he AHTS program are described.

  13. Basic research for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Water quality monitoring report for the White Oak Creek Embayment. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, C.J.; Wefer, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    Water quality monitoring activities that focused on the detection of resuspended sediments in the Clinch River were conducted in conjunction with the White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE) time-critical Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to construct a sediment-retention structure at the mouth of White Oak Creek (WOC). Samples were collected by use of a 24-h composite sampler and through real-time water grab sampling of sediment plumes generated by the construction activities. Sampling stations were established both at the WOC mouth, immediately adjacent to the construction site, and at K-1513, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site drinking water intake approximately 9.6 km downstream in the Clinch River. Results are described.

  15. Assessing regional environmental quality by integrated use of remote sensing, GIS, and spatial multi-criteria evaluation for prioritization of environmental restoration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Rejaur; Shi, Z H; Chongfa, Cai

    2014-11-01

    This study was an attempt to analyse the regional environmental quality with the application of remote sensing, geographical information system, and spatial multiple criteria decision analysis and, to project a quantitative method applicable to identify the status of the regional environment of the study area. Using spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) approach with expert knowledge in this study, an integrated regional environmental quality index (REQI) was computed and classified into five levels of regional environment quality viz. worse, poor, moderate, good, and very good. During the process, a set of spatial criteria were selected (here, 15 criterions) together with the degree of importance of criteria in sustainability of the regional environment. Integrated remote sensing and GIS technique and models were applied to generate the necessary factors (criterions) maps for the SMCE approach. The ranking, along with expected value method, was used to standardize the factors and on the other hand, an analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was applied for calculating factor weights. The entire process was executed in the integrated land and water information system (ILWIS) software tool that supports SMCE. The analysis showed that the overall regional environmental quality of the area was at moderate level and was partly determined by elevation. Areas under worse and poor quality of environment indicated that the regional environmental status showed decline in these parts of the county. The study also revealed that the human activities, vegetation condition, soil erosion, topography, climate, and soil conditions have serious influence on the regional environment condition of the area. Considering the regional characteristics of environmental quality, priority, and practical needs for environmental restoration, the study area was further regionalized into four priority areas which may serve as base areas of decision making for the recovery, rebuilding, and

  16. Integrating TQM into environmental restoration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    Responsible and cost-effective waste management and environmental restoration are best achieved when the principles and procedures of Total Quality Management are made an integral part of the process. By describing three case histories, we explore and explain techniques for using TQM in environmental projects. Key aspects considered include: quality measurement systems; establishing and maintaining standard operating procedures; management and technical peer review; the use of Quality Improvement Teams; Roadmapping (a new procedure that the US Department of Energy is incorporating into environmental restoration programs); and the role of audit teams in document production. The three case histories covered include: The Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project on which Roadmapping and Quality Improvement Teams have led to significant changes in procedures; the EPA ARCS program on which adoption of project management Standard Operating Procedures enhanced cost and schedule control; the Jacobs Engineering TQM program that emphasizes performance measurement and management and project technical peer review.

  17. Water Awareness Through Environmental Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis-Caldwell, K.

    2012-04-01

    This poster will highlight a series of project based activities carried out at Hammond Elementary School in Laurel, Maryland, USA. All of the featured projects revolve around the school's Green School Initiative or an integral part of the science curricula. The Maryland Green School program was developed by a diverse team of educators representing the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE), Office of the Governor, the Maryland Association of Student Councils, Maryland Department of Education, Department of Natural Resources and Maryland Department of the Environment. The program is administered through the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education. The Maryland Green Schools Award Program recognizes Maryland schools that include environmental education in the curricula, model best management practices at the school and address community environmental issues. Among these numerous projects water is a common thread. Hammond Elementary School lies within the Chesapeake Bay watershed which stretches across 64,000 square miles and encompasses the entire District of Columbia. Educational components address habitats, tributaries and, the estuary system. The projects being highlighted in the poster will include: Trout to Streams Project: This 4th grade project focuses on the natural filtration system that area trout provide to the local and global waterways. As students learn about the importance of various fish to the watershed, they come to understand the effect of changes in the population of fish species due to consumption and pollution. The service learning project highlighted teaches students about water quality as they raise trout eggs and monitor their development into hatching and later stream release. Buffer Streams Tree Planting Projects: This 5th grade science service learning project allows students to investigate the water quality and conditions of local area streams. This project teaches students the positive

  18. Environmental quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The potential use of space systems to help determine the current state of air, water, and land environments was examined; the effects of man's activities on these parameters were also examined. Data are limited to pollutants introduced into the major environmental media, environmental changes manifested by such pollutants, and the effectiveness of abatement and control methods. Data also cover land quality as related to land use and public health.

  19. Minimizing waste in environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, L.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning and facility dismantelment projects are not typically known for their waste minimization and pollution prevention efforts. Typical projects are driven by schedules and milestones with little attention given to cost or waste minimization. Conventional wisdom in these projects is that the waste already exists and cannot be reduced or minimized. In fact, however, there are three significant areas where waste and cost can be reduced. Waste reduction can occur in three ways: beneficial reuse or recycling; segregation of waste types; and reducing generation of secondary waste. This paper will discuss several examples of reuse, recycle, segregation, and secondary waste reduction at ANL restoration programs.

  20. Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1972-01-01

    Data from the Third Annual Report of the United States Council of Environmental Quality are used in an editorial advocating the use of some of the money committed to cleaning air and water to create a more adequate knowledge base for action. (AL)

  1. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  2. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  3. Quality assurance plan for the design and construction of Waste Area Grouping 6 Closure at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The WAG 6 Closure Quality Assurance Plan establishes the procedures and requirements to be implemented for control of quality-related activities for the WAG 6 Closure project that are subject to the application of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) QA Program, the Environmental Restoration Division QA Program, and other quality requirements. These activities may be performed by Energy Systems organizations, a subcontractor to Energy Systems, an architect-engineer (A-E) under prime contract to the Department of Energy (DOE), and/or a construction manager under prime contract to DOE. This plan specifies the overall Energy Systems Engineering quality requirements for the project. The WAG 6 Closure QA Plan will be supplemented by subproject QA plans that will identify additional requirements pertaining to each subproject.

  4. Environmental restoration value engineering guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This document provides guidance on Value Engineering (VE). VE is an organized team effort led by a person trained in the methodology to analyze the functions of projects, systems, equipment, facilities, services, and processes for achieving the essential functions at the lowest life cycle cost while maintaining required performance, reliability, availability, quality, and safety. VE has proven to be a superior tool to improve up-front project planning, cut costs, and create a better value for each dollar spent. This document forms the basis for the Environmental Restoration VE Program, describes the VE process, and provides recommendations on when it can be most useful on ER projects.

  5. Quality assurance programs developed and implemented by the US Department of Energy`s Analytical Services Program for environmental restoration and waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lillian, D.; Bottrell, D.

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has been tasked with addressing environmental contamination and waste problems facing the Department. A key element of any environmental restoration or waste management program is environmental data. An effective and efficient sampling and analysis program is required to generate credible environmental data. The bases for DOE`s EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) are contained in the charter and commitments in Secretary of Energy Notice SEN-13-89, EM program policies and requirements, and commitments to Congress and the Office of Inspector General (IG). The Congressional commitment by DOE to develop and implement an ASP was in response to concerns raised by the Chairman of the Congressional Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Subcommittee, and the Chairman of the Congressional Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, regarding the production of analytical data. The development and implementation of an ASP also satisfies the IG`s audit report recommendations on environmental analytical support, including development and implementation of a national strategy for acquisition of quality sampling and analytical services. These recommendations were endorsed in Departmental positions, which further emphasize the importance of the ASP to EM`s programs. In September 1990, EM formed the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) in the Office of Technology Development to provide the programmatic direction needed to establish and operate an EM-wide ASP program. In January 1992, LMD issued the {open_quotes}Analytical Services Program Five-Year Plan.{close_quotes} This document described LMD`s strategy to ensure the production of timely, cost-effective, and credible environmental data. This presentation describes the overall LMD Analytical Services Program and, specifically, the various QA programs.

  6. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 18 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11. WAG 11 (White Wing Scrap Yard) is located on the west end of East Fork Ridge between White Wing Road and the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The scrap yard is approximately 25 acres in size. The wells at WAG 11 were drilled and developed between January 1990 and October 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at WAG 11 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of four basic installation methods was utilized. Detailed procedures for well construction were specified by the Engineering Division to ensure that the wells would provide water samples representative of the aquifer. To ensure conformance with the specifications, Energy Systems Construction Engineering and ERCE provided continuous oversight of field activities. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 11. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents.

  7. Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives.

  8. Environmental restoration and statistics: Issues and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1991-10-01

    Statisticians have a vital role to play in environmental restoration (ER) activities. One facet of that role is to point out where additional work is needed to develop statistical sampling plans and data analyses that meet the needs of ER. This paper is an attempt to show where statistics fits into the ER process. The statistician, as member of the ER planning team, works collaboratively with the team to develop the site characterization sampling design, so that data of the quality and quantity required by the specified data quality objectives (DQOs) are obtained. At the same time, the statistician works with the rest of the planning team to design and implement, when appropriate, the observational approach to streamline the ER process and reduce costs. The statistician will also provide the expertise needed to select or develop appropriate tools for statistical analysis that are suited for problems that are common to waste-site data. These data problems include highly heterogeneous waste forms, large variability in concentrations over space, correlated data, data that do not have a normal (Gaussian) distribution, and measurements below detection limits. Other problems include environmental transport and risk models that yield highly uncertain predictions, and the need to effectively communicate to the public highly technical information, such as sampling plans, site characterization data, statistical analysis results, and risk estimates. Even though some statistical analysis methods are available off the shelf'' for use in ER, these problems require the development of additional statistical tools, as discussed in this paper. 29 refs.

  9. Groundwater Quality Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

  10. Environmental Restoration Program Control Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, R.T.

    1992-08-13

    Environmental Restoration managers need to demonstrate that their programs are under control. Unlike most industrial programs, the public is heavily involved in Environmental Restoration activities. The public is demanding that the country prove that real progress is being made towards cleaning up the environment. A Program Control Management System can fill this need. It provides a structure for planning, work authorization, data accumulation, data analysis and change control. But it takes time to implement a control system and the public is losing its patience. This paper describes critical items essential to the quick development and implementation of a successful control system.

  11. Environmental restoration at the KCP: Quality science with a view toward the future. [Remedial action at a plant manufacturing non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. . Kansas City Div.); Korte, N. )

    1992-07-01

    The Kansas City Plan-E (KCP), built in 1942, is currently operated by Allied-Signal for the Department of Energy (DOE). The KCP manufactures non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons. Throughout the production history of the KCP, waste material has been generated and hazardous spills have occurred. In 1983, the DOE and Allied-Signal began a concerted effort to clean-up all hazardous waste sites at the KCP. This paper briefly discusses the history of the environmental restoration effort at the KCP before and after a RCRA order on Consent Agreement was signed with the Environmental Protection Agency, the successes of the program, problems encountered, and a vision for the future of environmental restoration at the KCP.

  12. Russian: United States Environmental Restoration Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Russian - United States Environmental Restoration Workshop, held in Washington, D.C., and Richland, Washington, from April 5 through 18, 1993, was the first extended collaborative information exchange between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian scientists at the site level. In addition to the Russian scientists, workshop participants included scientists and staff from DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the US Environmental Training Institute (USETI), universities, and the private sector. The first week (April 5 through 10) of the workshop took place in Washington, D.C., where the Russian and US participants were presented with a US perspective on environmental restoration and remediation issues from representatives in DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second week (April 11 through 18) occurred in Richland, Washington, where the participants were presented with site-specific environmental restoration and remediation issues related to Hanford Site cleanup. This report is a compilation of the presentations, discussions, and experiences shared during the second week of the workshop in Richland, Washington.

  13. Environmental guidance for public participation in environmental restoration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this document, entitled Guidance on Public Participation for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Activities, to summarize policy and provide guidance for public participation in environmental restoration activities at DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, facilities, and laboratories. While the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has environmental restoration responsibility for the majority of DOE sites and facilities, other DOE Project Offices have similar responsibilities at their sites and facilities. This guidance is applicable to all environment restoration activities conducted by or for DOE under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) (corrective actions only); and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). This guidance also is applicable to CERCLA remedial action programs under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 and the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, where DOE is the designated lead. The primary objectives of this guidance document are as follows: acclimate DOE staff to a changing culture that emphasizes the importance of public participation activities; provide direction on implementing these public participation activities; and, provide consistent guidance for all DOE Field Offices and facilities. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on conducting effective public participation activities for environmental restoration activities under CERCLA; RCRA corrective actions under sections 3004(u), 3004(v), and 3008(h); and NEPA public participation activities.

  14. Intergenerational equity and environmental restoration cleanup levels.

    SciTech Connect

    Hocking, E. K.; Environmental Assessment

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy environmental restoration program faces difficult decisions about the levels of cleanup to be achieved at its many contaminated sites and has acknowledged the need for considering intergenerational equity in its decision making. Intergenerational equity refers to the fairness of access to resources across generations. Environmental restoration cleanup levels can have unintended and unfair consequences for future generations access to resources. The potentially higher costs associated with using low, non-risk-based cleanup levels for remediation may divert funding from other activities that could have a greater beneficial impact on future generations. Low, non-risk-based cleanup levels could also result in more damage to the nation's resources than would occur if a higher cleanup level were used. The loss or impairment of these resources could have an inequitable effect on future generations. However, intergenerational inequity could arise if sites are not completely restored and if access to and use of natural and cultural resources are unfairly limited as a result of residual contamination. In addition to concerns about creating possible intergenerational inequities related to selected cleanup levels, the tremendous uncertainties associated with sites and their restoration can lead site planners to rely on stewardship by default. An ill-conceived stewardship program can contribute to intergenerational inequity by limiting access to resources while passing on risks to future generations and not preparing them for those risks. This paper presents a basic model and process for designing stewardship programs that can achieve equity among generations.

  15. 1998 Annual Report - Environmental Restoration Division

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.B.

    1998-12-30

    This is a 1998 annual report for Environmental Restoration. Environmental Restoration's accomplishments were significant in 1998. The division, including its support organizations, completed one year without a lost time accident. It also met 111 enforceable agreement milestones on time, with more than 80% ahead of schedule. Funds used to meet these milestones were effectively utilized and $9.63 million in regulatory scope was added. Twelve new, innovative technologies were deployed, enabling ER to achieve significant progress on major field remediation projects, including: Remediation of 25 acres of radioactive burial ground; Removal of 1,300 batteries for recycling; Removal and safe storage of a radioactive underground tank; Extraction of 115,000 pounds of solvent; and Installation of 9 new recirculation wells and a second GeoSiphon Cell for additional removal of solvent Final Records of Decision were made for 9 base unit sites. No Further Action decisions were made for 61 additional sites.

  16. Environmental Quality Index webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental Quality index, data reduction approaches to help improve statistical efficiency, summarizing information on the wider environment humans are exposed to. air, water, land, built, socio-demographic, human and environmental health

  17. Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, P.J.; Beck, J.E.; Gephart, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site`s soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site`s production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user`s needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach.

  18. Growth and Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Larry J.

    1976-01-01

    The author suggests that numbers and distribution of people should be given highest priority in dealing with environmental quality. If population problems are solved, then other environmental problems will be prevented or solved. New Mexico, contends the author, must determine the balance between growth and quality of life. (MR)

  19. Sixth Environmental Quality Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This study, measuring the nation's clean-up efforts, shows an overall decline in environmental quality in the U.S. over the past year. In 1974, called "the year of the trade off," the federal government relaxed environmental quality standards to relieve economic problems and to solve the energy crisis temporarily. (MA)

  20. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  1. Everglades restoration and water quality challenges in south Florida.

    PubMed

    Perry, William B

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides background information and a brief overview of water quality issues for the rest of the papers in this volume that are concerned with Everglades restoration. The Everglades of Florida have been diminished over 50% of their former extent. The Everglades are no longer a free-flowing wetland ecosystem, but are now subject to a complicated system of water management that is regulated primarily for flood control and consumptive use. Attempts to restore a more natural hydropattern to the remaining undeveloped Everglades are made more difficult by the natural extremes in rainfall, flat landscape, highly porous geology, and inaccessibility of the remaining natural areas. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) seeks ecosystem restoration by adding water storage capacity, reducing groundwater seepage, improving regulatory delivery and timing of water to avoid environmental damage, and where feasible, improving the quality of water to be used for Everglades restoration. Water quality issues that currently exist for south Florida include eutrophication (especially phosphorus), mercury, and contaminants from agricultural production and the urban environment. Lands once in agricultural production that will be converted back to wetlands or will become reservoirs may contribute to the water quality concerns. Stormwater runoff from managed lands that will be used for restoration purposes will also present water quality challenges. The state continues to seek water quality improvement with a number of pollution reduction programs, and CERP attempts to improve water quality without sacrificing even more natural areas; however providing water quality sufficient for use in recovery of remaining Everglades wetlands and estuaries will remain a daunting challenge.

  2. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  3. Environmental Restoration Program Document Control Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, L.M.

    1993-09-01

    This Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Document Control Plan has been developed to comply with the document control system requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), the Hanford Federal Facility and the ER Program. One of the five components, or summary subprojects, of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program is program management and support, which includes both management systems development and information and data management. Efforts within the management systems development area include the creation of a document control plan. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and established an overall document control system that governs the methods by which all WHC documents are generated, maintained, and disposed of. The ER Program performing organizations within WHC utilize the established WHC document control systems to the maximum extent possible. These systems are discussed in Chapters 3.0 and 4.0 of this plan. In addition, this plan describes the documents that require control within the ER Program and how they will be controlled.

  4. Environmental-quality technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Navy ships and facilities in nearly every coastal state, and therefore, has a longterm interest in protecting the environmental health of marine ecosystems, specifically those located in harbors and estuaries where the Navy has port facilities. The Navy's goals are to obtain environmentally safe ships and shore facilities, to investigate and remediate past hazardous waste (HW) disposal sites, and to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Water Act, and other legislative and regulatory requirements. The Environmental Quality Science and Technology program at the Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Center RDT and E Division (NRaD), Environmental Sciences Division, consists of research, development, test, and evaluation projects (RDT and E) in support of this effort. The primary focus of the RDT and E program is on environmental measurement and monitoring instrumentation, contaminant fate and effects methodologies, biotechnology, and integrated risk assessment methods. In addition, the program provides support and information to interested Navy sponsors and other agencies.

  5. Environmental restoration by Native American tribes

    SciTech Connect

    Grijalva, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    From time immemorial, Native American peoples have maintained a close physical and spiritual connection to the natural environment. Because the quality of the environment was critical to the sustenance and general well-being of tribal peoples, tribal governments developed customs and practices intended to minimize the impact of human activity on the environment. Several hundred years later, the U.S. Federal Government struggles to strike a balance between economic development and environmental protection. In many cases, the result is prescriptive statutes intended to prevent or avert substantial environmental impacts from commercial and industrial activities. Compliance-based behavioral limitations, however, are not always completely successful. This report discusses the natural resource damage assessment process which can be utilized by tribal governments fro environmental clean-up purposes.

  6. Environmental Quality Index - Overview Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better estimate of overall environmental quality is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and humanhealth. Described in this report is the effort to construct an environmental quality index representing multiple domains of the ...

  7. Environmental Quality Index - Overview Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better estimate of overall environmental quality is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and humanhealth. Described in this report is the effort to construct an environmental quality index representing multiple domains of the ...

  8. Bioassay criteria for environmental restoration workers

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) work at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site posed questions concerning when to perform bioassay monitoring of workers for potential intakes of radioactivity. Application of criteria originally developed for use inside radionuclide processing facilities to ER work resulted in overly restrictive bioassay requirements. ER work typically involves site characterization or, excavating large quantities of potentially contaminated soil, rather than working with concentrated quantities of radioactivity as in a processing facility. An improved approach, tailored to ER work, provided soil contamination concentrations above which worker bioassay would be required. Soil concentrations were derived assuming acute or chronic intakes of 2% of an Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), or a potential committed effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem, and conservative dust loading of air from the work. When planning ER work, the anticipated soil concentration and corresponding need for bioassay could be estimated from work-site historical records. Once site work commenced, soil sampling and work-place surveys could be used to determine bioassay needs. This approach substantially reduced the required number of bioassay samples with corresponding reductions in analytical costs, schedules, and more flexible work-force management. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under contract DOE-AC06-76RLO 1830.)

  9. A Study on the Management Systematize of Environmental Restoration Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoike, Toshiki; Shimazaki, Toshikazu

    In recent years, it has been wrestled an investigation and the soil, groundwater contamination measures business (as follows: the environmental restoration project) that purify it and take measures against about pollution of the soil and groundwater led by a private enterprise. Japan has accumulated rich in restoration projects on the environment. The measures requires a hefty cost, it is clear that variety risks, management techniques are required to establish an efficient environmental restoration projects. In this paper, comparative study of the generation construction and environmentalrestoration projects, said the basic features of environmental restoration projects and trouble cases residents have been there. The types of features of the project for environmental restoration CM and demonstrated the business. To organize a variety of business risks and illustrates the concept of risk management. In addition, the figure of a management system based on its severity and the relationship between each elements and the business.

  10. Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Lower Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the drilling and installation of 11 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Lower Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2. Lower WAG 2 consists of White Oak Lake and the embayment below White Oak Dam above the Clinch River. The wells in Lower WAG 2 were drilled and developed between December 1989 and September 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at Lower WAG 2 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of three basic installation methods was utilized. Detailed procedures for well construction were specified by the Engineering Division to ensure that the wells would provide water samples representative of the aquifer. To ensure conformance with the specifications, Energy Systems Construction Engineering and ERCE provided continuous oversight of field activities. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at Lower WAG 2. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents.

  11. Data Management Plan for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bryd, P.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to assist environmental restoration (ER) projects in the preparation of a data management implementation plan (DMIP). The DMIP identifies and documents an ER project's requirements and responsibilities for the management, quality assurance, use, and archival of its environmental data. It is important that a project complete its DMIP in the early planning phase to ensure that the necessary and appropriate data management systems and personnel are in place before the project begins acquiring data. All ER projects that collect or use environmental data at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and surrounding onsite and offsite areas must prepare a DMIP. Project types that often collect environmental data include surveillance and maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning, remedial design/remedial action, and remedial investigation/feasibility studies. Even if a project does little environmental data management, a DMIP is required to document this fact.

  12. The INEL approach: Environmental Restoration Program management and implementation methodology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The overall objectives of the INEL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program management approach are to facilitate meeting mission needs through the successful implementation of a sound, and effective project management philosophy. This paper outlines the steps taken to develop the ER program, and explains further the implementing tools and processes used to achieve what can be viewed as fundamental to a successful program. The various examples provided will demonstrate how the strategies for implementing these operating philosophies are actually present and at work throughout the program, in spite of budget drills and organizational changes within DOE and the implementing contractor. A few of the challenges and successes of the INEL Environmental Restoration Program have included: a) completion of all enforceable milestones to date, b) acceleration of enforceable milestones, c) managing funds to reduce uncosted obligations at year end by utilizing greater than 99% of FY-95 budget, d) an exemplary safety record, e) developing a strategy for partial Delisting of the INEL by the year 2000, f) actively dealing with Natural Resource Damages Assessment issues, g) the achievement of significant project cost reductions, h) and implementation of a partnering charter and application of front end quality principles.

  13. 75 FR 21650 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... National Park Service Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement... Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan... Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan for Biscayne National Park,...

  14. Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  15. Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, D.L.

    1990-04-30

    The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines.

  17. DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  18. Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program. Phase I, Data listing

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R. B.

    1992-09-28

    This report consists of tables and listings from the results of the Phase I data gathering activities of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The table of contents outlines the presentation of the material and has been annotated to indicate the key fields used to order the printing of each data table. Definitions of selected column headings are provided. Sample collection information is shown first and then more specific information for each matrix type is presented. The analytical results have been reviewed by independent validators and the qualifiers shown are the results of their efforts. No data that were rejected by the validation process are included in this listing. Only results of routine samples are listed; quality control sample results were excluded. All data, both detected and nondetected values, were used to calculated the summary table values. However, only Detected values are given on the analyte specific listings.

  19. CEER 2014 Dedicated Session Proposal: Restoring Water Quality along with Restoring the Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session focuses on the importance of restoring water quality as part of the larger Gulf of Mexico restoration efforts. Water quality has been identified as a significant indicator of water body condition, and Gulf waters have been impacted by increased urban development, agr...

  20. CEER 2014 Dedicated Session Proposal: Restoring Water Quality along with Restoring the Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session focuses on the importance of restoring water quality as part of the larger Gulf of Mexico restoration efforts. Water quality has been identified as a significant indicator of water body condition, and Gulf waters have been impacted by increased urban development, agr...

  1. Monitoring environmental quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, C.N.; Calder, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, billions of public and private dollars have been spent on pollution control and other costs of compliance with environmental regulations in coastal and estuarine areas of the US. Much of this investment has been made without comprehensive, high quality, and continuing information about the status and trends of environmental quality in these areas. Are general conditions getting better or worse. How do existing conditions among different estuaries and coastal areas compare. Are these conditions approaching or exceeding levels that are known to be harmful to living resources. Since 1984 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has conducted a national program that will answer these questions. Progress has been made on the cleanup of conventional pollutants (oxygen-demanding materials, particulate matter and nutrients) in the water column, and now increasing attention is being directed toward toxic substances in animals and sediments. Emphasis of the National Status and Trends Program is on the measurement of these chemicals and observations of the effects they may cause. The program is measuring existing levels of toxic chemical contaminants in bivalves (mussels and oysters), bottom-fish (flounders), and associated sediments.

  2. Examining water quality effects of riparian wetland loss and restoration scenarios in a southern ontario watershed.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanhong; Liu, Yongbo; Ou, Chunping; Gabor, Shane

    2016-06-01

    Wetland conservation has two important tasks: The first is to halt wetland loss and the second is to conduct wetland restoration. In order to facilitate these tasks, it is important to understand the environmental degradation from wetland loss and the environmental benefits from wetland restoration. The purpose of the study is to develop SWAT based wetland modelling to examine water quality effects of riparian wetland loss and restoration scenarios in the 323-km(2) Black River watershed in southern Ontario, Canada. The SWAT based wetland modelling was set up, calibrated and validated to fit into watershed conditions. The modelling was then applied to evaluate various scenarios of wetland loss from existing 7590 ha of riparian wetlands (baseline scenario) to 100% loss, and wetland restoration up to the year 1800 condition with 11,237 ha of riparian wetlands (100% restoration). The modelling was further applied to examine 100% riparian wetland loss and restoration in three subareas of the watershed to understand spatial pattern of water quality effects. Modelling results show that in comparing to baseline condition, the sediment, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) loadings increase by 251.0%, 260.5%, and 890.9% respectively for 100% riparian wetland loss, and decrease by 34.5%, 28.3%, and 37.0% respectively for 100% riparian wetland restoration. Modelling results also show that as riparian wetland loss increases, the corresponding environmental degradation worsens at accelerated rates. In contrast, as riparian wetland restoration increases, the environmental benefits improve but at decelerated rates. Particularly, the water quality effects of riparian wetland loss or restoration show considerable spatial variations. The watershed wetland modelling contributes to inform decisions on riparian wetland conservation or restoration at different rates. The results further demonstrate the importance of targeting priority areas for stopping riparian wetland loss

  3. Affective priming of perceived environmental restorativeness.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Research into the perceived restorativeness of environments tends to focus on the Kaplans' Attention Restoration Theory at the expense of the affective considerations of Ulrich's psychoevolutionary model. To better understand the role of emotion, this study used contextual text-based primers (newspaper articles) to manipulate participants' affective state (positive or negative) prior to them rating different environments using the Restorative Components Scale. Sixty-nine participants completed the web-based study, being pseudo-randomly allocated to the positive- or negative-prime condition before rating three natural and three urban environments. Natural environments were rated as more restorative than urban, with negative-priming giving higher mean ratings for all environments. This effect was overall statistically significant for two components (Being Away and Fascination), but only Fascination showed a significant interaction of affective-prime and environment, a larger effect being seen for natural environments. Results are discussed in terms of current understanding of the interrelationship between attentional and affective processes. © 2013 International Union of Psychological Science.

  4. Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

  5. Identifying predictors for quality and quantity restorative character of wilderness: using events as an analysis unit

    Treesearch

    Chad D. Pierskalla; Jason M. Siniscalchi; William E. Hammitt; David A. Smaldone; Steven J. Storck

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand whether and how trail design and resource impacts influence the quality and quantity of restorative experiences. The focus of past research has been on understanding the quality-side (what happens). What is missing is a better understanding of the quantity-side of experiences (how much happens). Gibson's environmental...

  6. The summary of national environmental restoration needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Office of Technology Development of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has directed the Savannah River Technology Center to implement an Integrated Demonstration Program at Savannah River Site to assess new environmental remediation systems and technologies and transfer them to other DOE sites and private industry for use in full-scale remediation efforts. The first phase of the Integrated Demonstration Program is coming to a successful conclusion and the Savannah River Technology Center has asked a panel of environmental experts to prioritize national, DOE, and Savannah River Site environmental problems and make programmatic recommendations for future technology research and demonstrations. This document is a summary of national and DOE environmental problems that are common to Savannah River Site and was created as a decision making tool for the expert panel. There are many diverse environmental problems, therefore the summary has been limited to environmental problems that are significant to the Savannah River Site. National environmental problems identified in the summary are soil and water contaminated with organic compounds. Specifically, groundwater contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquid hydrocarbons was found to be a significant national environmental problem. The DOE environmental problems identified in the summary are soil and water contaminated with fuel and chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds, metal compounds, and radioactive elements. Savannah River Site environmental problems identified in the summary are soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons, metal compounds, tritiated water, and other radioactive elements. Technology deficiencies that were identified in the summary were deficiencies in in situ remediation technologies, in situ characterization technologies, and in situ isolation and containment technologies.

  7. Environmental quality and infant mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between environmental conditions and human health varies by environmental media. In order to account for multiple ambient environmental conditions, we constructed an Environmental Quality Index (EQI)for use in health research. We used u.s. county level data repre...

  8. Environmental quality and infant mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between environmental conditions and human health varies by environmental media. In order to account for multiple ambient environmental conditions, we constructed an Environmental Quality Index (EQI)for use in health research. We used u.s. county level data repre...

  9. Benefits of On-Site Management of Environmental Restoration Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, Michael J. ,P.E.; Wood, Craig, R.E.M.; Kwiecinski, Daniel, P.E.; Alanis, Saul

    2003-02-27

    As Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) began assessing options under which to conduct the remediation of environmental restoration sites, it became clear that the standard routes for permanent disposal of waste contaminated with hazardous materials would be difficult. Publicly, local citizens' groups resisted the idea of large volumes of hazardous waste being transported through their communities. Regulations for the off-site disposal are complicated due to the nature of the environmental restoration waste, which included elevated tritium levels. Waste generated from environmental restoration at SNL/NM included debris and soils contaminated with a variety of constituents. Operationally, disposal of environmental restoration waste was difficult because of the everchanging types of waste generated during site remediation. As an alternative to standard hazardous waste disposal, SNL/NM proposed and received regulatory approval to construct a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU). By containing the remediation wastes on-site, SNL/NM's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program managed to eliminate transportation concerns from the public, worked with regulatory agencies to develop a safe, permanent disposal, and modified the waste disposal procedures to accommodate operational changes. SNL/NM accomplished the task and saved approximately $200 million over the life of the CAMU project, as compared to off-site disposal options.

  10. ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION TO RESTORE WATER QUALITY; AN UNREALIZED OPPORTUNITY FOR PRACTITIONERS AND RESEARCHERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restoration of ecosystems is increasingly proposed as a strategy for improving water quality. Although this approach makes intuitive sense, practitioners have received little guidance from researchers on the effectiveness of and concerns associated with particular techniques. Thi...

  11. ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION TO RESTORE WATER QUALITY; AN UNREALIZED OPPORTUNITY FOR PRACTITIONERS AND RESEARCHERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restoration of ecosystems is increasingly proposed as a strategy for improving water quality. Although this approach makes intuitive sense, practitioners have received little guidance from researchers on the effectiveness of and concerns associated with particular techniques. Thi...

  12. Quality Assurance Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, G.P.; Miller, D.E.

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Site Investigation (SI)includes the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) drainage and enbayment, and associated floodplain and subsurface environment. The ORNL main plant and the major waste storage and disposal facilities at ORNL are located in the WOC watershed and are drained by the WOC system to the Clinch River, located off-site. Environmental media are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from hydrologically upgradient WAGS. WAG 2 is important as a conduit from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. The general objectives of the WAG 2 SI Project are to conduct a multimedia monitoring and characterization program to define and monitor the input of contaminants from adjacent WAGS, monitor and gather sufficient information for processes controlling or driving contaminant fluxes to construct an appropriate conceptual model for WAG 2, and prepare for the eventual remediation of WAG 2.

  13. Environmental Restoration Program Roadmap: Strategic program plan. Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-11

    This Addendum to the Portsmouth (PORTS) Environmental Restoration (ER) Roadmap expands on the FY 1992 strategic plan for PORTS by providing human resource loading, ADS linkages to resolution activities, and technology development information. Each of these topics is presented in a separate section.

  14. Environmental Research In Practice: Restoration And Protection Of Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is tasked to protect human health and the environment. To carry out this task, the EPA makes use of technical expertise within its Office of Research and Development. Restoration and protection of water resources is one area of tec...

  15. Revegetation manual for the environmental restoration contractor

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, T.; Redente, E.F.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance and general guidelines for the revegetation of remediation waste sites and other disturbed areas on the Hanford Site. Specific revegetation plans will be developed using guidance from this manual. Locations, resources, and funding will dictate the specific revegetation design at each disturbed area. Disturbances have occurred to some of the ecological communities of the Hanford Site. Many of these disturbances are the result of operations of the Hanford Site, including Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 waste sites on small portions of the Hanford Site. There were, however, extensive disturbances to the native vegetation prior to operations of the facility. These resulted from cultivation, grazing, fire, and the introduction of exotics. Revegetation planning must take into account these early disturbances, as well as the later ones.

  16. Environmental restoration using plant-microbe bioaugmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, M.T.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Metting, F.B.; Seidler, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Land farming, for the purpose of bioremediation, refers traditionally to the spreading of contaminated soil, sediments, or other material over land; mechanically mixing it; incorporating various amendments, such as fertilizer or mulch; and sometimes inoculating with degradative microorganisms. Populations of bacteria added to soils often decline rapidly and become metabolically inactive. To efficiently degrade contaminants, microorganisms must be metabolically active. Thus, a significant obstacle to the successful use of microorganisms for environmental applications is their long-term survival and the expression of their degradative genes in situ. Rhizosphere microorganisms are known to be more metabolically active than those in bulk soil, because they obtain carbon and energy from root exudates and decaying root matter. Rhizosphere populations are also more abundant, often containing 10{sup 8} or more culturable bacteria per gram of soil, and bacterial populations on the rhizoplane can exceed 10{sup 9}/g root. Many of the critical parameters that influence the competitive ability of rhizosphere bacteria have not been identified, but microorganisms have frequently been introduced into soil (bioaugmentation) as part of routine or novel agronomic practices. However, the use of rhizosphere bacteria and their in situ stimulation by plant roots for degrading organic contaminants has received little attention. Published studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using rhizobacteria (Pseudomonas putida) for the rapid removal of chlorinated pesticides from contaminated soil, and to promote germination of radish seeds in the presence of otherwise phytotoxic levels of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and phenoxyacetic acid (PAA). The present investigation was undertaken to determine if these strains (Pseudomonas putida PPO301/pRO101 and PPO301/pRO103) could be used to bioremediate 2,4-D-amended soil via plant-microbe bioaugmentation.

  17. Environmental restoration using plant-microbe bioaugmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, M.T.; Metting, F.B.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Seidler, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Land farming, for the purpose of bioremediation, refers traditionally to the spreading of contaminated soil, sediments, or other material over land; mechanically mixing it; incorporating various amendments, such as fertilizer or mulch; and sometimes inoculating with degradative microorganisms. Populations of bacteria added to soils often decline rapidly and become metabolically inactive. To efficiently degrade contaminants, microorganisms must be metabolically active. Thus, a significant obstacle to the successful use of microorganisms for environmental applications is their long-term survival and the expression of their degradative genes in situ. Rhizosphere microorganisms are known to be more metabolically active than those in bulk soil, because they obtain carbon and energy from root exudates and decaying root matter. Rhizosphere populations are also more abundant, often containing 10[sup 8] or more culturable bacteria per gram of soil, and bacterial populations on the rhizoplane can exceed 10[sup 9]/g root. Many of the critical parameters that influence the competitive ability of rhizosphere bacteria have not been identified, but microorganisms have frequently been introduced into soil (bioaugmentation) as part of routine or novel agronomic practices. However, the use of rhizosphere bacteria and their in situ stimulation by plant roots for degrading organic contaminants has received little attention. Published studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using rhizobacteria (Pseudomonas putida) for the rapid removal of chlorinated pesticides from contaminated soil, and to promote germination of radish seeds in the presence of otherwise phytotoxic levels of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and phenoxyacetic acid (PAA). The present investigation was undertaken to determine if these strains (Pseudomonas putida PP0301/pRO101 and PP0301/pRO103) could be used to bioremediate 2,4-D-amended soil via plant-microbe bioaugmentation.

  18. Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration programs at DOE facilities. An integral part of this mission involves the safe and cost-effective environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. For over 40 years the Hanford Site supported United States national defense programs, largely through the production of nuclear materials. One legacy of historical Hanford Site operations is a significant waste inventory of radioactive and/or regulated chemical materials. Releases of these materials have, in some cases, contaminated the Hanford Site environment. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment from potential Hanford Site environmental hazards by identifying, assessing, and mitigating risks posed by contaminated sites.

  19. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) program: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This booklet introduces the reader to the mission and functions of a major new unit within the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The Secretary of Energy established EM in November 1989, implementing a central purpose of DOE's first annual Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, which had appeared three months earlier. The contents of this booklet, and their arrangement, reflect the annual update of the Five-Year Plan. The Five-Year Plan supports DOE's strategy for meeting its 30-year compliance and cleanup goal. This strategy involves: focusing DOE's activities on eliminating or reducing known or recognized potential risks to worker and public health and the environment, containing or isolating, removing, or detoxifying onsite and offsite contamination, and developing technology to achieve DOE's environmental goals.

  20. Environmental quality program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The transcript of discussions held following formal presentations during sessions 4 and 5 of the program review are presented. Topics covered include global and regional tropospheric research and water quality. Plans for continued study are indicated.

  1. Total quality environmental management: Integrating environmental and quality management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carley, J.A.; Kubala, G.; Hudson, T.

    1996-11-01

    As the oilfield industry strives to globally sustain continuous movement of environmental and quality performance, companies have come to realize Total Quality Environmental Management (TQEM) is essential in product research, development manufacturing and services. As our industry endeavors to continuously improve, more emphasis is being placed upon the management systems we apply such as ISO 14000 and ISO 9000. These standards are tools for improving environmental and quality performance, meeting customer requirements, and increasing profitability. lbs paper presents actual examples of the successful integration of environmental and quality management systems into an operational TQEM system. Also presented are pilot study evaluations of the draft ISO 14000 standards by two certified ISO 9000 facilities. Examples of continuous improvement and cross-functional teams as means to merge environment and quality management into the functions of process control, corrective and preventive action, document control, and waste management are presented. Results and improvements from facilities involved with TQEM discussed along with their strategies and progress in consolidating the environmental and quality programs into a single, viable management system. The case histories from various facilities demonstrate the implementation of TQEM and in TQEM promotes a cleaner environment, reduces costs, con- serves energy and raw materials, minimizes pollutants and wastes, and reduces redundant paperwork.

  2. Effects of Prairie Restoration on Soil Quality Indicators

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characterization of soil ecosystem functioning based on soil quality assessments of native prairie may provide a reference for evaluating improvement in soil quality of cultivated agroecosystems converted to perennial vegetation during prairie restoration. Our objective was to determine the effect o...

  3. 77 FR 1717 - Notice of Availability; Draft Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... and Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Department of Natural Resources, have written a Draft Springfield Plateau Regional Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment (Plan), which describes proposed alternatives for restoring injured natural...

  4. 78 FR 7450 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems... a Final Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing... a manner that supports long-term ecosystem protection, supports natural ecosystem recovery and...

  5. Assessment and evaluation of technologies for environmental restoration. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Uzochukwu, G. A.

    2000-06-30

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration objectives of the Department of Energy are being evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objective of the environmental restoration effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  6. University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge environmental restoration education program

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    A joint program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK) has been initiated to provide education and research on environmental restoration and waste management. The program will provide opportunity for formal education and research for area businesses, while integrating their efforts in mixed-waste management with those of UTK and ORNL. Following successful results demonstrated at ORNL and UTK, the program will be integrated with other universities and research institutions in the country. During this presentation, the programs`s objective, scope, and goals will be described, and details of the program structure will be explained. Also, it will be demonstrated how experience gained in environmental restoration technology transfer activities could be applied in an educational program, providing a focal point for technology transfer and information exchange. Expected accomplishments and industry benefits will also be discussed.

  7. Assessment and evaluation of technologies for environmental restoration. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1999-01-15

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration objectives of the Department of Energy are being evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objective of the environmental restoration effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  8. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration plan. Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the proposed action analyzed in this final environmental impact statement (FEIS) is to restore, insofar as possible, the injured natural resources and thereby the services they provide that were affected by the Exxon Valdex oil spill (EVOS). The purpose of this document is to analyze the effects of proposed uses of the remaining funds (approximately $620 million as of February 1994, after final reimbursements) in accomplishing the mission of the Trustee Council.

  9. Savannah River Site environmental restoration lessons learned program

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.A.; Leibfarth, E.C.; Treger, T.M.; Blackmon, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    For the past three years environmental restoration has been formally consolidated at Savannah River Site. Accomplishments include waste site investigations to closure activities. Positive, as well as negatively impacting, events have occurred. Until recently, lessons learned were captured on a less than formal basis. Now, a program based upon critiques, evaluations and corrective actions is being used. This presentation reviews the development, implementation and use of that program.

  10. Opportunities for health and safety professionals in environmental restoration work

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The safety of workers in waste management and in environmental restoration work is regulated in large part by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Many of the OSHA rules are given in Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Section 120 of 29 CFR 1910 specifically addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response operations. The remainder of this discussion focuses on clean-up operations. The purpose of this paper is to review areas of employment opportunity in environmental restoration work for health and safety professionals. Safety and health risk analyses are mentioned as one area of opportunity, and these analyses are required by the standards. Site safety and health supervisors will be needed during field operations. Those who enjoy teaching might consider helping to meet the training needs that are mandated. Finally, engineering help both to separate workers from hazards and to improve personal protective equipment, when it must be worn, would benefit those actively involved in environmental restoration activities.

  11. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D.; Allen, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  12. Restored agricultural wetlands in Central Iowa: habitat quality and amphibian response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Rebecca A.; Pierce, Clay; Smalling, Kelly L.; Klaver, Robert W.; Vandever, Mark W.; Battaglin, William A.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are declining throughout the United States and worldwide due, partly, to habitat loss. Conservation practices on the landscape restore wetlands to denitrify tile drainage effluent and restore ecosystem services. Understanding how water quality, hydroperiod, predation, and disease affect amphibians in restored wetlands is central to maintaining healthy amphibian populations in the region. We examined the quality of amphibian habitat in restored wetlands relative to reference wetlands by comparing species richness, developmental stress, and adult leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) survival probabilities to a suite of environmental metrics. Although measured habitat variables differed between restored and reference wetlands, differences appeared to have sub-lethal rather than lethal effects on resident amphibian populations. There were few differences in amphibian species richness and no difference in estimated survival probabilities between wetland types. Restored wetlands had more nitrate and alkaline pH, longer hydroperiods, and were deeper, whereas reference wetlands had more amphibian chytrid fungus zoospores in water samples and resident amphibians exhibited increased developmental stress. Restored and reference wetlands are both important components of the landscape in central Iowa and maintaining a complex of fish-free wetlands with a variety of hydroperiods will likely contribute to the persistence of amphibians in this landscape.

  13. Poplar Island Environmental Restoration Project: Challenges in waterbird restoration on an island in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Miller, J.; Reese, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    At 460 hectares, the Paul Sarbanes Environmental Restoration Project at Poplar Island, Talbot County, Maryland, represents the largest 'beneficial use' dredged material project of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (a cooperative project with Maryland Port Administration). Begun in 1998, the 15-year restoration project will ultimately consist of roughly 220 ha of uplands and 220 ha of tidal wetland habitats, with limited areas of dike roads, perimeter riprap, and unvegetated mudflats. Wetland restoration began in one small section (or 'cell') in 2002, but not all cells will be filled with dredged material until at least 2013. As a major objective of the restoration, six species of waterbirds were identified as 'priority species' for Chesapeake Bay: American black duck (Anas rubripes), snowy egret (Egretta thula), cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis), osprey (Pandion haliaetus), common tern (Sterna hirundo), and least tern (S. antillarum). Monitoring of nesting activities of these species from 2002 to 2005 indicated that all species except black ducks colonized the site rapidly. More than 800 pairs of common terns nested in 2003 to 2004. Because of predation by red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and great horned owl (Bubo virginianus), reproductive success was very low for the terns. Trapping was effective in removing the foxes, and other controls have been applied to opportunistic nesting species including herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis). An effective public education program on the island has helped address concerns about animal control.

  14. How technology is improving decision making for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmars, J.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental restoration, or the cleanup of contaminants from past activities, at its core depends on a series of decisions about the nature and extent of contamination, the risk to human health and the environment, and the potential effectiveness of remediation techniques and technologies to reduce the risk to acceptable levels. The effectiveness with which these decisions are made has significant impacts on the cost and duration of the cleanup efforts. The decisions must often be made on the basis of incomplete and uncertain data. Emerging environmental information and data acquisition technologies together with appropriate strategies to support decision making are beginning to change the way environmental restoration occurs in the United States. Past environmental restoration activities too often relied on prescriptive data collection activities to generate the information upon which decisions were to be made. Retrospective studies of such activities have shown that, while often data were gathered for the purpose of reducing the risk in decision making, little true reduction in risk was realized and large amounts of resources were consumed. Recent examination of the failures in the United States to achieve many complete cleanups despite the investment of large sums and time points to the inability to have decisions made efficiently. The solution to the problem involves both regulatory change to allow more flexibility in decision-making and the introduction of technology to improve decision making. This paper reviews the recent assessments made of the cleanup process and application of strategies and technologies to enhance decision-making for cleanup. It provides examples of the new decision approaches and the technologies that have been employed to speed up characterization and to optimize the implementation of remediation.

  15. Soils and environmental quality, Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Pierzynski, G.M.; Sims, J.T.; Vance, G.F.

    2000-07-01

    The contents of this book include the following: introduction to environmental quality; soil nitrogen and environmental quality; soil phosphorus and environmental quality; soil sulfur and environmental quality; trace elements; organic chemicals in the environment; biogeochemical cycles and soil management; remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater; global climate change and acid rain; and risk assessment.

  16. Image gathering and restoration - Information and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Judith A.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Huck, Friedrich O.

    1989-01-01

    A method is investigated for optimizing the end-to-end performance of image gathering and restoration for visual quality. To achieve this objective, one must inevitably confront the problems that the visual quality of restored images depends on perceptual rather than mathematical considerations and that these considerations vary with the target, the application, and the observer. The method adopted in this paper is to optimize image gathering informationally and to restore images interactively to obtain the visually preferred trade-off among fidelity resolution, sharpness, and clarity. The results demonstrate that this method leads to significant improvements in the visual quality obtained by the traditional digital processing methods. These traditional methods allow a significant loss of visual quality to occur because they treat the design of the image-gathering system and the formulation of the image-restoration algorithm as two separate tasks and fail to account for the transformations between the continuous and the discrete representations in image gathering and reconstruction.

  17. 77 FR 13095 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for NOAA Restoration Center Programmatic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Statement for NOAA Restoration Center Programmatic Coastal Habitat Restoration Activities AGENCY: National... environmental impacts of different ranges of coastal and marine habitat restoration project types conducted and... restoring the nation's coastal, marine, and migratory fish habitat. Recognizing that the most successful...

  18. Environmental quality criteria: Some considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, H.; Davis, D. L.; Trauberman, J.

    1981-05-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of the recipient environment into which chemical contaminants are deposited may influence their chemical speciation, mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity. In formulating Water Quality Criteria, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA) considered the modifying effect of abiotic environmental factors on pollutant toxicity in an innovative regulatory approach. Scientific knowledge of the interactions and correlations between pollutant toxicity and abiotic factors remains limited. Recognition of the influence of the physicochemical characteristics of the recipient environment on pollutant toxicity has implications for the eventual formulation of regional, rather than uniform and national, criteria. In addition, in developing Water Quality Criteria that incorporate the effects of pollutants on “aquatic life,” EPA primarily focused on toxicity to aquatic animals and plants (including unicellular algae). The effects of pollutants on microbe-mediated ecological processes that are necessary for maintaining the state and quality of the ecosphere (such as biogeochemical cyclings, litter decomposition, and mineralization) were not included in the formulation of the Water Quality Criteria. To facilitate the recognition and quantification of adverse effects of pollutants on these ecological processes, the development of a computation, termed the “ecological dosage 50%” (EcD50) is recommended. Such a formulation could also be applied to setting environmental quality criteria for terrestrial ecosystems.

  19. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (Project W-296) Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    This Safety Assessment is based on information derived from the Conceptual Design Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (DOE/RL 1994) and ancillary documentation developed during the conceptual design phase of Project W-296. The Safety Assessment has been prepared to support the Solid Waste Burial Ground Interim Safety Basis document. The purpose of the Safety Assessment is to provide an evaluation of the design to determine if the process, as proposed, will comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) Limits for radioactive and hazardous material exposures and be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint. The evaluation considered affects on the worker, onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  20. Workforce estimates for environmental restoration at Pinellas Plant

    SciTech Connect

    April, J.G.; Stahlman, E.J.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assist the Pinellas Plant, Largo, Florida, in estimating work-force requirements for the anticipated environmental restoration (ER) mission. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has prepared workforce estimates required for ER and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at Pinellas Plant. These estimates are presented in the report and were based on a comparison of several ER projects of similar magnitude, including Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska; Hanford in Richland, Washington; and the Radium Chemical D&D project in Queens, New York. The characterization of the Pinellas Plant was based on the RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] Facility Investigation Report: Pinellas Plant.

  1. 76 FR 24050 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... National Park Service Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement... Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Biscayne National... Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan (Plan/FEIS) for Biscayne National Park, Florida....

  2. 78 FR 32441 - Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... National Park Service Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain... Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Rocky Mountain... Grand Ditch Breach Restoration, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. DATES: The National Park Service...

  3. Environmental quality for striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of environmental changes on the quality of life for striped bass populations can be evaluated objectively with modern procedures of environmental risk analysis. Such analysis requires knowledge of the sources of risk in the context of environmental requirements of the species. A prime environmental requirement of striped bass appears to be a suitable thermal structure that accommodates the hereditary thermal niche, which changes with age. Strong thermal preferences had promoted striped bass survival in the pristine natural estuaries of eastern North America, but they may increase risks to the species in some new environments and in native ones that are altered by man. The magnitude and likelihood of risks for striped bass from many pollutants and physical changes (structures or water flow, for example) depend upon the fish's thermally controlled distribution. The importance of a species' thermal niche and of the thermal structure of aquatic environments for population success is only beginning to be recognized and included in risk assessments.

  4. Mining in New Caledonia: environmental stakes and restoration opportunities.

    PubMed

    Losfeld, Guillaume; L'Huillier, Laurent; Fogliani, Bruno; Jaffré, Tanguy; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    New Caledonia is a widely recognised marine and terrestrial biodiversity hot spot. However, this unique environment is under increasing anthropogenic pressure. Major threats are related to land cover change and include fire, urban sprawling and mining. Resulting habitat loss and fragmentation end up in serious erosion of the local biodiversity. Mining is of particular concern due to its economic significance for the island. Open cast mines were exploited there since 1873, and scraping out soil to access ores wipes out flora. Resulting perturbations on water flows and dramatic soil erosion lead to metal-rich sediment transport downstream into rivers and the lagoon. Conflicting environmental and economic aspects of mining are discussed in this paper. However, mining practices are also improving, and where impacts are inescapable ecological restoration is now considered. Past and ongoing experiences in the restoration of New Caledonian terrestrial ecosystems are presented and discussed here. Economic use of the local floristic diversity could also promote conservation and restoration, while providing alternative incomes. In this regard, Ecocatalysis, an innovative approach to make use of metal hyperaccumulating plants, is of particular interest.

  5. Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

  6. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  7. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  8. Laboratory interface in support of Environmental Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Pardue, G.J. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A vital part of quality environmental data resides in the communication between the project and the analytical laboratory. It is essential that the project clearly identify its objectives to the laboratory and that the laboratory understands the scope and limitations of the analytical process. Successful completion of an environmental project must include an aggressive program between project managers and subcontracted Lyrical laboratories. All to often, individuals and organizations tend to deflect errors and failures observed in environmental toward {open_quotes}the other guy{close_quotes}. The engineering firm will blame the laboratory, the laboratory will blame the field operation, the field operation will blame the engineering, and everyone will blame the customer for not understanding the true variables in the environmental arena. It is the contention of the authors, that the majority of failures derive from a lack of communication and misunderstanding. Several initiatives can be taken to improve communication and understanding between the various pieces of the environmental data quality puzzle. This presentation attempts to outline mechanisms to improve communication between the environmental project and the analytical laboratory with the intent of continuous quality improvement. Concepts include: project specific laboratory statements of work which focus on project and program requirements; project specific analytical laboratory readiness reviews (project kick-off meetings); laboratory team workshops; project/program performance tracking and self assessment and promotion of team success.

  9. Exxon Valdez oil spill environmental restoration series. Irregular report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    On March 24, 1989, the supertanker Exxon Valdex ran aground on a well-marked reef in Prince William Sound. Within a few hours 10.8 million gallons of Alaska North Slope crude oil had leaked into one of the most bountiful and diverse marine ecosystems in the world. This environmental disaster resulted in a court settlement that included $900 million to be administered by the joint state and federal Exxon Valdex Oil Spill Trustee council for damage assessment and restoration. The National Technical Information Service is making these studies available to the public as they are released by the Trustee Council. Of particular interest to oil companies, environmental groups, education institutions and large public libraries, this peer-reviewed collection will include about 70 damage assessment reports followed by 40 to 50 restoration study documents each year through the year 2001. The initial damage assessment papers are due for release in May 1995. NTIS is offering the material both on demand when each study is released and also as a standing order. By choosing the standing order plan, customers save handling cost and ensure automatic shipping of the entire series as soon as each report is available.

  10. Pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunity assessment in environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, J.A.; Willison, C.P.

    1997-10-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories implicitly subscribed to the philosophy of pollution prevention and waste minimization. As a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) offer, Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOA) were conducted at two ER sites and a decontamination and Demolition (D and D) site. The purpose of one of the PPOAs was to identify pollution prevention (P2) opportunities during environmental remediation at the Classified Waste Landfill located at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The remediation activities at this site are scheduled to begin in the fall of 1997. The PPOA included presentations by the team members, a tour of the site, and a brainstorming session to list the waste streams, identify P2 opportunities and rank them in order of priority. Twenty-five P2 opportunities were identified during the brainstorming session of which twenty-two opportunities were selected for further investigation. Those twenty-two opportunities are discussed in this paper. A cost benefit analysis was performed for each P2 opportunity based on the estimated waste volume, feasibility, and cost. Pollution Prevention by Design (P2D) was incorporated into the PPOA to introduce waste minimization techniques that can be used during the planning phase of restoration projects.

  11. Exxon Valdez restoration plan. summary of the final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Exxon Valdez Trustee Council issued a draft Restoration Plan in November of 1993. The draft Restoration Plan provides long-term guidance for restoring the resources and services injured by the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill of March 24, 1989. This final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the draft Restoration Plan as the Proposed Action - Alternative 5, and four other alternatives that provide different policies and emphasis than the proposed action.

  12. Restoring biodiversity in the Gwydir Wetlands through environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, W A

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Water Reforms process, environmental flow rules have been progressively implemented in New South Wales rivers. The Integrated Monitoring of Environmental Flows (IMEF) is a major project established to better understand how rivers and associated wetlands respond to environmental water allocations. The results presented here represent the vegetation data collected for the testing of the hypothesis that "protecting or restoring a portion of freshes and high flows and otherwise maintaining natural flow variability will replenish anabranches and riverine wetlands, restoring their biodiversity". The study site is the Ramsar listed Gwydir Wetlands, located on the Gingham and Gwydir (Big Leather) Watercourses in the Lower Gwydir Valley, 100 km west of Moree. The expansion of irrigated agriculture in the lower Gwydir valley has severely altered flow regimes in the wetlands. The spread of the weed Phyla canescens (Lippia) is of major concern to landholders in the Gwydir Wetlands. Results indicate that Paspalum distichum (Water couch) and Eleocharis plana (Ribbed spike-rush) can maintain dominance over Phyla canescens if flooding occurs on a semi-regular basis. Conversely, Eichhornia crassipes (Water hyacinth) is a rampant noxious weed of open water in the Gwydir Wetlands, and has quickly spread in areas that are inundated for long periods. Management of this weed requires periodic drying of the wetlands to cause desiccation and death of the plants. The flooding requirement of individual species and plant associations in the Gwydir Wetlands are currently not fully understood. By providing better information on the consequence of different flows, the IMEF project will help to develop better management strategies to shift the dominance from introduced species such as P. canescens and E. crassipes to more desirable native plant species.

  13. Prospective environmental restoration/ restoration up front: a concept for an incentive-based program to increase restoration planning and implementation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Ralph G; Gouguet, Ron; DeSantis, Amanda; Liu, Jenny; Ammann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a concept variously termed prospective environmental restoration, restoration up front, or restoration banking. Briefly, the concept centers on the ability of an entity, public or private, to gain durable credits for undertaking proactive restoration activities. Once obtained, these credits can be applied to an existing liability, held in the event of a future liability, or traded or sold to others that might have need for the credits. In the case of a natural resource damage claim or response action, possessing or applying the credits does not negate the need for responsible entities to clean up spills or releases of hazardous substances or oil or to address their clean-up requirements under applicable federal and state statutes. Concepts similar to prospective environmental restoration/restoration up front include wetlands mitigation banking, conservation habitat banking, and emissions trading. Much of the concept and details provided herein stem from the practice of natural resource damage assessment, although that is not the sole driver for the concept. The concept could also apply where the credits could be used to offset other environmental liabilities, for example, to provide habitat mitigation where development is being planned. The authors believe that the concept, if widely applied, could reduce the time and costs associated with restoration and perhaps lead to an increase in voluntary restoration and conservation nationally. Currently, there are no state or federal regulations or policies that directly provide for this approach.

  14. 75 FR 13138 - Grand Ditch Breach Restoration Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... restoration process; regrading and recontouring areas to restore appropriate morphology and function; native... planning process include short-and-long-term potential impacts to: Wilderness character; geological... and wetland morphology and function; water quality; riparian and wetland communities; species of...

  15. EPA's Environmental Quality Index Supports Public Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Quality Index (EQI) pulls data from five domains: air, water, land, built, and sociodemographic environments to provide a county-by-county snapshot of overall environmental quality across the entire U.S.

  16. Initial robotics research for environmental restoration and waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.; Mann, R.C. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the initial research and development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will support the technology development component of the overall National Robotics Technology Development Program (NRTDP). The NRTDP is a subelement of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER and WM) 5-Year Applied Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Plan and of overall efforts at DOE operational sites around the country. ORNL research will focus on fundamental improvement of remote manipulation through enhancements of the human man/machine interface, integration of automated functions, and the incorporation of machine intelligence to increase productivity. Background and goals for these activities are presented in this paper.

  17. Image gathering and digital restoration for fidelity and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1991-01-01

    The fidelity and resolution of the traditional Wiener restorations given in the prevalent digital processing literature can be significantly improved when the transformations between the continuous and discrete representations in image gathering and display are accounted for. However, the visual quality of these improved restorations also is more sensitive to the defects caused by aliasing artifacts, colored noise, and ringing near sharp edges. In this paper, these visual defects are characterized, and methods for suppressing them are presented. It is demonstrated how the visual quality of fidelity-maximized images can be improved when (1) the image-gathering system is specifically designed to enhance the performance of the image-restoration algorithm, and (2) the Wiener filter is combined with interactive Gaussian smoothing, synthetic high edge enhancement, and nonlinear tone-scale transformation. The nonlinear transformation is used primarily to enhance the spatial details that are often obscurred when the normally wide dynamic range of natural radiance fields is compressed into the relatively narrow dynamic range of film and other displays.

  18. Image gathering and digital restoration for fidelity and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1991-01-01

    The fidelity and resolution of the traditional Wiener restorations given in the prevalent digital processing literature can be significantly improved when the transformations between the continuous and discrete representations in image gathering and display are accounted for. However, the visual quality of these improved restorations also is more sensitive to the defects caused by aliasing artifacts, colored noise, and ringing near sharp edges. In this paper, these visual defects are characterized, and methods for suppressing them are presented. It is demonstrated how the visual quality of fidelity-maximized images can be improved when (1) the image-gathering system is specifically designed to enhance the performance of the image-restoration algorithm, and (2) the Wiener filter is combined with interactive Gaussian smoothing, synthetic high edge enhancement, and nonlinear tone-scale transformation. The nonlinear transformation is used primarily to enhance the spatial details that are often obscurred when the normally wide dynamic range of natural radiance fields is compressed into the relatively narrow dynamic range of film and other displays.

  19. New model for public participation at Sandia National Laboratories: What comes after environmental restoration?

    SciTech Connect

    KEENER,R. WILLIAM; BACA,STEPHEN S.; BACA,MAUREEN R.; STOTTS,AL; TOOPS,TAMI; WOLFF,THEODORE A.

    2000-01-31

    As the Sandia National Laboratories' Environmental Restoration (ER) project moves toward closure, the project's experiences--including a number of successes in the public participation arena--suggest it is time for a new, more interactive model for future government-citizen involvement. This model would strive to improve the quality of public interaction with the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia, by using subject-specific working groups and aiming for long-term trustful relationships with the community. It would make use of interactive techniques, fewer formal public forums, and a variety of polling and communication technologies to improve information gathering and exchange.

  20. 76 FR 72436 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...; 2310-0057-422] Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Protecting and Restoring Native Ecosystems by... Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates. SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS... Restoring Native Ecosystems by Managing Non-Native Ungulates, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. The...

  1. Quality assurance for environmental analytical chemistry: 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, E.S.; Goode, W.E.; Perrin, D.R.; Burns, C.E.

    1981-09-01

    The continuing quality assurance effort by the Environmental Surveillance Group is presented. Included are all standard materials now in use, their consensus or certified concentrations, quality control charts, and all quality assurance measurements made by H-8 during 1980.

  2. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The LANL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Office, established in October 1989, is faced with the challenge of assessing and cleaning up nearly 1,8000 potentially hazardous waste sites according to an aggressive corrective action schedule that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated on May 23, 1990, in a Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit. To maximize program efficiency, the ER Program Office will implement a unique management approach designed to maximize the use of laboratory technical expertise. The Installation Work Plan, which provides a blueprint for the program, has been submitted to EPA for review and approval. A work plan for characterization of Technical Area 21, an early plutonium processing facility, is also nearing completion. The feasibility of an expedited cleanup of the Laboratory's worst hazardous waste release has been modelled using a computer code originally developed by LANL to assist the nuclear weapons testing program. A sophisticated Geographic Information System has been implemented to assist in data management and presentation, and the design of a Mixed Waste Disposal Facility is underway. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Nuclear criticality safety program for environmental restoration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), is located on a 1050 acre site approximately twenty miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The production area of the site covers approximately 136 acres in the central portion of the site. Surrounding the core production area is a buffer consisting of leased grazing land, reforested land, and unused areas. The uranium processing facility was designed and constructed in the early 1950s. During the period from 1952 to 1989 the site produced uranium feed material and uranium products used in the United States weapons complex. Production at the site ended in 1989, when the site was shut down for what was expected to be a short period of time. However, the FUTC was permanently shut down in 1991, and the site`s mission was changed from production to environmental restoration. The objective of this paper is to give an update on activities at the Fernald Site and to describe the Nuclear Criticality Safety issues that are currently being addressed.

  4. Identifying environmental safety and health requirements for an Environmental Restoration Management Contractor

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, W.H.; Cossel, S.C.; Alhadeff, N.; Porco, D.J.; Lindamood, S.B.; Beers, J.A.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of the Standards/Requirements Identification Program, developed partially in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-2, was to identify applicable requirements that established the Environmental Restoration Management Contractor`s (ERMC) responsibilities and authorities under the Environmental Restoration Management Contract, determine the adequacy of these requirements, ascertain a baseline level of compliance with them, and implement a maintenance program that would keep the program current as requirements or compliance levels change. The resultant Standards/Requirements Identification Documents (S/RIDs) consolidate the applicable requirements. These documents govern the development of procedures and manuals to ensure compliance with the requirements. Twenty-four such documents, corresponding with each functional area identified at the site, are to be issued. These requirements are included in the contractor`s management plan.

  5. A comparison of radiological risk assessment methods for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Peterson, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evaluation of risks to human health from exposure to ionizing radiation at radioactively contaminated sites is an integral part of the decision-making process for determining the need for remediation and selecting remedial actions that may be required. At sites regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a target risk range of 10{sup {minus}4} to 10{sup {minus}6} incremental cancer incidence over a lifetime is specified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as generally acceptable, based on the reasonable maximum exposure to any individual under current and future land use scenarios. Two primary methods currently being used in conducting radiological risk assessments at CERCLA sites are compared in this analysis. Under the first method, the radiation dose equivalent (i.e., Sv or rem) to the receptors of interest over the appropriate period of exposure is estimated and multiplied by a risk factor (cancer risk/Sv). Alternatively, incremental cancer risk can be estimated by combining the EPA`s cancer slope factors (previously termed potency factors) for radionuclides with estimates of radionuclide intake by ingestion and inhalation, as well as radionuclide concentrations in soil that contribute to external dose. The comparison of the two methods has demonstrated that resulting estimates of lifetime incremental cancer risk under these different methods may differ significantly, even when all other exposure assumptions are held constant, with the magnitude of the discrepancy depending upon the dominant radionuclides and exposure pathways for the site. The basis for these discrepancies, the advantages and disadvantages of each method, and the significance of the discrepant results for environmental restoration decisions are presented.

  6. Soil Quality in Mining Areas Undergoing Ecological Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinarowski, Marcela; Casagrande, José Carlos; Bizuti, Denise T. G.; Silva, Luiz Gabriel; Soares, Marcio Roberto; Brancalion, Pedro H. S.

    2014-05-01

    Mining is one of the anthropogenic activities most impactful to natural resources, and can profoundly affect the resilience of ecosystems depending on the level of soil degradation. Ecological restoration has generated promising results even in situations of degradation as intense as those of mining. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the soil in areas explored by the bauxite extraction undergoing restoration: recently mined, seven years, 20 years and native forest. The studied areas are located in the municipality of Poços de Caldas-MG, belonging to ALCOA Alumínio. The mined-out areas for seven and twenty years were uncompressed and received topsoil, liming and fertilization with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Samples for chemical analyses of soil fertility were carried out at depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm. Soil quality was evaluated by pondered additive model. The parameters were considered organic matter (0.6) and bases saturation (0.4) for soil fertility function (0.6) and calcium (0.5) and aluminum saturation (0.5) for the function root development (0.4) - (the numbers in parentheses represent the weights attributed). Despite the high content, only the organic matter was not a parameter enough to classify the soil quality, once the native forest has very low base saturation (7%). The soil quality index(SQI) obtained allowed to classify the areas, being the first restored 20 years ago with SQI equal to 0.7 followed of the restored 7 years ago, native forest and newly mined with SQIs equal to 0.6, 04 and 0.3, respectively. The native tropical forests have low soil fertility, keeping by the cycling of nutrients. This demonstrates the need for the degraded areas, especially the mined, are uncompressed to allow storage of water and root development, in addition to the replacement of nutrients and soil acidity correction, especially high levels of aluminum saturation (66%) and low calcium (3 mmolcdm-3).

  7. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

  8. 78 FR 2685 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Draft Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... Office of the Secretary Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Draft...: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The draft environmental assessment for the East Hobble Creek Restoration Project is available for public review and comment. The assessment analyzes the anticipated environmental...

  9. The Potential Importance of Conservation, Restoration and Altered Management Practices for Water Quality in the Wabash River Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Potential Importance of Conservation, Restoration and Altered Management Practices for Water Quality in the Wabash River Watershed Guoxiang Yang1, Elly P.H. Best2, Staci Goodwin3 1 ORISE Postdoc Research Associate at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk...

  10. The Potential Importance of Conservation, Restoration and Altered Management Practices for Water Quality in the Wabash River Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Potential Importance of Conservation, Restoration and Altered Management Practices for Water Quality in the Wabash River Watershed Guoxiang Yang1, Elly P.H. Best2, Staci Goodwin3 1 ORISE Postdoc Research Associate at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk...

  11. Identifying environmental safety and health requirements for the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, W.H.; Cossel, S.C.; Alhadeff, N.; Porco, D.J.; Lindamood, S.B.; Beers, J.A.

    1994-01-14

    This presentation will describe the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation`s (FERMCO) Standards/Requirements Identification Documents (S/RlDs) Program, the unique process used to implement it, and the status of the program. We will also discuss the lessons learned as the program was implemented. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Fernald site to produce uranium metals for the nation`s defense programs in 1953. In 1989, DOE suspended production and, in 1991, the mission of the site was formally changed to one of environmental cleanup and restoration. The site was renamed the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). FERMCO`s mission is to provide safe, early, and least-cost final clean-up of the site in compliance with all regulations and commitments. DOE has managed nuclear facilities primarily through its oversight of Management and Operating contractors. Comprehensive nuclear industry standards were absent when most DOE sites were first established, Management and Operating contractors had to apply existing non-nuclear industry standards and, in many cases, formulate new technical standards. Because it was satisfied with the operation of its facilities, DOE did not incorporate modern practices and standards as they became available. In March 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board issued Recommendation 90-2, which called for DOE to identify relevant standards and requirements, conduct adequacy assessments of requirements in protecting environmental, public, and worker health and safety, and determine the extent to which the requirements are being implemented. The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of DOE embraced the recommendation for facilities under its control. Strict accountability requirements made it essential that FERMCO and DOE clearly identify applicable requirements necessary, determine the requirements` adequacy, and assess FERMCO`s level of compliance.

  12. WATER QUALITY AND OYSTER HEALTH (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA): AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO DETERMINING HABITAT RESTORATION POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S. Gregory Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2001. Water Quality and Oyster Health (Crassostrea virginica): An Integrated Approach to Determining Habitat Restoration Potential (Abstract). Presented at the 5th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration, 18-21...

  13. Environmental Restoration Operations Consolidated Quarterly Report: July-September 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, John R.

    2017-01-01

    This Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) provides the status of ongoing corrective action activities being implemented at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during the July, August, and September 2016 quarterly reporting period. The Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified for corrective action at SNL/NM are listed in Table I-1. Sections I.2.1 and I.2.2 summarize the work completed during this quarter. Section I.2.1 summarizes the quarterly activities at sites undergoing corrective action field activities. Field activities are conducted at the three groundwater AOCs (Burn Site Groundwater [BSG AOC], Technical Area [TA]-V Groundwater [TAVG AOC], and Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater [TAG AOC]). Section I.2.2 summarizes quarterly activities at sites where the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a certificate of completion and the sites are in the corrective action complete (CAC) regulatory process. Currently, SWMUs 8 and 58, 68, 149, 154, and 502 are in the CAC regulatory process. Corrective action activities are deferred at the Long Sled Track (SWMU 83), the Gun Facilities (SWMU 84), and the Short Sled Track (SWMU 240) because these three sites are active mission facilities. These three active sites are located in TA-III.

  14. Pollution prevention in environmental restoration projects: communication, innovation, and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    With the change in US Department of Energy`s (DOE) primary mission from weapons production to complex clean-up, there is an increased emphasis to utilize proven tools and techniques that, when modified, will assist in this massive remediation effort. Tools and techniques which increase process efficiency while minimizing costs are highly attractive. The introduction of formalized Pollution Prevention (P2) practices into the DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) program should be encouraged to the measurable degree of success that P2 has obtained in DOE process operations. Most notably, the integration of Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs) into the ER process is highly recommended for three reasons: waste stream generation volumes will be minimized; the results of P2 implementation will be properly measured, quantified, and documented for use on other projects; and negative impacts to human health and the environment will be lessened. the application of P2 principles is encouraged as a Best Management Practice (BMP), in addition to minimizing waste generation to achieve DOE waste reduction goals. The challenge is how to apply P2 practices to ER projects and obtain quantifiable waster reductions.

  15. Use of remotely operated excavators for environmental restoration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, P.W.; Wilson, J.

    1995-12-31

    In support of the Department of Energy (DOE)`s environmental restoration program, Spar and RSI have modified a Hitachi model EX200LC for remote operation. For projects requiring the retrieval of certain types of radioactive and hazardous buried waste, the toxic nature of the material will require that remotely operated equipment be used to retrieve the waste. For the recovery of buried boxes and drums, an excavator that has been modified for remote operation provides both the high payload capacity as well as the ruggedness to safely and efficiently recover this type of material. The control system for the excavator uses coordinated control technology to assist the operator in controlling the position and movement of the bucket and end effectors. The remotely operated excavator as well as a teleoperated transport vehicle were recently demonstrated in the field as part of the first phase of the remote conveyance system and innovative end effector development program for the DOE Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  16. Application of safeguards technology in DOE's environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.; Baker, M.P.; Hansen, W.R.; Lucas, M.C.; Markin, J.T.; Phillips, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last two decades, the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has supported the research and development of safeguards systems analysis methodologies and nondestructive assay (NDS) technology for characterizing, monitoring, and accounting nuclear materials. This paper discusses methodologies and NDA instrumentation developed by the DOE/OSS program that could be applied in the Environmental Restoration Program. NDA instrumentation could be used for field measurements during site characterization and to monitor nuclear materials, heavy metals, and other hazardous materials during site remediation. Systems methodologies can minimize the expenditure of resources and help specify appropriate combinations of NDA instrumentation and chemical analyses to characterize a variety of materials quickly and reduce personnel exposure in hazardous environments. A training program is available to teach fundamental and advanced principles and approaches to characterize and quantify nuclear materials properly and to organize and analyze measurement information for decision making. The ability to characterize the overall volume and distribution of materials at a waste site is difficult because of the inhomogeneous distribution of materials, the requirement for extreme sensitivity, and the lack of resources to collect and chemically analyze a sufficient number of samples. Using a systems study approach based on statistical sampling, the resources necessary to characterize a site can be enhanced by appropriately combining in situ and field NDA measurements with laboratory analyses. 35 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Wang, Wei-ping; Jia, Li-jing; Mao, Zhuo-feng; Qu, Zhen-zhen; Luan, Shao-qun; Kan, Min-chen

    2012-08-27

    Maternal seizure has adverse effects on brain histology as well as on learning and memory ability in progeny. An enriched environment (EE) is known to promote structural changes in the brain and improve cognitive and motor deficits following a variety of brain injuries. Whether EE treatment in early postnatal periods could restore cognitive impairment induced by prenatal maternal seizure is unknown. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into two groups and were injected intraperitoneally either saline or pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) for 30 days. Then the fully kindled rats and control animals were allowed to mate. PTZ administration was continued until delivery, while the control group received saline at the same time. After weaning at postnatal day 22, one-half of the male offspring in the control and in the prenatal maternal group were given the environmental enrichment treatment through all the experiments until they were tested. Morris water maze testing was performed at 8 weeks of age. Western blot and synaptic ultrastructure analysis were then performed. We found that EE treatment reversed spatial learning deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure. An EE also reversed the changes in synaptic ultrastructure following prenatal maternal seizure. In addition, prenatal maternal seizure significantly decreased phosphorylation states of cAMP response element binding (CREB) in the hippocampus, whereas EE reversed this reduced expression. These findings suggest that EE treatment on early postnatal periods could be a potential therapy for improving cognitive deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure.

  18. Recreation trends: indicators of environmental quality

    Treesearch

    Roy Feuchter

    1980-01-01

    As you probably know, tomorrow is Earth Day-80, the 10th anniversary of the original Earth Day, so it is certainly appropriate that we talk these next few days about environmental quality and the relationship of outdoor recreation to that quality. However, perhaps the title should be more of a question such as: Are recreation trends indicators of environmental quality...

  19. HEIS: An integrated information system for environmental restoration and monitoring at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Tzemos, S.; Kissinger, B.

    1991-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has about 1500 waste sites that contain a complex mixture of chemical and radioactive contaminants. After many years of environmental monitoring to assess the impact of Hanford operations to the environment, the Site`s mission is shifting to environmental restoration. The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is being developed to provide advanced tools to (1) support environmental restoration and routine site-wide monitoring, and (2) aid the scientists in understanding and conducting the restoration efforts. This paper describes some of the highlights and distinctive features of HEIS.

  20. HEIS: An integrated information system for environmental restoration and monitoring at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Tzemos, S.; Kissinger, B.

    1991-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has about 1500 waste sites that contain a complex mixture of chemical and radioactive contaminants. After many years of environmental monitoring to assess the impact of Hanford operations to the environment, the Site's mission is shifting to environmental restoration. The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is being developed to provide advanced tools to (1) support environmental restoration and routine site-wide monitoring, and (2) aid the scientists in understanding and conducting the restoration efforts. This paper describes some of the highlights and distinctive features of HEIS.

  1. Environmental Quality, the Second Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Environmental Quality, Washington, DC.

    This second annual report examines in depth two fundamental aspects of environmental quality: economics and legal developments. It also reviews the status of and trends in environmental quality and developments, particularly among the states, since the publication of the first annual environmental quality report. A number of environmental problems…

  2. Response lags and environmental dynamics of restoration efforts for Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Hannah; Hamilton, David P.; Doole, Graeme J.

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory responses to degradation of freshwater ecosystems have been characterized by long response times and have often failed to prevent declining health or to implement successful restoration programs. We studied environmental and management dynamics of ecosystem restoration in Lake Rotorua, New Zealand, where land use intensification is the main driver of water quality decline. Water quality decline, invasions by exotic submerged plants and occurrences of algal blooms have led to a number of in-lake interventions such as herbicide spraying (to control submerged plants) and dosing of inflows with Alum to flocculate phosphorus (and reduce algal blooms). Management of land use to reduce nutrient run-off has also been initiated. Based on the drivers-pressures-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework, water quality changes and management responses were examined by studying research publications and data from 1922 to 2013. Multinomial regression analysis based on the generalized maximum entropy model was used to investigate the five categories of DPSIR and examine relationships of environmental dynamics and regulatory responses. We tested whether the visibility of ecosystem degradation in the public sphere, and social lag times to respond to them, were drivers of failures of these regulatory responses. Our study shows that management was reactive, and regulations often took effect only when ecosystem decline was already well advanced. There was a disconnect between land use intensification and its role in driving water quality change. Our results indicate that science can better inform management decision making by providing a holistic framework integrating ecological knowledge, economic interest and societal constraints.

  3. The Charles River, Eastern Massachusetts: Scientific Information in Support of Environmental Restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    Human activity has profoundly altered the Charles River and its watershed over the past 375 years. Restoration of environmental quality in the watershed has become a high priority for private- and public-sector organizations across the region. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs worked together to coordinate the efforts of the various organizations. One result of this initiative has been a series of scientific studies that provide critical information concerning some of the major hydrologic and ecological concerns in the watershed. These studies have focused upon: * Streamflows - Limited aquifer storage, growing water demands, and the spread of impervious surfaces are some of the factors exacerbating low summer streamflows in headwater areas of the watershed. Coordinated management of withdrawals, wastewater returns, and stormwater runoff could substantially increase low streamflows in the summer. Innovative approaches to flood control, including preservation of upstream wetland storage capacity and construction of a specially designed dam at the river mouth, have greatly reduced flooding in the lower part of the watershed in recent decades. * Water quality - Since the mid-1990s, the bacterial quality of the Charles River has improved markedly, because discharges from combined sewer overflows and the number of illicit sewer connections to municipal storm drains have been reduced. Improved management of stormwater runoff will likely be required, however, for full attainment of State and Federal water-quality standards. Phosphorus inputs from a variety of sources remain an important water-quality problem. * Fish communities and habitat quality - The Charles River watershed supports a varied fish community of about 20 resident and migratory species. Habitat conditions for fish and other aquatic species have improved in many parts of the river system in recent years. However, serious challenges remain

  4. Guidelines for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act

    SciTech Connect

    Kielusiak, C.

    1993-02-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) sets forth national policy for the protection of the environment. The NEPA process is intended to help officials of the federal government make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences, and take actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment. The California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 (CEQA) is similar to NEPA. The California legislature established CEQA to inform both state and local governmental decision-makers and the public about potential significant environmental effects of proposed activities, to identify ways to avoid or reduce environmental impacts, and to disclose to the public the reasons why a project is approved if significant environmental effects are involved. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), complies with the provisions of both NEPA and CEQA. This document defines the responsibilities and authorities for NEPA/CEQA compliance at LBL.

  5. Guidelines for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act

    SciTech Connect

    Kielusiak, C.

    1993-02-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) sets forth national policy for the protection of the environment. The NEPA process is intended to help officials of the federal government make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences, and take actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment. The California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 (CEQA) is similar to NEPA. The California legislature established CEQA to inform both state and local governmental decision-makers and the public about potential significant environmental effects of proposed activities, to identify ways to avoid or reduce environmental impacts, and to disclose to the public the reasons why a project is approved if significant environmental effects are involved. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), complies with the provisions of both NEPA and CEQA. This document defines the responsibilities and authorities for NEPA/CEQA compliance at LBL.

  6. Monitoring And Modeling Environmental Water Quality To Support Environmental Water Purchase Decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Null, S. E.; Elmore, L.; Mouzon, N. R.; Wood, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    More than 25 million cubic meters (20,000 acre feet) of water has been purchased from willing agricultural sellers for environmental flows in Nevada's Walker River to improve riverine habitat and connectivity with downstream Walker Lake. Reduced instream flows limit native fish populations, like Lahontan cutthroat trout, through warm daily stream temperatures and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Environmental water purchases maintain instream flows, although effects on water quality are more varied. We use multi-year water quality monitoring and physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality modeling to estimate streamflow, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen concentrations with alternative environmental water purchases. We simulate water temperature and dissolved oxygen changes from increased streamflow to prioritize the time periods and locations that environmental water purchases most enhance trout habitat as a function of water quality. Monitoring results indicate stream temperature and dissolved oxygen limitations generally exist in the 115 kilometers upstream of Walker Lake (about 37% of the study area) from approximately May through September, and this reach acts as a water quality barrier for fish passage. Model results indicate that low streamflows generally coincide with critically warm stream temperatures, water quality refugia exist on a tributary of the Walker River, and environmental water purchases may improve stream temperature and dissolved oxygen conditions for some reaches and seasons, especially in dry years and prolonged droughts. This research supports environmental water purchase decision-making and allows water purchase decisions to be prioritized with other river restoration alternatives.

  7. LANL environmental restoration site ranking system: System description. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Merkhofer, L.; Kann, A.; Voth, M.

    1992-10-13

    The basic structure of the LANL Environmental Restoration (ER) Site Ranking System and its use are described in this document. A related document, Instructions for Generating Inputs for the LANL ER Site Ranking System, contains detailed descriptions of the methods by which necessary inputs for the system will be generated. LANL has long recognized the need to provide a consistent basis for comparing the risks and other adverse consequences associated with the various waste problems at the Lab. The LANL ER Site Ranking System is being developed to help address this need. The specific purpose of the system is to help improve, defend, and explain prioritization decisions at the Potential Release Site (PRS) and Operable Unit (OU) level. The precise relationship of the Site Ranking System to the planning and overall budget processes is yet to be determined, as the system is still evolving. Generally speaking, the Site Ranking System will be used as a decision aid. That is, the system will be used to aid in the planning and budgetary decision-making process. It will never be used alone to make decisions. Like all models, the system can provide only a partial and approximate accounting of the factors important to budget and planning decisions. Decision makers at LANL will have to consider factors outside of the formal system when making final choices. Some of these other factors are regulatory requirements, DOE policy, and public concern. The main value of the site ranking system, therefore, is not the precise numbers it generates, but rather the general insights it provides.

  8. Environmental restoration and remediation technical data management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Key, K.T.; Fox, R.D.

    1994-02-01

    The tasks performed in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan for each Hanford Site operable unit must meet the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al 1992). An extensive amount of data will be generated in the evaluation and remediation of hazardous waste sites at the Site. The data must be of sufficient quality, as they will be used to evaluate the need, select the method(s), and support the full remediation of the waste sites as stipulated in the Tri-Party Agreement. In particular, a data management plan (DMP) is to be included in an RI/FS work plan for managing the technical data obtained during the characterization of an operable unit, as well as other data related to the study of the operable unit. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) sites are involved in the operable unit. Thus, the data management activities for the operable unit should be applied consistently to RCRA sites in the operable unit as well. This DMP provides common direction for managing-the environmental technical data of all defined operable units at the Hanford Site during the RI/FS activities. Details specific to an operable unit will be included in the actual work plan of that operable unit.

  9. Quality data validation: Comprehensive approach to environmental data validation

    SciTech Connect

    Matejka, L.A. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Environmental data validation consists of an assessment of three major areas: analytical method validation; field procedures and documentation review; evaluation of the level of achievement of data quality objectives based in part on PARCC parameters analysis and expected applications of data. A program utilizing matrix association of required levels of validation effort and analytical levels versus applications of this environmental data was developed in conjunction with DOE-ID guidance documents to implement actions under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order in effect at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This was an effort to bring consistent quality to the INEL-wide Environmental Restoration Program and database in an efficient and cost-effective manner. This program, documenting all phases of the review process, is described here.

  10. Economic Growth with Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Producers of environmental control equipment have formed the Environmental Industry Council (EIC) in order to acquire a voice in the Washington legislative machinery. The Council is interested in changes in tax policy and in publicizing case histories where environmental controls have led to industrial savings. (BT)

  11. Characterizing light attenuation within Northwest Florida Estuaries: Implications for RESTORE Act water quality monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water Quality (WQ) condition is based on ecosystem stressor indicators (e.g. water clarity) which are biogeochemically important and critical when considering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill restoration efforts under the 2012 RESTORE Act. Nearly all of the proposed RESTORE proj...

  12. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 416, Mud Pit, Project Shoal Area

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This plan addresses the actions necessary for the restoration and closure of the Project Shoal Area (PSA), Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 416, Mud Pit (Corrective Action Site No. 57-09-01), a pit that was used to store effluent produced during drilling of the Post-Shot Borehole PS-1 in 1963. This plan describes the activities that will occur at the site and the steps that will be taken to gather enough data to obtain a notice of completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and the Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan (DOE/NV, 1994). The SAFER process is being employed at this CAU where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action without completing a Corrective Action Decision Document and Corrective Action Plan. This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. This has already been completed for the mud pit so it will not be repeated here. The DQOs for the mud pit are presented in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Project Shoal Area, CAU No. 416 (DOE/NV, 1996). This observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision making.

  13. Risk-based priority scoring for Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental restoration programs

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.C.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the process of estimating the risk associated with environmental restoration programs under the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration. The process was part of an effort across all Department of Energy facilities to provide a consistent framework to communicate risk information about the facilities to senior managers in the DOE Office of Environmental Management to foster understanding of risk activities across programs. the risk evaluation was a qualitative exercise. Categories considered included: Public health and safety; site personnel safety and health; compliance; mission impact; cost-effective risk management; environmental protection; inherent worker risk; environmental effects of clean-up; and social, cultural, political, and economic impacts.

  14. Environmental management 1994. Progress and plans of the environmental restoration and waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy currently faces one of the largest environmental challenges in the world. The Department`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program is responsible for identifying and reducing risks and managing waste at 137 sites in 34 States and territories where nuclear energy or weapons research and production resulted in radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination. The number of sites continues to grow as facilities are transferred to be cleaned up and closed down. The program`s main challenge is to balance technical and financial realities with the public`s expectations and develop a strategy that enables the Department to meet its commitments to the American people. This document provides a closer look at what is being done around the country. Included are detailed discussions of the largest sites in the region, followed by site activities organized by state, and a summary of activities at FUSRAP and UMTRA sites in the region.

  15. Horses, Cows, and Water Quality: Prioritizing Stream Restoration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Ambers, R. K.

    2002-05-01

    In order to prioritize sites for a stream restoration project, water quality testing is being done in two small, partly forested watersheds on the Sweet Briar College campus east of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. The 1.3 km2 watershed of Dairy Creek contains a former dairy operation (now hayfields) and athletic fields. The 0.7 km2 watershed of Fern Creek contains an actively used horse pasture, riding, and stable area. The goals of this study are: (1) to determine which stream would benefit more from establishing or improving a forested riparian buffer zone and (2) to collect baseline water quality data which can be used in future years to monitor the effectiveness of the restoration project and other land management practices. Ten sites along the main stems and tributary streams in the two watersheds were chosen for water quality measurements. When water samples are collected, discharge is also determined at each site by dilution gauging using a conductivity logger. Water samples are tested in the lab for pH, turbidity, nitrate-nitrogen, orthophosphate, total phosphate, and fecal and total coloform bacteria. Total and orthophosphate and pH show no systematic downstream variation or difference between the two watersheds. In contrast, nitrate increases downstream and is positively correlated with conductivity and the upstream area of non-forested land. Nitrate concentrations in the Dairy Creek watershed are significantly higher than in the Fern Creek watershed. Fecal and total coloform counts also tend to be higher in Dairy than in Fern Creek, but the numbers vary widely. Although discharge increases downstream in a predictable way, it does not correlate well with any of the measured constituents. Despite the fact that the riding center is functioning but the dairy operation is not, these preliminary data suggest that water quality in the Dairy Creek system is poorer than in Fern Creek. Further investigation is needed to identify non-point sources of nutrient

  16. 75 FR 52969 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Wetland Restoration, Santa Cruz Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Wetland Restoration, Santa... coastal wetland on Santa Cruz Island, Channel Islands National Park. The requisite no-action ``wait period... restoration of palustrine wetlands and deepwater habitat at Prisoners Harbor, as well as remove a...

  17. Scale-dependent effects of river habitat quality on benthic invertebrate communities--Implications for stream restoration practice.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Stefan; Breyer, Philippa; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Früh, Denise; Haase, Peter

    2016-05-15

    Although most stream restoration projects succeed in improving hydromorphological habitat quality, the ecological quality of the stream communities often remains unaffected. We hypothesize that this is because stream communities are largely determined by environmental properties at a larger-than-local spatial scale. Using benthic invertebrate community data as well as hydromorphological habitat quality data from 1087 stream sites, we investigated the role of local- (i.e. 100 m reach) and regional-scale (i.e. 5 km ring centered on each reach) stream hydromorphological habitat quality (LQ and RQ, respectively) on benthic invertebrate communities. The analyses showed that RQ had a greater individual effect on communities than LQ, but the effects of RQ and LQ interacted. Where RQ was either good or poor, communities were exclusively determined by RQ. Only in areas of intermediate RQ, LQ determined communities. Metacommunity analysis helped to explain these findings. Species pools in poor RQ areas were most depauperated, resulting in insufficient propagule pressure for species establishment even at high LQ (e.g. restored) sites. Conversely, higher alpha diversity and an indication of lower beta dispersion signals at mass effects occurring in high RQ areas. That is, abundant neighboring populations may help to maintain populations even at sites with low LQ. The strongest segregation in species co-occurrence was detected at intermediate RQ levels, suggesting that communities are structured to the highest degree by a habitat/environmental gradient. From these results, we conclude that when restoring riverine habitats at the reach scale, restoration projects situated in intermediate RQ settings will likely be the most successful in enhancing the naturalness of local communities. With a careful choice of sites for reach-scale restoration in settings of intermediate RQ and a strategy that aims to expand areas of high RQ, the success of reach-scale restoration in promoting the

  18. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  19. Napa River Salt Marsh Restoration Project. Volume 2: Environmental Impact Statement Comments Letters and Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    including feral cats and red foxes. It is DFG’s professional opinion that levee lowering and breaches will help reduce predation. Minor new Napa River...Deartent f Fsh &Gam Final Napa River Salt Marsh Restoration Project Environmental Impact Report Comment Letters and Responses Volume 2 Prepared for...Distribution Unlimited 20070314143 Jones & Stokes. 2004. Napa-Sonoma Salt Marsh Restoration Project environmental impact statement. Final. Volume 2

  20. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan (SSP) for fiscal year 1992 (FY92)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The FY-92 Site-Specific Plan (FY-92 SSP) for environmental restoration and waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is designed to provide the reader with easy access to the status of environmental restoration and waste management activities at INEL. The first chapter provides background on INIEL`s physical environment, site history and mission, and general information about the site and its facilities. In addition, this chapter discusses the inter-relationships between the Site Specific Plan, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, the environmental restoration and waste management prioritization systems, and the Activity Data Sheets (ADSs) for environmental restoration and waste management. This discussion should help readers understand what the SSP is and how it fits into the environmental restoration and waste management process at INEL. This understanding should provide the reader with a better context for understanding the discussions in the SSP as well as a better feel for how and what to comment on during the public comment period that will be held from the first of September through the end of October 1991.

  1. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan (SSP) for fiscal year 1992 (FY92)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The FY-92 Site-Specific Plan (FY-92 SSP) for environmental restoration and waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is designed to provide the reader with easy access to the status of environmental restoration and waste management activities at INEL. The first chapter provides background on INIEL's physical environment, site history and mission, and general information about the site and its facilities. In addition, this chapter discusses the inter-relationships between the Site Specific Plan, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, the environmental restoration and waste management prioritization systems, and the Activity Data Sheets (ADSs) for environmental restoration and waste management. This discussion should help readers understand what the SSP is and how it fits into the environmental restoration and waste management process at INEL. This understanding should provide the reader with a better context for understanding the discussions in the SSP as well as a better feel for how and what to comment on during the public comment period that will be held from the first of September through the end of October 1991.

  2. Guidance document for the preparation of waste management plans for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A project waste management (WM) plan is required for all Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program remedial investigation, decommission and decontamination (D&D), and remedial action (RA) activities. The project WM plan describes the strategy for handling, packaging, treating, transporting, characterizing, storing, and/or disposing of waste produced as part of ORNL ER Program activities. The project WM plan also contains a strategy for ensuring worker and environmental protection during WM activities.

  3. Age chronosequence effects on restoration quality of reclaimed coal mine soils in Mississipian agroecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface coal mining causes drastic disturbances in landscape and soil properties, and reclamation has the potential to improve and re-store soil quality and biomass productivity. However, it is not clear how long it takes for an effective soil reclamation process to restore soil quality to the pre-...

  4. Installation Restoration at Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Phase I. Detailed Survey and Alternatives Assessment - Environmental Impact Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    PROJECT MANAGER FOR CHEMICAL DEMILITARIZATION AND INSTALLATION RESTORATION INSTALLATION RESTORATION AT FRANKFORD ARSENAL PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA PHASE 1...Frankford Arsenal Caretaker Activity Chemical Demilitarization and Installation Restoration SUMMARY SHEET INSTALLATION RESTORATION AT FRANKFORD... ARSENAL PHILADELPHIA, PENNYSLVANIA PHASE 1 - DETAILED SURVEY AND ALTERNATIVES ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Contact for additional information

  5. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: An Introduction. Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This technical document focuses on the Department of Energy's (DOE) efforts to restore the environment and manage nuclear waste. This student edition was rewritten and edited by a team of high school students in order to make it "user-friendly" for high school students and the general public. The document focuses on the efforts of the…

  6. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: An Introduction. Student Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This technical document focuses on the Department of Energy's (DOE) efforts to restore the environment and manage nuclear waste. This student edition was rewritten and edited by a team of high school students in order to make it "user-friendly" for high school students and the general public. The document focuses on the efforts of the…

  7. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Markets in Chesapeake Bay Restoration

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains two separate analyses, both of which make use of an optimization framework previously developed to evaluate trade-offs in alternative restoration strategies to achieve the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The first analysis expands on model app...

  8. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Markets in Chesapeake Bay Restoration

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains two separate analyses, both of which make use of an optimization framework previously developed to evaluate trade-offs in alternative restoration strategies to achieve the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The first analysis expands on model app...

  9. Models for urban forest restoration: Human and environmental values

    Treesearch

    Paul H. Gobster

    2010-01-01

    Urban forest restoration programs have been increasing worldwide in recent decades. A mail survey by Borneman and Hostetler (2004) gathered basic information on 33 urban natural areas programs in the United States and Canada and found the programs differed considerably along key variables such as budget, hectares under jurisdiction, and staffing. In terms of their...

  10. A Contract Management Guide for Air Force Environmental Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    specifically written as environmental contracting guidance (40; 58). Environmental Management. Mr Tony Negri was Director of the Wright-Patterson AFB...Environmental Management Office (2750AB0/EM). Mr Negri also echoed Dr Pursch’s statement that he knew of no literature specifically written as...environmental contracting guidance (54). Mr Negri pointed out that Wright-Patterson AFB is among many bases who have taken the initiative to create an

  11. On-site laboratory support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory environmental restoration field activities

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, J.L.E.

    1995-07-01

    A remedial investigation/feasibility study has been undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Bechtel National, Inc. and partners CH2M Hill, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, and PEER Consultants are contracted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, performing this work for ORNL`s Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. An on-site Close Support Laboratory (CSL) established at the ER Field Operations Facility has evolved into a laboratory where quality analytical screening results can be provided rapidly (e.g., within 24 hours of sampling). CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, chromatography, and wet chemistry. Radiochemical analyses include gamma spectroscopy, tritium and carbon-14 screens using liquid scintillation analysis, and gross alpha and beta counting. Cerenkov counting and crown-ether-based separation are the two rapid methods used for radiostrontium determination in water samples. By extending count times where appropriate, method detection limits can match those achieved by off-site contract laboratories. Volatile organic compounds are detected by means of gas chromatography using either headspace or purge and trap sample introduction (based on EPA 601/602). Ionic content of water samples is determined using ion chromatography and alkalinity measurement. Ion chromatography is used to quantify both anions (based on EPA 300) and cations. Wet chemistry procedures performed at the CSL include alkalinity, pH (water and soil), soil resistivity, and dissolved/suspended solids. Besides environmental samples, the CSL routinely screens health and safety and waste management samples. The cost savings of the CSL are both direct and indirect.

  12. Environmental Quality, the Fourth Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Environmental Quality, Washington, DC.

    The state of the environment and efforts to improve it are reported upon in this Fourth Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality. Broad in scope, the report covers federal and state activities during the past year, the urban environment, economics and environmental management, the law and land use regulation, environmental quality,…

  13. Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) operating procedures handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, T.E. ); Das, S. )

    1992-08-01

    The Operating Procedures Handbook of the Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) is intended to be kept current as EQIAC develops and evolves. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive guide to the mission, infrastructure, functions, and operational procedures of EQIAC. The handbook is a training tool for new personnel and a reference manual for existing personnel. The handbook will be distributed throughout EQIAC and maintained in binders containing current dated editions of the individual sections. The handbook will be revised at least annually to reflect the current structure and operational procedures of EQIAC. The EQIAC provides information on environmental issues such as compliance, restoration, and environmental monitoring do the Air Force and DOD contractors.

  14. Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) operating procedures handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, T.E.; Das, S.

    1992-08-01

    The Operating Procedures Handbook of the Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) is intended to be kept current as EQIAC develops and evolves. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive guide to the mission, infrastructure, functions, and operational procedures of EQIAC. The handbook is a training tool for new personnel and a reference manual for existing personnel. The handbook will be distributed throughout EQIAC and maintained in binders containing current dated editions of the individual sections. The handbook will be revised at least annually to reflect the current structure and operational procedures of EQIAC. The EQIAC provides information on environmental issues such as compliance, restoration, and environmental monitoring do the Air Force and DOD contractors.

  15. Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1994--FY 2001. Environmental Restoration Program, September 1993 Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project. FY 1994--FY 2001 is the third in a series of documents that report current estimates of the waste volumes expected to be generated as a result of Environmental Restoration activities at Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), sites. Considered in the scope of this document are volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of remedial action and decontamination and decommissioning activities taking place at these sites. Sites contributing to the total estimates make up the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the off-site contaminated areas adjacent to the Oak Ridge facilities (collectively referred to as the Oak Ridge Reservation Off-Site area). Estimates are available for the entire fife of all waste generating activities. This document summarizes waste estimates forecasted for the 8-year period of FY 1994-FY 2001. Updates with varying degrees of change are expected throughout the refinement of restoration strategies currently in progress at each of the sites. Waste forecast data are relatively fluid, and this document represents remediation plans only as reported through September 1993.

  16. Coordinating ecological restoration options analysis and risk assessment to improve environmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapustka, Lawrence A; Bowers, Keith; Isanhart, John; Martinez-Garza, Cristina; Finger, Susan; Stahl, Ralph G; Stauber, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Ecological risk assessment as currently practiced has hindered consideration of ecosystem services endpoints and restoration goals in the environmental management process. Practitioners have created barriers between procedures to clean up contaminated areas and efforts to restore ecosystem functions. In this article, we examine linkages between contaminant risk assessment approaches and restoration efforts with the aim of identifying ways to improve environmental outcomes. We advocate that project managers and other stakeholders use an ecological planning framework, with restoration options included upfront in the risk assessment. We also considered the opportunities to incorporate ecosystem services as potential assessment endpoints in the Problem Formulation stages of a risk assessment. Indeed, diverse perspectives of stakeholders are central to understand the relevance of social, cultural, economic, and regional ecology as influences on future use options for the landscape being restored. The measurement endpoints used to characterize the existing ecological conditions for selected ecosystem services can also be used to evaluate restoration success. A regional, landscape, or seascape focus is needed throughout the risk assessment process, so that restoration efforts play a more prominent role in enhancing ecosystem services. In short, we suggest that practitioners begin with the question of "how can the ecological risk assessment inform the decision on how best to restore the ecosystem?"

  17. Homogenization of Environmental Condition and Benthic Communities in Restored Streams of the North Carolina Piedmont.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullos, D. D.; Penrose, D. L.; Jennings, G. D.; Wentworth, T. R.

    2005-05-01

    Stream ecosystems, as described through benthic communities and twenty environmental variables, exhibited decreased variances and reduced ordinal dimensionality in restored streams when compared to associated upstream reaches in this upstream-downstream investigation of stream restoration in the North Carolina Piedmont. Through paired t-tests of the environmental variables and several descriptions of community structure and function, the variance for restored stream reaches was lower than the upstream reaches for 70% of environmental characteristics, for 75% of Functional Feeding and Habitat Groups, and for all of the community descriptions, including the Q statistic, Shannon Index, Simpson Index, EPT taxa richness, and NCBI. Further, Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling of the sites best expressed the upstream reaches on three axes, while the restored stream reaches required only one axis to effectively describe variation in the benthic communities. These results suggest that simplification of the biota may occur following steam restoration activities, indicating the biological losses associated with early recovery in these streams. While the science of stream restoration has advanced since the early construction and implementation at these sites, the consequential homogenization demonstrated by these biotic and abiotic stream corridor features emphasizes the importance of a concentrated effort to re-establish heterogeneity in restoration designs.

  18. The use of soil quality indicators to assess soil functionality in restored semi-arid ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Erickson, Todd E.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Merritt, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: Pilbara, 1-day CO2 test, microbial activity, mine restoration, soil health, ecosystem services. Introduction Semi-arid and arid environments are highly vulnerable to land degradation and their restoration has commonly showed low rates of success (James et al., 2013). A systematic knowledge of soil functionality is critical to successful restoration of degraded ecosystems since approximately 80% of ecosystem services can be connected to soil functions. The assessment of soil functionality generally involves the evaluation of soil properties and processes as they relate to the ability of soil to function effectively as a component of a healthy ecosystem (Costantini et al., 2015) Using soil quality indicators may be a valuable approach to assess functionality of topsoil and novel substrates used in restoration (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014; 2015). A key soil chemical indicator is soil organic C, that has been widely used as an attribute of soil quality because of the many functions that it provides and supports (Willaarts et al., 2015). However, microbial indicators can be more sensitive to disturbances and could be a valuable addition in soil assessment studies in restoration programs. Here, we propose a set of soil quality indicators to assess the soil status in restored soils (topsoil and waste material) of semi-arid environments. The study was conducted during March 2015 in the Pilbara biogeographical region (northwestern Australia) at an iron ore mine site rehabilitated in 2011. Methods Soil samples were collected from two sub-areas with different soil materials used as growth media: topsoil retrieved from nearby stockpiles and a lateritic waste material utilised for its erosive stability and physical competence. An undisturbed natural shrub-grassland ecosystem dominated by Triodia spp. and Acacia spp. representative of the restored area was selected as the analogue reference site. Soil physicochemical analysis were undertaken according to standard methods

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP), Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-20

    This document was prepared to take the place of a Safety Evaluation Report since the Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)and associated Baseline Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) File do not meet the requirements of a complete safety analysis documentation. Its purpose is to present in summary form the background of how the BSAF and Baseline TSR originated and a description of the process by which it was produced and approved for use in the Environmental Restoration Program.The BSAF is a facility safety reference document for INEL environmental restoration activities including environmental remediation of inactive waste sites and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of surplus facilities. The BSAF contains safety bases common to environmental restoration activities and guidelines for performing and documenting safety analysis. The common safety bases can be incorporated by reference into the safety analysis documentation prepared for individual environmental restoration activities with justification and any necessary revisions. The safety analysis guidelines in BSAF provide an accepted method for hazard analysis; analysis of normal, abnormal, and accident conditions; human factors analysis; and derivation of TSRS. The BSAF safety bases and guidelines are graded for environmental restoration activities.

  20. Effects of Soundscape on the Environmental Restoration in Urban Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Jian; Kang, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Context: According to the attention restoration theory, directed attention is a limited physiological resource and is susceptible to fatigue by overuse. Natural environments are a healthy resource, which allows and promotes the restoration of individuals within it from their state of directed attention fatigue. This process is called the environmental restoration on individuals, and it is affected both positively and negatively by environmental factors. Aims: By considering the relationship among the three components of soundscape, that is, people, sound and the environment, this study aims to explore the effects of soundscape on the environmental restoration in urban natural environments. Materials and Methods: A field experiment was conducted with 70 participants (four groups) in an urban natural environment (Shenyang, China). Directed attention was first depleted with a 50-min ‘consumption’ phase, followed by a baseline measurement of attention level. Three groups then engaged in 40 min of restoration in the respective environments with similar visual surroundings but with different sounds present, after which attention levels were re-tested. The fourth group did not undergo restoration and was immediately re-tested. The difference between the two test scores, corrected for the practice effect, represents the attention restoration of individuals exposed to the respective environments. Statistical Analysis Used: An analysis of variance was performed, demonstrating that the differences between the mean values for each group were statistically significant [sig. = 0.027 (<0.050)]. Results: The results showed that the mean values (confidence interval of 95%) of each group are as follows: ‘natural sounds group’ (8.4), ‘traffic sounds group’ (2.4) and ‘machine sounds group’ (−1.8). Conclusion: It can be concluded that (1) urban natural environments, with natural sounds, have a positive effect on the restoration of an individuals’ attention and

  1. Approaches to environmental restoration of a polluted harbour with submerged archaeology: the Alexandria case study.

    PubMed

    El-Rayis, Osman A; Hemeda, Engy I; Ismael, Amany M; Jammo, K

    2003-01-01

    Many invaluable underwater buildings of archaeological interest in Alexandria were discovered in 1996 at different sites in the Eastern Harbour of Alexandria. There is a belief that the best way to protect these invaluable heritages is to transfer them to an underwater park or museum. Obviously, the execution of such a project depends essentially upon the water quality (including water transparency) improving in the future. The harbour is presently polluted by discharge of wastewater effluents from different sources. It has recently been decided to restore this important coastal area through: (1) stopping the direct discharge of wastewater effluents into this semi-enclosed harbour in 1993 and (2) gradually reducing the discharge of the municipal wastewater through marine outfalls at two sites lying at the outer sides of the harbour. Zero discharge is expected to be effective by the end of the year 2001. The present work, therefore, is a follow up of the study of water quality in the harbour after 1993: in 1996 and 1999-2000. The water quality of an open sea reference station was also studied for comparison. The results reveal occurrence of an improvement of the environmental conditions in the harbour. The water has turned from being eutrophic to mesotrophic. The harbour is expected to become meso/oligotrophic as soon as the complete cessation of the discharge from the two outside sources is attained.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INFORMATION SYSTEM - EQULS® - ITER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of an evaluation of the Environmental Quality Information System (EQuIS) software designed by Earthsoft, Inc. as an environmental data management and analysis platform for monitoring and remediation projects. In consultation with the EQuIS vendor, six pri...

  3. The Benefits of Improving Indoor Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamping, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    As school funding levels nationwide continue to plummet amid public demands for increased student performance, an expanding body of research in the field of indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is providing greater statistical validity about the relationship between environmental conditions in school facilities and student achievement. Since the…

  4. The Benefits of Improving Indoor Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamping, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    As school funding levels nationwide continue to plummet amid public demands for increased student performance, an expanding body of research in the field of indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is providing greater statistical validity about the relationship between environmental conditions in school facilities and student achievement. Since the…

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INFORMATION SYSTEM - EQULS® - ITER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of an evaluation of the Environmental Quality Information System (EQuIS) software designed by Earthsoft, Inc. as an environmental data management and analysis platform for monitoring and remediation projects. In consultation with the EQuIS vendor, six pri...

  6. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defense Environmental... System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts...

  7. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defense Environmental... System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts...

  8. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defense Environmental... System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction...

  9. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defense Environmental... System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction...

  10. 48 CFR 228.102-70 - Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defense Environmental... System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds 228.102-70 Defense Environmental Restoration Program construction...

  11. US - Former Soviet Union environmental restoration and waste management activities, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy Agreement was signed between DOE and the Ministry of Atomic Energy for the Russian Federation and provides a mechanism for cooperation in research, development, and safe utilization of nuclear energy. Under the umbrella of this agreement, DOE and the former Ministry of Atomic Power and Industry signed a Memorandum of Cooperation in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management in September 1990. This document discusses the environmental situation, science and technology process, technical projects (separations, contaminant transport, waste treatment, environmental restoration), scientist exchanges, enhanced data transfer, the US-Russia industry partnership (conference, centers), and future actions.

  12. Restoration of color in a remote sensing image and its quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuxun; Li, Zhijiang; Zhang, Jianqing; Wang, Zhihe

    2003-09-01

    This paper is focused on the restoration of color remote sensing (including airborne photo). A complete approach is recommended. It propose that two main aspects should be concerned in restoring a remote sensing image, that are restoration of space information, restoration of photometric information. In this proposal, the restoration of space information can be performed by making the modulation transfer function (MTF) as degradation function, in which the MTF is obtained by measuring the edge curve of origin image. The restoration of photometric information can be performed by improved local maximum entropy algorithm. What's more, a valid approach in processing color remote sensing image is recommended. That is splits the color remote sensing image into three monochromatic images which corresponding three visible light bands and synthesizes the three images after being processed separately with psychological color vision restriction. Finally, three novel evaluation variables are obtained based on image restoration to evaluate the image restoration quality in space restoration quality and photometric restoration quality. An evaluation is provided at last.

  13. Phase I of the Kissimmee River restoration project, Florida, USA: impacts of construction on water quality.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, David J; Jones, Bradley L

    2005-03-01

    Phase I of the Kissimmee River restoration project included backfilling of 12 km of canal and restoring flow through 24 km of continuous river channel. We quantified the effects of construction activities on four water quality parameters (turbidity, total phosphorus flow-weighted concentration, total phosphorus load and dissolved oxygen concentration). Data were collected at stations upstream and downstream of the construction and at four stations within the construction zone to determine if canal backfilling and construction of 2.4 km of new river channel would negatively impact local and downstream water quality. Turbidity levels at the downstream station were elevated for approximately 2 weeks during the one and a half year construction period, but never exceeded the Florida Department of Environmental Protection construction permit criteria. Turbidity levels at stations within the construction zone were high at certain times. Flow-weighted concentration of total phosphorus at the downstream station was slightly higher than the upstream station during construction, but low discharge limited downstream transport of phosphorus. Total phosphorus loads at the upstream and downstream stations were similar and loading to Lake Okeechobee was not significantly affected by construction. Mean water column dissolved oxygen concentrations at all sampling stations were similar during construction.

  14. 75 FR 12745 - SFIREG Environmental Quality Issues Working Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SFIREG Environmental Quality Issues Working Committee Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection...)/State FIFRA Issues Research and Evaluation Group (SFIREG), Environmental Quality Issues (EQI)...

  15. U.S. Air Force Environmental Restoration Contracting Strategies Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Uability Act ( CERCLA ) and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act...Federal Legislation The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 ( CERCLA ) and the Superfund Amendments and...276c); McNamara - O’Hara Service Contract Act; and CERCLA , as amended by Superfund Amendments & Reauthorization Act (SARA). A.7 ORGANIZATIONAL

  16. Peatland restoration and effects on groundwater, water quality and runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menberu, Meseret; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Irannezhad, Masoud; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Marttila, Hannu; Penttinen, Jouni; Klöve, Björn

    2015-04-01

    There is increasing interest to restore degraded peatland, but long term effects of restoration are poorly known. Totally 46 boreal peatland were included in a study set, including 20 fens, 13 pine mires and 13 spruce mires, with peatland types ranging from nearly ombrotrophic Sphagnum bogs to rich fens. Study sites covered spatially almost whole Finland. Furthermore, 27 of the sites were previously drained and restored during the monitoring period, while the remaining 19 sites were in pristine condition. The pristine sites were held as paired counterparts of the drained sites and are located in the vicinity of drained/restored sites to ensure similar vegetation, nutrient and hydrological status. Since 2008, water table fluctuation (continuous measurement), pore water chemistry at all sites, and runoff and water chemistry (nutrients, DOC, ions with adjusted intervals through frost-free season) from 9 sites were studied. Drained/restored sites were monitored for 1 to 3 years before restoration. This presentation shows preliminary results and analysis of present dataset. Restoration operation increased water table (WT) in all study areas, but high variation was observed. Highest change in WT elevation was observed in spruce mires and smaller increases in fens. Disturbance of peat material and higher WT caused leaching of nutrients and ions from restoration areas, e.g. phosphorus, nitrogen and iron. Increase was highest during the first year after restoration, but showed decreasing trend almost in all study areas in pore-water samples. Generally it can be concluded that restoration have reached its main target for elevated WT, launching re-development of acrotelm peat layers. However, restoration operation caused disturbance and elevated nutrient loading to water courses. Preliminary results of statistical analysis revealed no significant differences of mean daily runoff between drained and pristine counterparts. After restoration, one study site showed decrease in

  17. Alteration of soil microbial communities and water quality in restored wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossio, D.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Scow, K.M.; Fujii, R.

    2006-01-01

    Land usage is a strong determinant of soil microbial community composition and activity, which in turn determine organic matter decomposition rates and decomposition products in soils. Microbial communities in permanently flooded wetlands, such as those created by wetland restoration on Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta islands in California, function under restricted aeration conditions that result in increasing anaerobiosis with depth. It was hypothesized that the change from agricultural management to permanently flooded wetland would alter microbial community composition, increase the amount and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds in Delta waters; and have a predominant impact on microbial communities as compared with the effects of other environmental factors including soil type and agricultural management. Based on phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, active microbial communities of the restored wetlands were changed significantly from those of the agricultural fields, and wetland microbial communities varied widely with soil depth. The relative abundance of monounsaturated fatty acids decreased with increasing soil depth in both wetland and agricultural profiles, whereas branched fatty acids were relatively more abundant at all soil depths in wetlands as compared to agricultural fields. Decomposition conditions were linked to DOC quantity and quality using fatty acid functional groups to conclude that restricted aeration conditions found in the wetlands were strongly related to production of reactive carbon compounds. But current vegetation may have had an equally important role in determining DOC quality in restored wetlands. In a larger scale analysis, that included data from wetland and agricultural sites on Delta islands and data from two previous studies from the Sacramento Valley, an aeration gradient was defined as the predominant determinant of active microbial communities across soil types and land usage. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  19. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  20. Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, R.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

  1. Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  2. Surface and ground water quality in a restored urban stream affected by road salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001 research began in Minebank Run, MD to examine the impact of restoration on water quality. Our research area was to determine if road salts in the surface and ground waters are detrimental to the stream channel restoration. The upstream reach (UP), above the Baltimore I-...

  3. Surface and ground water quality in a restored urban stream affected by road salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001 research began in Minebank Run, MD to examine the impact of restoration on water quality. Our research area was to determine if road salts in the surface and ground waters are detrimental to the stream channel restoration. The upstream reach (UP), above the Baltimore I-...

  4. Targeting Environmental Quality to Improve Population Health ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Key goals of health care reform are to stimulate innovative approaches to improve healthcare quality and clinical outcomes while holding down costs. To achieve these goals value-based payment places the needs of the patient first and encourages multi-stakeholder cooperation. Yet, the stakeholders are typically all within the healthcare system, e.g. the Accountable Care Organization or Patient-Centered Medical Home, leaving important contributors to the health of the population such as the public health and environmental health systems absent. And rarely is the quality of the environment regarded as a modifiable factor capable of imparting a health benefit. Underscoring this point, a PubMed search of the search terms “environmental quality” with “value-based payment”, “value-based healthcare” or “value-based reimbursement” returned no relevant articles, providing further evidence that the healthcare industry largely disregards the quality of the environment as a significant determinant of wellbeing and an actionable risk factor for clinical disease management and population health intervention. Yet, the quality of the environment is unequivocally related to indicators of population health including all-cause mortality. The EPA’s Environmental Quality Index (EQI) composed of five different domains (air, land use, water, built environment and social) has provided new estimates of the associations between environmental quality and health stat

  5. Restore Harlem River's Water Quality to Swimmable/Fishable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) discharged untreated sewage into the Harlem River during rainstorms, elevated nutrient and bacteria levels. The river is not safe for swimming, fishing or boating during wet weather conditions. We had collected water samples from CSOs discharge point, analyzed ammonia (NH3-N), phosphate (PO43-), fecal coliform, E.Coli., enteroccus, and polychlorinated biphenyl's (PCBs). On tropical storm Arthur, we had collected CSOs: DO reduced during heavy thunderstorm dropped down from 4 to 2.9 mg/L (49 to 35%); fecal coliform was 5 million MPN/100ml, E.Coli. was 1000-2000 MPN/100ml, enterococcus was 2000-2500 MPN/100ml, turbidity was 882 FAU, ammonia was 2.725 mg/L. Nutrient and bacteria exceeded EPA regulated levels significantly (ammonia: 0.23mg/L; fecal coliform: 200 MPN/100ml, E.Coli.: 126 MPN/100ml, enterococcus: 104 MPN/100ml; turbidity: 0.25-5.25 FAU, DO: 4mg/L). Water sampling of CSOs during heavy rainstorm on 4/30/14 showed turbidity reached 112 FAU, ammonia was 0.839 mg/L, fecal coliform: 5 million MPN/100ml, E.Coli.: 500 MPN/100ml and enterococcus: 10,000 MPN/100ml. CSO collection on June 5, 2014 during morning rainstorm showed ammonia was 2.273 mg/L, turbidity was 37 FAU. New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) suggested women under 50 & children under 15 do not eat fish such as blue crab meat, carb or lobster tomalley, channel catfish, gizzard shad, white catfish, Atlantic needlefish, bluefish, carp, goldfish, rainbow smelt, striped bass, white perch because chemical concerns (PCBs, cadmium, dioxin). Fish caught in the Harlem River was banned from commercial. Swimming in the river was not safe due to high pathogen levels. CSOs reduction, such as green roof, green wall, and wetland could help reduce stormwater runoff and CSOs. Water quality improvement and ecology restoration will help achieve the goal of swimmable and fishable in the Harlem River.

  6. RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. The ORD/NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002, which emphasizes collabora...

  7. RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. The ORD/NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002, which emphasizes collabora...

  8. Environmental Restoration and Base Closure: How Clean is Clean Enough?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    laws and policies spanning a number of administrations of both parties. The case of Love Canal changed that view, at least at it applies to hazardous...and toxic wastes. Love Canal was a crisis of both personal health and public confidence. In its wake, the Comprehensive Environmental Response

  9. Environmental Quality, the Third Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Environmental Quality, Washington, DC.

    The state of the environment and efforts to improve it are reported upon in this Third Annual Report of the Council on Environmental Quality. Broad in scope, the report covers federal and state activities during the past year, the development of environmental indices, and legal implications of the National Environmental Policy Act. The chapter on…

  10. Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. [Effects of riparian ecological restoration engineering with offshore wave-elimination weir on restoration area's water quality].

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Fei; Xu, Chi; Wang, Lei; Liu, Mao-Song

    2012-06-01

    Riparian ecological restoration engineering with offshore wave-elimination weir is an engineering measure with piled wave-elimination weir some meters away from the shore. This measure can dissipate waves, promote sediment deposition, and create an artificial semi-closed bay to restore vegetation in a riparian area which has hard dam and destroyed vegetation. Three habitat gradient zones, i. e., emerged vegetation zone, submerged vegetation zone, and open water area, can be formed after this engineering. In June 2010-May 2011, a field investigation was conducted on the water quality in the three zones in an ecological restoration area of Gonghu Bay, Taihu Lake. The water body inside the weir generally had lower concentrations of nitrite and nitrate but higher concentrations of ammonium and total nitrogen than the water body outside the weir. The water phosphorus concentration inside the weir was lower than that outside the weir in autumn and winter, while an opposite trend was observed in spring and summer. The coefficients of variation of the water body' s nitrite and orthophosphate concentration inside the weir decreased, and the annual maximum values of the water nitrite, nitrate, and orthophosphate concentrations inside the weir were lower than those outside the weir. On the contrary, the coefficients of variation of the water body's ammonium and total nitrogen concentrations inside the weir increased, and the annual maximum values of the water ammonium and total nitrogen concentrations inside the weir were higher than those outside the weir. To some extent, the restoration engineering could exacerbate the deterioration of the water quality indices such as ammonium and total nitrogen in the restoration area by the end of growth season

  12. Understanding the relationship between environmental quality ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In 2014, approximately 17.7 million (7.4%) of United States (U.S.) adults had asthma. In 2009 alone, asthma caused 479,300 hospitalizations and 1.9 million emergency room visits. Asthma has been associated with exposure to air pollution and socioeconomic status, and reductions in atopic sensitization, an asthma precursor, have been associated with green space exposure, suggesting a role of environmental quality. We linked the Environmental Quality Index (EQI), representing 5 environmental domains (air, water, land, built, and sociodemographic) for all US counties (N=3,141) from 2000—2005 to Truven Health’s MarketScan individual claims database to examine associations between county-level EQI and asthma among U.S. adults ages 18-65 from 2003-2010. We defined asthma as having at least 1 claim (International Classification of Disease 9th edition, code 493) during the study period. We used random intercept multi-level Poisson regression clustered by county, adjusted for 10-year age category and sex, to estimate fixed effects of quintiles of the EQI on asthma prevalence. We examined modification by urbanicity through stratification by 4 rural-urban continuum codes (RUCC) ranging from most urban (RUCC1) to rural (RUCC4). Approximately 3% of adults in MarketScan have asthma claims. Comparing the highest EQI quintile (worst quality) to lowest EQI quintile (best quality), we observed increased asthma claims associated with worse environmental quality (prevalence rat

  13. Hydrological factors behind the water quality changes due to restoration in boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Marttila, Hannu; Walle Menberu, Meseret; Irannezhad, Masoud; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Penttinen, Jouni; Hokkanen, Reijo; Klöve, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Recovery of hydrological conditions after restoration in previously drained peatlands is typically faster process compared to changes in runoff water quality. Often nutrient load from restored sites increase remarkably during restoration operation and reduce over time when conditions stabilize. However, in some sites nutrient load can remain high for long periods of time which increase negative effects of restoration on downstream water bodies. The factors and challenges behind these processes are poorly understood in practical catchment restoration planning. This study aims to understand factors affecting water quality changes after peatland restoration. Totally 43 peatlands areas of which 24 sites were previously drained and restored during the study and 19 sites at their pristine stage (control sites) were included to the study. The control pristine sites had as little anthropogenic disturbances as possible and the sites were chosen so that the paired study sites closely share similar peatland type, nutrient status and weather conditions. Pore water quality (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, pH, electric conductivity and colour) was measured from all sites and runoff quality and amount from 7 sites in the years 2008-2014. Measured parameters, different peatland types and nutrient loads were studied together with numerous hydrological parameters (variation in water table fluctuations, peat pore water recharge coefficient, physical parameters of peat e.g. specific yield, degree of humification) by statistical methods. Differences in water table dependent hydrological conditions indicate e.g. flow paths and residence time of water that is known to have effect on runoff water quality. As a result, water table related hydrological changes following restoration are as well assumed to explain alterations in water quality in different peatland types. In addition, using water table related hydrological processes as a proxy for water quality

  14. Department of Energy Defense Programs Environmental Restoration Program update

    SciTech Connect

    Lehr, J.C.; Eyman, L.D.; Thompson, W.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Federal facilities are under increasing pressure to remediate inactive hazardous waste sites and associated off-site areas. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act federal facilities provision requires that the Environmental Protection Agency establish a public docket to list all federal sites contaminated by hazardous wastes or substances and to monitor the progress of investigations and cleanups against an established schedule. In addition, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requires that operating permits for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities be issued only upon binding agreements that identify specific schedules for corrective action for all hazardous waste releases that have or are occurring at the facility. Defense Programs (DP) must make remedial actions integral to its mission. Environmental cleanups are given increased emphasis with the new regulations/laws providing the right to private citizens and the states to sue to enforce these statutes and schedule commitments. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Quality Management Plan for the Environmental Assessment and Innovation Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Quality management plan (QMP) which identifies the mission, roles, responsibilities of personnel with regard to quality assurance and quality management for the environmental assessment and innovation division.

  16. STREAM CORRIDOR RESTORATION AND ITS POTENTIAL TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed stream corridors are being degraded by anthropogenic impacts of increased flow from runoff, sediment loading from erosion and contaminants such as nitrate from non-point sources. One solution is to restore stream corridors with bank stabilization and energy dissipation ...

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation Site Management Plan for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This site management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program implements the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (EPA 1990), also known as an Interagency Agreement (IAG), hereafter referred to as the Agreement.'' The Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), hereafter known as the Parties,'' entered into this Agreement for the purpose of coordinating remediation activities undertaken on the ORR to comply with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). 7 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Creating an Overall Environmental Quality Index - Technical Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better estimate of overall environmental quality is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and humanhealth. Described in this report is the effort to construct an environmental quality index representing multiple domains of the ...

  19. Creating an Overall Environmental Quality Index - Technical Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better estimate of overall environmental quality is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and humanhealth. Described in this report is the effort to construct an environmental quality index representing multiple domains of the ...

  20. Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

  1. Photosynthetic performance of restored and natural mangroves under different environmental constraints.

    PubMed

    Rovai, André Scarlate; Barufi, José Bonomi; Pagliosa, Paulo Roberto; Scherner, Fernando; Torres, Moacir Aluísio; Horta, Paulo Antunes; Simonassi, José Carlos; Quadros, Daiane Paula Cunha; Borges, Daniel Lázaro Gallindo; Soriano-Sierra, Eduardo Juan

    2013-10-01

    We hypothesized that the photosynthetic performance of mangrove stands restored by the single planting of mangroves species would be lowered due to residual stressors. The photosynthetic parameters of the vegetation of three planted mangrove stands, each with a different disturbance history, were compared to reference sites and correlated with edaphic environmental variables. A permutational analysis of variance showed significant interaction when the factors were compared, indicating that the photosynthetic parameters of the restoration areas differed from the reference sites. A univariate analysis of variance showed that all the photosynthetic parameters differed between sites and treatments, except for photosynthetic efficiency (αETR). The combination of environmental variables that best explained the variations observed in the photosynthetic performance indicators were Cu, Pb and elevation disruptions. Fluorescence techniques proved efficient in revealing important physiological differences, representing a powerful tool for rapid analysis of the effectiveness of initiatives aimed at restoring coastal environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Quality Program (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster created for the ETV Quality Program. The EPA Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) develops test protocols and verifies the performance of innovative technologies that have the potential to improve protection of human health and the environment. The...

  3. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Quality Program (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster created for the ETV Quality Program. The EPA Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) develops test protocols and verifies the performance of innovative technologies that have the potential to improve protection of human health and the environment. The...

  4. PROMOTING AIR QUALITY THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the promotion of improved air quality through environmental technology verifications (ETVs). In 1995, the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development began the ETV Program in response to President Clinton's "Bridge to a Sustainable Future" and Vice Presiden...

  5. PROMOTING AIR QUALITY THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the promotion of improved air quality through environmental technology verifications (ETVs). In 1995, the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development began the ETV Program in response to President Clinton's "Bridge to a Sustainable Future" and Vice Presiden...

  6. Code of accounts, management overview volume: Richland environmental restoration. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Hajner, R.S.

    2000-01-19

    This document contains the code of accounts volume for the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. Contents include: Total ERC work category, Work location listing, Standard work activity, Work activity definitions, Code of Account trees, the Code of Accounts, Netscape instructions, Setup of charge codes, and Distribution.

  7. 77 FR 66626 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review AGENCY: Interior. ACTION... Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, the Federal and State natural resource... oil spill, which occurred on or about April 20, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. The purpose of this...

  8. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review AGENCY: Interior... Addressing Injuries Resulting from the DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), notice is hereby... services injured or lost as a result of the DEEPWATER HORIZON oil spill, which occurred on or about April...

  9. Genetic and environmental effects on seed weight in subspecies of big sagebrush: Applications for restoration

    Treesearch

    Bryce A. Richardson; Hector G. Ortiz; Stephanie L. Carlson; Deidre M. Jaeger; Nancy L. Shaw

    2015-01-01

    The sagebrush steppe is a patchwork of species and subspecies occupying distinct environmental niches across the intermountain regions of western North America. These ecosystems face degradation from disturbances and exotic weeds. Using sagebrush seed that is matched to its appropriate niche is a critical component to successful restoration, improving habitat for the...

  10. Assessment of eco-environmental quality of Western Taiwan Straits Economic Zone.

    PubMed

    Ma, He; Shi, Longyu

    2016-05-01

    Regional eco-environmental quality is the key and foundation to the sustainable socio-economic development of a region. Eco-environmental quality assessment can reveal the capacity of sustainable socio-economic development in a region and the degree of coordination between social production and the living environment. As part of a new development strategy for Fujian Province, the Western Taiwan Straits Economic Zone (hereafter referred to as the Economic Zone) provides an important guarantee for the development of China's southeastern coastal area. Based on ecological and remote sensing data on the Economic Zone obtained in 2000, 2005, and 2010, this study investigated county-level administrative regions with a comprehensive index of eco-environmental indicators. An objective weighting method was used to determine the importance of each indicator. This led to the development of an indicator system to assess the eco-environmental quality of the economic zone. ArcGIS software was used to assess the eco-environmental quality of the economic zone based on each indicator. The eco-environmental quality index (EQI) of the county-level administrative regions was calculated. The overall eco-environmental quality of the Economic Zone during the period studied is described and analyzed. The results show that the overall eco-environmental quality of the Economic Zone is satisfactory, but significant intraregional differences still exist. The key to improving the overall eco-environmental quality of this area is to restore vegetation and preserve biodiversity.

  11. Environmental Awareness and Public Support for Protecting and Restoring Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safford, Thomas G.; Norman, Karma C.; Henly, Megan; Mills, Katherine E.; Levin, Phillip S.

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to garner consensus around environmental programs, practitioners have attempted to increase awareness about environmental threats and demonstrate the need for action. Nonetheless, how beliefs about the scope and severity of different types of environmental concerns shape support for management interventions are less clear. Using data from a telephone survey of residents of the Puget Sound region of Washington, we investigate how perceptions of the severity of different coastal environmental problems, along with other social factors, affect attitudes about policy options. We find that self-assessed environmental understanding and views about the seriousness of pollution, habitat loss, and salmon declines are only weakly related. Among survey respondents, women, young people, and those who believe pollution threatens Puget Sound are more likely to support policy measures such as increased enforcement and spending on restoration. Conversely, self-identified Republicans and individuals who view current regulations as ineffective tend to oppose governmental actions aimed at protecting and restoring Puget Sound. Support for one policy measure—tax credits for environmentally-friendly business practices—is not significantly affected by political party affiliation. These findings demonstrate that environmental awareness can influence public support for environmental policy tools. However, the nature of particular management interventions and other social forces can have important mitigating effects and need to be considered by practitioners attempting to develop environment-related social indicators and generate consensus around the need for action to address environmental problems.

  12. Environmental awareness and public support for protecting and restoring Puget sound.

    PubMed

    Safford, Thomas G; Norman, Karma C; Henly, Megan; Mills, Katherine E; Levin, Phillip S

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to garner consensus around environmental programs, practitioners have attempted to increase awareness about environmental threats and demonstrate the need for action. Nonetheless, how beliefs about the scope and severity of different types of environmental concerns shape support for management interventions are less clear. Using data from a telephone survey of residents of the Puget Sound region of Washington, we investigate how perceptions of the severity of different coastal environmental problems, along with other social factors, affect attitudes about policy options. We find that self-assessed environmental understanding and views about the seriousness of pollution, habitat loss, and salmon declines are only weakly related. Among survey respondents, women, young people, and those who believe pollution threatens Puget Sound are more likely to support policy measures such as increased enforcement and spending on restoration. Conversely, self-identified Republicans and individuals who view current regulations as ineffective tend to oppose governmental actions aimed at protecting and restoring Puget Sound. Support for one policy measure-tax credits for environmentally-friendly business practices-is not significantly affected by political party affiliation. These findings demonstrate that environmental awareness can influence public support for environmental policy tools. However, the nature of particular management interventions and other social forces can have important mitigating effects and need to be considered by practitioners attempting to develop environment-related social indicators and generate consensus around the need for action to address environmental problems.

  13. Five domains of environmental quality and infant mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between environmental conditions and human health varies by environmental media. In order to account for multiple ambient environmental conditions, we constructed an Environmental Quality Index (EQI) for health research. We used U.S. county level data representin...

  14. Five domains of environmental quality and infant mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between environmental conditions and human health varies by environmental media. In order to account for multiple ambient environmental conditions, we constructed an Environmental Quality Index (EQI) for health research. We used U.S. county level data representin...

  15. Data-driven Inquiry in Environmental Restoration Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalles, D. R.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Place-based field work has been recognized as an important component of geoscience education programs for engaging students. Field work helps students appreciate the spatial extent of data and the systems operating in a locale. Data collected in a place has a temporal aspect that can be explored through representations such as photographs and maps and also though numerical data sets that capture characteristics of place. Yet, experiencing authentic geoscience research in an educational setting requires going beyond fieldwork: students must develop data literacy skills that will enable them to connect abstract representations of spatio-temporal data with place. Educational researchers at SRI International led by Dr. Daniel Zalles, developer of inquiry-based geoscience curricula, and geoscientists at the University of Washington (UW) led by Dr. David Montgomery, Professor of Earth and Space Sciences, are building educational curriculum modules that help students make these connections. The modules concern the environmental history of the Puget Sound area in Washington State and its relevance for the American Indians living there. This collaborative project relies on environmental data collected in the Puget Sound Regional Synthesis Model (PRISM) and Puget Sound River History Project. The data sets are being applied to inquiry-based geoscience investigations at the undergraduate and high school level. The modules consist of problem-based units centered on the data sets, plus geographic and other data representations. The modules will rely on educational "design patterns" that characterize geoscientific inquiry tasks. Use of design patterns will enable other modules to be built that align to the modes of student thinking and practice articulated in the design patterns. The modules will be accompanied by performance assessments that measure student learning from their data investigations. The design principles that drive this project have already been used effectively

  16. Tip60 HAT Action Mediates Environmental Enrichment Induced Cognitive Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songjun; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Iqbal, Sahira; Elefant, Felice

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) conditions have beneficial effects for reinstating cognitive ability in neuropathological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While EE benefits involve epigenetic gene control mechanisms that comprise histone acetylation, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) involved remain largely unknown. Here, we examine a role for Tip60 HAT action in mediating activity- dependent beneficial neuroadaptations to EE using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that flies raised under EE conditions display enhanced MB axonal outgrowth, synaptic marker protein production, histone acetylation induction and transcriptional activation of cognition linked genes when compared to their genotypically identical siblings raised under isolated conditions. Further, these beneficial changes are impaired in both Tip60 HAT mutant flies and APP neurodegenerative flies. While EE conditions provide some beneficial neuroadaptive changes in the APP neurodegenerative fly MB, such positive changes are significantly enhanced by increasing MB Tip60 HAT levels. Our results implicate Tip60 as a critical mediator of EE-induced benefits, and provide broad insights into synergistic behavioral and epigenetic based therapeutic approaches for treatment of cognitive disorder. PMID:27454757

  17. Impact of rehabilitation with metal-ceramic restorations on oral health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gisele Rodrigues; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Ribeiro, Cristianne Pacheco; da Mota, Adérito Soares; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    Dental ceramics present excellent ability to reproduce the natural teeth regarding esthetic and biomechanics. Recently, due to the advancement of ceramic technology, metal-free restorations were developed. However, the traditional metal-ceramic restorations still present the requirements of high strength, long survival in the oral environment and favorable aesthetics. In this context, it is essential to know the specificity of each ceramic system available in order to apply it properly to various clinical situations. This report describes an integrated rehabilitation using metal-ceramic restorations of a patient at 50 years of age, who presented edentulous spaces, and previous unsatisfactory composite and amalgam restorations, and indirect metallic restorations, leading to compromised quality of life in both functional and psychosocial aspects. The impact on quality of life was measured using a generic instrument, OHIP-14, validated for the World Health Organization, which covers both the biological and the psychosocial dimensions. This instrument was applied to the patient before and after treatment. The patient had an overall OHIP-14 score of 28 before the treatment and after treatment the score decreased to 0, showing that dental and oral health conditions are factors that do impact on the quality of life. Rehabilitation has provided functional and aesthetic restorations, harmony of the stomatognathic system and improvement of life quality.

  18. Potential CERCLA reauthorization issues relevant to US DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.; Jaksch, J.A.; Dailey, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is currently scheduled to be reauthorized in 1994. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a significant stake in CERCLA reauthorization. CERCLA, along with its implementing regulation, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), is the principal legal authority governing DOE`s environmental restoration program. The manner in which CERCLA-related issues are identified, evaluated, and dispatched may have a substantial impact on DOE`s ability to conduct its environmental restoration program. A number of issues that impact DOE`s environmental restoration program could be addressed through CERCLA reauthorization. These issues include the need to (1) address how the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) should be integrated into DOE CERCLA actions, (2) facilitate the streamlining of the Superfund process at DOE sites, (3) address the conflicts between the requirements of CERCLA and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) that are especially relevant to DOE, (4) examine the criteria for waiving applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) at DOE sites, and (5) delineate the appropriate use of institutional controls at DOE sites.

  19. Westinghouse Savannah River Site Supplier Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Information Exchange Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, H.F. Jr.; Hottel, R.E.; Christoper, N.

    1994-06-01

    The Savannah River Site conducted its first Supplier Information Exchange in September 1993. The intent of the conference was to inform potential suppliers of the Savannah River Sites mission and research and development program objectives in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management, and to solicit proposals for innovative research in those areas. Major areas addressed were Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Environmental Monitoring, Transition/Decontamination and Decommissioning, and the Savannah River Technology Center. A total of 1062 proposals were received addressing the 89 abstracts presented. This paper will describe the forum the process for solicitation, the process for proposal review and selection, and review the overall results and benefits to Savannah River.

  20. ITEP: A survey of innovative environmental restoration technologies in the Netherlands and France

    SciTech Connect

    Roberds, W.J.; Voss, C.F.; Hitchcock, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    The International Technology Exchange Program (ITEP) of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for promoting the import of innovative technologies to better address EM`s needs and the export of US services into foreign markets to enhance US competitiveness. Under this program, potentially innovative environmental restoration technologies, either commercially available or under development in the Netherlands and France, were identified, described, and evaluated. It was found that 12 innovative environmental restoration technologies, which are either commercially available or under development in the Netherlands and France, may have some benefit for the DOE EM program and should be considered for transfer to the United States.

  1. Defense environmental restoration program annual report to congress for fiscal year 1992. Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-02

    The Defense Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) was established in 1984 to promote and coordinate efforts for the evaluation and cleanup of contamination at Department of Defense (DoD) installations. The program currently includes: (1) The Installation Restoration Program (IRP)m, where potential contamination at DoD installations and formerly used properties is investigated and, as necessary, site cleanups are conducted; and (2) Other Hazardous Waste (OHW) Operations, through which research, development, and demonstration programs aimed at improving remediation technology and reducing DoD waste generation rates are conducted.

  2. 24 CFR 242.79 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental quality... Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, “Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality,” 24 CFR part 51, “Environmental Criteria and Standards,” and 24 CFR part...

  3. 24 CFR 242.79 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental quality... Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, “Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality,” 24 CFR part 51, “Environmental Criteria and Standards,” and 24 CFR part...

  4. 24 CFR 200.75 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental quality... § 200.75 Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, 24 CFR part 51, Environmental Criteria and Standards, 24...

  5. 24 CFR 242.79 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental quality... Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, “Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality,” 24 CFR part 51, “Environmental Criteria and Standards,” and 24 CFR part...

  6. 24 CFR 200.75 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental quality... § 200.75 Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, 24 CFR part 51, Environmental Criteria and Standards, 24...

  7. 43 CFR 10010.55 - Organization for environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Organization for environmental quality... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Managing the NEPA Process § 10010.55 Organization for environmental quality. (a... Commission on matters pertaining to environmental quality and for overseeing and coordinating the Commission...

  8. 24 CFR 242.79 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental quality... Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, “Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality,” 24 CFR part 51, “Environmental Criteria and Standards,” and 24 CFR part...

  9. 24 CFR 242.79 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental quality... Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, “Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality,” 24 CFR part 51, “Environmental Criteria and Standards,” and 24 CFR part...

  10. 24 CFR 200.75 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental quality... § 200.75 Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, 24 CFR part 51, Environmental Criteria and Standards, 24...

  11. 24 CFR 200.75 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental quality... § 200.75 Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, 24 CFR part 51, Environmental Criteria and Standards, 24...

  12. 24 CFR 200.75 - Environmental quality determinations and standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental quality... § 200.75 Environmental quality determinations and standards. Requirements set forth in 24 CFR part 50, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality, 24 CFR part 51, Environmental Criteria and Standards, 24...

  13. 43 CFR 10010.55 - Organization for environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Organization for environmental quality... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Managing the NEPA Process § 10010.55 Organization for environmental quality. (a... Commission on matters pertaining to environmental quality and for overseeing and coordinating the Commission...

  14. 43 CFR 10010.55 - Organization for environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Organization for environmental quality... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Managing the NEPA Process § 10010.55 Organization for environmental quality. (a... Commission on matters pertaining to environmental quality and for overseeing and coordinating the...

  15. 43 CFR 10010.55 - Organization for environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Organization for environmental quality... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Managing the NEPA Process § 10010.55 Organization for environmental quality. (a... Commission on matters pertaining to environmental quality and for overseeing and coordinating the...

  16. 1995 annual water monitoring report, LEHR environmental restoration, University of California at Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.L.; Smith, R.M.; Sauer, D.R.

    1996-03-01

    This 1995 Annual Water Monitoring Report presents analytical data collected between January and December 1995 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) located at the University of California (UC), Davis. This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in compliance with the Water Monitoring Plan for the LEHR site, which contains the sample collection, analysis, and quality assurance/quality control procedures and reporting requirements. Water monitoring during 1995 was conducted in conjunction with the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study currently being implemented at the LEHR site as part of a US Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored environmental restoration program. Based on a review of historical groundwater monitoring data compiled since the fall of 1990, the list of analytes included in the program was reduced and the schedule for analyzing the remaining analytes was revised. The revision was implemented for the first time in the summer monitoring period. Analytes eliminated from the program were those that were (1) important for establishing baseline groundwater chemistry (alkalinity, anions, Eh, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand); (2) important for establishing sources of contamination; (3) not detected in water samples or not from the LEHR site; and (4) duplicates of another measurement. Reductions in the analytical schedule were based on the monitoring history for each well; the resultant constituents of concern list was developed for individual wells. Depending on its importance in a well, each analyte was analyzed quarterly, semi-annually, or annually. Pollutants of major concern include organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides.

  17. Environmental and Water Quality Operational Studies. Handbook on Reservoir Releases for Fisheries and Environmental Quality.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    likely to allow development of water re- sources consistent with environmental quality objectives. For example, a tailwater downstream from a peaking...substantial numbers of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and larval fish that may provide a food source for many tailwater organisms. Turbid water ’* may be...AD-A172 710 ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER QUALITY OPERATIONAL STUDIES is HANDBOOK ON RESERVOIR (U) ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS

  18. The influence of road salts on water quality in a restored urban stream (Columbus, OH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the connection between road salts and water quality is essential to assess the implications for human health and ecosystem services. To assess the effects of the restoration on water quality, surface and ground water have been monitored at Minebank Run, MD since 20...

  19. EVALUATION OF STREAMBANK RESTORATION ON IN-STREAM WATER QUALITY IN AN URBAN WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this on-going project are to: investigate the effectiveness of streambank restoration techniques on increasing available biological habitat and improving in-stream water quality in an impaired stream; and, demonstrate the utility of continuous water-quality moni...

  20. The influence of road salts on water quality in a restored urban stream (Columbus, OH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the connection between road salts and water quality is essential to assess the implications for human health and ecosystem services. To assess the effects of the restoration on water quality, surface and ground water have been monitored at Minebank Run, MD since 20...

  1. EVALUATION OF STREAMBANK RESTORATION ON IN-STREAM WATER QUALITY IN AN URBAN WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this on-going project are to: investigate the effectiveness of streambank restoration techniques on increasing available biological habitat and improving in-stream water quality in an impaired stream; and, demonstrate the utility of continuous water-quality moni...

  2. Environmental attitude as a mediator of the relationship between psychological restoration in nature and self-reported ecological behavior.

    PubMed

    Byrka, Katarzyna; Hartig, Terry; Kaiser, Florian G

    2010-12-01

    Environmental attitude and ecological behavior were investigated in relation to the use of nature for psychological restoration. Specifically, with survey data from 468 German university students, the role of environmental attitude was investigated as a mediator of the restoration-behavior relationship. Assuming that positive experiences in nature can have a broad influence on environmental attitudes, the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scale, an attitudinal measure with broad scope, was adopted. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated partial mediation by environmental concern. The study helps to consolidate the restoration theme in the growing literature on positive motivations for ecological behavior.

  3. Satellite global monitoring of environmental quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The missions of two NASA satellites for the monitoring of environmental quality are described: Nimbus G, the Air Pollution and Oceanographic Observing Satellite, and the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) satellite to be used in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE). The scientific payload of Nimbus G is described in detail with a discussion of limb infrared monitoring of the stratosphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder, stratospheric aerosol measurement, the solar and backscatter UV spectrometer for ozone mapping, the earth radiation budget experiment, the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer, the coastal zone color scanner and the temperature-humidity infrared radiometer. A brief description is given of the SAGE program and future NASA plans relating to the global monitoring of environmental quality are outlined.

  4. Satellite global monitoring of environmental quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The missions of two NASA satellites for the monitoring of environmental quality are described: Nimbus G, the Air Pollution and Oceanographic Observing Satellite, and the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) satellite to be used in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE). The scientific payload of Nimbus G is described in detail with a discussion of limb infrared monitoring of the stratosphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder, stratospheric aerosol measurement, the solar and backscatter UV spectrometer for ozone mapping, the earth radiation budget experiment, the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer, the coastal zone color scanner and the temperature-humidity infrared radiometer. A brief description is given of the SAGE program and future NASA plans relating to the global monitoring of environmental quality are outlined.

  5. Worldwide report: Environmental quality, Number 407

    SciTech Connect

    1983-08-02

    Attention is focused on the following: Government Plan, Conservation Improvements, Soil Salinity, Soil Conservation, Pesticide Study, Erosion, Flood, Reforestation, Endangered Lists, Herbicide Impact, Antipollution, Protect Environment, International Affairs, Pollution Expert, Acid Rain Indicates, Water Purification Systems, Quality Outlined, Agriculture, Fisheries, Inter African affairs, Underground Water, Fight Drought, Water Use, Rainforest, Government Estimates, Salt water, Law Attacked, Air Pollution, Power Cuts, Death, Drains, Environmental Protection, Earthquake, Food Industries.

  6. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.J.; Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1993-06-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

  7. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan, CAU No. 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points landfill Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept. The SAFER process is employed at Corrective Action Units (CAUs) where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action prior to the implementation of a Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision-making. The purpose of the investigation in the SAFER process is to document and verify the adequacy of existing information (such as process knowledge); to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or to take no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action.

  8. The need to restore the public health base for environmental control.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B D

    1995-01-01

    Restoration of the public health base for local, national, and international efforts aimed at protection against adverse health consequences of environmental degradation should be of prime concern for today and the future. Wherever possible, whether it be a mission statement for a cabinet-level EPA or the training and composition of the environmental health work force, we must reinvigorate the public health mission of our environmental protection activities. This cannot be accomplished without recognition by the public health community that environmental health is a central public health concern. As we move toward facing the initially more subtle, but eventually more consequential, global environmental health challenges, it will become even more important for the public health profession to respond. PMID:7702109

  9. Use of a portable indoor environmental quality logger for indoor environmental quality assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, D.W.T.; Burnett, J.; Mui, H.K.W.

    1999-07-01

    The authors conducted a large-scale study in Hong Kong on the indoor environment in high-rise office buildings. The indoor environmental quality assessment covered thermal, indoor air, visual, and aural comforts. The assessment had two parts--physical measurements by laboratory grade instruments and a survey of subjective responses. However, the approach of study requires sophisticated instrumentation together with an intensive questionnaire. Based on the experience gained from this comprehensive study, a portable indoor environmental quality logger has been developed as a tool to more conveniently assess the indoor environmental quality by building operators, occupants, and facility managers. This instrument incorporates sensors for measuring essential physical parameters. In addition, switches are provided on the front panel to allow occupants to record directly their sensation votes on the acceptability of their immediate microenvironment, focusing on four indoor environmental qualifiers and the overall acceptability. The physical parameters and the subjective responses are all automatically logged for analysis. This indoor environmental quality logger not only provides an easy method for assessment of the indoor environment, but it can also be used as a diary logger for detailed analysis of localized problems in the indoor spaces. This comprehensive environmental quality concept can be further developed to a control algorithm for HVAC systems.

  10. Reliability testing across the Environmental Quality Index and national environmental indices.

    EPA Science Inventory

    One challenge in environmental epidemiology is the exploration of cumulative environmental exposure across multiple domains (e.g. air, water, land). The Environmental Quality Index (EQI), created by the U.S. EPA, uses principle component analyses combining environmental domains (...

  11. Reliability testing across the Environmental Quality Index and national environmental indices.

    EPA Science Inventory

    One challenge in environmental epidemiology is the exploration of cumulative environmental exposure across multiple domains (e.g. air, water, land). The Environmental Quality Index (EQI), created by the U.S. EPA, uses principle component analyses combining environmental domains (...

  12. Environmental quality: The twenty-fifth anniversary report of the Council on Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Livernash, R.

    1998-11-01

    ;Table of Contents: Part 1 -- America the Environment: Past, Present, and Future (A 25-Year Retrospective; The Changing Role of Government; The National Environmental Policy Act); Part 2 -- Environmental Conditions and Trends: Section A. People and Communities (Population; Environmental Aspects of Human Health; Environmental Justice); Section B. Ecosystems and Biodiversity (Ecosystems; Biodiversity; Local and Regional Resource Conservation); Section C. Air Quality and Climate (Air Quality; Stratospheric Ozone; Climate Change); Section D. Aquatic Resources (Water; Coasts; Wetlands); Section E. Terrestrial Resources (Agriculture; Forestry); Section F. Energy and Transportation (Energy; Transportation); Section G. Pollution Prevention (Solid Waste; Toxic, Hazardous and Nuclear Waste); Part 3 -- Environmental Data and Trends; and Part 4 -- Appendix, NEPA Case Law and Statistical Tables.

  13. Imaging quality of bifocal piggyback intraocular lens versus ReSTOR and TECNIS multifocal lenses.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Felipe, Adelina; Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; Garcia-Delpech, Salvador; Navea, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    The imaging quality provided by a piggyback integrated by a monofocal intraocular lens (IOL) + a bifocal IOL of zero power and +3.75 diopters of addition is compared with the optics quality of a simple multifocal IOL of the same power and addition. The imaging quality was evaluated by determining the modulation transfer function (MTF), using an artificial eye simulating in vivo conditions of the anterior chamber, including an artificial cornea and a wet cell containing physiologic solution where the IOL was positioned. The MTFs of the bifocal piggyback for near and distance vision were measured, with pupil diameters of 3 and 5 mm, and compared with the MTFs of an equivalent power of ReSTOR and TECNIS multifocal IOLs measured under the same conditions. The MTFs for distance and near focus of the bifocal piggyback are similar to the MTFs of the ReSTOR and TECNIS multifocal IOLs with the two diameters of pupil. A more accurate comparison, values of average modulation, and Strehl ratio show a greater similitude with ReSTOR than with TECNIS. The bifocal piggyback system provides a similar imaging quality to that obtained with a ReSTOR multifocal IOL and, like the ReSTOR, provides better performance in distance vision than in near vision, whereas the TECNIS multifocal IOL provides the best performance.

  14. Development of an Integrated Performance Evaluation Program (IPEP) for the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, W.E.; Ka; Lindahl, P.C.; Bottrell, D.; Newberry, R.; Klusek, C.; Morton, S.; Karp, K.

    1993-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with DOE`s Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), and Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO), is working with the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop the Integrated Performance Evaluation Program (IPEP). The purpose of IPEP is to integrate performance evaluation (PE) information from existing PE programs with expanded quality assurance (QA) activities to develop information about the quality of radiological, mixed waste, and hazardous environmental sample analyses provided by all laboratories supporting DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) programs. The IPEP plans to utilize existing PE programs when available and appropriate for use by DOE-EM; new PE programs will be developed only when no existing program meets DOE`s needs.

  15. Associations between environmental quality and mortality in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Assessing cumulative effects of the multiple environmental factors influencing mortality remains a challenging task. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine the associations between cumulative environmental quality and all-cause and leading cause-specific (heart disease, cancer, and stroke) mortality rates. METHODS: We used the overall Environmental Quality Index (EQI) and its five domain indices (air, water, land, built, and sociodemographic) to represent environmental exposure. Associations between the EQI and mortality rates (CDC WONDER) for counties in the contiguous United States (n = 3,109) were investigated using multiple linear regression models and random intercept and random slope hierarchical models. Urbanicity, climate, and a combination of the two were used to explore the spatial patterns in the associations. RESULTS: We found 1 standard deviation increase in the overall EQI (worse environment) was associated with a mean 3.22% (95% Cl:2.80%, 3.64%) increase in all-cause mortality, a 0.54% (95% Cl: -0.17%, 1.25%) increase in heart disease mortality, a 2.71% (95% Cl: 2.21%, 3.22%) increase in cancer mortality, and a 2.25% (95% Cl: 1.11%, 3.39%) increase in stroke mortality. Among the environmental domains, the associations ranged from -1.27% (95% Cl: -1.70%,-0.84%) to 3.37% (95% Cl:2.90%, 3.84%),for all-cause mortality, -2.62% (95% Cl: -3.52%, -1.73%) to 4.50% (95% Cl:3.73%, 5.27%) for heart disease mortality, -0.88% (95% Cl:-2.12%, 0.36%)

  16. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites.

  17. Qualitative risk evaluation of environmental restoration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the evaluation of risks associated with environmental restoration activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory using two tools supplied by DOE to provide a consistent set of risk estimates across the DOE complex: Risk Data Sheets (RDS) and Relative Risk Ranking. The tools are described, the process taken characterized, results provided and discussed. The two approaches are compared and recommendations provided for continuing improvement of the process.

  18. Agroforestry systems and environmental quality: introduction.

    PubMed

    Nair, P K Ramachandran

    2011-01-01

    Investments in agroforestry research during the past three decades-albeit modest-have yielded significant gains in understanding the role of trees on farmlands, and the ecological and economic advantages of integrated farming systems. While early research focused mostly on farm or local levels, broader-level ecosystem services of agroforestry systems (AFS) have raised high expectations in recent years. The nine papers included in this special collection deal with three of such environmental benefits of AFS: water-quality enhancement, carbon sequestration, and soil improvement. These benefits are based on the perceived ability of (i) vegetative buffer strips (VBS) to reduce surface transport of agrochemical pollutants, (ii) large volumes of aboveground and belowground biomass of trees to store high amounts of C deeper in the soil profile, and (iii) trees to enhance soil productivity through biological nitrogen fixation, efficient nutrient cycling, and deep capture of nutrients. The papers included have, in general, substantiated these premises and provided new insights. For example, the riparian VBS are reported to increase the reservoir life, in addition to reducing transport of agrochemicals; the variations in C storage in different soil-fraction sizes suggest that microaggregate (250-53 μm) dynamics in the soil could be a good indicator of its C-storage potential; and the use of vector analysis technique is recommended in AFS to avoid consequences of inaccurate and overuse of fertilizers. The papers also identified significant knowledge gaps in these areas. A common theme across all three environmental quality issues covered is that more and varied research datasets across a broad spectrum of conditions need to be generated and integrated with powerful statistical tools to ensure wide applicability of the results. Furthermore, appropriate management practices that are acceptable to the targeted land users and agroforestry practitioners need to be designed to

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  20. Environmental Restoration Program waste minimization and pollution prevention self-assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. is currently developing a more active waste minimization and pollution prevention program. To determine areas of programmatic improvements within the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program, the ER Program required an evaluation of the program across the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site, and the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site. This document presents the status of the overall program as of fourth quarter FY 1994, presents pollution prevention cost avoidance data associated with FY 1994 activities, and identifies areas for improvement. Results of this assessment indicate that the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program is firmly established and is developing rapidly. Several procedural goals were met in FY 1994 and many of the sites implemented ER waste minimization options. Additional growth is needed, however, for the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program.

  1. Environmental restoration and waste management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities undertaken to implement the FYP goals at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) installations and programs specifically for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. This SSP addresses activities and goals to be accomplished during FY93 even through the FYP focuses on FY94.

  2. Reengineering of Analytical Data Management for the Environmental Restoration Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.; Dorries, A.; Nasser, K.; Scherma, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the characterization, clean up, and monitoring of over 2,124 identified potential release sites (PRS). These PRSs have resulted from operations associated with weapons and energy related research which has been conducted at LANL since 1942. To accomplish mission goals, the ER Project conducts field sampling to determine possible types and levels of chemical contamination as well as their geographic extent. Last fiscal year, approximately 4000 samples were collected during ER Project field sampling campaigns. In the past, activities associated with field sampling such as sample campaign planning, paperwork, shipping and analytical laboratory tracking; verification and order fulfillment; validation and data quality assurance were performed by multiple groups working with a variety of software applications, databases and hard copy reports. This resulted in significant management and communication difficulties, data delivery delays, and inconsistent processes; it also represented a potential threat to overall data integrity. Creation of an organization, software applications and a data process that could provide for cost-effective management of the activities and data mentioned above became a management priority, resulting in a development of a reengineering task. This reengineering effort--currently nearing completion--has resulted in personnel reorganization, the development of a centralized data repository, and a powerful web-based sample management system that allows for an appreciably streamlined and more efficient data process. These changes have collectively cut data delivery times, allowed for larger volumes of samples and data to be handled with fewer personnel, and resulted in significant cost savings. This paper will provide a case study of the reengineering effort undertaken by the ER Project of its analytical data management process. It includes

  3. Floristic Quality Index of Restored Wetlands in Coastal Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    aboveground biomass data (Steyer and Stewart 1992). Vegetation data are typically collected more frequently early in a project’s life (yearly), and...quality in Ohio wetlands. Science of the Total Environment 551: (556-562). Steyer, G. D., and R. E. Stewart , Jr. 1992. Monitoring Program for Coastal

  4. Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  5. Data sources for environmental assessment: determining availability, quality and utility

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: An environmental quality index (EQI) for all counties in the United States is being developed to explore the relationship between environmental insults and human health. The EQI will be particularly useful to assess how environmental disamenities contribute to health...

  6. Data sources for environmental assessment: determining availability, quality and utility

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: An environmental quality index (EQI) for all counties in the United States is being developed to explore the relationship between environmental insults and human health. The EQI will be particularly useful to assess how environmental disamenities contribute to health...

  7. Periradicular status and quality of root canal fillings and coronal restorations in an urban Colombian population.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jaime O; Alves, Flávio R F; Gonçalves, Lúcio S; Martinez, Angela M; Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2013-05-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence of apical periodontitis in 1086 root canal-treated teeth from an urban Colombian population and evaluated the association of several factors with the periradicular status. Periapical radiographs were used for analyses, and teeth were classified as healthy or diseased according to the periradicular status. Other factors were also evaluated for their association with the periradicular conditions, including gender, quality of both endodontic treatment and coronal restoration, apical level of filling, and presence of post restoration. Fifty-one percent of the treated teeth were classified as healthy. Only 33% of the teeth had endodontic treatment rated as adequate. The quality of both endodontic treatment and coronal restoration significantly influenced the periradicular conditions (P < .001). Combined data revealed that teeth with both adequate endodontic treatment and adequate restorations showed significantly better periradicular status than the other combinations (P < .01), except for teeth with adequate treatment and inadequate restoration (P = .08). Canals filled up to 0-2 mm short of the apex had a significantly higher number of teeth rated as healthy than overfilled or underfilled cases (P = .02). Regression analysis showed that the quality of endodontic treatment was the most significant factor influencing the periradicular status (P < .001). Gender and presence of post restoration had no association with the periradicular conditions. Data from this Colombian population showed a relatively high prevalence of apical periodontitis in root canal-treated teeth. This was largely due to an equally high prevalence of treatments performed under substandard technical quality. The quality of the endodontic treatment was the most determinant factor for healthy periradicular status. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 3 CFR 101.5 - Council on Environmental Quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Council on Environmental Quality. 101.5 Section 101... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT § 101.5 Council on Environmental Quality. Freedom of Information regulations for the Council on Environmental Quality appear at 40 CFR Ch. V. ...

  9. 3 CFR 101.5 - Council on Environmental Quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Council on Environmental Quality. 101.5 Section 101... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT § 101.5 Council on Environmental Quality. Freedom of Information regulations for the Council on Environmental Quality appear at 40 CFR Ch. V. ...

  10. 3 CFR 101.5 - Council on Environmental Quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Council on Environmental Quality. 101.5 Section 101... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT § 101.5 Council on Environmental Quality. Freedom of Information regulations for the Council on Environmental Quality appear at 40 CFR Ch. V. ...

  11. 3 CFR 101.5 - Council on Environmental Quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Council on Environmental Quality. 101.5 Section 101... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT § 101.5 Council on Environmental Quality. Freedom of Information regulations for the Council on Environmental Quality appear at 40 CFR Ch. V....

  12. 3 CFR 101.5 - Council on Environmental Quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Council on Environmental Quality. 101.5 Section 101... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT § 101.5 Council on Environmental Quality. Freedom of Information regulations for the Council on Environmental Quality appear at 40 CFR Ch. V....

  13. Payments for environmental services in Latin America as a tool for restoration and rural development.

    PubMed

    Montagnini, Florencia; Finney, Christopher

    2011-05-01

    Payments for Environmental Services (PES) can encourage projects that enhance restoration, production, and rural development. When projects promote differentiated systems by paying farmers for the provision of services, the application of PES requires evaluation of the environmental services provided by each system. We present evaluations of carbon stocks and biodiversity in pure and mixed native tree plantations in Costa Rica. To illustrate how monetary values can be assigned, we discuss a project that awarded PES to silvopastoral systems in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Colombia based on carbon stocks and biodiversity. PES can promote positive environmental attitudes in farmers. Currently this project is being scaled up in Colombia based on their positive experiences with PES as a tool to promote adoption. Compared to PES systems that include only one environmental service, systems that incorporate bundling or layering of multiple services can make sustainable land uses more attractive to farmers and reduce perverse incentives.

  14. Characterization of hazardous waste residuals from Environmental Restoration Program activities at DOE installations: Waste management implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaro, M.A.; Esposito, M.P.

    1995-06-01

    Investigators at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), with support from associates at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), have assembled an inventory of the types and volumes of radioactive, toxic or hazardous, and mixed waste likely to be generated over the next 30 years as the US Department of Energy (DOE) implements its nationwide Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The inventory and related analyses are being considered for integration into DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) covering the potential environmental impacts and risks associated with alternative management practices and programs for wastes generated from routine operations. If this happens, the ER-generated waste could be managed under a set of alternatives considered under the PEIS and selected at the end of the current National Environmental Policy Act process.

  15. The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Project performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy commissioned Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) to perform this Project Performance Study to provide a quantitative analysis determining how well EM develops and executes environmental remediation and waste management projects. The approach consisted of collecting detailed data on a sample of 65 completed and ongoing EM projects conducted since 1984. These data were then compared with key project characteristics and outcomes from 233 environmental remediation projects (excluding EM) in IPA`s Environmental Remediation Database and 951 projects In IPA`s Capital Projects Database. The study establishes the standing of the EM system relative to other organizations, and suggests areas and opportunities for improvement.

  16. EPA awards $91,000 to Malama Learning Center to improve environmental literacy by restoring Nanakuli Wetlands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (11/10/15) SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded an environmental education grant of $91,000 to the Malama Learning Center located in Kapolei, Hawaii, to improve environmental literacy by restoring the Nanakuli Wetland

  17. 78 FR 26063 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Final Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... significant impact on the quality of the human environment, and that an environmental impact statement is not required. ADDRESSES: Copies of the Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact are... Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission each signed a Finding of No Significant Impact...

  18. Evaluation of variations and affecting factors of eco-environmental quality during urbanization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Erqian; Ren, Lijun; Sun, Haoyu

    2015-03-01

    Regional eco-environmental quality is the foundation of economic sustainable development and rational utilization of resources. It is necessary to understand and evaluate the regional eco-environmental quality correctly. Based on national remote sensing land use data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data and some other statistical data, this paper established an eco-environmental quality index (EQI) model to evaluate the ecological status of Jinan from 2000 to 2011. The results of eco-environmental quality showed little variation, with EQI values ranged from 62.00 to 69.01. EQI of each region in Jinan firstly decreased sharply and then increased slowly with the development of local economy. Besides the spatial and temporal variations analysis, affecting factors of eco-environmental quality was also discussed in this article. According to the results of correlation and regression analysis, meteorological conditions (rainfall and sunshine duration) and industrial structure (the proportion of primary industry) had relatively high correlations with eco-environmental quality. To summarize, a better eco-environmental status is associated with increasing rainfall, shorter sunshine duration, and lower proportion of primary industry. This article aims to giving supporting data and decision-making bases to restore the ecological environment and promote the sustainable development of Jinan.

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake, Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-05-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake. CAU 496 consists of one site located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

  20. Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (ORIES) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1.2. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.

    1993-02-01

    The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.

  1. Effects of natural-channel-design restoration on habitat quality in Catskill Mountain streams, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ernst, Anne G.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Mulvihill, Christiane; Vian, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Stream restoration has received much attention in recent years, yet there has been little effort to evaluate its impacts on physical habitat, stability, and biota. A popular but controversial stream restoration approach is natural channel design (NCD), which cannot be adequately evaluated without a long-term, independent assessment of its effects on stream habitat. Six reaches of five Catskill Mountain streams in southeastern New York were restored during 2000–2003 following NCD techniques to decrease bed and bank degradation, decrease sediment loads, and improve water quality. Habitat surveys were conducted during summer low flows from 2001 to 2007. The effects of the NCD projects on stream condition were assessed via a before–after–control–impact study design to quantify the net changes in stream and bank habitat variables relative to those in unaltered control reaches. Analysis of variance tests of three different measures of bank stability show that on average stream stability increased at treatment sites for 2–5 years after restoration. Mean channel depth, thalweg depth, and the pool–riffle ratio generally increased, whereas mean channel width, percent streambank coverage by trees, and shade decreased. Habitat suitability indices for local salmonid species increased at four of six reaches after restoration. The changes in channel dimensions rendered them generally more characteristic of stabler stream forms in the given valley settings. Although these studies were done relatively soon after project completion, our findings demonstrate that habitat conditions can be improved in degraded Catskill Mountain streams through NCD restoration.

  2. Poverty alleviation and environmental restoration using the clean development mechanism: A case study from Humbo, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Douglas R; Dettmann, Paul; Rinaudo, Tony; Tefera, Hailu; Tofu, Assefa

    2011-08-01

    Poverty, hunger and demand for agricultural land have driven local communities to overexploit forest resources throughout Ethiopia. Forests surrounding the township of Humbo were largely destroyed by the late 1960s. In 2004, World Vision Australia and World Vision Ethiopia identified forestry-based carbon sequestration as a potential means to stimulate community development while engaging in environmental restoration. After two years of consultation, planning and negotiations, the Humbo Community-based Natural Regeneration Project began implementation--the Ethiopian organization's first carbon sequestration initiative. The Humbo Project assists communities affected by environmental degradation including loss of biodiversity, soil erosion and flooding with an opportunity to benefit from carbon markets while reducing poverty and restoring the local agroecosystem. Involving the regeneration of 2,728 ha of degraded native forests, it brings social, economic and ecological benefits--facilitating adaptation to a changing climate and generating temporary certified emissions reductions (tCERs) under the Clean Development Mechanism. A key feature of the project has been facilitating communities to embrace new techniques and take responsibility for large-scale environmental change, most importantly involving Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR). This technique is low-cost, replicable, and provides direct benefits within a short time. Communities were able to harvest fodder and firewood within a year of project initiation and wild fruits and other non-timber forest products within three years. Farmers are using agroforestry for both environmental restoration and income generation. Establishment of user rights and local cooperatives has generated community ownership and enthusiasm for this project--empowering the community to more sustainably manage their communal lands.

  3. Poverty Alleviation and Environmental Restoration Using the Clean Development Mechanism: A Case Study from Humbo, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Douglas R.; Dettmann, Paul; Rinaudo, Tony; Tefera, Hailu; Tofu, Assefa

    2011-08-01

    Poverty, hunger and demand for agricultural land have driven local communities to overexploit forest resources throughout Ethiopia. Forests surrounding the township of Humbo were largely destroyed by the late 1960s. In 2004, World Vision Australia and World Vision Ethiopia identified forestry-based carbon sequestration as a potential means to stimulate community development while engaging in environmental restoration. After two years of consultation, planning and negotiations, the Humbo Community-based Natural Regeneration Project began implementation—the Ethiopian organization's first carbon sequestration initiative. The Humbo Project assists communities affected by environmental degradation including loss of biodiversity, soil erosion and flooding with an opportunity to benefit from carbon markets while reducing poverty and restoring the local agroecosystem. Involving the regeneration of 2,728 ha of degraded native forests, it brings social, economic and ecological benefits—facilitating adaptation to a changing climate and generating temporary certified emissions reductions (tCERs) under the Clean Development Mechanism. A key feature of the project has been facilitating communities to embrace new techniques and take responsibility for large-scale environmental change, most importantly involving Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR). This technique is low-cost, replicable, and provides direct benefits within a short time. Communities were able to harvest fodder and firewood within a year of project initiation and wild fruits and other non-timber forest products within three years. Farmers are using agroforestry for both environmental restoration and income generation. Establishment of user rights and local cooperatives has generated community ownership and enthusiasm for this project—empowering the community to more sustainably manage their communal lands.

  4. Training and Manpower in Environmental Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Don

    1981-01-01

    Describes the kinds of occupations related to environmental management and summarizes the Environmental Protection Agency's activities in promoting the development of a skilled environmental labor force. (WB)

  5. Defense Environmental Restoration Program annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, T.

    1991-02-01

    The Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) was established in 1984 to promote and coordinate efforts for the evaluation and cleanup of contamination at Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In order to accomplish the recovery of military installations and DoD sites the program currently consists of two major elements: (1) The Installation Restoration Program (IRP), where potential chemical contamination, fuel contamination, ground water pollution and other toxic hazards are investigated and, as necessary, site cleanups and disposal are conducted. (2) Other Hazardous Waste (OHW) Operations, through which research, development, and demonstration programs aimed at reducing DoD hazardous waste generation rates are conducted. Also included are training of DoD personnel, progress reports at NLP sites, information of the reclamation process and site selection.

  6. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration (SAFER): Development, implementation, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.D.; Amaya, J.P.

    1994-05-01

    This report reviews the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) effort during FY 1992, FY 1993, and the first quarter of FY 1994. The report comprises three sections: Introduction, Activities Summary, and Lessons Learned and Related Activities. This section provides context for the report by briefly reviewing the development of SAFER and its operational assumptions. Section 2 describes SAFER workshops and site-specific SAFER implementation support. Additionally, Section 2 provides an update on the status of sites that initially received support from either Observational Approach or SAFER teams and subsequently implemented either of these two related approaches to site restoration streamlining. Section 3 describes lessons learned and upcoming SAFER activities.

  7. Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large 20, 340 hectare (50, 308 acre) project area. As individual properties are secured for the Project, three site-specific activities (habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) may be subject to further site-specific environmental review. All required Federal/Tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground disturbing activities.

  8. Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.

    SciTech Connect

    Tillman, Jack B.

    2008-09-01

    In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

  9. Air Quality and Indoor Environmental Exposures: Clinical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) is a term which refers to the air quality within and around buildings and homes as it relates to the health and comfort of the occupants. Many ambient (outdoor) air pollutants readily permeate indoor spaces. Because indoor air can be considerably more polluted than ambient air, the USEPA lists poor IAQ as a major environmental concern. In the sections that follow, health effects associated with commonly encountered ambient air pollutants and indoor contaminants will be broken down by agent class. In some cases, exposure may be acute, with one or more pets (and owners) experiencing signs within a relatively short period. However, most exposures are episodic or chronic, making it difficult to definitively link poor IAQ to respiratory or other adverse health outcomes. Age or underlying immunologic, cardiac, or respiratory disease may further complicate the clinical picture, as those patients may be more sensitive to (and affected by) lower concentrations than prove problematic for healthy housemates. Because pets, like their owners, spend most of their lives indoors, we will discuss how certain home conditions can worsen indoor air quality and will briefly discuss measures to improve IAQ for owners and their pets. In this overview presentation, health effects associated with commonly encountered ambient air pollutants and indoor contaminants will be broken down by agent class. Because pets, like their owners, spend most of their lives indoo

  10. Air Quality and Indoor Environmental Exposures: Clinical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) is a term which refers to the air quality within and around buildings and homes as it relates to the health and comfort of the occupants. Many ambient (outdoor) air pollutants readily permeate indoor spaces. Because indoor air can be considerably more polluted than ambient air, the USEPA lists poor IAQ as a major environmental concern. In the sections that follow, health effects associated with commonly encountered ambient air pollutants and indoor contaminants will be broken down by agent class. In some cases, exposure may be acute, with one or more pets (and owners) experiencing signs within a relatively short period. However, most exposures are episodic or chronic, making it difficult to definitively link poor IAQ to respiratory or other adverse health outcomes. Age or underlying immunologic, cardiac, or respiratory disease may further complicate the clinical picture, as those patients may be more sensitive to (and affected by) lower concentrations than prove problematic for healthy housemates. Because pets, like their owners, spend most of their lives indoors, we will discuss how certain home conditions can worsen indoor air quality and will briefly discuss measures to improve IAQ for owners and their pets. In this overview presentation, health effects associated with commonly encountered ambient air pollutants and indoor contaminants will be broken down by agent class. Because pets, like their owners, spend most of their lives indoo

  11. Image gathering and coding for digital restoration: Information efficiency and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; John, Sarah; Mccormick, Judith A.; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar

    1989-01-01

    Image gathering and coding are commonly treated as tasks separate from each other and from the digital processing used to restore and enhance the images. The goal is to develop a method that allows us to assess quantitatively the combined performance of image gathering and coding for the digital restoration of images with high visual quality. Digital restoration is often interactive because visual quality depends on perceptual rather than mathematical considerations, and these considerations vary with the target, the application, and the observer. The approach is based on the theoretical treatment of image gathering as a communication channel (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A2, 1644(1985);5,285(1988). Initial results suggest that the practical upper limit of the information contained in the acquired image data range typically from approximately 2 to 4 binary information units (bifs) per sample, depending on the design of the image-gathering system. The associated information efficiency of the transmitted data (i.e., the ratio of information over data) ranges typically from approximately 0.3 to 0.5 bif per bit without coding to approximately 0.5 to 0.9 bif per bit with lossless predictive compression and Huffman coding. The visual quality that can be attained with interactive image restoration improves perceptibly as the available information increases to approximately 3 bifs per sample. However, the perceptual improvements that can be attained with further increases in information are very subtle and depend on the target and the desired enhancement.

  12. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ``Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,`` the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base.

  13. Establishment of review groups on US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Eyman, L.D.

    1992-12-01

    A primary purpose of this grant was the establishment of expert research review groups to help facilitate expanded and improved communications and information among states, public, federal agencies, contractors, and DOE, relative to national environmental and waste management issues/problems. The general objectives of this grant were: Research on the further participation avenues of industry and academia and provide appropriate research documentation concerning the implementation of multi-party agreements; Analysis of the impediments that delay the accomplishment of agreements between states and the federal government for environmental compliance, as well as an assessment of the public need for research because of the above agreements; Analysis of the impact of environmental actions on states, industry, academia, public and other federal agencies; Provide research to help facilitate an interactive system that provides the various involved parties the capability and capacity to strengthen their commitment to national environmental and waste management goals and objectives; and Furthering research of public education in the environmental arena and research of needed national education resources in scientific and technical areas related to environmental restoration and waste management.

  14. Risk profile and quality of dental restorations: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sonbul, Helal; Birkhed, Dowen

    2010-03-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the percentage of recurrent caries with respect to the estimated caries risk profile obtained with a Cariogram, (2) to evaluate the quality of restorations in a Saudi population with several restorations and (3) to determine the additional value of bite-wing radiographs as an aid to quality evaluation. A total of 803 restorations were examined in 100 adults according to the United States Public Health Service/Ryge criteria. Salivary and microbiological factors, dietary habits and plaque index were investigated. The Cariogram was used to evaluate the risk profiles. Class II bite-wing radiographs (n = 281) were taken to examine the marginal integrity and the anatomic form proximally. The patients were categorized according to 'the chance of avoiding caries' into three risk groups: 0%-20% (n = 38), 21%-40% (n = 28) and 41%-100% (n = 34). ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences between the risk groups with respect to the recurrent caries (P < 0.05). A high percentage of the total restorations (56%) were diagnosed with recurrent caries. The quality of anatomic form and surface texture was unacceptable in the majority of cases. After adding the evaluations of class II bite-wings, the percentage of unacceptable restorations increased by 28% and 17% with regard to marginal integrity and anatomic form, respectively (P < 0.001). Recurrent caries was related to the percentage 'chance of avoiding caries' as estimated by the Cariogram. The importance of bite-wings was emphasized as an aid to quality evaluation.

  15. Optimal Site Characterization and Selection Criteria for Oyster Restoration using Multicolinear Factorial Water Quality Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated levels of nutrient loadings have enriched the Chesapeake Bay estuaries and coastal waters via point and nonpoint sources and the atmosphere. Restoring oyster beds is considered a Best Management Practice (BMP) to improve the water quality as well as provide physical aquatic habitat and a healthier estuarine system. Efforts include declaring sanctuaries for brood-stocks, supplementing hard substrate on the bottom and aiding natural populations with the addition of hatchery-reared and disease-resistant stocks. An economic assessment suggests that restoring the ecological functions will improve water quality, stabilize shorelines, and establish a habitat for breeding grounds that outweighs the value of harvestable oyster production. Parametric factorial models were developed to investigate multicolinearities among in situ water quality and oyster restoration activities to evaluate posterior success rates upon multiple substrates, and physical, chemical, hydrological and biological site characteristics to systematically identify significant factors. Findings were then further utilized to identify the optimal sites for successful oyster restoration augmentable with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and BMPs. Factorial models evaluate the relationship among the dependent variable, oyster biomass, and treatments of temperature, salinity, total suspended solids, E. coli/Enterococci counts, depth, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, nitrogen and phosphorus, and blocks consist of alternative substrates (oyster shells versus riprap, granite, cement, cinder blocks, limestone marl or combinations). Factorial model results were then compared to identify which combination of variables produces the highest posterior biomass of oysters. Developed Factorial model can facilitate maximizing the likelihood of successful oyster reef restoration in an effort to establish a healthier ecosystem and to improve overall estuarine water quality in the Chesapeake Bay estuaries.

  16. Overview of the EPA quality system for environmental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L.

    1993-12-31

    Formalized quality assurance program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than a decade. During this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. Many issues, such as ozone depletion and global climate warming, have become international concerns among the world environmental community. Other issues, such as hazardous waste cleanup and clean air, remain a focus of national environmental concerns. As the environmental issues of the 1980`s evolved, the traditional quality assurance (QA) program was transformed through the use of quality management principles into a Quality System to help managers meet the needs of the 1990`s and beyond.

  17. Construction of an environmental quality index for public health research

    EPA Science Inventory

    A more comprehensive estimate of environmental quality would improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and human health. An environmental quality index (EQI) for all counties in the U.S. was developed. The EQI was developed in four parts: doma...

  18. Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and operational environmental monitoring performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company as it implements the Operational Environmental Monitoring program. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company in implementing the Operational Environmental Monitoring program at the Hanford Site.

  19. Construction of an environmental quality index for public health research

    EPA Science Inventory

    A more comprehensive estimate of environmental quality would improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and human health. An environmental quality index (EQI) for all counties in the U.S. was developed. The EQI was developed in four parts: doma...

  20. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economicbenefits

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the current scientific evidence that improved indoor environmental quality can improve work performance and health. The review indicates that work and school work performance is affected by indoor temperature and ventilation rate. Pollutant source removal can sometimes improve work performance. Based on formal statistical analyses of existing research results, quantitative relationships are provided for the linkages of work performance with indoor temperature and outdoor air ventilation rate. The review also indicates that improved health and related financial savings are obtainable from reduced indoor tobacco smoking, prevention and remediation of building dampness, and increased ventilation. Example cost-benefit analyses indicate that many measures to improve indoor temperature control and increase ventilation rates will be highly cost effective, with benefit-cost ratios as high as 80 and annual economic benefits as high as $700 per person.

  1. Environmental restoration at the Pantex Plant. Quarterly progress report, April 12, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Charbeneau, R.J.

    1995-06-19

    This report summarizes the Work Plans for activities associated with Environmental Restoration of the perched aquifer and contaminated soils at the Pantex Plant. The Higher Education Consortium/Pantex Research Laboratory is participating in the Consortium Grant to evaluate subsurface remediation alternatives for the perched aquifer at the Pantex Plant. Research activities will develop site characterization data and evaluate remediation alternatives for the perched aquifer and the overlying vadose zone. The work plans cover research activities for the remainder of FY95, and proposed activities for FY96 and thereafter. A separate document will present more detailed plans for FY96 activities and budget requirements.

  2. The evolution of Hanford Environmental Restoration program planning, estimating and baselining

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, K.N.; Lind, C.R.; Gerth, R.B.

    1993-10-01

    Environmental Restoration (ER) planning, cost estimating and baselining efforts represent a unique challenge even to the experienced planner, estimator or program manager. ER work at US Department of Energy (DOE) installations if not typical of the large construction projects or the production programs of the past. This paper will discuss the evolution of the Hanford Site ER Program efforts in dealing with these challenges, with a focus on lessons learned. The intent is to share Hanford planning experience with other ER participants through out the DOE installations.

  3. Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1, Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    As part of the Environmental Restoration Program at Martin Marietta, IEM (Information Engineering Methodology) was developed as part of a complete and integrated approach to the progressive development and subsequent maintenance of automated data sharing systems. This approach is centered around the organization`s objectives, inherent data relationships and business practices. IEM provides the Information Systems community with a tool kit of disciplined techniques supported by automated tools. It includes seven stages: Information Strategy Planning; Business Area Analysis; Business System Design; Technical Design; Construction; Transition; Production.

  4. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  5. Evaluating the effect of river restoration techniques on reducing the impacts of outfall on water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mant, Jenny; Janes, Victoria; Terrell, Robert; Allen, Deonie; Arthur, Scott; Yeakley, Alan; Morse, Jennifer; Holman, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Outfalls represent points of discharge to a river and often contain pollutants from urban runoff, such as heavy metals. Additionally, erosion around the outfall site results in increased sediment generation and the release of associated pollutants. Water quality impacts from heavy metals pose risks to the river ecosystem (e.g. toxicity to aquatic habitats). Restoration techniques including establishment of swales, and the re-vegetation and reinforcement of channel banks aim to decrease outfall flow velocities resulting in deposition of pollutants and removal through plant uptake. Within this study the benefits of river restoration techniques for the removal of contaminants associated with outfalls have been quantified within Johnson Creek, Portland, USA as part of the EPSRC funded Blue-Green Cities project. The project aims to develop new strategies for protecting hydrological and ecological values of urban landscapes. A range of outfalls have been selected which span restored and un-restored channel reaches, a variety of upstream land-uses, and both direct and set-back outfalls. River Habitat Surveys were conducted at each of the sites to assess the level of channel modification within the reach. Sediment samples were taken at the outfall location, upstream, and downstream of outfalls for analysis of metals including Nickel, Lead, Zinc, Copper, Iron and Magnesium. These were used to assess the impact of the level of modification at individual sites, and to compare the influence of direct and set-back outfalls. Concentrations of all metals in the sediments found at outfalls generally increased with the level of modification at the site. Sediment in restored sites had lower metal concentrations both at the outfall and downstream compared to unrestored sites, indicating the benefit of these techniques to facilitate the effective removal of pollutants by trapping of sediment and uptake of contaminants by vegetation. However, the impact of restoration measures varied

  6. Institutionalizing urban forestry as a "biotechnology" to improve environmental quality

    Treesearch

    David J. Nowak

    2006-01-01

    Urban forests can provide multiple environmental benefits. As urban areas expand, the role of urban vegetation in improving environmental quality will increase in importance. Quantification of these benefits has revealed that urban forests can significantly improve air quality. As a result, national air quality regulations are now willing to potentially credit tree...

  7. Characterizing light attenuation within Northwest Florida Estuaries: Implications for RESTORE Act water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Conmy, Robyn N; Schaeffer, Blake A; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph; Aukamp, Jessica; Duffy, Allyn; Lehrter, John C; Greene, Richard M

    2017-01-30

    Water Quality (WQ) condition is based on ecosystem stressor indicators (e.g. water clarity) which are biogeochemically important and critical when considering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill restoration efforts under the 2012 RESTORE Act. Nearly all of the proposed RESTORE projects list restoring WC as a goal, but 90% neglect water clarity. Here, dynamics of optical constituents impacting clarity are presented from a 2009-2011 study within Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Andrew and St. Joseph estuaries (targeted RESTORE sites) in Northwest Florida. Phytoplankton were the smallest contribution to total absorption (at-wPAR) at 412nm (5-11%), whereas colored dissolved organic matter was the largest (61-79%). Estuarine at-wPAR was significantly related to light attenuation (KdPAR), where individual contributors to clarity and the influence of climatic events were discerned. Provided are conversion equations demonstrating interoperability of clarity indicators between traditional State-measured WQ measures (e.g. secchi disc), optical constituents, and even satellite remote sensing for obtaining baseline assessments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Environmental quality: 22nd annual report of the Council on Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The annual report is divided into two parts. Part I outlines key environmental and conservation issues facing the United States today in the following areas: Agriculture, Air Quality, Biodiversity, Budget, Coasts and Oceans, Data Collection and Analysis, Economics, Education, Energy, Enforcement, Federal Facilities Management, Fisheries and Marine Mammals, Forestry, Hazardous and Solid Wastes, International Issues, Mission to Planet Earth, National Environmental Policy Act, Pollution Prevention, Private Sector Initiatives, Public Lands, Science and Technology, Transportation, Water, and Wetlands. Part II contains over 100 tables and figures providing additional detail about conditions and trends in the environment.

  9. Exposure to Environmental Ozone Alters Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Rebecca Z.; Kraft, Peter; Fowler, Ian M.; Mamet, Rizvan; Kim, Elizabeth; Berhane, Kiros T.

    2006-01-01

    Idiopathic male infertility may be due to exposure to environmental toxicants that alter spermatogenesis or sperm function. We studied the relationship between air pollutant levels and semen quality over a 2-year period in Los Angeles, California, by analyzing repeated semen samples collected by sperm donors. Semen analysis data derived from 5,134 semen samples from a sperm donor bank were correlated with air pollutant levels (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter) measured 0–9, 10–14, and 70–90 days before semen collection dates in Los Angeles between January 1996 and December 1998. A linear mixed-effects model was used to model average sperm concentration and total motile sperm count for the donation from each subject. Changes were analyzed in relationship to biologically relevant time points during spermatogenesis, 0–9, 10–14, and 70–90 days before the day of semen collection. We estimated temperature and seasonality effects after adjusting for a base model, which included donor’s date of birth and age at donation. Forty-eight donors from Los Angeles were included as subjects. Donors were included if they collected repeated semen samples over a 12-month period between January 1996 and December 1998. There was a significant negative correlation between ozone levels at 0–9, 10–14, and 70–90 days before donation and average sperm concentration, which was maintained after correction for donor’s birth date, age at donation, temperature, and seasonality (p < 0.01). No other pollutant measures were significantly associated with sperm quality outcomes. Exposure to ambient ozone levels adversely affects semen quality. PMID:16507458

  10. Overall environmental quality and cancer incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer is associated with individual ambient environmental exposures such as fine particulate matter and arsenic in drinking water. However, the role of the overall ambient environment is not well-understood. To estimate cumulative environmental exposures, an Environmental Qualit...

  11. Overall environmental quality and cancer incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer is associated with individual ambient environmental exposures such as fine particulate matter and arsenic in drinking water. However, the role of the overall ambient environment is not well-understood. To estimate cumulative environmental exposures, an Environmental Qualit...

  12. An overview of the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, K.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) computer model designed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use in evaluating the health risks associated with US Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. This report has been prepared to provide DOE Oak Ridge Field Office personnel with a simplified explanation of MEPAS and an understanding of how MEPAS is used to quantify potential risks to human health. The scope and limitations of the MEPAS model are presented, and the possible contaminant release media and transport pathways are outlined. The two main types of health indexes generated -- the hazard potential index (HPI) and the maximum individual index are described; and calculations used to obtain these indexes are presented. Guidance on interpretation of the HPI is also included. Finally, the HPI calculations for 3 contaminants in a hypothetical environmental problem are demonstrated.

  13. Environmental controls of greenhouse gas release in a restoring peat bog in NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzel, S.; Forbrich, I.; Krüger, C.; Lemke, S.; Gerold, G.

    2008-01-01

    In Central Europe, most bogs have a history of drainage and many of them are currently being restored. Success of restoration as well as greenhouse gas exchange of these bogs is influenced by environmental stress factors as drought and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. We determined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of sites in the strongly decomposed center and less decomposed edge of the Pietzmoor bog in NW Germany in 2004. Also, we examined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of mesocosms from the center and edge before, during, and following a drainage experiment as well as carbon dioxide release from disturbed unfertilized and nitrogen fertilized surface peat. In the field, methane fluxes ranged from 0 to 3.8 mg m-2 h-1 and were highest from hollows. Field nitrous oxide fluxes ranged from 0 to 574 μg m-2 h-1 and were elevated at the edge. A large Eriophorum vaginatum tussock showed decreasing nitrous oxide release as the season progressed. Drainage of mesocosms decreased methane release to 0, even during rewetting. There was a tendency for a decrease of nitrous oxide release during drainage and for an increase in nitrous oxide release during rewetting. Nitrogen fertilization did not increase decomposition of surface peat. Our examinations suggest a competition between vascular vegetation and denitrifiers for excess nitrogen. We also provide evidence that the von Post humification index can be used to explain greenhouse gas release from bogs, if the role of vascular vegetation is also considered. An assessment of the greenhouse gas release from nitrogen saturated restoring bogs needs to take into account elevated release from fresh Sphagnum peat as well as from sedges growing on decomposed peat. Given the high atmospheric nitrogen deposition, restoration will not be able to achieve an oligotrophic ecosystem in the short term.

  14. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) multiprogram laboratory whose primary mission has been to research nuclear technologies. Working with these technologies and conducting other types of research generates waste, including radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. While most of the waste treatment, storage, and disposal practices have been effective, some practices have led to the release of contaminants to the environment. As a result, DOE has developed (1) an Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to identify and, where necessary, cleanup releases from inactive waste sites and (2) a Waste Management (WM) Program to safely treat, store, and dispose of DOE wastes generated from current and future activities in an environmentally sound manner. This document describes the plans for FY 1993 for the INEL`s ER and WM programs as managed by DOE`s Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID).

  15. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Trippet, W.A. II ); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  16. Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole.

  17. Assessment of interim flow water-quality data of the San Joaquin River restoration program and implications for fishes, California, 2009-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wulff, Marissa L.; Brown, Larry R.

    2015-01-01

    After more than 50 years of extensive water diversion for urban and agriculture use, a major settlement was reached among the U.S. Departments of the Interior and Commerce, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and the Friant Water Users Authority in an effort to restore the San Joaquin River. The settlement received Federal court approval in October 2006 and established the San Joaquin River Restoration Program, a multi-agency collaboration between State and Federal agencies to restore and maintain fish populations, including Chinook salmon, in the main stem of the river between Friant Dam and the confluence with the Merced River. This is to be done while avoiding or minimizing adverse water supply effects to all of the Friant Division contractors that could result from restoration flows required by the settlement. The settlement stipulates that water- and sediment-quality data be collected to help assess the restoration goals. This report summarizes and evaluates water-quality data collected in the main stem of the San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program during 2009-11. This summary and assessment consider sampling frequency for adequate characterization of variability, sampling locations for sufficient characterization of the San Joaquin River Restoration Program restoration reach, sampling methods for appropriate media (water and sediment), and constituent reporting limits. After reviewing the water- and sediment-quality results for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program, several suggestions were made to the Fisheries Management Work Group, a division of the San Joaquin River Restoration Program that focuses solely on the reintroduction strategies and health of salmon and other native fishes in the river. Water-quality results for lead and total organic carbon exceeded the Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program Basin Plan Objectives for the San Joaquin Basin

  18. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  19. Floristic quality assessment of one natural and three restored wetland complexes in North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Shaffer, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Floristic quality assessment is potentially an important tool for conservation efforts in the northern Great Plains of North America, but it has received little rigorous evaluation. Floristic quality assessments rely on coefficients assigned to each plant species of a region’s flora based on the conservatism of each species relative to others in the region. These “coefficients of conservatism” (C values) are assigned by a panel of experts familiar with a region’s flora. The floristic quality assessment method has faced some criticism due to the subjective nature of these assignments. To evaluate the effect of this subjectivity on floristic quality assessments, we performed separate evaluations of the native plant communities in a natural wetland complex and three restored wetland complexes. In our first assessment, we used C values assigned “subjectively” by the Northern Great Plains Floristic Quality Assessment Panel. We then performed an independent assessment using the observed distributions of species among a group of wetlands that ranged from highly disturbed to largely undisturbed (data-generated C values). Using the panel-assigned C values, mean C values (C¯">C¯C¯) of the restored wetlands rarely exceeded 3.4 and never exceeded 3.9, with the highest values occurring in the oldest restored complex; all but two wetlands in the natural wetland complex had a C¯">C¯C¯ greater than 3.9. Floristic quality indices (FQI) for the restored wetlands rarely exceeded 22 and usually reached maximums closer to 19, with higher values occurring again in the oldest restored complex; only two wetlands in the natural complex had an FQI less than 22. We observed that 95% confidence limits for species richness and percent natives overlapped greatly among wetland complexes, whereas confidence limits for both C¯">C¯C¯ and FQI overlapped little. C¯">C¯C¯ and FQI values were consistently greater when we used the datagenerated C values than when we used the

  20. Climate change in the four corners and adjacent regions: Implications for environmental restoration and land-use planning

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the workshop proceedings on Climate Change in the Four Corners and Adjacent Regions: Implications for Environmental Restoration and Land-Use Planning which took place September 12-14, 1994 in Grand Junction, Colorado. The workshop addressed three ways we can use paleoenvironmental data to gain a better understanding of climate change and its effects. (1) To serve as a retrospective baseline for interpreting past and projecting future climate-induced environmental change, (2) To differentiate the influences of climate and humans on past environmental change, and (3) To improve ecosystem management and restoration practices in the future. The papers presented at this workshop contained information on the following subjects: Paleoclimatic data from the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, climate change and past cultures, and ecological resources and environmental restoration. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992. Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K.

    1992-12-31

    This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks.

  2. Floristic Quality Index: An assessment tool for restoration projects and monitoring sites in coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cretini, K.F.; Steyer, G.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) program was established to assess the effectiveness of individual coastal restoration projects and the cumulative effects of multiple projects at regional and coastwide scales. In order to make these assessments, analytical teams have been assembled for each of the primary data types sampled under the CRMS program, including vegetation, hydrology, landscape, and soils. These teams consist of scientists and support staff from the U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal agencies, the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration, and university academics. Each team is responsible for developing or identifying parameters, indices, or tools that can be used to assess coastal wetlands at various scales. The CRMS Vegetation Analytical Team has developed a Floristic Quality Index for coastal Louisiana to determine the quality of a wetland based on its plant species composition and abundance.

  3. Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

  4. Healing the Earth: Through Programs in Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, the Tribal Colleges Are Working Together to Solve the Nation's Most Pressing Environmental Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Carlos

    1992-01-01

    Describes "Promoting Environmental Restoration/Management for American Indians" (PERMA), a joint effort of all Indian controlled colleges to create certificate programs in environmental and waste management. PERMA includes a summer bridge program to build science/math skills; a core academic transfer curriculum; a vocationally oriented…

  5. Restoring fish ecological quality in estuaries: Implication of interactive and cumulative effects among anthropogenic stressors.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Nils; Borja, Angel; Chust, Guillem; Uriarte, Ainhize; Lepage, Mario

    2016-01-15

    Estuaries are subjected to multiple anthropogenic stressors, which have additive, antagonistic or synergistic effects. Current challenges include the use of large databases of biological monitoring surveys (e.g. the European Water Framework Directive) to help environmental managers prioritizing restoration measures. This study investigated the impact of nine stressor categories on the fish ecological status derived from 90 estuaries of the North East Atlantic countries. We used a random forest model to: 1) detect the dominant stressors and their non-linear effects; 2) evaluate the ecological benefits expected from reducing pressure from stressors; and 3) investigate the interactions among stressors. Results showed that largest restoration benefits were expected when mitigating water pollution and oxygen depletion. Non-additive effects represented half of pairwise interactions among stressors, and antagonisms were the most common. Dredged sediments, flow changes and oxygen depletion were predominantly implicated in non-additive interactions, whereas the remainder stressors often showed additive impacts. The prevalence of interactive impacts reflects a complex scenario for estuaries management; hence, we proposed a step-by-step restoration scheme focusing on the mitigation of stressors providing the maximum of restoration benefits under a multi-stress context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Second annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring and field investigations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, striving to provide an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. Results are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) program. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The remedial investigation for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. This report also includes information from other site-specific remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) for contaminated sites at ORNL and data from other ongoing monitoring programs conducted by other organizations [e.g., the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance monitoring conducted by the Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section]. This information is included to provide an integrated basis to support ER decision making. This report summarizes information gathered through early 1993. Annual data, such as annual discharges of contaminants, are reported for calendar year 1992.

  7. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the Environmental Restoration Program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.C.

    1994-08-01

    Since the 1940s, US Department of Energy (DOE) sites have been used for nuclear materials processing and production, warhead testing, and weapons research and development. These activities have resulted in extensive environmental contamination. DOE has established a goal to cleanup and restore the groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water at its facilities across the nation. To achieve this goal, many workers will be needed to conduct the cleanup. These workers will need training and will be required to follow occupational safety and health (OSH) regulations and guidelines. Compliance with the OSH regulations and guidelines will have an anomous influence on the schedule, money, and technology needed for environmental restoration. Therefore, one area that must be considered in the early stages of long-term planning is the impact of OSH issues on the environmental restoration process. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigate the impact of these issues on the environmental restoration process.

  8. Evaluating the accotink creek restoration project for improving water quality, in-stream habitat, and bank stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Struck, S.D.; Selvakumar, A.; Hyer, K.; O'Connor, T.

    2007-01-01

    Increased urbanization results in a larger percentage of connected impervious areas and can contribute large quantities of stormwater runoff and significant quantities of debris and pollutants (e.g., litter, oils, microorganisms, sediments, nutrients, organic matter, and heavy metals) to receiving waters. To improve water quality in urban and suburban areas, watershed managers often incorporate best management practices (BMPs) to reduce the quantity of runoff as well as to minimize pollutants and other stressors contained in stormwater runoff. It is well known that land-use practices directly impact urban streams. Stream flows in urbanized watersheds increase in magnitude as a function of impervious area and can result in degradation of the natural stream channel morphology affecting the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of the stream. Stream bank erosion, which also increases with increased stream flows, can lead to bank instability, property loss, infrastructure damage, and increased sediment loading to the stream. Increased sediment loads may lead to water quality degradation downstream and have negative impacts on fish, benthic invertebrates, and other aquatic life. Accotink Creek is in the greater Chesapeake Bay and Potomac watersheds, which have strict sediment criteria. The USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) and USGS (United States Geological Survey) are investigating the effectiveness of stream restoration techniques as a BMP to decrease sediment load and improve bank stability, biological integrity, and in-stream water quality in an impaired urban watershed in Fairfax, Virginia. This multi-year project continuously monitors turbidity, specific conductance, pH, and water temperature, as well as biological and chemical water quality parameters. In addition, physical parameters (e.g., pebble counts, longitudinal and cross sectional stream surveys) were measured to assess geomorphic changes associated with the restoration. Data

  9. Quality science and quality assurance: observations of an environmental scientist.

    PubMed

    Hughes, T J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to examine the relationship between quality science (QS) and quality assurance (QA). Many research scientists definitely want to do QS, but are afraid or do not want to do QA because they are intimidated by the QA process or they do not appreciate the benefits of QA. Therefore, the relationship between QS and QA is examined in this manuscript by an environmental scientist who has conducted 30 years of research in university, contract and government laboratories. To start, QS is defined in this paper as data that are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The quality of the research data is assumed by the general scientific population to be directly proportional to the status of the journal. For example, it is highly prestigious to have an article published in Science. At the U.S. EPA, the procedure for sending a manuscript to a journal for publication is the responsibility of the senior author. The senior author of an EPA-sponsored manuscript is expected to have the manuscript reviewed by the coauthors (they should also review the data), then the manuscript must be reviewed by at least two other scientists, one of whom must be from outside the authors' division. After this review and approval by management, the manuscript is sent to a peer-reviewed journal, where it is reviewed by several anonymous scientists as determined by the journal. After the comments of the reviewers are addressed, the manuscript can either be accepted or rejected for publication by the journal. For the purpose of this manuscript, the definition of QA is defined as the guarantee from a review team that the entire study was adequately and correctly conducted and recorded according to the study protocol. Many scientists view QS and QA as separate entities. From the scientist's perspective, QA procedures are not applicable to research studies, and should be used only for studies that will be submitted to either the EPA or the FDA for regulatory approval (i

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND PROTECTION STRATEGIES AT MULTIPLE SCALES IN RHODE ISLAND WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public concerns for the environment are often the basis for environmental regulations. The Clean Water Act seeks to ensure that water quality and quantity fully support aquatic life and human health. The legislative requirements help focus limited resources on areas where problem...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND PROTECTION STRATEGIES AT MULTIPLE SCALES IN RHODE ISLAND WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public concerns for the environment are often the basis for environmental regulations. The Clean Water Act seeks to ensure that water quality and quantity fully support aquatic life and human health. The legislative requirements help focus limited resources on areas where problem...

  12. Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

    1994-08-01

    This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

  13. Health and Safety Plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lugar, R.M.

    1991-07-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP. This plan also incorporates the Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program'' (EGG-WM-8771, Rev. 1) with an addendum completed for vapor vacuum extraction (VVE). The VVE project includes sampling and analysis of gas concentrations in monitors and open wells, measurement of pressures in monitoring wells, measurement of extraction well gas and system operational parameters in support of characterizing the volatile organic compounds (VOC) contamination beneath the subsurface disposal area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), calibrating the organic transport model and prevailing engineering data for a final remedial action. 16 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Water Quality and Sustainable Environmental Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setegn, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lack of adequate safe water, the pollution of the aquatic environment and the mismanagement of resources are major causes of ill-health and mortality, particularly in the developing countries. In order to accommodate more growth, sustainable fresh water resource management will need to be included in future development plans. One of the major environmental issues of concern to policy-makers is the increased vulnerability of ground water quality. The main challenge for the sustainability of water resources is the control of water pollution. To understand the sustainability of the water resources, one needs to understand the impact of future land use and climate changes on the natural resources. Providing safe water and basic sanitation to meet the Millennium Development Goals will require substantial economic resources, sustainable technological solutions and courageous political will. A balanced approach to water resources exploitation for development, on the one hand, and controls for the protection of health, on the other, is required if the benefits of both are to be realized without avoidable detrimental effects manifesting themselves. Meeting the millennium development goals for water and sanitation in the next decade will require substantial economic resources, sustainable technological solutions and courageous political will. In addition to providing "improved" water and "basic" sanitation services, we must ensure that these services provide: safe drinking water, adequate quantities of water for health, hygiene, agriculture and development and sustainable sanitation approaches to protect health and the environment.

  15. Restoration of shallow peatlands on Exmoor (UK): initial effects on water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand-Clement, Emilie; Luscombe, David; Anderson, Karen; Gatis, Naomi; Ashe, Josie; Brazier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Historical and recent anthropogenic pressure has had dramatic effects on peatlands throughout the UK. In the South West, drainage for agricultural reclamation and peat cutting since the 19th century has progressively altered the hydrological behaviour of the peatlands of Exmoor and Dartmoor National Parks. Lower water table levels have caused increased oxidation, erosion and vegetation change, further affecting the storage of carbon and the provision of other ecosystem services (i.e. supply of drinking water, biodiversity). Moreover, the location of these peatlands at the southernmost margin of the UK peatlands' geographical extent makes them extremely vulnerable to the predicted effects of climate change, i.e. increased temperature and change in rainfall pattern. An extensive programme of peatland restoration is currently underway on Exmoor. Drainage ditches were blocked to reinstate the hydrological behaviour, reduce the outflow of dissolved organic carbon and, in doing so, improve other ecosystem services delivered by peatlands. This paper will report on the water quality monitoring results from a small headwater catchment in Exmoor. We will show results comparing changes in Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) losses and colour pre- and post-restoration. Our experimental approach uses event-based water quality monitoring across three drainage ditches that are representative of the different scales of damage in the area. Samples were taken back to the laboratory and analysed for DOC and colour, using UV spectrophotometry and UV-vis spectrometry respectively. DOC loads were calculated using discharge for each drain. Overall, DOC concentrations ranged between 3 and 30mg/L. Both pre and post- restoration datasets presented high seasonal variability, with higher concentrations measured from June to September. No significant change in DOC concentrations was observed in the 6 months after restoration. It is hypothesised that the effects of restoration could be hidden by

  16. UTILIZING SHELLFISH RESPONSES TO SET TARGET WATER QUALITY CONDITIONS FOR THE RESTORATION OF OYSTER REEFS IN THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S.G. Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2002. Utilizing Shellfish Responses to Set Target Water Quality Conditions for the Restoration of Oyster Reefs in the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida. Presented at the International Workshop on Restoration of Benthic Invertebr...

  17. Nursery stock quality as an indicator of bottomland hardwood forest restoration success in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Rosa C. Goodman; Emile S. Gardiner; K Frances Salifu; Ronald P. Overton; George Hernandez

    2012-01-01

    Seedling morphological quality standards are lacking for bottomland hardwood restoration plantings in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA, which may contribute toward variable restoration success. We measured initial seedling morphology (shoot height, root collar diameter, number of first order lateral roots, fresh mass, and root volume), second year field...

  18. UTILIZING SHELLFISH RESPONSES TO SET TARGET WATER QUALITY CONDITIONS FOR THE RESTORATION OF OYSTER REEFS IN THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S.G. Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2002. Utilizing Shellfish Responses to Set Target Water Quality Conditions for the Restoration of Oyster Reefs in the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida. Presented at the International Workshop on Restoration of Benthic Invertebr...

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-08-31

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574, Neptune. CAU 574 is included in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 [as amended March 2010]) and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This plan provides the methodology for the field activities that will be performed to gather the necessary information for closure of the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 574 using the SAFER process. Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, field screening, analytical results, the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process (Section 3.0), and an evaluation of corrective action alternatives (Appendix B), closure in place with administrative controls is the expected closure strategy for CAU 574. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to verify and support the expected closure strategy and provide a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  20. Environmental Restoration Program project management plan for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office Major System Acquisition OR-1. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In the early 1940s, the Manhattan Project was conducted in a regulatory and operational environment less sophisticated than today. Less was known of the measures needed to protect human health and safety and the environment from the dangers posed by radioactive and hazardous wastes, and experience in dealing with these hazardous materials has grown slowly. Certain hazards were recognized and dealt with from the beginning. However, the techniques used, though standard practices at the time, are now known to have been inadequate. Consequently, the DOE has committed to an aggressive program for cleaning up the environment and has initiated an Environmental Restoration Program involving all its field offices. The objective of this program is to ensure that inactive and surplus DOE facilities and sites meet current standards to protect human health and the environment. The objective of these activities is to ensure that risks posed to human health and safety and the environment by inactive sites and surplus facilities contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and/or mixed wastes are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed safe levels. This Project Management Plan for Major System Acquisition OR-1 Project documents, communicates, and contributes to the evolution of, the management organizations, systems, and tools necessary to carry out effectively the long-range complex cleanup of the DOE sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and at the Paducah, Kentucky, and Piketon, Ohio, uranium enrichment plants managed by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office; the cleanup of off-site contamination resulting from past releases; and the Decontamination and Decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities at these installations.

  1. Diclofenac Potassium Restores Objective and Subjective Measures of Sleep Quality in Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Iacovides, Stella; Avidon, Ingrid; Bentley, Alison; Baker, Fiona C.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynecological disorder that disrupts daytime functioning and nighttime sleep quality. We determined the effectiveness of diclofenac potassium, compared to placebo, in alleviating nighttime pain and restoring sleep architecture in women with primary dysmenorrhea. Design: Randomized, double-blind, crossover study Setting: Sleep laboratory Participants: Ten healthy women (21 ± 1 years) with a history of primary dysmenorrhea. Interventions: Placebo or diclofenac potassium (150 mg per day) for menstrual pain. Measurements and results: We assessed objective measures of sleep (polysomnography) and subjective measures of sleep quality, mood, and intensity of menstrual pain. Compared to a pain-free phase of the menstrual cycle (mid-follicular), women receiving placebo for their menstrual pain had a poorer mood (P < 0.01), decreased sleep efficiency (P < 0.05), less REM sleep (P < 0.05), more stage 1 sleep (P < 0.01), and more sleep stage changes per hour of sleep during the night. Administration of diclofenac potassium compared to placebo not only attenuated the women's menstrual pain (P < 0.05), but also increased sleep efficiency (P < 0.05) and percentage of REM sleep (P < 0.01), decreased percentage of stage 1 sleep (P < 0.05) and number of sleep stage changes per hour of sleep (P < 0.05), and improved subjective ratings of sleep quality and morning vigilance (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Diclofenac potassium effectively attenuates nighttime dysmenorrheic pain and restores subjective and objective measures of sleep quality to values recorded in a pain-free phase of the menstrual cycle. Citation: Iacovides S; Avidon I; Bentley A; Baker FC. Diclofenac potassium restores objective and subjective measures of sleep quality in women with primary dysmenorrhea. SLEEP 2009;32(8):1019-1026. PMID:19725253

  2. Exploring safety and quality in a hemodialysis environment with participatory photographic methods: a restorative approach.

    PubMed

    Marck, Patricia; Molzahn, Anita; Berry-Hauf, Rhonda; Hutchings, Loretta Gail; Hughes, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study used principles and methods of good ecological restoration, including participatory photographic research methods, to explore perceptions of safety and quality in one hemodialysis unit. Using a list of potential safety and quality issues developed during an initial focus group, a practitioner-led photo walkabout was conducted to obtain photographs of the patient care unit and nurses' stories (photo narration) about safety and quality in their environment. Following a process of iterative coding, photos were used to discuss preliminary themes in a photo elicitation focus group with four additional unit staff The major themes identified related to clutter, infection control, unit design, chemicals and air quality, lack of storage space, and health and safety hazards (including wet floors, tripping hazards from hoses, moving furniture/chairs). The visual methods engaged researchers and unit nurses in rich dialogue about safety in this complex environment and provides an ongoing basis for monitoring and enhancing safety.

  3. [Clinical evaluation of a quality criteria system for ceramic inlay restorations].

    PubMed

    Lempel, Edina; Tóth, Vilmos; Szalma, József; Szabó, Gyula

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the utilization of a generally accepted quality criteria system (United States Public Health Services Modified Quality Criteria) in the authors' practice, in the cases of all ceramic inlays and onlays. 41 ceramic inlays/onlays--29 pressed and 12 laminated--were made for 28 patients. Restorations were controlled after 2 years of cementation. According to the USPHS criteria system the following characteristics were controlled: anatomic contour, marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, color match, secondary caries, and surface roughness. In addition, postoperative sensitivity, patient's satisfaction and tooth vitality were examined as well. The USPHS quality criteria system together with the complementary data proved to be an objective examination method that was easily applicable to our clinical practice. On the basis of these studies the utilization of this system together with patient's satisfaction, tooth vitality and sensitivity records appeared a good basis for a regular quality control system of ceramic inlays and onlays.

  4. IMPROVING AIR QUALITY THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program in 1995 as a means of working with the private sector to establish a market-based verification process available to all environmental technologies. Under EPA's Office of R...

  5. IMPROVING AIR QUALITY THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program in 1995 as a means of working with the private sector to establish a market-based verification process available to all environmental technologies. Under EPA's Office of R...

  6. Management approaches for environmental restoration at the U.S. Department of Energy Weapons Complex, Savannah River Site: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.V.; Mayberry, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    This paper introduces the management approaches for environmental restoration at the US Department of Energy Weapons Complex. A brief chronology of environmental restoration complex-wide is presented. This chronology, which focuses on the changing climate at DOE facilities, is then keyed to activities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, USA. Past, present, and future environmental restoration activities at SRS are discussed, reflecting the change in emphasis at the site.

  7. Strategic plan for the utilization of remote sensing technologies in the environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.D.; Doll, W.E.; Durfee, R.C.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Conder, S.R.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The objectives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program are to apply state-of-the-art remote sensing and geophysical technologies and to manage routine and remotely-sensed examinations of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), and their adjacent off-site areas. Repeated multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery, gamma, and photographic surveys will allow monitoring of the degradation that might occur in waste containment vessels and monitoring (at a later stage in the remediation life cycle) of improvements from restoration efforts and cleanup. These technologies, in combination with geophysical surveys, will provide an effective means for identifying unknown waste sites and contaminant transport pathways. All of the data will be maintained in a data base that will be accessible to site managers in the ER Program. The complete analysis of collected data will provide site-specific data to the ER Program for characterizing and monitoring ER Program hazardous waste sites.

  8. Strategic plan for the utilization of remote sensing technologies in the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.D.; Doll, W.E.; Durfee, R.C.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Conder, S.R.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The objectives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program are to apply state-of-the-art remote sensing and geophysical technologies and to manage routine and remotely-sensed examinations of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), and their adjacent off-site areas. Repeated multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery, gamma, and photographic surveys will allow monitoring of the degradation that might occur in waste containment vessels and monitoring (at a later stage in the remediation life cycle) of improvements from restoration efforts and cleanup. These technologies, in combination with geophysical surveys, will provide an effective means for identifying unknown waste sites and contaminant transport pathways. All of the data will be maintained in a data base that will be accessible to site managers in the ER Program. The complete analysis of collected data will provide site-specific data to the ER Program for characterizing and monitoring ER Program hazardous waste sites.

  9. Stakeholder Interaction in Participatory Land Restoration in Iceland: Environmental Officers' Challenges and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Brita; Hallgren, Lars; Aradóttir, Ása L

    2015-08-01

    Participatory approaches involve stakeholder interaction but environmental agency employees engaged in participatory undertakings often lack training for interaction tasks. This study explored how district officers at the Soil Conservation Service of Iceland (SCSI) experienced and dealt with stakeholder interaction in participatory land restoration. We made semi-structured interviews with all district officers with at least 1-year experience; seven in total. A thematic content analysis revealed five challenges facing the officers in their interaction activities and seven strategies that they used to deal with these challenges. The core challenge was to establish and maintain contacts with farmers and other stakeholders as it enabled the SCSI to support and influence their land restoration practices. Other challenges were to: accomplish SCSI's objectives; represent the SCSI and the government; have adequate skills, knowledge, and background; and deal with one's own emotions. Four of the strategies seemed to promote collaboration: create win-win scenarios; "go local"; direct and positive communication; and motivation and knowledge sharing. The other strategies: supportive district officer team; self-reliance and personal background; and self-control supported the officers in their interaction tasks. Factors undermining their collaboration efforts included insufficient time and other resources, an unsupportive organizational culture and a legal duty to assess the condition of vegetation cover on farmland. Increased resource allocation to the SCSI's local operations, more attention to emotional issues, and efforts to develop a more flexible and learning organizational culture that supports collaboration could counteract these factors.

  10. Stakeholder Interaction in Participatory Land Restoration in Iceland: Environmental Officers' Challenges and Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Brita; Hallgren, Lars; Aradóttir, Ása L.

    2015-08-01

    Participatory approaches involve stakeholder interaction but environmental agency employees engaged in participatory undertakings often lack training for interaction tasks. This study explored how district officers at the Soil Conservation Service of Iceland (SCSI) experienced and dealt with stakeholder interaction in participatory land restoration. We made semi-structured interviews with all district officers with at least 1-year experience; seven in total. A thematic content analysis revealed five challenges facing the officers in their interaction activities and seven strategies that they used to deal with these challenges. The core challenge was to establish and maintain contacts with farmers and other stakeholders as it enabled the SCSI to support and influence their land restoration practices. Other challenges were to: accomplish SCSI's objectives; represent the SCSI and the government; have adequate skills, knowledge, and background; and deal with one's own emotions. Four of the strategies seemed to promote collaboration: create win-win scenarios; "go local"; direct and positive communication; and motivation and knowledge sharing. The other strategies: supportive district officer team; self-reliance and personal background; and self-control supported the officers in their interaction tasks. Factors undermining their collaboration efforts included insufficient time and other resources, an unsupportive organizational culture and a legal duty to assess the condition of vegetation cover on farmland. Increased resource allocation to the SCSI's local operations, more attention to emotional issues, and efforts to develop a more flexible and learning organizational culture that supports collaboration could counteract these factors.

  11. Partnering for environmental restoration: The Port Hope Harbour Remedial Action Plan (RAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, S.M.C.

    1995-12-31

    A Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is being developed for Port Hope Harbour, one of 43 Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified by the International Joint Commission (IJC). The RAP, when implemented, will lead to the restoration and protection of desirable water conditions in Port Hope Harbour. The environmental concern associated with the harbor can be best viewed as a historical contaminated sediment problem. Approximately 90,000 m{sup 3} of sediment located in Port Hope Harbour`s turning basin and west slip are contaminated by uranium and thorium series radionuclides, heavy metals, and PCBs. There are several groups contributing to the development of the RAP. All of these groups have the common goal of developing an environmentally sound plan that reflects the views of the community. Strategic partnerships have been established that recognize the need to integrate and coordinate the efforts of all agencies, stakeholders, and the community. The objective is to develop an environmentally sound remediation plan through an efficient and effective management framework.

  12. Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program annual report, January--December 1993. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conder, S.R.; Doll, W.E.; Gabrielsen, C.A.; King, A.D.; Durfee, R.C.; Parr, P.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program has been established to provide environmental characterization data, change data, and trend data to various Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) programs. The data are acquired through several different types of survey platforms. During the calendar year of 1993, a variety of surveys were conducted through the Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program. The aerial surveys included geophysical, radiological, false color infrared (IR) photography, and natural color photography. Ground surveys were conducted to correlate data collected from the airborne platforms to data measured at ground level. Ground surveys were also conducted to determine the existence or absence of threatened and endangered plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Some of the special surveys included laser induced fluorescence imaging, solar reflectance, and various remote sensing and ground control activities for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) initiative. Data analysis, management, and storage are also conducted by the Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program to achieve the highest level of data useability possible. The data acquired through these surveys have provided and will continue to provide much needed information to ERWM programs.

  13. Integration of Environmental Restoration and Decontamination and Dismantlement Requirements at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Reese; D. J. Kuhns

    1999-02-01

    In 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that it was necessary to remediate a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA) site to address the risk of subsurface petroleum contamination to human health and the environment. This cleanup project was conducted utilizing the Non-time Critical Removal Action process. Due to the close proximity (above the contaminated soil) of a number of above ground storage tanks and a building, the CERCLA project team worked closely with the D&D group to ensure all requirements for each program were met. Lessons learned and regulatory requirements are discussed in the paper, including the factors unknown to many ER personnel regarding the steps required to be completed prior to the dismantlement of structures. The paper summarizes the background associated with the site, why the removal action was conducted, the scope of the removal action, and the results. The emphasis of the paper is to discuss the integration between ER and D&D requirements and processes. In the current environment where ER and D&D activities are commingled, it is imperative that ER and D&D personnel are aware of the requirements imposed upon each program. By working together and building upon the strengths of each program, the INEEL�s 1997 removal action was a tremendous success.

  14. Integration of Environmental Restoration and Decontamination and Dismantlement Requirements at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhns, Douglass Jack; Reese, Craig Lyle

    1999-03-01

    In 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that it was necessary to remediate a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA) site to address the risk of subsurface petroleum contamination to human health and the environment. This cleanup project was conducted utilizing the Non-time Critical Removal Action process. Due to the close proximity (above the contaminated soil) of a number of above ground storage tanks and a building, the CERCLA project team worked closely with the D&D group to ensure all requirements for each program were met. Lessons learned and regulatory requirements will be discussed in the paper, including the factors unknown to many ER personnel regarding the steps required to be completed prior to the dismantlement of structures. The paper will summarize the background associated with the site, why the removal action was conducted, the scope of the removal action, and the results. The emphasis of the paper will discuss the integration between ER and D&D requirements and processes. In the current environment where ER and D&D activities are commingled, it is imperative that ER and D&D personnel are aware of the requirements imposed upon each program. By working together and building upon the strengths of each program, the INEEL’s 1997 removal action was a tremendous success.

  15. Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1994-01-06

    This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

  16. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  17. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.L.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of July 22-29, 1993, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 19.0 and Mile 22.0 on July 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Project quarterly technical report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-18

    This quarterly report describes the technical status of activities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Each activity is identified by an activity data sheet number, a brief title describing the activity or the technical area where the activity is located, and the name of the project leader. The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) portion of the facility operating permit requires the submission of a technical progress report on a quarterly basis. This report, submitted to fulfill the permit`s requirement, summarizes the work performed and the results of sampling and analysis in the ER Project. Suspect waste found include: Radionuclides, high explosives, metals, solvents and organics. The data provided in this report have not been validated. These data are considered ``reviewed data.``

  19. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22-29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase II Sampling and Analysis activities as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  20. Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative Project Achievements for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Hohman, E.H.; Lohrstorfer, C.L.; Venedam, R.J.; Weeks, S.J.; Fannin, C.R.

    2006-07-01

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) project has been in existence since 2002. In this short time period, AMSI has successfully developed, tested and/or demonstrated over 30 advanced sensors and monitoring systems for applications in environmental restoration, waste management and other areas of national interest. This presentation summarizes the AMSI project, and gives examples of recent successes. The purpose of the presentation is to make Symposium attendees aware of AMSI's capabilities and experience, for possible use in the future. Example successes include the following: - Automated hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) monitoring in wells alongside the Columbia River; - Atmospheric chemical sensor array for remote, real-time plume tracking; - Wireless sensor platform for long-term monitoring of subsurface moisture; - Embedded piezo-resistive micro-cantilever (EPM) units for carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) detection; - 'iHistorian' for efficient, real-time data management of chemical releases. (authors)

  1. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management manpower needs assessment: US Department of Energy complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, C.W.; Lewis, R.E.; Hunt, S.T. ); Finn, M.G. )

    1992-06-01

    A study was conducted Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc. to assess the supply and demand for 53 scientific, engineering, and technical occupations relevant to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM). These assessments were made by examining budget projections and the input of program/project and human resources managers throughout the DOE complex. Quantitative projections of full-time equivalent employees slots for each occupation have been developed for the 1993--1997 time frame. Qualitative assessments of the factors that affect recruitment, staffing, and retention are also reported. The implications of the study are discussed within the likely skills mix of the future workforce and the education and organization interventions most likely to address the needs of the DOE complex.

  2. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management manpower needs assessment: US Department of Energy complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, C.W.; Lewis, R.E.; Hunt, S.T.; Finn, M.G.

    1992-06-01

    A study was conducted Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc. to assess the supply and demand for 53 scientific, engineering, and technical occupations relevant to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM). These assessments were made by examining budget projections and the input of program/project and human resources managers throughout the DOE complex. Quantitative projections of full-time equivalent employees slots for each occupation have been developed for the 1993--1997 time frame. Qualitative assessments of the factors that affect recruitment, staffing, and retention are also reported. The implications of the study are discussed within the likely skills mix of the future workforce and the education and organization interventions most likely to address the needs of the DOE complex.

  3. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention checklist guide for the feasibility study project phase

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Feasibility studies (FS) determine what remedial alternatives are presented to regulators for site cleanup. A key consideration in this process is the waste to be generated. Minimizing the volume and toxicity of this waste will ultimately contribute to the selection of the best remedial option. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user in incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all FS phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will help users document PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to assist users with implementing and evaluating waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves and perform preliminary waste assessments.

  4. Simulated wetland conservation-restoration effects on water quantity and quality at watershed scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xixi; Shang, Shiyou; Qu, Zhongyi; Liu, Tingxi; Melesse, Assefa M; Yang, Wanhong

    2010-07-01

    Wetlands are one of the most important watershed microtopographic features that affect hydrologic processes (e.g., routing) and the fate and transport of constituents (e.g., sediment and nutrients). Efforts to conserve existing wetlands and/or to restore lost wetlands require that watershed-level effects of wetlands on water quantity and water quality be quantified. Because monitoring approaches are usually cost or logistics prohibitive at watershed scale, distributed watershed models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), enhanced by the hydrologic equivalent wetland (HEW) concept developed by Wang [Wang, X., Yang, W., Melesse, A.M., 2008. Using hydrologic equivalent wetland concept within SWAT to estimate streamflow in watersheds with numerous wetlands. Trans. ASABE 51 (1), 55-72.], can be a best resort. However, there is a serious lack of information about simulated effects using this kind of integrated modeling approach. The objective of this study was to use the HEW concept in SWAT to assess effects of wetland restoration within the Broughton's Creek watershed located in southwestern Manitoba, and of wetland conservation within the upper portion of the Otter Tail River watershed located in northwestern Minnesota. The results indicated that the HEW concept allows the nonlinear functional relations between watershed processes and wetland characteristics (e.g., size and morphology) to be accurately represented in the models. The loss of the first 10-20% of the wetlands in the Minnesota study area would drastically increase the peak discharge and loadings of sediment, total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen (TN). On the other hand, the justifiable reductions of the peak discharge and loadings of sediment, TP, and TN in the Manitoba study area may require that 50-80% of the lost wetlands be restored. Further, the comparison between the predicted restoration and conservation effects revealed that wetland conservation seems to deserve a higher priority

  5. Water quality variables as indicators in the restoration impact assessment of the north lagoon of Tunis, South Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, E. L. Bahri; Armi, Zina; Trabelsi-Annabi, Neila; Shili, Abdessalem; Maiz, Naceur Ben

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of the ecological status of the north lagoon of Tunis, a shallow Mediterranean coastal area after its restoration is discussed with respect to different environmental variables as indicators of water quality. Salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds and chlorophyll a were determined biweekly from January 2004 to June 2006. After the restoration works, the main changes are the decrease of the residence time of the lagoon's water and the nutrient concentrations. The colonization of the substratum by the seagrass was also observed. The analysis of the data set has indicated that nutrient availability was maintained the year round and was regulated through horizontal lagoon-open sea flux by the inlet-outlet gates. Nitrate dominated slightly ammonium in the dissolved inorganic nitrogen pool with a percentage contribution of 35-72%, followed by ammonia (16-62%) and nitrites. Dissolved oxygen ranged between 2.8 mg l- 1 and 10.9 mg l- 1 (31% and 118% oxygen saturation respectively). These conditions are sustained by the water circulation system and the short water residence time as confirmed by multivariate analysis.

  6. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  7. Natural resource risk and cost management in environmental restoration: Demonstration project at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.J.; Sharples, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is both a trustee for the natural resources present on its properties and the lead response agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As such, DOE is addressing the destruction or loss of those resources caused by releases of hazardous substances from its facilities (DOE 1991) and collecting data to be used in determining the extent of contamination at its facilities, estimating risks to human health and the environment, and selecting appropriate remedial actions. The remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process is used to investigate sites and select remedial actions. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process may be used to determine whether natural resources have also been injured by the released hazardous substances and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In FY 1994, the Savannah River Site (SRS) was chosen to serve as a demonstration site for testing the integrated NRDA framework and demonstrating how NRDA concerns might be integrated into the environmental restoration activities of an actual site that is characteristically large and complex. The demonstration project (1) provided a means to illustrate the use of complex analyses using real information on the specific natural resources of the SRS; (2) served as a vehicle for reinforcing and expanding the SRS staff`s understanding of the links between the NRDA and RI/FS processes; (3) provided a forum for the discussion of strategic issues with SRS personnel; and (4) allowed the refining and elaboration of DOE guidance by benchmarking the theoretical process using real information and issues.

  8. Four Universities: Achieving Environmental Quality through Environmental Education and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Ralph W., Jr., Ed.; Nash, Roderick, Ed.

    Five universities receiving aid from the Rockefeller Foundation are discussed. The American University has had difficulty initially interdisciplinary environmental studies. Problems include insufficient financial independence, autonomous faculty nature, seniority system, students, and departmental structure. Penn State's efforts involve…

  9. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  10. Development of a zoning-based environmental-ecological-coupled model for lakes to assess lake restoration effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengjia; Zou, Changxin; Zhao, Yanwei

    2017-04-01

    Environmental/ecological models are widely used for lake management as they provide a means to understand physical, chemical and biological processes in highly complex ecosystems. Most research focused on the development of environmental (water quality) and ecological models, separately. Limited studies were developed to couple the two models, and in these limited coupled models, a lake was regarded as a whole for analysis (i.e., considering the lake to be one well-mixed box), which was appropriate for small-scale lakes and was not sufficient to capture spatial variations within middle-scale or large-scale lakes. This paper seeks to establish a zoning-based environmental-ecological-coupled model for a lake. The Baiyangdian Lake, the largest freshwater lake in Northern China, was adopted as the study case. The coupled lake models including a hydrodynamics and water quality model established by MIKE21 and a compartmental ecological model used STELLA software have been established for middle-sized Baiyangdian Lake to realize the simulation of spatial variations of ecological conditions. On the basis of the flow field distribution results generated by MIKE21 hydrodynamics model, four water area zones were used as an example for compartmental ecological model calibration and validation. The results revealed that the developed coupled lake models can reasonably reflected the changes of the key state variables although there remain some state variables that are not well represented by the model due to the low quality of field monitoring data. Monitoring sites in a compartment may not be representative of the water quality and ecological conditions in the entire compartment even though that is the intention of compartment-based model design. There was only one ecological observation from a single monitoring site for some periods. This single-measurement issue may cause large discrepancies particularly when sampled site is not representative of the whole compartment. The

  11. Environmental Quality and Issues of Adoption Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pampel, Fred, Jr.; van Es, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered through telephone interviews with Illinois farmers are used to study the adoption of soil conservation practices (operationalization of environmental innovation) and commercial practices. (NQ)

  12. Sediment quality and polychlorinated biphenyls in the Lower Neponset River, Massachusetts, and implications for urban river restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Cooke, Matthew G.; Merrill, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to restore fish passage, habitat, and recreational use of the Neponset River, a tributary to Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, have raised concerns about the sediment, water, and biota quality of the river. Consequently, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs Department of Fish and Game Riverways Program and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, studied sediment and water quality, with a specific focus on polychlorinated biphenyls, in the Neponset River. Sediment samples were collected throughout the Neponset River and tested for elements and organic compounds including polyaromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Although enriched compared to background concentrations, sediment quality in the Neponset River was generally better than that of other urban rivers in the United States, except with respect to one constituent, polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations of lead, some polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls in the sediment may be toxic to aquatic organisms and may pose a risk to human health. The sediment quality also fails to meet the minimum requirements set by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for lined landfill disposal. The locations of the source(s) of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Neponset River were determined by means of congener analysis from PISCES passive water-column samplers. The PISCES data indicate a sharp increase in polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and a substantial shift in congener pattern downstream of one PISCES sampling location near Fairmont Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts. This result indicates that the area upstream of this sampling location may be the location of a historical source of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Neponset River. The present (2003) source to the water column may likely be PCB contaminated sediment.

  13. County-level cumulative environmental quality associated with cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Jagai, Jyotsna S; Messer, Lynne C; Rappazzo, Kristen M; Gray, Christine L; Grabich, Shannon C; Lobdell, Danelle T

    2017-08-01

    Individual environmental exposures are associated with cancer development; however, environmental exposures occur simultaneously. The Environmental Quality Index (EQI) is a county-level measure of cumulative environmental exposures that occur in 5 domains. The EQI was linked to county-level annual age-adjusted cancer incidence rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program state cancer profiles. All-site cancer and the top 3 site-specific cancers for male and female subjects were considered. Incident rate differences (IRDs; annual rate difference per 100,000 persons) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed-slope, random intercept multilevel linear regression models. Associations were assessed with domain-specific indices and analyses were stratified by rural/urban status. Comparing the highest quintile/poorest environmental quality with the lowest quintile/best environmental quality for overall EQI, all-site county-level cancer incidence rate was positively associated with poor environmental quality overall (IRD, 38.55; 95% CI, 29.57-47.53) and for male (IRD, 32.60; 95% CI, 16.28-48.91) and female (IRD, 30.34; 95% CI, 20.47-40.21) subjects, indicating a potential increase in cancer incidence with decreasing environmental quality. Rural/urban stratified models demonstrated positive associations comparing the highest with the lowest quintiles for all strata, except the thinly populated/rural stratum and in the metropolitan/urbanized stratum. Prostate and breast cancer demonstrated the strongest positive associations with poor environmental quality. We observed strong positive associations between the EQI and all-site cancer incidence rates, and associations differed by rural/urban status and environmental domain. Research focusing on single environmental exposures in cancer development may not address the broader environmental context in which cancers develop, and future research should address cumulative environmental

  14. GIS environmental information analysis of the Darro River basin as the key for the management and hydrological forest restoration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paz; Delgado, Expectación; Lopez-Alonso, Mónica; Poyatos, José Manuel

    2017-09-23

    This article presents analyses of soil and environmental information for the Darro River basin (Granada-Spain) preliminary to its hydrological and forestry restoration. These analyses were carried out using a geographical information system (GIS) and employing a new procedure that adapts hydrological forest-restoration methods. The complete analysis encompasses morphological conditions, soil and climate characteristics as well as vegetation and land use. The study investigates soil erosion in the basin by using Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and by mapping erosion fragility units. The results are presented in a set of maps and their analysis, providing the starting point for river basin management and the hydrological and forestry-restoration project that was approved at the end of 2015. The presence of soft substrates (e.g. gravel and sand) indicates that the area is susceptible to erosion, particularly the areas that are dominated by human activity and have little soil protection. Finally, land use and vegetation cover were identified as key factors in the soil erosion in the basin. According to the results, river authorities have included several measures in the restoration project aimed at reducing the erosion and helping to recover the environmental value of this river basin and to include it in recreation possibilities for the community of Granada. The presented analytical approach, designed by the authors, would be useful as a tool for environmental restoration in other small Mediterranean river basins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Monitoring environmental quality at the landscape scale

    Treesearch

    Robert V. O' Neill; Carolyn T. Hunsaker; K. Bruce Jones; Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; Paul M. Schwartz; Iris A. Goodman; Barbara L. Jackson; William S. Baillargeon

    1997-01-01

    Over the past century, technological advances have greatly improved the standard of living in the United States. But these same advances have caused sweeping environmental changes, often unforeseen and potentially irreparable. Ethical stewardship of the environment requires that society monitor and assess environmental changes at the national scale with a view toward...

  16. Tensions Between Materials and Environmental Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Richard A.

    1976-01-01

    Conflicts between economic growth and environmental awareness will change availability and usage of materials. Environmental protection will increase materials costs, restrict land use for manufacturing sites and mineral extraction, and divert capital from expansion. The tradeoff for undesirable effects will be materials conservation and improved…

  17. United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program. Guidance on Soil Vapor Extraction Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    DoD Department of Defense DNAPL Dense non-aqueous phase liquid DPE dual-phase extraction DQO Data quality objective ECD electron capture device...EPA Environmental Protection Agency ER electrical resistance FID flame ionization detector Hg Mercury MCL maximum contaminant level MCLG Maximum...Well Ground Surface Soil (Advection) V a d o s e Z o n e (Diffusion) Massive Clay Sand Sand Vadose Zone Groundwater Zone LNAPL DNAPL Groundwater Table

  18. Fiscal year 1990 Rocky Flats Plant Environmental Restoration program Current-Year Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, T. ); Waage, E.; Miller, D. Corp., Boulder, CO )

    1990-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is a nuclear weapons manufacturing facility currently operated by EG G for the US Department of Energy (DOE). RFP is located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Jefferson Country, Colorado. The Fiscal Year 1990 (FY90) Current-Year Work Plan (CYWP) is intended to serve as a guidance document for the Environmental Restoration (ER) and RCRA Compliance programs that will be implemented at RFP. The CYWP provides in one document any cross-references necessary to understand the interrelationships between the CYWP and the DOE Five-Year Plan (FYP), Site-Specific Plan (SSP), and other related documents. The scope of this plan includes comparison of planned FY90 ER activities to those actually achieved. The CYWP has been updated to include Colorado Department of Health (CDH), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and DOE Inter-Agency Agreement ER activities. It addresses hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, mixed wastes (radioactive and hazardous), and sanitary wastes. The CYWP also addresses facilities and sites contaminated with or used in management of those wastes.

  19. Waste management/waste certification plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. Jr.; Hunt-Davenport, L.D.; Cofer, G.H.

    1995-03-01

    This Waste Management/Waste Certification (C) Plan, written for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), outlines the criteria and methodologies to be used in the management of waste generated during ORNL ER field activities. Other agreed upon methods may be used in the management of waste with consultation with ER and Waste Management Organization. The intent of this plan is to provide information for the minimization, handling, and disposal of waste generated by ER activities. This plan contains provisions for the safe and effective management of waste consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) guidance. Components of this plan have been designed to protect the environment and the health and safety of workers and the public. It, therefore, stresses that investigation derived waste (IDW) and other waste be managed to ensure that (1) all efforts be made to minimize the amount of waste generated; (2) costs associated with sampling storage, analysis, transportation, and disposal are minimized; (3) the potential for public and worker exposure is not increased; and (4) additional contaminated areas are not created.

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program Schedule Contingency Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report represents the schedule contingency evaluation done on the FY-93 Major System Acquisition (MSA) Baseline for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Environmental Restoration Program (EPP). A Schedule Contingency Evaluation Team (SCET) was established to evaluate schedule contingency on the MSA Baseline for the INEL ERP associated with completing work within milestones established in the baseline. Baseline schedules had been established considering enforceable deadlines contained in the Federal Facilities Agreement/Consent Order (FFA/CO), the agreement signed in 1992, by the State of Idaho, Department of Health & Welfare, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The evaluation was based upon the application of standard schedule risk management techniques to the specific problems of the INEL ERP. The schedule contingency evaluation was designed to provided early visibility for potential schedule delays impacting enforceable deadlines. The focus of the analysis was on the duration of time needed to accomplish all required activities to achieve completion of the milestones in the baseline corresponding to the enforceable deadlines. Additionally, the analysis was designed to identify control of high-probability, high-impact schedule risk factors.

  1. Regulatory framework for U.S. Department of Energy surplus facility decommissioning under environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Buller, J.

    1995-12-31

    DOE has identified more than 700 contaminated surplus facilities that require decommissioning through the environmental restoration program. This paper discusses the regulatory framework for decommissioning these facilities, specifically the framework established by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA jurisdiction covers releases of hazardous substances to the environment, substantial threats of such releases, and responses to these releases or threatened releases. DOE has determined that a use of CERCLA removal action authority is the appropriate means of responding to releases or threats of releases from contaminated surplus facilities under the jurisdiction, custody, or control of the Department. Not all surplus facilities to be decommissioned, however, will fall under CERCLA jurisdiction. In these instances, the same basic process will still be followed, but a graded approach will be applied consistent with DOE orders. This paper focuses on the draft policy and process for decommissioning contaminated surplus facilities subject to CERCLA. Considerations pertinent to decommissioning in circumstances where CERCLA does not apply are noted where appropriate.

  2. Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-29

    This report presents the findings of the Interagency Requirements Review of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) Program. The review was requested by Admiral Watkins to help determine the FY 1993 funding levels necessary to meet all legal requirements. The review was undertaken by analysts from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Army Corps of Engineers, reporting to an Interagency Group (IAG) of senior Administration officials concerned with environmental cleanup issues. The purpose of the study was to determine the level of finding needed in FY 1993 for each ERWM Field Office to comply with all Federal, State, and local government legal requirements; all DOE Orders that establish standards for environment, safety and health (ES and H) management; and for prudent investments in other discretionary and management activities such as upgrading administrative buildings, information systems, etc. The study also reviewed the cost estimates supporting the ERWM proposed budget, including direct costs (labor, equipment) and indirect costs (administrative, landlord services, contractor overhead). The study did not analyze whether the Federal/State legal requirements and DOE Orders were necessary or whether the proposed clean-up remedies represent the most cost effective alternatives available.

  3. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention checklist guide for the surveillance and maintenance project phase

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    DOE Order 5820.2 mandates that a surveillance and maintenance program be established in all shut-down facilities to ensure adequate containment of contamination, provide physical safety and security, and reduce potential public and environmental hazards. A key consideration in this process is the prevention of any waste to be generated from these activities. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will help users document their PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to assist users with implementing and evaluating waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves and perform preliminary waste assessments.

  4. Environmental Education in Action: An SCS Environmental Quality Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This first of a series of reprints from "Soil Conservation Magazine" presents ideas and ways of incorporating environmental and outdoor education into school programs at all levels. This publication contains 10 such reprints. The titles of the articles are: (1) Conservation Education - It Lasts a Lifetime; (2) Through an Open Door; (3)…

  5. Environmental Impact Assessment of reservoir construction: new perspectives for restoration economy, and development: the Belo Monte Power Plant case study.

    PubMed

    Tundisi, J G; Matsumura-Tundisi, T; Tundisi, J E M

    2015-08-01

    The Environmental Impact Assessment of reservoir construction can be viewed as a new strategic perspective for the economic development of a region. Based on the principles of a watershed approach a interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary systemic view including biogeophysiographical, economic and socio environmental studies the new vision of a EIA provides a basic substratum for the restoration economy and an advanced model for the true development much well ahead of the modernization aspects of the project of a reservoir construction.

  6. The impact of river restoration on the water quality of the surface water and groundwater in an Alpine catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittoor Viswanathan, V.; Schirmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The importance of river restoration projects can only be realized upon evaluating their success or failure in a region mainly with regards to water quality, ecological adaptations and flood mitigation. The Thur catchment in North eastern Switzerland is chosen as the study area. The water quality along the entire river reach (with the corresponding groundwater monitoring wells) will be analyzed with regard to the existing land use and a comparison shall be made with the water quality in the restored river sections of the river. A restored river section at Niederneunforn has been heavily monitored as part of the RECORD project and this data shall be vital for the present work. The water quality changes are to be observed by relating to some of the basic parameters like pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC) , the concentration of ions like chloride, nitrate, nitrite, ortho-phosphate, ammonium and calcium. These are to be measured in both the surface and the groundwater upstream and downstream of the restored section in the study river. Both long-term monitoring as well as localized water sampling campaigns are planned as part of the study. Use of the stable isotopes of oxygen and nitrogen is to be done to trace the possible sources of contamination in the river reach. This study shall aim to answer the following questions: 1. What are the diurnal and seasonal water quality changes in the Thur river; upstream and downstream of the restored section? 2. Are there any links between the different water quality parameters and how does the restored section influence these links? 3. How does the water quality change from the river to the groundwater (due to the recharge) between the restored and the unrestored river sections? 4. How does the land use in the catchment affect / alter the water quality in the river? -Is there high pollutant load from a particular waste water treatment or more agricultural runoff

  7. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  8. Vugraph presentations of the fourth DOE Industry/University/Lab Forum on Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of various presentations from the Fourth DOE Industry/University/Lab Forum on Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management held in Albuquerque, New Mexico July 19--21, 1993. Separate abstracts were prepared for each presentation of this report.

  9. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

  10. 75 FR 1807 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Restoration Design Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... (EIS) to support possible amendments to several BLM-Arizona Resource Management Plans (RMP) to identify sites and/or areas managed by the BLM that may be suitable for the development of renewable energy and... Restoration Design Energy Project is to foster environmentally responsible production of renewable energy by...

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 489: WWII UXO Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada; May 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-05-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan provides the details for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 489: WWII UXO Sites, Tonopah Test Range. CAU 489 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996.

  12. 78 FR 16655 - Draft Damage Assessment, Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the T/B DBL 152 Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... Assessment for the T/B DBL 152 Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... and Environmental Assessment for the T/B DBL 152 Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Request for Comments... restoring natural resource injuries resulting from the November 11, 2005, T/B DBL 152 oil spill in the...

  13. Cardiovascular hospitalizations and associations with environmental quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular disease has been identified as a condition that may be associated with environmental factors. Air pollution in particular has been demonstrated to be associated with cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, which can increase the likelihood of cardiovascular eve...

  14. 78 FR 26319 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Proposal of Future Early Restoration Projects and Environmental Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... (Plaquemines Parish and Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana). Barrier island restoration would restore beach, dune... million. Beach Enhancement Project at Gulf Island National Seashore (Escambia County, Florida). This... Santa Rosa areas of Gulf Island National Seashore. The purpose is to help restore lost...

  15. Using an environmental public health tracking biomonitoring study to validate safe water restoration efforts in Florida.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Melissa; DuClos, Chris; Kintziger, Kristina; Gray, Albert; Bonometti, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a carcinogen when consumed over many years and is the type of arsenic that is associated with well water. Private wells in many central Florida counties have been found to contain levels of arsenic above 10 μg/L, which is the maximum contaminant level (MCL) established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The purpose of this study was to test whether individuals living in homes with arsenic levels above the MCL who use bottled water or have a point of use (POU) filter on their main source of water in the house (eg, kitchen sink) are ingesting unsafe levels of arsenic through other unfiltered water sources in the home. Case-control study of residents with private wells above (case) and below (control) the MCL for arsenic in drinking water (10 μg/L) conducted between April and July 2013. Residents with private wells living in Hernando County, Florida, where nearly 400 unique wells of 1200 tested have been found to have elevated arsenic levels (targeted sampling). Participants with elevated water arsenic levels were referred to the Florida Safe Water Restoration Program for assistance in obtaining bottled water vouchers and/or POU filters. Creatinine-corrected total urinary arsenic levels and information on water use and consumption behaviors, dietary intake, and other possible exposure sources. Total urinary arsenic levels were similar for cases using POU filters or bottled water when compared with controls (geometric means of 7.17 and 7.19 μg/L, respectively). The current practice used by the Florida Safe Water Restoration Program of supplying POU filters or bottled water to households with arsenic levels in private wells between 10 and 50 μg/L appears to be sufficient to protect residents from arsenic exposure through tap water.

  16. A case study of elementary teachers' conceptions of environmental literacy in relationship to a tall grass prairie restoration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, Teresa Jayne

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe seven elementary teachers' conceptions of environmental literacy in relationship to a tall grass prairie restoration project and to explore ways in which the tall grass prairie restoration project for third grade contributed to enhancing educational learning experiences. The research questions were: 1. What are teachers' conceptions of environmental literacy for third grade students? 2. How does the prairie restoration trip contribute to teachers' capacity to teach for environmental literacy of third grade students? 3. What is the pedagogical value of the prairie restoration project? The theoretical frameworks underpinning this study were David Sobel's (1996) model for developmental progression in children's relationships with nature, and the North American Environmental Education Association's (2011) framework for environmental literacy. The first assertion derived from thematic data analysis of interviews, field trip observations, classroom observations, and artifacts was, The participating teachers' visions of environmental literacy for third grade students included components that spanned across a developmentally appropriate progression from cultivating empathy for living things, to fueling discovery of nature, to fostering a sense of responsibility toward the natural world . Components of environmental literacy described by teachers included being at ease in the natural environment, appreciation and respect, wonder and curiosity, awareness and interdependence, sense of agency, responsibility and service, and environmental knowledge. The second assertion stemming from thematic data analysis was, The prairie restoration project and related curriculum have pedagogical value that included and exceeded addressing state science standards. In addition to addressing state science standards identified by teachers, the curriculum related to the prairie restoration project served as an agent of curricular

  17. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Parker, A.F.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides summary information on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) sites as listed in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), dated January 1, 1992, Appendix C. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory was built in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The original mission of ORNL was to produce and chemically separate the first gram-quantities of plutonium as part of the national effort to produce the atomic bomb. The current mission of ORNL is to provide applied research and development in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in nuclear fusion and fission, energy conservation, fossil fuels, and other energy technologies and to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical, life, and environmental sciences. ER is also tasked with clean up or mitigation of environmental impacts resulting from past waste management practices on portions of the approximately 37,000 acres within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Other installations located within the ORR are the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25) and the Y-12 plant. The remedial action strategy currently integrates state and federal regulations for efficient compliance and approaches for both investigations and remediation efforts on a Waste Area Grouping (WAG) basis. As defined in the ORR FFA Quarterly Report July - September 1995, a WAG is a grouping of potentially contaminated sites based on drainage area and similar waste characteristics. These contaminated sites are further divided into four categories based on existing information concerning whether the data are generated for scoping or remedial investigation (RI) purposes. These areas are as follows: (1) Operable Units (OU); (2) Characterization Areas (CA); (3) Remedial Site Evaluation (RSE) Areas; and (4) Removal Site Evaluation (RmSE) Areas.

  18. Environmental Quality of Upper Honey Creek: A Preliminary Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    AD-AU98 283 HEIDELBERG COLL TIFFIN OH WATER QUALITY LAB FIG 8/8 ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF UPPER HONEY CREEK: A PRELIMINARY ASSES--EYC(U) JAN 81 K A... Water Quality Lab oo&Ipry Heidelberg College Tiffin, Oio 44883 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Water Quality Section NCBED-HQ...different how Report) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Copies are available from National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161 19. KEY WORDS

  19. Technical management plan for sample generation, analysis, and data review for Phase 2 of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.C.; Benson, S.B.; Beeler, D.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The remedial investigation is entering Phase 2, which has the following items as its objectives: define the nature and extent of the contamination in areas downstream from the DOE ORR, evaluate the human health and ecological risks posed by these contaminants, and perform preliminary identification and evaluation of potential remediation alternatives. This plan describes the requirements, responsibilities, and roles of personnel during sampling, analysis, and data review for the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The purpose of the plan is to formalize the process for obtaining analytical services, tracking sampling and analysis documentation, and assessing the overall quality of the CR-ERP data collection program to ensure that it will provide the necessary building blocks for the program decision-making process.

  20. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  1. Near Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    MCKINNEY, S.M.

    2000-05-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near-facility environmental monitoring directed by Waste Management Technical Services and supersedes HNF-EP-0538-4. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Waste Management Technical Services in implementing near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1 (DOE 1990) as a part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE-RL 1997) and is used to define: Environmental measurement and sampling locations used to monitor environmental contaminants near active and inactive facilities and waste storage and disposal sites; Procedures and equipment needed to perform the measurement and sampling; Frequency and analyses required for each measurement and sampling location; Minimum detection level and accuracy; Quality assurance components; and Investigation levels. Near-facility environmental monitoring for the Hanford Site is conducted in accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1990), 5400.5 (DOE 1993), 5484.1 (DOE 1990), and 435.1 (DOE 1999), and DOE/EH-O173T (DOE 1991). It is Waste Management Technical Services' objective to manage and conduct near-facility environmental monitoring activities at the Hanford Site in a cost-effective and environmentally responsible manner that is in compliance with the letter and spirit of these regulations and other environmental regulations, statutes, and standards.

  2. QUALITY SCIENCE AND QUALITY ASSURANCE: OBSERVATIONS OR AN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTIST

    EPA Science Inventory

    --

    ABSTRACT
    The purpose of this manuscript is to examine the relationship between quality science (QS) and quality assurance (QA). Many research scientists definitely want to do QS, but are afraid or do not want to do QA because they are intimidated by the QA proc...

  3. QUALITY SCIENCE AND QUALITY ASSURANCE: OBSERVATIONS OR AN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTIST

    EPA Science Inventory

    --

    ABSTRACT
    The purpose of this manuscript is to examine the relationship between quality science (QS) and quality assurance (QA). Many research scientists definitely want to do QS, but are afraid or do not want to do QA because they are intimidated by the QA proc...

  4. White tea consumption restores sperm quality in prediabetic rats preventing testicular oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro F; Tomás, Gonçalo D; Dias, Tânia R; Martins, Ana D; Rato, Luís; Alves, Marco G; Silva, Branca M

    2015-10-01

    Prediabetes represents a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It encompasses some, but not all, T2DM diagnostic criteria. Prediabetes has been recently associated with altered testicular function and increased testicular oxidative stress (OS). Tea is widely consumed and its anti-hyperglycaemic/antioxidant properties are known. This study aimed to evaluate whether white tea (WTEA) consumption by prediabetic rats could prevent testicular OS, preserving sperm quality. For that purpose, WTEA (presenting a high catechin content) was given to 30-day-old streptozotocin-induced prediabetic rats for 2 months. Testicular antioxidant potential and OS were evaluated, as well as sperm parameters, by standard techniques. WTEA consumption improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in prediabetic rats. Testicular antioxidant potential was increased by WTEA consumption, restoring protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, although glutathione content and redox state were not altered. WTEA consumption improved sperm concentration and sperm quality (motility, viability and abnormality) was restored. Overall, WTEA consumption improved reproductive health of male prediabetic rats. Based on the study results, WTEA consumption appears to be a natural, economical and effective strategy to counteract the deleterious effects of prediabetes on male reproductive health, but further studies will be needed before a definitive recommendation is made. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Systematic Review of Outcome Measurements and Quality of Studies Evaluating Fixed Tooth-Supported Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Devangkumar Rajnikant; O'Brien, Tim; Petrie, Aviva; Petridis, Haralampos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this systematic review was to review clinical studies of fixed tooth-supported prostheses, and to assess the quality of evidence with an emphasis on the assessment of the reporting of outcome measurements. Multiple hypotheses were generated to compare the effect of study type on different outcome modifiers and to compare the quality of publications before and after January 2005. Materials and Methods An electronic search was conducted using specific databases (MEDLINE via Ovid, EMBASE via Ovid, Cochrane Library) through July 2012. This was complemented by hand searching the past 10 years of issues of the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Journal of Prosthodontics, and the International Journal of Prosthodontics. All experimental and observational clinical studies evaluating survival, success, failure, and complications of tooth-supported extracoronal fixed partial dentures, crowns, and onlays were included. No restrictions on age or follow-up time were placed. Results The electronic search generated 14,869 papers, of which 206 papers were included for full-text review. Hand-searching added 23 papers. Inclusion criteria were met by 182 papers and were included for the review. The majority were retrospective studies. Only 8 (4.4%) were randomized controlled trials. The majority of the studies measured survival and failure, and few studies recorded data on success; however, more than 60% of the studies failed to define survival, success, and failure. Many studies did not use any standardized criteria for assessment of the quality of the restorations and, when standardized criteria were used, they were modified, thereby not allowing for comparisons with other studies. There was an increase of 21.8% in the number of studies evaluating outcome measurements of all-ceramic restorations in past 8 years. Conclusions Prosthodontic literature presents with a reduced percentage of RCTs compared to other disciplines in

  6. National Wildlife's Eleventh Annual Environmental Quality Index 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presented is the Eleventh Annual Environmental Quality Index, a subjective analysis of the state of the nation's natural resources. Resource trends are detailed for wildlife, minerals, air, water, soil living space, and forests. (BT)

  7. National Wildlife's Eleventh Annual Environmental Quality Index 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presented is the Eleventh Annual Environmental Quality Index, a subjective analysis of the state of the nation's natural resources. Resource trends are detailed for wildlife, minerals, air, water, soil living space, and forests. (BT)

  8. Environmental control: operating room air quality.

    PubMed

    Bartley, J M

    1993-01-01

    1. OR staff members should familiarize themselves with basic air handling system terminology to better manage their own environment (eg, HVAC, air changes, air balancing, HEPA filtration). A working relationship with building engineers is an important skill for the OR nurse. 2. Knowledge of the standards on which air quality in the OR is based should assist in the process of planning for improved design--as well as in monitoring existing air quality. 3. Current standards balance energy savings with air changes and high levels of filtration to achieve optimum outcomes. Recommendations from design and engineering authorities (even for implant surgery) are based on average air changes and HEPA filtration, not laminar air flow. 4. The daily, operational role of the OR staff in maintaining high air quality includes managing traffic, using low-lint barrier materials, monitoring air quality indicators, and investigating unusual variances with the engineering staff for appropriate follow-up (eg, filter changes).

  9. Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

  10. A Calibration and Quality Assurance Program for Environmental Radon Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Fisenne, Isabel M.; George, Andreas C.; Keller, Helen W.

    1990-01-01

    The ideal facility for assessing the quality of radon measurements at environmental levels consists of: (1) an instrument whose response to radon and its progeny is determined from measurements of a certified or standard 226Ra source, and (2) a calibration room with a known radon concentration. The linkage between these two elements and additional quality control requirements are discussed here for some Environmental Measurements Laboratory radon measurements programs. PMID:28179764

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER

  12. Environmental Quality Index and Childhood Mental Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Childhood mental disorders affect between 13%-20% of children in the United States (US) annually and impact the child, family, and community. Literature suggests associations exist between environmental and children’s mental health such as air pollution with autism and ADHD...

  13. Environmental Quality of the Pensacola Bay System ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The objective of this report is to summarize the scattered environmental information for the PBS which is essential for understanding its current environmental condition and trend and needed for future cost-effective and science-based resource management. The management and regulatory response to the on-going influx of anthropogenic contaminants, the effects of episodic events (hurricanes, oil spills) and the effects of climate change depend upon technically-based information such as that contained in a current state-of-the-science synthesis report. Many environmental reviews are available for the PBS (examples, Pratt et al. 1990; Thorpe et al. 1997; BARC et al. 1998; WFRPC et al. 2005) but many are limited in scope, most are outdated, and none have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. This review provides an updated and critical appraisal of the environmental condition of the PBS based on consolidation and integration of historical, recently published, and unpublished information reflective of current chemical and biological assessment methodologies. The review also includes summaries for ecological information lacking or under-reported in previous reviews. This includes information for biodiversity, non-nutrient contaminant concentrations in surface water and sediment, sediment phytotoxicity and genotoxicity, bioaccumulation, use of colonized periphyton as bioindicators, organism and wildlife health, economic value for ecological services, climate c

  14. Environmental Quality Index and Childhood Mental Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Childhood mental disorders affect between 13%-20% of children in the United States (US) annually and impact the child, family, and community. Literature suggests associations exist between environmental and children’s mental health such as air pollution with autism and ADHD...

  15. Environmental Quality of the Pensacola Bay System ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The objective of this report is to summarize the scattered environmental information for the PBS which is essential for understanding its current environmental condition and trend and needed for future cost-effective and science-based resource management. The management and regulatory response to the on-going influx of anthropogenic contaminants, the effects of episodic events (hurricanes, oil spills) and the effects of climate change depend upon technically-based information such as that contained in a current state-of-the-science synthesis report. Many environmental reviews are available for the PBS (examples, Pratt et al. 1990; Thorpe et al. 1997; BARC et al. 1998; WFRPC et al. 2005) but many are limited in scope, most are outdated, and none have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. This review provides an updated and critical appraisal of the environmental condition of the PBS based on consolidation and integration of historical, recently published, and unpublished information reflective of current chemical and biological assessment methodologies. The review also includes summaries for ecological information lacking or under-reported in previous reviews. This includes information for biodiversity, non-nutrient contaminant concentrations in surface water and sediment, sediment phytotoxicity and genotoxicity, bioaccumulation, use of colonized periphyton as bioindicators, organism and wildlife health, economic value for ecological services, climate c

  16. Worldwide Report, Environmental Quality, No. 406.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-18

    years, seen a decline in the health of its population and an acceleration of damage to its architectural monuments and works of art . Environmental...1984 in the lowland zone of Guana- caste and in the upland regions of Puriscal, San Ramon, Naranjo, and Grecia , have been discussed with commercial

  17. Influence of Cavity Margin Design and Restorative Material on Marginal Quality and Seal of Extended Class II Resin Composite Restorations In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sebastian; Preidl, Reinhard; Karl, Sabine; Hofmann, Norbert; Krastl, Gabriel; Klaiber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of three cavity designs on the marginal seal of large Class II cavities restored with low-shrinkage resin composite limited to the enamel. One hundred twenty (120) intact human molars were randomly divided into 12 groups, with three different cavity designs: 1. undermined enamel, 2. box-shaped, and 3. proximal bevel. The teeth were restored with 1. an extra-low shrinkage (ELS) composite free of diluent monomers, 2. microhybrid composite (Herculite XRV), 3. nanohybrid composite (Filtek Supreme XTE), and 4. silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane). After artificial aging by thermocycling and storage in physiological saline, epoxy resin replicas were prepared. To determine the integrity of the restorations' approximal margins, two methods were sequentially employed: 1. replicas were made of the 120 specimens and examined using SEM, and 2. the same 120 specimens were immersed in AgNO3 solution, and the dye penetration depth was observed with a light microscope. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn-Bonferroni tests. After bevel preparation, SEM observations showed that restorations did not exhibit a higher percentage of continuous margin (SEM-analysis; p>0.05), but more leakage was found than with the other cavity designs (p<0.05). The lowest percentage of continuous margin was observed in ELS restorations (p<0.05). More fractured margins were observed in the undermined enamel cavity design groups (p<0.05). Bevel preparation failed to improve margin quality in large Class II composite restorations and is no longer recommended. However, undermined enamel should be removed to prevent enamel fractures.

  18. Major Threats to Environmental Quality in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogl, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reports study findings of environmental educators' opinions on issues which pose threats to environmental quality in North America and the status of the availability of educational materials for the issues. Identified as priority items were hazardous wastes management, water contamination, and acid deposition. Compares responses of American and…

  19. Five domains of environmental quality and birth outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human health is affected by simultaneous exposure to stressors and amenities, but research employs single exposure models. To address this, we constructed a county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) with data representing five environmental domains (air, water, land, built a...

  20. County-level environmental quality and associations with cancer incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer has been associated with individual ambient environmental exposures such as PM2.5 and arsenic. However, the role of the overall ambient environment is not well-understood. A novel county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) was developed for all U.S. counties (n=3,141)...

  1. Major Threats to Environmental Quality in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogl, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reports study findings of environmental educators' opinions on issues which pose threats to environmental quality in North America and the status of the availability of educational materials for the issues. Identified as priority items were hazardous wastes management, water contamination, and acid deposition. Compares responses of American and…

  2. Five domains of environmental quality and birth outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human health is affected by simultaneous exposure to stressors and amenities, but research employs single exposure models. To address this, we constructed a county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) with data representing five environmental domains (air, water, land, built a...

  3. 10 CFR 960.5-2-5 - Environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Environmental quality. 960.5-2-5 Section 960.5-2-5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Environment, Socioeconomics, and Transportation § 960.5-2-5 Environmental...

  4. 10 CFR 960.5-2-5 - Environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental quality. 960.5-2-5 Section 960.5-2-5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Environment, Socioeconomics, and Transportation § 960.5-2-5 Environmental...

  5. 10 CFR 960.5-2-5 - Environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Environmental quality. 960.5-2-5 Section 960.5-2-5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Environment, Socioeconomics, and Transportation § 960.5-2-5 Environmental...

  6. 10 CFR 960.5-2-5 - Environmental quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Environmental quality. 960.5-2-5 Section 960.5-2-5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Environment, Socioeconomics, and Transportation § 960.5-2-5 Environmental...

  7. County-level environmental quality and associations with cancer incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer has been associated with individual ambient environmental exposures such as PM2.5 and arsenic. However, the role of the overall ambient environment is not well-understood. A novel county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) was developed for all U.S. counties (n=3,141)...

  8. Lacandon Maya ecosystem management: sustainable design for subsistence and environmental restoration.

    PubMed

    Diemont, Stewart A W; Martin, Jay F

    2009-01-01

    Indigenous groups have designed and managed their ecosystems for generations, resulting in biodiversity protection while producing for their family's needs. Here we describe the agroecosystem of the Lacandon Maya, an indigenous group who live in Chiapas, Mexico. The Lacandon practice a form of swidden agriculture that conserves the surrounding rain forest ecosystem while cycling the majority of their land through five successional stages. These stages include an herbaceous stage, two shrub stages, and two forest stages. A portion of their land is kept in primary forest. This study presents the Lacandon traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) for agroforestry and quantitatively describes the plant community and the associated soil ecology of each successional stage. Also documented is the knowledge of the Lacandon regarding the immediate use of plant species and plant species useful for soil fertility enhancement. Woody plant diversity increases during the successional stages of the Lacandon system, and by the beginning of the first forest stage, the diversity is similar to that of the primary forest. In all stages, Lacandon use 60% of the available plant species for food, medicine, and raw materials. Approximately 45% of the woody plant species present in each fallow stage were thought by the Lacandon to enhance soil fertility. Total soil nitrogen and soil organic matter increased with successional stage and with time from intentional burn. Nutrient and soil nematode dynamics in shrub stages related to the presence of introduced and managed plants, indicating engineered soil enhancement by the Lacandon. The effects on biodiversity and soil ecology coupled with productivity for agricultural subsistence indicate that Lacandon TEK may offer tools for environmental conservation that would provide for a family's basic needs while maintaining a biodiverse rain forest ecosystem. Tools such as these may offer options for regional restoration and conservation efforts such as

  9. Environmental management: Integrating ecological evaluation, remediation, restoration, natural resource damage assessment and long-term stewardship on contaminated lands

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Ecological evaluation is essential for remediation, restoration, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and forms the basis for many management practices. These include determining status and trends of biological, physical, or chemical/radiological conditions, conducting environmental impact assessments, performing remedial actions should remediation fail, managing ecosystems and wildlife, and assessing the efficacy of remediation, restoration, and long-term stewardship. The objective of this paper is to explore the meanings of these assessments, examine the relationships among them, and suggest methods of integration that will move environmental management forward. While remediation, restoration, and NRDA, among others, are often conducted separately, it is important to integrate them for contaminated land where the risks to ecoreceptors (including humans) can be high, and the potential damage to functioning ecosystems great. Ecological evaluations can range from inventories of local plants and animals, determinations of reproductive success of particular species, levels of contaminants in organisms, kinds and levels of effects, and environmental impact assessments, to very formal ecological risk assessments for a chemical or other stressor. Such evaluations can range from the individual species to populations, communities, ecosystems or the landscape scale. Ecological evaluations serve as the basis for making decisions about the levels and kinds of remediation, the levels and kinds of restoration possible, and the degree and kinds of natural resource injuries that have occurred because of contamination. Many different disciplines are involved in ecological evaluation, including biologists, conservationists, foresters, restoration ecologists, ecological engineers, economists, hydrologist, and geologists. Since ecological evaluation forms the basis for so many different types of environmental management, it seems reasonable to integrate management options

  10. Environmental management: integrating ecological evaluation, remediation, restoration, natural resource damage assessment and long-term stewardship on contaminated lands.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2008-08-01

    Ecological evaluation is essential for remediation, restoration, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and forms the basis for many management practices. These include determining status and trends of biological, physical, or chemical/radiological conditions, conducting environmental impact assessments, performing remedial actions should remediation fail, managing ecosystems and wildlife, and assessing the efficacy of remediation, restoration, and long-term stewardship. The objective of this paper is to explore the meanings of these assessments, examine the relationships among them, and suggest methods of integration that will move environmental management forward. While remediation, restoration, and NRDA, among others, are often conducted separately, it is important to integrate them for contaminated land where the risks to ecoreceptors (including humans) can be high, and the potential damage to functioning ecosystems great. Ecological evaluations can range from inventories of local plants and animals, determinations of reproductive success of particular species, levels of contaminants in organisms, kinds and levels of effects, and environmental impact assessments, to very formal ecological risk assessments for a chemical or other stressor. Such evaluations can range from the individual species to populations, communities, ecosystems or the landscape scale. Ecological evaluations serve as the basis for making decisions about the levels and kinds of remediation, the levels and kinds of restoration possible, and the degree and kinds of natural resource injuries that have occurred because of contamination. Many different disciplines are involved in ecological evaluation, including biologists, conservationists, foresters, restoration ecologists, ecological engineers, economists, hydrologist, and geologists. Since ecological evaluation forms the basis for so many different types of environmental management, it seems reasonable to integrate management options

  11. Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Tiner, P.F.

    1992-05-01

    As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL and will be implemented by ORNL/MAD. Major components of the plan include (1) a quality assurance project plan that describes the scope and objectives of ORNL/MAD activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, assigns responsibilities, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during field operations; (2) sampling and analysis sections; (3) a site-specific health and safety section that describes general site hazards, hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements, and mandatory safety procedures; (4) procedures and requirements for equipment decontamination and responsibilities for generated wastes, waste management, and contamination control; and (5) a discussion of form completion and reporting required to document activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site.

  12. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

  13. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste.

  14. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of April 14-21, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 4.3, Poplar Creek Mile 5.1, and Poplar Creek Mile 6.0 on April 13, 15, and 18. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to daphnids in undiluted samples; however, toxicity to fathead minnows (significantly reduced survival) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Daphnid reproduction was significantly less than controls in 50 percent dilutions of samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0, while no toxicity to fathead minnows was shown in diluted (50 percent) samples.

  15. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis within a methodology for evaluating environmental restoration technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zio, Enrico; Apostolakis, George E.

    1999-03-01

    This paper illustrates an application of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis techniques within a methodology for evaluating environmental restoration technologies. The methodology consists of two main parts: the first part ("analysis") integrates a wide range of decision criteria and impact evaluation techniques in a framework that emphasizes and incorporates input from stakeholders in all aspects of the process. Its products are the rankings of the alternative options for each stakeholder using, essentially, expected utility theory. The second part ("deliberation") utilizes the analytical results of the "analysis" and attempts to develop consensus among the stakeholders in a session in which the stakeholders discuss and evaluate the analytical results. This paper deals with the analytical part of the approach and the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses that were carried out in preparation for the deliberative process. The objective of these investigations was that of testing the robustness of the assessments and of pointing out possible existing sources of disagreements among the participating stakeholders, thus providing insights for the successive deliberative process. Standard techniques, such as differential analysis, Monte Carlo sampling and a two-dimensional policy region analysis proved sufficient for the task.

  16. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program adopted a Pollution Prevention Program in March 1991. The program's mission is to minimize waste and prevent pollution in remedial investigations (RI), feasibility studies (FS), decontamination and decommissioning (D D), and surveillance and maintenance (S M) site program activities. Mission success will result in volume and/or toxicity reduction of generated waste. Energy Systems is producing a fully developed a Numerical Scoring System (NSS) and actually scoring the generators of Investigation Derived Waste (IDW) at six ER sites: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge K-25 site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), and Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (Portsmouth). This report summarizes the findings of this initial numerical scoring evaluation and shows where improvements in the overall ER Pollution prevention program may be required. This report identifies a number of recommendations that, if implemented, would help to improve site-performance measures. The continued development of the NSS will support generators in maximizing their Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization efforts. Further refinements of the NSS, as applicable suggest comments and/or recommendations for improvement.

  17. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program adopted a Pollution Prevention Program in March 1991. The program`s mission is to minimize waste and prevent pollution in remedial investigations (RI), feasibility studies (FS), decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) site program activities. Mission success will result in volume and/or toxicity reduction of generated waste. Energy Systems is producing a fully developed a Numerical Scoring System (NSS) and actually scoring the generators of Investigation Derived Waste (IDW) at six ER sites: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge K-25 site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), and Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (Portsmouth). This report summarizes the findings of this initial numerical scoring evaluation and shows where improvements in the overall ER Pollution prevention program may be required. This report identifies a number of recommendations that, if implemented, would help to improve site-performance measures. The continued development of the NSS will support generators in maximizing their Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization efforts. Further refinements of the NSS, as applicable suggest comments and/or recommendations for improvement.

  18. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention checklist guide for the facility characterization project phase

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    A facility characterization (FC) is conducted to determine the nature and extent contamination at a potential hazardous facility waste site. The information gathered during an FC includes (1) data on the volume and chemical nature of the waste, (2) information on the extent of contamination and the migration potential of the contaminants, (3) preliminary information on evaluation of alternative concepts that can or cannot be considered, and (4)supportive technical and cost data. For the purposes of identification, the following operational phases will be used for definition for this phase of the decommissioning and decontamination process (1) facility characterization before clean up, (2) characterization during clean up, (3) characterization of waste materials, and (4) site characterization after clean up. A key consideration in this process is the prevention of any waste to be generated from these characterization activities. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist users with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all FC phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will help users document PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to assist users with implementing and evaluating waste reduction.

  19. Office of Inspector General report on audit of environmental restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Los Alamos` Environmental Restoration Program is charged with cost effectively remediating contaminated sites. To monitor progress toward this goal, the University of California, the contractor operating Los Alamos, and the Department negotiated eight performance measures. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the contract performance criteria were reasonable, measurable, and complete, thereby allowing the Department to determine if Los Alamos had expeditiously and cost effectively remediated contaminated sites. The audit determined that Los Alamos did not generate the information needed to assess the cost effectiveness of remediation on a site-by-site basis. This situation occurred because the performance criteria used to evaluate cost effectiveness were not always reasonable, measurable, and complete. As a result, neither Los Alamos nor the Department could evaluate the cost effectiveness or progress of the remediation program or accurately budget for upcoming remediation activities. The audit also determined that Los Alamos` sample validation procedures were too costly because Los Alamos validated more samples than called for by Federal and New Mexico standard practices. While the Office of Inspector General recognizes the importance of prudent sample validation, Los Alamos paid $540,000 more than necessary to validate sample results. These funds could have been used to remediate contaminated sites.

  20. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This plan covers robotics Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation activities in the Program for the next five years. These activities range from bench-scale R D to full-scale hot demonstrations at DOE sites. This plan outlines applications of existing technology to near-term needs, the development and application of enhanced technology for longer-term needs, and initiation of advanced technology development to meet those needs beyond the five-year plan. The objective of the Robotic Technology Development Program (RTDP) is to develop and apply robotics technologies that will enable Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER WM) operations at DOE sites to be safer, faster and cheaper. Five priority DOE sites were visited in March 1990 to identify needs for robotics technology in ER WM operations. This 5-Year Program Plan for the RTDP detailed annual plans for robotics technology development based on identified needs. In July 1990 a forum was held announcing the robotics program. Over 60 organizations (industrial, university, and federal laboratory) made presentations on their robotics capabilities. To stimulate early interactions with the ER WM activities at DOE sites, as well as with the robotics community, the RTDP sponsored four technology demonstrations related to ER WM needs. These demonstrations integrated commercial technology with robotics technology developed by DOE in support of areas such as nuclear reactor maintenance and the civilian reactor waste program. 2 figs.

  1. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    In FY 1990 Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) planning teams visited five DOE sites. These sites were selected by the Office of Technology Development to provide a needs basis for developing a 5-Year Plan. Visits to five DOE sites provided identification of needs for robotics technology development to support Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER WM) projects at those sites. Additional site visits will be conducted in the future to expand the planning basis. This volume summarizes both the results of the site visits and the needs and requirements of the priority ER WM activities at the sites, including potential needs for robotics and remote systems technology. It also discusses hazards associated with the site activities and any problems or technical uncertainties associated with dealing with the hazards in the performance of the ER WM work. Robotic or remote systems currently under development for remediation projects or waste operations are also discussed. The information in this document is organized principally by site, activity, and priority. Section 2.0, Site Needs, is based on information from the site visit reports and provides a summary which focuses on the site needs and requirements for each priority activity. Section 2.0 also records evaluations and discussions by the RTDP team following the site visit. Section 3.0, Commonality Assessment, documents similar site needs where common, or cross-cutting, robotics technology might be applied to several activities. Section 4.0 contains a summary of the site needs and requirements in tabular form. 1 tab.

  2. Environmental restoration program pollution prevention checklist guide for the evaluation of alternatives project phase

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Evaluation of alternative studies determine what decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) alternatives are presented to regulators for facility and site cleanup. A key consideration in this process is the waste to be generated. Minimizing the volume and toxicity of this waste will ultimately contribute to the selection of the best clean-up option. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all Evaluation of Alternatives (EV) phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will assist users with documenting PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to help users implement and evaluate waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves, eliminating expensive process waste assessments and audit teams.

  3. A large-scale environmental flow experiment for riparian restoration in the Colorado River delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Schlatter, Karen; Gomez-Sapiens, Martha; Lundgren, Erick; Grabau, Matthew R.; Ramirez-Hernandez, Jorge; Rodriguez-Burgeueno, J. Eliana; Flessa, Karl W.

    2017-01-01

    Managing streamflow is a widely-advocated approach to provide conditions necessary for seed germination and seedling establishment of trees in the willow family (Salicaceae). Experimental flow releases to the Colorado River delta in 2014 had a primary objective of promoting seedling establishment of Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and Goodding's willow (Salix gooddingii). We assessed seed germination and seedling establishment of these taxa as well as the non-native tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) and native seepwillow shrubs (Baccharis spp.) in the context of seedling requirements and active land management (land grading, vegetation removal) at 23 study sites along 87 river km. In the absence of associated active land management, experimental flows to the Colorado River delta were minimally successful at promoting establishment of new woody riparian seedlings, except for non-native Tamarix. Our results suggest that the primary factors contributing to low seedling establishment varied across space, but included low or no seed availability in some locations for some taxa, insufficient soil moisture availability during the growing season indicated by deep groundwater tables, and competition from adjacent vegetation (and, conversely, availability of bare ground). Active land management to create bare ground and favorable land grades contributed to significantly higher rates of Salicaceae seedling establishment in a river reach with high groundwater tables. Our results provide insights that can inform future environmental flow deliveries to the Colorado River delta and its ecosystems and other similar efforts to restore Salicaceae taxa around the world.

  4. 47 CFR 1.1302 - Cross-reference; Regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Environmental Quality. 1.1302 Section 1.1302 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL...-reference; Regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality. A further explanation regarding... Environmental Quality, 40 CFR 1500-1508.28. ...

  5. Worldwide Report, Environmental Quality, No. 401

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-14

    Government from building the dam, on the ground that the State’s decision to go alhead with its planned hydro-electric scheme is inconsistent with...conservation movement was concerned at the lack of effective environmental legislation and land use planning pro- cedures in Queensland. There was...sturdy wire to make a barbed hook and a short wade on any reef would reward one with a good size lobster or a couple of crabs which could be roasted

  6. Measuring Environmental Quality in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Treesearch

    Linwood Pendleton; Brent Sohngen; Robert Mendelsohn; Thomas Holmes

    1998-01-01

    This study presents a method for valuing recreational environmental quality in the forests of the southeastern United States. The paper offers a method for choosing, measuring, and valuing forest attributes. Surveys and popular recreation literature are used to identify forest attributes that contribute to recreational quality. Standard ecological techniques are...

  7. Are different generations of CAD/CAM milling machines capable to produce restorations with similar quality?

    PubMed

    Roperto, Renato; Assaf, Hussein; Soares-Porto, Thiago; Lang, Lisa; Teich, Sorin

    2016-10-01

    Different CAD/CAM machines' generation may impact the restoration overall quality. The present study evaluated the marginal fit of CAD/CAM restorations manufactured with different generations of CEREC milling unit systems. Sixteen typodont teeth were divided into two groups (n=8) according to the machine's generation assigned. These are control group (G1): Cerec AC with Bluecam/Cerec 3 milling unit and (G2): Cerec AC with Bluecam/MC XL Premium Package milling unit. Scanning of the preparation were performed and crowns were milled using the Vita Mark II blocks. Blocks were cemented using epoxy glue on the pulpal floor only and finger pressure applied for 1 min. Upon completion of the cementation step, misfits between the restoration and abutment were measured by microphotography and the silicone replica technique using light body silicon material on Mesial (M) and Distal (D) surfaces. Mean and SDs of marginal gaps in micrometers were: G1/M: 94.90 (±38.52), G1/D: 88.53 (±44.87), G2/M: 85.65 (±29.89), G2/D: 95.28 (±28.13). Two-way ANOVA indicated no significant differences among different groups (P>0.05); surface area (P>0.05) and the interaction (P>0.05). Overall, G2 had greater margin gaps than G1, however, without statistical difference (P>0.05). Difference in milling unit generation did not significantly affect the marginal fit. Marginal gap means were in the range of the clinical acceptance levels for both generations of Cerec milling units, regardless the teeth site area. Key words:CAD/CAM, margin, ceramics.

  8. Are different generations of CAD/CAM milling machines capable to produce restorations with similar quality?

    PubMed Central

    Roperto, Renato; Assaf, Hussein; Soares-Porto, Thiago; Lang, Lisa; Teich, Sorin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different CAD/CAM machines’ generation may impact the restoration overall quality. The present study evaluated the marginal fit of CAD/CAM restorations manufactured with different generations of CEREC milling unit systems. Material and Methods Sixteen typodont teeth were divided into two groups (n=8) according to the machine’s generation assigned. These are control group (G1): Cerec AC with Bluecam/Cerec 3 milling unit and (G2): Cerec AC with Bluecam/MC XL Premium Package milling unit. Scanning of the preparation were performed and crowns were milled using the Vita Mark II blocks. Blocks were cemented using epoxy glue on the pulpal floor only and finger pressure applied for 1 min. Upon completion of the cementation step, misfits between the restoration and abutment were measured by microphotography and the silicone replica technique using light body silicon material on Mesial (M) and Distal (D) surfaces. Results Mean and SDs of marginal gaps in micrometers were: G1/M: 94.90 (±38.52), G1/D: 88.53 (±44.87), G2/M: 85.65 (±29.89), G2/D: 95.28 (±28.13). Two-way ANOVA indicated no significant differences among different groups (P>0.05); surface area (P>0.05) and the interaction (P>0.05). Overall, G2 had greater margin gaps than G1, however, without statistical difference (P>0.05). Conclusions Difference in milling unit generation did not significantly affect the marginal fit. Marginal gap means were in the range of the clinical acceptance levels for both generations of Cerec milling units, regardless the teeth site area. Key words:CAD/CAM, margin, ceramics. PMID:27703611

  9. Development and use of innovative approaches to waste management and environmental restoration: Potential liability and its implications

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.L.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established as its goal to have all of its facilities cleaned up and in compliance with all applicable environmental laws by the year 2019. As part of its plan to achieve that goal, DOE created, in November 1989, an Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and, within EM, an Office of Technology Development (OTD). Since the achievement of DOE's long-term objective in the area of waste management and environmental restoration is not possible utilizing only existing technology, the importance of OTD's mission is clear. A question has been raised regarding the nature of the potential liability associated with development, testing, and use of new technologies for waste management and environmental restoration; and the impact it may have on the ability or willingness of other parties to participate in DOE's technology development program. This report is intended to provide at least a preliminary answer to the question. Given the range of activities involved in the technology development process, there are many circumstances that could result in liability. Therefore, the discussion here is somewhat general. It may, however, provide a base for more detailed analysis, at a later time, of liability issues raised by specific circumstances.

  10. Development and use of innovative approaches to waste management and environmental restoration: Potential liability and its implications

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.L.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established as its goal to have all of its facilities cleaned up and in compliance with all applicable environmental laws by the year 2019. As part of its plan to achieve that goal, DOE created, in November 1989, an Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and, within EM, an Office of Technology Development (OTD). Since the achievement of DOE`s long-term objective in the area of waste management and environmental restoration is not possible utilizing only existing technology, the importance of OTD`s mission is clear. A question has been raised regarding the nature of the potential liability associated with development, testing, and use of new technologies for waste management and environmental restoration; and the impact it may have on the ability or willingness of other parties to participate in DOE`s technology development program. This report is intended to provide at least a preliminary answer to the question. Given the range of activities involved in the technology development process, there are many circumstances that could result in liability. Therefore, the discussion here is somewhat general. It may, however, provide a base for more detailed analysis, at a later time, of liability issues raised by specific circumstances.

  11. Response of phytoplankton to protective-restoration treatments enhancing water quality in a shallow urban lake.

    PubMed

    Zębek, Elżbieta; Napiórkowska-Krzebietke, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    Lake Jeziorak Mały is a shallow urban lake where storm water pretreatment separators and a fountain-based water aeration system were installed as protective-restoration measures to enhance water quality. We investigated the effect of these procedures on phytoplankton dynamics and physicochemical properties in the littoral and pelagial zones in 1996-2003, 2005, and 2013. A decrease in cyanobacteria proportion, abundance, and biomass has been noticed, and other phytoplankton groups increased after these procedures. Significantly elevated species diversity was recorded in the littoral zone with the exchange of cyanobacteria and diatom dominant species typically induced by alteration from hypertrophic to eutrophic status. For example, the polytrophic Limnothrix redekei was replaced by eutrophic Planktolyngbya brevicellularis. This stemmed from greater oxygenation, water visibility and diminished pH, conductivity, and orthophosphates. Our results showed that introducing these restoration measures influence on the long-term succession of phytoplankton and induced the change from a polytrophic to eutrophic state, and that such measures are vitally important in future considerations of shallow urban lake management.

  12. A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration

    PubMed Central

    Timpane-Padgham, Britta L.

    2017-01-01

    Ecological restoration is widely practiced as a means of rehabilitating ecosystems and habitats that have been degraded or impaired through human use or other causes. Restoration practices now are confronted by climate change, which has the potential to influence long-term restoration outcomes. Concepts and attributes from the resilience literature can help improve restoration and monitoring efforts under changing climate conditions. We systematically examined the published literature on ecological resilience to identify biological, chemical, and physical attributes that confer resilience to climate change. We identified 45 attributes explicitly related to climate change and classified them as individual- (9), population- (6), community- (7), ecosystem- (7), or process-level attributes (16). Individual studies defined resilience as resistance to change or recovery from disturbance, and only a few studies explicitly included both concepts in their definition of resilience. We found that individual and population attributes generally are suited to species- or habitat-specific restoration actions and applicable at the population scale. Community attributes are better suited to habitat-specific restoration at the site scale, or system-wide restoration at the ecosystem scale. Ecosystem and process attributes vary considerably in their type and applicability. We summarize these relationships in a decision support table and provide three example applications to illustrate how these classifications can be used to prioritize climate change resilience attributes for specific restoration actions. We suggest that (1) including resilience as an explicit planning objective could increase the success of restoration projects, (2) considering the ecological context and focal scale of a restoration action is essential in choosing appropriate resilience attributes, and (3) certain ecological attributes, such as diversity and connectivity, are more commonly considered to confer

  13. A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration.

    PubMed

    Timpane-Padgham, Britta L; Beechie, Tim; Klinger, Terrie

    2017-01-01

    Ecological restoration is widely practiced as a means of rehabilitating ecosystems and habitats that have been degraded or impaired through human use or other causes. Restoration practices now are confronted by climate change, which has the potential to influence long-term restoration outcomes. Concepts and attributes from the resilience literature can help improve restoration and monitoring efforts under changing climate conditions. We systematically examined the published literature on ecological resilience to identify biological, chemical, and physical attributes that confer resilience to climate change. We identified 45 attributes explicitly related to climate change and classified them as individual- (9), population- (6), community- (7), ecosystem- (7), or process-level attributes (16). Individual studies defined resilience as resistance to change or recovery from disturbance, and only a few studies explicitly included both concepts in their definition of resilience. We found that individual and population attributes generally are suited to species- or habitat-specific restoration actions and applicable at the population scale. Community attributes are better suited to habitat-specific restoration at the site scale, or system-wide restoration at the ecosystem scale. Ecosystem and process attributes vary considerably in their type and applicability. We summarize these relationships in a decision support table and provide three example applications to illustrate how these classifications can be used to prioritize climate change resilience attributes for specific restoration actions. We suggest that (1) including resilience as an explicit planning objective could increase the success of restoration projects, (2) considering the ecological context and focal scale of a restoration action is essential in choosing appropriate resilience attributes, and (3) certain ecological attributes, such as diversity and connectivity, are more commonly considered to confer

  14. Walnut creek watershed monitoring project, Iowa: Monitoring water quality in response to prairie restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Thompson, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Land use and surface water data for nitrogen and pesticides (1995 to 1997) are reported for the Walnut Creek Watershed Monitoring Project, Jasper County Iowa. The Walnut Creek project was established in 1995 as a nonpoint source monitoring program in relation to watershed habitat restoration and agricultural management changes implemented at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The monitoring project utilizes a paired-watershed approach (Walnut and Squaw creeks) as well as upstream/downstream comparisons on Walnut for analysis and tracking of trends. From 1992 to 1997, 13.4 percent of the watershed was converted from row crop to native prairie in the Walnut Creek watershed. Including another 6 percent of watershed farmed on a cash-rent basis, land use changes have been implemented on 19.4 percent of the watershed by the USFWS. Nitrogen and pesticide applications were reduced an estimated 18 percent and 28 percent in the watershed from land use changes. Atrazine was detected most often in surface water with frequencies of detection ranging from 76-86 percent. No significant differences were noted in atrazine concentrations between Walnut and Squaw Creek. Nitrate-N concentrations measured in both watersheds were similar; both basins showed a similar pattern of detection and an overall reduction in nitrate-N concentrations from upstream to downstream monitoring sites. Water quality improvements are suggested by nitrate-N and chloride ratios less than one in the Walnut Creek watershed and low nitrate-N concentrations measured in the subbasin of Walnut Creek containing the greatest amount of land use changes. Atrazine and nitrate-N concentrations from the lower portion of the Walnut Creek watershed (including the prairie restoration area) may be decreasing in relation to the upstream untreated component of the watershed. The frequencies of pesticide detections and mean nitrate-N concentrations appear related to the percentage of

  15. 75 FR 21651 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Prisoners Harbor Coastal Wetland Restoration Plan, Channel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... species. Work will be initiated in the late spring and completed in late summer or early fall when the wetland restoration area is in its driest condition, so that late-fall rains will initiate plant germination and growth after work is completed. Riparian restoration in Canada del Puerto would take place...

  16. 77 FR 35323 - National Environmental Policy Act: Categorical Exclusions for Soil and Water Restoration Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Agriculture Tom Vilsack called for restoring forestlands to protect water resources, the climate, and... to floodplains, wetlands and watersheds, or past natural or human-caused damage. The Forest Service... exclusions. * * * * * (e) * * * (18) Restoring wetlands, streams, and riparian areas by removing, replacing...

  17. Reference Concepts in Ecosystem Restoration and Environmental Benefits Analysis (EBA): Principles and Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    and often analyzed (e.g., aerial photography, flood records, and population studies), though the geographical resolution of these data varies...Primer on Ecological Restoration. www.ser.org & Tucson : Society for Ecological Restoration International. Stapanian, M. A., T. A. Waite, G. Krzys, J

  18. Snapshot of a Multi-Year Multidisciplinary Environmental Mapping and Restoration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusignan, Molly; Abilock, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a snapshot of the authors' first restoration project with young children which grew out of a fourth- and fifth-grade forestry curriculum. The restoration project was part of a long-term plan for enhancing the wild areas of the campus for wildlife habitat and for educational use. It is a native oak woodland and riparian…

  19. 77 FR 14418 - Grand Ditch Breach Restoration Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain National Park...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... emphasize the removal of large debris deposits in the alluvial fan area and in the Lulu City wetland... portions of the restoration area. Hydrology through the Lulu City wetland would be restored in the... reconfiguration of the Colorado River through the Lulu City wetland. This alternative would include stabilization...

  20. 75 FR 5039 - Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Restoration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... resources in Portland Harbor in the Lower Willamette River. The Trustees seek damages from potentially responsible parties (PRPs) to restore, rehabilitate, replace or acquire the equivalent of natural resources... are required to use recovered damages only to restore, replace or acquire the equivalent of...

  1. Snapshot of a Multi-Year Multidisciplinary Environmental Mapping and Restoration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusignan, Molly; Abilock, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a snapshot of the authors' first restoration project with young children which grew out of a fourth- and fifth-grade forestry curriculum. The restoration project was part of a long-term plan for enhancing the wild areas of the campus for wildlife habitat and for educational use. It is a native oak woodland and riparian…

  2. 77 FR 43808 - Supplement to the Draft Programmatic Restoration Plan and Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    .... The Restoration Plan identifies a restoration approach to compensate for injuries to natural resources... PEIS. Comments may be submitted in written form or verbally at a public meeting. DATES: Written... regulations provide a legal framework for addressing injuries to the nation's natural resources resulting from...

  3. 78 FR 60309 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Restoration of Native Species in High Elevation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Elevation Aquatic Ecosystems Plan, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California AGENCY: National Park... Native Species in High Elevation ] Aquatic Ecosystems Plan (Restoration Plan/DEIS), Sequoia and Kings... management direction to restore and conserve high elevation aquatic species and ecosystems in the parks. The...

  4. Prolong Restoration of the Water Quality of River Ganga Effect of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements.

    PubMed

    Tare, Vinod; Basu, Subhankar

    2014-04-01

    The genesis of the present research was the belief since ages and the observations made through some studies that the water of river Ganga has unique characteristics, which allows storage of water quality even on prolong storage. Very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the contention that the Ganga water indeed has some special composition that could be attributed to its unique storage capacity. It was postulated that prolong restoration of water quality depends on the ability to arrest microbial activity that is generally responsible for deterioration in water quality on prolong storage. Hence, attempt has been made to identify the parameters that are likely to influence the prolong storage of river water. Along with Ganga river water, other three major rivers, viz. Yamuna, Godavari and Narmada, were selected for comparison. Emphasis was made on estimation of heavy metals, radioactive elements, dissolved carbon and other physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, hardness and dissolved organic carbon. Based on the available information regarding the impact of heavy metals, radioactive elements vis-à-vis the chemical composition of water on microorganisms in the aquatic environment, an overall impact score for the waters of the four Indian rivers selected in the study has been assigned.

  5. Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 and 2 Verification for the Environmental Restoration Contractor Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    CARTER, R.P.

    2000-04-04

    DOE Policy 450.4 mandates that safety be integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. The goal of an institutionalized Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and the federal property over the life cycle of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The purpose of this Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) ISMS Phase MI Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes were institutionalized within the ER Project, whether these programs and processes were implemented, and whether the system had promoted the development of a safety conscious work culture.

  6. Development and testing of a sustainable environmental restoration policy on eradicating the poverty trap in China's Changting County.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shixiong; Zhong, Binglin; Yue, Hui; Zeng, Heshui; Zeng, Jinhua

    2009-06-30

    It is widely accepted that environmental degradation and poverty are linked and that conservation and poverty reduction should be tackled together. However, success with integrated strategies has been elusive. Here, we present the results of a study that illustrates how development that combines environmental and economic perspectives and that provides appropriate compensation to affected populations can improve both nature and society, thereby eradicating the "poverty trap." The results show that if we cannot improve the livelihood of local residents, we will be unable to restore degraded environments when state-owned property is transferred to private ownership to encourage better management by residents. In contrast, measures to eliminate poverty, combined with the development of green enterprises that improve the livelihoods of private land owners in the long term, is the precondition for successful ecological restoration.

  7. Development and testing of a sustainable environmental restoration policy on eradicating the poverty trap in China's Changting County

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shixiong; Zhong, Binglin; Yue, Hui; Zeng, Heshui; Zeng, Jinhua

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that environmental degradation and poverty are linked and that conservation and poverty reduction should be tackled together. However, success with integrated strategies has been elusive. Here, we present the results of a study that illustrates how development that combines environmental and economic perspectives and that provides appropriate compensation to affected populations can improve both nature and society, thereby eradicating the “poverty trap.” The results show that if we cannot improve the livelihood of local residents, we will be unable to restore degraded environments when state-owned property is transferred to private ownership to encourage better management by residents. In contrast, measures to eliminate poverty, combined with the development of green enterprises that improve the livelihoods of private land owners in the long term, is the precondition for successful ecological restoration. PMID:19528646

  8. Assessing Variability and Uncertainty of Water Quality, Geomorphic, and Habitat Indicators to Evaluate Western New York Stream Restoration Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, C. E.; Rabideau, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of stream restoration projects is often constrained by uncertainty and variability in performance indicators, as well as financial and time limitations. In Western New York (WNY), several projects, termed stream restoration, have been implemented that rely heavily on bank stabilization methods. Due to the lack of evaluation of these projects, it is uncertain if they are 1) meeting their objectives to protect against high erosion rates and 2) if they are improving stream function and processes in a manner consistent with the designation of “stream restoration”. During the summer/fall 2010 seasons, water quality, geomorphic, and rapid habitat indicators were used to characterize fourteen implemented and/or planned stream restoration projects spanning three WNY watersheds. Indicators included stream velocity, nutrient concentrations, water quality parameters (e.g. dissolved oxygen, conductivity, etc.), canopy coverage, substrate characteristics (e.g. embeddedness, particle size distribution) and bank characteristics (e.g. slope, shape, percentage erosion). In addition, five rapid assessment methods were implemented; two methods used the above indicators and three were based on visual assessments. Indicators were assessed for variability within and across sites to determine which indicators are most useful for evaluating WNY stream restoration and/or require additional investigation in summer 2011. Areas of uncertainty and vagueness in assessment methods were identified during field data collection, with a focus on how stream restoration structures were assessed. The poster presents results on select indicators, strengths/weaknesses of the rapid assessment techniques, and a preliminary evaluation of WNY stream restoration projects.

  9. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Zhang, Hao; Tong, Chuanliang; Xie, Chong; Fan, Guohua; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Xiaogang; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-17

    Triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1) (interquartile range, 0.41-2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1)). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = -0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-0.32, -0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = -0.35; 95% CI (-0.68, -0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = -1.64; 95% CI (-3.05, -0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  10. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  11. In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Northeast Site Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Juhlin, R.; Butherus, M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting thermal remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site that is part of the Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project. The Northeast Site is located on the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center in Largo, Florida. The STAR Center was formerly a DOE facility. The NAPL remediation was performed at Area A and is currently being performed at Area B at the Northeast Site. The remediation at Area A was completed in 2003 and covered an area of 900 m{sup 2} (10,000 ft{sup 2}) and a depth of remediation that extended to 10.7 m (35 ft) below ground surface. Cleanup levels achieved were at or below maximum contaminant levels in almost all locations. The remediation project at Area B is ongoing and covers an area of 3,240 m{sup 2} (36,000 ft{sup 2}), a volume of 41,300 m (54,000 yd 3), and a depth of remediation to 12 m (40 ft) below ground surface. In addition, a portion of the subsurface under an occupied building in Area B is included in the remediation. The cleanup levels achieved from this remediation will be available in the Area B Final Report that will be posted on the DOE Office of Legacy Management web site (www.lm.doe.gov/land/sites/fl/ pinellas/pinellas.htm) in January 2007. Electrical resistive heating and steam were the chosen remediation methods at both areas. Lessons learned from the Area A remediation were incorporated into the Area B remediation and could benefit managers of similar remediation projects. (authors)

  12. The restructuring of the Environmental Restoration Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) has supported this country through 50 years of research and development primarily in the area of nuclear weapons and energy. As a result of the Laboratory`s activities, contamination of the environment occurred. The cleanup of contaminated areas and the prevention of further contamination has become an important part of the Laboratory`s new mission: the reduction of the nuclear danger. The cleanup of the Laboratory is somewhat unique. It is a very large site. It includes 43 square miles of Laboratory land that will continue to be in industrial use or under institutional control for decades or centuries to come. It also includes about 25 square miles of former Laboratory land that has been converted to residential use, the Los Alamos townsite. The unusual topography and hydrogeology of the site was shaped during the last million years through the eruption of a huge volcano and the ensuing erosion of the tuff-basalt plateau into 19 canyons and associated finger-like mesas. During the early phase of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, 2,100 sites were identified as potential release sites. Sites range from a few hundred square feet to a few acres in area. Contamination depths range from a few to 100 feet. Typical contaminants are chemicals, heavy metals, radioactive constituents, and high explosives. Of greatest concern are surface contamination, migration of the contaminants along the surface into creeks and arroyos of the canyons and ultimately into the Rio Grande, and migration through the earth into the drinking water aquifers.

  13. Value engineering as applied at the Savannah River Site for environmental restoration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kupar, J.J.; Morgenstern, M.R.; Richardson, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Value Engineering (VE) has been defined as the organized study of functions which satisfy the user`s needs at the lowest life cycle costs through applied creativity. VE was established in the World War II era when Mr. Lawrence Miles formed the concept of intentionally substituting materials to perform the function of more expensive standard materials. Since that time, VE has spread throughout the Department of Defense procurement agencies, and has in recent times been applied to almost every government agency. DOE Order 4040.1 states the policy to establish VE programs and use VE, where appropriate, to reduce nonessential costs and improve productivity for Departmental Elements. The order states that these VE programs shall, at a minimum, provide for the management and procurement practices as required by the OMB Circular A-131. Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), as the prime DOE contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS), has adopted a policy of applying Value Engineering to all major projects with a Total Estimated Cost (TEC) of $10 million or greater. Projects of a lesser TEC may also have VE studies performed if management has determined that a significant potential exists for cost savings and/or cost avoidance. Within the Environmental Restoration (ER) Department, many of the groundwater remediation and waste site closure project represent individual projects that make up an overall SRS requirement to meet Federal RCRA or CERCLA clean up requirements. Many of these individual projects are not initially considered for VE studies because they never reach the $10 million TEC level. Because many remediation projects are duplicated throughout the site, there is a large potential for cross-link savings throughout the site.

  14. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This plan covers robotics Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, activities in the Program for the next five years. These activities range from bench-scale R D to fullscale hot demonstrations at DOE sites. This plan outlines applications of existing technology to near-term needs, the development and application of enhanced technology for longer-term needs, and an initiation of advanced technology development to meet those needs beyond the five-year plan. The objective of the Robotic Technology Development (RTDP) is to develop and apply robotics technologies that will enable Environmental Restoration and Waste Management operations at DOE sites to be safer, faster and cheaper. Five priority DOE sites were visited in March 1990 to identify needs for robotics technology in ER WM operations. This 5-Year Program Plan for the RTDP detailed annual plans for robotics technology development based on identified needs. This 5-Year Program Plan discusses the overall approach to be adopted by the RTDP to aggressively develop robotics technology and contains discussions of the Program Management Plan, Site Visit and Needs Summary, Approach to Needs-Directed Technical Development, Application-Specific Technical Development, and Cross-Cutting and Advanced Technology. Integrating application-specific ER WM needs, the current state of robotics technology, and the potential benefits (in terms of faster, safer, and cheaper) of new technology, the Plan develops application-specific road maps for robotics RDDT E for the period FY 1991 through FY 1995. In addition, the Plan identifies areas where longer-term research in robotics will have a high payoff in the 5- to 20-year time frame. 12 figs.

  15. Electronic document management system analysis report and system plan for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Frappaolo, C.

    1995-09-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) has established and maintains Document Management Centers (DMCs) to support Environmental Restoration Program (ER) activities undertaken at three Oak Ridge facilities: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; and two sister sites: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky. The role of the DMCs is to receive, store, retrieve, and properly dispose of records. In an effort to make the DMCs run more efficiently and to more proactively manage the records` life cycles from cradle to grave, ER has decided to investigate ways in which Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) technologies can be used to redefine the DMCs and their related processes. Specific goals of this study are tightening control over the ER documents, establishing and enforcing record creation and retention procedures, speeding up access to information, and increasing the accessibility of information. A working pilot of the solution is desired within the next six months. Based on a series of interviews conducted with personnel from each of the DMCs, key management, and individuals representing related projects, it is recommended that ER utilize document management, full-text retrieval, and workflow technologies to improve and automate records management for the ER program. A phased approach to solution implementation is suggested starting with the deployment of an automated storage and retrieval system at Portsmouth. This should be followed with a roll out of the system to the other DMCs, the deployment of a workflow-enabled authoring system at Portsmouth, and a subsequent roll out of this authoring system to the other sites.

  16. Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, R.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

  17. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations: Generator training manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This computer-based program is designed to help waste generators in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program prevent pollution at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) facilities in Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth. The Numerical Scoring System (NSS) is an interactive system designed to maintain data on ER Program pollution prevention efforts and to measure the success of these efforts through the ER Program life cycle.

  18. Technical Approach and Plan for Transitioning Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-10-06

    This document describes the approach and process in which the 100-K Area Facilities are to be deactivated and transitioned over to the Environmental Restoration Program after spent nuclear fuel has been removed from the K Basins. It describes the Transition Project's scope and objectives, work breakdown structure, activity planning, estimated cost, and schedule. This report will be utilized as a planning document for project management and control and to communicate details of project content and integration.

  19. Relationships between environmental governance and water quality in a growing metropolitan area of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.; Thiers, P.; Netusil, N. R.; Yeakley, J. A.; Rollwagen-Bollens, G.; Bollens, S. M.; Singh, S.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate relationships between environmental governance and water quality in two adjacent growing metropolitan areas in the western US. While the Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington metro areas share many common biophysical characteristics, they have different land development histories and water governance structures, providing a unique opportunity for examining how differences in governance might affect environmental quality. We conceptualize possible linkages in which water quality influences governance directly, using monitoring efforts as a metric, and indirectly by using the change in the sale price of single-family residential properties. Governance may then influence water quality directly through riparian restoration resulting from monitoring results and indirectly through land use policy. We investigate evidence to substantiate these linkages. Our results showed that changes in monitoring regimes and land development patterns differed in response to differences in growth management policy and environmental governance systems. Our results also showed similarities in environmental quality responses to varying governance systems. For example, we found that sales prices responded positively to improved water quality (e.g., increases in DO and reductions in bacteria counts) in both cities. Furthermore, riparian restoration efforts improved over time for both cities, indicating the positive effect of governance on this land-based resource that may result in improved water quality. However, as of yet, there were no substantial differences across study areas in water temperature over time, despite an expansion of these urban areas of more than 20 % over 24 years. The mechanisms by which water quality was maintained was similar in the sense that both cities benefited from riparian restoration, but different in the sense that Portland benefited indirectly from land use policy. A combination of long-term legacy effects of land development, and a

  20. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenting; Zhang, Hao; Tong, Chuanliang; Xie, Chong; Fan, Guohua; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Xiaogang; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (2,4,4′-trichloro-2′-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)−1 (interquartile range, 0.41–2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)−1). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = −0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (−0.32, −0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = −0.35; 95% CI (−0.68, −0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = −1.64; 95% CI (−3.05, −0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26901211